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Sample records for advanced neonatal nurse

  1. Legal issues in neonatal nursing: considerations for staff nurses and advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Enzman Hagedorn, M I; Gardner, S L

    1999-01-01

    A neonatal nurse is a professional with special training, skill, and knowledge in the care of newborns and their families. The neonatal nurse is accountable to the patient, profession, and employer. Failure of the neonatal nurse to meet these obligations can result in liability in the profession, liability in the employment, a civil suit, or a criminal conviction. Regardless of the health care setting, professional nurses, whether at the bedside or in advanced practice, are morally, ethically, and legally accountable for their nursing judgments and actions. Although most nurses assume they will never be named in a lawsuit, and it is true that few are, their professional actions can be the focus of a suit. An overview of the legal implications found within neonatal nursing practice is presented. Two recent legal cases are presented and discussed to illustrate neonatal nursing and advanced practice liability.

  2. The Future of Neonatal Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Practice: White Paper.

    PubMed

    Staebler, Suzanne; Meier, Susan R; Bagwell, Gail; Conway-Orgel, Margaret

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the National Association of Neonatal Nurses and the National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners have been monitoring aspects of neonatal advanced practice nursing and providing leadership and advocacy to address concerns related to workforce, education, competency, fatigue, safety, and scope of practice. This white paper discusses current barriers within neonatal advanced practice registered nurse practice as well as strategies to promote the longevity of the neonatal advanced practice registered nurse roles. PMID:26742097

  3. Evaluating the Outcomes of Advanced Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redshaw, Margaret; Hart, Bev; Harvey, Merryl; Harris, Anne

    The outcomes of advanced neonatal nurse practitioner (ANNP) programs in the United Kingdom were examined. The different programs of education currently available for nurses wishing to become ANNPs were compared, and the outcomes of ANNP programs, as demonstrated in the levels of performance of practitioners undertaking different programs, were…

  4. Nurse/parent role perceptions in care of neonatal intensive care unit infants: implications for the advanced practice nurse.

    PubMed

    Paredes, S D; Frank, D I

    2000-09-01

    This study compared parent and nurse perceptions of the nurse's roles regarding responsibilities toward infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It also examined the attitudes of nurses and parents regarding the extent to which parents should participate in the care of their infants in the NICU, as well as the role of the advanced practice nurse (APN). The convenience sample of 25 parents of infants in the NICU and 35 nurses who cared for the infants was surveyed regarding perceptions of nurses and parents about nurse responsibilities and parent roles in the NICU. Results suggest parents and nurses have different perceptions about role expectations and that nurses perceive themselves to lack comfort and knowledge in providing support to parents. The findings support a role of the APN as fostering a nursing NICU philosophy to facilitate role transition for parents of infants in the NICU.

  5. Neonatal nursing: an unmet challenge in India.

    PubMed

    Kalyan, Geetanjli; Vatsa, Manju

    2014-11-01

    Nurses comprise a key component to maternal and newborn health care delivery, including the care of 'at-risk' or sick newborns. However, the efficiency and effectiveness of services rely heavily on adequate numbers of highly skilled neonatal nurses. Currently, in India, a significant shortage of trained nurses in the field of newborn care is contributing to poor neonatal outcomes. Specifically, nurses caring for newborns lack the competency and experience needed to ensure optimal care. This deficiency has been linked to a lack of expert faculty, standardized training and minimal or no exposures to newborn clinical care areas during pre service education. Moreover, in addition to a lack of operational research in the area, nurses who provide care for newborns are often faced with numerous system related issues that impede their ability to provide optimal care. Most notably, frequent changes of work place, poor wages, and lack of continuing education, skill maintenance, recognition, and collaborative team culture further compromise the nursing care. All these lead to poor motivation and competency. To meet this challenge, it is essential that emphasis be placed on the identification and support of nursing faculty with expertise in newborn and neonatal care who are able to ensure that nurses receive standardized education for pre-service, in-service and ongoing care. In addition, importance should be placed on encouraging newborn nursing research as well as on governmental increases in salary compensation. Lastly, given the shortage of physicians to take care of sick neonates in remote areas, the creation of a cadre of Neonatal nurse practitioner/ advanced practice nurses would be an invaluable solution in developing countries. Furthermore, centralized oversight of newborn education and training would be best served, if responsibility was placed with Reproductive maternal newborn child health (RMNCH) workers and district level officers. PMID:25278279

  6. Neonatal nurse practitioners: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Honeyfield, Mary Ellen

    2009-06-01

    The advanced practice nursing role in neonatal intensive care enjoys an almost 40-year history. The 1970s and the 1980s were fraught with growing pains, including what to call these providers, and role clarity that was defined in most settings by community need. With the birth of NANN, 25 years ago, the neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) role began to receive support and advocacy that led to the development of educational standards and definition of the role. This article reviews the role's history and identifies current and future issues that will require attention by the national NNP leadership. PMID:19542775

  7. Internet resources for neonatal nurses.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, S

    1999-03-01

    The availability of health information over the Internet has exploded in recent years. Nurses can use the Internet to access information to support professional and clinical interests and join in dialogues with colleagues around the world. The Internet can also be used to identify resources for clients and their families. As with any other information resource, Internet sites must be evaluated for accuracy, currency, and objectivity. The article describes examples of Internet resources and discussion forums for neonatal nurses, use of search engines to find and retrieve information about specific topics, and evaluation of World Wide Web sites.

  8. Perspectives on neonatal nursing: 1985-2005.

    PubMed

    Samson, Linda F

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal nursing practice has been influenced by a number of external forces over the past 20 years. This article explores some of the influences that have altered practice in the 20-year history of the Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing. Attention is directed to several significant influences such as the development of the Internet and the World Wide Web and the role that information plays in care delivery. Changing practice roles with the continuing evolution of the neonatal nurse practitioner role and the emerging plans for the doctorate of nursing practice are described. The history of professional associations for neonatal nurses and the impact of evidence-based practice are considered. Finally, the legal environment surrounding practice is explored.

  9. The neonatal nurse: advocating for breastfeeding mothers.

    PubMed

    Darby, Colm; Nurse, Sharon

    2016-02-01

    Accurate information and support from healthcare professionals as well as respect for parental choice are all factors which contribute to effective breastfeeding in the neonatal unit; with this in mind, Colm Darby and Sharon Nurse discuss the potential problems in expressing breast milk and the interventions which might be effective in avoiding them. Advocacy is an inherent part of neonatal nurses' role whilst caring for sick, vulnerable babies. Colm Darby is a male neonatal nurse working in a predominantly female environment and passionately believes in supporting and advocating for mothers who want to provide breast milk for their babies. In this article, CoIm uses Borton's model of reflection to discuss how he acted as an effective advocate for such a mother. PMID:27008754

  10. The neonatal nurse: advocating for breastfeeding mothers.

    PubMed

    Darby, Colm; Nurse, Sharon

    2016-02-01

    Accurate information and support from healthcare professionals as well as respect for parental choice are all factors which contribute to effective breastfeeding in the neonatal unit; with this in mind, Colm Darby and Sharon Nurse discuss the potential problems in expressing breast milk and the interventions which might be effective in avoiding them. Advocacy is an inherent part of neonatal nurses' role whilst caring for sick, vulnerable babies. Colm Darby is a male neonatal nurse working in a predominantly female environment and passionately believes in supporting and advocating for mothers who want to provide breast milk for their babies. In this article, CoIm uses Borton's model of reflection to discuss how he acted as an effective advocate for such a mother.

  11. Legal and ethical issues in neonatal nursing.

    PubMed

    2016-09-12

    Neonatal nurses regularly face complex legal and ethical dilemmas. This article discusses the hypothetical case of Jack, a two-day-old infant, born at 39 weeks' gestation, and diagnosed with trisomy 13 (syndrome), a life-limiting condition and being cared for in a neonatal intensive care unit. Jack's prognosis is poor and he is not expected to live past two weeks of age. PMID:27615591

  12. Job satisfaction and dissatisfaction amongst neonatal nurses.

    PubMed

    Williamson, S

    1993-06-01

    This study was conducted against the background of the concerns expressed in the press about the difficulties in recruiting and retaining nurses and midwives who were trained and experienced in the field of neonatal nursing. A small study (N = 50) was undertaken in one regional unit using semi-structured interviews. The interview schedule covered a broad range of topics which were identified in the literature as exerting an influence on job satisfaction and dissatisfaction. A relationship between job satisfaction/dissatisfaction, staff turnover, and recruitment was demonstrated. Unfortunately the clinical regrading exercise had a complex effect, which could not be fully assessed within the narrow terms of reference of this study. Interestingly the majority of the respondents found their work stimulating and rewarding. However, the overriding factor which was said to exert a negative influence at work was the way their individual contribution to neonatal care was valued by senior medical and nursing/midwifery colleagues. PMID:8332096

  13. Values influencing neonatal nurses' perceptions and choices.

    PubMed

    Raines, D A

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the values influencing the nurses' perception and choice of behavior in a hypothetical clinical situation. The theoretical framework was Rokeach's theory on the nature of human values and value systems. A descriptive study using a mailed survey was conducted on a random sample of 331 members of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses. Data on individual nurse's values, perception of information, and behavioral choices were collected with an investigator-developed questionnaire consisting of a values scale, and an information scale and choice alternatives related to three hypothetical vignettes: a low-birthweight infant, an infant with chromosomal anomalies, and a chronically ill infant. Results of this study indicate that nurses identified a hierarchy of values related to their practice. Information related to infant characteristics was consistently most important; however, in uncertain situations, rules or external protocols had an increased influence on the behavioral choice process. The behavioral choice option with the greatest agreement was different for each situation. A consistently negative correlation between the options within each vignette indicates that nurses have clearly defined choice preferences. Model testing revealed a consistent relationship across the three vignettes between the variable being just and protocol, doing right and infant characteristics, and infant characteristics and the choice options (p < .05).

  14. To explore the neonatal nurses' beliefs and attitudes towards caring for dying neonates in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Huei; Huang, Li-Chi; Liu, Hsin-Li; Lee, Ho-Yu; Wu, Shu-Ya; Chang, Yue-Cune; Peng, Niang-Huei

    2013-12-01

    (1) To explore attitudes and beliefs of neonatal nurses toward nursing care for dying neonates; (2) to estimate the influence of neonatal nurses' personal and professional characteristics on their attitudes towards end-of life care for dying infants. A cross-sectional design was used. A questionnaire was used to collect data from 80 neonatal nurses. Research setting was four level III NICUs at four medical centers around the central region of Taiwan. Research participants were neonatal nurses who had worked for at least 1 year in one of level III NICUs and had been directly involved with the care of dying infants. Research participants were 80 neonatal nurses (response rate 100 %). Research findings identified eight barriers hindering neonatal palliative care practice. These barriers were insufficient communication due to the lack of an in-service educational program; the lack of available counseling help for neonatal clinicians; inability to express personal opinions, values and beliefs towards neonatal palliative care; insufficient staffing; the lack of unit policies/guidelines for supporting palliative care; the technological imperative; parental demands and personal beliefs about death and previous experience caring for dying infants. Further studies are needed to explore each barrier and to provide in-service neonatal palliative care educational programs that are needed to decrease these barriers.

  15. Advances in Neonatal Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Steinhorn, Robin H

    2016-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a surprisingly common event in the neonatal intensive care unit, and affects both term and preterm infants. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the maternal, fetal and genetic risk factors that trigger PPHN. There have been numerous therapeutic advances over the last decade. It is now appreciated that oxygen supplementation, particularly for the goal of pulmonary vasodilation, needs to be approached as a therapy that has risks and benefits. Administration of surfactant or inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy at a lower acuity of illness can decrease the risk of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation/death, progression of disease and duration of hospital stay. Milrinone may have specific benefits as an 'inodilator', as prolonged exposure to iNO plus oxygen may activate phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A. Additionally, sildenafil and hydrocortisone may benefit infants exposed to hyperoxia and oxidative stress. Continued investigation is likely to reveal new therapies such as citrulline and cinaciguat that will enhance NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase function. Continued laboratory and clinical investigation will be needed to optimize treatment and improve outcomes. PMID:27251312

  16. Barriers to provision of developmental care in the neonatal intensive care unit: neonatal nursing perceptions.

    PubMed

    Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D; Prendergast, Carol C

    2007-02-01

    The role of the neonatal nurse is vital for the successful implementation of developmental care and the provision of an optimal neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment. The goal was to identify nurses' perceived barriers to implementation or improving developmental care in their NICUs. Nursing perceptions related to barriers for implementing developmental care were assessed using a 12-point questionnaire during two New York City Neonatal Nursing regional conferences. One hundred forty-six (86%) of 170 nurses representing 24 regional hospitals returned the survey. Developmental care was viewed as essential by 136 nurses (93%), yet 125 nurses (86%) believed that their NICU was not providing optimal developmental care. Light and sound standards were viewed as important to providing care by 71% and 91% of respondents, respectively, yet only four NICUs (3%) had light and sound meters to identify or standardize this environmental source of pain. As a group, the perceived barriers to provision of optimal developmental care in order of decreasing importance were staff nurses and staff physicians (53%) > NICU funds (42%) > physician leadership (37%) > facility limitations (31%) > registered nurse leadership (25%). In contrast, 90% of nurses whose NICU did not use developmental multidisciplinary team meetings or developmental care champions or advocates were significantly more likely to identify nursing or physician colleagues as barriers to implementing or improving developmental care, compared with 38% of nurses whose NICU used such activities ( P < 0.001). Developmental care is perceived by the neonatal nurse as a vital component to the care provided in the NICU. Use of simple light and sound measures may enhance perception of providing an optimal NICU environment. Neonatal nurses perceived barriers to care are often attributed to neonatal staff nursing and physician colleagues. This perception is decreased considerably in those NICUs in which multidisciplinary

  17. Cost of nursing staffing adequacy in a neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro; Lima, Antonio Fernandes Costa; Castilho, Valéria; Bochembuzio, Luciana; Costa, Janaína Anchieta; Castro, Liliana; Silva, Natália Célia Lima; Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone

    2011-12-01

    The objectives of this descriptive, quantitative study were: to identify the mean nursing care time provided and required by newborns (NB) hospitalized at the Neonatal Unit of the University of São Paulo University Hospital; to calculate the cost of the mean nursing care time provided and required, by NB; to assess the cost of the nursing staffing adequacy required to assist the NB. The mean nursing care times, provided by the nursing staff and required by NBs, were calculated using equations available in the literature and by applying the Nursing Activities Score. The costs of the mean nursing care times and to make nursing staffing adequate were calculated based on the hourly cost of nurses and nursing technicians. The financial impact of nursing staffing adequacy accounted for a 30% increase over the cost of the current situation.

  18. Advancing leadership capacity in nursing.

    PubMed

    Scott, Elaine S; Miles, Jane

    2013-01-01

    To address the potential shortage of nurse leaders, the profession must evaluate current strategies in both education and practice. While many new graduates dream of becoming a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist, few transition into practice with the goal of becoming a nurse leader. To increase the number of nurses capable of leadership, the profession must address 2 critical issues. First, effort must be made to augment faculty and students' conceptualization of nursing such that leadership is seen as a dimension of practice for all nurses, not just those in formal leadership roles. In so doing, leadership identity development would be seen as a part of becoming an expert nurse. Second, a comprehensive conceptual framework for lifelong leadership development of nurses needs to be designed. This framework should allow for baseline leadership capacity building in all nurses and advanced leadership development for those in formal administrative and advanced practice roles. The knowledge and skill requirements for quality improvement and patient safety have been explored and recommendations made for Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, but parallel work needs to be done to outline educational content, objectives, and effective pedagogy for advancing leadership development in nursing students at all levels.

  19. The history of the neonatal nurse practitioner: reflections from "under the looking glass".

    PubMed

    Johnson, Patricia J

    2002-08-01

    The neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) emerged in the 1970s. During the first two decades, nurses who functioned in this new advanced-practice role were forced to overcome interprofessional isolation, variable educational preparation, underutilization, and title ambiguity. However, after nearly 30 years of evolution influenced by the changing health care environment, technological advancements in newborn care, medical personnel shortages, and the advanced-practice nurse movement, the NNP is now a recognized member of the neonatal health care team nationwide. The NNP has achieved the level of provider status, but only after successfully overcoming many practice restrictions and restraints over the decades. This article chronicles the history of the NNP and recounts the external and internal elements that contributed to the development of this profession.

  20. Legal and ethical issues in neonatal nursing: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hagger, Victoria; Ellis, Catherine; Strumidlo, Laura

    2016-06-29

    Neonatal nurses regularly face complex legal and ethical dilemmas. This article discusses the hypothetical case of Jack, a two-day-old infant diagnosed with trisomy 13 (syndrome), a life-limiting condition. Jack's prognosis is poor, and he is not expected to live past two weeks of age. The legal and ethical perspectives of withholding life-sustaining treatment in infants and children will be explored through the application of ethical frameworks, as well as statute and case law relevant to children and adolescent nursing. The article also discusses the neonatal nurse's role, with reference to local and national guidelines. PMID:27353936

  1. Age and Nursing Affect the Neonatal Porcine Uterine Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Kathleen M; Camp, Meredith E; Prasad, Nripesh; McNeel, Anthony K; Levy, Shawn E; Bartol, Frank F; Bagnell, Carol A

    2016-02-01

    The lactocrine hypothesis for maternal programming of neonatal development was proposed to describe a mechanism through which milk-borne bioactive factors, delivered from mother to nursing offspring, could affect development of tissues, including the uterus. Porcine uterine development, initiated before birth, is completed postnatally. However, age- and lactocrine-sensitive elements of the neonatal porcine uterine developmental program are undefined. Here, effects of age and nursing on the uterine transcriptome for 48 h from birth (Postnatal Day [PND] = 0) were identified using RNA sequencing (RNAseq). Uterine tissues were obtained from neonatal gilts (n = 4 per group) within 1 h of birth and before feeding (PND 0), or 48 h after nursing ad libitum (PND 2N) or feeding a commercial milk replacer (PND 2R). RNAseq analysis revealed differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with both age (PND 2N vs. PND 0; 3283 DEGs) and nursing on PND 2 (PND 2N vs PND 2R; 896 DEGs). Expression of selected uterine genes was validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Bioinformatic analyses revealed multiple biological processes enriched in response to both age and nursing, including cell adhesion, morphogenesis, and cell-cell signaling. Age-sensitive pathways also included estrogen receptor-alpha and hedgehog signaling cascades. Lactocrine-sensitive processes in nursed gilts included those involved in response to wounding, the plasminogen activator network and coagulation. Overall, RNAseq analysis revealed comprehensive age- and nursing-related transcriptomic differences in the neonatal porcine uterus and identified novel pathways and biological processes regulating uterine development.

  2. Nurses Behave Differentially to Neonates in Terms of Their True Gender Compared to Their Ascribed Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Albert R.; And Others

    Response patterns of 24 female nurses to 2-day-old neonates who had been arbitrarily labeled male or female were studied. A total of 17 reliable behaviors of nurses were scored from videotapes of nurse-infant interaction. Nurses responded differentially to neonates based on true gender rather than ascribed gender. Nurses held boys more by their…

  3. Learning preferences among neonatal and maternal child nurses.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, Jobeth

    2013-01-01

    How do you prefer to learn? Do you prefer to attend a lecture or complete a self-study? Do you enjoy looking up material on the Internet? Do you participate in online nursing continuing education (CE) activities, blogs, or forums? How about podcasts, webinars, or simulations? We asked these types of questions to nurses attending the Twelfth Neonatal Nurses Conference and the Fifteenth National Mother Baby Nurses Conference in Chicago in September 2012. This article includes an overview of their responses as well as a discussion regarding how the information can be applied to the learning environment.

  4. Neonatal nurses' attitudes, beliefs, and feelings toward the care and management of fetal-infants.

    PubMed

    Richey, D A

    1988-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care nurses must handle on a regular basis the complex dilemmas that accompany the rapid advances in knowledge and technology that have enabled the survival of fetal-infants. Little literature addresses the attitudes and feelings of neonatal nurses regarding the moral, ethical, legal, economic, and social issues surrounding fetal-infants. The purpose of this investigation, therefore, was to examine the attitudes, beliefs, and feelings held by neonatal nurses towards these issues as they relate to the care and management of fetal-infants. The research design of this study was a nonexperimental approach. The sample was drawn from a roster of subscribers to a neonatal nursing journal. The tool that was used in this study is an attitudinal assessment questionnaire developed by the investigator. Data obtained were described and synthesized by use of measures of central tendency, variability, frequency, and the chi square statistic. Comments to the questionnaire almost overwhelmingly referred to the participants' difficulty in responding as the issues were felt to be dependent on the particular fetal-infant, family, and circumstances involved. Respondents strongly supported the need for situational ethics in cases involving fetal-infants.

  5. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  6. Age and nursing affect the neonatal porcine uterine transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lactocrine hypothesis for maternal programming of neonatal development was proposed to describe a mechanism through which milk-borne bioactive factors, delivered from mother to nursing offspring, could affect development of tissues, including the uterus. Porcine uterine development, initiated be...

  7. A Primer for Nurses on Perinatal/Neonatal Stroke.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jill S

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal or neonatal stroke is not uncommon, but diagnosis is often missed. Perinatal nurses are often the first health professionals in the position to observe the most typical symptom of stroke in a newborn, which is focal seizure. Etiology, symptoms and outcomes are reviewed and discussed through the context of the author's personal story.

  8. What neonatal intensive care nurses need to know about neonatal palliative care.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Kathy

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and prioritize topics for a professional development program in neonatal palliative care. A total of 276 nurses and midwives who work in an Australian neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and 26 international healthcare professionals working in NICU and palliative care served as participants. A Delphi technique was used, consisting of a series of rounds of data collection via interview and questionnaire, to identify and consolidate opinions of nurses and other healthcare professionals who work in neonatal intensive care units. The main outcome measures were: (1) Topics to be included in a professional development program for nurses working in neonatal intensive care units and (2) the preferred format of the program. Twenty-three high-priority topics were identified, which included preparing families when death is imminent, how to provide emotional support to grieving parents, advocating for a dying baby, and assessing and managing pain in a dying baby. Care of a dying infant requires the same skill set as caring for older terminally ill children internationally. A combination of face-to-face lectures and interactive workshops using case studies and audiovisual examples is the preferred format.

  9. The need to nurse the nurse: emotional labor in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Cricco-Lizza, Roberta

    2014-05-01

    In this 14-month ethnographic study, I examined the emotional labor and coping strategies of 114, level-4, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses. Emotional labor was an underrecognized component in the care of vulnerable infants and families. The nature of this labor was contextualized within complex personal, professional, and organizational layers of demand on the emotions of NICU nurses. Coping strategies included talking with the sisterhood of nurses, being a super nurse, using social talk and humor, taking breaks, offering flexible aid, withdrawing from emotional pain, transferring out of the NICU, attending memorial services, and reframing loss to find meaning in work. The organization had strong staffing, but emotional labor was not recognized, supported, or rewarded. The findings can contribute to the development of interventions to nurse the nurse, and to ultimately facilitate NICU nurses' nurturance of stressed families. These have implications for staff retention, job satisfaction, and delivery of care. PMID:24675967

  10. Ethical challenges in the neonatal intensive care units: perceptions of physicians and nurses; an Iranian experience.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Maliheh; Mosayebi, Ziba; Asghari, Fariba; Zarrini, Pari

    2015-01-01

    The challenging nature of neonatal medicine today is intensified by modern advances in intensive care and treatment of sicker neonates. These developments have caused numerous ethical issues and conflicts in ethical decision-making. The present study surveyed the challenges and dilemmas from the viewpoint of the neonatal intensive care personnel in the teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in the capital of Iran. In this comparative cross-sectional study conducted between March 2013 and February 2014, the physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units were compared. The physicians and nurses of the study hospitals were requested to complete a 36-item questionnaire after initial accommodations. The study samples consisted of 284 physicians (36%) and nurses (64%). Content validity and internal consistency calculations were used to examine the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation, t-test, ANOVA, and linear regression using SPSS v. 22. Respecting patients' rights and interactions with parents were perceived as the most challenging aspects of neonatal care. There were significant differences between sexes in the domains of the perceived challenges. According to the linear regression model, the perceived score would be reduced 0.33 per each year on the job. The results of our study showed that the most challenging issues were related to patients' rights, interactions with parents, communication and cooperation, and end of life considerations respectively. It can be concluded, therefore, that more attention should be paid to these issues in educational programs and ethics committees of hospitals. PMID:26839675

  11. Ethical challenges in the neonatal intensive care units: perceptions of physicians and nurses; an Iranian experience.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Maliheh; Mosayebi, Ziba; Asghari, Fariba; Zarrini, Pari

    2015-01-01

    The challenging nature of neonatal medicine today is intensified by modern advances in intensive care and treatment of sicker neonates. These developments have caused numerous ethical issues and conflicts in ethical decision-making. The present study surveyed the challenges and dilemmas from the viewpoint of the neonatal intensive care personnel in the teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in the capital of Iran. In this comparative cross-sectional study conducted between March 2013 and February 2014, the physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units were compared. The physicians and nurses of the study hospitals were requested to complete a 36-item questionnaire after initial accommodations. The study samples consisted of 284 physicians (36%) and nurses (64%). Content validity and internal consistency calculations were used to examine the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation, t-test, ANOVA, and linear regression using SPSS v. 22. Respecting patients' rights and interactions with parents were perceived as the most challenging aspects of neonatal care. There were significant differences between sexes in the domains of the perceived challenges. According to the linear regression model, the perceived score would be reduced 0.33 per each year on the job. The results of our study showed that the most challenging issues were related to patients' rights, interactions with parents, communication and cooperation, and end of life considerations respectively. It can be concluded, therefore, that more attention should be paid to these issues in educational programs and ethics committees of hospitals.

  12. Evaluation of a developmental care training programme for neonatal nurses.

    PubMed

    Milette, Isabelle H; Richard, Lucie; Martel, Marie-Josée

    2005-06-01

    Although the impact of developmental care on premature infants has been investigated at length, often the issue of professional development and training related to this type of care has not been examined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a developmental care training programme on nurses' behaviours and cognitive attributes with regard to the prevention of overstimulation of premature infants. The Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) was the framework underlying the study. This programme evaluation used a quasi-experimental one group pre-test/post-test design. Participants were nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaires. Significantly higher post-test scores were observed for knowledge and for a variety of theoretical constructs. The results of this study showed the potential of such training programmes to help nurses implement developmental care.

  13. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  14. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork. PMID:27455363

  15. Use of a professional organization (Council of International Neonatal Nurses) for global networking.

    PubMed

    Boykova, Marina

    2010-01-01

    The article illustrates the need to belong to professional specialty organizations to foster collaborations across the globe. The Council of International Neonatal Nurses is the exemplar for this professional group. The personal journey of the author to the global community of neonatal nurses is presented.

  16. High-Fidelity Simulation for Neonatal Nursing Education: An Integrative Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Allyson

    2015-01-01

    The lack of safe avenues to develop neonatal nursing competencies using human subjects leads to the notion that simulation education for neonatal nurses might be an ideal form of education. This integrative literature review compares traditional, teacher-centered education with high-fidelity simulation education for neonatal nurses. It examines the theoretical frameworks used in neonatal nursing education and outlines the advantages of this type of training, including improving communication and teamwork; providing an innovative pedagogical approach; and aiding in skill acquisition, confidence, and participant satisfaction. The importance of debriefing is also examined. High-fidelity simulation is not without disadvantages, including its significant cost, the time associated with training, the need for very complex technical equipment, and increased faculty resource requirements. Innovative uses of high-fidelity simulation in neonatal nursing education are suggested. High-fidelity simulation has great potential but requires additional research to fully prove its efficacy.

  17. Advanced nursing roles: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jokiniemi, Krista; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Kylmä, Jari; Haatainen, Kaisa

    2012-09-01

    In this systematic literature review, we analyzed and synthesized the literature on one specialized advance practice nursing role in three countries for the purpose of describing and comparing these roles, as well as discussing whether an international consensus of the advance practice nursing definition is possible. A systematic search on CINAHL and PubMed Medline was conducted in 2011 to search the literature on the nurse consultant in the UK, the clinical nurse specialist in the USA, and the clinical nurse consultant in Australia. The studies (n = 42) were analyzed and combined using qualitative content analysis method. The roles of the nurse consultant, clinical nurse specialist, and clinical nurse consultant were similar. The variation in the roles appears to derive from organizational or individual choices, not the country in question. The study process comprised a synthesized representation of one specialized advance practice nursing role. More work is needed to further define the concept of the advance practice nursing, as well as its implementation on other cultures beyond this review. Based on this review, an international consensus regarding the definition of advance practice nursing and its subroles is possible. PMID:22950621

  18. Education of advanced practice nurses in Canada.

    PubMed

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Harbman, Patricia; Donald, Faith; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Carter, Nancy; Kilpatrick, Kelley; DiCenso, Alba

    2010-12-01

    In Canada, education programs for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) roles began 40 years ago. NP programs are offered in almost all provinces. Education for the CNS role has occurred through graduate nursing programs generically defined as providing preparation for advanced nursing practice. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the literature and key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to describe the following: (1) history of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (2) current status of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (3) curriculum issues, (4) interprofessional education, (5) resources for education and (6) continuing education. Although national frameworks defining advanced nursing practice and NP competencies provide some direction for education programs, Canada does not have countrywide standards of education for either the NP or CNS role. Inconsistency in the educational requirements for primary healthcare NPs continues to cause significant problems and interferes with inter-jurisdictional licensing portability. For both CNSs and NPs, there can be a mismatch between a generalized education and specialized practice. The value of interprofessional education in facilitating effective teamwork is emphasized. Recommendations for future directions for advanced practice nursing education are offered.

  19. Head nurse leadership style with staff nurse burnout and job satisfaction in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, M L; Armstrong, G D; Drew, D J; Henly, S J

    1984-01-01

    Leadership style has been defined as a two-factor construct composed of "consideration" and "initiating structure." Research has suggested that these factors affect the behavior and attitude of subordinates. This study's purpose was to quantify the relationships of head nurse leadership style with self-reported staff nurse burnout and job satisfaction in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs). Three instruments--the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire, the Tedium Scale, and the Leadership Opinion Questionnaire--were voluntarily completed by 283 registered nurses employed by 14 level-III NICUs in the United States. The leadership dimensions of consideration and structure were distinct (r = -.10). Staff nurse satisfaction and burnout were related (r = -.41). Head nurse consideration was clearly related to staff nurse satisfaction (r = -.55) and to a lesser extent to burnout (r = -.29). Initiating structure alone was not related to satisfaction or burnout. Aggregate perceptions of head nurse leadership were ranked across NICUs in order to classify the head nurses on consideration and structure. The 14 head nurses were separated into four groups: high consideration-high structure, high consideration-low structure, low consideration-high structure, and low consideration-low structure. Satisfaction and burnout of staff nurses in each of the leadership-style groups were then compared. Analysis of variance for satisfaction (F(3,279) = 3.10, p = .03) and burnout (F(3,279) = 3.90, p = .01) were both significant. For both satisfaction and burnout, the head nurse leadership classification of low consideration-high structure was most deviant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Advance directives: role of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Schlenk, J S

    1997-07-01

    Advance directives are documents that guide end of life decisions. Although advance directives are a fairly recent phenomenon in health care, they are grounded in both legal and ethical principles. Studies show few people have completed advance directives. Persons do not tend to complete advance directives for various reasons. Lack of knowledge has been identified, as well as belief that physicians should initiate the discussion and that the topic is appropriate only for the elderly or those in poor health. Many nurse practitioners practice in primary care settings, which are ideal for discussions about advance directives. Nurse practitioners possess the opportunities and skills to discuss advance directives with their patients.

  1. Developing a strategic plan for a neonatal nurse practitioner service.

    PubMed

    Lee, Laurie A; Jones, Luann R

    2004-10-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) have been in practice for over 3 decades. More recently, NNPs have begun to take ownership for building their group practice models. The purpose of this article is to present a detailed case study demonstrating how one NNP group used a 4-phase strategic planning process to turn a crisis into an opportunity. The article describes data obtained during the strategic planning process from an informal national survey of NNP managers that focused on key benchmarks, such as role definition, responsibilities, protected nonclinical time, NNP salary and benefits, and educational and professional development support. Using the strategic planning process, the group defined mutually agreed upon minimum safe staffing levels for NNPs, interns, residents and neonatologists in their setting. Based on the data generated, the group successfully justified additional NNP positions and organizational support for 10% protected nonclinical time. A sample operational budget, comparison of 3 staffing scenarios, and a timeline are also provided.

  2. Developing a strategic plan for a neonatal nurse practitioner service.

    PubMed

    Lee, Laurie A; Jones, Luann R

    2004-10-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) have been in practice for over 3 decades. More recently, NNPs have begun to take ownership for building their group practice models. The purpose of this article is to present a detailed case study demonstrating how one NNP group used a 4-phase strategic planning process to turn a crisis into an opportunity. The article describes data obtained during the strategic planning process from an informal national survey of NNP managers that focused on key benchmarks, such as role definition, responsibilities, protected nonclinical time, NNP salary and benefits, and educational and professional development support. Using the strategic planning process, the group defined mutually agreed upon minimum safe staffing levels for NNPs, interns, residents and neonatologists in their setting. Based on the data generated, the group successfully justified additional NNP positions and organizational support for 10% protected nonclinical time. A sample operational budget, comparison of 3 staffing scenarios, and a timeline are also provided. PMID:15517523

  3. [Advances in the management of neonatal hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Riesgo, Rudimar dos Santos; Becker, Michele M; Ranzan, Josiane; Winckler, Maria Isabel B; Ohlweiler, Lygia

    2013-09-01

    Introduccion. Durante el nacimiento, ocurren cambios fisiologicos en practicamente todos los organos del niño, incluyendo el sistema nervioso central. En esta fase de transicion, es posible un cierto grado de hipoxemia, en general bien tolerado por el neonato. Sin embargo, si la hipoxia neonatal es muy intensa y continuada, puede instalarse una encefalopatia neonatal, lo que caracteriza una situacion critica para el recien nacido. Su abordaje adecuado es imprescindible para garantizar un buen pronostico a largo plazo. Desarrollo. Se actualizan las informaciones acerca de la hipoxia neonatal y se revisan publicaciones recientes acerca de los avances en su abordaje a traves de la medicina basada en evidencias. Conclusiones. La encefalopatia neonatal se puede clasificar desde el punto de vista clinico en tres niveles de intensidad. Usualmente, los casos leves tienen un buen pronostico, los casos de intensidad moderada tienen un 30% de posibilidad de secuelas y los de intensidad grave tienen mas del 70% de mortalidad, pero practicamente todos los supervivientes tendran secuelas. Los avances ocurrieron en dos areas: en el diagnostico, con nuevas tecnicas de EEG y RM, y en el tratamiento, con la aparicion de la hipotermia terapeutica. Existe la posibilidad de un uso futuro para la terapia con celulas madre. El pronostico depende de la clasificacion clinica, de los datos de neuroimagen y del EEG.

  4. Knowledge and attitudes regarding neonatal pain among nursing staff of pediatric department: an Indian experience.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Archana S; Dongara, Ashish R; Phatak, Ajay G; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M

    2014-03-01

    Neonates receiving care in intensive care units are highly likely to experience pain due to investigations and/or treatments carried out by the health care providers. Neonates are a vulnerable population because they are unable to vocalize their pain. Unaddressed and mismanaged pain can not only affect the child's comfort, but also may alter the development and cognitive abilities of the child in a later part of his/her life. Therefore it is entirely the caregiver's responsibility to accurately assess and manage neonatal pain. We assessed and compared the knowledge and attitudes regarding neonatal pain among the nurses posted in the various units of a pediatric department [pediatric ward, pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)]. An appropriately modified Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain questionnaire was consensually validated, pretested, and then administered to the nursing staff of the pediatric department at a department at a hospital in Gujarat. Data were entered in Epi-Info and analyzed with the use of SPSS 14.0. The questionnaire was administered to 41 nurses working in the Department of Pediatrics, and the response rate was 97.5%. Mean age of the nurses in the study sample was 25.75 years (SD 5.513). The mean total score of the participants was 8.75 out of 17 (SD 2.549), which was unsatisfactory. The mean correct answer rate was 49.67% among the staff of NICU and 48.67% among the pediatric ward and PICU staff. The attitudes among the nurses were assessed. It was concluded that the nurses lack knowledge and that their attitudes also were hindering pain management. One of the barriers identified by the nurses was that physicians do not prescribe analgesics for managing neonatal pain. So not only the nursing staff, but all of the caregivers involved in neonatal care may be lacking in knowledge and hold perceptions and attitudes that hamper neonatal pain management.

  5. Nursing diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Ana Paula de Souza; da Silva, Maria de Lourdes Costa; de Souza, Nilba Lima; Mota, Gabriela Miranda; de França, Débora Feitosa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to elaborate the Nursing Diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a neonatal intensive care unit and characterize the profile of the neonates and their mothers. Method a cross-sectional and quantitative study, with a sample of 41 neonates. A physical examination and consultation of the hospital records were undertaken, using an instrument. The elaboration of the Nursing Diagnoses followed a process of diagnostic inference and was based on the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association 2012-2014. Results the mothers were around 25 years old, had a low average number of pre-natal consultations, and various complications during the pregnancy; and the newborns were predominantly premature and with very low birth weights. Five Nursing Diagnoses predominated, and all the neonates presented Risk of Shock and Risk of fluid volume imbalance. Conclusion the Nursing Diagnoses of the neonates with sepsis can guide the formulating of specific assistential plans. The study contributes to the generation of new knowledge and found various relationships between the Nursing Diagnoses and the variables selected in the characterization of the neonates, which deserve to be elucidated in greater detail based on further research on the issue. PMID:26107833

  6. Advances in management of neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Vesoulis, Zachary A; Mathur, Amit M

    2014-06-01

    Seizures are more common in the neonatal period than any other time in the human lifespan. A high index of suspicion for seizures should be maintained for infants who present with encephalopathy soon after birth, have had a stroke, central nervous system (CNS) infection or intracranial hemorrhage or have a genetic or metabolic condition associated with CNS malformations. Complicating the matter, most neonatal seizures lack a clinical correlate with only subtle autonomic changes and often no clinical indication at all. Over the last three decades, several tools have been developed to enhance the detection and treatment of neonatal seizures. The use of electroencephalography (EEG) and the later development of amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), allows for Neurologists and non-Neurologists alike, to significantly increase the sensitivity of seizure detection. When applied to the appropriate clinical setting, time to diagnosis and start of therapy is greatly reduced. Phenobarbital maintains the status of first-line therapy in worldwide use. However, newer anti-epileptic agents such as, levetiracetam, bumetanide, and topiramate are increasingly being applied to the neonatal population, offering the potential for seizure treatment with a significantly better side-effect profile. Seizures in premature infants, continue to confound clinicians and researchers alike. Though the apparent seizure burden is significant and there is an association between seizures and adverse outcomes, the two are not cleanly correlated. Compounding the issue, GABA-ergic anti-epileptic drugs are not only less effective in this age group due to reversed neuronal ion gradients but may cause harm. Selecting an appropriate treatment group remains a challenge. PMID:24796413

  7. The neonatal nurse's role in preventing abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kimberly A

    2014-10-01

    Abusive head trauma in infants occurs in 24.6 to 39.8 per 100,000 infants in developed countries. Abusive head trauma refers to any type of intentional head trauma an infant sustains, as a result of an injury to the skull or intracranial contents from a blunt force and/or violent shaking. The clinical question was: what evidence-based interventions have been implemented by neonatal nurses to prevent abusive head trauma in infants? PubMed was searched to obtain English language publications from 2005 to May 2014 for interventions focused on preventing abusive head trauma using the key term "shaken baby syndrome." A total of 10 studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. All of the interventions targeted prevention of abusive head trauma with information about abusive head trauma/shaken baby syndrome and the "normal" infant crying behaviors. Interventions taught parents why infants cried, how to calm the infants, ways to cope with inconsolable infants, and how to develop a plan for what to do if they could not cope anymore. Parents who participated in the interventions were consistently able to explain the information and tell others about the dangers of shaking infants compared to the control parents. Only 2 studies calculated the preintervention abusive head trauma rate and the postintervention frequency of abusive head trauma. Each found significant differences in abusive head trauma.

  8. [Promoting affective attachment at the neonatal intensive care unit: a challenge for nurses].

    PubMed

    Conz, Claudete Aparecida; Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto

    2009-12-01

    The study was motivated by observations of the routine at neonatal intensive care units (NICU), thoughts about the dichotomy between theory, discourse, and the practice of many nurses towards the newborns' parents. The objectives were to learn about nurses' experiences regarding neonatal care to newborns and their parents, and to understand how nurses experience the process of affective attachment between newborns hospitalized at NICUs and their parents. This study was developed according to the social phenomenology approach of Alfred Schütz. Study subjects were eight practical nurses who had worked at NICU of public and private hospitals. Categories of experience emerged from the discourses, including Human Contact. The analysis revealed that nurses see themselves as the connection between parents and children, and believe they play an important role in creating the affective attachment between parent and child. PMID:20085155

  9. Neonatal nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward caring for cocaine-exposed infants and their mothers.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, M A; Marecki, M; Wooldridge, P J; Sherman, L M

    1996-03-01

    The knowledge, attitudes, and backgrounds of 215 nurses employed in the nurseries of six hospitals were studied by means of a questionnaire survey. The nurses' attitudes toward the mothers of cocaine-addicted infants were found to be generally negative and/or judgmental and their knowledge to be low. More experience with nursing cocaine-addicted infants and greater acuity of the neonatal unit in which the nurse worked correlated with more positive attitudes toward the infants but not toward their mothers. Knowledge and attitude correlated positively with formal education, inservice education, and self-education, but the correlations were weak.

  10. Nurses' responses to do-not-resuscitate orders in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Savage, T A; Cullen, D L; Kirchhoff, K T; Pugh, E J; Foreman, M D

    1987-01-01

    A statewide survey of nurses in perinatal centers was conducted to assess the prevalence of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) policies in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and to examine factors influencing nurses in those centers in their compliance with DNR orders. Three nurses in each of 10 perinatal centers were asked to complete a questionnaire on DNR policies and nurses' compliance and to respond to four hypothetical clinical situations. Eighteen of the 27 responding nurses reported the existence of a DNR policy. Factors affecting compliance with DNR orders were agreement that the infant should not be resuscitated (n = 24) or respect for the parents' wishes (n = 19). Nurses' intention to resuscitate despite a DNR order varied, depending on the description of the infant. Multiple regression analyses showed that subjective norms (beta = .41 to .82) rather than attitudes (beta = .17 to .39) exerted a more powerful influence on nurses' decisions not to resuscitate.

  11. Neonatal ethical issues: viability, advance directives, family centered care.

    PubMed

    Sudia-Robinson, Tanya

    2011-01-01

    Ethical issues in perinatal and NICU settings can arise from a variety of situations. This article focuses on issues surrounding viability and the incorporation of advance directives and family-centered care. Prenatal education about infant viability, probable scenarios, and parental involvement in decision-making are addressed. Considerations for advance directives for complex births and critical decisions at the time of birth are also discussed. Implications for nurses and suggested dialogue strategies are provided. PMID:21407121

  12. Assessment of neonatal nurses' behaviors that prevent overstimulation in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Aita, Marilyn; Goulet, Céline

    2003-04-01

    This study assessed the adoption by neonatal nurses of behaviors that prevent visual, auditory, and tactile overstimulations in preterm infants, as well as the intentions, attitudes, and subjective norms related to the adoption of these behaviors. The convenience sample consisted of 54 neonatal nurses working in three Montreal region teaching hospitals. A multiple-choice questionnaire, composed on the basis of a review of the literature and the Theory of Reasoned Action, was used for data collection. The results revealed that the nurses often adopted behaviors that prevented tactile overstimulation, and that their intentions, attitudes, and subjective norms all favored the adoption of such behaviors. However, more than the half of the nurses did not frequently adopt behaviors that prevent visual and auditory overstimulations, nor did their intentions, attitudes, and subjective norms favor the adoption of these behaviors. Findings suggest that neonatal nurses lack specific knowledge in this area and that they would benefit from the completion of an evidence-based educational program on the prevention of overstimulation of preterm infants prior to their employment in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

  13. Technological Advances in Psychiatric Nursing: An update.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Andrea C

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and treating mental illness has improved in many ways as a result of the fast pace of technological advances. The technologies that have the greatest potential impact are those that (1) increase the knowledge of how the brain functions and changes based on interventions, (2) have the potential to personalize interventions based on understanding genetic factors of drug metabolism and pharmacodynamics, and (3) use information technology to provide treatment in the absence of an adequate mental health workforce. Technologies are explored for psychiatric nurses to consider. Psychiatric nurses are encouraged to consider the experiences of psychiatric patients, including poor health, stigmatization, and suffering.

  14. Neonatal nurses' views on the barriers to parenting in the intensive care nursery--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Walker, S B

    1997-03-01

    A descriptive study, using a self-reporting questionnaire, was undertaken to identify neonatal nurses' views on barriers to parenting in the intensive care nursery. The objective of the study was to determine nurses' responses to the barriers to parenting identified in the nursing literature. Relevant literature was examined and the questionnaire developed. To determine reliability and validity, the questionnaire was examined by both medical and nursing experts and a pilot study was undertaken, with relevant changes made, as many answers reflect current unit policy rather than opinion. Questionnaires were distributed in an intensive care nursery in Brisbane, Australia; the nurses were asked to rate the extent of their agreement with the points identified in the literature on a seven-point scale, with 1 being the lowest score and 7 the highest. Of the 80 questionnaires distributed, 40 were returned. The results of the questionnaire indicated an understanding of the environmental and emotional barriers confronting parents. However, there was little acknowledgement of the nurse-initiated practices which also prevent parents fulfilling their parenting role. Evenly divided responses were received to several questions, indicating inconsistency in neonatal nurses' views on what constitute barriers to parenting. The results of the questionnaire are of value in extending neonatal nursing knowledge. They provide a snapshot of neonatal nurses' views on the barriers confronting parents as they attempt to fulfill their parenting role, and bring nurse-initiated barriers, such as policy and procedures, to the attention of neonatal intensive care nurses.

  15. Advanced nursing practice: old hat, new design.

    PubMed

    De Grasse, C; Nicklin, W

    2001-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses positively impact the delivery of healthcare and client outcomes. However, in the past these positions have been seen to have variable value and were often vulnerable during budget cuts. Lack of a clear advanced nursing practice (ANP) framework probably contributed to the compromised effectiveness of these roles and evolution of roles with different titles, scopes of practice and reporting structures. To build the foundation for developing an ANP framework, a task force at The Ottawa Hospital (TOH) conducted a literature review related to ANP roles and completed a review of all clinical nursing roles at TOH. In addition, focus groups with nurses and other health professionals elicited ANP perceptions. The ANP framework includes a standardized job description that details competencies under five role components: clinical practice; consultation; research; education; and, leadership. Recommendations for assessment, implementation and evaluation of ANP roles are identified. The process undertaken by our ANP task force proved to be thorough and sound in developing a framework within which to move forward with ANP role implementation throughout TOH. This article, describing the process, may assist other organizations in defining ANP roles to better meet patient needs in changing health care environments. PMID:11803945

  16. Materials on Nursing in the Clearinghouse: Bibliography #16, and Neonatal Intensive Care Units: Bibliography #17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Public Health Association, Springfield.

    The first of the two bibliographies in this document contains 38 entries on neonatal nursing, including books and journal articles (originally published from 1973 to 1986) dealing with such topics as high-risk pregnancy and delivery, home care of developmentally disabled newborns, and family dynamics. The second bibliography, titled "Neonatal…

  17. Tennessee advanced practice nurse compensation survey results 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, representatives from Middle Tennessee Advanced Practice Nurses (MTAPN), Greater Memphis Area Advanced Practice Nurses (GMAAPN), and Northeast Tennessee Nurse Practitioners Association (NETNPA) decided to poll APNs in Tennessee to compare data with the most recent results from the Advance for Nurse Practitioners national NP survey. Every other year, Advance for Nurse Practitioners publishes salary survey results from their survey. Most recently, in January 2006, an average nationwide salary for all APNs was reported at $74,812, with Tennessee's average at $71,068.

  18. Palliative care delivery in the NICU: what barriers do neonatal nurses face?

    PubMed

    Kain, Victoria J

    2006-01-01

    Despite the existence of a universal protocol in palliative care for dying babies and their families, provision of this type of care remains ad hoc in contemporary neonatal settings. Influential bodies such as the American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization support palliative care to this patient population, so why are such measures not universally adopted? Are there barriers that prevent neonatal nurses from delivering this type of care? A search of the literature reveals that such barriers may be significant and that they have the potential to prevent dying babies from receiving the care they deserve. The goal of this literature review is to identify these barriers to providing palliative care in neonatal nursing. Results of the research have been used to determine item content for a survey to conceptualize and address these barriers.

  19. Educational outcomes associated with providing a comprehensive guidelines program about nursing care of preterm neonates receiving total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Al-Rafay, Safy S; Al-Sharkawy, Sabah S

    2012-05-01

    Poor understanding or practice of Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) causes devastating complications. Therefore, good Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nursing care for preterm neonates and close monitoring of complications is essential for successful TPN therapy. The study was conducted in NICU at Ain Shams University Hospital in Cairo, Egypt, using a quasi-experimental research design with prepost intervention assessments. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire sheet and an observation checklist (prepost format) and developed a comprehensive guidelines program about nursing care of TPN of preterm neonates. Results revealed that the program had a significant positive impact on nurses' knowledge and practice outcomes.

  20. [Advanced nursing practice: vision in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Morin, Diane; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie; Shaha, Maya

    2013-12-01

    To meet the challenges related to the development of health problems taking into account the development of knowledge, several innovations in care are being implemented. Among these, advanced nursing roles and increased interprofessional collaboration are considered as important features in Switzerland. Although the international literature provides benchmarks for advanced roles, it was considered essential to contextualize these in order to promote their application value in Switzerland. Thus, from 79 statements drawn from the literature, 172 participants involved in a two-sequential phases study only kept 29 statements because they considered they were relevant, important and applicable in daily practice. However, it is important to point out that statements which have not been selected at this stage to describe advanced practice cannot be considered irrelevant permanently. Indeed, given the emergence of advanced practice in western Switzerland, it is possible that a statement judged not so relevant at this moment of the development of advanced practice, will be considered as such later on. The master's program in nursing embedded at the University of Lausanne and the University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland was also examined in the light of these statements. It was concluded that all the objectives of the program are aligned with the competencies statements that were kept.

  1. Neonatal nurses' views on the barriers to parenting in the intensive care nursery--a national study.

    PubMed

    Walker, S B

    1998-09-01

    A descriptive research study was undertaken at a national level to identify neonatal nurses' views on the barriers to parenting in the intensive care nursery. The objective of the study was to determine nurses' responses to the barriers to parenting identified in the literature. Relevant literature was examined and a questionnaire developed and pilot tested. In all, 794 questionnaires were distributed with neonatal nursing newsletters and in intensive care nurseries throughout NSW, the ACT, South Australia, Western Australia, the Northern Territory and Queensland. The Neonatal Nurses Association of Victoria and Tasmania did not respond to the invitation for its members to participate, so no questionnaires were distributed in these states. Neonatal nurses were asked to indicate the extent of their agreement with the issues identified in the literature on a four-point scale, with 1 the lowest score and 4 the highest. Of the 794 questionnaires distributed 298 were returned, representing a 37.5 per cent response rate. The results of the questionnaire indicate nurses' understanding of the environmental and emotional barriers confronting parents; however, there was little acknowledgment of nurse-initiated practices which also prevent parents fulfilling their parenting role. Responses to several questions were evenly divided, indicating inconsistency in neonatal nurses' views on what constitute barriers to parenting. The results of the questionnaire provide a national snapshot of the views of neonatal nurses with respect to the barriers confronting parents as they attempt to fulfil their parenting role and bring nurse-initiated barriers, such as policies and procedures, to the attention of neonatal nurses.

  2. Nurse Staffing in Neonatal Intensive Care Units in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Jeannette A; Staiger, Douglas O; Patrick, Thelma E; Horbar, Jeffrey D; Kenny, Michael J; Lake, Eileen T

    2015-10-01

    The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is a setting with high nurse-to-patient ratios. Little is known about the factors that determine nurse workload and assignment. The goals of this study were to (1) develop a measure of NICU infant acuity; (2) describe the acuity distribution of NICU infants; (3) describe the nurse/infant ratio at each acuity level, and examine the factors other than acuity, including nurse qualifications and the availability of physicians and other providers, that determined staffing ratios; and (4) explore whether nurse qualifications were related to the acuity of assigned infants. In a two-stage cohort study, data were collected in 104 NICUs in 2008 by nurse survey (6,038 nurses and 15,191 infants assigned to them) and administrators reported on unit-level staffing of non-nurse providers; in a subset of 70 NICUs in 2009-2010, census data were collected on four selected shifts (3,871 nurses and 9,276 infants assigned to them). Most NICU infants (62%) were low-acuity (Levels 1 and 2); 12% of infants were high-acuity (Levels 4 and 5). The nurse-to-infant ratio ranged from 0.33 for the lowest-acuity infants to 0.95 for the highest-acuity infants. The staffing ratio was significantly related to the acuity of assigned infants but not to nurse education, experience, certification, or availability of other providers. There was a significant but small difference in the percentage of high-acuity (Levels 4 and 5) infants assigned to nurses with specialty certification (15% vs. 12% for nurses without certification). These staffing patterns may not optimize patient outcomes in this highly intensive pediatric care setting.

  3. A burden of knowledge: A qualitative study of experiences of neonatal intensive care nurses' concerns when keeping information from parents.

    PubMed

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2015-12-01

    Improved life-sustaining technology in the neonatal intensive care has resulted in an increased probability of survival for extremely premature babies. In the neonatal intensive care, the condition of a baby can deteriorate rapidly. Nurses and parents are together for long periods at the bedside and so form close and trusting relationships. Neonatal nurses as the constant caregivers may be presented with contradictory demands in attempting to meet the baby's needs and being a patient and family advocate. This article aims to explore the issues arising for neonatal nurses when holding information about changes to a condition of a baby that they are unable to share with parents. Data were collected via interviews with 24 neonatal nurses in New South Wales, Australia. A qualitative approach was used to analyse the data. The theme 'keeping secrets' was identified and comprised of three sub-themes 'coping with potentially catastrophic news', 'fear of inadvertent disclosure' and 'a burden that could damage trust'. Keeping secrets and withholding information creates internal conflict in the nurses as they balance the principle of confidentiality with the parent's right to know information. The neonatal nurses experienced guilt and shame when they were felt forced by circumstances to keep secrets or withhold information from the parents of extremely premature babies.

  4. Career Advancement of Nurse Executives: Planned or Accidental?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Sylvia A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A survey of 12 nurse executives indicated that most did not originally plan to be administrators when they entered nursing. However, all had pursued advanced degrees and most had been involved in nursing education prior to their administrator-level position. (CH)

  5. Penn Macy Initiative To Advance Academic Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Norma M.; Evans, Lois K.; Swan, Beth Ann

    2002-01-01

    The Penn School of Nursing and the Macy Foundation established a comprehensive institute and technical assistance program to help nursing schools advance academic nursing practice. The Penn School consulted with 21 participating schools, providing institutes, conferences, a listserv and a web-based knowledge center focused on integrating research,…

  6. The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Future of Nursing" explores how nurses' roles, responsibilities, and education should change significantly to meet the increased demand for care that will be created by health care reform and to advance improvements in America's increasingly complex health system. At more than 3 million in number, nurses make up the single…

  7. Antimicriobial resistance patterns of colonizing flora on nurses' hands in the neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Heather A.; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Saiman, Lisa; Larson, Elaine L.

    2007-01-01

    Background The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the use of an alcohol-based handrub for health care worker hand hygiene. The purpose of this study was to examine effects of hand hygiene product and skin condition on the antimicrobial resistance patterns of colonizing hand flora among nurses. Methods Colonizing hand flora of 119 nurses working in 2 neonatal intensive care units was compared during a 22-month crossover study using alcohol handrub or antiseptic soap. Results Altogether, 1442 isolates from 834 hand cultures (mean, 7 cultures/nurse) were obtained. In 3 of 9 regression analyses modeling for resistant staphylococcal flora, the use of antiseptic soap was a significant predictor of resistance, and nurses with damaged skin were 2.79 times more likely to carry Staphylococcus warneri isolates resistant to gentamicin. Conclusion Hand hygiene product and skin condition may influence resistance patterns of hand flora of care providers. PMID:17482994

  8. Caring for dying infants: experiences of neonatal intensive care nurses in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yam, B M; Rossiter, J C; Cheung, K Y

    2001-09-01

    Ten registered nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit in Hong Kong were interviewed to explore their experiences of caring for infants whose disease is not responsive to curative treatment, their perceptions of palliative care, and factors influencing their care. Eight categories emerged from the content analysis of the interviews: disbelieving; feeling ambivalent and helpless; protecting emotional self; providing optimal physical care to the infant; providing emotional support to the family; expressing empathy; lack of knowledge and counselling skills; and conflicting values in care. The subtle cultural upbringing and socialization in nurse training and workplace environment also contributed to their moral distress. Hospital and nurse administrators should consider different ways of facilitating palliative care in their acute care settings. For example, by culture-specific death education, peer support groups, bereavement teams, modification of departmental policies, and a supportive work environment. Future research could include the identification of family needs and coping as well as ethical decision-making among nurses.

  9. Nurses' expectations of using music for premature infants in neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Pölkki, Tarja; Korhonen, Anne; Laukkala, Helena

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to describe nurses' expectations of using music for premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and to find out about the related background factors. The subjects consisted of 210 Finnish nurses who were recruited from the country's five university hospitals providing premature infant care in NICU. The data were collected by validated questionnaire, and the response rate was 82%. Most nurses preferred recorded music to live music in the NICU. They expected that music would have positive effects on premature infants, parents, and staff. Few demographic and many background factors of the respondents' music-related experiences correlated significantly with the expectations concerning their preference. In conclusion, the nurses' expectations were positive regarding the use of music in the NICU, which supports evidence regarding the efficacy of music therapy for premature infants.

  10. POSTPARTUM AND NEONATAL NURSING CARE DURING THE 2009 H1N1 INFLUENZA PANDEMIC

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Lauren B.; Ruch-Ross, Holly S.; Williams, Jennifer L.; Ruhl, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    We describe select influenza infection control policies and practices related to postpartum and newborn care during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. In an online survey of obstetric and neonatal nurses, significantly more nurses indicated a written hospital policy supporting each of the practices during versus before the pandemic. The two practices least oft en implemented were temporary separation of healthy newborns from ill mothers (37.7 percent) and testing newborns for influenza virus infection if signs of influenza were observed (31.4 percent). Presence of written hospital policies increased implementation of practices. Findings may be useful to guide planning for future pandemics or other public health emergencies. PMID:23957794

  11. [Nursing interventions on the physical environment of Neonatal Intensive Care Units].

    PubMed

    Miquel Capó Rn, I

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to analyse nursing interventions regarding noise and lighting that influence neurodevelopment of the preterm infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. A review of the literature was performed using the databases: Cuiden Plus, PubMed, IBECS and Cochrane Library Plus. The inclusion and exclusion criteria were established in accordance with the objectives and limits used in each database. Of the 35 articles used, most were descriptive quantitative studies based on the measurement of sound pressure levels and lighting in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units. The countries included in this study are Brazil and the United States, and the variables analysed were the recording the times of light and noise. Based on the high levels of light and noise recorded in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units, nursing interventions that should be carried out to reduce them are described. The evidence indicates that after the implementation of these interventions, the high levels of both environmental stimuli are reduced significantly. Despite the extensive literature published on this problem, the levels of light and noise continue to exceed the recommended limits. Therefore, nurses need to increase and enhance their efforts in this environment, in order to positively influence neurodevelopment of premature newborn.

  12. Advance Placement Policies of Nursing Education in North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Board of Education, Raleigh.

    Advance placement policies are identified in this booklet designed to aid persons who are potentially qualified by prior training or experience for advance placement in programs leading to graduation in nursing or practical nursing. The information was gathered from all 82 programs approved by the state board for 1975. The trend toward improving…

  13. Implementing an open unit policy in a neonatal intensive care unit: nurses' and parents' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Voos, Kristin C; Park, Nesha

    2014-01-01

    Family presence is linked to reduced stress, better patient safety, and increased family satisfaction. But parental presence can increase nurses' workload and make nurses feel uncomfortable. An open unit (OU) policy and plan for implementation was developed. An anonymous survey was given to nurses about an OU pre- and postimplementation. Responses were used to learn perceived barriers; focus groups were held to understand the concerns and develop solutions. The success of the program was measured by pre/post nursing and parent surveys. Initially, 87% (76/87) of nurses were not in favor of an OU. Most common concerns were as follows: HIPPA 71%, social issues 56%, and increased time for report 45%. Post-OU, only 17% (10/59) were not in favor. Fifty-four percent expressed no major concerns. The most common concerns were as follows: interruptions 25%, limited space 22%, HIPPA 17%. Eighty percent cited benefits for parents. Most common benefits were as follows: increased visiting 49% and improved parent emotional state 43%. Pre-OU, 78% (18/23) of parents felt they were allowed to be with their baby as much as they wanted compared to 92% (36/39) post-OU. Neonatal intensive care unit nurses had reservations toward open visitation, but with education and a focused process for implementation, most nurses favored the change and benefits for families were recognized. Parent satisfaction increased regarding time spent with their infant.

  14. Sources of Stress for Nurses in Neonatal Intensive Care Units of East Azerbaijan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Farnam, Alireza; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Bafandehzendeh, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Stress is one of the main factors affecting one's efficiency as well as staff health and quality of nursing services. Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) can be stressful environments for nurses, infants and families as well. Since there is no evidence in this regard in Iran, the present study aimed to determine stress levels related to care delivering in NICU from the viewpoint of nurses in NICUs of East Azerbaijan Province, Iran during 2011. Methods: This was a descriptive study including a purposive sample of 110 nurses working in NICUs of hospitals in East Azerbaijan Province. The data collection tool was a self-report questionnaire. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire were assessed by content validity and Cronbach's alpha coefficient (α = 0.84). Results: According to factor analysis, the stressors included environmental and nurse and human factors. Stress sources in total and separately in each category were reported as moderate. The mean and 95% confidence interval of the factors in the categories were 2.75 (0.84); 2.59-2.91 and 3.21 (0.72); 3.07-3.35, respectively. Therefore, human factors caused significantly higher levels of stress compared to environmental factors (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Stressors involved in NICU nursing include environmental and human factors. Planning to remove or reduce their impact can improve the quality of nursing services in intensive care units and, thus, decrease the adverse effects of stress on workers. PMID:25276702

  15. Teaching Pediatric Nursing Concepts to Non-Pediatric Nurses Using an Advance Organizer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Julie Ann

    2013-01-01

    Non-pediatric nurses in rural areas often care for children in adult units, emergency departments, and procedural areas. A half-day program about pediatric nursing using constructivist teaching strategies including an advance organizer, case studies, and simulation was offered at a community hospital in Western North Carolina. Nurses reported a…

  16. The myth of the miracle baby: how neonatal nurses interpret media accounts of babies of extreme prematurity.

    PubMed

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2015-09-01

    Improved life sustaining technology in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has resulted in an increased probability of survival in extremely premature babies. Miracle baby stories in the popular press are a regular occurrence and these reports are often the first source from which the general public learn about extremely premature babies. The research from which this paper is drawn sought to explore the care-giving and ethical dilemmas of neonatal nurses when caring for extremely premature babies 24 weeks gestation and less. This current paper aims to outline the views of neonatal nurses on miracle baby stories in the media. Data were collected via a questionnaire to 760 Australian neonatal nurses with 414 returned, representing a response rate of 54.4%. Narrative was collected from semi-structured interviews with 24 experienced neonatal nurses in NSW, Australia. A qualitative approach utilising thematic analysis was utilised to analyse the data. The theme the myth of the miracle baby is seen as generating myths and unrealistic expectations on the part of vulnerable families and the public. Neonatal nurses, as the primary caregivers for tiny babies and their families, viewed popular media publications with suspicion, believing published reports to be incomplete, inaccurate and biased towards the positive.

  17. Advancing the nursing profession begins with leadership.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Jennifer A

    2013-04-01

    This bimonthly department, sponsored by the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE), presents information to assist nurse leaders in shaping the future of healthcare through creative and innovative leadership. The strategic priorities of AONE anchor the editorial content. They reflect contemporary healthcare and nursing practice issues that challenge nurse executives as they strive to meet the needs of patients.

  18. Pediatric nursing practice: keeping pace with technological advances.

    PubMed

    Bowden, V R

    2000-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, extensive technological and medical advances have had a major impact on the way pediatric nursing is practiced. Pediatric nurses have expanded their nursing roles, established professional organizations and certification standards to ensure clinical competence at the bedside, and tirelessly advocated for the health care needs of children and their families. In addition, pediatric nurses have collaborated with other health care providers to institute family-centered and developmentally appropriate philosophies of care. All of these changes will assist pediatric nurses to remain focused on the most important aspect of their work: Supporting the unique needs of children and their families.

  19. Ethics and the politics of advancing nursing knowledge.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2015-04-01

    The politics of academia involve intricate human relationships that are political in nature as nurse leaders and scholars struggle to advance nursing science with complex leading-following situations. This article begins a dialogue of considering potential meanings for what it means to be political within competing interest groups in academia, and within the discipline of nursing. What is most important in the struggle for identity and what possibilities surface when potential competing interests in academia collide? The ethical tenets of humanbecoming and the leading-following model are used to illustrate issues surrounding academic integrity and possibilities for the advancement of nursing scholarship in future generations.

  20. Nurses' self-efficacy and academic degree advancement.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Susan; DeGuzman, Pamela; Kulbok, Pamela; Jackson, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has brought about a synergy of influences for registered nurses to advance their academic preparation. Literature indicates that there is correlation between self-efficacy and goal establishment and success. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the relationship between self-efficacy and advancing academic aspirations of registered nurses. Findings indicated that there was a trend toward a difference in the self-efficacy of nurses who began their career with a diploma or associate degree and went on for academic advancement and those who did not.

  1. Advanced practice nursing: leadership to effect policy change.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Greta; McLennan, Marianne

    2005-02-01

    Nursing leaders used evidence-based thinking to engage key stakeholders when implementing advanced practice nursing roles in a traditional medically oriented tertiary oncology center. A strategic orientation to the policy change initiative was guided by a theoretical framework for connecting research and policy. Policy approaches that addressed stakeholder values and beliefs, while attending to questions of competence, standards of practice, fiscal savings, medical and nursing workload, and ongoing multidisciplinary teamwork were essential to facilitate change. PMID:15714096

  2. Kangaroo Care in a Neonatal Context: Parents’ Experiences of Information and Communication of Nurse-Parents

    PubMed Central

    Lemmen, Desirée; Fristedt, Petra; Lundqvist, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Kangaroo Care (KC) is an evidence-based nursing practice with many benefits for infants and parents. The purpose of this study was to describe parents’ experience of information and communication mediated by staff nurses before and during KC at neonatal wards. Methodology and Participants: A qualitative study with semi-structured interviews was performed. The sample consisted of 20 parents. Results: The results show that the information and communication were experienced as both optimal and suboptimal including following categories: initially conflicting emotions in relation to KC, participation and confidence in KC is evolving, strengthening preparation and context is decisive as well as parental sense and caution. The overall theme was that good preparation will contribute to a positive experience of KC. Conclusion: The conclusion is that most of the parents had positive experiences of KC. The information and communication from the staff nurses encouraged and motivated the parents to practice KC, in a sense that it was a natural way to get to know the infant, when the staff nurses were well versed in the method and coherent and supportive. Conflicting emotions emerged when staff nurses practised KC as a routine without deeper knowledge and skills of the method and its advantages as well as without sensitivity to parents’ vulnerable situation. PMID:23802029

  3. Neonatal death and parents' grief. Experience, behaviour and attitudes of Swedish nurses.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, A; Nilstun, T

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to survey the experience, behaviour and attitudes of nurses in Swedish neonatal wards towards parents who refuse or are reluctant to see, touch or hold their dying or dead baby. A questionnaire was distributed to 173 nurses, of whom 144 responded. The questionnaire contained questions about the nurses' own experience of such situations, their behaviour, and their attitude towards influencing the parents. Seventy-four percent answered that they had experience of such situations, 59% that they often tried to persuade or in other ways influence the parents to change their mind, and 60% were of the opinion that the parents mourning-process is always facilitated when they touch or hold their dead baby. Most nurses (83%) were of the opinion that the conflict between beneficence and autonomy was difficult but not impossible to solve. A majority of the nurses were inclined to give priority to the principle of beneficence. But is this inclination ethically justified? A well-founded answer to this question requires more knowledge about the experiences of parents who have lived through such traumatic situations.

  4. Courage as integral to advancing nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Spence, Deb; Smythe, Liz

    2007-11-01

    Courage is an elusive but fundamental component of nursing. Yet it is seldom mentioned in professional texts and other literature nor is it often recognised and supported in practice. This paper focuses on the illumination of courage in nursing. Data from a hermeneutic analysis of nurses' practice stories is integrated with literature to assist deeper understanding of the meaning of courage in contemporary nursing practice. The purpose is to make visible a phenomenon that needs to be actively fostered or 'en-courage-d' if nursing is to effectively contribute to an improved health service. PMID:18293656

  5. Neonatal Resuscitation Program and Pediatric Advanced Life Support.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, C

    1995-05-01

    The need for delivery resuscitation of the newborn cannot be predicted in most cases; therefore it is judicious to train all providers who may be involved in the delivery of newborns to follow guidelines developed to improve outcome, especially in the presence of transitional asphyxia. The Neonatal Resuscitation Program emphasizes basic steps of warming, drying, suctioning, and adequately ventilating the newborn. It also addresses current theories regarding resuscitation of the low birthweight newborns, infants with meconium aspiration, and medication use. The NRP applies to all acute-care hospitals that provide delivery services and those at which a respiratory therapist is likely to be present in the high-risk delivery or unanticipated delivery-room resuscitation. Outcomes have not been well documented and more clinical research is needed to identify which therapeutic strategies promote the best survival in this population. A topic that should be included in the NRP of the future is exogenous surfactant delivery. Respiratory distress syndrome has been a significant cause of death and morbidity in prematurely born neonates. Exogenous surfactant therapy has had a dramatic effect on the death rate of premature infants and on the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome. Current methods of surfactant administration demand that personnel proficient in management of the low birthweight newborn be present. As hospitals with all levels of nurseries continue to receive the prematurely delivered newborn and better methods to administer surfactant are discovered, the NRP could add information and a skills laboratory on surfactant administration. A trained cadre of health professionals who are proficient in the specific resuscitation skills required in pediatric patients can make a difference. The infant and child have different anatomy, physiology, and disease etiology that need to be emphasized and understood by the pediatric caregiver. The Pediatric Advanced Life

  6. [Exposure of nursing personnel to electromagnetic fields in neonatal intensive care].

    PubMed

    Valerio, Bellieni C; Nadia, Franci; Manola, Giunti; Barbara, Tecce; Beatrice, Ricci; Sandra, Gagliardini; Marco, Fortunato; Franco, Bagnoli

    2002-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMF) are recognised as a source of environmental pollution for workers and people resident in exposed areas. The level of exposure to EMFs of the nurses working in the Siena Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, during two workdays was recorded and peak levels > 10 mG (1 microT) were registered well above an almost permanence exposure at > 2 mg G. The application of existing standard, cautionary criteria and rules would suggest protective or restrictive measures against EMF exposure for these workers.

  7. [Nurses' knowledge about the health care proxy and advance directives].

    PubMed

    Georget, Jean-Philippe; Cecire-Denoyer, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    The Basse-Normandie palliative care nurses' group carried out a survey regarding nurses' knowledge of the health care proxy and advance directives. The study revealed a lack of connection between these two arrangements, poor knowledge about advance directives but an understanding of the role of the health care proxy. How, therefore, can patients be effectively informed? How should they be supported in this process of determining themselves the conditions of their end of life? PMID:26146326

  8. Advance Care Planning in Nursing Homes: Correlates of Capacity and Possession of Advance Directives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rebecca S.; DeLaine, Shermetra R.; Chaplin, William F.; Marson, Daniel C.; Bourgeois, Michelle S.; Dijkstra, Katinka; Burgio, Louis D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The identification of nursing home residents who can continue to participate in advance care planning about end-of-life care is a critical clinical and bioethical issue. This study uses high quality observational research to identify correlates of advance care planning in nursing homes, including objective measurement of capacity. Design…

  9. Assuring Quality and Access in Advanced Practice Nursing: A Challenge to Nurse Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundinger, Mary O.; Cook, Sarah Sheets; Lenz, Elizabeth R.; Piacentini, Karen; Auerhahn, Carolyn; Smith, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses are assuming increasingly accountable roles in primary health care. A doctor of nursing practice degree would signify the high level of competency they achieve. Columbia University's training model is an example of the preparation needed for this level of professional practice. (SK)

  10. Skills Required for Nursing Career Advancement: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Reza; Fallahi-Khoshnab, Masoud; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Oskouie, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Nurses require certain skills for progression in their field. Identifying these skills can provide the context for nursing career advancement. Objectives This study aimed to identify the skills needed for nurses’ career advancement. Materials and Methods A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted to study a purposive sample of eighteen nurses working in teaching hospitals affiliated with the Qazvin, Shahid Beheshti, and Iran Universities of Medical Sciences. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews, and analyzed using conventional content analysis. Results The three themes extracted from the data included interpersonal capabilities, competency for career success, and personal capacities. The results showed that acquiring a variety of skills is essential for career advancement. Conclusions The findings showed that personal, interpersonal, and functional skills can facilitate nurses’ career advancement. The effects of these skills on career advancement depend on a variety of conditions that require further studies. PMID:27556054

  11. Advanced nursing practice--the influences and accountabilities.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Heather

    The past two decades have seen a proliferation of new, advanced clinical roles for nurses in the UK which has resulted in much debate about the nature of advanced practice as these new roles involve many tasks that were traditionally considered the remit of doctors. This article critically analyses the professional accountabilities of working at an advanced level and the influences which are driving the NHS modernization agenda with particular reference to the role of the Community Matron. It concludes that advanced nursing practice presents an opportunity for the combination of the art of nursing and advanced tasks, but emphasizes that new roles must develop within a recognized framework which takes account of the educational, ethical and legal accountability issues and clarifies the scope and remit of roles for health professionals, patients and indemnifying agents.

  12. Advanced Health Assessment in Nurse Practitioner Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Frances J.; Kopac, Catharine

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 140 nursing schools indicated that most taught health assessment to nurse practitioners as a separate course; public institutions were more involved in computer-assisted instruction. Faculty cited scarce resources and limited time to develop new teaching strategies. Most agreed that graduate courses should focus on differential…

  13. Advanced nurse-patient communication system.

    PubMed

    Unluturk, Mehmet S

    2012-08-01

    Effective communication is the most important part of any healthcare organization. For many years, hospital nurse call solutions had been stand-alone systems with occasional integration to pocket paging for outputting patient call alerts to mobile staff. In the late 1990's, technology enabled in-building wireless phones to supplement or replace paging systems as a means of not only sending alerts, but also enabling voice communication between mobile staff and patients. Today's nurse call market requires integration of additional information from location and ADT (admit, discharge, transfer) systems into what have traditionally been nurse call applications. This system information is required not only at the nursing station, pagers, and phones, but also at PC's placed on each patient care floor in hallways, nurse stations, and offices, and at areas away from the patients, including administrator and clinical engineering offices. It is crucial that nurses have the latest patient information in their hand wherever they go in the hospital. In this paper, MatchMaker.NET has been developed to integrate all these technologies into the hospital's LAN to improve nurse-patient communication. PMID:21541690

  14. Advancing health policy in nursing education through service learning.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S S; Milone-Nuzzo, P

    2001-03-01

    Knowledge of health policy is an increasingly important aspect of nursing practice and education, especially as nurses strive to improve the rapidly changing health care delivery system. At the same time, many educators, researchers, foundations, and government officials are touting the benefits of service learning. In particular, service learning offers ways to enhance partnerships between academia and community agencies and to extend learning beyond the traditional classroom. We present a model for educating nurses as advanced practice nurses in health policy that links service learning with a framework for the political development of nurses. Under the rubric of service learning, the curriculum is based on the overlap among health policy, the role of the nurse as consultant, and community-based care. After discussing the importance of health policy for graduate nursing education and reviewing the essentials of service learning, we describe a three-semester graduate sequence in health policy service learning. The focus is on the clinical and classroom components of both individual and group practica and their relationship to stages of nursing's political development. The article concludes with evaluation considerations and the implications of our work for nursing theory, research, practice, and education.

  15. Technological Advances in Nursing Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Debra Henline

    2015-12-01

    Technology is rapidly changing the way nurses deliver patient care. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 encourages health care providers to implement electronic health records for meaningful use of patient information. This development has opened the door to many technologies that use this information to streamline patient care. This article explores current and new technologies that nurses will be working with either now or in the near future.

  16. The covered wagon journey: student chronicles in advanced holistic nursing.

    PubMed

    Purnell, Marguerite J; Lange, Bernadette; Bailey, Christie; Drozdowicz, Aleida; Eckes, Shirley; Kinchen, Elizabeth; Smith-Atkinson, Nikkisha

    2013-01-01

    This article recounts the experiences of a first cohort of graduate students in a newly implemented advanced holistic nursing (AHN) track, one of only a handful in the nation, and the first in Florida. The increasing popularity of complementary and alternative healing processes represents the insufficiency of a health system of fragmented care and a desire for holistic healing that is beyond mainstream allopathic care. Graduate holistic nurse education equips nurses to explore the commitment needed to advance the evolution of health care. The covered wagon journey is a metaphor for this meaningful participation. Students journaled their experiences as cotravelers in a lone wagon: embarking on a courageous journey, forging a path of discovery, and reaching their destination as pioneers. This cohort experience embodied the central tenets of holistic nursing, thus creating conscious change and unity within a learning community. The future of AHN is addressed in the context of the contemporary health care environment.

  17. An overview of Medicare reimbursement regulations for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Frakes, Michael A; Evans, Tracylain

    2006-01-01

    The federal government spends nearly 15% of the budget on Medicare services annually, and advanced practice nurses are eligible for reimbursement from that pool. The regulations governing reimbursement are complex because of the social, political, and financial pressures involved in their development. Although economic viability and due diligence considerations make it incumbent on advanced practice nurses to understand the rules, the profession, as a whole, has knowledge deficits in this area. The essentials of regulatory development and structure are reviewed and considerations for optimizing reimbursement are described. PMID:16676748

  18. The role of the nurse executive in fostering and empowering the advanced practice registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Tukea L

    2012-06-01

    The nurse executive plays a critical role in the design, oversight, and outcomes of the delivery of care and a key role in the success of the integration of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) into an organization. The critical areas that nurse executives must consider to foster and empower APRNs are: (1) knowledge and self preparation, especially of political initiatives that affect the role, (2) visionary leadership and development of clear role expectations and appropriate credentialing, (3) strategies to reduce disconnection between the APRN and their practice setting, and (4) appropriate education and marketing of the role to stakeholders.

  19. Advanced nursing practice and Newton's three laws of motion.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, David

    This article considers the reasons for the development of advanced practice roles among nurses and other healthcare professions. It explores the implications of financial constraints, consumer preferences and the development of new healthcare services on the reorganization of professional boundaries. It makes use of Sir Isaac Newton's three laws of motion to demonstrate how professional development in nursing has taken place in response to a number of external influences and demands. It also considers the significance of skill mix for the nursing profession, in particular the development and likely expansion of the physician assistant role. The application of different professionals and grades within a healthcare team or organization is central to the Government's Agenda for Change proposals and nurses have successfully adopted a number of roles traditionally performed by doctors. Nurses have demonstrated that they are capable of providing high quality care and contributing directly to positive patient outcome. Advanced nursing roles should not only reflect the changing nature of healthcare work, they should also be actively engaged in reconstructing healthcare boundaries.

  20. Kenya and distance education: a model to advance graduate nursing.

    PubMed

    Mutea, Naomi; Cullen, Deborah

    2012-08-01

    Africa is faced with a myriad of challenges, such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and a variety of political and historical complications that have affected the educational system for advanced nursing practice. In Kenya, the current situation in the higher education sector does not give nurses an opportunity to pursue graduate education after they have acquired the basic diploma in nursing due to limited government support and the type of education system existing in the country today. Although distance education has been available in Kenya for professionals such as teachers, in public universities, this kind of opportunity is unreachable for nurses who are working and need to further their education. Nurses desire to have access to advanced practice education to equip them with the relevant knowledge to cope and address the complex health issues arising in the management and care of patients. A collaborative model is presented as a potential solution for this need. Four major constituents are identified including hospitals and agencies, communities of interest, Kenyan universities and international education partners. Each has a part to play including contributions to information, communication of opinion and expertise, money and support, infrastructure and in-kind resources. Distance education is cost-effective and will help in building capacity at various levels of nursing including leadership in clinical practice, teaching, administration and research.

  1. Kenya and distance education: a model to advance graduate nursing.

    PubMed

    Mutea, Naomi; Cullen, Deborah

    2012-08-01

    Africa is faced with a myriad of challenges, such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and a variety of political and historical complications that have affected the educational system for advanced nursing practice. In Kenya, the current situation in the higher education sector does not give nurses an opportunity to pursue graduate education after they have acquired the basic diploma in nursing due to limited government support and the type of education system existing in the country today. Although distance education has been available in Kenya for professionals such as teachers, in public universities, this kind of opportunity is unreachable for nurses who are working and need to further their education. Nurses desire to have access to advanced practice education to equip them with the relevant knowledge to cope and address the complex health issues arising in the management and care of patients. A collaborative model is presented as a potential solution for this need. Four major constituents are identified including hospitals and agencies, communities of interest, Kenyan universities and international education partners. Each has a part to play including contributions to information, communication of opinion and expertise, money and support, infrastructure and in-kind resources. Distance education is cost-effective and will help in building capacity at various levels of nursing including leadership in clinical practice, teaching, administration and research. PMID:22845642

  2. Advancing nursing leadership: a model for program implementation and measurement.

    PubMed

    Omoike, Osei; Stratton, Karen M; Brooks, Beth A; Ohlson, Susan; Storfjell, Judy Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    Despite the abundant literature documenting the need for nurse management education and career development, only recently have professional standards been targeted for this group. Competency standards for nurse leaders repeatedly identify systems-level concepts including finance and budget, communication skills, strategic management, human resources management, change management, and computer technology skills. However, educational initiatives to meet these standards are still at the early stages and most nurse leaders continue to acquire knowledge and experience through "on-the-job" training. This article will illustrate the need for partnerships and collaboration between academia and hospitals to advance nursing leadership to the next century. In addition, a tool to measure the impact of a graduate certificate program in nursing administration on nurse leader competencies is presented. Overall, the certificate program has been successful in multiple ways; it has "graduated" almost 80 nurse leaders, improved participant competence in their role at the systems level, as well as providing an impetus for completion of a graduate degree post program. PMID:21900817

  3. Advancing Information and Communication Technology Knowledge for Undergraduate Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Paula M

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic profession; for registered nurses their role is increasingly requiring greater information process understanding and the effective management of information to ensure high quality safe patient care. This paper outlines the design and implementation of Systems of eCare. This is a course which advances information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students within a Faculty of Health and Wellbeing appropriately preparing nurses for their professional careers. Systems of eCare entwines throughout the three year programme mapping to the curriculum giving meaning to learning for the student. In conclusion comments from students convey their appreciation of the provision of this element of the undergraduate programme. PMID:24199114

  4. [Anticoagulant therapy clinic: moving towards Advanced Nursing Practice].

    PubMed

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Parrado Borrego, Gema; Rodríguez González, José; Caparrós Miranda, Isabel S; Vargas Lirio, M Isabel; Ortiz Fernández, Primitiva

    2014-01-01

    There is currently around one million people receiving oral anticoagulants in Spain. The drug most used is acenocoumarol, which requires coagulation monitoring to ensure that the patient is within its normal therapeutic range. Patients usually start this treatment in a hospital clinic and, when they are stabilised, they are referred to primary care, where they are followed-up by their community nurses. The usual practice is that nurses are responsible for changes in the dose when the patients are outside the range. This practice is not performed by hospital nurses, despite having sufficient experience and knowledge to adequately manage these types of patients. An Advanced Nursing Practice model has been introduced into the Haematology management unit of the Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga. This involves various aspects of attention and care of patients on anticoagulant therapy, and includes adjusting the doses of their treatment following a catalogue of therapeutic and diagnostic ranges.

  5. Telemedicine for neonatal resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Scheans, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high levels of readiness for neonatal resuscitation in low-risk maternity settings is challenging. The neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) algorithm is a community standard in the United States; yet training is biannual, and exposure to enough critical events to be proficient at timely implementation of the algorithm and the advanced procedures is rare. Evidence supports hands-free leadership to help prevent task saturation and communication to promote patient safety. Telemedicine for neonatal resuscitation involves the addition of remote, expert NRP leadership (a NICU-based neonatal nurse practitioner) via camera link to augment effectiveness of the low-risk birth center team. Unanticipated outcomes to report include faster times to transfer initiation and neuroprotective cooling. The positive impact of remote NRP leadership could lead to use of telemedicine to support teams at birthing centers throughout the United States as well as around the world.

  6. Advances in neonatal screening for primary immune deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, TINGTING; LI, ZHENGUANG; ZHANG, QIULI

    2016-01-01

    The congenital disorders of immune competence are known as primary immunodeficiencies (PID) and are mainly characterized by a pathological susceptibility to infection. These infections are mostly of time repetitive and drug resistant in nature. The number of infected infants has reached over 200 and is on the increase. Additionally, clinical severity of the disease has been confirmed to be extensive. The increasing number of these severe PIDs is due to the lack of specific as well as efficient management avenues. New assays and concepts for newborn screening of severe primary immune deficiencies are being explored and the present review focused on these new upcoming strategies for improved screening of neonates. PMID:27168770

  7. Positioning advanced practice nurses for financial success in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kennerly, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are well prepared for patient care, but not for the financial aspects of clinical practice. A lack of reimbursement knowledge and skills limits the prospects for APNs to be key players in business and practice ventures. Faculty are challenged to strengthen the advanced practice reimbursement component of the financial management core to promote the reimbursement competency of APNs. The author discusses 4 primary content categories that are critical to financial success in clinical practice.

  8. Advancing Your Career: Concepts of Professional Nursing. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Rose

    This textbook, intended for registered nurses (RN's) returning to school, is designed to provide practicing RN's with professional concepts to advance their careers. The book contains 22 chapters organized in five sections. Each chapter includes chapter objectives, key terms, key points, chapter exercises, references, and a bibliography. Section I…

  9. Educational Changes to Support Advanced Practice Nursing Education

    PubMed Central

    LeFlore, Judy L.; Thomas, Patricia E.

    2016-01-01

    Educational factors limit the number of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) graduates to meet the growing workforce demands. Healthcare dynamics are necessitating a shift in how nursing education envisions, creates, and implements clinical learning opportunities. The current clinical education model in APRN programs continues to be the same as it was 45 years ago when the student numbers were much smaller. New approaches in graduate nursing education are needed to address the shortage of APRNs in primary and acute care areas. Determining competency based on the number of clinical hours can be inefficient, ineffective, and costly and limits the ability to increase capacity. Little research exists in graduate nursing education to support the effectiveness and efficiency of current hours of clinical required for nurse practitioner students. Simulation and academic-practice partnership models can offer innovative approaches to nurse practitioner education for clinical training, with the goal of producing graduates who can provide safe, quality care within the complex practice-based environment of the nation's evolving healthcare system. PMID:27465446

  10. Description of an advanced practice nursing consultative model to reduce restrictive siderail use in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Laura M; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Brush, Barbara; Boltz, Marie; Renz, Susan; Talerico, Karen A

    2007-04-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that the use of physical restraints in nursing homes can be reduced, particularly where advanced practice nurses (APNs) are utilized. We examined the link between APN practice, siderail reduction, and the costs of siderail alternatives in 273 residents in four Philadelphia nursing homes. The majority of participants were cognitively and physically impaired with multiple co-morbidities. APNs recommended a total of 1,275 siderail-alternative interventions aimed at reducing fall risk. The median cost of siderail alternatives to prevent falls per resident was $135. Residents with a fall history experienced a significantly higher cost of recommendation compared to non-fallers. Findings suggest that an APN consultation model can effectively be implemented through comprehensive, individualized assessment without incurring substantial costs to the nursing home.

  11. Nursing entrepreneurship: motivators, strategies and possibilities for professional advancement and health system change.

    PubMed

    Wall, Sarah

    2013-06-01

    In Canada, as well as internationally, efficiency-focused organizational restructuring in healthcare has resulted in stressful job change for nurses, although nurses continue to work in a system that values technology-based, physician-provided services. Employed nurses have had to participate in organizational activities that undermine their professional values and goals. Nursing entrepreneurship presents an opportunity to explore nursing's professional potential in nursing practice that is uniquely independent. In this study, a focused ethnographic approach was used to explore the experiences of self-employed nurses, who see themselves as leaders in advancing the profession of nursing and its contribution to healthcare. Key themes in the findings include the responses of self-employed nurses to health system change, expanded roles for nurses, the consequences of this non-traditional approach to nursing work and the possibilities for change that arise from nursing entrepreneurship. This research has implications for healthcare policy, professional advocacy and nursing education.

  12. Transnationalism: A Framework for Advancing Nursing Research With Contemporary Immigrants.

    PubMed

    Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S; Boutain, Doris M; Mohammed, Selina A

    2016-01-01

    This article advances nursing research by presenting transnationalism as a framework for inquiry with contemporary immigrants. Transnationalism occurs when immigrants maintain relationships that transcend the geographical borders of their origin and host countries. Immigrants use those relationships to experience health differently within concurrent socioeconomic, political, and cultural contexts than national situated populations. Nurse researchers are called upon to consider these trans-border relationships when exploring the health of contemporary immigrants. Such consideration is needed to develop relevant research designs, methods, analysis, and dissemination strategies. PMID:26836998

  13. Advanced practice nursing in Latin America and the Caribbean: regulation, education and practice

    PubMed Central

    Zug, Keri Elizabeth; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli; Pulcini, Joyce; Garcia, Alessandra Bassalobre; Aguirre-Boza, Francisca; Park, Jeongyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the current state of advanced practice nursing regulation, education and practice in Latin America and the Caribbean and the perception of nursing leaders in the region toward an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional design utilizing a web-based survey of 173 nursing leaders about their perceptions of the state of nursing practice and potential development of advanced practice nursing in their countries, including definition, work environment, regulation, education, nursing practice, nursing culture, and perceived receptiveness to an expanded role in primary health care. Result: the participants were largely familiar with the advanced practice nursing role, but most were unaware of or reported no current existing legislation for the advanced practice nursing role in their countries. Participants reported the need for increased faculty preparation and promotion of curricula reforms to emphasize primary health care programs to train advanced practice nurses. The vast majority of participants believed their countries' populations could benefit from an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care. Conclusion: strong legislative support and a solid educational framework are critical to the successful development of advanced practice nursing programs and practitioners to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. PMID:27508923

  14. Blended roles: preparing the advanced practice nurse educator/clinician with a Web-based nurse educator certificate program.

    PubMed

    Bonnel, Wanda B; Starling, Carol K; Wambach, Karen A; Tarnow, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Changing demographics, a nursing shortage, and various societal changes underscore the need for nurse educators and new nurse educator programs. This article describes a Web-based nurse educator program designed to prepare advanced practice nurses for faculty roles while simultaneously preparing them as clinicians. Guided by adult education theory and self-directed learning theory, the Web-based Nurse Educator Certificate (four Web-based nurse educator courses including a teaching practicum) has been developed and offered to clinical master's and postmaster's students. This article also describes student work with mentors, interactive Web-based teaching strategies, portfolios, graduate competencies, and initial evaluative data. In the first two years of the program, 48 students have taken at least one course in the Nurse Educator Certificate program and eight students have completed it. A Web-based nurse educator certificate program, as part of a clinical master's or postmaster's program, has the potential to help meet the faculty shortage.

  15. Advancing diversity through inclusive excellence in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Michael R; MacWilliams, Brent R; Schmidt, Bonnie J

    2015-01-01

    Nurse leaders call for a more diverse nursing workforce, but too few address the concept of inclusion as a recruitment and retention strategy or as part of improving the academic learning milieu. This article addresses organizational considerations of diversity and inclusion as part of the agenda established by the Association of American Colleges and Universities for inclusive excellence, building on the idea that academic environments only become excellent when an inclusive climate is reached. Six organizational strategies to inclusion are presented from the authors' experiences, some structural and others behavioral: admissions processes, invisibility, absence of community, promotion and tenure, exclusion, and tokenism. A call for structural and behavioral adaptions within nursing education to advance an inclusive excellence agenda is presented.

  16. Neonatal amygdala lesions advance pubertal timing in female rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Shannon B.Z.; Raper, Jessica; Bachevalier, Jocelyne; Wallen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Summary Social context influences the timing of puberty in both humans and nonhuman primates, such as delayed first ovulation in low-ranking rhesus macaques, but the brain region(s) mediating the effects of social context on pubertal timing are unknown. The amygdala is important for responding to social information and thus, is a potential brain region mediating the effects of social context on pubertal timing. In this study, female rhesus macaques living in large, species-typical, social groups received bilateral neurotoxic amygdala lesions at one month of age and pubertal timing was examined beginning at 14 months of age. Pubertal timing was affected in neonatal amygdala-lesioned females (Neo-A), such that they experienced significantly earlier menarche and first ovulation than did control females (Neo-C). Duration between menarche and first ovulation did not differ between Neo-A and Neo-C females, indicating earlier first ovulation in Neo-A females was likely a consequence of earlier menarche. Social rank of Neo-A females was related to age at menarche, but not first ovulation, and social rank was not related to either event in Neo-C females. It is more likely that amygdalectomy affects pubertal timing through its modulation of GABA-ergic mechanisms rather than as a result of the removal of a social-contextual inhibition on pubertal timing. PMID:25462903

  17. The presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations, European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care and European Society of Cardiology Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions Joint Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Fulbrook, Paul; Latour, Jos; Albarran, John; de Graaf, Wouter; Lynch, Fiona; Devictor, Denis; Norekvål, Tone

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents the European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations, the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care, and the European Society of Cardiology Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions Joint Position Statement on The Presence of Family Members During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. PMID:17919981

  18. Writing an employer-focused resume for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Welton, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    The most important new trend in resumes is the employer-focused resume. Writing one is not difficult, but it requires a change in focus. The focus of this type of resume is on the needs of prospective employers. This new resume format allows applicants to describe to prospective employers what they can provide related to the employer's needs as opposed to a simple listing of their academic and work experiences without relation to the prospective new job. This article provides advanced practice nurses with sources to guide construction of informative text about their advanced practice nursing skills and competencies using language familiar to employers. Resumes and curriculum vitae formats are compared, and advice is provided on developing content for either format. Guidelines are provided about listing credentials, identifying clinical proficiencies from student clinical practicum, using qualification summaries rather than an objective statement, choosing references, and including essential components in a cover letter.

  19. Computer and laboratory simulation in the teaching of neonatal nursing: innovation and impact on learning 1

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; Aredes, Natália Del' Angelo; Fernandes, Ananda Maria; Batalha, Luís Manuel da Cunha; Apóstolo, Jorge Manuel Amado; Martins, José Carlos Amado; Rodrigues, Manuel Alves

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to evaluate the cognitive learning of nursing students in neonatal clinical evaluation from a blended course with the use of computer and laboratory simulation; to compare the cognitive learning of students in a control and experimental group testing the laboratory simulation; and to assess the extracurricular blended course offered on the clinical assessment of preterm infants, according to the students. Method: a quasi-experimental study with 14 Portuguese students, containing pretest, midterm test and post-test. The technologies offered in the course were serious game e-Baby, instructional software of semiology and semiotechnique, and laboratory simulation. Data collection tools developed for this study were used for the course evaluation and characterization of the students. Nonparametric statistics were used: Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon. Results: the use of validated digital technologies and laboratory simulation demonstrated a statistically significant difference (p = 0.001) in the learning of the participants. The course was evaluated as very satisfactory for them. The laboratory simulation alone did not represent a significant difference in the learning. Conclusions: the cognitive learning of participants increased significantly. The use of technology can be partly responsible for the course success, showing it to be an important teaching tool for innovation and motivation of learning in healthcare. PMID:27737376

  20. The Obstacles against Nurse-Family Communication in Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Rakhshan, Mahnaz; Pishva, Narjes; Jahanpour, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Communication is one of the key principles in Family-Centered Care (FCC). Studies have shown some drawbacks in communication between families and nurses. Therefore, the present study aimed to recognize the obstacles against nurse-family communication in FCC in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Methods: This qualitative study was conducted on 8 staff nurses in 2 NICUs affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences selected through purposive sampling. The data were collected using 8 deep semi-structured interviews and 3 observations. Then, they were analyzed through inductive content analysis. Results: Data analysis resulted in identification of 3 main categories and 7 subcategories. The first category was organizational factors with 2 subcategories of educational domain (inadequate education, lack of a system for nursing student selection, and poor professionalization) and clinical domain (difficult working conditions, lack of an efficient system for ongoing education and evaluation, and authoritarian management). The second category was familial factors with socio-cultural, psychological, and economic subcategories. The last category was the factors related to nurses with socio-cultural and psycho-physical subcategories. Conclusion: Identification of the obstacles against nurse-family communication helps managers of healthcare systems to plan and eliminate the challenges of effective communication. Besides, elimination of these factors leads to appropriate strategies in NICUs for effective application of FCC. PMID:26464837

  1. Consultant pharmacists, advanced practice nurses, and the interdisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara

    2014-03-01

    Although in geriatrics we are better than many other clinical disciplines in terms of providing interdisciplinary care to older adults, I hope that we will continue to recognize how much more could actually be done. Before addressing the relationship between advanced practice nurses (APNs) and consultant pharmacists in real world settings, I want to review teamwork in geriatrics in general. It is critical to define what we mean by team, what type of team, and what the goals are of this teamwork.

  2. Reflections on ethnocentrism and racism: a challenge for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Harris, S H; Cummings, S H

    1996-01-01

    As nurses and patient populations increasingly reflect the changing demographics of the United States, it will be necessary for nurses to address the critical issues surrounding a multicultural society. Nurses have been relatively quiet on the topic of ethnocentric and racist behavior. If advanced practice nurses are to be successful in assisting nurses and organizations to embrace cultural diversity, understanding ethnocentric and racist behaviors is key to developing strategies to facilitate the provision of culturally competent care.

  3. [An advanced nurse practitioner in general medicine in the United Kingdom].

    PubMed

    Aston, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, an advanced nurse practitioner can carry out consultations and write prescriptions in the same way as a general practitioner. Jenny Aston, a nurse for more than 30 years, works in a GP surgery in Cambridge. Here, she explains the role of nurses in the organisation of health care in the UK, and talks about her career and her missions as an advanced nurse practitioner.

  4. Surgical advances in the fetus and neonate: esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Foker, John E

    2012-06-01

    This article focuses on selected topics in the diagnosis and management of patients with esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheoesophageal fistula. The current status of prenatal diagnosis and recent advances in surgical techniques, including thoracoscopic repair for short-gap EA and tension-induced esophageal growth for long-gap EA, are reviewed. Although no consensus exists among pediatric surgeons regarding the role of these procedures in the treatment of EA, one can reasonably expect that, as they evolve, their application will become more widespread in this challenging patient population.

  5. [The strict sense nursing postgraduation in Brazil: advances and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; Munari, Denize Bouttelet; Gelbcke, Francine Lima; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; de Gutiérrez, Maria Gaby Rivero; Rodrigues, Rosalina Aparecida Partezani

    2013-09-01

    Nursing is a specific field of knowledge and social practice that has been consolidated and strengthened as science. In Brazil, it has been developed due to the increase and qualification of strict sense post-graduate programs. This study aims to present a historical review of the strict sense post-graduate nursing courses in Brazil and to reflect on their evolution, progress, challenges and future perspectives. It explores the creation of strict sense post-graduate courses, highlighting the movement to build a culture of academic and professional post-graduation in nursing. The historical path of their consolidation, expansion, conquest of excellence and international visibility over four decades, and the challenges and future perspectives are showed. It is found that the post-graduate programs in the field has contributed to the advancement and consolidation of scientific, technological knowledge and innovation in nursing and health care, having as philosophy the respect for diversity and the free exchange of ideas, the improvement of quality of life and health, and the effectiveness of citizenship.

  6. Using appreciative inquiry to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance family-centred care: A collaborative workshop.

    PubMed

    Trajkovski, Suza; Schmied, Virginia; Vickers, Margaret; Jackson, Debra

    2015-06-01

    Family-centred care (FCC) has been well recognised, accepted and reported in the literature as an optimised way of caring for hospitalised children. While neonatal units strive to adopt this philosophy, published research suggests there are difficulties implementing FCC principles in daily practice. Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a philosophy and methodology that offers a unique, strength-based approach to promoting organisational learning and positive organisational change. As a participatory approach, AI facilitates change from the ground up and lends itself to building effective partnerships or collaborations. This article reports the findings of a one-day workshop using an AI methodology to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance the FCC within a neonatal intensive care unit in Sydney, Australia. Participants (n = 15) developed collaborative insights of optimal FCC that can be built upon to support neonates and their families in the future. Shared visions were formed, strategies identified and a development plan made for ongoing collaborations and partnerships. AI provides a flexible framework that enables the mandatory collaboration needed to develop action plans that can form the catalyst for organizational change in health-care research and practice.

  7. Neonatal teeth.

    PubMed

    Kovac, J; Kovac, D

    2011-01-01

    Teeth that are present at birth are called natal teeth, and teeth that emerge through the gingiva during the first 4 weeks of life are called neonatal teeth. The incidence of the appearance of natal and neonatal teeth has been reported to be between once every 800 and once every 6000 births. Natal and neonatal teeth may be uncomfortable for a nursing mother and present a risk of aspiration and swallowing by the infant if they are loose. Also, they may cause irritation and trauma to the infant's soft tissues. Under these circumstances, natal and neonatal teeth need to be extracted. In this article, a case report of two neonatal teeth in a five week old girl is presented. The teeth were present in the mandibular incisor region and were excessively mobile and caused discomfort for the nursing mother. They were extracted because of the fear of aspiration (Fig. 4, Ref. 10).

  8. Recent Trends in Advance Directives at Nursing Home Admission and One Year after Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuley, William J.; Buchanan, Robert J.; Travis, Shirley S.; Wang, Suojin; Kim, MyungSuk

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Advance directives are important planning and decision-making tools for individuals in nursing homes. Design and Methods: By using the nursing facility Minimum Data Set, we examined the prevalence of advance directives at admission and 12 months post-admission. Results: The prevalence of having any advance directive at admission declined…

  9. Experiences of the advanced nurse practitioner role in acute care.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Alison; Cooper, Joanne; Goldberg, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the service evaluation presented in this article was to explore the multidisciplinary team's (MDT) experiences and perception of the advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) role on an acute health care of the older person ward. A qualitative case study was carried out comprising semi-structured interviews with members of the MDT, exploring their experiences of the ANP role. An overarching theme of 'Is it a nurse? Is it a doctor? No, it's an ANP' emerged from the data, with three subthemes: the missing link; facilitating and leading holistic care; and safe, high quality care. The ANP role is valued by the MDT working with them and provides a unique skill set that has the potential to enhance care of older patients living with frailty. While there are challenges to its introduction, it is a role worth introducing to older people's wards.

  10. Experiences of the advanced nurse practitioner role in acute care.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Alison; Cooper, Joanne; Goldberg, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the service evaluation presented in this article was to explore the multidisciplinary team's (MDT) experiences and perception of the advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) role on an acute health care of the older person ward. A qualitative case study was carried out comprising semi-structured interviews with members of the MDT, exploring their experiences of the ANP role. An overarching theme of 'Is it a nurse? Is it a doctor? No, it's an ANP' emerged from the data, with three subthemes: the missing link; facilitating and leading holistic care; and safe, high quality care. The ANP role is valued by the MDT working with them and provides a unique skill set that has the potential to enhance care of older patients living with frailty. While there are challenges to its introduction, it is a role worth introducing to older people's wards. PMID:27125941

  11. Recent advancements in understanding endogenous heart regeneration-insights from adult zebrafish and neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Nicole; Harrison, Michael R; Krainock, Michael; Kim, Richard; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2016-10-01

    Enhancing the endogenous regenerative capacity of the mammalian heart is a promising strategy that can lead to potential treatment of injured cardiac tissues. Studies on heart regeneration in zebrafish and neonatal mice have shown that cardiomyocyte proliferation is essential for replenishing myocardium. We will review recent advancements that have demonstrated the importance of Neuregulin 1/ErbB2 and innervation in regulating cardiomyocyte proliferation using both adult zebrafish and neonatal mouse heart regeneration models. Emerging findings suggest that different populations of macrophages and inflammation might contribute to regenerative versus fibrotic responses. Finally, we will discuss variation in the severity of the cardiac injury and size of the wound, which may explain the range of outcomes observed in different injury models.

  12. Advanced practice nursing in performing arts health care.

    PubMed

    Weslin, Anna T; Silva-Smith, Amy

    2010-06-01

    Performing arts medicine is a growing health care profession specializing in the needs of performing artists. As part of the performing arts venue, the dancer, a combination of athlete and artist, presents with unique health care needs requiring a more collaborative and holistic health care program. Currently there are relatively few advanced practice nurses (APNs) who specialize in performing arts health care. APNs, with focus on collaborative and holistic health care, are ideally suited to join other health care professionals in developing and implementing comprehensive health care programs for the performing artist. This article focuses on the dancer as the client in an APN practice that specializes in performing arts health care.

  13. Addressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nokes, Kathleen M.; Stein, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 23 advanced practice nursing programs showed only 3 had HIV-specific graduate-level nursing courses. Recommendations were made for HIV-specific courses, integration of HIV content into other courses, use of Centers for Disease Control and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, and subspecialties in HIV nursing. (SK)

  14. 78 FR 54255 - HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... Education Nursing Traineeship Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS... Education Nursing Traineeship (AENT) program. Effective fiscal year (FY) 2014, AENT support for part-time... practitioners and nurse midwives. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joan Wasserman, DrPH, RN, Advanced...

  15. Nurses' and Parents' Perceptions of Parental Guidance on Using Nonpharmacological Pain-Relieving Methods Among Neonates in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Pölkki, Tarja; Laukkala, Helena; Korhonen, Anne

    2016-08-01

    Despite growing knowledge of parents' important role in their infants' pain management, the extent to which nurses in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) provide guidance to parents on nonpharmacological methods is unclear. This study aimed to describe and compare the perceptions of parental guidance in using nonpharmacological pain-relieving methods among neonates in NICUs from the viewpoints of nurses and parents, and to examine the participants' demographics related to the guidance. A cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study using questionnaire surveys was conducted. Eight NICUs of 5 university hospitals in Finland. A total of 427 participants, including 294 nurses and 178 parents. The participants indicated that the methods of touching and holding were the most commonly introduced strategies in infants' pain alleviation, as they were given as an alternative "nearly always/always" (nurses 91%, 87% and parents 61%, 58%, respectively). In contrast, music and breast-feeding were the less commonly introduced nonpharmacological methods (nurses 11%, 6% and parents 1%, 6%, respectively). A significant difference (p < .001) was found between the parents' and nurses' perceptions of parental guidance; nurses reported providing more guidance about all nonpharmacological methods compared with parents. In addition, many demographic factors of the nurses, the parents, and their infants were related to the parental guidance. Our findings indicate that parental guidance should not be based on nurses' evaluations of their activities without taking into account parents' perspectives. When counseling parents to use nonpharmacological methods, neonatal nurses should actively interact with families and discuss parents' individual needs. PMID:27287760

  16. A protocol for the use of amorphous hydrogel to support wound healing in neonatal patients: an adjunct to nursing skin care.

    PubMed

    Cisler-Cahill, Lorna

    2006-01-01

    The care registered nurses offer makes a critical difference in the quality and cost-effectiveness of patient outcomes. The prevention and treatment of alterations in skin integrity remain primary nurse-sensitive quality indicators. Although wound prevention is a primary goal for nurses, iatrogenic wounds do occur. Neonatal patients are at greater risk for alterations in skin integrity because of the fragile nature of their skin. When skin breakdown occurs, nurses must have knowledge of effective treatment alternatives. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of a collaborative practice protocol to introduce and document patient outcomes with the use of amorphous hydrogel as a treatment modality for iatrogenic neonatal wounds. All hospitals collect data on the quality of patient care, and it has been known for some time that registered nurses can make a critical difference in the quality of patient care and the effectiveness of patient outcomes. The American Nurses Association has identified ten specific quality measures that are impacted by nursing care. Referred to as nurse-sensitive quality indicators, these measures include the maintenance of skin integrity. PMID:16913237

  17. Professional excellence and career advancement in nursing: a conceptual framework for clinical leadership development.

    PubMed

    Adeniran, Rita Kudirat; Bhattacharya, Anand; Adeniran, Anthony A

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, stakeholders in the health care community are recognizing nursing as key to solving the nation's health care issues. This acknowledgment provides a unique opportunity for nursing to demonstrate leadership by developing clinical nurse leaders to collaborate with the multidisciplinary care team in driving evidence-based, safe quality, cost-effective health care services. One approach for nursing success is standardizing the entry-level education for nurses and developing a uniform professional development and career advancement trajectory with appropriate incentives to encourage participation. A framework to guide and provide scientific evidence of how frontline nurses can be engaged will be paramount. The model for professional excellence and career advancement provides a framework that offers a clear path for researchers to examine variables influencing nurses' professional development and career advancement in a systematic manner. Professional Excellence and Career Advancement in Nursing underscores professional preparedness of a registered nurse as central to leadership development. It also describes the elements that influence nurses' participation in professional development and career advancement under 4 main categories emphasizing mentorship and self-efficacy as essential variables.

  18. Effectiveness of Advanced Illness Care Teams for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Dennis G.; Toseland, Ronald W.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of advanced illness care teams (AICTs) for nursing home residents with advanced dementia. The AICTs used a holistic approach that focused on four domains: (1) medical, (2) meaningful activities, (3) psychological, and (4) behavioral. The authors recruited 118 residents in two nursing homes for this study and…

  19. Social justice considerations in neonatal care for nurse managers and executives.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Linda; Walden, Marlene; Verklan, M Terese

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the struggle between social justice and market justice within the current health care system, specifically issues affecting neonatal care. Community benefit is described and discussed as an aspect of social justice demonstrated by hospitals. The federal and state Children's Health Insurance Program also is discussed in relation to social justice and health care costs. Implications for managers and executives overseeing neonatal care are presented in relation to the economic and social issues.

  20. Education of Advanced Practice Nurses Serving Vulnerable Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vezeau, Toni M.; Peterson, Jane W.; Nakao, Constance; Ersek, Mary

    1998-01-01

    The master's of science in nursing curriculum at Seattle University leads to the designation Community Health Clinical Nurse Specialist. The School of Nursing's goal is to educate leaders in nursing who advocate for those least able to speak for themselves and least able to access resources available to the majority of people. (Author/JOW)

  1. Emerging areas of science: Recommendations for Nursing Science Education from the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science Idea Festival.

    PubMed

    Henly, Susan J; McCarthy, Donna O; Wyman, Jean F; Heitkemper, Margaret M; Redeker, Nancy S; Titler, Marita G; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Stone, Patricia W; Moore, Shirley M; Alt-White, Anna C; Conley, Yvette P; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science aims to "facilitate and recognize life-long nursing science career development" as an important part of its mission. In light of fast-paced advances in science and technology that are inspiring new questions and methods of investigation in the health sciences, the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science convened the Idea Festival for Nursing Science Education and appointed the Idea Festival Advisory Committee (IFAC) to stimulate dialogue about linking PhD education with a renewed vision for preparation of the next generation of nursing scientists. Building on the 2005 National Research Council report Advancing The Nation's Health Needs and the 2010 American Association of Colleges of Nursing Position Statement on the Research-Focused Doctorate Pathways to Excellence, the IFAC specifically addressed the capacity of PhD programs to prepare nursing scientists to conduct cutting-edge research in the following key emerging and priority areas of health sciences research: omics and the microbiome; health behavior, behavior change, and biobehavioral science; patient-reported outcomes; big data, e-science, and informatics; quantitative sciences; translation science; and health economics. The purpose of this article is to (a) describe IFAC activities, (b) summarize 2014 discussions hosted as part of the Idea Festival, and (c) present IFAC recommendations for incorporating these emerging areas of science and technology into research-focused doctoral programs committed to preparing graduates for lifelong, competitive careers in nursing science. The recommendations address clearer articulation of program focus areas; inclusion of foundational knowledge in emerging areas of science in core courses on nursing science and research methods; faculty composition; prerequisite student knowledge and skills; and in-depth, interdisciplinary training in supporting area of science content and methods. PMID:26187079

  2. Emerging areas of science: Recommendations for Nursing Science Education from the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science Idea Festival.

    PubMed

    Henly, Susan J; McCarthy, Donna O; Wyman, Jean F; Heitkemper, Margaret M; Redeker, Nancy S; Titler, Marita G; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Stone, Patricia W; Moore, Shirley M; Alt-White, Anna C; Conley, Yvette P; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science aims to "facilitate and recognize life-long nursing science career development" as an important part of its mission. In light of fast-paced advances in science and technology that are inspiring new questions and methods of investigation in the health sciences, the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science convened the Idea Festival for Nursing Science Education and appointed the Idea Festival Advisory Committee (IFAC) to stimulate dialogue about linking PhD education with a renewed vision for preparation of the next generation of nursing scientists. Building on the 2005 National Research Council report Advancing The Nation's Health Needs and the 2010 American Association of Colleges of Nursing Position Statement on the Research-Focused Doctorate Pathways to Excellence, the IFAC specifically addressed the capacity of PhD programs to prepare nursing scientists to conduct cutting-edge research in the following key emerging and priority areas of health sciences research: omics and the microbiome; health behavior, behavior change, and biobehavioral science; patient-reported outcomes; big data, e-science, and informatics; quantitative sciences; translation science; and health economics. The purpose of this article is to (a) describe IFAC activities, (b) summarize 2014 discussions hosted as part of the Idea Festival, and (c) present IFAC recommendations for incorporating these emerging areas of science and technology into research-focused doctoral programs committed to preparing graduates for lifelong, competitive careers in nursing science. The recommendations address clearer articulation of program focus areas; inclusion of foundational knowledge in emerging areas of science in core courses on nursing science and research methods; faculty composition; prerequisite student knowledge and skills; and in-depth, interdisciplinary training in supporting area of science content and methods.

  3. 'Something normal in a very, very abnormal environment'--Nursing work to honour the life of dying infants and children in neonatal and paediatric intensive care in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Melissa J; Endacott, Ruth; Copnell, Beverley; O'Connor, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    The majority of deaths of children and infants occur in paediatric and neonatal intensive care settings. For nurses, managing an infant/child's deterioration and death can be very challenging. Nurses play a vital role in how the death occurs, how families are supported leading up to and after the infant/child's death. This paper describes the nurses' endeavours to create normality amidst the sadness and grief of the death of a child in paediatric and neonatal ICU. Focus groups and individual interviews with registered nurses from NICU and PICU settings gathered data on how neonatal and paediatric intensive care nurses care for families when a child dies and how they perceived their ability and preparedness to provide family care. Four themes emerged from thematic analysis: (1) respecting the child as a person; (2) creating opportunities for family involvement/connection; (3) collecting mementos; and (4) planning for death. Many of the activities described in this study empowered parents to participate in the care of their child as death approached. Further work is required to ensure these principles are translated into practice.

  4. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction in Advanced Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Hants; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Tanabe, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss how advanced practice nurses (APNs) can incorporate mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) as a nonpharmacologic clinical tool in their practice. Over the last 30 years, patients and providers have increasingly used complementary and holistic therapies for the nonpharmacologic management of acute and chronic diseases. Mindfulness-based interventions, specifically MBSR, have been tested and applied within a variety of patient populations. There is strong evidence to support that the use of MBSR can improve a range of biological and psychological outcomes in a variety of medical illnesses, including acute and chronic pain, hypertension, and disease prevention. This article will review the many ways APNs can incorporate MBSR approaches for health promotion and disease/symptom management into their practice. We conclude with a discussion of how nurses can obtain training and certification in MBSR. Given the significant and growing literature supporting the use of MBSR in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease, increased attention on how APNs can incorporate MBSR into clinical practice is necessary. PMID:25673578

  5. Accelerating the Global Workforce Demand for Nurse Informaticians: Advanced Health Informatics Certification (AHIC).

    PubMed

    Gadd, Cynthia; Delaney, Connie W; de Fátima Marin, Heimar; Greenwood, Karen; Williamson, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    Advances in professional recognition of nursing informatics vary by country but examples exist of training programs moving from curriculum-based education to competency based frameworks to produce highly skilled nursing informaticians. This panel will discuss a significant credentialing project in the United States that should further enhance professional recognition of highly skilled nurses matriculating from NI programs as well as nurses functioning in positions where informatics-induced transformation is occurring. The panel will discuss the professionalization of health informatics by describing core content, training requirements, education needs, and administrative framework applicable for the creation of an Advanced Health Informatics Certification (AHIC). PMID:27332309

  6. Quality Nursing Care for Hospitalized Patients with Advanced Illness: Concept Development

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Shigeko; Baggs, Judith G.; Knafl, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of nursing care as perceived by hospitalized patients with advanced illness has not been examined. A concept of quality nursing care for this population was developed by integrating the literature on constructs defining quality nursing care with empirical findings from interviews of 16 patients with advanced illness. Quality nursing care was characterized as competence and personal caring supported by professionalism and delivered with an appropriate demeanor. Although the attributes of competence, caring, professionalism, and demeanor were identified as common components of quality care across various patient populations, the caring domain increased in importance when patients with advanced illness perceived themselves as vulnerable. Assessment of quality nursing care for patients with advanced illness needs to include measures of patient perceptions of vulnerability. PMID:20572095

  7. Emergency Department Mental Health Triage and Consultancy Service: an advanced practice role for mental health nurses.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Stuart; Wynaden, Dianne; Finn, Michael; McGowan, Sunita; Chapman, Rose; Gray, Shirilee

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes a four-month preparatory training program for mental health nurses to provide an Emergency Mental Health Triage and Consultancy Service in the emergency department. The emergency department is an important gateway for patients presenting with psychiatric/psychosocial problems and mental health professionals need to provide prompt and effective care to this group of patients. Prior to the implementation of the service, it was acknowledged that occupational stress and burnout could affect the turnover of mental health nurses in the department. Therefore, a training program was employed to prepare a number of experienced mental health nurses to work at an advanced practitioner level. The four-month training program developed at Fremantle Hospital in Western Australia provided support, guidance and clinical supervision. In the first 12 months of the service, five mental health nurses completed the program, thus creating a pool of nurses who were able to provide the service. The results demonstrated that providing mental health nurses with a structured program was instrumental in facilitating their movement to an advanced practitioner level. The nurses were able to apply advanced knowledge and skills to assess and manage clients with complex mental health /psychosocial problems. Furthermore, on leaving the emergency department these nurses were able to utilise the advanced skills in other areas of mental health nursing practice.

  8. Development and Implementation of the Advanced Practice Nurse Worldwide With an Interest in Geriatric Care.

    PubMed

    Fougère, Bertrand; Morley, John E; Decavel, Frédérique; Nourhashémi, Fati; Abele, Patricia; Resnick, Barbara; Rantz, Marilyn; Lai, Claudia Kam Yuk; Moyle, Wendy; Pédra, Maryse; Chicoulaa, Bruno; Escourrou, Emile; Oustric, Stéphane; Vellas, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Many countries are seeking to improve health care delivery by reviewing the roles of health professionals, including nurses. Developing new and more advanced roles for nurses could improve access to care in the face of a limited or diminishing supply of doctors and growing health care demand. The development of new nursing roles varies greatly from country to country. The United States and Canada established "nurse practitioners" (NPs) in the mid-1960s. The United Kingdom and Finland also have a long experience in using different forms of collaboration between doctors and nurses. In other countries, such as Australia, NPs were endorsed more recently in 2000. In France, Belgium, or Singapore, the formal recognition of advanced practice nurses is still in its infancy, whereas in other countries, such as Japan or China, advanced practice nurses are not licensed titles. The aims of this article were to define precisely what is meant by the term "advanced practice nurse (APN)," describe the state of development of APN roles, and review the main factors motivating the implementation of APN in different countries. Then, we examine the main factors that have hindered the development of APN roles. Finally, we explain the need for advanced practice roles in geriatrics. PMID:27321868

  9. Development and Implementation of the Advanced Practice Nurse Worldwide With an Interest in Geriatric Care.

    PubMed

    Fougère, Bertrand; Morley, John E; Decavel, Frédérique; Nourhashémi, Fati; Abele, Patricia; Resnick, Barbara; Rantz, Marilyn; Lai, Claudia Kam Yuk; Moyle, Wendy; Pédra, Maryse; Chicoulaa, Bruno; Escourrou, Emile; Oustric, Stéphane; Vellas, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Many countries are seeking to improve health care delivery by reviewing the roles of health professionals, including nurses. Developing new and more advanced roles for nurses could improve access to care in the face of a limited or diminishing supply of doctors and growing health care demand. The development of new nursing roles varies greatly from country to country. The United States and Canada established "nurse practitioners" (NPs) in the mid-1960s. The United Kingdom and Finland also have a long experience in using different forms of collaboration between doctors and nurses. In other countries, such as Australia, NPs were endorsed more recently in 2000. In France, Belgium, or Singapore, the formal recognition of advanced practice nurses is still in its infancy, whereas in other countries, such as Japan or China, advanced practice nurses are not licensed titles. The aims of this article were to define precisely what is meant by the term "advanced practice nurse (APN)," describe the state of development of APN roles, and review the main factors motivating the implementation of APN in different countries. Then, we examine the main factors that have hindered the development of APN roles. Finally, we explain the need for advanced practice roles in geriatrics.

  10. Advanced practice role characteristics of the community/public health nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Julie Fisher; Baldwin, Karen Brandt

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the advanced practice role of nurses with master's degrees in community/public health nursing using their experiences and perspectives. The purposive sample consisted of 10 nurses who had master's degrees in community/public health nursing and were working in a variety of community health settings. Data were collected using audiotaped interviews and 1-day observations of study participants in their workplaces. An editing analysis technique was used to analyze the data. Findings indicated that role characteristics included advocacy and policy setting at the organizational, community, and state levels; a leadership style centered on empowerment; a broad sphere of influence; and high-level skills in large-scale program planning, project management, and building partnerships. Results provide important descriptive data about significant aspects of the advanced practice role of nurses with master's degrees in community/public health nursing.

  11. Family support and family-centered care in the neonatal intensive care unit: origins, advances, impact.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Judith S; Cooper, Liza G; Blaine, Arianna I; Franck, Linda S; Howse, Jennifer L; Berns, Scott D

    2011-02-01

    Family-centered care (FCC) has been increasingly emphasized as an important and necessary element of neonatal intensive care. FCC is conceptualized as a philosophy with a set of guiding principles, as well as a cohort of programs, services, and practices that many hospitals have embraced. Several factors drive the pressing need for family-centered care and support of families of infants in NICUs, including the increase in the number of infants in NICUs; growth in diversity of the population and their concurrent needs; identification of parental and familial stress and lack of parenting confidence; and gaps in support for families, as identified by parents and NICU staff. We explore the origins of and advances in FCC in the NICU and identify various delivery methods and aspects of FCC and family support in the NICU. We examine the research and available evidence supporting FCC in the NICU and offer recommendations for increased dissemination and for future study.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of a WOC Advanced Practice Nurse in the Acute Care and Outpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of advanced practice nurses who practice within the WOC specialty are challenged by the need to justify their role by demonstrating clinical and fiscal benefits to the employing agency. This View From Here column describes the steps I took while completing such an analysis for a position for a nurse practitioner with WOC certification in upstate New York. PMID:24918767

  13. [Advanced nursing practice: a must for the quality of care and mental health services].

    PubMed

    Ricard, Nicole; Page, Claire; Laflamme, France

    2014-01-01

    New professional legislation and reorganization of mental health services have had a significant influence on mental health nursing practice. Many nurses have demonstrated clinical leadership and have been able to adapt their services to the needs of the population specially in the primary health care setting. However, many believe that the role of nurses is not sufficiently known and optimally utilized in mental health services. In this article we take a critical look at the mental health nursing practice in Quebec and at the essential requirements for its development. This review aims to: 1) describe current trends in the changing roles and the modernization of mental health nursing practice in Quebec, 2) provide an overview of the development of advanced nursing practice and its impact on the quality of mental health services; 3) clarify the concept of advanced nursing practice and position its development in Quebec and 4) propose various strategies for optimizing the role of nurses and their complementarity with other professionals providing mental health services. This review presents innovative practices developed by nurses in the context of the restructuring of mental health services. For example, new nursing roles have been developed to improve the collaboration with general practitioners groups in primary care settings and facilitate the evaluation and monitoring of patient presenting medical and psychological problems. Another interesting innovation was set up by nurses in developing a new service to allow timely access to integrated care for patients with substance abuse and mental health problems. The various testimonies reported in this article illustrate the potential contribution of these nursing innovations in improving the mental health services in Quebec. Also, in few countries, the reform of mental health services has been a good time to recognize this potential. Thus, some countries have repositioned the role of mental health nurses and

  14. [Advanced nursing practice: a must for the quality of care and mental health services].

    PubMed

    Ricard, Nicole; Page, Claire; Laflamme, France

    2014-01-01

    New professional legislation and reorganization of mental health services have had a significant influence on mental health nursing practice. Many nurses have demonstrated clinical leadership and have been able to adapt their services to the needs of the population specially in the primary health care setting. However, many believe that the role of nurses is not sufficiently known and optimally utilized in mental health services. In this article we take a critical look at the mental health nursing practice in Quebec and at the essential requirements for its development. This review aims to: 1) describe current trends in the changing roles and the modernization of mental health nursing practice in Quebec, 2) provide an overview of the development of advanced nursing practice and its impact on the quality of mental health services; 3) clarify the concept of advanced nursing practice and position its development in Quebec and 4) propose various strategies for optimizing the role of nurses and their complementarity with other professionals providing mental health services. This review presents innovative practices developed by nurses in the context of the restructuring of mental health services. For example, new nursing roles have been developed to improve the collaboration with general practitioners groups in primary care settings and facilitate the evaluation and monitoring of patient presenting medical and psychological problems. Another interesting innovation was set up by nurses in developing a new service to allow timely access to integrated care for patients with substance abuse and mental health problems. The various testimonies reported in this article illustrate the potential contribution of these nursing innovations in improving the mental health services in Quebec. Also, in few countries, the reform of mental health services has been a good time to recognize this potential. Thus, some countries have repositioned the role of mental health nurses and

  15. The 2015 NASN School Nurse Survey: Developing and Providing Leadership to Advance School Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Mangena, Anantha Sameera; Maughan, Erin

    2015-11-01

    This article summarizes the results of the 2015 NASN School Nurse Survey, identifies similarities and differences between this survey and the 2013 NASN School Nurse Survey, and evaluates the possible impacts of this data on the organization. PMID:26515570

  16. Gerontological nursing leadership in the Advancing Excellence Campaign: moving interdisciplinary collaboration forward.

    PubMed

    Bakerjian, Debra; Beverly, Claudia; Burger, Sarah Greene; Carter, Diane; Dornberger, Sherrie; Eliopoulos, Charlotte; Remsburg, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Nursing was not a part of the coalition of multiple nursing home stakeholders at the roll out of the Advancing Excellence Campaign (AEC). In January 2007, several nurse organizations proactively approached the AEC leadership, were welcomed and immediately began to volunteer for leadership positions such as committee chairs and conference coordinators. This paper presents an exemplar of how a proactive stance, even when not initially included, allowed nurses to secure chairs at the decision making table of this quality campaign and contribute to improved resident outcomes.

  17. An exemplar for evidence-based nursing practice using the Magnet(®) model as the framework for change: oral feeding practice in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Sables-Baus, Sharon; Zuk, Jeannie

    2012-10-01

    Implementation of research evidence into practice can be challenging in areas such as the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), where the environment is complex and rapidly changing and caregiving goals have shifted from simply infant survival to supporting positive long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. Clinical nurse specialists (CNS) are ideally positioned to use research to obtain new knowledge, innovations, and improvements in care as part of an interdisciplinary team. The authors describe the role of the CNS in changing NICU culture around feeding infants, an important and frequent nursing activity, with the Magnet(®) model as the framework for change.

  18. [Necessary changes for advancing nursing as caring science].

    PubMed

    de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires

    2013-09-01

    The article aimed to reflect upon the challenges involved in strengthening Nursing as a caring science. It is founded on the sociological theory, connecting three approaches: the historical-dialectic materialism perspective about the working process in health care and nursing; the sociology of professions from a critical perspective; and the philosophy of science. The discussion is organized considering the aspects of Nursing as a discipline, work and health care profession. It sustains that knowledge production should be driven both by the purpose of Nursing work which is providing care to human beings with health needs and to advocate for the indispensable work conditions to a safe and responsible practice. It concludes that to strengthening Nursing it is necessary to produce knowledge to support nursing care and the political actions defending safe work conditions, the universal right to health as well safe and high quality care. PMID:24092308

  19. Advancing Nursing Informatics in the Next Decade: Recommendations from an International Survey.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Maxim; Ronquillo, Charlene; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Badger, Martha K; Ali, Samira; Lewis, Adrienne; Georgsson, Mattias; Jeon, Eunjoo; Tayaben, Jude L; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Islam, Tasneem; Sommer, Janine; Jung, Hyunggu; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Alhuwail, Dari

    2016-01-01

    In the summer of 2015, the International Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA NISIG) Student Working Group developed and distributed an international survey of current and future trends in nursing informatics. The survey was developed based on current literature on nursing informatics trends and translated into six languages. Respondents were from 31 different countries in Asia, Africa, North and Central America, South America, Europe, and Australia. This paper presents the results of responses to the survey question: "What should be done (at a country or organizational level) to advance nursing informatics in the next 5-10 years?" (n responders = 272). Using thematic qualitative analysis, responses were grouped into five key themes: 1) Education and training; 2) Research; 3) Practice; 4) Visibility; and 5) Collaboration and integration. We also provide actionable recommendations for advancing nursing informatics in the next decade.

  20. Advancing Nursing Informatics in the Next Decade: Recommendations from an International Survey.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Maxim; Ronquillo, Charlene; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Badger, Martha K; Ali, Samira; Lewis, Adrienne; Georgsson, Mattias; Jeon, Eunjoo; Tayaben, Jude L; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Islam, Tasneem; Sommer, Janine; Jung, Hyunggu; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Alhuwail, Dari

    2016-01-01

    In the summer of 2015, the International Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA NISIG) Student Working Group developed and distributed an international survey of current and future trends in nursing informatics. The survey was developed based on current literature on nursing informatics trends and translated into six languages. Respondents were from 31 different countries in Asia, Africa, North and Central America, South America, Europe, and Australia. This paper presents the results of responses to the survey question: "What should be done (at a country or organizational level) to advance nursing informatics in the next 5-10 years?" (n responders = 272). Using thematic qualitative analysis, responses were grouped into five key themes: 1) Education and training; 2) Research; 3) Practice; 4) Visibility; and 5) Collaboration and integration. We also provide actionable recommendations for advancing nursing informatics in the next decade. PMID:27332175

  1. Preserving the Art and Science of Psychotherapy for Advance Practice Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses.

    PubMed

    Caughill, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric Mental Health (PMH) Nurses are challenged to maintain the viability of their roles in today's healthcare climate as advances in research and complexity of mental healthcare needs of society continue to unfold. Today's mental health practice environment includes disciplines with marketable credentials. Roles for PMH nurses in recent decades are less clearly defined than for other disciplines, much of this related to changes in educational and practice settings. This article reviews literature on the topic of psychotherapy and a call for a renewed emphasis on this mode of treatment for psychiatric mental health advance practice nurses.

  2. Advanced Practice Nursing Committee on Process Improvement in Trauma: An Innovative Application of the Strong Model.

    PubMed

    West, Sarah Katherine

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to summarize the successes and future implications for a nurse practitioner-driven committee on process improvement in trauma. The trauma nurse practitioner is uniquely positioned to recognize the need for clinical process improvement and enact change within the clinical setting. Application of the Strong Model of Advanced Practice proves to actively engage the trauma nurse practitioner in process improvement initiatives. Through enhancing nurse practitioner professional engagement, the committee aims to improve health care delivery to the traumatically injured patient. A retrospective review of the committee's first year reveals trauma nurse practitioner success in the domains of direct comprehensive care, support of systems, education, and leadership. The need for increased trauma nurse practitioner involvement has been identified for the domains of research and publication.

  3. Successfully incorporating Writing Across the Curriculum with advanced writing in nursing.

    PubMed

    Luthy, Karlen E; Peterson, Neil E; Lassetter, Jane H; Callister, Lynn C

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain the concepts of Writing Across the Curriculum, Writing in the Disciplines, and Writing to Learn, and to describe the incorporation of advanced writing into a baccalaureate nursing program and provide suggestions for accessing resources and promoting success. The goals of incorporating Writing Across the Curriculum, Writing in the Disciplines, and Writing to Learn concepts into nursing curriculum are to assist nursing students to achieve competence in clinically relevant writing assignments; to demonstrate critical thinking and communication skills, both oral and written; to execute useful literature searches; to read and understand research reports; and to encourage the incorporation of evidence into clinical practice. With a strong and established writing foundation, nursing students will be more successful in written and oral communication during their nursing program and throughout their nursing career.

  4. Advanced Practice Nursing Committee on Process Improvement in Trauma: An Innovative Application of the Strong Model.

    PubMed

    West, Sarah Katherine

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to summarize the successes and future implications for a nurse practitioner-driven committee on process improvement in trauma. The trauma nurse practitioner is uniquely positioned to recognize the need for clinical process improvement and enact change within the clinical setting. Application of the Strong Model of Advanced Practice proves to actively engage the trauma nurse practitioner in process improvement initiatives. Through enhancing nurse practitioner professional engagement, the committee aims to improve health care delivery to the traumatically injured patient. A retrospective review of the committee's first year reveals trauma nurse practitioner success in the domains of direct comprehensive care, support of systems, education, and leadership. The need for increased trauma nurse practitioner involvement has been identified for the domains of research and publication. PMID:27414145

  5. Advanced nursing apprenticeship program: a strategy for retention of experienced critical care nurses.

    PubMed

    Coleman, B

    1990-05-01

    Most hospitals are frantically planning recruitment strategies to attract new nurses for intensive care units. The direct cost associated with orientation of one of these nurses is estimated at greater than $2000, plus 6 months' to 1 year's salary per nurse. An interim strategy of using registered nurses to fill a full-time position for 1 year can cost upwards of $75,000 a year. Germane to the acclimatization of these nurses to the intensive care unit is the nurturing role of experienced nurses during the orientation and in assuring continuity of high-quality patient care. By virtue of their position, experienced nurses also model leadership behavior, and they are exposed to many day-to-day stresses that may leave them frustrated and feeling a lack of accomplishment. These factors, coupled with the scarcity of educational opportunities designed specifically for experienced nurses and a perceived absence of challenges, can lead to burnout. In this article I will describe an innovation in practice that uses the clinical nurse specialist role to stimulate and challenge experienced nurses. The program taught, supported, and nurtured unit-based change initiated by experienced nurses.

  6. Reaching for the stars: career advancement and the registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kim

    2005-08-01

    Clinical nursing has long struggled to secure the place of primacy it deserves in the profession's hierarchy of importance and worth. It is ironic that, even at the beginning of the 21st century, a clinical nurse is generally not as well-recognized, rewarded or remunerated as a colleague working in nursing management, education or research. Until the profession recognizes and takes serious action to remedy this situation, the crisis of recruitment and retention in nursing currently ravaging the globe is likely to continue. In this paper, I present a discursive account of an exciting initiative by a leading private, acute-care hospital which addresses this very problem. A new ladder for clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) introduces a rigorous and systematic approach to the appointment of three classifications of CNS, each requiring evidence of successively higher levels of competency, and which are accompanied by fiscal reward and stronger peer recognition. PMID:15985097

  7. Emergency nurse practitioners' perceptions of their role and scope of practice: is it advanced practice?

    PubMed

    McConnell, Donna; Slevin, Oliver D; McIlfatrick, Sonja J

    2013-04-01

    There are multiple interpretations of the nurse practitioner role which appear to be shaped by discourses within and outside the profession and its regulatory body. This study aimed to explore and clarify the role and scope of practice of emergency nurse practitioners in a region in the United Kingdom and determine if they fulfil the proposed criteria for Advanced Nurse Practitioners. A survey approach using questionnaires (n=42) was adopted. The sample included all emergency nurse practitioners working in Accident and Emergency Departments and Minor Injury Units in the region. Statistical data was analysed using SPSS for Windows and qualitative data was content analysed for themes. Results revealed a variation in education. Investigation of role typology and scope of practice revealed a relatively homogenous group where the clinical aspect of the role dominated. The scope of practice was perceived to be influenced by internal factors such as competence; however protocol use, referral rights and prescribing authority could be considered ways that nursing management and medical staff indirectly control the role. Findings suggested that emergency nurse practitioners were working at a level significantly beyond registration, yet do not fulfil the Nursing and Midwifery Council proposed criteria for Advanced Nurse Practitioner. PMID:23615513

  8. The TriCouncil for Nursing: An Interorganizational Collaboration for Advancing the Profession.

    PubMed

    Bednash, Geraldine Polly

    2015-01-01

    The TriCouncil for Nursing is a coalition of 4 leading nursing organizations: the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the American Nurses Association, the American Organization of Nurse Executives, and the National League for Nursing. This informal, yet highly complex, collaboration has endeavored to advance the profession for almost 4 decades despite the inherent challenges in coalition formation and sustainment. Coalition building occurs when organizations seek the potential to advance common issues or protect individual resources or status, and by their very nature have the potential to fail. The history of the TriCouncil for Nursing provides evidence of the challenges associated with the process of developing consensus and the benefits of working to create consensus to achieve common goals. The commitment of the TriCouncil member organizations to sustain this coalition and find consensus across an array of challenging issues and in complex environments has created significant policy advances for the profession, which provides evidence of the benefits associated with this type of collaborative work. This coalition has continued despite the inherent challenges for organizations seeking consensus. The TriCouncil commitment to lead in advocacy for the profession and create significant policy to change health care models the value of this type of effort.

  9. Nurse anesthesia education in the new millennium: outcomes of a federally funded advanced nursing education grant.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M; Kost, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Graduate nursing education is evolving in response to multiple societal influences affecting higher education. Nurse anesthesia education has also been affected by these forces. This article describes the planning, implementation, and evaluation of a new graduate track in nurse anesthesia made possible by an academic partnership, and the positive impact that a federally funded grant had on the venture. The excellent academic outcomes, the changes in diversity of the student body, the innovative curriculum, and lessons learned from the project are described.

  10. Education and Advance Care Planning in Nursing Homes: The Impact of Ownership Type.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Leslie C.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 25 nonprofit and 87 for-profit nursing homes showed both types likely to offer education on advance care planning. However, nonprofits were more likely to have ongoing discussions that covered more than life support decisions and to have ethics committees to support advance care planning. (SK)

  11. Advancing the Digital Health Discourse for Nurse Leaders.

    PubMed

    Remus, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Limited informatics competency uptake is a recognized nursing leadership challenge impacting digital practice settings. The health system's inability to reap the promised benefits of EHRs is a manifestation of inadequate development of informatics competencies by chief nurse executives (CNEs) and other clinicians. Through the application of Transformational Leadership Theory (TL), this discussion paper explains how informatics competencies enable CNEs to become transformational nursing leaders in digital health allowing them to meet their accountabilities to lead integrated, high-quality care delivery through evidence based practices (EBPs). It is proposed that successful CNE eHealth sponsors will be those armed with informatics competencies who can drive health organizations' investment in technology and innovation. Finally, some considerations are suggested in how nurse informaticists globally play a critical role in preparing our existing and future CNEs to fulfill their transformational leader roles in the digital age. PMID:27332233

  12. Penn Macy initiative to advance academic nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Lang, Norma M; Evans, Lois K; Swan, Beth Ann

    2002-01-01

    Academic nursing practice holds great promise for the future of the nursing discipline. The successful and intentional integration of the tripartite mission of research, education, and clinical practice can facilitate both the evolution of the science and implementation of evidence-based practice, while imbuing practitioners in the making with the world of the possible. Although many schools of nursing have been involved in some aspects of academic practice, the lack of common focus and direction has hampered concerted movement. The Penn Macy Initiative was conceived as a vehicle to help build and coalesce the critical mass needed to bridge this gap. The Penn Macy Initiative, its implementation and experience in the first 3 years, and how its alumni fellows, an annual conference, and Web-based consultation will continue to provide impetus, leadership, and resources for academic nursing practice in the years to come are described.

  13. [Brazilian technological output in the area of nursing: advances and challenges].

    PubMed

    Koerich, Micheline Henrique Araujo da Luz; Vieira, Raquel Heloisa Guedes; Silva, Daniela Eda; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Meirelles, Betina Horner Shlindwein

    2011-12-01

    This article aims to analyze the patents registered in the nursing area, since these patents may be used as an indicator of the technological development in the area. It presents and discusses national technological productions, tracked through the "nursing" keyword, patented in the period from 1990-2009. This is a retrospective documental research, using, as a source, data from the National Industrial Property Institute (INPI). The information gathered is discussed in relation to the appropriation of the technologies, the incentive to develop them and register them as a source of knowledge in the nursing field, aiming the practice of care. Light and light hard technology productions are increasing in the nursing field. However, these are not registered and patented. The technological advance in the nursing field is emergent and needs policies for its development.

  14. Advancing the science of research in nursing education: contributions of the critical decision method.

    PubMed

    McNelis, Angela M; Ironside, Pamela M; Zvonar, Sarah E; Ebright, Patricia R

    2014-02-01

    Advancing the science of nursing education will require the discipline to conduct research that investigates complex phenomena, such as students' clinical thinking and decision-making skills, using multiple methods. The research methods developed in other disciplines can provide nursing education researchers with new ways to investigate clinical teaching and learning in nursing. The critical decision method (CDM), derived from psychology and human factors engineering, is a technique by which researchers elicit experts' thinking and the cognitive work informing decision making in the context of practice. This article describes how the CDM was adapted to study nursing students' situation awareness, cues for action, and pattern recognition during clinical experiences. The CDM is a promising method for investigators to use to conduct research in nursing education and to inform the design of clinical experiences to promote these critical abilities.

  15. Educating advanced practice nurses in using social media in rural health care.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Carolyn M; Renaud, Michelle; Shepherd, Laurel; Bordelon, Michele; Haney, Tina; Gregory, Donna; Ayers, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Health care in the United States is facing a crisis in providing access to quality care for those in underserved and rural regions. Advanced practice nurses are at the forefront of addressing such issues, through modalities such as health care technology. Many nursing education programs are seeking strategies for better educating students on technology utilization. Health care technology includes electronic health records, telemedicine, and clinical decision support systems. However, little focus has been placed on the role of social media in health care. This paper describes an educational workshop using standardized patients and hands-on experiences to introduce advanced practice nurses in a Doctor of Nursing Practice program to the role of social media in addressing issues inherent in the delivery of rural health care. The students explore innovative approaches for utilizing social media for patient and caregiver support as well as identify online resources that assist providers in a rural setting. PMID:22718665

  16. Primary healthcare NZ nurses' experiences of advance directives: understanding their potential role.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Raewyn; Banister, Elizabeth; de Vries, Kay

    2013-07-01

    Advance directives are one aspect of advance care planning designed to improve end of life care. The New Zealand Nurses Organisation released their first mission statement in 2010 concerning advance directives suggesting an increase in the use of these. A burgeoning older population, expected to rise over the next few years, places the primary healthcare nurse in a pivotal role to address the challenges in constructing advance directives. While literature supports the role for primary healthcare nurses in promoting advance directives, no research was found on this role in the New Zealand context. This paper presents results of a qualitative study conducted in New Zealand with 13 senior primary healthcare nurses with respect to their knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of advance directives. Results of the analysis revealed a dynamic process involving participants coming to understand their potential role in this area. This process included reflection on personal experience with advance directives; values and ethics related to end of life issues; and professional actions. PMID:24187807

  17. Using the Rx for Change tobacco curriculum in advanced practice nursing education.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Frances J; Heath, Janie; Crowell, Nancy

    2006-03-01

    In today's health care system driven by quality outcome indicators and performance care measures, it is essential for nurses to know how to intervene with tobacco-dependent patients. This article discusses pilot results from the "Rx for Change: Clinician Assisted Tobacco Cessation Curriculum" intervention conducted at Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies using advanced practice students. The results reveal that 6 hours of tobacco-cessation training can increase knowledge and self-efficiency scores. PMID:16546016

  18. Advances in neonatal extracorporeal support: the role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and the artificial placenta.

    PubMed

    Gray, Brian W; Shaffer, Andrew W; Mychaliska, George B

    2012-06-01

    This review addresses the history and evolution of neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), with a discussion of the indications, contraindications, modalities, outcomes, and impact of ECMO. Controversies surrounding novel uses of ECMO in neonates, namely ECMO for premature infants and ex utero intrapartum therapy with transition to ECMO, are discussed. The development of an extracorporeal artificial placenta for support of premature infants is presented, including the rationale, research, and challenges. ECMO has had a dramatic effect on the care of critically ill neonates over the past 4 decades, and there is great potential to expand these benefits in the future.

  19. The changing hope trajectory in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Judith Brown; Seda, Julie S; Kardinal, Carl G

    2012-06-01

    As patients with advanced-stage cancer move from the initial diagnosis through treatment, remission, recurrence, and advanced-stage disease, the hope trajectory undergoes a dynamic transformation. By identifying the hope trajectory, nurses can help patients focus on obtainable hope objects while balancing the need to present a realistic prognosis. This, in turn, may help patients find meaning and purpose in advanced-stage cancer and facilitate realistic hope when faced with a life-threatening illness.

  20. Advancing nursing leadership in long-term care.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jennifer; Ringland, Margaret; Wilson, Susan

    2010-05-01

    Nurses working in the long-term care (LTC) sector face unique workplace stresses, demands and circumstances. Designing approaches to leadership training and other supportive human-resource strategies that reflect the demands of the LTC setting fosters a positive work life for nurses by providing them with the skills and knowledge necessary to lead the care team and to address resident and family issues. Through the St. Joseph's Health Centre Guelph demonstration site project, funded by the Nursing Secretariat of Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, the Excelling as a Nurse Leader in Long Term Care training program and the Mentor Team program were developed to address these needs. Evaluation results show that not only have individual nurses benefitted from taking part in these programs, but also that the positive effects were felt in other parts of the LTC home (as reported by Directors of Care). By creating a generally healthier work environment, it is anticipated that these programs will also have a positive effect on recruitment and retention. PMID:20463447

  1. Advancing practice inquiry: research foundations of the practice doctorate in nursing.

    PubMed

    Magyary, Diane; Whitney, Joanne D; Brown, Marie Annette

    2006-01-01

    The University of Washington Doctor of Nursing Practice program entails 3 curricular dimensions: advanced practice, leadership, and practice inquiry. In this article, the practice inquiry dimension is discussed and defined as a type of clinical investigation that closely aligns with the realities and complexities of everyday practice by advanced practice nurses (APNs). The advancement of APNs' practice inquiry competencies is timely for its interfaces with the national scientific agenda's emphasis on translating science to clinical practice, health care delivery systems and policy. A framework for conceptualizing a practice inquiry curriculum and competencies is proposed. In addition, the divergent and convergent comparisons with Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) nursing programs are discussed, with emphasis placed on potential collaborative clinical research endeavors.

  2. Advanced practice in emergency care: the paediatric flow nurse.

    PubMed

    Gray, Constance; Hutch, Michelle; Christensen, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Children admitted to emergency departments (EDs) in Australia are often placed in an environment better suited to the treatment of adult patients. This can lead to problems because ED staff are unfamiliar with specialist paediatric care and children often find adult EDs frightening. The development of the paediatric flow nurse (PFN) role at Caboolture Hospital has meant children are treated and supported by a trained paediatric nurse and triaged and treated quickly and effectively. The PFN team collaborates with ED nursing and medical staff to start treating patients and to help move children from the ED to the paediatric emergency short stay unit or inpatient paediatric beds. Each week, the PFN team sees about 30-50 children, many of whom are cared for and discharged directly from the ED.

  3. Role of extrahepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1: Advances in understanding breast milk-induced neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ryoichi; Maruo, Yoshihiro; Chen, Shujuan; Tukey, Robert H

    2015-11-15

    Newborns commonly develop physiological hyperbilirubinemia (also known as jaundice). With increased bilirubin levels being observed in breast-fed infants, breast-feeding has been recognized as a contributing factor for the development of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Bilirubin undergoes selective metabolism by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 and becomes a water soluble glucuronide. Although several factors such as gestational age, dehydration and weight loss, and increased enterohepatic circulation have been associated with breast milk-induced jaundice (BMJ), deficiency in UGT1A1 expression is a known cause of BMJ. It is currently believed that unconjugated bilirubin is metabolized mainly in the liver. However, recent findings support the concept that extrahepatic tissues, such as small intestine and skin, contribute to bilirubin glucuronidation during the neonatal period. We will review the recent advances made towards understanding biological and molecular events impacting BMJ, especially regarding the role of extrahepatic UGT1A1 expression. PMID:26342858

  4. The mindful nurse leader: Advancing executive nurse leadership skills through participation in action learning.

    PubMed

    FitzPatrick, Kate; Doucette, Jeffrey N; Cotton, Amy; Arnow, Debra; Pipe, Teri

    2016-10-01

    In this second installment of a three-part series on mindfulness, we describe the process of producing video vignettes to illustrate how clinical nurses draw on the power of mindfulness to build their own resiliency while delivering compassionate care.

  5. Using Standardized Patients in Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vessey, Judith A.; Huss, Karen

    2002-01-01

    Graduating nurse practitioners (n=26) completed simulated clinical encounters with standardized patients. Their performance did not reflect their results on other clinical evaluations and national certifying examinations, suggesting that simulated encounters lack validity and reliability. They may be useful for formative learning. (Contains 38…

  6. Gerontology found me: gaining understanding of advanced practice nurses in geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Detrixhe, Dia D; Grassley, Jane S; Zeigler, Vicki L

    2013-10-01

    Examining the meanings of the experiences of advanced practice nurses (APNs) who chose to work with older adults and why they continue to work with this population was the focus of this hermeneutic qualitative research study. Twelve geriatric APNs currently practicing in two South Central states were interviewed using an open-ended interview guide. Using Gadamerian hermeneutics, the researchers identified Gerontology Found Me as the significant expression that reflected the fundamental meaning of the experience as a whole. Four themes emerged that further described the meanings of the participants' personal, educational, and professional experiences: Becoming a Gerontology Nurse, Being a Gerontology Nurse, Belonging to Gerontology, and Bringing Others to Gerontology. This study concluded that APNs' personal and professional experiences were more influential than educational experiences to become geriatric nurses, and having these personal and professional experiences of being in relationship with older individuals further contributed to their choice of gerontology.

  7. Implementing a prescribing practicum within a Master's degree in advanced nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Spence, Deb; Anderson, Maxine

    2007-11-01

    The recent introduction of Nurse Practitioner registration in New Zealand has resulted in the development of a number of Master's degree programmes in which students focus clinically and can complete a Nursing Council of New Zealand approved programme for prescribing. This article reports the implementation of a collaborative project undertaken to monitor and improve the effectiveness of the prescribing practicum papers delivered within two Master's degree programmes in advanced nursing practice. A developmental action research approach was used. Data were collected through interviews with practicum students, their medical supervisors and academic staff. Formative findings were progressively used to refine delivery of the practicum papers and a thematic analysis of summative findings identified areas for further improvement. The findings suggest that the processes being implemented are developing well. Further education is required to clearly differentiate medical and advanced nursing roles. Greater attention needs to be paid to the preparation of medical supervisors and, most significantly, revision of funding is required to more equitably support the ongoing development of nurses for advanced practice roles.

  8. Advanced practice nursing students in the patient-centered medical home: preparing for a new reality.

    PubMed

    Swartwout, Kathryn; Murphy, Marcia Pencak; Dreher, Melanie C; Behal, Raj; Haines, Alison; Ryan, Mary; Ryan, Norman; Saba, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Driven by reimbursement incentives for increased access, improved quality and reduced cost, the patient-centered medical home model of health care delivery is being adopted in primary care practices across the nation. The transition from traditional primary care models to patient-centered medical homes presents many challenges, including the assembly of a well-prepared, interprofessional provider team to achieve effective, well-coordinated care. In turn, advanced practice nursing education programs are challenged to prepare graduates who are qualified for practice in the new reality of health care reform. This article reviews the patient-centered medical home model and describes how one college of nursing joined 7 primary care physician practices to prepare advanced practice nursing students for the new realities of health care reform while supporting each practice in its transition to the patient-centered medical home. PMID:24720942

  9. Communicating with Patients Who Have Advanced Dementia: Training Nurse Aide Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Laura E.; Hutchinson, Susan R.; Skala-Cordes, Kristine K.

    2012-01-01

    The increase of dementia in older adults is changing how medical care is delivered. Recognizing symptoms of pain, managing behaviors, and providing quality of life for people who have advanced dementia requires a new skill set for caregivers. Researchers in this study targeted nurse aide students to test an educational module's effect on students'…

  10. A Qualitative Analysis of an Advanced Practice Nurse-Directed Transitional Care Model Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradway, Christine; Trotta, Rebecca; Bixby, M. Brian; McPartland, Ellen; Wollman, M. Catherine; Kapustka, Heidi; McCauley, Kathleen; Naylor, Mary D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe barriers and facilitators to implementing a transitional care intervention for cognitively impaired older adults and their caregivers lead by advanced practice nurses (APNs). Design and Methods: APNs implemented an evidence-based protocol to optimize transitions from hospital to home. An…

  11. The mindful nurse leader: Advancing executive nurse leadership skills through participation in action learning.

    PubMed

    FitzPatrick, Kate; Doucette, Jeffrey N; Cotton, Amy; Arnow, Debra; Pipe, Teri

    2016-10-01

    In this second installment of a three-part series on mindfulness, we describe the process of producing video vignettes to illustrate how clinical nurses draw on the power of mindfulness to build their own resiliency while delivering compassionate care. PMID:27683167

  12. Health Insurance Status and the Care of Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Goldfeld, Keith S.; Grabowski, David C.; Caudry, Daryl J.; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Nursing home residents with advanced dementia commonly experience burdensome and costly hospitalizations that may not extend survival or improve the quality of life. Fragmentation in health care has contributed to poor coordination of care for acutely ill nursing home residents. Objective To compare patterns of care and quality outcomes for nursing home residents with advanced dementia covered by managed care to those covered by traditional fee-for-service Medicare. Design The Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advanced Dementia at the End-of-Life (CASCADE) study was a prospective cohort study that followed 323 nursing home residents over eighteen months to better understand the course of advanced dementia at or near the end of life. CASCADE and Medicare data were linked to determine the health insurance status of study participants. Setting Twenty-two nursing homes in the Boston area. Participants Nursing home residents with advanced dementia and their health care proxies. Exposure The health insurance status of the resident, either managed care or traditional fee-for-service. Main Outcomes The outcomes included survival, symptoms related to comfort, treatment of pain and dyspnea, presence of pressure ulcers, presence of a DNH order, treatment for pneumonia, hospital transfer (hospitalization or emergency room visit) for an acute illness, hospice referral, primary care visits, and family satisfaction with care. Results Residents enrolled in managed care (n=133) were more likely to have do-not-hospitalize orders compared to those in traditional Medicare fee-for service (n=158) (64% vs. 51%, p-value < 0.05), were less likely to be transferred to the hospital for acute illness (4% vs. 16%, p-value < 0.05), had more primary care visits per 90 days (4.8±2.6 vs. 4.2±5.0, p-value < 0.05), and had more nurse practitioner visits (3.0±2.1 vs. 0.8±2.6, p-value < 0.05). Survival, comfort, and other treatment outcomes did not differ across groups

  13. Globalization and advances in information and communication technologies: the impact on nursing and health.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Patricia A; Coenen, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Globalization and information and communication technology (ICT) continue to change us and the world we live in. Nursing stands at an opportunity intersection where challenging global health issues, an international workforce shortage, and massive growth of ICT combine to create a very unique space for nursing leadership and nursing intervention. Learning from prior successes in the field can assist nurse leaders in planning and advancing strategies for global health using ICT. Attention to lessons learned will assist in combating the technological apartheid that is already present in many areas of the globe and will highlight opportunities for innovative applications in health. ICT has opened new channels of communication, creating the beginnings of a global information society that will facilitate access to isolated areas where health needs are extreme and where nursing can contribute significantly to the achievement of "Health for All." The purpose of this article is to discuss the relationships between globalization, health, and ICT, and to illuminate opportunities for nursing in this flattening and increasingly interconnected world. PMID:18922277

  14. Advanced practice nursing in Canada: overview of a decision support synthesis.

    PubMed

    DiCenso, Alba; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Bourgeault, Ivy; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Donald, Faith; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Harbman, Patricia; Carter, Nancy; Kioke, Sandra; Abelson, Julia; McKinlay, R James; Pasic, Dianna; Wasyluk, Brandi; Vohra, Julie; Charbonneau-Smith, Renee

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this decision support synthesis was to identify and review published and grey literature and to conduct stakeholder interviews to (1) describe the distinguishing characteristics of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) role definitions and competencies relevant to Canadian contexts, (2) identify the key barriers and facilitators for the effective development and utilization of CNS and NP roles and (3) inform the development of evidence-based recommendations for the individual, organizational and system supports required to better integrate CNS and NP roles into the Canadian healthcare system and advance the delivery of nursing and patient care services in Canada. Four types of advanced practice nurses (APNs) were the focus: CNSs, primary healthcare nurse practitioners (PHCNPs), acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) and a blended CNS/NP role. We worked with a multidisciplinary, multijurisdictional advisory board that helped identify documents and key informant interviewees, develop interview questions and formulate implications from our findings. We included 468 published and unpublished English- and French-language papers in a scoping review of the literature. We conducted interviews in English and French with 62 Canadian and international key informants (APNs, healthcare administrators, policy makers, nursing regulators, educators, physicians and other team members). We conducted four focus groups with a total of 19 APNs, educators, administrators and policy makers. A multidisciplinary roundtable convened by the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation formulated evidence-informed policy and practice recommendations based on the synthesis findings. This paper forms the foundation for this special issue, which contains 10 papers summarizing different dimensions of our synthesis. Here, we summarize the synthesis methods and the recommendations formulated at the roundtable.

  15. The consequences of using advanced physical assessment skills in medical and surgical nursing: A hermeneutic pragmatic study

    PubMed Central

    Zambas, Shelaine I.; Smythe, Elizabeth A.; Koziol-Mclain, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Aims and objectives The aim of this study was to explore the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills on medical and surgical wards. Background Appropriate, accurate, and timely assessment by nurses is the cornerstone of maintaining patient safety in hospitals. The inclusion of “advanced” physical assessment skills such as auscultation, palpation, and percussion is thought to better prepare nurses for complex patient presentations within a wide range of clinical situations. Design This qualitative study used a hermeneutic pragmatic approach. Method Unstructured interviews were conducted with five experienced medical and surgical nurses to obtain 13 detailed narratives of assessment practice. Narratives were analyzed using Van Manen's six-step approach to identify the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills. Results The consequences of using advanced assessment skills include looking for more, challenging interpretations, and perseverance. The use of advanced assessment skills directs what the nurse looks for, what she sees, interpretation of the findings, and her response. It is the interpretation of what is seen, heard, or felt within the full context of the patient situation, which is the advanced skill. Conclusion Advanced assessment skill is the means to an accurate interpretation of the clinical situation and contributes to appropriate diagnosis and medical management in complex patient situations. Relevance to clinical practice The nurse's use of advanced assessment skills enables her to contribute to diagnostic reasoning within the acute medical and surgical setting. PMID:27607193

  16. Current status of neonatal intensive care in India.

    PubMed

    Karthik Nagesh, N; Razak, Abdul

    2016-05-01

    Globally, newborn health is now considered as high-level national priority. The current neonatal and infant mortality rate in India is 29 per 1000 live births and 42 per 1000 live births, respectively. The last decade has seen a tremendous growth of neonatal intensive care in India. The proliferation of neonatal intensive care units, as also the infusion of newer technologies with availability of well-trained medical and nursing manpower, has led to good survival and intact outcomes. There is good care available for neonates whose parents can afford the high-end healthcare, but unfortunately, there is a deep divide and the poor rural population is still underserved with lack of even basic newborn care in few areas! There is increasing disparity where the 'well to do' and the 'increasingly affordable middle class' is able to get the most advanced care for their sick neonates. The underserved urban poor and those in rural areas still contribute to the overall high neonatal morbidity and mortality in India. The recent government initiative, the India Newborn Action Plan, is the step in the right direction to bridge this gap. A strong public-private partnership and prioritisation is needed to achieve this goal. This review highlights the current situation of neonatal intensive care in India with a suggested plan for the way forward to achieve better neonatal care. PMID:26944066

  17. Current status of neonatal intensive care in India.

    PubMed

    Karthik Nagesh, N; Razak, Abdul

    2016-05-01

    Globally, newborn health is now considered as high-level national priority. The current neonatal and infant mortality rate in India is 29 per 1000 live births and 42 per 1000 live births, respectively. The last decade has seen a tremendous growth of neonatal intensive care in India. The proliferation of neonatal intensive care units, as also the infusion of newer technologies with availability of well-trained medical and nursing manpower, has led to good survival and intact outcomes. There is good care available for neonates whose parents can afford the high-end healthcare, but unfortunately, there is a deep divide and the poor rural population is still underserved with lack of even basic newborn care in few areas! There is increasing disparity where the 'well to do' and the 'increasingly affordable middle class' is able to get the most advanced care for their sick neonates. The underserved urban poor and those in rural areas still contribute to the overall high neonatal morbidity and mortality in India. The recent government initiative, the India Newborn Action Plan, is the step in the right direction to bridge this gap. A strong public-private partnership and prioritisation is needed to achieve this goal. This review highlights the current situation of neonatal intensive care in India with a suggested plan for the way forward to achieve better neonatal care.

  18. Exploring the district nurse role in facilitating individualised advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Boot, Michelle

    2016-03-01

    Health-care policy recognises the importance of engaging people in making decisions related to the management of their health. Advance care planning (ACP) offers a framework for decision making on end-of-life care. There are positive indicators that ACP enables health professionals to meet people's preferences. However, there are reports of insensitive attempts to engage people in end-of-life care decision making. District nurses are in the ideal position to facilitate ACP, as they have the opportunity to build relationships with the people they are caring for--an antecedent to sensitive ACP--and in recognising and fulfilling this role, they could ameliorate the risk of insensitive ACP. Distric nurse leaders also have a role to play in ensuring that organisational and environmental factors support appropriate ACP facilitation including: training, fostering a team culture that empowers district nurses to recognise and meet their ACP role, and advocating for appropriate ACP evaluation outcome measures. PMID:26940617

  19. Exploring the district nurse role in facilitating individualised advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Boot, Michelle

    2016-03-01

    Health-care policy recognises the importance of engaging people in making decisions related to the management of their health. Advance care planning (ACP) offers a framework for decision making on end-of-life care. There are positive indicators that ACP enables health professionals to meet people's preferences. However, there are reports of insensitive attempts to engage people in end-of-life care decision making. District nurses are in the ideal position to facilitate ACP, as they have the opportunity to build relationships with the people they are caring for--an antecedent to sensitive ACP--and in recognising and fulfilling this role, they could ameliorate the risk of insensitive ACP. Distric nurse leaders also have a role to play in ensuring that organisational and environmental factors support appropriate ACP facilitation including: training, fostering a team culture that empowers district nurses to recognise and meet their ACP role, and advocating for appropriate ACP evaluation outcome measures.

  20. ADVANCES IN THE CELL-BASED TREATMENT OF NEONATAL HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC BRAIN INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Pabon, Mibel M.; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy for adult stroke has reached limited clinical trials. Here, we provide translational research guidance on stem cell therapy for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury requiring a careful consideration of clinically relevant animal models, feasible stem cell sources, and validated safety and efficacy endpoint assays, as well as a general understanding of modes of action of this cellular therapy. To this end, we refer to existing translational guidelines, in particular the recommendations outlined in the consortium of academicians, industry partners and regulators called Stem cell Therapeutics as an Emerging Paradigm for Stroke or STEPS. Although the STEPS guidelines are directed at enhancing the successful outcome of cell therapy in adult stroke, we highlight overlapping pathologies between adult stroke and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. We are, however, cognizant that the neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury displays disease symptoms distinct from adult stroke in need of an innovative translational approach that facilitates the entry of cell therapy in the clinic. Finally, insights into combination therapy are provided with the vision that stem cell therapy may benefit from available treatments, such as hypothermia, already being tested in children diagnosed with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. PMID:23565051

  1. Advancing Genomic Research and Reducing Health Disparities: What Can Nurse Scholars Do?

    PubMed Central

    Jaja, Cheedy; Gibson, Robert; Quarles, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Advances in genomic research are improving our understanding of human diseases and evoking promise of an era of genomic medicine. It is unclear whether genomic medicine may exacerbate or attenuate extant racial group health disparities. We delineate how nurse scholars could engage in the configuration of an equitable genomic medicine paradigm. Organizing Construct We identify as legitimate subjects for nursing scholarship the scientific relevance, ethical, and public policy implications for employing racial categories in genomic research in the context of reducing extant health disparities. Findings Since genomic research is largely population specific, current classification of genomic data will center on racial and ethnic groups. Nurse scholars should be involved in clarifying how putative racial group differences should be elucidated in light of the current orthodoxy that genomic solutions may alleviate racial health disparities. Conclusions Nurse scholars are capable of employing their expertise in concept analysis to elucidate how race is used as a variable in scientific research, and to use knowledge brokering to delineate how race variables that imply human ancestry could be utilized in genomic research pragmatically in the context of health disparities. Clinical Relevance In an era of genomic medicine, nurse scholars should recognize and understand the challenges and complexities of genomics and race and their relevance to health care and health disparities. PMID:23452096

  2. AACN's healthy work environment standards and an empowering nurse advancement system.

    PubMed

    Vollers, Dawn; Hill, Edie; Roberts, Cynthia; Dambaugh, Lori; Brenner, Zara R

    2009-12-01

    An empowering clinical nurse advancement system can facilitate institutional behaviors that embrace all of AACN's healthy work environment standards and thus serve as a building block for developing a flourishing health care environment. The results generate positive outcomes that are evident to health care professionals, patients, patients' families, and health care organizations. Patients benefit from highly satisfied employees who work in a culture of caring and excellence. PMID:19952335

  3. Managing the marketing function for advanced nurse practitioners in a managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Pakis, S

    1997-09-01

    Delivering quality, cost-efficient health care is a desired service in the health care market today. Advanced nurse practitioners are positioned to deliver this product. The key in today's market is clearly defining the product, identifying the customers of the product, and crafting the message for each customer. The development of marketing strategies to address each of the above points will assist an organization in targeting resources and evaluating the effectiveness of the message being delivered.

  4. Advanced nursing roles in critical care--a natural or forced evolution?

    PubMed

    Coombs, Maureen; Chaboyer, Wendy; Sole, Mary Lou

    2007-01-01

    Meeting the expectation of delivering safe, effective, and timely health care services within current financial and workforce envelopes requires all health care clinicians to refine and adapt to their clinical roles. The arena of critical care is currently receiving increasing scrutiny regarding developing dedicated advanced practice roles. This is challenging to critical care nurses who historically neither have been exposed to nor have chosen to engage in such specific role developments. The critical care nursing community has, on the whole, embraced previous role expansions within the limits of existing group practices rather than an evolution of new subspecialties. International comparisons demonstrate that critical care nurses in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia are all facing common health policy drivers. Although there are some similarities in addressing these challenges, the solutions remain at various stages of development. The natural history framework of Bucher [Work and Occupations 1988;15:131-147] provides a useful and supportive tool to understand how it is necessary and natural for specialties within occupational groups to emerge to meet changing health care needs. A shared concern providing challenges at national and international levels involves the coordination of educational standards as well as competencies and clear articulation of the leadership component of advanced practice roles. These areas must be addressed to enable the international critical care community to naturally transform and evolve into fully established and legitimate advanced practitioners. PMID:17383600

  5. Advanced practice nursing for enduring health needs management: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Liisa; Mikkonen, Irma; Graham, Iain; Norman, Linda D; Richardson, Jim; Savage, Eileen; Schorn, Mavis

    2012-07-01

    Advanced practice nursing expertise has been acknowledged worldwide as one response to the challenges arising from changes in society and health care. The roots of advanced practice nursing education are at the University of Colorado where the first known programme started in 1965. In many countries advanced practice nurses (APNs) have taken responsibility for routine patient care formerly carried out by physicians in order to reduce their workload. However, more and more, APNs have taken responsibility for new service areas and quality programmes not previously provided. Chronic disease management is one of these new service areas because long-term diseases are increasingly challenging service systems globally. This article is based on an international APN partnership. The aim of the article is to describe how the partnership will design a 15 ECTS credit course on Enduring Health Need Management as a cross-cultural collaborative endeavour. The adaptation of an inquiry based learning framework will be described drawing on four main principles of the theory: authentic learning communities; student encouragement in analysing gradually more complicated problems; networking in knowledge creation and; student engagement and activity. The cross-cultural online course aims to increase APNs' intercultural competence as well as their global and international work orientation. PMID:21839552

  6. Can the Institute of Medicine trump the dominant logic of nursing? Leading change in advanced practice education.

    PubMed

    Dreher, Melanie C; Clinton, Patricia; Sperhac, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM; 2010) has called for a transformation of the nursing profession to lead the redesign of health care in the United States. It acknowledges the need for profound change in nursing education, particularly advanced practice education, to produce the next generation of leaders in sufficient quantity to expand access, improve quality, and reduce cost. Although the IOM provides welcome validation of nursing's significant role, most of the recommendations are not new and have been advocated by nurse educators for decades. What has prevented us from creating the nimble and responsive educational programs that would ensure a sufficient corpus of advanced practice nurses with the relevant knowledge and skill to transform our ailing health system? Conceptualizing nursing as a complex, adaptive system (J.W. Begun and K. White, 1997), this article explores three examples of the dominant logic, grounded in a historical legacy that has kept the nursing profession from realizing its promise as a potent force: (a) the continuing preference for experience over education, (b) the belief that only nurses can teach nurses, and (c) the hegemony of the research doctorate.

  7. Surgeon-nurse anesthetist collaboration advanced surgery between 1889 and 1950.

    PubMed

    Koch, Bruce Evan

    2015-03-01

    To meet the need for qualified anesthetists, American surgeons recruited nurses to practice anesthesia during the Civil War and in the latter half of the 19th century. The success of this decision led them to collaborate with nurses more formally at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. During the 1890s, Alice Magaw refined the safe administration of ether. Florence Henderson continued her work improving the safety of ether administration during the first decade of the 20th century. Safe anesthesia enabled the Mayo surgeons to turn the St. Mary's Hospital into a surgical powerhouse. The prominent surgeon George Crile collaborated with Agatha Hodgins at the Lakeside Hospital in Cleveland to introduce nitrous oxide/oxygen anesthesia. Nitrous oxide/oxygen caused less cardiovascular depression than ether and thus saved the lives of countless trauma victims during World War I. Crile devised "anoci-association," an outgrowth of nitrous oxide/oxygen anesthesia. Hodgins' use of anoci-association made Crile's thyroid operations safer. Pioneering East Coast surgeons followed the lead of the surgeons at Mayo. William Halsted worked closely with Margaret Boise, and Harvey Cushing worked closely with Gertrude Gerard. As medicine became more complex, collaboration between surgeons and nurse anesthetists became routine and necessary. Teams of surgeons and nurse anesthetists advanced thoracic, cardiovascular, and pediatric surgery. The team of Evarts Graham and Helen Lamb performed the world's first pneumonectomy. Surgeon-nurse anesthetist collaboration seems to have been a uniquely American phenomenon. This collaboration facilitated both the "Golden Age of Surgery" and the profession we know today as nurse anesthesia.

  8. Surgeon-nurse anesthetist collaboration advanced surgery between 1889 and 1950.

    PubMed

    Koch, Bruce Evan

    2015-03-01

    To meet the need for qualified anesthetists, American surgeons recruited nurses to practice anesthesia during the Civil War and in the latter half of the 19th century. The success of this decision led them to collaborate with nurses more formally at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. During the 1890s, Alice Magaw refined the safe administration of ether. Florence Henderson continued her work improving the safety of ether administration during the first decade of the 20th century. Safe anesthesia enabled the Mayo surgeons to turn the St. Mary's Hospital into a surgical powerhouse. The prominent surgeon George Crile collaborated with Agatha Hodgins at the Lakeside Hospital in Cleveland to introduce nitrous oxide/oxygen anesthesia. Nitrous oxide/oxygen caused less cardiovascular depression than ether and thus saved the lives of countless trauma victims during World War I. Crile devised "anoci-association," an outgrowth of nitrous oxide/oxygen anesthesia. Hodgins' use of anoci-association made Crile's thyroid operations safer. Pioneering East Coast surgeons followed the lead of the surgeons at Mayo. William Halsted worked closely with Margaret Boise, and Harvey Cushing worked closely with Gertrude Gerard. As medicine became more complex, collaboration between surgeons and nurse anesthetists became routine and necessary. Teams of surgeons and nurse anesthetists advanced thoracic, cardiovascular, and pediatric surgery. The team of Evarts Graham and Helen Lamb performed the world's first pneumonectomy. Surgeon-nurse anesthetist collaboration seems to have been a uniquely American phenomenon. This collaboration facilitated both the "Golden Age of Surgery" and the profession we know today as nurse anesthesia. PMID:25695581

  9. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of patients with bipolar disorder: A review for advanced practice nurses

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Bethany; McNew, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose This review article provides an overview of the frequency, burden of illness, diagnosis, and treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) from the perspective of the advanced practice nurses (APNs). Data sources PubMed searches were conducted using the following keywords: “bipolar disorder and primary care,” restricted to dates 2000 to present; “bipolar disorder and nurse practitioner”; and “bipolar disorder and clinical nurse specialist.” Selected articles were relevant to adult outpatient care in the United States, with a prioritization of articles written by APNs or published in nursing journals. Conclusions BD has a substantial lifetime prevalence in the population at 4%. Because the manic or depressive symptoms of BD tend to be severe and recurrent over a patient's lifetime, the condition is associated with significant burden to the individual, caregivers, and society. Clinician awareness that BD may be present increases the likelihood of successful recognition and appropriate treatment. A number of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments are available for acute and maintenance treatments, with the prospect of achieving reduced symptom burden and increased functioning for many patients. Implications for practice Awareness of the disease burden, diagnostic issues, and management choices in BD has the potential to enhance outcome in substantial proportions of patients. PMID:26172568

  11. [Neonatal hemochromatosis: Another entity that is no longer orphan. Advances in the diagnosis and management of the main cause of neonatal acute liver failure].

    PubMed

    Molera Busoms, C; Quintero Bernabeu, J; Martín de Carpi, J

    2015-09-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the neonatal period. It is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to iron overload in hepatic and extra-hepatic tissues. New evidence has emerged during the last few years as regards its alloimmune etiology, which have had an important repercussion on the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of these patients. Treatment with immunoglobulins and exchange transfusions has radically changed the prognosis without liver transplant. Another great success has been the preventive use of immunoglobulin in pregnant women with a past history of neonatal hemochromatosis, thus decreasing the rate of disease recurrence up to 70%. This new paradigm has led to an entity with a poor prognosis becoming a curable disease if diagnosed and treated early. Nevertheless, a large widespread ignorance of the disease persists, with medical implications that result in significant health problems, due to the delayed referral of these patients to specialized centers.

  12. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of a... humidity, a control valve through which oxygen may be added, and access ports for nursing care....

  13. The CNS with practitioner preparation: an emerging role in advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Busen, N H; Engleman, S G

    1996-05-01

    As health care reform continues, CNSs are retooling for nurse practitioner (NP) roles. Although the debate regarding role integration is ongoing, advanced practice nurses (APNs) with blended preparation are appearing in the workplace. Much has been written about attributes the NP brings to the practice setting, but little has been said about the unique skills and knowledge base that the CNS brings. CNSs, with additional preparation as practitioners, will be marketable providers with population-specific knowledge, technological expertise, and comfort with higher acuity levels. This will allow APNs to combine a preventive model with high acuity levels, practice holistically, improve quality, and decrease costs of care. A case study of care given by a pediatric critical care CNS returning to school for practitioner preparation, which demonstrates several of the above concepts, is presented.

  14. What is Family-Centered Care for Nursing Home Residents With Advanced Dementia?

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Ruth Palan; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Givens, Jane L.

    2014-01-01

    To understand family members’ perspectives on person- and family-centered end-of-life care provided to nursing home (NH) residents with advanced dementia, we conducted a qualitative follow-up interview with 16 respondents who had participated in an earlier prospective study, Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advance Dementia at End of Life (CASCADE). Family members of NH residents (N = 16) with advanced dementia participated in semistructured qualitative interviews that inquired about overall NH experience, communication, surrogate decision making, emotional reaction, and recommendations for improvement. Analysis identified 5 areas considered important by family members: (1) providing basic care; (2) ensuring safety and security; (3) creating a sense of belonging and attachment; (4) fostering self-esteem and self-efficacy; and (5) coming to terms with the experience. These themes can provide a framework for creating and testing strategies to meet the goal of person- and family-centered care. PMID:24085250

  15. Providing a navigable route for acute medicine nurses to advance their practice: a framework of ascending levels of practice.

    PubMed

    Lees-Deutsch, Liz; Christian, Jan; Setchfield, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This article conveys concerns raised by delegates at the International SAM Conference (Manchester, 2015) regarding how to advance nursing practice in acute medicine. It endeavors to capture the essence of 'how to advance practice' and 'how to integrate advanced practice' within the workforce structures of an acute medicine unit (AMU). It addresses the production of tacit knowledge and the recognition and integration of this to developing the nursing workforce. The current context of NHS efficiencies and recruitment issues emphasize the value of retaining tacit knowledge. Uniquely, this article offers an early conceptual framework through which levels of advancement and potential transition points to advance nursing practice in acute medicine are articulated. Determining how to advance requires identification of prior accomplishments such as, tacit knowledge, experiential learning, CPD, specialist courses and management experience. This requires nurses to make judicious decisions to advance their practice and the distinction between 'amassing experience' and 'career progression'. It aims to stimulate thinking around the practicalities of advancement, the value of tacit knowledge and potential realization through the framework trajectory. PMID:27441313

  16. [Challenges and opportunities: contributions of the Advanced Practice Nurse in the chronicity. Learning from experiences].

    PubMed

    Appleby, Christine; Camacho-Bejarano, Rafaela

    2014-01-01

    Undoubtedly, our society is facing new economic, political, demographic, social and cultural challenges that require healthcare services able to meet the growing health needs of the population, especially in dealing with chronic conditions. In this new context, some countries such as the United Kingdom have made a firm commitment to develop new models for chronic patients care based on the introduction of new figures of Advanced Practice Nurses, which includes 4 cornerstones of professional practice: advanced clinical skills, clinical management, teaching and research. The implementation of this new figures implies a redefinition of professional competencies and has its own accreditation system and a specific catalogue of services adapted to the population requirements, in order to provide chronic care support from Primary Care settings. This trajectory allows us analysing the process of design and implementation of these new models and the organizational structure where it is integrated. In Spain, there are already experiences in some regions such as Andalucia and the Basque Country, focused on the creation of new advanced nursing roles. At present, it is necessary to consider suitable strategic proposals for the complete development of these models and to achieve the best results in terms of overall health and quality of life of patients with chronic conditions, improving the quality of services and cost-effectiveness through a greater cohesion and performance of healthcare teams towards the sustainability of healthcare services and patient satisfaction.

  17. The impact of interprofessional collaboration on the effectiveness, significance, and future of advanced practice registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Brooten, Dorothy; Youngblut, JoAnne M; Hannan, Jean; Guido-Sanz, Frank

    2012-06-01

    Interprofessional collaboration was essential for the conduct of research that demonstrated the effectiveness and significance of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) in providing care, in reducing health care costs, and in developing innovative models of care for the nation's citizens. If the 2010 Affordable Care Act is to be implemented, APRNs, with their expertise and numbers, are essential to its implementation. Continued interdisciplinary collaboration is needed to expand the scope of APRN state practice regulations, to change reimbursement for APRN services, and to mute opposition to these changes by medical organizations. PMID:22579063

  18. An Incentive Pay Plan for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: Impact On Provider and Organizational Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Catherine A; Bechtle, Mavis; McNett, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are integral to the provision of quality, cost-effective health care throughout the continuum of care. To promote job satisfaction and ultimately decrease turnover, an APRN incentive plan based on productivity and quality was formulated. Clinical productivity in the incentive plan was measured by national benchmarks for work relative value units for nonphysician providers. After the first year of implementation, APRNs were paid more for additional productivity and quality and the institution had an increase in patient visits and charges. The incentive plan is a win-win for hospitals that employ APRNs. PMID:26259336

  19. The story of nurse licensure.

    PubMed

    Benefiel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of nurse licensure is representative of the heroic efforts of nurses to enhance the value and impact of the nursing profession. This literature review presents a historical account of the advancement of nursing through the nurse licensure process.

  20. Advance care planning in nursing homes: pre- and post-Patient Self-Determination Act.

    PubMed Central

    Castle, N G; Mor, V

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (1) To identify resident and organizational factors associated with the use of advance care plans pre- and post-implementation of the Patient Self-Determination Act (PSDA), and (2) to identify changes (pre- and post-implementation of the PSDA) in the relationship between these factors and the use of advance care plans. DESIGN: Complex, multistage cluster sampling. SETTING: Ten states were selected for variation in geographic location, Medicaid reimbursement rate, and average staffing patterns. Participants were 4,215 nursing home residents in 268 facilities. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seventeen resident and organizational factors were associated with the use of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in 1990, and 12 resident and organizational factors were associated with their use in 1993. Five factors showed a significant change from 1990 to 1993: activities of daily living (ADL) scores, race, cognitive performance scale (CPS) scores, full-time equivalent (FTE) nurse aides per resident, and bed size. Ten resident and organizational factors were associated with use of do-not-hospitalize (DNH) orders in 1990 and six resident and organizational factors were associated with DNH orders in 1993. Four factors showed a significant change from 1990 to 1993: legal guardian, FTE LPNs per resident, Medicaid census, and forprofit ownership. Five resident and organizational factors were associated with the use of living wills in 1990 and seven resident and organizational factors were associated with the use of living wills in 1993. Four factors showed a significant change from 1990 to 1993: ADL scores, race, length of stay, and for-profit ownership. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the PSDA may have been successful in increasing the use of advance care plans and in changing the types of residents who use advance care plans. However, they also show that the use of advance care plans is associated with organizational characteristics, indicating that some types of facilities

  1. To be involved or not: factors that influence nurses' involvement in providing treatment decisional support in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Barthow, Christine; Moss, Cheryle; McKinlay, Eileen; McCullough, Leslie; Wise, Debbie

    2009-02-01

    Decisional support is a multifaceted process of facilitating patients' decision making regarding treatment choices. Effective decisional support practices of nurses in relation to the use of anticancer therapies in patients with advanced disease are central to quality cancer care. A recent qualitative descriptive study (n=21) exploring the decision making practices of doctors and nurses in one tertiary cancer centre in New Zealand identified many complexities associated with nurses and their participation in decisional support. The study revealed that cancer nurses had varied opinions about the meaning and importance of their roles in treatment related decision making. This variation was significant and led the researchers to undertake a detailed secondary exploration of factors that impacted on the nurses' involvement in the provision of decisional support. Four key groups of factors were identified. These were factors relating to degree of knowledge, level of experience, beliefs and understandings about nursing roles and cancer therapies, and structural interfaces in the work setting. Understanding these factors is important because it allows modification of the conditions which impact on the ability to provide effective decisional care. It also provides some understanding of clinical drivers associated with nurses' decisional support work with patients who have advanced cancer.

  2. Positioning advanced practice registered nurses for health care reform: consensus on APRN regulation.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Joan M; Werner, Kathryn E; Apple, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) have positioned themselves to serve an integral role in national health care reform. This article addresses both the policy and the process to develop this policy that has placed them in a strategic position. A successful transformation of the nation's health system will require utilization of all clinicians, particularly primary care providers, to the full extent of their education and scope of practice. APRNs are highly qualified clinicians who provide cost-effective, accessible, patient-centered care and have the education to provide the range of services at the heart of the reform movement, including care coordination, chronic care management, and wellness and preventive care. The APRN community faces many challenges amidst the opportunities of health reform. However, the APRN community's triumph in reaching consensus on APRN regulation signifies a cohesive approach to overcoming the obstacles. The consensus model for APRN regulation, endorsed by 44 national nursing organizations, will serve as a beacon for nursing, as well as a guidepost for consumers and policymakers, on titling, education, certification, accreditation, and licensing for all four APRN roles.

  3. Advancing the status of nursing in Egypt: the project to promote the development of the High Institutes of Nursing.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, J T; Sukkary-Stolba, S

    1995-10-01

    This paper discusses the successes and the challenges of a 3-year project to improve the image and status of nursing in Egypt. Several strategies were developed and tested. These activities focused on transforming nurse-training and the nursing role to the status of professional education and practice. These activities have a broad applicability for other countries engaged in similar efforts. Successful interventions included the following: (1) A board composed of health professionals, health policy-makers, and the nursing trade union was established, providing opportunity for interprofessional dialogue; (2) criteria that would enable the High Institutes of Nursing (HINs) to quality for university faculty status were identified; (3) HINs shared their resources in order to enable lesser developed HINs to strengthen their academic curricula, initiate graduate degree programs and provide for faculty development; (4) a set of standards for nursing clinical practice was developed; and (5) Demonstration Clinical Units were established as model settings for improving nursing clinical skills. Project trajectories that remain to be accomplished include final development and promulgation of a set of nursing standards, development of a nursing organization that can speak for professional as well as trade issues and upgrading the educational pathway to the nursing profession.

  4. Advanced Practice Nursing: Meeting the Caregiving Challenges for Families of Persons with Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Merrilees, Jennifer; Ketelle, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD), once thought to be a rare cause for dementia, is now acknowledged to be the most common presenile (before age 65) cause of dementia (1). FTD is associated with profound changes in behavior, personality, emotions, and cognition. The purpose of this paper is to describe two cases of patients with FTD in order to illustrate salient aspects of the caregiving experience. Issues faced by caregivers are organized into 6 categories: diagnosis, behavioral symptoms, function, communication, long term management and care, and maintenance of the caregiver’s emotional and physical health. Examples of interventions directed by advanced practice nurses are described. We suggest that management of FTD requires expertise as scientific advances and discoveries about FTD continually change the landscape of care. PMID:20716977

  5. Ethical aspects of the expansion of neonatal screening programme due to technological advances.

    PubMed

    Elliman, David

    2012-06-01

    Many countries are considering the expansion of their newborn bloodspot screening programmes. Whereas some countries screen for very few conditions, others are planning to screen for dozens. While advances in technology may facilitate this expansion, they must not lead it at the expense of considerations of the possible harms of this expansion. This article reviews some of the potential disbenefits of this expansion and outlines the ethical issues that should be considered.

  6. Integrating interprofessional collaboration skills into the advanced practice registered nurse socialization process.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Kathleen; Payne, Camille; Heye, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of interprofessional collaboration and practice as a means to provide patient-centered care and to decrease the current fragmentation of health care services in the 21st century provides a clear and unique opportunity for the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) to assume a key role. For APRNs and other health care providers, to participate effectively as team members requires an interprofessional mindset. Development of interprofessional skills and knowledge for the APRN has been hindered by a silo approach to APRN role socialization. The Institute of Medicine Report (IOM; 2010) states that current health care systems should focus on team collaboration to deliver accessible, high-quality, patient-centered health care that addresses wellness and prevention of illness and adverse events, management of chronic illness, and increased capacity of all providers on the team. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the need to incorporate interprofessional education (IPE) into the socialization models used in advanced practice nursing programs. IPE requires moving beyond profession-specific educational efforts to engage students of different health care professions in interactive learning. Being able to work effectively as member of a clinical team while a student is a fundamental part of that learning (Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel, 2011). The objective of IPE curriculum models in graduate nursing programs is to educate APRNs in the development of an interprofessional mindset. Interprofessional collaboration and coordination are needed to achieve seamless transitions for patients between providers, specialties, and health care settings (IOM, 2010). Achieving the vision requires the continuous development of interprofessional competencies by APRNs as part of the learning process, so that upon entering the workforce, APRNs are ready to practice effective teamwork and team-based care. Socialization of the professional APRN

  7. Developing a professional poster: four "ps" for advanced practice nurses to consider.

    PubMed

    Bindon, Susan L; Davenport, Joan M

    2013-01-01

    Professional posters play an important role in the dissemination of knowledge and the professional development of advanced practice nurses, graduate students, and clinical faculty. Posters should be considered an integral component in communication of professional work in practice, research, and education. The invitation to submit a poster abstract is an important opportunity for clinicians and faculty alike to consider. Though sometimes misperceived as less prestigious than a podium presentation, posters add a unique element to professional and academic events. The argument is made for posters as an equal among scholarly presentation formats. The poster serves as a tremendous opportunity for collaboration between partners and a way to communicate important findings and advertise the presenters' work. For the advanced practice nurse who is a novice in presenting best practice or evidence from research trials, the poster format may be less intimidating while allowing the invaluable sharing of results. Four critical elements of professional poster development are deciding on a clear Purpose, targeting the right People, outlining key steps in the Process, and delivering a memorable Presentation. Using the "4 Ps" as cornerstones for the work of developing, preparing, and delivering the poster to an audience, the authors aim to help organize the entire process into these essential considerations. The poster, as a means of scholarly work, is a viable and essential activity, as interdisciplinary collaboration and sharing of best practice becomes the expectation for all professional development. PMID:23615014

  8. Attributes of advanced practice registered nurse care coordination for children with medical complexity.

    PubMed

    Cady, Rhonda G; Kelly, Anne M; Finkelstein, Stanley M; Looman, Wendy S; Garwick, Ann W

    2014-01-01

    Care coordination is an essential component of the pediatric health care home. This study investigated the attributes of relationship-based advanced practice registered nurse care coordination for children with medical complexity enrolled in a tertiary hospital-based health care home. Retrospective review of 2,628 care coordination episodes conducted by telehealth over a consecutive 3-year time period for 27 children indicated that parents initiated the majority of episodes and the most frequent reason was acute and chronic condition management. During this period, care coordination episodes tripled, with a significant increase (p < .001) between years 1 and 2. The increased episodes could explain previously reported reductions in hospitalizations for this group of children. Descriptive analysis of a program-specific survey showed that parents valued having a single place to call and assistance in managing their child's complex needs. The advanced practice registered nurse care coordination model has potential for changing the health management processes for children with medical complexity.

  9. Improving End-of-Life Care Prognostic Discussions: Role of Advanced Practice Nurses.

    PubMed

    Kalowes, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Research has validated the desire of patients and families for ongoing prognostic information; however, few conversations occur before patients reach the advanced stages of their disease trajectory. Physician hesitance and delay in discussing unfavorable prognoses deny patients and families optimal time to prepare for critical decision making. Advanced practice registered nurses can play a crucial, complementary role with the critical care interdisciplinary team to implement strategies to improve communication about prognosis and end of life with patients and families. Clinicians should discuss deterioration in disease-specific characteristics and changes (decline) in functional status. Functional status can serve as an accurate guide for forecasting prognosis, particularly in patients with heart failure, stroke, chronic lung disease, and end-stage renal disease. This article provides an overview of effective intensive care unit prognostic systems and discusses barriers and opportunities for nurses to use evidence-based knowledge related to disease trajectory and prognosis to improve communication and the quality of palliative and end-of-life care for patients.

  10. Outcomes of Feeding Problems in Advanced Dementia in a Nursing Home Population

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Laura C.; Ersek, Mary; Lin, Feng Chang; Carey, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Weight loss is common in advanced dementia, but regulators and clinicians are uncertain how often it is treatable. Study objectives were to describe: 1) quality of care for feeding problems in advanced dementia, and 2) probability and predictors of weight loss and mortality. Design Prospective cohort Setting 24 nursing homes Participants 256 residents with advanced dementia and feeding problems, and family surrogates Measurements Family reported on quality of feeding care at enrollment and 3 months. Chart reviews at enrollment, 3, 6 and 9 months provided data on feeding problems, treatments, weight loss of >5% in 30 days or >10% in 6 months, and mortality. Organizational variables were obtained from administrator surveys and publically reported data. Results Residents with advanced dementia and feeding problems had an average age of 85; 80% had chewing and swallowing problems, 11% weight loss and 48% poor intake. Family reported feeding assistance of moderate quality; 23% felt the resident received less assistance than needed. Mortality risk was significant; 8% died within 3 months, 17% within 6 months and 27% within 9 months. Residents with advanced dementia and stable weight had a 5.4% rate of significant weight loss and a 2.1% risk of death over 3 months. Residents with advanced dementia and weight loss had a 38.9% chance of stabilizing weight over the next 3 months, but also had a 19.2% chance of dying. Weight loss was the only independent predictor of death. Conclusion Weight loss is a predictor of death in advanced dementia. Treatments can often stabilize weight, but weight loss should be used to trigger discussion of goals of care and treatment options. PMID:24083403

  11. Quality improvement for neonatal nurses, part II: using a PDSA quality improvement cycle approach to implement an oral feeding progression guideline for premature infants.

    PubMed

    Marcellus, Lenora; Harrison, Adele; Mackinnon, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    The development of clinical practice guidelines involving multiple health care providers presents a challenge in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Implementation and evaluation of the guideline is as important as the development of the guideline itself. We explored the use of a quality improvement approach in the implementation of a feeding framework. A Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) quality improvement cycle model was used to implement and evaluate a stepwise oral infant feeding guideline with emphasis on parent and care provider satisfaction. Three PDSA cycles were conducted, with each cycle resulting in modifications to use of the framework and development of knowledge translation and parent education techniques and tools. A PDSA cycle approach can be used effectively in guideline implementation and evaluation involving multidisciplinary health care professionals. This is Part II of a two-part series. Part I introduced the concept of quality improvement and tools for advancing practice changes.

  12. Accelerated Second Degree Advanced Practice Nurses: How Do They Fare in the Job Market?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kenneth R.; Wax, William A.; Berrey, Allison J.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of the demographic and job characteristics of 29 second degree, nonnurse college graduates who pursued graduate degrees in nursing found they had diverse work experience and baccalaureate majors; most were full-time, certified nurse practitioners; most did not feel registered nurse experience was necessary for nurse practitioners. (JOW)

  13. The Attending Nurse Caring Model: integrating theory, evidence and advanced caring-healing therapeutics for transforming professional practice.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jean; Foster, Roxie

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents a proposed model: The Attending Nursing Caring Model (ANCM) as an exemplar for advancing and transforming nursing practice within a reflective, theoretical and evidence-based context. Watson's theory of human caring is used as a guide for integrating theory, evidence and advanced therapeutics in the area of children's pain. The ANCM is offered as a programme for renewing the profession and its professional practices of caring-healing arts and science, during an era of decline, shortages, and crises in care, safety, and hospital and health reform. The ANCM elevates contemporary nursing's caring values, relationships, therapeutics and responsibilities to a higher/deeper order of caring science and professionalism, intersecting with other professions, while sustaining the finest of its heritage and traditions of healing.

  14. A conceptual framework for advanced practice nursing in a pediatric tertiary care setting: the SickKids' experience.

    PubMed

    LeGrow, Karen; Hubley, Pam; McAllister, Mary

    2010-05-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) are pediatric healthcare providers who integrate principles and theories of advanced nursing with specialty knowledge to provide autonomous, independent, accountable, ethical and developmentally appropriate care in complex, often ambiguous and rapidly changing healthcare environments. Caring for children and adolescents requires culturally sensitive and family-centred approaches to care that incorporate a unique body of knowledge. Family-centred care is an approach to planning, delivery and evaluation of healthcare that is governed by the establishment of mutually beneficial partnerships among APNs, health professionals and children/families. The cornerstone of APN practice at SickKids is the recognition of "family" as the recipients of care. By valuing and developing relationships with families, APNs promote excellence in healthcare across the care continuum to optimize the child's and family's physical, emotional, social, psychological and spiritual well-being. This paper outlines the evolution of advanced practice nursing at SickKids, beginning with the introduction of APN roles in the 1970s and culminating in the current critical mass of APNs who have been integrated throughout the hospital's infrastructure. We describe the process used to create a common vision and a framework to guide pediatric advanced nursing practice.

  15. The Experiences of Advanced Practice Nurses Caring for Patients with Substance Use Disorder and Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    St Marie, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Management of chronic pain is a challenge shared by healthcare providers in various clinical settings. The epidemic of opioid misuse has escalated this challenge. A gap exists in understanding barriers and facilitators to practices of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) caring for patients with chronic pain and substance use disorder (SUD). The purpose of this study was to examine the APRNs' experiences while caring for patients with coexisting SUD and chronic pain to help envision better ways to manage pain and direct educational initiatives. Qualitative narrative method. Telephone interviews. Twenty APRNs caring for patients with coexisting SUD and chronic pain were recruited nationwide through the American Society for Pain Management Nursing list serve. Semistructured interviews with thematic analysis. Participants identified 1) a shift of patients from other healthcare providers into the APRNs' practices; 2) barriers to accessing nonmedical modalities for managing pain, including insurance coverage, geographic location, and the patient's desire for only medication management; 3) the role of the APRN in caring for this population contained subthemes of educating and guiding patients through a process of change, applying risk strategies to keep patients safe, and educating colleagues on implementing risk management strategies while prescribing opioids. The APRNs identified barriers to providing care for patients with coexisting SUD and chronic pain. They also described the role of APRNs in providing focused education regarding risk management strategies for assessment, prescribing opioids to manage pain, and minimizing risk. PMID:27567096

  16. A survey of oncology advanced practice nurses in Ontario: profile and predictors of job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Green, Esther; Fitch, Margaret; Macartney, Gail; Robb-Blenderman, Linda; McFarlane, Sandra; Bosompra, Kwadwo; DiCenso, Alba; Matthews, Susan; Milne, Harry

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine role structures and processes and their impact on job satisfaction for oncology advanced practice nurses (APNs) in Ontario. APNs caring for adult, paediatric or palliative patients in integrated regional cancer programs, tertiary care hospitals or community hospitals and agencies were invited to complete a mailed self-report questionnaire. A total of 73 of 77 APNs participated in the study. Most APNs (55%) were acute care nurse practitioners employed by regional cancer programs or tertiary care hospitals. Adult patients with breast or haematological cancers and those receiving initial treatment or palliative care were the primary focus of APN roles. APN education needs related to specialization in oncology, leadership and research were identified. Overall, APNs were minimally satisfied with their roles. Role confidence (beta = .404, p = .001) and the number of overtime hours (beta = -.313, p = .008) were respective positive and negative predictors of APN job satisfaction. Progress in role development is described, and recommendations for improving role development and expanding the delivery of oncology APN services are provided. PMID:17619596

  17. Caring for dying children: assessing the needs of the pediatric palliative care nurse.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Darla

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric palliative nursing care, both stressful and rewarding, requires coping skills, confidence, and other attributes for successful patient care and nursing practice. Through a thorough literature review, clinical workshops, direct observations in pediatric palliative care settings, and personal nursing experience in the neonatal intensive care, pediatric intensive care, and oncology wards, this author confirmed the necessity for studies to clarify the needs of dying pediatric patients and their families, as well as the needs of nurses who provide their care. This article briefly reviews the history and current status of pediatric palliative care, describes the experiences of nurses caring for dying children, explores the impact of providing palliative care on the hospital staff, and seeks to discover possible interventions by the advanced practice nurse to influence more positive patient care and nursing staff job satisfaction and retention.

  18. Privacy and confidentiality issues in primary care: views of advanced practice nurses and their patients--an APRNet study [corrected].

    PubMed

    Deshefy-Longhi, Terry; Dixon, Jane Karpe; Olsen, Douglas; Grey, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    Various aspects of the concepts of privacy and confidentiality are discussed in relation to health care information in primary health care settings. In addition, findings are presented from patient and nurse practitioner focus groups held to elicit concerns that these two groups have in relation to privacy and confidentiality in their respective primary care settings. The focus groups were held prior to the implementation of the Health Insurance Portability and Accessibility Act in the USA. Implications for advanced practice registered nurses in primary care practices are provided.

  19. Nursing Education for College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavinsky, Ann T.; Diers, Donna

    1982-01-01

    Describes the masters programs for nonnurse college graduates at Yale School of Nursing which offers both basic and advanced nursing preparation in a single three-year curriculum sequence. The program prepares nurses who can function in advanced-practice specialty roles as nurse-midwives, nurse practitioners, or clinical nurse specialists. (CT)

  20. Enhancing presentation skills for the advanced practice nurse: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Vollman, Kathleen M

    2005-01-01

    Professional speaking is a component of the professional practice role of the advanced practice nurse (APN). The skills to communicate effectively to one person or an audience of 100 provide the APN with the essential tools for implementing change, collaborating effectively, presenting information at professional meetings, or communicating the impact of clinical outcomes in the boardroom. Public speaking skills, a professional image, and improved communication can facilitate advancement along any career ladder. The greater your fear, the more self-confidence you will gain by stepping up to a challenge and conquering it. This article describes strategies for organizing and presenting your message in a clear and concise format. Techniques to manage the anxiety produced when attempting to articulate your thoughts is essential for effective communication. Skills for enhancing the delivery of your message through effective body language, professional image, voice modulation, and use of audiovisual aids are addressed. Creative techniques for fielding questions are key in promoting a dynamic closure and provide consistent reinforcement of the key message content. PMID:15714019

  1. Enhancing presentation skills for the advanced practice nurse: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Vollman, Kathleen M

    2005-01-01

    Professional speaking is a component of the professional practice role of the advanced practice nurse (APN). The skills to communicate effectively to one person or an audience of 100 provide the APN with the essential tools for implementing change, collaborating effectively, presenting information at professional meetings, or communicating the impact of clinical outcomes in the boardroom. Public speaking skills, a professional image, and improved communication can facilitate advancement along any career ladder. The greater your fear, the more self-confidence you will gain by stepping up to a challenge and conquering it. This article describes strategies for organizing and presenting your message in a clear and concise format. Techniques to manage the anxiety produced when attempting to articulate your thoughts is essential for effective communication. Skills for enhancing the delivery of your message through effective body language, professional image, voice modulation, and use of audiovisual aids are addressed. Creative techniques for fielding questions are key in promoting a dynamic closure and provide consistent reinforcement of the key message content.

  2. Mini Review of Integrated Care and Implications for Advanced Practice Nurse Role

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Diana; Startsman, Laura F.; Perraud, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Literature related to primary care and behavioral health integration initiatives is becoming abundant. The United States’ 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act included provisions encouraging increased collaboration of care for individuals with behavioral and physical health service needs in the public sector. There is relatively little known of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs) roles with integrating primary and behavioral healthcare. The goal of this review article is to: (a) define integration of physical and behavioral healthcare and potential models; (b) answer the question as to what are effective evidence based models/strategies for integrating behavioral health and primary care; (c) explore the future role and innovations of APRNs in the integration of physical and behavioral healthcare. Results: The evidence- based literature is limited to three systematic reviews and six randomized controlled trials. It was difficult to generalize the data and the effective integration strategies varied from such interventions as care management to use of sertraline to depression management and to access. There were, though, implications for the integrated care advanced practice nurse to have roles inclusive of competencies, leadership, engagement, collaboration and advocacy. PMID:27347258

  3. Infection Management and Multidrug-Resistant Organisms in Nursing Home Residents With Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Susan L.; Shaffer, Michele L.; Loeb, Mark B.; Givens, Jane L.; Habtemariam, Daniel; Kiely, Dan K.; D’Agata, Erika

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Infection management in advanced dementia has important implications for (1) providing high-quality care to patients near the end of life and (2) minimizing the public health threat posed by the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective cohort study of 362 residents with advanced dementia and their health care proxies in 35 Boston area nursing homes for up to 12 months. MAINOUTCOMESAND MEASURES Data were collected to characterize suspected infections, use of antimicrobial agents (antimicrobials), clinician counseling of proxies about antimicrobials, proxy preference for the goals of care, and colonization with MDROs (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria). Main outcomes were (1) proportion of suspected infections treated with antimicrobials that met minimum clinical criteria to initiate antimicrobial treatment based on consensus guidelines and (2) cumulative incidence of MDRO acquisition among noncolonized residents at baseline. RESULTS The cohort experienced 496 suspected infections; 72.4% were treated with antimicrobials, most commonly quinolones (39.8%) and third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins (20.6%). At baseline, 94.8% of proxies stated that comfort was the primary goal of care, and 37.8% received counseling from clinicians about antimicrobial use. Minimum clinical criteria supporting antimicrobial treatment initiation were present for 44.0% of treated episodes and were more likely when proxies were counseled about antimicrobial use (adjusted odds ratio, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.08–1.86) and when the infection source was not the urinary tract (referent). Among noncolonized residents at baseline, the cumulative incidence of MDRO acquisition at 1 year was 48%. Acquisition was associated with exposure (>1 day) to quinolones (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 1.89; 95% CI, 1.28–2.81) and third- or fourth

  4. Advanced Practice Nursing: Is the Physician's Assistant an Accident of History or a Failure to Act?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman, Luther

    1998-01-01

    The responses of some nursing organizations regarding the establishment of collaborative relationships in the nursing profession may be responsible for the development of the physician assistant profession. The nursing profession should examine these responses while planning strategies to cope with the current chaos in health care. (JOW)

  5. Partnership for the Advancement of Information Literacy in a Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Sheila; Blake-Campbell, Barbara; McKay, Devin

    2012-01-01

    Nursing educators know that healthcare stakeholders expect nursing graduates to be able to manage information. Consequently, many nursing education programs are exploring ways of integrating information literacy across the curriculum not only to bolster evidence-based practice, but also to enhance professional development and encourage lifelong…

  6. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... and professional practice in nursing." Demonstration of professional development support and clinical advancement programs are hallmarks of a professional nursing practice environment and critical components of Nursing Magnet status. The ...

  7. Maternal and Neonatal Care. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains the materials required to teach a course in maternal and neonatal care that will prepare students for employment as practical nurses. The course's five instructional units cover procedures for caring for the following: prenatal patients, patients in labor and delivery, postpartum patients, healthy neonates, and…

  8. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BE. Perinatal viral infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ... K. Postnatal bacterial infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ...

  9. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies.

  10. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies. PMID:27108085

  11. Infusing Swanson's Theory of caring into an advanced practice nursing model for an infectious diseases anal dysplasia clinic.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Richard L; Corless, Inge B; Davis, Sheila M; Kwong, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing among HIV-infected men and women. The process of screening for anal dysplasia and the management of abnormal findings are currently and most often based on a medical model. The needs of these patients, however, go well beyond medical care. A more comprehensive and holistic approach to health care is, therefore, required. Given the scope of practice of advanced practice nurses who are involved in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with anal dysplasia, it is appropriate for them to assume leadership roles in addressing the needs of these patients. This article describes the application of a theory of caring to create an advanced practice nursing model of care for HIV-infected men and women in infectious diseases anal dysplasia clinics. PMID:22035527

  12. Bedside Guide for Neonatal Care Petty Julia Bedside Guide for Neonatal Care 352pp £21.99 Palgrave/Macmillan Education 9781137398468 1137398469 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    THE CHALLENGES and complexities of neonatal care are presented in an interactive way in this pocket-size teaching and learning tool. It would suit novice neonatal nurses and those qualified who want to refresh their skills.

  13. Advanced practice nursing, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an extensive review of the organizational and health care literature of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness. Teams have a long history in health care. Managers play an important role in mobilizing resources, guiding expectations of APN roles in teams and within organizations, and facilitating team process. Researchers have identified a number of advantages to the addition of APN roles in health care teams. The process within health care teams are dynamic and responsive to their surrounding environment. It appears that teams and perceptions of team effectiveness need to be understood in the broader context in which the teams are situated. Key team process are identified for team members to perceive their team as effective. The concepts of teamwork, perceptions of team effectiveness, and the introduction of APN roles in teams have been studied disparately. An exploration of the links between these concepts may further our understanding the health care team's perceptions of team effectiveness when APN roles are introduced. Such knowledge could contribute to the effective deployment of APN roles in health care teams and improve the delivery of health care services to patients and families.

  14. Advanced practice nursing, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an extensive review of the organizational and health care literature of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness. Teams have a long history in health care. Managers play an important role in mobilizing resources, guiding expectations of APN roles in teams and within organizations, and facilitating team process. Researchers have identified a number of advantages to the addition of APN roles in health care teams. The process within health care teams are dynamic and responsive to their surrounding environment. It appears that teams and perceptions of team effectiveness need to be understood in the broader context in which the teams are situated. Key team process are identified for team members to perceive their team as effective. The concepts of teamwork, perceptions of team effectiveness, and the introduction of APN roles in teams have been studied disparately. An exploration of the links between these concepts may further our understanding the health care team's perceptions of team effectiveness when APN roles are introduced. Such knowledge could contribute to the effective deployment of APN roles in health care teams and improve the delivery of health care services to patients and families.

  15. Advanced Nurse Practitioner Educational Needs for Safe and Efficient Radiological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Logsdon, Roberta; Gleason, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated perceived knowledge and educational preparedness of advanced practice nurses (APNs) in the area of radiological imaging, including awareness and utilization of the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria (ACR-AC). Previous studies have found a need for further education in radiological imaging for medical students, residents, and hospitalists; however, little to no research has been done to assess such knowledge and educational preparedness among APNs. An e-mail link to a researcher-developed questionnaire was sent to Florida licensed APNs. Statistical analysis used descriptive, parametric, and nonparametric methods including frequencies, percentages, and Mann-Whitney U statistics. Florida licensed APNs (n = 905) from 175 educational programs and 10 specialty areas responded to the questionnaire; 75.9% (n = 681) had never heard of the ACR-AC. Years of experience and training in acute care specialties increased perceived competency in ordering radiological tests. Results among APNs were similar to those reported from physician studies, and 92.3% of respondents (n = 829) stated that additional APN imaging education would be beneficial. These findings highlight the importance of incorporating more radiological imaging information into APN education, which could lead to a reduction in overall costs and improvement in perceived competence and knowledge of appropriate imaging utilization. PMID:26218489

  16. Advanced nurse practitioner-led referral for specialist care and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Mashlan, Wendy; Hayes, Julie; Thomas, Ceri

    2016-02-01

    In response to the need for appropriate and timely care of frail older patients admitted to hospital, a dedicated advanced nurse practitioner (ANP)-led referral service was developed. The service has continued to evolve over the 13 years since its implementation in accordance with changing service demands. This article describes the role of the ANP in care of the elderly/rehabilitation medicine and focuses on one area of clinical practice developed by the team: an ANP-led referral service. The aim of developing the service was to ensure that patients who required specialist care and rehabilitation could be identified and assessed as soon as possible after admission, with the premise that they could be transferred to a bed in care of the elderly medical wards. This was perceived by the ANPs to be advantageous for patients, who would receive care from a specialist team, and for care of the elderly staff who could use their knowledge and skills appropriately and safely.

  17. Advanced practice nursing, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an extensive review of the organizational and health care literature of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness. Teams have a long history in health care. Managers play an important role in mobilizing resources, guiding expectations of APN roles in teams and within organizations, and facilitating team process. Researchers have identified a number of advantages to the addition of APN roles in health care teams. The process within health care teams are dynamic and responsive to their surrounding environment. It appears that teams and perceptions of team effectiveness need to be understood in the broader context in which the teams are situated. Key team process are identified for team members to perceive their team as effective. The concepts of teamwork, perceptions of team effectiveness, and the introduction of APN roles in teams have been studied disparately. An exploration of the links between these concepts may further our understanding the health care team's perceptions of team effectiveness when APN roles are introduced. Such knowledge could contribute to the effective deployment of APN roles in health care teams and improve the delivery of health care services to patients and families. PMID:25397338

  18. Right person, right skills, right job: the contribution of objective structured clinical examinations in advancing staff nurse experts.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Marion; Strube, Petra; Vaux, Amanda; West, Nicky; Auditore, Anthony

    2013-10-01

    Recruitment processes need to discriminate among candidates to ensure that the right person with the right skills is selected for advancement opportunities. An innovative recruitment process using an objective structured clinical examination grounded in best practice guidelines resulted in improved recruitment practices for senior nursing clinical expert roles. Candidates' skills, knowledge, and attitudes in the areas of patient focus, clinical expertise, teamwork, and leadership were assessed using a clinical simulation. Candidates achieving advancement were assessed at 6 months to validate the efficacy of the process.

  19. From Nurse to Nurse Anesthetist: The Influence of Age and Gender on Professional Socialization and Career Commitment of Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugaman, Wynne R.; Lohrer, Donna J.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 1,106 student nurse anesthetists (40% male) showed that increasing age was negatively correlated with socioeconomic rewards. Male gender was positively correlated with administrative/supervisory roles, female gender with holistic patient care. Men achieved socialization more readily in occupational orientation. (SK)

  20. Conceptualizing Telehealth in Nursing Practice: Advancing a Conceptual Model to Fill a Virtual Gap.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Daniel A; Penner, Jamie L

    2016-03-01

    Increasingly nurses use various telehealth technologies to deliver health care services; however, there has been a lag in research and generation of empirical knowledge to support nursing practice in this expanding field. One challenge to generating knowledge is a gap in development of a comprehensive conceptual model or theoretical framework to illustrate relationships of concepts and phenomena inherent to adoption of a broad range of telehealth technologies to holistic nursing practice. A review of the literature revealed eight published conceptual models, theoretical frameworks, or similar entities applicable to nursing practice. Many of these models focus exclusively on use of telephones and four were generated from qualitative studies, but none comprehensively reflect complexities of bridging nursing process and elements of nursing practice into use of telehealth. The purpose of this article is to present a review of existing conceptual models and frameworks, discuss predominant themes and features of these models, and present a comprehensive conceptual model for telehealth nursing practice synthesized from this literature for consideration and further development. This conceptual model illustrates characteristics of, and relationships between, dimensions of telehealth practice to guide research and knowledge development in provision of holistic person-centered care delivery to individuals by nurses through telehealth technologies. PMID:25858897

  1. Leading the revolution in nursing practice: advancing health in the digital age.

    PubMed

    Porter-O'Grady, Tim

    2014-06-01

    Nursing is on the verge of a major shift in both its work and its value due to increasing pressure to move out of acute-care hospitals and into the community; and the influence of digitization in how nurses are able to provide care. PMID:25073051

  2. Updating the definition and role of public health nursing to advance and guide the specialty.

    PubMed

    Bekemeier, Betty; Walker Linderman, Tessa; Kneipp, Shawn; Zahner, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    National changes in the context for public health services are influencing the nature of public health nursing practice. Despite this, the document that defines public health nursing as a specialty--The Definition and Role of Public Health Nursing--has remained in wide use since its publication in 1996 without a review or update. With support from the American Public Health Association (APHA) Public Health Nursing Section, a national Task Force, was formed in November 2012 to update the definition of public health nursing, using processes that reflected deliberative democratic principles. A yearlong process was employed that included a modified Delphi technique and various modes of engagement such as online discussion boards, questionnaires, and public comment to review. The resulting 2013 document consisted of a reaffirmation of the one-sentence 1996 definition, while updating supporting documentation to align with the current social, economic, political, and health care context. The 2013 document was strongly endorsed by vote of the APHA Public Health Nursing Section elected leadership. The 2013 definition and document affirm the relevance of a population-focused definition of public health nursing to complex systems addressed in current practice and articulate critical roles of public health nurses (PHN) in these settings. PMID:25284433

  3. Updating the definition and role of public health nursing to advance and guide the specialty.

    PubMed

    Bekemeier, Betty; Walker Linderman, Tessa; Kneipp, Shawn; Zahner, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    National changes in the context for public health services are influencing the nature of public health nursing practice. Despite this, the document that defines public health nursing as a specialty--The Definition and Role of Public Health Nursing--has remained in wide use since its publication in 1996 without a review or update. With support from the American Public Health Association (APHA) Public Health Nursing Section, a national Task Force, was formed in November 2012 to update the definition of public health nursing, using processes that reflected deliberative democratic principles. A yearlong process was employed that included a modified Delphi technique and various modes of engagement such as online discussion boards, questionnaires, and public comment to review. The resulting 2013 document consisted of a reaffirmation of the one-sentence 1996 definition, while updating supporting documentation to align with the current social, economic, political, and health care context. The 2013 document was strongly endorsed by vote of the APHA Public Health Nursing Section elected leadership. The 2013 definition and document affirm the relevance of a population-focused definition of public health nursing to complex systems addressed in current practice and articulate critical roles of public health nurses (PHN) in these settings.

  4. Community of inquiry model: advancing distance learning in nurse anesthesia education.

    PubMed

    Pecka, Shannon L; Kotcherlakota, Suhasini; Berger, Ann M

    2014-06-01

    The number of distance education courses offered by nurse anesthesia programs has increased substantially. Emerging distance learning trends must be researched to ensure high-quality education for student registered nurse anesthetists. However, research to examine distance learning has been hampered by a lack of theoretical models. This article introduces the Community of Inquiry model for use in nurse anesthesia education. This model has been used for more than a decade to guide and research distance learning in higher education. A major strength of this model learning. However, it lacks applicability to the development of higher order thinking for student registered nurse anesthetists. Thus, a new derived Community of Inquiry model was designed to improve these students' higher order thinking in distance learning. The derived model integrates Bloom's revised taxonomy into the original Community of Inquiry model and provides a means to design, evaluate, and research higher order thinking in nurse anesthesia distance education courses.

  5. A new neurological focus in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Sonia L; Glass, Hannah C; Peloquin, Susan; Ferriero, Donna M

    2011-09-01

    Advances in the care of high-risk newborn babies have contributed to reduced mortality rates for premature and term births, but the surviving neonates often have increased neurological morbidity. Therapies aimed at reducing the neurological sequelae of birth asphyxia at term have brought hypothermia treatment into the realm of standard care. However, this therapy does not provide complete protection from neurological complications and a need to develop adjunctive therapies for improved neurological outcomes remains. In addition, the care of neurologically impaired neonates, regardless of their gestational age, clearly requires a focused approach to avoid further injury to the brain and to optimize the neurodevelopmental status of the newborn baby at discharge from hospital. This focused approach includes, but is not limited to, monitoring of the patient's brain with amplitude-integrated and continuous video EEG, prevention of infection, developmentally appropriate care, and family support. Provision of dedicated neurocritical care to newborn babies requires a collaborative effort between neonatologists and neurologists, training in neonatal neurology for nurses and future generations of care providers, and the recognition that common neonatal medical problems and intensive care have an effect on the developing brain. PMID:21808297

  6. Incorporating a health policy practicum in a graduate training program to prepare advanced practice nursing health services researchers.

    PubMed

    DiCenso, Alba; Housden, Laura; Heale, Roberta; Carter, Nancy; Canitz, Brenda; MacDonald-Rencz, Sandra; Buckley, Christine Rieck

    2012-11-01

    Health services research benefits from the active engagement of researchers and policy makers from generation through to application of research-based knowledge. One approach to help graduate students learn about the policy world is through participation in a policy practicum. This is an opportunity to work for a defined period of time in a setting where policy decisions are made. This article focuses on the integration of the policy practicum into graduate nursing education for advanced practice nurses. Ten graduate students and two postdoctoral fellows who had recently completed their practicums and three policy makers who had recently supervised students in provincial, federal, and international practicum projects were invited to submit a narrative about the experience. Based on qualitative analysis of the narratives, this article outlines objectives of the practicum, the policy practicum journey, student learning, and finally, the benefits and challenges of the experience.

  7. Effect of simulation on knowledge of advanced cardiac life support, knowledge retention, and confidence of nursing students in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Tawalbeh, Loai I; Tubaishat, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of simulation on nursing students' knowledge of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), knowledge retention, and confidence in applying ACLS skills. An experimental, randomized controlled (pretest-posttest) design was used. The experimental group (n = 40) attended an ACLS simulation scenario, a 4-hour PowerPoint presentation, and demonstration on a static manikin, whereas the control group (n = 42) attended the PowerPoint presentation and a demonstration only. A paired t test indicated that posttest mean knowledge of ACLS and confidence was higher in both groups. The experimental group showed higher knowledge of ACLS and higher confidence in applying ACLS, compared with the control group. Traditional training involving PowerPoint presentation and demonstration on a static manikin is an effective teaching strategy; however, simulation is significantly more effective than traditional training in helping to improve nursing students' knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention, and confidence about ACLS.

  8. Type 2 diabetes, genomics, and nursing: necessary next steps to advance the science into improved, personalized care.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Patricia C

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an inherited, chronic disorder with long-term complications; including cardiovascular disease the leading cause of mortality in the United States. The prevalence of T2DM and its complications are on the rise in the United States, highlighting the need for improved individualized prevention and treatment strategies. Exciting advancements in the field of genomics has led to the recent discovery of numerous genetic markers for T2DM; completing a promising first step toward improved, individualized prevention and treatment strategies for T2DM. These genomic markers, identified using genome-wide association studies (GWAS), candidate gene, and rare variant methodology, identify new physiologic pathways underlying the development of T2DM. Much more work is needed to successfully translate the identification of genetic markers for T2DM into improved, individualized prevention and treatment strategies. As front line providers and leaders of prevention and treatment strategies for chronic disease, nurses, nurse practitioners, and nurse scientists must contribute to this translational effort. Thus, it is important for nurses at all levels to (a) be aware of the current science of genetics and T2DM and (b) participate in the translation of this genetic information into improved, personalized patient care. The aim of this review is to (a) provide an overview of the current state of the science of genetic markers and T2DM and (b) highlight essential next steps to successfully translate the identification of genetic markers for T2DM into improved prevention and treatment strategies; focusing particularly on the role of nursing in this process.

  9. Nurses' knowledge of advance directives and perceived confidence in end‐of‐life care: a cross‐sectional study in five countries

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Geraldine; Weathers, Elizabeth; Friedman, M. Isabel; Gallo, Katherine; Ehrenfeld, Mally; Chan, Sophia; Li, William H.C.; Poletti, Piera; Zanotti, Renzo; Molloy, D. William; McGlade, Ciara; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J.; Itzhaki, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Nurses' knowledge regarding advance directives may affect their administration and completion in end‐of‐life care. Confidence among nurses is a barrier to the provision of quality end‐of‐life care. This study investigated nurses' knowledge of advance directives and perceived confidence in end‐of‐life care, in Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy and the USA using a cross‐sectional descriptive design (n = 1089). In all countries, older nurses and those who had more professional experience felt more confident managing patients' symptoms at end‐of‐life and more comfortable stopping preventive medications at end‐of‐life. Nurses in the USA reported that they have more knowledge and experience of advance directives compared with other countries. In addition, they reported the highest levels of confidence and comfort in dealing with end‐of‐life care. Although legislation for advance directives does not yet exist in Ireland, nurses reported high levels of confidence in end‐of‐life care. PMID:26823112

  10. Pain in the neonate: focus on nonpharmacologic interventions.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Brandy; Giebe, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    The assessment and treatment of pain in the neonate, especially preterm neonates, has been a challenge in the NICU for many years. Nurses caring for these vulnerable patients are in a key position to not only recognize when the neonate is experiencing pain but to also work collaboratively with other health care providers in determining the best method to treat and help prevent pain associated with procedures and routine caregiving activities. The American Academy of Pediatrics along with parent groups has recognized the importance of pain-prevention programs in treating pain in the neonate. Nurses, by anticipating and reducing both painful procedures and bedside interruptions, along with innovative nonpharmacologic interventions, can dramatically decrease the neonate's exposure to pain and the potential for long-term effects. An overview of nonpharmacologic interventions in the treatment of neonatal pain is provided for NICU nurses to help them effectively reduce their patient's pain and discomfort.

  11. 'I Used to Fight with Them but Now I Have Stopped!': Conflict and Doctor-Nurse-Anaesthetists' Motivation in Maternal and Neonatal Care Provision in a Specialist Referral Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Aberese-Ako, Matilda; Agyepong, Irene Akua; Gerrits, Trudie; Van Dijk, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives This paper analyses why and how conflicts occur and their influence on doctors and nurse-anaesthetists' motivation in the provision of maternal and neonatal health care in a specialist hospital. Methodology The study used ethnographic methods including participant observation, conversation and in-depth interviews over eleven months in a specialist referral hospital in Ghana. Qualitative analysis software Nvivo 8 was used for coding and analysis of data. Main themes identified in the analysis form the basis for interpreting and reporting study findings. Ethics Statement Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ghana Health Service Ethics Review board (approval number GHS-ERC:06/01/12) and from the University of Wageningen. Written consent was obtained from interview participants, while verbal consent was obtained for conversations. To protect the identity of the hospital and research participants pseudonyms are used in the article and the part of Ghana in which the study was conducted is not mentioned. Results Individual characteristics, interpersonal and organisational factors contributed to conflicts. Unequal power relations and distrust relations among doctors and nurse-anaesthetists affected how they responded to conflicts. Responses to conflicts including forcing, avoiding, accommodating and compromising contributed to persistent conflicts, which frustrated and demotivated doctors and nurse-anaesthetists. Demotivated workers exhibited poor attitudes in collaborating with co-workers in the provision of maternal and neonatal care, which sometimes led to poor health worker response to client care, consequently compromising the hospital's goal of providing quality health care to clients. Conclusion To improve health care delivery in health facilities in Ghana, health managers and supervisors need to identify conflicts as an important phenomenon that should be addressed whenever they occur. Effective mechanisms including training managers

  12. The Integration of Research by Nurse Educators: Advancing Practice through Professional Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Janice; Durrant, Michele; Avery, Shirley

    1999-01-01

    A nurse preceptorship program used narrative to help participants explore the complexity of pediatric clinical practice. Through narratives they shared clinical decision making, knowledge, and skills, transforming knowing into story telling into learning. (SK)

  13. Factors associated with the use of advanced practice nurses/physician assistants in a fee-for-service nursing home practice: a comparison with primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Bakerjian, Debra; Harrington, Charlene

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine factors associated with the use of advanced practice nurse and physician assistant (APN/PA) visits to nursing home (NH) patients compared with those by primary care physicians (PCPs). This was a secondary analysis using Medicare claims data. General estimation equations were used to determine the odds of NH residents receiving APN/PA visits. Ordinary least squares analyses were used to examine factors associated with these visits. A total of 5,436 APN/PAs provided care to 27% of 129,812 residents and were responsible for 16% of the 1.1 million Medicare NH fee-for-service visits in 2004. APN/PAs made an average of 33 visits annually compared with PCPs (21 visits). Neuropsychiatric and acute diagnoses and patients with a long-stay status were associated with more APN/PA visits. APN/PAs provide a substantial amount of care, but regional variations occur, and Medicare regulations constrain the ability of APN/PAs to substitute for physician visits.

  14. Nursing informatics: the future now.

    PubMed

    Mamta

    2014-01-01

    Technological advancements in the health care field have always impacted the health care practices. Nursing practice has also been greatly influenced by the technology. In the recent years, use of information technology including computers, handheld digital devices, internet has advanced the nursing by bridging the gap from nursing as an art to nursing as science. In every sphere of nursing practice, nursing research, nursing education and nursing informatics play a very important role. If used properly it is a way to save time, helping to provide quality nursing care and increases the proficiency of nursing personnel. PMID:25924417

  15. Implementing computer-based testing in distance education for advanced practice nurses: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Caudle, Patricia; Bigness, Joanne; Daniels, Judi; Gillmor-Kahn, Mickey; Knestrick, Joyce

    2011-01-01

    A distance education program utilized by graduate nursing students worldwide faces unique problems with testing. This article presents the results of a pilot study on the implementation of computer-based testing at the Frontier Nursing University. A detailed analysis of the evaluative survey completed by students in the pilot study revealed issues of hi-directional respect and trust between faculty and students and technological anxiety among students using computer-based testing. PMID:22029246

  16. Meaningful Use of Data in Care Coordination by the Advanced Practice Registered Nurse: The TeleFamilies Project

    PubMed Central

    Looman, Wendy S.; Erickson, Mary M.; Garwick, Ann W.; Cady, Rhonda G.; Kelly, Anne; Pettey, Carrie; Finkelstein, Stanley M.

    2012-01-01

    Meaningful use of electronic health records to coordinate care requires skillful synthesis and integration of subjective and objective data by practitioners to provide context for information. This is particularly relevant in the coordination of care for children with complex special health care needs. The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework and example of meaningful use within an innovative telenursing intervention to coordinate care for children with complex special health care needs. The TeleFamilies intervention engages an advanced practice nurse in a full-time care coordinator role within an existing hospital-based medical home for children with complex special health care needs. Care coordination is facilitated by the synthesis and integration of internal and external data using an enhanced electronic health record and telehealth encounters via telephone and videoconferencing between the advanced practice nurse and the family at home. The advanced practice nurse’s ability to maintain an updated plan of care that is shared across providers and systems and build a relationship over time with the patient and family supports meaningful use of these data. PMID:22948406

  17. Cost-utility analysis of an advanced pressure ulcer management protocol followed by trained wound, ostomy, and continence nurses.

    PubMed

    Kaitani, Toshiko; Nakagami, Gojiro; Iizaka, Shinji; Fukuda, Takashi; Oe, Makoto; Igarashi, Ataru; Mori, Taketoshi; Takemura, Yukie; Mizokami, Yuko; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of severe pressure ulcers (PUs) is an important issue that requires to be highlighted in Japan. In a previous study, we devised an advanced PU management protocol to enable early detection of and intervention for deep tissue injury and critical colonization. This protocol was effective for preventing more severe PUs. The present study aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness of the care provided using an advanced PU management protocol, from a medical provider's perspective, implemented by trained wound, ostomy, and continence nurses (WOCNs), with that of conventional care provided by a control group of WOCNs. A Markov model was constructed for a 1-year time horizon to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of advanced PU management compared with conventional care. The number of quality-adjusted life-years gained, and the cost in Japanese yen (¥) ($US1 = ¥120; 2015) was used as the outcome. Model inputs for clinical probabilities and related costs were based on our previous clinical trial results. Univariate sensitivity analyses were performed. Furthermore, a Bayesian multivariate probability sensitivity analysis was performed using Monte Carlo simulations with advanced PU management. Two different models were created for initial cohort distribution. For both models, the expected effectiveness for the intervention group using advanced PU management techniques was high, with a low expected cost value. The sensitivity analyses suggested that the results were robust. Intervention by WOCNs using advanced PU management techniques was more effective and cost-effective than conventional care.

  18. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    PubMed

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum.

  19. Neonatal conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn conjunctivitis; Conjunctivitis of the newborn; Ophthalmia neonatorum; Eye infection - neonatal conjunctivitis ... diseases spread through sexual contact to prevent newborn conjunctivitis caused by these infections. Putting eye drops into ...

  20. Neonatal Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Neonatal death ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Complications & Loss ...

  1. Advances in prevention and therapy of neonatal dairy calf diarrhoea: a systematical review with emphasis on colostrum management and fluid therapy.

    PubMed

    Meganck, Vanessa; Hoflack, Geert; Opsomer, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal calf diarrhoea remains the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in preweaned dairy calves worldwide. This complex disease can be triggered by both infectious and non-infectious causes. The four most important enteropathogens leading to neonatal dairy calf diarrhoea are Escherichia coli, rota- and coronavirus, and Cryptosporidium parvum. Besides treating diarrhoeic neonatal dairy calves, the veterinarian is the most obvious person to advise the dairy farmer on prevention and treatment of this disease. This review deals with prevention and treatment of neonatal dairy calf diarrhoea focusing on the importance of a good colostrum management and a correct fluid therapy. PMID:25431305

  2. Integrating advanced writing content into a scholarly inquiry in nursing course.

    PubMed

    Mandleco, Barbara L; Bohn, Christina; Callister, Lynn C; Lassetter, Jane; Carlton, Troy

    2012-02-17

    Since there are few data examining methods to help students learn to write in a scholarly manner, the purposes of this project were to (1) evaluate students' learning of writing content integrated into a Scholarly Inquiry in Nursing course by examining differences in scores on a writing assessment taken at the beginning and end of the course; and (2) examine student confidence ratings relative to writing to see if it improved during the course. After obtaining IRB approval and informed consent, the CLIPS pre and post assessment mean scores of 82 students in a Scholarly Inquiry in Nursing course were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Confidence ratings in formal and informal writing were also obtained from a subsample of 47 students. Mean scores improved in 12 out of 26 assessment categories related to punctuation, correct usage of words, and sentence construction. Student mean confidence ratings increased each month.

  3. Using an academic-community partnership model and blended learning to advance community health nursing pedagogy.

    PubMed

    Ezeonwu, Mabel; Berkowitz, Bobbie; Vlasses, Frances R

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a model of teaching community health nursing that evolved from a long-term partnership with a community with limited existing health programs. The partnership supported RN-BSN students' integration in the community and resulted in reciprocal gains for faculty, students and community members. Community clients accessed public health services as a result of the partnership. A blended learning approach that combines face-to-face interactions, service learning and online activities was utilized to enhance students' learning. Following classroom sessions, students actively participated in community-based educational process through comprehensive health needs assessments, planning and implementation of disease prevention and health promotion activities for community clients. Such active involvement in an underserved community deepened students' awareness of the fundamentals of community health practice. Students were challenged to view public health from a broader perspective while analyzing the impacts of social determinants of health on underserved populations. Through asynchronous online interactions, students synthesized classroom and community activities through critical thinking. This paper describes a model for teaching community health nursing that informs students' learning through blended learning, and meets the demands for community health nursing services delivery.

  4. Professional Behavior in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Karren

    2016-04-01

    Being clear about what constitutes professional behavior is a pathway to effective leadership. Not all nurses come out of educational programs with an understanding about what aspects of behavior signal true professionalism. This article uses the American Organization of Nurse Executives' Nurse Executive Competency for Processional Behavior to help professional development nurse faculty identify role modeling behavior and other aspects that new nurses can use to help them advance in their careers, while improving care to patients and families. PMID:27031029

  5. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  6. Considerations for design of an e-learning program augmenting advanced geriatric nurse practitioner's clinical skills training.

    PubMed

    Rostad, Hanne M; Grov, Ellen Karine; Moen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    E-learning programs offer learners flexibility, more control over their learning experience, possibilities for repetition and allows for learning to be more individualized compared to traditional teaching methods. This paper presents considerations for an interdisciplinary project to design an e-learning program for graduate students enrolled in a master's program in Advanced Geriatric Nursing. The e-learning program offers new opportunities for learners to apply theoretical knowledge and develop their skills in the process of collaborative knowledge creation. A model based on the systematic development of instruction and learning and a pedagogical framework for e-learning has guided the design process. This paper explains how the e-learning program was created and how content was developed and implemented in an e-learning environment. PMID:24943556

  7. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  8. Changing focus of practice for community health nurses: advancing the practice role.

    PubMed

    Munns, Ailsa; Downie, Jill; Wynaden, Diane; Hubble, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Many parents lack support in their parenting role that was once provided through extended families and community structures. Thus, some new parents experience high levels of stress and low self-esteem associated with the challenges of parenting. The lack of support also results in family discord and breakdown with the family environment having the potential to adversely impact children's mental and physical wellbeing and development. The Community Mothers Program (CMP) was initially developed in England and offers support to families during the first year of parenting. The program aims to provide parents with the support once experienced from within the extended family. It also aims to enrich community development by building the capacity of community members living in local communities to support parents. This paper describes the impact of the CMP when implemented into Western Australian as well as the changes to the professional practice role of community child health nurses involved in the program. The Community Mothers Program has proved to be very successful. The success is attributed to the partnership model established between community members, parents, and child health nurses.

  9. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital.

  10. Physician Assistant and Advance Practice Nurse Care in Hospital Outpatient Departments: United States, 2008-2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates Dashboard Technical Notes Other Publications Advance Data From Vital and ... Vital Statistics of the United States: 1890-1938 Technical Appendices Miscellaneous Publications National Conference on Health Statistics ...

  11. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) consensus on science with treatment recommendations for pediatric and neonatal patients: pediatric basic and advanced life support.

    PubMed

    2006-05-01

    Recommendations. Circulation. 2005;112(suppl):73-90) and Resuscitation (International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. 2005 International Consensus Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations. Resuscitation. 2005;67:271-291). Readers are encouraged to review the 2005 COSTR document in its entirety. It can be accessed through the CPR and ECC link at the AHA Web site: www.americanheart.org. The complete publication represents the largest evaluation of resuscitation literature ever published and contains electronic links to more detailed information about the international collaborative process. To organize the evidence evaluation, ILCOR representatives established 6 task forces: basic life support, advanced life support, acute coronary syndromes, pediatric life support, neonatal life support, and an interdisciplinary task force to consider overlapping topics such as educational issues. The AHA established additional task forces on stroke and, in collaboration with the American Red Cross, a task force on first aid. Each task force identified topics requiring evaluation and appointed international experts to review them. A detailed worksheet template was created to help the experts document their literature review, evaluate studies, determine levels of evidence, develop treatment recommendations, and disclose conflicts of interest. Two evidence evaluation experts reviewed all worksheets and assisted the worksheet reviewers to ensure that the worksheets met a consistently high standard. A total of 281 experts completed 403 worksheets on 275 topics, reviewing more than 22000 published studies. In December 2004 the evidence review and summary portions of the evidence evaluation worksheets, with worksheet author conflict of interest statements, were posted on the Internet at www.C2005.org, where readers can continue to access them. Journal advertisements and e-mails invited public comment. Two hundred forty

  12. Reinstating nursing administration graduate study in federal nurse traineeships.

    PubMed

    Kersbergen, A L

    1994-01-01

    In 1992, the federal guidelines for funding nurse traineeships were amended to exclude nurses who pursue advanced degrees in nursing administration. This legislation expires soon, and final drafting of new legislation will be completed during the summer of 1994. The author presents information to use in advocating for reinstatement of nursing administration students as potential recipients of federal nurse traineeship dollars for advanced education. PMID:8057165

  13. Considerations for emergencies & disasters in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Ronni; Pouletsos, Cheryl; Combs, Adriann

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines outside principles of emergency and disaster planning for neonatal intensive care units and includes resources available to organizations to support planning and education, and considerations for nurses developing hospital-specific neonatal intensive care unit disaster plans. Hospital disaster preparedness programs and unit-specific policies and procedures are essential in facilitating an effective response to major incidents or disasters, whether they are man-made or natural. All disasters place extraordinary stress on existing resources, systems, and personnel. If nurses in neonatal intensive care units work collaboratively to identify essential services in disasters, the result could be safer care for vulnerable patients.

  14. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis.

  15. Nurse burnout and stress in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Mercedes

    2008-12-01

    The effects of nurse burnout and stress in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)-high levels of absenteeism, low morale, mental fatigue, and exhaustion-can have detrimental effects on neonatal care. Because of the nature of this highly specialized form of nursing, NICU nurses can experience high levels of psychologic and physical stress. Burnout is a response to workplace stress that results in emotional and mental exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased sense of personal accomplishment. Job satisfaction, emotional support, and self-care are important components for preventing burnout in staff. Therefore, the implications regarding practice and nurse burnout in the NICU are clear. It is the responsibility of both individual nurses and administrative leaders to take the necessary steps to prevent nurse burnout. Preventing this phenomenon in the NICU can lead to better retention and recruitment rates and delivery of safe neonatal care. PMID:19060580

  16. “Picking up the pieces”—Meanings of receiving home nursing care when being old and living with advanced cancer in a rural area

    PubMed Central

    Devik, Siri Andreassen; Hellzen, Ove; Enmarker, Ingela

    2015-01-01

    Rural home nursing care is a neglected area in the research of palliative care offered to older cancer patients. Because access to specialized services is hampered by long distances and fragmented infrastructure, palliative care is often provided through standard home nursing services and delivered by general district nurses. This study aimed to illuminate the lived experience and to interpret the meaning of receiving home nursing care when being old and living with advanced cancer in a rural area in Norway. Narrative interviews were conducted with nine older persons, and a phenomenological hermeneutic approach was used to interpret the meaning of the lived experience. The analysis revealed three themes, each with subthemes: being content with what one gets, falling into place, and losing one's place. The phrase picking up the pieces was found useful to sum up the meaning of this lived experience. The three respective themes refer to how the pieces symbolize the remaining parts of life or available services in their environment, and how the older persons may see themselves as pieces or bricks in a puzzle. A strong place attachment (physical insideness, social insideness, and autobiographical insideness) is demonstrated by the informants in this study and suggests that the rural context may provide an advantageous healthcare environment. Its potential to be a source of comfort, security, and identity concurs with cancer patients’ strong desire for being seen as unique persons. The study shows that district nurses play an essential role in the provision of palliative care for older rural patients. However, the therapeutic value of being in one's familiar landscape seems to depend on how homecare nurses manage to locate it and use it in a more or less person-centred manner. Communication skills and attentiveness to psychosocial aspects of patient care stand out as important attributes for nursing in this context. PMID:26362533

  17. Neonatal Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Whitington, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a clinical condition in which severe liver disease in the newborn is accompanied by extrahepatic siderosis. Gestational alloimmune liver disease (GALD) has been established as the cause of fetal liver injury resulting in nearly all cases of NH. In GALD, a women is exposed to a fetal antigen that she does not recognize as “self” and subsequently begins to produce IgG antibodies that are directed against fetal hepatocytes. These antibodies bind to fetal liver antigen and activate the terminal complement cascade resulting in hepatocyte injury and death. GALD can cause congenital cirrhosis or acute liver failure with and without iron overload and siderosis. Practitioners should consider GALD in cases of fetal demise, stillbirth, and neonatal acute liver failure. Identification of infants with GALD is important as treatment is available and effective for subsequent pregnancies. PMID:25755519

  18. Overcoming the barriers to using kangaroo care in neonatal settings.

    PubMed

    Penn, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    Skin-to-skin contact, or kangaroo care (KC), has benefits for babies and parents, improving clinical outcomes, temperature control, breastfeeding rates and child-parent bonding; it reduces morbidity and mortality. Barriers to KC for neonates may include a lack of training for nurses, lack of time, maternal or child physical or mental ill health, and inappropriate settings. With education and helpful management, neonatal nurses can advocate for KC for all babies. Parents may need information and encouragement to begin with. Therefore, nurses can improve the experiences of their patients and, in the long run, free time to perform clinical procedures.

  19. Neonatal tumours.

    PubMed

    Moore, S W

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal or perinatal tumours frequently relate to prenatal or developmental events and have a short exposure window which provides an opportunity to study tumours in a selective sensitive period of development. As a result, they display a number of host-specific features which include occasional spontaneous maturational changes with cells still responding to developmental influences. Neonatal tumours (NNT) are studied for a number of important reasons. Firstly, many of the benign tumours arising from soft tissue appear to result from disturbances in growth and development and some are associated with other congenital anomalies. Study of these aspects may open the door for investigation of genetic and epigenetic changes in genes controlling foetal development as well as environmental and drug effects during pregnancy. Secondly, the clinical behaviour of NNT differs from that of similar tumours occurring later in childhood. In addition, certain apparently malignant NNT can 'change course' in infancy leading to the maturation of apparently highly malignant tumours. Thirdly, NNT underline the genetic associations of most tumours but appear to differ in the effects of proto-oncogenes and other oncogenic factors. In this context, there are also connections between the foetal and neonatal period and some "adult" cancers. Fourthly, they appear to arise in a period in which minimal environmental interference has occurred, thus providing a unique potential window of opportunity to study the pathogenesis of tumour behaviour. This study will seek to review what is currently known in each of these areas of study as they apply to NNT. Further study of the provocative differences in tumour behaviour in neonates provides insights into the natural history of cancer in humans and promotes novel cancer therapies.

  20. Regulatory Advances in 11 Sub-Saharan Countries in Year 3 of the African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives (ARC)

    PubMed Central

    Dynes, Michelle; Tison, Laura; Johnson, Carla; Verani, Andre; Zuber, Alexandra; Riley, Patricia L.

    2016-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa carries the greatest burden of the HIV pandemic. Enhancing the supply and use of human resources through policy and regulatory reform is a key action needed to improve the quality of HIV services in this region. In year 3 of the African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives (ARC), a President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief initiative, 11 country teams of nursing and midwifery leaders (“Quads”) received small grants to carry out regulatory improvement projects. Four countries advanced a full stage on the Regulatory Function Framework (RFF), a staged capability maturity model used to evaluate progress in key regulatory functions. While the remaining countries did not advance a full stage on the RFF, important gains were noted. The year-3 evaluation highlighted limitations of the ARC evaluation strategy to capture nuanced progress and provided insight into how the RFF might be adapted for future use. PMID:27086189

  1. Neonatal circumcision.

    PubMed

    Lerman, S E; Liao, J C

    2001-12-01

    The merits of neonatal circumcision continue to be debated hotly. Some argue that circumcision is a "uniquely American medical enigma." Most of the world's male population remains uncircumcised; however, most boys born in the United States continue to undergo neonatal circumcision. Review of existing literature supports that most children who are uncircumcised do well from a medical standpoint and, thus, the question of whether US health care practitioners are subjecting neonates to an unnecessary surgical procedure remains. The medical benefits of circumcision are multiple, but most are small. The clearest medical benefit of circumcision is the relative reduction in the risk for a UTI, especially in early infancy. Although this risk [figure: see text] is real, the absolute numbers are small (risk ranges from 1 in 100 to 1 in 1000), and one investigator has estimated that it may take approximately 80 neonatal circumcisions to prevent one UTI. In the case of a patient with known urologic abnormalities that predispose to UTI, neonatal circumcision has a clearer role in terms of medical benefit to the patient. Most of the other medical benefits of circumcision probably can be realized without circumcision as long as access to clean water and proper penile hygiene are achieved. Proper penile hygiene should all but eliminate the risk for foreskin-related medical problems that will require circumcision. Moreover, proper hygiene and access to clean water has been shown to reduce the rate of development of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis in the uncircumcised population. Proper techniques on the care of the foreskin are illustrated in the American Academy of Pediatrics pamphlet titled "How to care for the uncircumcised penis." Regarding the relationship between STDs and circumcision, patient education and the practice of low-risk sexual behavior make a far greater impact than does routine circumcision in hopes of reducing the spread of HIV and other STDs. Nevertheless

  2. The role of governance in implementing task-shifting from physicians to nurses in advanced roles in Europe, U.S., Canada, New Zealand and Australia.

    PubMed

    Maier, Claudia B

    2015-12-01

    Task-shifting from physicians to nurses is increasing worldwide; however, research on how it is governed is scarce. This international study assessed task-shifting governance models and implications on practice, based on a literature scoping review; and a survey with 93 country experts in 39 countries (response rate: 85.3%). Governance was assessed by several indicators, regulation of titles, scope of practice, prescriptive authority, and registration policies. This policy analysis focused on eleven countries with task-shifting at the Advanced Practice Nursing/Nurse Practitioner (APN/NP) level. Governance models ranged from national, decentralized to no regulation, but at the discretion of employers and settings. In countries with national or decentralized regulation, restrictive scope of practice laws were shown as barrier, up-to-date laws as enablers to advanced practice. Countries with decentralized regulation resulted in uneven levels of practice. In countries leaving governance to individual settings, practice variations existed, moreover data availability and role clarity was limited. Policy options include periodic reviews to ensure laws are up to date, minimum harmonization in decentralized contexts, harmonized educational and practice-level requirements to reduce practice variation and ensure quality. From a European Union (EU) perspective, regulation is preferred over non-regulation as a first step toward the recognition of qualifications in countries with similar levels of advanced practice. Countries early on in the process need to be aware that different governance models can influence practice.

  3. Interpretation of clotting tests in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sanchita; Curley, Anna; Stanworth, Simon J

    2015-05-01

    There are significant differences between the coagulation system in neonates compared with children and adults. Abnormalities of standard coagulation tests are common within the neonatal population. The laboratory tests of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) were developed to investigate coagulation factor deficiencies in patients with a known bleeding history, and their significance and applied clinical value in predicting bleeding (or thrombotic) risk in critically ill patients is weak. Routine screening of coagulation on admission to the neonatal intensive care unit leads to increased use of plasma for transfusion. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is a human donor plasma frozen within a short specified time period after collection (often 8 h) and then stored at -30°C. FFP has little effect on correcting abnormal coagulation tests when mild and moderate abnormalities of PT are documented in neonates. There is little evidence of effectiveness of FFP in neonates. A large trial by the Northern Neonatal Nursing Initiative assessed the use of prophylactic FFP in preterm infants and reported no improvement in clinical outcomes in terms of mortality or severe disability. An appropriate FFP transfusion strategy in neonates should be one that emphasises the therapeutic use in the face of bleeding rather than prophylactic use in association with abnormalities of standard coagulation tests that have very limited predictive value for bleeding.

  4. Meeting the Needs of Children with Medical Complexity Using a Telehealth Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Care Coordination Model

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Mary; Lunos, Scott; Finkelstein, Stanley M.; Looman, Wendy; Celebreeze, Margaret; Garwick, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Effective care coordination is a key quality and safety strategy for populations with chronic conditions, including children with medical complexity (CMC). However, gaps remain in parent report of the need for care coordination help and receipt of care coordination help. New models must close this gap while maintaining family-centered focus. A three-armed randomized controlled trial conducted in an established medical home utilized an advanced practice registered nurse intervention based on Presler’s model of clinic-based care coordination. The model supported families of CMC across settings using telephone only or telephone and video telehealth care coordination. Effectiveness was evaluated from many perspectives and this paper reports on a subset of outcomes that includes family-centered care (FCC), need for care coordination help and adequacy of care coordination help received. FCC at baseline and end of study showed no significant difference between groups. Median FCC scores of 18.0–20.0 across all groups indicated high FCC within the medical home. No significant differences were found in the need for care coordination help within or between groups and over time. No significant difference was found in the adequacy of help received between groups at baseline. However, this indicator increased significantly over time for both intervention groups. These findings suggest that in an established medical home with high levels of FCC, families of CMC have unmet needs for care coordination help that are addressed by the APRN telehealth care coordination model. PMID:25424455

  5. Meeting the needs of children with medical complexity using a telehealth advanced practice registered nurse care coordination model.

    PubMed

    Cady, Rhonda G; Erickson, Mary; Lunos, Scott; Finkelstein, Stanley M; Looman, Wendy; Celebreeze, Margaret; Garwick, Ann

    2015-07-01

    Effective care coordination is a key quality and safety strategy for populations with chronic conditions, including children with medical complexity (CMC). However, gaps remain in parent report of the need for care coordination help and receipt of care coordination help. New models must close this gap while maintaining family-centered focus. A three-armed randomized controlled trial conducted in an established medical home utilized an advanced practice registered nurse intervention based on Presler's model of clinic-based care coordination. The model supported families of CMC across settings using telephone only or telephone and video telehealth care coordination. Effectiveness was evaluated from many perspectives and this paper reports on a subset of outcomes that includes family-centered care (FCC), need for care coordination help and adequacy of care coordination help received. FCC at baseline and end of study showed no significant difference between groups. Median FCC scores of 18.0-20.0 across all groups indicated high FCC within the medical home. No significant differences were found in the need for care coordination help within or between groups and over time. No significant difference was found in the adequacy of help received between groups at baseline. However, this indicator increased significantly over time for both intervention groups. These findings suggest that in an established medical home with high levels of FCC, families of CMC have unmet needs for care coordination help that are addressed by the APRN telehealth care coordination model.

  6. Infection control in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Chudleigh, J; Fletcher, M; Gould, D

    2005-10-01

    Healthcare-associated infection is a major problem in acute hospital settings. Hand decontamination is considered to be the most effective means of preventing healthcare-associated infection, but is poorly performed. Few studies have examined technique, which may be important in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) where clinical procedures are intricate and could result in contamination of many areas of the hand, resulting in cross-infection. This study examined technique in six NICUs. Eighty-eight nurses were observed. A scoring system was developed so that technique could be quantified and subjected to statistical testing. The mean score was 6.29 out of 11 when hands were washed and 3.87 out of 7 when alcohol hand rub was used, indicating that performance was not optimal. Scores for technique were not significantly different in each NICU. Senior nurses achieved higher scores for handwashing (P<0.01), as did nurses holding positive feelings about the atmosphere in their NICU (P=0.04). Junior nurses scored less well on a knowledge questionnaire than senior nurses (P<0.01). Nurses who had been employed in the neonatal unit for less than one year also scored less well (P<0.01). Differences in technique were noted when comparing the beginning and end of long shifts. These differences were not noted at the beginning and end of standard shifts.

  7. Can training non-physician clinicians/associate clinicians (NPCs/ACs) in emergency obstetric, neonatal care and clinical leadership make a difference to practice and help towards reductions in maternal and neonatal mortality in rural Tanzania? The ETATMBA project

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, David R; Shemdoe, Aloisia; Mazuguni, Festo; Mbaruku, Godfrey; Davies, David; Kihaile, Paul; Pemba, Senga; Bergström, Staffan; Nyamtema, Angelo; Mohamed, Hamed-Mahfoudh; O'Hare, Joseph Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives During late 2010, 36 trainees including 19 assistant medical officers (AMOs) 1 senior clinical officer (CO) and 16 nurse midwives/nurses were recruited from districts across rural Tanzania and invited to join the Enhancing Human Resources and Use of Appropriate Technologies for Maternal and Perinatal Survival in the sub-Saharan Africa (ETATMBA) training programme. The ETATMBA project was training associate clinicians (ACs) as advanced clinical leaders in emergency obstetric care. The trainees returned to health facilities across the country with the hope of being able to apply their new skills and knowledge. The main aim of this study was to explore the impact of the ETATMBA training on health outcomes including maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality in their facilities. Secondly, to explore the challenges faced in working in these health facilities. Design The study is a pre-examination/postexamination of maternal and neonatal health indicators and a survey of health facilities in rural Tanzania. The facilities surveyed were those in which ETATMBA trainees were placed post-training. The maternal and neonatal indicators were collected for 2011 and 2013 and the survey of the facilities was in early 2014. Results 16 of 17 facilities were surveyed. Maternal deaths show a non-significant downward trend over the 2 years (282–232 cases/100 000 live births). There were no significant differences in maternal, neonatal and birth complication variables across the time-points. The survey of facilities revealed shortages in key areas and some are a serious concern. Conclusions This study represents a snapshot of rural health facilities providing maternal and neonatal care in Tanzania. Enhancing knowledge, practical skills, and clinical leadership of ACs may have a positive impact on health outcomes. However, any impact may be confounded by the significant challenges in delivering a service in terms of resources. Thus, training may be beneficial, but it

  8. School Nurse Intention to Pursue Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a…

  9. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: Gateway to Screening for Bipolar Disorder in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel-Gasparro, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this mixed methods descriptive study was to explore Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs’) knowledge of bipolar disorder (BPD) and their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to screening patients with known depression for BPD. Methods: A mixed method study design using surveys on BPD knowledge and screening practices as well as focus group data collection method for facilitators and barriers to screening. Results: 89 APRNs completed the survey and 12 APRNs participated in the focus groups. APRNs in any practice setting had low knowledge scores of BPD. No significant differences in screening for BPD for primary and non primary care APRNs. Qualitative findings revealed screening relates to tool availability; time, unsure of when to screen, fear of sigma, symptoms knowledge of BPD, accessible referral system, personal experiences with BPD, and therapeutic relationships with patients. Conclusion: Misdiagnosis of BPD as unipolar depression is common in primary care settings, leading to a long lag time to optimal diagnosis and treatment. The wait time to diagnosis and treatment could be reduced if APRNs in primary care settings screen patients with a diagnosis of depression by using validated screening tools. These results can inform APRN practice and further research on the effectiveness of screening for reducing the morbidity and mortality of BPDs in primary care settings; underscores the need for integration of mental health care into primary care as well as the need for more APRN education on the diagnosis and management of bipolar disorders. PMID:27347256

  10. Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography.

    PubMed

    Duffey, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography is a new technique intended to enhance the quality of the photographs provided to families following their loss. Water immersion appears to be most helpful following a second trimester fetal demise. This technique can be used by nurses, professional photographers and others in addition to more traditional neonatal bereavement photography. It does not require special skills or equipment and can be implemented in virtually any perinatal setting. The enhanced quality of photographs produced with this method can potentially provide a source of comfort to grieving families.

  11. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Robles, David T; Jaramillo, Lorena; Hornung, Robin L

    2006-12-10

    An otherwise healthy 5-week-old infant with erythematous plaques predominantly on the face and scalp presented to our dermatology clinic. The mother had been diagnosed with lupus erythematosus 2 years earlier but her disease was quiescent. Neonatal lupus is a rare condition associated with transplacental transfer of IgG anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies from the mother to the fetus. Active connective tissue disease in the mother does not have to be present and in fact is often absent. Although the cutaneous, hematologic and hepatic manifestations are transient, the potential for permanent heart block makes it necessary for this to be carefully ruled out. As in this case, the dermatologist may be the one to make the diagnosis and should be aware of the clinical presentation, work-up, and management of this important disease.

  12. Value of intensified nursing

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Wilhelm; Konta, Brigitte; Prusa, Nina; Raymann, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    The concept "intensified nursing" is mentioned in differentiation to concepts of "nursing care" or "nursing" which intensifies resources or patient contact. Especially psychic and social needs of patients are very appreciated in nursing. A similar type of nursing is known under the concept "advanced nursing practice" (ANP) which means, that a specialised, academically trained nurse offers an extended nursing care in which a focus on the published knowledge of evidence based research is made. From the thin literature to this topic a selection of predetermined topics was analysed where at least two articles with a sufficient high methodical quality were available. The selected topic groups were: „Infant and paediatric nursing", "gerontology" and "oncology". Generally the five publications concerning infant and paediatric nursing could conclusive show a benefit of intensified nursing. Further research is still needed to prove intensified nursing care. Two publications could be found to the gerontological intensified nursing; both used an extended nursing model and an enlarged use of resources. Both studies demonstrated a measurable success in the applied parameters. Two studies also could be analysed in the oncological field in which successes were also provable by the applied parameters. The success was given especially in a higher patient satisfaction, one study showed an improved scheduling (time planning) of nurses. There was not one article concerning economic questions of intensified nursing care. It has to be taken into account that the financial resources have to be used effectively also in nursing nowadays. It has to be assumed that the costs are driven by increased use of resources. Savings can be achieved, however, in the form of avoided therapies and days in hospital by intensified nursing. The intensified nursing can be considered as similar cost-effective as conventional models of nursing. Ethically it is necessary to consider that the possibilities of

  13. The standardization of critical care nursing education and training: strategies for advancing clinical practice in Ontario's adult ICUs.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Patricia; Pinto, Marsha; Fortier, Wendy; Bennett, Jocelyn

    2007-01-01

    In 2004/2005, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC) launched a critical care transformation strategy with a goal to enhance service delivery through improved access, quality and system resource management. Health human resources planning was seen as essential to the success of the strategy, particularly recruitment, education/training and retention of critical care nurses. A nursing task group was invited to articulate core competencies and practice standards that can be applied across Ontario's adult ICUs and to make recommendations for implementation and the training needed to encourage compliance with the initiative. In this article, the opportunity to position nursing within the Ontario MOHLTC vision is described, as well as the work undertaken to prepare for a province-wide approach to critical care nursing education and training.

  14. AACN White Paper: Distance Technology in Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    Technological advances have increased opportunities for nursing education, affording increased collaboration among nursing faculties in teaching, practice, and research. In an era when nurses are in demand, technology may help the profession educate nurses, prepare future educators, and advance the science of nursing. Several factors should be…

  15. A conversation about practice development and knowledge translation as mechanisms to align the academic and clinical contexts for the advancement of nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kenneth; Kitson, Alison; Cross, Wendy; Thoms, Debra; Thornton, Anna; Moss, Cheryle; Campbell, Steve; Graham, Iain

    2012-01-01

    Practice development (PD) and knowledge translation (KT) have emerged recently as methodologies which assist advancement in gathering and using evidence in practice. For nursing to benefit from these methodologies there is a need to advance the dialogue between academia and the service sector concerning the use and further development of these methodologies as well as how we create the most effective partnerships between academia and practice. To advance this dialogue and to gain insights into the similarities and differences between KT and PD and between the academic and the service sectors, four conversations from different leaders in these sectors have been gathered and are presented here. These four discrete narratives are presented to showcase the diversity of sector contexts in relation to PD and KT methodologies. Narrative One focuses on some of the theoretical and policy issues related to creating partnerships between traditional "knowledge creation systems" (universities) and "knowledge utilization systems" Narrative Two discusses how a large school of nursing responded to the challenge of creating partnerships for practice development in an attempt to bridge the academic/service divide and produce benefits to both organisations. Narratives Three and Four describe the view of practice development from the service side. The final section of the paper presents an agenda for discussion and action based on the emerging set of principles.

  16. Being in a safe haven and struggling against alcohol dependency. The meaning of caring for male patients in advanced addiction nursing.

    PubMed

    Thurang, Anna; Rydström, Jens; Bengtsson Tops, Anita

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore and illuminate the meaning of advanced nursing caring for men with alcohol dependency, as narrated by the men themselves. Ten male patients were interviewed in-depth and data were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic analysis. Caring meant having the opportunity to rest in a safe haven together with professional caregivers, to struggle for liberation from dependency, and to expand the life-sphere by starting to accept oneself and broaden social participation. The findings illuminate various patterns of masculinity and point to the importance for caregivers to be open to challenging stereotypical gender assumptions.

  17. A proof-of-concept implementation of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) role: structural empowerment, role clarity and team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Feistritzer, Nancye R; Jones, Pam O

    2014-03-01

    The quest for decreased cost of care and improved outcomes has created the need for highly effective clinical roles and teams. This article describes the role of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) within a proof-of-concept implementation of a new care delivery model, the Vanderbilt Anticipatory Care Team. Role clarity is central to both structural empowerment of the APRN and team effectiveness. A modified PeaceHealth Team Development Measure tool measured baseline role clarity as a component of overall team effectiveness. A role description for the unit-based APRN based on a comprehensive assessment of the proof-of-concept unit is provided.

  18. Update on Neonatal Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Rozance, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Neonatal hypoglycemia is one of the most common biochemical abnormalities encountered in the newborn. However, controversy remains surrounding its definition and management especially in asymptomatic patients. Recent Findings New information has been published that describes the incidence and timing of low glucose concentrations in the groups most at risk for asymptomatic neonatal hypoglycemia. Furthermore, one large prospective study failed to find an association between repetitive low glucose concentrations and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. But hypoglycemia due to hyperinsulinism, especially genetic causes, continued to be associated with brain injury. New advances were made in the diagnosis and management of hyperinsulinism, including acquired hyperinsulinism in small for gestational age infants and others. Continuous glucose monitoring remains an attractive strategy for future research in this area. Summary The fundamental question of how best to manage asymptomatic newborns with low glucose concentrations remains unanswered. Balancing the risks of over treating newborns with low glucose concentrations who are undergoing a normal transition following birth against the risks of under treating those in whom low glucose concentrations are pathological, dangerous, and/or a harbinger of serious metabolic disease remains a challenge. PMID:24275620

  19. Good nurse, bad nurse....

    PubMed

    Alavi, C; Cattoni, J

    1995-02-01

    The construction of the nursing subject is discussed. The paper takes a historical perspective, arguing that the range of speaking positions available to the nurse is limited by gender, class and education. It evaluates the position of nursing in the university, showing how this also has propensity to limit the development of the nursing profession.

  20. Change in neonatal care pattern and neonatal mortality in a rural medical college.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, P; Potdar, S

    1988-02-01

    Due to the nonavailability of separate nursing staff for a special care neonatal unit in a rural medical college, the strategy for neonatal care of high risk babies was changed from January 1, 1985 onwards. These babies were managed mainly in postnatal wards with emphasis on maternal involvement reinforced by day-to-day orientation of mothers, nurses, and doctors to neonatal care. The incidence of fullterm (FT), preterm (PT), and low birthweight (LBW) babies were comparable in 1984 and 1985. The overall neonatal mortality (NM) was 8.3% in 1984 and 4.3% in 1985, NM in PT was 50.8% in 1984 and 30.0% in 1985, and NM in LBW was 17.0% in 1984 and 9.3% in 1985. These rates were reduced by approximately 40-50% of that recorded in 1984. The difference in all groups was statistically significant. However, the NM in the VLBW (1500 g) did not change substantially. Deaths due to severe asphyxia and intraventricular hemorrhage were reduced from 4.03% of all livebirths in 1984 to 2.2%, the difference being statistically significant. The most significant reeducation was seen in deaths due to infection which dropped from 2.45% of total livebirths in 1984 to 0.88% of the total in 1985. With this experience, the authors recommend the measures adopted by them to reduce the NM, especially in small centers and rural areas where nursing and other facilities are not optimal. PMID:3246397

  1. Participants' engagement with and reactions to the use of on-line action learning sets to support advanced nursing role development.

    PubMed

    Currie, Kay; Biggam, John; Palmer, Janette; Corcoran, Terry

    2012-04-01

    Professional role development in nursing is occurring at a rapid pace in the UK as elsewhere. Internationally, finding relevant, flexible, sustainable educational solutions to support the preparation of nurses for new roles presents significant challenges for Higher Education Institutions, health service managers and the clinical practitioners who are would-be students. The use of on-line learning is frequently advocated as one means of resolving these difficulties. This paper discusses participants' engagement with, and reactions to, the use of on-line Action Learning Sets (ALS) as part of a national pilot development pathway for Advanced Nursing Practice in Scotland. Data collection included: survey of participants' views of on-line ALS; survey comparing perceptions of ALS with other educational experiences within the pathway; in-depth interviews with case-site participants. A range of benefits and limitations of on-line ALS was identified. The benefit of flexible access and sharing experiences with others was emphasised. Conversely, multiple commitments and lack of group cohesiveness significantly interfered with the effectiveness of this process. Key recommendations for future implementation acknowledge participants' preference for a blended approach, with face-to-face sessions to provide 'getting-to-know-you' opportunities, enhancing commitment to the group process.

  2. Dimensions of nursing process: the leadership cure.

    PubMed

    McBride, Karin; Snyder, Eugene R

    2011-08-01

    The field of nursing is in a state of crisis. This crisis has a number of causes: a shortage of registered nurses to fill job vacancies, lack of professional growth opportunities, inability to participate in decision making, and lack of orientation and training for newly graduated nurses. Democratic leadership can result in respect and greater levels of trust among staff in a neonatal intensive care unit.

  3. Advancing the educational agenda.

    PubMed

    Baker, Cynthia

    2010-12-01

    This timely paper provides a thought-provoking analysis of current advanced practice nursing education in Canada. It comes at a critical juncture in the evolution of Canadian healthcare services and the redefinition of nursing roles. Increasingly, multiple sectors of society are calling for more nurses with advanced practice preparation and for a wider range of advanced practice nursing specialties. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are being proposed as a solution to a financially overburdened national healthcare system, the increasing complexity of healthcare services, and a crisis in access to primary healthcare. Thus, governments seeking greater fiscal efficiency, medical specialists needing sophisticated collaborative support, and healthcare consumers see APNs as the way forward.

  4. They know!—Do they? A qualitative study of residents and relatives views on advance care planning, end-of-life care, and decision-making in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Bollig, Georg; Gjengedal, Eva; Rosland, Jan Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Residents living in long-term care facilities are a vulnerable population. For many residents, a nursing home is their place of death. Palliative care and end-of-life decisions are important components of their care provision. Aim: To study the views of cognitively able residents and relatives on advance care planning, end-of-life care, and decision-making in nursing homes. Design: A qualitative study with in-depth interviews with nursing home residents and focus group interviews with relatives of nursing home residents. Analysis is based on interpretive description. Setting/participants: In total, 43 informants from nine nursing homes participated in the study (25 nursing home residents and 18 relatives). All included residents had capacity to provide informed consent and lived in long-term care. Results: The main findings of this study were the differing views about decision-making and advance care planning of residents and relatives. Residents do trust relatives and staff to make important decisions for them. The relatives are in contrast insecure about the residents’ wishes and experience decision-making as a burden. The majority of the residents had not participated in advance care planning. None of the residents stated challenges connected to end-of-life care or mentioned the wish for euthanasia. Conclusion: Although most residents seem to be satisfied with decision-making and end-of life care, there is a need for systematic advance care planning. Advance care planning could help to explore future wishes for care and ease decision-making for the relatives, physicians, and staff and should be offered to all cognitively able nursing homes residents. PMID:26396227

  5. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Brucato, Antonio; Cimaz, Rolando; Stramba-Badiale, Marco

    2002-12-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB), defined as an atrioventricular block diagnosed in utero, at birth, or within the neonatal period (0-27 d after birth), is a rare disorder closely linked to transplacental transport of maternal antibodies anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB. These antibodies may induce a myocarditis, or interact directly with calcium channel proteins with disturbance of transmembrane signaling at the level of the conduction tissue, or interfere with apoptosis. Depending on the severity of the process, the fetus may die in utero or a few days after birth or survive to the perinatal period and have a near-normal life; in most survivors a pace-maker must be implanted. Skin lesions, haematological disorders, and hepatic cholestasis are other transient clinical features of the syndrome. Sinus bradycardia and QT interval prolongation may be observed as well in babies born from anti-Ro/SSA positive mothers. The risk of recurrence of complete block ranges from 10-17%. Most of the mothers are asymptomatic at delivery and are identified only by the birth of an affected child. Their long-term outcome generally is more reassuring than previously assumed and arthralgias and dry eyes are the most common symptoms. A standard therapy for blocks detected in utero still does not exist. The prevalence of complete CHB in newborns of anti-Ro/SSA positive women and with known connective-tissue disease was 2%. Serial echocardiograms and obstetric sonograms, performed at least every 2 wk starting from the 16 wk gestation, are recommended in anti-Ro/SSA positive pregnant women.

  6. Continuing the cultural competency journey through exploration of knowledge, attitudes, and skills with advanced practice psychiatric nursing students: an exemplar.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Mary M; Robbins, Leslie K

    2011-06-01

    Numerous training and education programs have evolved to address culturally competent health care delivery. This article describes an exemplar educational approach used to teach cultural competency to beginning graduate psychiatric mental health nursing students. Using interactive strategies delivered within the 4 phases of the curriculum, the approach has been shown to facilitate students' ongoing journey to cultural competence. Building on baccalaureate nursing competencies, the course addresses attitudes, knowledge, skills, and cultural humility to strengthen cultural self-assessment, cross-cultural clinical practice expertise, and the use of culturally appropriate research for graduate students.

  7. [Mental health support for nurses].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yoshie

    2012-01-01

    Burnout specific to human service workers has been reported in the U.S. in the 1970s. Since then, such burnout has become widely known and the mental health of nurses has attracted attention. Stressors in the work environment and complexity have increased with advancement in increasingly complicated medical care. One of the major roles of a psychiatric liaison nurse is to provide support to improve the mental health of nurses. In our hospital, a psychiatric liaison nurse has a staff position under the direct supervision of the director of the nursing department but operates outside the chain of command. A psychiatric liaison nurse is not involved in the performance review of nurses. Thus, the nursing staff and the nursing manager can discuss their problems with the psychiatric liaison nurse without risks. Psychiatric liaison nurses provide support as counselors through individual and group interviews so that nurses can become re-energized about their work. In addition, psychiatric liaison nurses provide consultations and education. They perform coordination function to organize an environment to promote consultations regarding nurse support to the staff nurses and the nursing manager and to promote support by supervisors. For support after reinstatement of a nurse following a medical leave, it is particularly important to work with not only the individual nurse but also the entire nursing team. In our hospital, newly graduated nurses are given the GHQ-28 after one month of employment to assess the support they might need. In our study, nurses with high risks were divided into a group with a score of at least 6 points but less than 10 points and a group with a score of at least 10 points. The group with at least 10 points had significantly higher rates of leave of absence and resignation. Thus, early intervention was thought to be necessary in newly graduated nurses with a score of at least 10 points in the GHQ.

  8. Nursing science: more promise than threat.

    PubMed

    Jennings, B M

    1986-09-01

    This paper considers the issue of nursing science. Nursing, as an art, has long been accepted as integral to nursing. Nursing, as a science, however, is a more recent concept. Nursing science is viewed as a threat to the profession by its opponents, while the proponents of nursing science see it as a promise for advancement of the discipline. This paper examines the issue of nursing science by looking at its history and development, the definition of science, and five factors critical to the nursing science issue. The author concludes that nursing science is, in varying respects, both a threat and a promise. It is clear that the preponderance of evidence favours the promise nursing science holds for the profession of nursing. It is not a matter of choosing either art or science, but rather skillfully blending both for the betterment of nursing. Both art and science are necessary in nursing--neither, however, is sufficient.

  9. Anaesthetic consideration for neonatal surgical emergencies.

    PubMed

    Pani, Nibedita; Panda, Chinmaya K

    2012-09-01

    A newborn requires constant vigilance, rapid recognition of the events and swift intervention during anaesthesia. The anaesthetic considerations in neonatal surgical emergencies are based on the physiological immaturity of various body systems, poor tolerance of the anaesthetic drugs, associated congenital disorders and considerations regarding the use of high concentration of oxygen. The main goal is for titration of anaesthetics to desired effects, while carefully monitoring of the cardiorespiratory status. The use of regional anaesthesia has shown to be safe and effective. Advancements in neonatology have resulted in the improvement of the survival of the premature and critically ill newborn babies. Most of the disorders previously considered as neonatal surgical emergencies in the past no longer require immediate surgery due to new technology and new methods of treating sick neonates. This article describes the common neonatal surgical emergencies and focuses on factors that affect the anaesthetic management of patients with these disorders.

  10. Neonatal herpes should be a reportable disease.

    PubMed

    Handsfield, H Hunter; Waldo, Ann B; Brown, Zane A; Corey, Lawrence; Drucker, Joan L; Ebel, Charles W; Leone, Peter A; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Whitley, Richard J

    2005-09-01

    Neonatal herpes is a devastating disease, the most serious complication of genital herpes, one of the most common serious congenital or perinatal infections, and the most frequent complication of sexually transmitted infections among children. Nevertheless, neonatal herpes is not reportable to health authorities in most states. The potential for prevention has been enhanced by recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances, and the disease meets widely accepted criteria for reporting, including incidence rates that exceed those of comparable conditions, epidemiologic instability, disease severity, direct and indirect socioeconomic costs, concern by persons at risk, the potential for prevention by public health interventions, and the prospect that the resulting data would influence public health policy. The absence of national surveillance contributes to beliefs by healthcare providers and the public health community that genital and neonatal herpes are uncommon conditions that affect small segments of society, beliefs that directly interfere with prevention. Neonatal herpes should be a reportable condition. PMID:16118598

  11. Nurse Mentors to Advance Quality Improvement in Primary Health Centers: Lessons From a Pilot Program in Northern Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elizabeth A; Jayana, Krishnamurthy; Cunningham, Troy; Washington, Maryann; Mony, Prem; Bradley, Janet; Moses, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    High-quality care during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period is critically important since maternal and child morbidity and mortality are linked to complications that arise during these stages. A nurse mentoring program was implemented in northern Karnataka, India, to improve quality of services at primary health centers (PHCs), the lowest level in the public health system that offers basic obstetric care. The intervention, conducted between August 2012 and July 2014, employed 53 full-time nurse mentors and was scaled-up in 385 PHCs in 8 poor rural districts. Each mentor was responsible for 6 to 8 PHCs and conducted roughly 6 mentoring visits per PHC in the first year. This paper reports the results of a qualitative inquiry, conducted between September 2012 and April 2014, assessing the program's successes and challenges from the perspective of mentors and PHC teams. Data were gathered through 13 observations, 9 focus group discussions with mentors, and 25 individual and group interviews with PHC nurses, medical officers, and district health officers. Mentors and PHC staff and leaders reported a number of successes, including development of rapport and trust between mentors and PHC staff, introduction of team-based quality improvement processes, correct and consistent use of a new case sheet to ensure adherence to clinical guidelines, and increases in staff nurses' knowledge and skills. Overall, nurses in many PHCs reported an increased ability to provide care according to guidelines and to handle maternal and newborn complications, along with improvements in equipment and supplies and referral management. Challenges included high service delivery volumes and/or understaffing at some PHCs, unsupportive or absent PHC leadership, and cultural practices that impacted quality. Comprehensive mentoring can build competence and improve performance by combining on-the-job clinical and technical support, applying quality improvement principles, and promoting team

  12. Nurse Mentors to Advance Quality Improvement in Primary Health Centers: Lessons From a Pilot Program in Northern Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elizabeth A; Jayana, Krishnamurthy; Cunningham, Troy; Washington, Maryann; Mony, Prem; Bradley, Janet; Moses, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    High-quality care during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period is critically important since maternal and child morbidity and mortality are linked to complications that arise during these stages. A nurse mentoring program was implemented in northern Karnataka, India, to improve quality of services at primary health centers (PHCs), the lowest level in the public health system that offers basic obstetric care. The intervention, conducted between August 2012 and July 2014, employed 53 full-time nurse mentors and was scaled-up in 385 PHCs in 8 poor rural districts. Each mentor was responsible for 6 to 8 PHCs and conducted roughly 6 mentoring visits per PHC in the first year. This paper reports the results of a qualitative inquiry, conducted between September 2012 and April 2014, assessing the program's successes and challenges from the perspective of mentors and PHC teams. Data were gathered through 13 observations, 9 focus group discussions with mentors, and 25 individual and group interviews with PHC nurses, medical officers, and district health officers. Mentors and PHC staff and leaders reported a number of successes, including development of rapport and trust between mentors and PHC staff, introduction of team-based quality improvement processes, correct and consistent use of a new case sheet to ensure adherence to clinical guidelines, and increases in staff nurses' knowledge and skills. Overall, nurses in many PHCs reported an increased ability to provide care according to guidelines and to handle maternal and newborn complications, along with improvements in equipment and supplies and referral management. Challenges included high service delivery volumes and/or understaffing at some PHCs, unsupportive or absent PHC leadership, and cultural practices that impacted quality. Comprehensive mentoring can build competence and improve performance by combining on-the-job clinical and technical support, applying quality improvement principles, and promoting team

  13. Caring in Nursing Professional Development.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mary Brigid

    2015-01-01

    Caring science has been identified and examined in the discipline of nursing for over 40 years. Within this period, the topic has been analyzed and studied resulting in theories, models, books, and articles published nationally and internationally. Although advancements have been made in caring knowledge development, opportunities to integrate caring science into all aspects of nursing abound, including the specialty of nursing professional development. The focus of this article is to present ways in which nursing professional development specialists may incorporate caring science into practice, using Ray's (2010) Transcultural Caring Dynamics in Nursing and Health Care model as an exceptional exemplar for understanding, awareness, and choice for nurses and patients. PMID:26381337

  14. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  15. Emergency Nurses Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... sex with someone infected with Zika, examine the importance of screening protocols, and understand likely symptoms, such ... Job Center ENA provides opportunity for education and leadership as well as resources to advance nursing careers. ...

  16. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care: Identifying Parental Needs Through Participatory Design

    PubMed Central

    Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte; Clemensen, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home visits from neonatal nurses. For hospitals covering large regions, home visits may be challenging, time consuming, and expensive and alternative approaches must be explored. Objective To identify parental needs when wanting to provide neonatal home care supported by telemedicine. Methods The study used participatory design and qualitative methods. Data were collected from observational studies, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Two neonatal units participated. One unit was experienced in providing neonatal home care with home visits, and the other planned to offer neonatal home care with telemedicine support. A total of 9 parents with preterm infants assigned to a neonatal home care program and 10 parents with preterm infants admitted to a neonatal unit participated in individual interviews and focus group interviews, respectively. Results Three overall themes were identified: being a family, parent self-efficacy, and nurse-provided security. Parents expressed desire for the following: (1) a telemedicine device to serve as a “bell cord” to the neonatal unit, giving 24-hour access to nurses, (2) video-conferencing to provide security at home, (3) timely written email communication with the neonatal unit, and (4) an online knowledge base on preterm infant care, breastfeeding, and nutrition. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of neonatal home care. NH provides parents with a feeling of being a family, supports their self-efficacy, and gives them a feeling of security when combined with nursing guidance. Parents did not request hands-on support for infant care, but instead expressed a need for communication and guidance, which could be met using

  17. North Carolina School Nurse Leadership Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guttu, Martha

    2007-01-01

    Recognizing that school nurse leaders are essential to the development of school nurses, the North Carolina School Nurse Leadership Institute was developed to enable school nurse leaders to update and advance their leadership skills. The Institute was a collaborative endeavor between the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services,…

  18. Health Communications: Nursing Education for Increased Visibility and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, Mary

    2000-01-01

    To improve the visibility of nurses in mass media, health communications content should be integrated into nursing education. Nurses equipped with advanced communication skills, media expertise and teaching strategies can empower the profession to influence the health care environment. (SK)

  19. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, J P; Rupel, A; Clancy, R M

    2004-01-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes (NLS), while quite rare, carry significant mortality and morbidity in cases of cardiac manifestations. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in > 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with congenital heart block (CHB) in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with CHB was at or below 1 in 50. While the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors (e.g., TGFbeta) from the scavenging macrophages and modulation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroflast scarring phenotype. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to expand, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements which identify first degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. In order to achieve advances at both the bench and bedside, national research registries established in the US and Canada are critical.

  20. Mothers of Pre-Term Infants in Neonate Intensive Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this study, eight mothers of pre-term infants under the care of nursing staff and neonatologists in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Children's Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, were observed and interviewed about their birth experience and their images of themselves as mothers during their stay. Patterns and themes in the…

  1. [The difficulties of staff retention in neonatal intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Deparis, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units attract nurses due to the technical and highly specific nature of the work. However, there is a high turnover in these departments. Work-related distress and the lack of team cohesion are the two main causes of this problem. Support from the health care manager is essential in this context.

  2. [The difficulties of staff retention in neonatal intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Deparis, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units attract nurses due to the technical and highly specific nature of the work. However, there is a high turnover in these departments. Work-related distress and the lack of team cohesion are the two main causes of this problem. Support from the health care manager is essential in this context. PMID:26183101

  3. Nurse Mentors to Advance Quality Improvement in Primary Health Centers: Lessons From a Pilot Program in Northern Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Elizabeth A; Jayana, Krishnamurthy; Cunningham, Troy; Washington, Maryann; Mony, Prem; Bradley, Janet; Moses, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    High-quality care during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period is critically important since maternal and child morbidity and mortality are linked to complications that arise during these stages. A nurse mentoring program was implemented in northern Karnataka, India, to improve quality of services at primary health centers (PHCs), the lowest level in the public health system that offers basic obstetric care. The intervention, conducted between August 2012 and July 2014, employed 53 full-time nurse mentors and was scaled-up in 385 PHCs in 8 poor rural districts. Each mentor was responsible for 6 to 8 PHCs and conducted roughly 6 mentoring visits per PHC in the first year. This paper reports the results of a qualitative inquiry, conducted between September 2012 and April 2014, assessing the program's successes and challenges from the perspective of mentors and PHC teams. Data were gathered through 13 observations, 9 focus group discussions with mentors, and 25 individual and group interviews with PHC nurses, medical officers, and district health officers. Mentors and PHC staff and leaders reported a number of successes, including development of rapport and trust between mentors and PHC staff, introduction of team-based quality improvement processes, correct and consistent use of a new case sheet to ensure adherence to clinical guidelines, and increases in staff nurses’ knowledge and skills. Overall, nurses in many PHCs reported an increased ability to provide care according to guidelines and to handle maternal and newborn complications, along with improvements in equipment and supplies and referral management. Challenges included high service delivery volumes and/or understaffing at some PHCs, unsupportive or absent PHC leadership, and cultural practices that impacted quality. Comprehensive mentoring can build competence and improve performance by combining on-the-job clinical and technical support, applying quality improvement principles, and promoting team

  4. Interprofessional Obstetric Ultrasound Education: Successful Development of Online Learning Modules; Case-Based Seminars; and Skills Labs for Registered and Advanced Practice Nurses, Midwives, Physicians, and Trainees.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Young-Lin, Nichole; Bearman, Sage; Dau, Kim; Vargas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important aid in the clinical diagnosis and management of normal and complicated pregnancy and childbirth. The technology is widely applied to maternity care in the United States, where comprehensive standard ultrasound examinations are routine. Targeted scans are common and used for an increasing number of clinical indications due to emerging research and a greater availability of equipment with better image resolution at lower cost. These factors contribute to an increased demand for obstetric ultrasound education among students and providers of maternity care, despite a paucity of data to inform education program design and evaluation. To meet this demand, from 2012 to 2015 the University of California, San Francisco nurse-midwifery education program developed and implemented an interprofessional obstetric ultrasound course focused on clinical applications commonly managed by maternity care providers from different professions and disciplines. The course included matriculating students in nursing and medicine, as well as licensed practitioners such as registered and advanced practice nurses, midwives, and physicians and residents in obstetrics and gynecology and family medicine. After completing 10 online modules with a pre- and posttest of knowledge and interprofessional competencies related to teamwork and communication, trainees attended a case-based seminar and hands-on skills practicum with pregnant volunteers. The course aimed to establish a foundation for further supervised clinical training prior to independent practice of obstetric ultrasound. Course development was informed by professional guidelines and clinical and education research literature. This article describes the foundations, with a review of the challenges and solutions encountered in obstetric ultrasound education development and implementation. Our experience will inform educators who wish to facilitate obstetric ultrasound competency development among new and experienced

  5. Interprofessional Obstetric Ultrasound Education: Successful Development of Online Learning Modules; Case-Based Seminars; and Skills Labs for Registered and Advanced Practice Nurses, Midwives, Physicians, and Trainees.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Young-Lin, Nichole; Bearman, Sage; Dau, Kim; Vargas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important aid in the clinical diagnosis and management of normal and complicated pregnancy and childbirth. The technology is widely applied to maternity care in the United States, where comprehensive standard ultrasound examinations are routine. Targeted scans are common and used for an increasing number of clinical indications due to emerging research and a greater availability of equipment with better image resolution at lower cost. These factors contribute to an increased demand for obstetric ultrasound education among students and providers of maternity care, despite a paucity of data to inform education program design and evaluation. To meet this demand, from 2012 to 2015 the University of California, San Francisco nurse-midwifery education program developed and implemented an interprofessional obstetric ultrasound course focused on clinical applications commonly managed by maternity care providers from different professions and disciplines. The course included matriculating students in nursing and medicine, as well as licensed practitioners such as registered and advanced practice nurses, midwives, and physicians and residents in obstetrics and gynecology and family medicine. After completing 10 online modules with a pre- and posttest of knowledge and interprofessional competencies related to teamwork and communication, trainees attended a case-based seminar and hands-on skills practicum with pregnant volunteers. The course aimed to establish a foundation for further supervised clinical training prior to independent practice of obstetric ultrasound. Course development was informed by professional guidelines and clinical and education research literature. This article describes the foundations, with a review of the challenges and solutions encountered in obstetric ultrasound education development and implementation. Our experience will inform educators who wish to facilitate obstetric ultrasound competency development among new and experienced

  6. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  7. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction in Advanced Nursing Practice: A Nonpharmacologic Approach to Health Promotion, Chronic Disease Management, and Symptom Control.

    PubMed

    Williams, Hants; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Tanabe, Paula

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss how advanced practice nurses (APNs) can incorporate mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) as a nonpharmacologic clinical tool in their practice. Over the last 30 years, patients and providers have increasingly used complementary and holistic therapies for the nonpharmacologic management of acute and chronic diseases. Mindfulness-based interventions, specifically MBSR, have been tested and applied within a variety of patient populations. There is strong evidence to support that the use of MBSR can improve a range of biological and psychological outcomes in a variety of medical illnesses, including acute and chronic pain, hypertension, and disease prevention. This article will review the many ways APNs can incorporate MBSR approaches for health promotion and disease/symptom management into their practice. We conclude with a discussion of how nurses can obtain training and certification in MBSR. Given the significant and growing literature supporting the use of MBSR in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease, increased attention on how APNs can incorporate MBSR into clinical practice is necessary.

  8. Faculty Practice: Criterion for Academic Advancement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Dolores J.

    1993-01-01

    Although nursing educators must use academic criteria for faculty advancement, they should customized them to reflect the need of nursing faculty not only to be good teachers and researchers but also to maintain expertise in nursing practice. (SK)

  9. Nursing science and public health: contributions to the discipline of nursing.

    PubMed

    Kulbok, Pamela A; Ervin, Naomi E

    2012-01-01

    This column highlights the unique relationship of nursing science and public health in the broader context of the discipline of nursing and healthcare. An integrated framework is used to illustrate that nursing knowledge is the product of interaction and interdependence of four domains -the discipline and science of nursing, the philosophy of nursing, the nursing profession, and nursing practice. In the context of the integrated framework, knowledge specific to public health nursing is shown to inform the discipline of nursing and other health disciplines. Ongoing challenges related to clarifying and describing unique contributions to nursing and public health are explored. In addition, under utilization of theoretical and conceptual nursing knowledge from public health nursing for the advancement nursing science in education, practice, and research is addressed.

  10. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. In addition, many doctors share office space ...

  11. Perceptions of environmental stressors in the neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Raeside, L

    The purpose of this study was to explore maternal and infant stress within the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment and to assess the perceptions of neonatal nurses in relation to these stressors. Using both qualitative and quantitative methods, 12 mothers and 12 nurses were interviewed. Within the framework of the Roy Adaptation Model, the interview schedules were structured to include an 18-item stress scale. Results reflected a lower maternal stress level than was perceived by nurses, with mothers of very low birthweight babies reporting higher stress levels than mothers of low birthweight babies. Nurses' perceptions of the elements of the environment that caused most maternal stress differed from those reported by mothers. The highest reported stressor in the maternal group was the heat intensity; however, the nursing sample perceived the highest maternal stressor to be the monitors attached to the baby. This study highlights the need for increased awareness of stress in both the technological and psychosocial environment of the NICU. The promotion of individualized developmental care is also emphasized, with the aim of modifying and controlling environmental stress for both the mother and the neonate.

  12. Reducing CBC Clotting Rates in the Neonatal Patient Care Areas.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Jennifer; Tichon, Tanya; Narvey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Performing a complete blood count (CBC) is a common test performed in neonatal intensive care. Samples reported as "clotted" are not able to be analyzed and require redraw. A perceived "high" clotting rate elicits frustration among team members and has negative effects on patient flow and patient satisfaction. Process mapping and a root cause analysis determined that an educational intervention was required to optimize blood collection skills of front-line nurses. Through four rapid PDSA cycles over a three year period, the neonatal patient care areas were able to decrease their CBC clotting rates from 30% (monthly rate when the problem was identified) to 16% (yearly average at the end of the project). The CBC clotting rates continue to decease over time due to the integration of a multi-faceted educational plan into biannual education days designed for current staff nurses, as well as into the orientation plan for newly hired and student nurses. PMID:27493749

  13. Reducing CBC Clotting Rates in the Neonatal Patient Care Areas

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jennifer; Tichon, Tanya; Narvey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Performing a complete blood count (CBC) is a common test performed in neonatal intensive care. Samples reported as “clotted” are not able to be analyzed and require redraw. A perceived “high” clotting rate elicits frustration among team members and has negative effects on patient flow and patient satisfaction. Process mapping and a root cause analysis determined that an educational intervention was required to optimize blood collection skills of front-line nurses. Through four rapid PDSA cycles over a three year period, the neonatal patient care areas were able to decrease their CBC clotting rates from 30% (monthly rate when the problem was identified) to 16% (yearly average at the end of the project). The CBC clotting rates continue to decease over time due to the integration of a multi-faceted educational plan into biannual education days designed for current staff nurses, as well as into the orientation plan for newly hired and student nurses. PMID:27493749

  14. The attitudes of neonatal professionals towards end-of-life decision-making for dying infants in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Chi; Chen, Chao-Huei; Liu, Hsin-Li; Lee, Ho-Yu; Peng, Niang-Huei; Wang, Teh-Ming; Chang, Yue-Cune

    2013-06-01

    The purposes of research were to describe the neonatal clinicians' personal views and attitudes on neonatal ethical decision-making, to identify factors that might affect these attitudes and to compare the attitudes between neonatal physicians and neonatal nurses in Taiwan. Research was a cross-sectional design and a questionnaire was used to reach different research purposes. A convenient sample was used to recruit 24 physicians and 80 neonatal nurses from four neonatal intensive care units in Taiwan. Most participants agreed with suggesting a do not resuscitate (DNR) order to parents for dying neonates (86.5%). However, the majority agreed with talking to patients about DNR orders is difficult (76.9%). Most participants agree that review by the clinical ethics committee is needed before the recommendation of 'DNR' to parents (94.23%) and nurses were significantly more likely than physicians to agree to this (p=0.043). During the end-of-life care, most clinicians accepted to continue current treatment without adding others (70%) and withholding of emergency treatments (75%); however, active euthanasia, the administration of drug to end-of-life, was not considered acceptable by both physicians and nurses in this research (96%). Based on our research results, providing continuing educational training and a formal consulting service in moral courage for neonatal clinicians are needed. In Taiwan, neonatal physicians and nurses hold similar values and attitudes towards end-of-life decisions for neonates. In order to improve the clinicians' communication skills with parents about DNR options and to change clinicians' attitudes for providing enough pain-relief medicine to dying neonates, providing continuing educational training and a formal consulting service in moral courage are needed.

  15. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement.

  16. Nurses' beliefs and values about doing cue-based care in an NICU in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Jen-Jiuan; Chen, Shu-Yueh; Yin, Ying-Ti

    2004-12-01

    Although advances in medical technology have increased the survival rate of preterm infants, science is no cure-all for these high-risk patients. A growing number of studies report that caregiving interventions cause physiological and behavioral distress in such infants. The results have prompted changes in caregiving practices, attempting to reduce stress and strengthen protection for the infants, in order to promote their stability and development in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) . This study uses qualitative research methods to grasp the richness and diversity of nurses' beliefs and experience in the taking care of preterm infants. Ten groups of questions explore how NICU nurses take care of premature infants, nurses' perspectives on cue-based care, and the extent to which NICU nurses practice cue-based care. The results generated three themes: (1) timely and skillful management of the preterm infants; (2) compassionate and holistic care for the infants and their highly stressed families; and (3) the relationship between good nursing care and meeting the needs of preterm infants, families, physicians, units, and the environment. It is apparent that the approach to care delivery in NICU practice is still clinical-based, and that there are some obstacles to the delivery of cue-based care. The reasons for this include lack of knowledge, incomplete collaboration with team members, and insufficient support from the administrative systems. To improve the quality of nursing care and preterm infant outcomes, it will be necessary to educate NICU nurses on cue-based care, to enhance collaboration among all team members, to reduce their non-nursing workload, and to re-design NICUs for optimal cue-based care. PMID:15619178

  17. Conflict engagement: a new model for nurses.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Debra

    2015-03-01

    This article is one in a series on conflict. It is part of an ongoing series on leadership coordinated by the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE), highlighting topics of interest to nurse managers and emerging nurse leaders. The AONE provides leadership, professional development, advocacy, and research to advance nursing practice and patient care, promote nursing leadership excellence, and shape public policy for health care.

  18. Conflict engagement: a new model for nurses.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Debra

    2015-03-01

    This article is one in a series on conflict. It is part of an ongoing series on leadership coordinated by the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE), highlighting topics of interest to nurse managers and emerging nurse leaders. The AONE provides leadership, professional development, advocacy, and research to advance nursing practice and patient care, promote nursing leadership excellence, and shape public policy for health care. PMID:25715220

  19. Hypotension and shock in the preterm neonate.

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, Chris

    2009-08-01

    While the methods of establishing and maintaining organ perfusion differ from one clinician to the next, the underlying physiological rationale remains constant. The gestalt for correcting circulatory compromise is generally performed in a stepwise manner; first ensuring that the vasculature is filled, then administering medications to tighten the vasculature, and lastly, compensating for an immature vasculature. This stepwise approach is reflected in the pharmacological interventions of providing fluid boluses (filling the pump), giving catecholamines (tightening the pump), and starting hydrocortisone (compensating for an immature pump). While the stepwise management approach may be familiar to some nurses, it is important to understand the evidence-based rationale that supports clinical decisions. This article will outline physiology unique to the neonate, clarify terminology that surrounds hypotension and shock, and explore various methods for the treatment of circulatory compromise in the preterm neonate. PMID:19696569

  20. Hypotension and shock in the preterm neonate.

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, Chris

    2009-08-01

    While the methods of establishing and maintaining organ perfusion differ from one clinician to the next, the underlying physiological rationale remains constant. The gestalt for correcting circulatory compromise is generally performed in a stepwise manner; first ensuring that the vasculature is filled, then administering medications to tighten the vasculature, and lastly, compensating for an immature vasculature. This stepwise approach is reflected in the pharmacological interventions of providing fluid boluses (filling the pump), giving catecholamines (tightening the pump), and starting hydrocortisone (compensating for an immature pump). While the stepwise management approach may be familiar to some nurses, it is important to understand the evidence-based rationale that supports clinical decisions. This article will outline physiology unique to the neonate, clarify terminology that surrounds hypotension and shock, and explore various methods for the treatment of circulatory compromise in the preterm neonate.

  1. Newborn ethical dilemmas: intensive care and intermediate care nursing attitudes.

    PubMed

    Berseth, C L; Kenny, J D; Durand, R

    1984-06-01

    A self-administered questionnaire concerning various neonatal ethical issues was completed by 39 ICU and 36 intermediate care unit (INT) nurses. Guttman scale analysis indicated that ICU nurses were more reluctant than INT nurses to resuscitate certain high-risk newborn infants. Work experience and a stated religious preference accentuated an INT nurse's disinclination to resuscitate high-risk babies. ICU nurses were more likely than INT nurses to favor passive and active euthanasia. Further, ICU nurses were more likely than INT nurses to view termination of life support for a sick infant as a necessity. ICU nurses were less likely than INT nurses to favor physician intervention in the care of all acutely sick neonates. ICU and INT nurses agreed, however, that the decision to terminate a baby's life support should be made jointly by the child's parents and physicians. Although differences in ICU and INT nursing attitudes may reflect quantitative and qualitative differences in work experience, these findings suggest a common need for emotional support and continuing education programs for nurses who care for high-risk newborns.

  2. Overview of neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benay

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal lupus (NL) is defined by the presentation of the fetus and the newborn who possess autoantibodies received from the mother. It is the dysfunction of the maternal immune system that leads to the production of autoantibodies to anti-Sjögren syndrome-A, anti-Sjögren syndrome-B, and anti-ribonuclear protein antigens. These antibodies are shared through the placenta and produce bodily changes in the fetal skin and heart, as well as potential changes in other body systems. Congenital complete heart block is the most dangerous manifestation of NL that can occur in utero or after birth. This article will provide an overview the presentation of NL and current therapies. Prenatal steroids have been the mainstay of therapy to try to reverse first- and second-degree congenital heart block and to prevent progression to a more advanced stage. New therapies are combining steroids with intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. This article will provide guidelines for practitioners so they can consider NL as a differential diagnosis when presented with cutaneous lesions, congenital heart block, or abnormal findings in the hematologic, hepatobiliary, neurologic, and musculoskeletal systems.

  3. Development of a Composite Pain Measure for Persons with Advanced Dementia: Exploratory Analyses in Self-Reporting Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Mary; Polissar, Nayak; Neradilek, Moni Blazej

    2010-01-01

    Context Experts agree that pain assessment in non-communicative persons requires data from sources that do not rely on self-report, including proxy reports, health history, and observation of pain behaviors. However, there is little empirical evidence to guide clinicians in weighting or combining these sources to best approximate the person’s experience. Objectives The aim of this exploratory study was to identify a combination of observer-dependent pain indicators that would be significantly more predictive of self-reported pain intensity than any single indicator. Because self-reported pain is usually viewed as the criterion measure for pain, self-reported usual and worst pain were the dependent variables. Methods The sample consisted of 326 residents (mean age: 83.2 years; 69% female) living in one of 24 nursing homes. Independent variables did not rely on self-report: surrogate reports from certified nursing assistants (CNA IPT), Checklist of Nonverbal Pain Indicators (CNPI), Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD), Pittsburgh Agitation Scale (PAS), number of painful diagnoses, and Minimum Data Set (MDS) pain variables. Results In univariate analyses, the CNA IPT scores were correlated most highly with self-reported pain. The final multivariate model for self-reported usual pain included CNA IPT, CSDD, PAS and education; this model accounted for only 14% of the variance. The more extensive of the two final models for worst pain included MDS pain frequency, CSDD, CNA IPT, CNPI and age (R2 = 0.14). Conclusion Additional research is needed to develop a predictive pain model for nonverbal persons. PMID:21094018

  4. Neonatal leukaemia cutis.

    PubMed

    Handler, M Z; Schwartz, R A

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal leukaemia cutis is a significant neoplasm that may represent a cutaneous manifestation of systemic leukaemia, usually of myeloblastic type. Rarely, it may be or appear to be limited to skin, in which case it is called neonatal aleukaemic leukaemia cutis. By definition, it presents within the first 4 weeks of life and often has a 'blueberry muffin baby' appearance of magenta coloured nodules affecting almost any area of the skin, usually sparing mucous membranes, palms and soles. This clinical pattern is more commonly associated with neonatal infections such rubella and toxoplasmosis, and may be evident with other neonatal neoplasms such as neuroblastoma. Due to the morbidity associated with chemotherapy and reported cases of spontaneous remission without systemic progression in those with neonatal aleukaemic leukaemia cutis without 11q23 translocation, the authors not treating the child with chemotherapy, but to simply monitor for fading of the violaceous nodules, and watch for possible signs of systemic leukaemia.

  5. The Impact of Recycled Neonatal Incubators in Nigeria: A 6-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Amadi, Hippolite Onyejiaka; Azubuike, Jonathan C.; Etawo, Uriah S.; Offiong, Uduak R.; Ezeaka, Chinyere; Olateju, Eyinade; Adimora, Gilbert N.; Osibogun, Akin; Ibeziako, Ngozi; Iroha, Edna O.; Dutse, Abdulhameed I.; Chukwu, Christian O.; Okpere, Eugene E.; Kawuwa, Mohammed B.; El-Nafaty, Aliyu U.; Kuranga, Sulyman A.; Mokuolu, Olugbenga Ayodeji

    2010-01-01

    Nigeria has a record of high newborn mortality as an estimated 778 babies die daily, accounting for a ratio of 48 deaths per 1000 live births. The aim of this paper was to show how a deteriorating neonatal delivery system in Nigeria may have, in part, been improved by the application of a novel recycled incubator technique (RIT). Retrospective assessment of clinical, technical, and human factors in 15 Nigerian neonatal centres was carried out to investigate how the application of RIT impacted these factors. Pre-RIT and post-RIT neonatal mortalities were compared by studying case files. Effect on neonatal nursing was studied through questionnaires that were completed by 79 nurses from 9 centres across the country. Technical performance was assessed based on 10-indices scores from clinicians and nurses. The results showed an increase in neonatal survival, nursing enthusiasm, and practice confidence. Appropriately recycled incubators are good substitutes to the less affordable modern incubators in boosting neonatal practice outcome in low-income countries. PMID:21331375

  6. [Who is afraid of a well prepared nurse? Nursing education: leadership by nurses is urgently needed].

    PubMed

    Sansoni, J; Luccone, M T

    1998-01-01

    We discuss some problems related to the nursing education and the lack of unitary nursing leadership. The cultural development of the profession is slow and not enough supported. The profession must learn to invest in Nursing education for a real empowerment. We underline some aspects that we think to be important for the future: the revision of the basic nursing curriculum, the teaching position at University, the utility of a post basic nursing degree. In conclusion, some urgent aims for the near future in order to advance the profession, are reported.

  7. Neonatal intensive care in the home.

    PubMed

    Sudia-Robinson, T M

    1998-12-01

    As the trend toward early discharge and home care of medically fragile neonates continues, parents find themselves thrust into a lifestyle for which they are unprepared. They must quickly adjust to a new daily routine and new home environment. They watch as part of their home is transformed into a mini intensive care unit with the kind of high-tech equipment and supplies once exclusively reserved for hospital settings. Parents also must learn to live with limited privacy because home care nurses and other providers become a visible presence and a daily reminder that their lives have been forever altered. PMID:10030204

  8. Neonatal Sepsis due to Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Elizabeth A.; Boyce, Guilaine K.; Sadarangani, Manish; Lavoie, Pascal M.

    2013-01-01

    Neonates, especially those born prematurely, are at high risk of morbidity and mortality from sepsis. Multiple factors, including prematurity, invasive life-saving medical interventions, and immaturity of the innate immune system, put these infants at greater risk of developing infection. Although advanced neonatal care enables us to save even the most preterm neonates, the very interventions sustaining those who are hospitalized concurrently expose them to serious infections due to common nosocomial pathogens, particularly coagulase-negative staphylococci bacteria (CoNS). Moreover, the health burden from infection in these infants remains unacceptably high despite continuing efforts. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, immunological risk factors, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and outcomes of neonatal infection due to the predominant neonatal pathogen CoNS. PMID:23762094

  9. The Normal and Abnormal Equine Neonatal Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Levine, David G

    2015-12-01

    The first weeks of life are critical in many aspects, and the musculoskeletal system is no exception. Being able to stand and nurse within hours of life is necessary for survival. Laxity, flexural deformities, and skeletal immaturity can all make it difficult for neonates to ambulate. The increased vascularity to bones and cartilage mixed with the newly forming immune system also make neonates susceptible to infections that we rarely see in adult animals. This article concentrates on orthopedic conditions seen in the first 2 weeks of life.

  10. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  11. What's changed and what's stayed the same: a case study in nursing and philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Judge, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Philanthropic resources can help the nursing profession and nurses advance the health of the nation. While progress has been made by nursing organizations, primarily in academia, to fundraise for nursing-focused projects over the last 20 years, nursing receives little of the total annual US giving. The American Nurses Foundation's recent expansion provides an example of changes in philanthropy within the context of how the core principles of fundraising and market change can leverage giving for nursing activities and nurses. PMID:25208149

  12. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  13. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Nursing Positions KidsHealth > For Parents > Nursing Positions Print A ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ...

  14. Nursing's new paradigm is transcultural nursing: an interview with Madeleine Leininger. Interview by Susan Cummings.

    PubMed

    Leininger, M

    1996-01-01

    Around the world, transcultural nursing is being developed to provide culturally competent, congruent, humanistic health care. In this article, Susan Cummings, Associate Editor of Advanced Practice Nursing Quarterly, interviews Madeleine Leininger, founder of transcultural nursing and leader in human care nursing research. For the past 40 years Dr. Leininger has been instrumental in developing concepts, definitions, and a theoretical and research base for the development of transcultural nursing with a human care focus.

  15. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  16. Neonatal hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Kenna, Margaret A

    2003-04-01

    Neonatal hearing screening can be performed using reliable and reproducible methods. Intervention before the age of 6 months with hearing aids and appropriate educational support services will give the infant the best possible opportunity to develop language. Potential barriers to efficient implementation of a neonatal hearing screening program include access to appropriate and timely diagnostic and support services and insurance to cover the services. Without universal neonatal hearing screening, many children with hearing loss will be missed, which will have a direct negative impact on their speech, language, educational, and social development. PMID:12809324

  17. School nurse intention to pursue higher education.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-10-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a bachelor's degree. In many states, the bachelor's degree is required for all school nurses, and many school nurses are prepared at the masters' and doctoral levels. The purpose of this study was to examine the intention of Louisiana school nurses to pursue higher education in nursing. A survey was distributed to all members of the Louisiana School Nurses Organization, and results indicated that 65% of the participants were motivated to return to school. Incentives and barriers to pursuing higher education were identified, and strategies for overcoming these barriers were proposed.

  18. Nurse practitioners: a contract for change and excellence in nursing.

    PubMed

    Turner, Clare; Keyzer, Dirk

    2002-10-01

    The role of the Nurse Practitioner has been in existence in a variety of contexts and within a broad range of the scope of their practice throughout the world for a number of years. Many nurses work at this advanced level of clinical practice without the acknowledgement f the very important and responsible role that they play within the healthcare setting. Although the United States and United Kingdom have recognised the role of the advanced Nurse Practitioner for a number of years, there still exists confusion and disagreement as to their scope of practice. There is uncertainty and anxiety as to where the role boundaries between nursing and medical and allied health professionals begin and end. The role of the Nurse Practitioner in Australia has not been without its problems in the developmental stage of its creation. New South Wales finally achieved recognition of the role this year after a decade of negotiation. This has culminated in the acceptance for the development of 40 Nurse Practitioner positions across the State. The first of these was accepted in the Far West Area Health Service in May 2001. The Far West Area Health Service created a five-year plan, which addresses the development of nurses preparing for authorisation, the creation of Nurse Practitioner positions in the remote communities, the creation of clinical guidelines to support advanced practice and the evaluation process for both the positions and the nurses. The objective of this approach is to ensure effective implementation of these advanced nursing positions in the remote communities of New South Wales. The Nurse Practitioner role needs to respond to the individual, the family and the community, utilising advanced clinical skills and remaining responsive to the changes in health care within a primary health care framework, which is essential for combating the complex health care issues in remote areas (NSW Health 2000). PMID:12539922

  19. Research Opportunities to Improve Neonatal Red Blood Cell Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi Mangal; Meyer, Erin K; Widness, John A

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a common and lifesaving therapy for anemic neonates and infants, particularly among those born prematurely or undergoing surgery. However, evidence-based indications for when to administer RBCs and adverse effects of RBC transfusion on important outcomes including necrotizing enterocolitis, survival, and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment remain uncertain. In addition, blood-banking practices for preterm and term neonates and infants have been largely developed using studies from older children and adults. Use of and refinements in emerging technologies and advances in biomarker discovery and neonatal-specific RBC transfusion databases may allow clinicians to better define and tailor RBC transfusion needs and practices to individual neonates. Decreasing the need for RBC transfusion and developing neonatal-specific approaches in the preparation of donor RBCs have potential for reducing resource utilization and cost, improving outcomes, and assuring blood safety. Finally, large donor-recipient-linked cohort studies can provide data to better understand the balance of the risks and benefits of RBC transfusion in neonates. These studies may also guide the translation of new research into best practices that can rapidly be integrated into routine care. This review highlights key opportunities in transfusion medicine and neonatology for improving the preparation and transfusion of RBCs into neonates and infants. We focus on timely, currently addressable knowledge gaps that can increase the safety and efficacy of preterm and term neonatal and infant RBC transfusion practices.

  20. Research Opportunities to Improve Neonatal Red Blood Cell Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi Mangal; Meyer, Erin K; Widness, John A

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a common and lifesaving therapy for anemic neonates and infants, particularly among those born prematurely or undergoing surgery. However, evidence-based indications for when to administer RBCs and adverse effects of RBC transfusion on important outcomes including necrotizing enterocolitis, survival, and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment remain uncertain. In addition, blood-banking practices for preterm and term neonates and infants have been largely developed using studies from older children and adults. Use of and refinements in emerging technologies and advances in biomarker discovery and neonatal-specific RBC transfusion databases may allow clinicians to better define and tailor RBC transfusion needs and practices to individual neonates. Decreasing the need for RBC transfusion and developing neonatal-specific approaches in the preparation of donor RBCs have potential for reducing resource utilization and cost, improving outcomes, and assuring blood safety. Finally, large donor-recipient-linked cohort studies can provide data to better understand the balance of the risks and benefits of RBC transfusion in neonates. These studies may also guide the translation of new research into best practices that can rapidly be integrated into routine care. This review highlights key opportunities in transfusion medicine and neonatology for improving the preparation and transfusion of RBCs into neonates and infants. We focus on timely, currently addressable knowledge gaps that can increase the safety and efficacy of preterm and term neonatal and infant RBC transfusion practices. PMID:27424006

  1. Challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zea-Vera, Alonso; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2015-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the third leading cause of neonatal mortality and a major public health problem, especially in developing countries. Although recent medical advances have improved neonatal care, many challenges remain in the diagnosis and management of neonatal infections. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is complicated by the frequent presence of noninfectious conditions that resemble sepsis, especially in preterm infants, and by the absence of optimal diagnostic tests. Since neonatal sepsis is a high-risk disease, especially in preterm infants, clinicians are compelled to empirically administer antibiotics to infants with risk factors and/or signs of suspected sepsis. Unfortunately, both broad-spectrum antibiotics and prolonged treatment with empirical antibiotics are associated with adverse outcomes and increase antimicrobial resistance rates. Given the high incidence and mortality of sepsis in preterm infants and its long-term consequences on growth and development, efforts to reduce the rates of infection in this vulnerable population are one of the most important interventions in neonatal care. In this review, we discuss the most common questions and challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis, with a focus on developing countries.

  2. Genomics Nursing Faculty Champion Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jean; Calzone, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Nurse faculty are challenged to keep up with the emerging and fast-paced field of genomics and the mandate to prepare the nursing workforce to be able to translate genomic research advances into routine clinical care. Using Faculty Champions and other options, the initiative stimulated curriculum development and promoted genomics curriculum integration. The authors summarize this yearlong initiative for undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty. PMID:24300251

  3. Innovation in transformative nursing leadership: nursing informatics competencies and roles.

    PubMed

    Remus, Sally; Kennedy, Margaret Ann

    2012-12-01

    In a recent brief to the Canadian Nurses Association's National Expert Commission on the Health of Our Nation, the Academy of Canadian Executive Nurses (ACEN) discussed leadership needs in the Canadian healthcare system, and promoted the pivotal role of nursing executives in transforming Canada's healthcare system into an integrated patient-centric system. Included among several recommendations was the need to develop innovative leadership competencies that enable nurse leaders to lead and advance transformative health system change. This paper focuses on an emerging "avant-garde executive leadership competency" recommended for today's health leaders to guide health system transformation. Specifically, this competency is articulated as "state of the art communication and technology savvy," and it implies linkages between nursing informatics competencies and transformational leadership roles for nurse executive. The authors of this paper propose that distinct nursing informatics competencies are required to augment traditional executive skills to support transformational outcomes of safe, integrated, high-quality care delivery through knowledge-driven care. International trends involving nursing informatics competencies and the evolution of new corporate informatics roles, such as chief nursing informatics officers (CNIOs), are demonstrating value and advanced transformational leadership as nursing executive roles that are informed by clinical data.

  4. [Neonatal herpes simplex infection].

    PubMed

    van Ham-Borawitz, Veronique E J; Stam, Edo D; Welborn, Kathleen M; Sas, Theo C J

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal encephalitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a familiar disease with a high mortality and morbidity rate. Isolated skin-eye-mouth infection is less familiar among professionals. In this article we present two neonates with an isolated skin lesion caused by an HSV infection. Of the neonates infected with HSV, 40-45% show isolated skin-eye-mouth disease. With correct treatment, the risk of spread to the central nervous system will decrease from 50-60% to 5-10%. Typical HSV skin lesions may present at a late stage of the disease or may be masked by a secondary bacterial infection. When a neonate presents with atypical skin lesions starting 7-12 days after the birth, immediate testing for HSV and immediate treatment are required, to decrease the risk of further progression of the disease.

  5. Drug Screening in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Bell, Susan Givens

    2016-01-01

    Gestational substance exposure continues to be a significant problem. Neonates may be exposed to various substances including illicit drugs, prescription drugs, and other legal substances that are best not used during pregnancy because of their potential deleterious effects as possible teratogens or their potential to create dependence and thus withdrawal in the neonate. Screening the newborn for gestational substance exposure is important for both acute care and early intervention to promote the best possible long-term outcomes. This column provides insight into what is known about the extent of substance use by pregnant women, an overview of neonatal biologic matrices for drug testing, and a discussion of the legal implications of neonatal substance screening. PMID:27636697

  6. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...

  7. Maternal and neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2015-01-24

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58,000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  8. Neonatal Jaundice Detection System.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Mustafa; Hardalaç, Fırat; Ural, Berkan; Karap, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a common condition that occurs in newborn infants in the first week of life. Today, techniques used for detection are required blood samples and other clinical testing with special equipment. The aim of this study is creating a non-invasive system to control and to detect the jaundice periodically and helping doctors for early diagnosis. In this work, first, a patient group which is consisted from jaundiced babies and a control group which is consisted from healthy babies are prepared, then between 24 and 48 h after birth, 40 jaundiced and 40 healthy newborns are chosen. Second, advanced image processing techniques are used on the images which are taken with a standard smartphone and the color calibration card. Segmentation, pixel similarity and white balancing methods are used as image processing techniques and RGB values and pixels' important information are obtained exactly. Third, during feature extraction stage, with using colormap transformations and feature calculation, comparisons are done in RGB plane between color change values and the 8-color calibration card which is specially designed. Finally, in the bilirubin level estimation stage, kNN and SVR machine learning regressions are used on the dataset which are obtained from feature extraction. At the end of the process, when the control group is based on for comparisons, jaundice is succesfully detected for 40 jaundiced infants and the success rate is 85 %. Obtained bilirubin estimation results are consisted with bilirubin results which are obtained from the standard blood test and the compliance rate is 85 %. PMID:27229489

  9. Malaysian nurses' skin care practices of preterm infants: experience vs. knowledge.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Zainah; Newton, Jennifer Margaret; Lau, Rosalind

    2014-04-01

    This study sought to explore the impact of Malaysian nurses' perceptions, knowledge and experiences in preterm infant skin care practices using a descriptive approach. Questionnaires were distributed to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses in one teaching hospital in Malaysia. A knowledge gap was revealed among nurses in both theoretical and practical knowledge of preterm infant skin. Nurses working for more than 5 years in NICU or having a Neonatal Nursing Certificate (NNC) were not predictors of having adequate knowledge of preterm infants' skin care. The results highlight the complex issue of providing effective skin care to preterm infants. However, a specific finding related to nurses' confidence provides some direction for future practice and research initiatives. Clear clinical evidence-based guidelines and Continuing Nursing Education on relevant topics of preterm infants' care may provide the required knowledge for the nurses.

  10. Erythropoietin and Neonatal Neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Juul, Sandra E; Pet, Gillian C

    2015-09-01

    Certain groups of neonates are at high risk of developing long-term neurodevelopmental impairment and might be considered candidates for neuroprotective interventions. This article explores some of these high-risk groups, relevant mechanisms of brain injury, and specific mechanisms of cellular injury and death. The potential of erythropoietin (Epo) to act as a neuroprotective agent for neonatal brain injury is discussed. Clinical trials of Epo neuroprotection in preterm and term infants are updated. PMID:26250911

  11. Nursing: Registered Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses for jobs in health planning and development, marketing, consulting, policy development, and quality assurance. Some RNs ... workers was $36,200. Recommend this page using: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn tools Areas at a Glance Industries ...

  12. [Phenomenologic study about experiences when living the death in the neonatal critical care unit].

    PubMed

    Silva, Laureana Cartaxo Salgado Pereira; Valença, Cecília Nogueira; Germano, Raimunda Medeiros

    2010-01-01

    This research aimed at describing the care experiences of neonatal critical care nurses when facing the death and to understand their feelings before the death of the newborn. Qualitative research with a phenomenological approach, with the guiding question: How do you feel about the death of the newborn ICU where you work? Attended the interview 12 nurses and ICU nursing. Emerging feelings such as guilt, failure and denial. Understanding the phenomenon being studied, we affirm that the death of the newborn within the ICU is an experience of conflicting feelings, sometimes painful for the nurses.

  13. Parents as their infant's primary caregivers in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg; Engvall, Gunn

    2009-04-01

    The aim was to explore parents' and professionals' opinions about parental performance of care in a neonatal intensive care unit. Forty-three parents and 85 nurses completed questionnaires composed of a list of 95 caregiving activities; 14 nurses and 4 neonatologists participated in four focus group interviews. Considerable differences appeared in parents' and nurses' responses about parents' participation in their infants' care. All listed activities were marked as optional by at least a few parents. Agreement was reached about parents as their infants' primary caregivers, based on individual assessment of parents' willingness and ability, with nurses acting as educators and supporters instead of caregivers.

  14. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT.

  15. Neonatal surgery in Africa.

    PubMed

    Chirdan, Lohfa B; Ngiloi, Petronilla J; Elhalaby, Essam A

    2012-05-01

    The management of neonatal surgical problems continues to pose considerable challenges, particularly in low-resource settings. The burden of neonatal surgical diseases in Africa is not well documented. The characteristics of some neonatal surgical problems are highlighted. Late presentation coupled with poor understanding of the milieu interior of the neonates by incompetent health care providers and poorly equipped hospitals combine to give rise to the unacceptable high morbidity and mortality in most parts of Africa. Proper training of all staff involved in neonatal health care coupled with community awareness must be vigorously pursued by all stakeholders. Various governments throughout the continent of Africa, in conjunction with international donor agencies, must not only provide an adequate budget for health care services and improve infrastructures, but must also deliberately encourage and provide funding for neonatal surgical care and research across the continent. The well-established pediatric surgical training programs, particularly in North and South Africa, should hold the moral responsibility of training all possible numbers of young surgeons from other African countries that do not have any existing pediatric surgical training programs or those countries suffering from remarkable shortage of trained pediatric surgeons.

  16. Neonatal clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van de Velde, Marc; van den Anker, John

    2013-01-01

    Effective and safe drug administration in neonates should be based on integrated knowledge on the evolving physiological characteristics of the infant who will receive the drug, and the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a given drug. Consequently, clinical pharmacology in neonates is as dynamic and diverse as the neonates we admit to our units while covariates explaining the variability are at least as relevant as median estimates. The unique setting of neonatal clinical pharmacology will be highlighted based on the hazards of simple extrapolation of maturational drug clearance when only based on ‘adult’ metabolism (propofol, paracetamol). Secondly, maturational trends are not at the same pace for all maturational processes. This will be illustrated based on the differences between hepatic and renal maturation (tramadol, morphine, midazolam). Finally, pharmacogenetics should be tailored to neonates, not just mirror adult concepts. Because of this diversity, clinical research in the field of neonatal clinical pharmacology is urgently needed, and facilitated through PK/PD modeling. In addition, irrespective of already available data to guide pharmacotherapy, pharmacovigilance is needed to recognize specific side effects. Consequently, paediatric anesthesiologists should consider to contribute to improved pharmacotherapy through clinical trial design and collaboration, as well as reporting on adverse effects of specific drugs. PMID:23617305

  17. Platelets in neonates: central mediators in haemostasis, antimicrobial defence and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Andres, Oliver; Schulze, Harald; Speer, Christian P

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are not only centrally involved in haemostasis, but also in antimicrobial defence and inflammation. Since evaluation of platelet physiology in the particular patient group of preterm and term neonatal infants is highly restricted for ethical reasons, there are hardly any data available in healthy and much less in extremely immature or ill neonates. By summarising current knowledge and addressing both platelet researchers and neonatologists, we describe neonatal platelet count and morphology, report on previous analyses of neonatal platelet function in primary haemostasis and provide insights into recent advances in platelet immunology that considerably impacts our clinical view on the critically ill neonatal infant. We conclude that neonatal platelets, originating from liver megakaryocytes, substantially differ from adult platelets and may play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of neonatal sepsis or intraventricular haemorrhage, both complications which seriously augment perinatal morbidity and mortality.

  18. Career Preferences of Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Odette N.; MacLennan, Anna; Dupuis-Blanchard, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates novice and experienced student nurses' attitudes about caring for patients across the lifespan. Students were also asked why they would enjoy or not enjoy caring for children and older adults. Both novice (n = 114) and advanced (n = 56) nursing students were relatively positive about caring for patients across the lifespan.…

  19. Neonatal tetanus in Zaria, Northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Osuhor, P C

    1983-01-01

    This discussion describes the problem of neonatal tetanus as seen in the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH) Zaria, Northern Nigeria over the January 1975 to December 1977 period. Appropriate health actions to be taken regarding prevention and management of neonatal tetanus are described. The pediatric ward of ABUTH, Zaria, admitted 4600 during the study period. Of these, 54 (1.2%) were neonatal tetanus cases. For these tetanus babies, information was available as to the age, sex, apparent portal of entry of the organisms, and the outcome of the infection. Analysis of their mothers included antenatal clinic attendance, residence, and place of delivery. More perinatal babies were infected and died than the other age groups. By the end of the 2nd week of life, over 90% of all the infected babies died. Home delivered babies were more infected than other babies delivered in hospitals. Only 7.4% of the mothers had any form of antenatal care. Zaria City, the traditional residence of the indigenous, had the highest number of cases and deaths. 44 (81.5%) of the babies had septic umbilical cord stumps with 35 deaths among them. The best treatment for an established case of tetanus is total muscle relaxation with anesthetic agents and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. This requires a specialized intensive care unit and a highly skilled personnel that are not yet available in Zaria. Simple sedation and expert and dedicated nursing and medical supervision can go far in reducing the mortality rate. PMID:6654472

  20. Relationship-based care in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Faber, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    At St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center in Paterson, New Jersey, implementation of the Relationship-Based Care (RBC) model of care delivery and enculturation of the philosophy of care embodied in Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring (Watson, 2007) improved patient outcomes and supported quality nursing care across the continuum of care in our organization. The ability of staff nurses to create an atmosphere of professional inquiry that places patients and families at the center of practice supported implementation of RBC in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

  1. Anthroposophical nursing.

    PubMed

    Therkleson, Tessa

    2005-10-01

    Anthroposophical nursing evolved out of a striving to maintain the human caring and loving warmth of nursing practice whilst having cognisance of academic rigor and scientific nursing research. It is an extension of traditional nursing requiring inner personal development to accompany a modern scientific approach. PMID:19175263

  2. The Neurointensive Care Nursery and Evolving Roles for Nursing.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, Susan; Carley, Annette; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Glass, Hannah C

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal neurocritical care is an emerging subspecialty that combines the expertise of critical care medicine and neurology with that of nursing and other providers in an interprofessional team approach to care. Neurocritical care of the neonate has roots in adult and pediatric practice. It has been demonstrated that adults with acute neurologic conditions who are treated in a specialized neurocritical care unit have reduced morbidity and mortality, as well as decreased length of stay, lower costs, and reduced need for neurosurgical procedures. In pediatrics, neurocritical care has focused on various primary and secondary neurologic conditions complicating critical care that also contribute to mortality, morbidity, and duration of hospitalization. However, the concept of neurocritical care as a subspecialty in pediatric practice is still evolving, and evidence demonstrating improved outcomes is lacking. In the neonatal intensive care nursery, neurocritical care is also evolving as a subspecialty concept to address both supportive and preventive care and optimize neurologic outcomes for an at-risk neonatal patient population. To enhance effectiveness of this care approach, nurses must be prepared to appropriately recognize acute changes in neurologic status, implement protocols that specifically address neurologic conditions, and carefully monitor neurologic status to help prevent secondary injury. The complexity of this team approach to brain-focused care has led to the development of a specialized role: the neurocritical care nurse (neonatal intensive care nursery [NICN] nurse). This article will review key concepts related to neonatal neurocritical care and the essential role of nursing. It will also explore the emerging role of the NICN nurse in supporting early recognition and management of at-risk infants in this neonatal subspecialty practice. PMID:27052983

  3. [Towards a pluralistic approach in nursing].

    PubMed

    Nazon, Evy; Perron, Amélie

    2014-03-01

    For many years, nurses have contributed in the advancement of knowledge in nursing. From theories to conceptual models, several researchers offered their vision on how to achieve this goal. Beyond the diversity and differences of opinion, monistic and pluralistic conceptions emerge from their position. Using Karl Popper's (1979) theories of open and closed societies and McLennan's (1995) definition of pluralism, this study argues for pluralism in nursing. Pluralism provides the opportunity for nurse researchers to combine their research to other theories, other concepts, other approaches and other disciplines to enable further analysis and a broader perspective of the nursing discipline. This study is a theoretical reflection on interdisciplinarity in nursing research.

  4. Early neonatal special care units and their scientific achievements.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of sick neonates originated in maternity and foundling hospitals in the 19th century. Nosocomial infections and difficult logistics of wet-nursing prevented admission of neonates in most children's hospitals well into the 20th century. In this article, 31 hospitals are described, all located in large cities, in which preterm and sick neonates were treated before the Great Depression. Even though mostly initiated by private charity, these institutions performed research right from the start. Topics included warming and feeding preterm infants, collecting and distributing human milk, developing and storing breast milk substitutes, prevention of rickets and nosocomial infections, maternal and public education regarding infection control, pathoanatomic characterisation of diseases and malformations and epidemiologic studies of infant mortality. These pioneering hospitals, their founding dates, researchers and classic publications are presented in a table.

  5. Neonatal intensive care unit lighting: update and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Roberto G; Pattini, Andrea E

    2016-08-01

    Achieving adequate lighting in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge: in addition to the usual considerations of visual performance, cost, energy and aesthetics, there appear different biological needs of patients, health care providers and family members. Communicational aspects of light, its role as a facilitator of the visual function of doctors and nurses, and its effects on the newborn infant physiology and development were addressed in order to review the effects of light (natural and artificial) within neonatal care with a focus on development. The role of light in regulating the newborn infant circadian cycle in particular and the therapeutic use of light in general were also reviewed. For each aspect, practical recommendations were specified for a proper well-lit environment in neonatal intensive care units.

  6. Distance Technology in Nursing Education. AACN White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    Careful use of technology in education may enhance the ability of the nursing education profession to educate nurses for practice, prepare future nurse educators, and advance nursing science. To take full advantage of technology, several factors must be addressed. Superior distance education programs require substantial institutional financial…

  7. Before operating room nursing journals: operating room nursing in the pages of the Canadian Nurse 1940-1960.

    PubMed

    Moszczynski, Alice

    2010-09-01

    The Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) values learning from nursing history to provide a contextual perspective in understanding how past events have shaped current nursing practice. Until the publication of operating room nursing journals, Canada's national nursing journal, The Canadian Nurse, served as an educational and professional resource for those nurses working in the operating room and for nurses whose work was related to, or connected with, the operating room. A historical review of early issues of The Canadian Nurse (first published in 1905) reveals a substantial amount of content related to operating room nursing in the twenty year period, beginning in the 1940s, that predated the existence of OR specialty journals. The content was, for the time, both detailed and informative. It was through this journal that operating room nurses, indeed all Canadian nurses, learned about new advances, employment opportunities, educational programs, professional associations, and the achievements of those in the profession. Operating Room Nursing, as an isolated and quickly emerging specialty, was introduced to other nurses via items in The Canadian Nurse journal.

  8. Advanced practice nurses' perspectives on the use of health optimization strategies for managing chronic disease among older adults in different care settings: pushing the boundaries of self-management programs.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Justin B; Smith, Matthew Lee; Dowdy, Diane M; McKinley, Ashley; Ahn, Sangnam; Ory, Marcia G

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the intention of advanced practice nurses (APNs) to utilize health optimization programs (HOPs) for addressing clients' chronic disease in various work settings (i.e., nursing homes or other care settings). A paper-based survey was administered to 270 APNs at a continuing education conference to determine their intentions to refer patients to HOPs for chronic disease management. APNs working in nursing homes were 0.23 times as likely to utilize HOPs for management of their patients' chronic disease compared with their counterparts working in other care settings (odds ratio = 0.23, confidence interval = 0.06-0.80, P = .021). APNs who had previously used a HOP for management of their patients' chronic disease were 5.2 times as likely to do so again relative to those who had not previously used a HOP for management of their patients' chronic disease (odds ratio = 5.17, confidence interval = 1.78-14.99, P = .002). Educational and organizational interventions are recommended to disseminate further HOPs for chronic disease in nursing home settings as part of an overall health optimization strategy. PMID:22055641

  9. Hiring and incorporating doctor of nursing practice-prepared nurse faculty into academic nursing programs.

    PubMed

    Agger, Charlotte A; Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R

    2014-08-01

    Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 deans and directors of nursing programs across the United States to gain an understanding of how Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-prepared nurses seeking academic positions are hired and used in schools of nursing. Interviews sought to gain information regarding (a) differences and similarities in the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)-prepared faculty, (b) educational advancement and mentoring of DNP-prepared nurse faculty, (c) recruitment of doctorally prepared nurse faculty, and (d) shortages of nursing faculty. DNP- and PhD-prepared nurse faculty are hired for varying roles in baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing, some similar to other faculty with master's degrees and others similar to those with PhDs; in associate degree in nursing programs, they are largely hired for the same type of work as nurse faculty with master's degrees. Regardless of program or degree type, the main role of DNP-prepared faculty is teaching.

  10. The value of nursing: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Horton, Khim; Tschudin, Verena; Forget, Armorel

    2007-11-01

    This article is part of a wider study entitled Value of Nursing, and contains the literature search from electronic databases. Key words for the search included 'values of nursing', 'values in nursing', 'organisational values' and 'professional identity'. Thirty-two primary reports published in English between 2000 and 2006 were identified. The findings highlight the importance of understanding values and their relevance in nursing and how values are constructed. The value of nursing is seen to be influenced by cultural change, globalization, and advancement in technology and medicine. These factors are crucial in providing a more structured and measured view of what nursing is, which will result in greater job satisfaction among nurses, better nurse retention and enhanced patient care within a supportive and harmonious organization. The findings of this review have implications for policy makers in recruitment and retention in determining the global value of nursing. PMID:17901183

  11. Developing a center for nursing research: an influence on nursing education and research through mentorship.

    PubMed

    Krause-Parello, Cheryl A; Sarcone, Annaruth; Samms, Kimika; Boyd, Zakiya N

    2013-03-01

    Nursing research, education, and mentoring are effective strategies to enhance and generate nursing knowledge. In order to explore new opportunities using an international and interdisciplinary approach, a Center for Nursing Research (CNR) was developed at Kean University a public institution for higher education in the United States. At the CNR, nursing professionals and students collaborate in all aspects of nursing education and the research process from a global perspective and across disciplines. The advancement of knowledge and understanding is of absolute importance to the field of nursing and other collaborative fields. The CNR functions to educate nursing faculty and students through scholarly activities with an ongoing commitment to nursing education and research. Mentorship in nursing education and research fosters professional, scholarly, and personal growth for both the mentor and mentee. The CNR serves as a model vehicle of applied, functional mentoring strategies and provides the venue to allow the mentor and mentee to collaborate in all aspects of nursing education and research.

  12. Illuminance of neonatal units.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J; Moseley, M J; Fielder, A R

    1990-07-01

    We have measured the illuminance (brightness) of seven neonatal units during both the day and the night. When the units were lit solely by fluorescent tubes the mean illuminance was 348 lux (range 192-690). During the day the mean illuminance was 470 lux (range 236-905). The high dependency regions in four of the seven units were significantly brighter than the corresponding low dependency nurseries at all times. In two of these units there is a policy of reducing the amount of artificial light in the low dependency areas at night, and in these the normal mean illuminance was 50 lux. We have measured the general levels of illumination to which a neonate might be exposed; the ocular exposure to light of a neonate depends, however, on both physical and biological factors and more research is required before an accurate estimate can be made.

  13. Nursing and nursing education in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Richard M; Berryman, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Haiti has long had the largest proportion of people living in poverty and the highest mortality level of any country in the Americas. On January 12, 2010, the most powerful earthquake to hit Haiti in 200 years struck. Before the earthquake, half of all Haitians lacked any access to modern medical care services. Health care professionals in Haiti number around one-fourth of the world average and about one-tenth the ratio present in North America. The establishment of new primary care services in a country where half of the people had no access to modern health care prior to the earthquake requires advanced practice roles for nurses and midwives. With a high burden of infectious, parasitic, and nutritional conditions, Haiti especially needs mid-level community health workers and nurses who can train and supervise them for public health programs. As in many other developing countries, organized nursing lacks many of the management and planning skills needed to move its agenda forward. The public schools prepare 3-year diploma graduates. These programs have upgraded the curriculum little in decades and have mainly trained for hospital service. Primary care, public health program management, and patient education had often not been stressed. Specializations in midwifery and HIV care exist, while only informal programs of specialization exist in administration, surgery, and pediatrics. An advanced practice role, nonetheless, is not yet well established. Nursing has much to contribute to the recovery of Haiti and the revitalization if its health system. Professional nurses are needed in clinics and hospitals throughout the country to care for patients, including thousands in need of rehabilitation and mental health services. Haitian nursing colleagues in North America have key roles in strengthening their profession. Ways of supporting our Haitian colleagues are detailed.

  14. Addressing sexuality-related needs in practice: perspectives of maternal/child and women's health nurses.

    PubMed

    Propst, M G; Phillips, B R; Andrew, M E

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative, descriptive survey was conducted using Waterhouse's instrument, Survey of Sexuality-Related Nursing Practice. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which maternal/child and women's health nurses address sexuality in their practice and to assess the influence of select variables on that practice. A sample of maternal/child and women's health registered nurses (n = 130) was systematically selected from the 1995 Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses' (AWHONN) District VII mailing list. Findings reveal incongruities in maternal/child and women's health nurses' perspectives and the incorporation of sexuality-related nursing interventions into practice.

  15. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  16. A Model for Collaboration: The Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing and the Frontier Nursing Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotny, Jeanne M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The collaboration between the Frontier Nursing Service and the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing provides a way for those with associate degrees in midwifery to obtain a baccalaureate degree in nursing and become eligible for advanced training in midwifery. Distance learning facilitates instruction for the geographically dispersed midwives.…

  17. Prevention of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Paolo; De Luca, Daniele; Stronati, Mauro; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Ruffinazzi, Giulia; Luparia, Martina; Tavella, Elena; Boano, Elena; Castagnola, Elio; Mostert, Michael; Farina, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes a huge burden of morbidity and mortality and includes bloodstream, urine, cerebrospinal, peritoneal, and lung infections as well as infections starting from burns and wounds, or from any other usually sterile sites. It is associated with cytokine - and biomediator-induced disorders of respiratory, hemodynamic, and metabolic processes. Neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit feature many specific risk factors for bacterial and fungal sepsis. Loss of gut commensals such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli spp., as occurs with prolonged antibiotic treatments, delayed enteral feeding, or nursing in incubators, translates into proliferation of pathogenic microflora and abnormal gut colonization. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment do not protect septic neonates form the risk of late neurodevelopmental impairment in the survivors. Thus prevention of bacterial and fungal infection is crucial in these settings of unique patients. In this view, improving neonatal management is a key step, and this includes promotion of breast-feeding and hygiene measures, adoption of a cautious central venous catheter policy, enhancement of the enteric microbiota composition with the supplementation of probiotics, and medical stewardship concerning H2 blockers with restriction of their use. Additional measures may include the use of lactoferrin, fluconazole, and nystatin and specific measures to prevent ventilator associated pneumonia. PMID:23292914

  18. Advancing Evidence in Preterm Neonatal Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Pamela K.; Robinson, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Few interventions and treatments for premature infants have undergone the rigors of a randomized controlled trial (RCT), the cornerstone of evidence-based healthcare. Multiple barriers in establishing a quality evidence base for the care of preterm infants are examined including the systematic exclusion of children from drug trials, vulnerability…

  19. Nursing Reclaims its Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diers, Donna

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain the nurses' role: what the nurse is, what the nurse does, how the nurse is viewed by society, why nurses suffer burnout, nursing costs, and health care system reform. (CT)

  20. Functional characteristics of neonatal rat β cells with distinct markers.

    PubMed

    Martens, G A; Motté, E; Kramer, G; Stangé, G; Gaarn, L W; Hellemans, K; Nielsen, J H; Aerts, J M; Ling, Z; Pipeleers, D

    2014-02-01

    Neonatal β cells are considered developmentally immature and hence less glucose responsive. To study the acquisition of mature glucose responsiveness, we compared glucose-regulated redox state, insulin synthesis, and secretion of β cells purified from neonatal or 10-week-old rats with their transcriptomes and proteomes measured by oligonucleotide and LC-MS/MS profiling. Lower glucose responsiveness of neonatal β cells was explained by two distinct properties: higher activity at low glucose and lower activity at high glucose. Basal hyperactivity was associated with higher NAD(P)H, a higher fraction of neonatal β cells actively incorporating (3)H-tyrosine, and persistently increased insulin secretion below 5 mM glucose. Neonatal β cells lacked the steep glucose-responsive NAD(P)H rise between 5 and 10 mM glucose characteristic for adult β cells and accumulated less NAD(P)H at high glucose. They had twofold lower expression of malate/aspartate-NADH shuttle and most glycolytic enzymes. Genome-wide profiling situated neonatal β cells at a developmental crossroad: they showed advanced endocrine differentiation when specifically analyzed for their mRNA/protein level of classical neuroendocrine markers. On the other hand, discrete neonatal β cell subpopulations still expressed mRNAs/proteins typical for developing/proliferating tissues. One example, delta-like 1 homolog (DLK1) was used to investigate whether neonatal β cells with basal hyperactivity corresponded to a more immature subset with high DLK1, but no association was found. In conclusion, the current study supports the importance of glycolytic NADH-shuttling in stimulus function coupling, presents basal hyperactivity as novel property of neonatal β cells, and provides potential markers to recognize intercellular developmental differences in the endocrine pancreas. PMID:24049066

  1. Evaluation of an educational intervention on breastfeeding for NICU nurses.

    PubMed

    Siddell, Erica; Marinelli, Kathleen; Froman, Robin D; Burke, Georgine

    2003-08-01

    The effect of breastfeeding education on breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes of nurses in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was evaluated. NICU nurses (intervention) and pediatric nurses (untreated control) working at a northeastern US children's hospital participated in the pretest/posttest design study. Both groups answered the same breastfeeding questionnaire on 2 occasions. NICU nurses completed the questionnaire the second time after attending the education session. Outcome measures evaluated by questionnaire items were (1) breastfeeding knowledge, (2) pro-breastfeeding attitudes, (3) baby-focused care attitudes, and (4) nurse-focused care attitudes. Comparison groups were similar at pretest on demographic variables and remained so despite attrition between pretesting and posttesting. A significant increase (P < .001) occurred in NICU nurses' breastfeeding knowledge after the education session. Findings suggest that an educational intervention has potential for improving NICU nurses' knowledge and certain attitudes about breastfeeding but may not alter other attitudes of interest in the desired direction.

  2. Scrotal Swelling in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Amaya M.; Courtier, Jesse; Phelps, Andrew; Copp, Hillary L.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of scrotal swelling in a neonate can be a source of anxiety for parents, clinicians, and sonologists alike. This pictorial essay provides a focused review of commonly encountered scrotal masses and mimics specific to the neonatal setting. Although malignancy is a concern, it is very uncommon, as most neonatal scrotal masses are benign. Key discriminating features and management options are highlighted to improve the radiologist’s ability to diagnose neonatal scrotal conditions and guide treatment decisions. Neonatal scrotal processes ranging from common to uncommon will be discussed. PMID:25715370

  3. Transcultural nursing research to transform nursing education and practice: 40 years.

    PubMed

    Leininger, M

    1997-01-01

    In this article, an overview of some major trends, philosophical perspectives, and theoretical perspectives are presented, along with selected transcultural nursing research findings, primarily from the theory of culture care using the ethnonursing research method. A substantial body of transcultural nursing knowledge with health or well being outcomes has been forthcoming since transcultural nursing was launched in the 1950s. The author contends that transcultural nursing knowledge of Western and non-Western cultures is urgently needed to meet health needs in a multicultural world. Some misconceptions and reflections are offered to advance transcultural nursing research, education, and practice. For "newcomers" to transcultural nursing, some basic readings are recommended.

  4. Expanding the role of the oncology nurse

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, A

    2008-01-01

    Oncology nursing continues to evolve in response to advances in cancer treatment, information and biotechnology. As new scientific and technological discoveries are integrated into cancer care, oncology nurses need to play a key role in the management of this patient population. The role of the oncology nurse has expanded significantly and can differ greatly across cultures. Sophisticated treatments and the growth of targeted therapies will create the challenge of ensuring that all nurses working in this arena are well-educated, independent thinkers. Thus the future success of oncology nurses will focus on enhancement of nursing practice through advanced education. The increased globalisation of healthcare offers exciting opportunities to accomplish this goal by allowing for collaborative relationships among oncology nurses across the globe. PMID:21611002

  5. Expanding the role of the oncology nurse.

    PubMed

    Quinn, A

    2008-07-01

    Oncology nursing continues to evolve in response to advances in cancer treatment, information and biotechnology. As new scientific and technological discoveries are integrated into cancer care, oncology nurses need to play a key role in the management of this patient population. The role of the oncology nurse has expanded significantly and can differ greatly across cultures. Sophisticated treatments and the growth of targeted therapies will create the challenge of ensuring that all nurses working in this arena are well-educated, independent thinkers. Thus the future success of oncology nurses will focus on enhancement of nursing practice through advanced education. The increased globalisation of healthcare offers exciting opportunities to accomplish this goal by allowing for collaborative relationships among oncology nurses across the globe.

  6. Persistent neonatal hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Mathew, P M; Young, J M; Abu-Osba, Y K; Mulhern, B D; Hammoudi, S; Hamdan, J A; Sa'di, A R

    1988-03-01

    Over a 3-year period, the diagnosis of persistent neonatal hyperinsulinism (PNH) was made in seven infants, from an unselected cohort of 18,726 births, all of Saudi Arabian origin. Thus the incidence of PNH was one in 2,675 births. The high incidence, associated consanguinity, and occurrence in siblings suggest that PNH may be inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder.

  7. Neonatal antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soares Rolim, A M; Castro, M; Santiago, M B

    2006-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a clinical entity characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, adverse obstetric outcome and the presence of antibodies against phospholipids in serum or plasma. The objective of the present study is to describe a rare case of APS that occurred in a neonate born from a patient previously diagnosed as primary APS. A male, preterm born twin infant, whose mother had been diagnosed as primary APS, developed thrombocytopenia, livedo reticularis, pericardial effusion and thrombosis of the left subclavian and external jugular veins concomitantly with severe respiratory tract infection soon after his delivery, that culminated with his death two months after the birth, in spite of the large spectrum antibiotic therapy and all supportive measures. Laboratory findings included high titers of IgM anticardiolipin antibodies and moderate titers of IgG isotype and negative antinuclear antibody, configuring a case of neonatal APS. Neonatal APS is a rare clinical condition, with only a few cases described in the literature. Its occurrence may depend on the passage of antibodies through the placenta or, as it seems to have occurred in the present case, by the production of de novo antibodies by the fetus. The present case illustrates the necessity of a higher surveillance of the neonates born from mothers with primary APS or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) for the eventual development of such complication. PMID:16761506

  8. [Neonatal medicine, past and present].

    PubMed

    Salle, Bernard L; Vert, Paul

    2013-06-01

    This review deals with early neonatal medicine and its rapid development as a medical specialty, starting with the birth of neonatology in the early 19th century. Shaffer first used the term neonatology in 1963 to cover neonatal disorders and their treatment. Between the early 19th century and the 1950s, neonatal care was ensured by obstetricians, whose main goal was to reduce neonatal mortality. After the second world war, and especially the 1960s, the development of neonatal physiology and pathophysiology provided insights into neonatal diseases and their treatment, including respiratory distress, jaundice, malnutrition, and prevention of respiratory distress and brain complications, etc. Currently, neonatal mortality, regardless of birth weight, is below 2/1000, and the survival rate of premature infants, regardless of gestational age and birth weight, exceeds 85%. This represents a resounding success, despite the associated costs, ethical issues, and inevitable morbidity.

  9. Nursing Home Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  10. Teaching antenatal counseling skills to neonatal providers.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Theophil A; Watson, Katie L; Boss, Renee D

    2014-02-01

    Counseling a family confronted with the birth of a periviable neonate is one of the most difficult tasks that a neonatologist must perform. The neonatologist's goal is to facilitate an informed, collaborative decision about whether life-sustaining therapies are in the best interest of this baby. Neonatologists are trained to provide families with a detailed account of the morbidity and mortality data they believe are necessary to facilitate a truly informed decision. Yet these complicated and intensely emotional conversations require advanced communication and counseling skills that our current fellowship-training strategies are not adequately providing. We review educational models for training neonatology fellows to provide antenatal counseling at the threshold of viability. We believe that training aimed at teaching these skills should be incorporated into the neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship. The optimal approaches for teaching these skills remain uncertain, and there is a need for continued innovation and outcomes-based research.

  11. Ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Xin-Xin; Wang, Xin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    On one hand, advances in neonatal care and rescue technology allow for the healthy survival or prolonged survival time of critically ill newborns who, in the past, would have been non-viable. On the other hand, many of the surviving critically ill infants have serious long-term disabilities. If an infant eventually cannot survive or is likely to suffer severe disability after surviving, ethical issues in the treatment process are inevitable, and this problem arises not only in developed countries but is also becoming increasingly prominent in developing countries. In addition, ethical concerns cannot be avoided in medical research. This review article introduces basic ethical guidelines that should be followed in clinical practice, including respecting the autonomy of the parents, giving priority to the best interests of the infant, the principle of doing no harm, and consent and the right to be informed. Furthermore, the major ethical concerns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in China are briefly introduced.

  12. Diffusion of a nursing education innovation: nursing workforce development through promotion of RN/BSN education.

    PubMed

    Diaz Swearingen, Connie; Clarke, Pamela N; Gatua, Mary Wairimu; Sumner, Christa Cooper

    2013-01-01

    Despite state, national, and organizational objectives to increase the proportion of nurses with a bachelor's degree or higher, a majority of nurses hold an associate's degree in nursing. To address the need for a better-prepared nursing workforce in this rural state, an RN/BSN recruitment and retention project was implemented. The authors discuss the Leadership Education to Advance Practice project and its outcomes.

  13. Ebstein's anomaly in neonates.

    PubMed

    Moura, C; Guimarães, H; Areias, J C; Moreira, J

    2001-09-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a rare congenital heart disease abnormality in which the tricuspid valve leaflets do not attach normally to the tricuspid valve annulus. The effective tricuspid valve orifice is displaced apically into the right ventricle (RV), near the junction of the inlet and the trabecular parts of the RV. The authors present a retrospective study of the patients with Ebstein's anomaly admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit, in the period between January 1993 and March 2000. There were ten patients, representing 0.24% of total neonates and 1.99% of total congenital heart disease admitted to the institution in the same period. Fifty per cent were male and only one case had prenatal diagnosis. Holosystolic murmur (100%) from tricuspid regurgitation and cyanosis (80%) were the most frequent clinical findings. Chest X-ray was abnormal in 90% of the neonates, with a "balloon-shaped" enlarged heart. The main electrocardiographic findings were right atrial enlargement (70%) and arrhythmias (40%). Apical displacement of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve, to a maximum of 20 mm, and leaflets tethering to underlying RV myocardium were found in all patients. Tricuspid valve regurgitation was found in 90% (severe form in four cases). An atrial intracardiac shunt, mostly right-to-left, was also found in 50%. Digoxin was used (40%) to restore sinus rhythm. Fifty per cent of the neonates received intravenous prostaglandins. Two patients required a surgical procedure. Two patients died in the neonatal period. During the follow-up period (range 0.3-74.6 months), only one episode of supraventricular tachycardia was recorded. At present seven patients are clinically stable, three of them on medication.

  14. Facility Death Review of Maternal and Neonatal Deaths in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Animesh; Rahman, Fazlur; Eriksson, Charli; Halim, Abdul; Dalal, Koustuv

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the experiences, acceptance, and effects of conducting facility death review (FDR) of maternal and neonatal deaths and stillbirths at or below the district level in Bangladesh. Methods This was a qualitative study with healthcare providers involved in FDRs. Two districts were studied: Thakurgaon district (a pilot district) and Jamalpur district (randomly selected from three follow-on study districts). Data were collected between January and November 2011. Data were collected from focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, and document review. Hospital administrators, obstetrics and gynecology consultants, and pediatric consultants and nurses employed in the same departments of the respective facilities participated in the study. Content and thematic analyses were performed. Results FDR for maternal and neonatal deaths and stillbirths can be performed in upazila health complexes at sub-district and district hospital levels. Senior staff nurses took responsibility for notifying each death and conducting death reviews with the support of doctors. Doctors reviewed the FDRs to assign causes of death. Review meetings with doctors, nurses, and health managers at the upazila and district levels supported the preparation of remedial action plans based on FDR findings, and interventions were planned accordingly. There were excellent examples of improved quality of care at facilities as a result of FDR. FDR also identified gaps and challenges to overcome in the near future to improve maternal and newborn health. Discussion FDR of maternal and neonatal deaths is feasible in district and upazila health facilities. FDR not only identifies the medical causes of a maternal or neonatal death but also explores remediable gaps and challenges in the facility. FDR creates an enabled environment in the facility to explore medical causes of deaths, including the gaps and challenges that influence mortality. FDRs mobilize health managers at upazila and district

  15. The discipline of nursing: historical roots, current perspectives, future directions.

    PubMed

    Shaw, M C

    1993-10-01

    As advances in nursing science and research impact upon nursing education and clinical practice, new ways of looking at phenomena have led to a re-examination and refinement of the traditional concepts: person, environment, health and nursing. This evolving pattern of intellectual growth holds promise for the discipline of nursing through the advancement of knowledge based upon scientific inquiry into the practice of nursing. This paper discusses nursing as a discipline by examining the development of a unique body of knowledge from three viewpoints: historical past, current perspectives and future direction.

  16. Neonatal thyroid storm accompanied with severe anaemia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu-Ying; Wei, Hong; Wang, Zheng-Li

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal thyroid storm is rare; the diagnostic criteria and management of neonatal thyroid storm have not been well established. In this paper, we report a preterm infant diagnosed with neonatal hyperthyroidism secondary to maternal Graves' disease who was discharged after therapy. Unfortunately, he was rehospitalised for neonatal thyroid storm. We will discuss the diagnosis and general therapy of neonatal thyroid storm.

  17. Nursing resilience: a nursing opportunity.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Ellarene Duis

    2015-01-01

    Resilience is a concept that has been explored in many other professions and cultures. Nurses experience many difficult and unanticipated adverse situations that can negatively impact them. Resilience can be cultivated to aid individual nurses and nursing work groups to bounce back from these situations and integrate them into context of their practice. Practices such as meditation and education can support development of resilience.

  18. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  19. Healthcare employers' policies on nurse education.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Patricia; Herrera, Carolina-Nicole S; Horton, Katherine; Thompson, Pamela A; Ware, Jamie M; Terry, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The 2010 recommendation that the proportion of registered nurses with BSN (bachelor of science in nursing) degrees in the nursing workforce should increase from the current 40% to 80% by the year 2020 has shifted the focus on nurses educational progression from state legislatures-where changes in entry-level requirements were debated for decades-to the executive suites of large healthcare providers. The recommendation, contained in the report titled The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing at the Institute of Medicine, suggests that human resources policies for nurses have the potential to double the rates of college degree completions (IOM, 2010). We surveyed 447 nurse executives in hospitals, nurse-led clinics, and home and hospice companies to explore the current practices of healthcare employers with regard to this recommendation. Almost 80% of respondents reported that their institution either preferred or required newly hired nurses to have a bachelor's degree, and 94% of the facilities offered some level of tuition reimbursement. Only 25%, however, required their nurses to earn a BSN or offered salary differentials on the basis of educational attainment (9%). We conclude that if employers are serious about wanting a more highly educated nurse workforce, they need to adopt requirements for degree completion and wage differentials in the coming years. The likelihood that such policies will be widely adopted, however, is dramatically affected by the dynamics of nursing supply and demand. PMID:24400456

  20. Healthcare employers' policies on nurse education.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Patricia; Herrera, Carolina-Nicole S; Horton, Katherine; Thompson, Pamela A; Ware, Jamie M; Terry, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The 2010 recommendation that the proportion of registered nurses with BSN (bachelor of science in nursing) degrees in the nursing workforce should increase from the current 40% to 80% by the year 2020 has shifted the focus on nurses educational progression from state legislatures-where changes in entry-level requirements were debated for decades-to the executive suites of large healthcare providers. The recommendation, contained in the report titled The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing at the Institute of Medicine, suggests that human resources policies for nurses have the potential to double the rates of college degree completions (IOM, 2010). We surveyed 447 nurse executives in hospitals, nurse-led clinics, and home and hospice companies to explore the current practices of healthcare employers with regard to this recommendation. Almost 80% of respondents reported that their institution either preferred or required newly hired nurses to have a bachelor's degree, and 94% of the facilities offered some level of tuition reimbursement. Only 25%, however, required their nurses to earn a BSN or offered salary differentials on the basis of educational attainment (9%). We conclude that if employers are serious about wanting a more highly educated nurse workforce, they need to adopt requirements for degree completion and wage differentials in the coming years. The likelihood that such policies will be widely adopted, however, is dramatically affected by the dynamics of nursing supply and demand.

  1. Neonatal pain management: still in search for the Holy Grail.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, Karel; van den Anker, John N

    2016-07-01

    Inadequate pain management but also inappropriate use of analgesics in early infancy has negative effects on neurodevelopmental outcome. As a consequence, neonatal pain management is still in search for the Holy Grail. At best, effective pain management is based on prevention, assessment, and treatment followed by a re-assessment of the pain to determine if additional treatment is still necessary. Unfortunately, epidemiological observations suggest that neonates are undergoing painful procedures very frequently, unveiling the need for effective preventive, non-pharmacological strategies. In addition, assessment is still based on validated, multimodal, but subjective pain assessment tools. Finally, in neonatal intensive care units, there is a shift in clinical practices (e.g., shorter intubation and ventilation), and this necessitates the development and validation of new pharmacological treatment modalities. To illustrate this, a shift in the use of opioids to paracetamol has occurred and short-acting agents (remifentanil, propofol) are more commonly administered to neonates. In addition to these new modalities and as part of a more advanced approach of the developmental pharmacology of analgesics, pharmacogenetics also emerged as a tool for precision medicine in neonates. To assure further improvement of neonatal pain management the integration of pharmacogenetics with the usual covariates like weight, age and/or disease characteristics is needed.

  2. Neonatal pain management: still in search of the Holy Grail

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van den Anker, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate pain management but also inappropriate use of analgesics in early infancy has negative effects on neurodevelopmental outcome. As a consequence, neonatal pain management is still in search for the Holy Grail. At best, effective pain management is based on prevention, assessment, and treatment followed by a re-assessment of the pain to determine if additional treatment is still necessary. Unfortunately, epidemiological observations suggest that neonates are undergoing painful procedures very frequently, unveiling the need for effective preventive, non-pharmacological strategies. In addition, assessment is still based on validated, multimodal, but subjective pain assessment tools. Finally, in neonatal intensive care units, there is a shift in clinical practices (e.g., shorter intubation and ventilation), and this necessitates the development and validation of new pharmacological treatment modalities. To illustrate this, a shift in the use of opioids to paracetamol has occurred and short-acting agents (remifentanil, propofol) are more commonly administered to neonates. In addition to these new modalities and as part of a more advanced approach of the developmental pharmacology of analgesics, pharmacogenetics also emerged as a tool for precision medicine in neonates. To assure further improvement of neonatal pain management the integration of pharmacogenetics with the usual covariates like weight, age and/or disease characteristics is needed. PMID:27087155

  3. Inspired gas temperature in ventilated neonates.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mark William; Dunster, Kimble Robert; Cartwright, David William

    2004-07-01

    The warming and humidification of inspired gases for ventilated neonates are routine. There are no data on the temperature of the gas at the airway opening in ventilated neonates. Is the inspired gas temperature at the airway opening, as expected and set on the humidifier, around 37 degrees C? We aimed to measure temperature at the airway opening and compare this with the circuit temperature. This was an observational study in a neonatal intensive care unit. Twenty-five mechanically ventilated infants were studied. All had humidifiers with chamber temperature set at 36 degrees C and the circuit temperature set at 37 degrees C. Two temperature probes were inserted and rested at the circuit-exit and at the airway opening, and temperatures were measured for 2 min in each infant. At this time, the circuit temperature was also noted. The mean (SD) temperature at the airway opening in infants nursed in incubators was 34.9 (1.2) degrees C, compared with radiant warmers where the mean (SD) was 33.1 (0.5) degrees C. The mean (SD) difference in temperature from the circuit temperature probe to the airway opening was greater under radiant warmers, with a mean (SD) drop of 3.9 (0.6) degrees C compared with a mean (SD) drop of 2.0 (1.3) degrees C in the incubators. In conclusion, the temperature at the circuit temperature probe does not reflect the temperature at the airway opening. Inspired gas temperatures are lower than the expected 37 degrees C with the normal circuits and usual humidifier settings. PMID:15170873

  4. Error reduction when prescribing neonatal parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cynthia L; Garrison, Nancy A; Hutchison, Alastair A

    2007-08-01

    A neonatal intensive care unit audit of 204 parenteral nutrition (PN) orders revealed a 27.9% PN prescribing error rate, with errors by pediatric residents exceeding those by neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) (39% versus 16%; P < 0.001). Our objective was to reduce the PN prescribing error rate by implementing an ordering improvement process. An interactive computerized PN worksheet, used voluntarily, was introduced and its impact analyzed in a retrospective cross-sectional study. A time management study was performed. Analysis of 480 PN orders revealed that the PN prescribing error rate was 11.7%, with no difference in error rates between pediatric residents and NNPs (12.3% versus 10.5%). Use of the interactive computerized PN worksheet was associated with a reduction in the prescribing error rate from 14.5 to 6.8% for all PN orders ( P = 0.016) and from 29.3 to 9.6% for peripheral PN orders ( P = 0.002). All 12 errors that occurred in the 177 PN prescriptions completed using the computerized PN worksheet were due to avoidable data entry or transcription mistakes. The time management study led to system improvements in PN ordering. We recommend that an interactive computerized PN worksheet be used to prescribe peripheral PN and thus reduce errors.

  5. [Neonatal hearing screening].

    PubMed

    Oudesluys-Murphy, A M; van Straaten, H L; Ens-Dokkum, M H; Kauffman-de Boer, M A

    2000-03-25

    Approximately 1 to 2 per thousand live-born infants suffer from a serious perceptive hearing loss. Normal hearing from birth is essential for optimal human development (language and speech, social and emotional development, communicative skills and learning). The earlier the hearing loss is diagnosed the better the prognosis for the infant with a hearing impairment. Suitable methods are now available for neonatal hearing screening: automated measurement of auditory brain stem response and measurement of oto-acoustic emissions. Screening must be viewed as only the first step in a program of diagnosis, treatment and habilitation of these children. The ultimate goal of the implementation of neonatal hearing screening is: identification of bilateral hearing losses before the age of 3 months and start of therapy and counselling before the age of 6 months.

  6. The ascension health experience: maximizing the chief nursing officer role in a large, multihospital system to advance patient care quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Hendrich, Ann L; Batcheller, Joyce; Ellison, Darcy A; Janik, Angela M; Jeffords, Nina B; Miller, Linda; Perlich, Gwynn L; Staffileno, Gerri; Strom, Maria; Williams, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Ascension Health is the largest Catholic and nonprofit health system in the United States, encompassing 70 acute care hospitals organized into 34 health ministries. Consistent with its distributed leadership model, Ascension Health has created a Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) Advisory Council to provide strategic direction and thought leadership on major system-level initiatives that impact quality, safety, operational performance, nursing leadership, and patient care delivery. The council fosters systemwide CNO engagement and dialogue through a unique structure of regional CNO work teams called "pods," each of which is chaired by a member of the council. This communication structure has facilitated consensus on major system initiatives at Ascension Health related to clinical goals, patient safety, nursing leadership, and systemwide capital investments. This article describes the history, structure, goals, processes, and successes of the CNO Advisory Council shared governance model.

  7. Neonatal mortality in Meerut district.

    PubMed

    Garg, S K; Mishra, V N; Singh, J V; Bhatnagar, M; Chopra, H; Singh, R B

    1993-09-01

    A study of neonatal mortality in Meerut district revealed an infant mortality rate of 50.1 per 1000 live births. Neonatal mortality accounted for 37.8% of infant mortality with a neonatal mortality rate of 19.0 per 1000 live births. 90.5% of these neonates were delivered at home largely by untrained personnel (57.2%). Only 28.6% of these neonates were treated by qualified doctors and only 30.9% of their mothers were fully immunized against tetanus. At least 2/3rd of neonatal mortality was due to exogenous factors with tetanus neonatorum and septicaemia being the principal causes of mortality each accounting for a mortality rate of 4.7 per 1000 live births. PMID:8112786

  8. [Neonatal conventional ventilation guidelines].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory pathology is a frequent problem in Neonatal Intensive Care Units; the last few years, our knowledge about its management has improved enormously. Conventional Ventilatory support is a high-specialized technique that maintains a correct alveolar gas exchange while the primary aetiology is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory failure improves. The aim of this document is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory pathology

  9. Humane Neonatal Care Initiative.

    PubMed

    Levin, A

    1999-04-01

    The author has worked for many years in experimental departments in the former Soviet health system. Now, with integration into the western health system, many questions are being asked about high-technology neonatal medicine and whether it is sufficiently humane. The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) movement is well known all over the world, but unfortunately it is only used for healthy children in maternity hospitals. A paradoxical situation has been created: the routines of maternity wards comply with the BFHI, whereas a neonatal intensive care unit in the same hospital may not meet the requirements of the BFHI. BFHI mainly cover breastfeeding in maternity hospitals. Humane Neonatal Care Initiatives include minimum aggressive therapy, minimum contact between sick newborns and medical staff, and maximum contact with mothers; the number of tests and examinations should be reduced to a minimum. Eleven steps towards the improvement of psychosocial and medical care in units for sick newborns are presented. This article is intended to provoke serious discussion. PMID:10342526

  10. Pasteurella gallinarum neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, K; Sein, P P; Shahnawaz, M; Hoosen, A A

    2002-01-01

    A 4-day-old baby weighing 1.7 kg was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Ga-Rankuwa Hospital, Pretoria, with a history of apneic attacks. On examination there was an umbilical sepsis and the neonate was septicemic. The baby had been delivered at home and the umbilical cord had been cut by the grandmother using unclean scissors and chimney soot applied to the umbilical stump. On admission, a septic screen was done and antibiotic treatment was started with penicillin and amikacin. The investigations showed that the baby was slightly anemic, with hemoglobin levels of 10.0 g/dL (14.9-23.7 g/dL), and a pure growth of a Gram-negative bacillus was obtained from the cerebrospinal fluid, blood culture and suprapubic aspirate urine specimens. The Gram-negative bacillus was catalase and oxidase positive and it was identified as Pasteurella gallinarum. Antimicrobial profiling showed the organism to be susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, gentamicin and amikacin. Despite having received antimicrobial agents to which the etiological agent was susceptible, the neonate died within 5 days of admission. The cause of death was postulated to be due to overwhelming sepsis which resulted in septic shock. PMID:11906503

  11. Neonatal cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Hines, Michael H

    2013-11-01

    The pediatric surgeon deals with a large number and variety of congenital defects in neonates that frequently involve early surgical intervention and care. Because the neonatal cardiac physiology is unique, starting with the transition from fetal circulation and including differences in calcium metabolism and myocardial microscopic structure and function, it serves the pediatric surgeon well to have a sound understanding of these principles and how they directly and indirectly affect their plans and treatments. In addition, many patients will have associated congenital heart disease that can also dramatically influence not only the surgical and anesthetic care but also the timing and planning of procedures. Finally, the pediatric surgeon is often called upon to treat conditions and complications associated with complex congenital heart disease such as feeding difficulties, bowel perforations, and malrotation in heterotaxy syndromes. In this article, we will review several unique aspects of neonatal cardiac physiology along with the basic physiology of the major groups of congenital heart disease to better prepare the training and practicing pediatric surgeon for care of these complex and often fragile patients.

  12. Development and validation of a simple algorithm for initiation of CPAP in neonates with respiratory distress in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Hundalani, Shilpa G; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Oden, Maria; Kawaza, Kondwani; Gest, Alfred; Molyneux, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Low-cost bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP) systems have been shown to improve survival in neonates with respiratory distress, in developing countries including Malawi. District hospitals in Malawi implementing CPAP requested simple and reliable guidelines to enable healthcare workers with basic skills and minimal training to determine when treatment with CPAP is necessary. We developed and validated TRY (T: Tone is good, R: Respiratory Distress and Y=Yes) CPAP, a simple algorithm to identify neonates with respiratory distress who would benefit from CPAP. Objective To validate the TRY CPAP algorithm for neonates with respiratory distress in a low-resource setting. Methods We constructed an algorithm using a combination of vital signs, tone and birth weight to determine the need for CPAP in neonates with respiratory distress. Neonates admitted to the neonatal ward of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, in Blantyre, Malawi, were assessed in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Nurses and paediatricians-in-training assessed neonates to determine whether they required CPAP using the TRY CPAP algorithm. To establish the accuracy of the TRY CPAP algorithm in evaluating the need for CPAP, their assessment was compared with the decision of a neonatologist blinded to the TRY CPAP algorithm findings. Results 325 neonates were evaluated over a 2-month period; 13% were deemed to require CPAP by the neonatologist. The inter-rater reliability with the algorithm was 0.90 for nurses and 0.97 for paediatricians-in-training using the neonatologist's assessment as the reference standard. Conclusions The TRY CPAP algorithm has the potential to be a simple and reliable tool to assist nurses and clinicians in identifying neonates who require treatment with CPAP in low-resource settings. PMID:25877290

  13. Distribution of mercury in neonatal guinea pigs after exposure to mercury vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Minoru; Aoyama, Haruhiko; Kojima, Sakae; Yamamura, Yukio ); Satoh, Hiroshi )

    1989-11-01

    The mammalian fetus and neonate is well known to be particularly susceptible to the toxic effects of heavy metals and other chemical substances and subsequently the potentially adverse effects appear in the developing individuals. Exposure of the neonate to toxic metals occurs in the living environment through nursing and intake of metal-containing foods and water, and respiration in contaminated atmospheres. Significant exposure of the neonate to mercury compounds, such as mercuric mercury and methylmercury, is often a potential hazard; higher gastrointestinal absorption of these compounds in suckling animals results in more accumulation and retention of mercury than in the adult. It is still unknown how the toxic effects and metabolism of mercury vapor in immature animals differ from that in adults. The purpose of this study is to clarify the accumulation and distribution of mercury in neonatal animals after exposure to mercury vapor.

  14. Nursing outside hospitals: the working experience of community nurses. Educational characteristics and job perceptions.

    PubMed

    Temple-Smith, M J; Johnson, K A; Dunt, D R

    1989-01-01

    The community nursing practice research project reports the results of a mailed questionnaire survey of nurses employed outside hospitals and nursing homes in Victoria in 1985. Two 10 per cent random samples stratified across practice areas were selected from listings of community nurses providing detailed employment information to the Victorian Nursing Council. An 84 per cent response rate was obtained from these listings yielding 689 responses. This paper reports that part of the study relevant to job entry, job satisfaction, job mobility and perceived career options as well as educational preparation. One half of community nurses entered community nursing after five years of hospital experience. The major reasons for choosing employment in community health nursing were its conditions of work, its autonomy and a dissatisfaction with hospital nursing, rather than a specific orientation to community nursing. These can be appreciated in terms of competing demands by the nurse's family life and her sense of growing professional maturity. Job satisfaction was high, with 87 per cent of nurses in the study population being satisfied or very satisfied. Only one quarter considered opportunities for career advancement to exist in their practice area. In the event only one fifth of nurses regarded promotion as important. The high levels of job satisfaction and the low importance attached to promotion are explicable given the nature of female employment and dissatisfaction with hospital nursing. Despite this high level of job satisfaction, one third of nurses believed they would not be nursing in five years time. Less than one third of nurses felt there was adequate opportunity for advancement in their practice area.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2605904

  15. Nursing the Nursing Shortage Back to Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisbord, Anne

    1992-01-01

    Discusses shortage of nurses, improved compensation, and other benefits for nurses. Discusses effects of institutional reputation. Describes move to retention programs by nurse recruiters. Concludes image of nursing has developed into professional status. (ABL)

  16. From nurse to marketing entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Aydlotte, J H

    1998-03-01

    An important lesson in career advancement is to be prepared for and take advantage of sudden opportunities that come your way. This risk-taking nurse went into nurse recruitment, which then opened avenues into health care marketing. She pioneered one of the largest health care advertising companies in the country and describes how she has used her new-found skills, at work and at home, to face life's biggest challenges.

  17. Health providers' perception of quality of care for neonates in health facilities in a municipality in Southern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Elikplim Pomevor, Kokui; Adomah-Afari, Augustine

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess available human resources for neonatal care and their skills, in order to explore health providers' perceptions of quality of neonatal care in health facilities in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach Data were gathered using qualitative interviews with health providers working in the maternity and paediatric wards and midwives; direct observation; and documentary review at a regional hospital, a municipal hospital and four health centres in a municipality in a region in Southern Ghana. Data were analysed using thematic framework through the process of coding in six phases to create and establish meaningful patterns. Findings The study revealed that health providers were concerned about the number of staff available, their competence and also equipment available for them to work more efficiently. Some essential equipment for neonatal care was either not available or was non-functional where it was available, while aseptic procedures were not adhered to. Moreover, personal protective equipment such as facemask, caps, aprons were not used except in the labour wards where staff had to change their footwear before entering. Research limitations/implications Limited number of health providers and facilities used, lack of exploration of parents of neonates' perspective of quality of neonatal care in this study and other settings, including the teaching hospitals. The authors did not examine issues related to the ineffective use of IV cannulation for neonates by nurses as well as referral of neonates. Additionally, the authors did not explore the perspectives of management of the municipal and regional health directorates or policy makers of the Ministry of Health and Ghana Health Service regarding the shortage of staff, inadequate provision of medical equipment and infrastructure. Practical implications This paper suggests the need for policy makers to redirect their attention to the issues that would improve the quality of

  18. Health providers' perception of quality of care for neonates in health facilities in a municipality in Southern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Elikplim Pomevor, Kokui; Adomah-Afari, Augustine

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess available human resources for neonatal care and their skills, in order to explore health providers' perceptions of quality of neonatal care in health facilities in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach Data were gathered using qualitative interviews with health providers working in the maternity and paediatric wards and midwives; direct observation; and documentary review at a regional hospital, a municipal hospital and four health centres in a municipality in a region in Southern Ghana. Data were analysed using thematic framework through the process of coding in six phases to create and establish meaningful patterns. Findings The study revealed that health providers were concerned about the number of staff available, their competence and also equipment available for them to work more efficiently. Some essential equipment for neonatal care was either not available or was non-functional where it was available, while aseptic procedures were not adhered to. Moreover, personal protective equipment such as facemask, caps, aprons were not used except in the labour wards where staff had to change their footwear before entering. Research limitations/implications Limited number of health providers and facilities used, lack of exploration of parents of neonates' perspective of quality of neonatal care in this study and other settings, including the teaching hospitals. The authors did not examine issues related to the ineffective use of IV cannulation for neonates by nurses as well as referral of neonates. Additionally, the authors did not explore the perspectives of management of the municipal and regional health directorates or policy makers of the Ministry of Health and Ghana Health Service regarding the shortage of staff, inadequate provision of medical equipment and infrastructure. Practical implications This paper suggests the need for policy makers to redirect their attention to the issues that would improve the quality of

  19. Forecasting the nursing workforce in a dynamic health care market.

    PubMed

    Dumpe, M L; Herman, J; Young, S W

    1998-01-01

    The ability to discern the interacting factors that affect supply and demand for nurses could help nurse educators and nurse leaders allocate resources to meet these needs. Forecasting models must take into account the interactions of three crucial groups of health care providers--physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician's assistants. Buerhaus has noted that market size, wages, preferences for nursing services, and availability of substitutes influence the demand for nursing services. Changes in nurse supply resulting from Medicare reimbursement for nursing services have not been studied, though it could safely be projected that such reimbursement will increase nurse supply. Nurses with baccalaureate degrees and advanced practice preparation will be in the greatest demand in ambulatory care, managed care, public health, and home care settings, raising concerns again that the educational mix is in need of adjustment upwards. PMID:9748982

  20. Obstetrical staff nurses experiences of clinical learning.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    The clinical learning experience is used in nursing programs of study worldwide to prepare nurses for professional practice. This study's purpose was to use Naturalistic Inquiry to understand the experiences of staff nurses in an obstetrical unit with undergraduate nursing students present for clinical learning. A convenience sample of 12 staff nurses, employed on a Family Birth Center, participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparative method as modified by Lincoln and Guba was used to analyze data. Five themes related to staff nurses experiences of clinical learning were identified: Giving and Receiving; Advancing Professionally and Personally; Balancing Act; Getting to Know and Working with You; and Past and Present. This research highlights staff nurses' experiences of clinical learning in undergraduate nursing education. Staff nurses exert a powerful, long lasting influence on students. A need exists to prepare and judiciously select nurses to work with students. Clinical agencies and universities can take joint responsibility providing tangible incentives, financial compensation, and recognition to all nurses working with nursing students.

  1. Addressing barriers to achieving nursing certification: development of a certification achievement program on a medical-surgical unit.

    PubMed

    Perlstein, Lori; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Lindberg, Judy; Petras, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Nursing certification is recognized as advanced competency and knowledge beyond basic preparation, thus empowering nurses to contribute to improved outcomes by demonstrating expertise in their specialties. It has been recognized that nurses do not seek certification because of identified barriers. Through a structured Certification Achievement Program that reduced barriers, a cohort of nurses was able to achieve certification in medical-surgical nursing.

  2. Perceived roles of oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO) Standards of Care (2001) provides a framework that delineates oncology nursing roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to explore how oncology nurses perceive their roles and responsibilities compared to the CANO Standards of Care. Six focus groups were conducted and 21 registered nurses (RNs) from a community-based hospital participated in this study. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative inductive content analysis. Three themes were identified: (1) Oncology nurses perceive a gap between their defined roles and the reality of daily practice, as cancer care becomes more complex and as they provide advanced oncology care to more patients while there is no parallel adaptation to the health care system to support them, such as safe staffing; (2) Oncology nursing, as a specialty, requires sustained professional development and leadership roles; and (3) Oncology nurses are committed to providing continuous care as a reference point in the health care team by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration andfacilitating patient's navigation through the system. Organizational support through commitment to appropriate staffing and matching scope ofpractice to patient needs may lead to maximize the health and well-being of nurses, quality of patient care and organizational performance. PMID:26897865

  3. [A career in nursing sciences?].

    PubMed

    Pelletier, P A; Brassard, C; Caty, S; Adam, D

    1992-11-01

    A research study was conducted in a francophone high school in Northern Ontario to examine students' perceptions of nursing and the influence of these perceptions on nursing as a career choice. All students in grades 11, 12 and 13 were invited to participate. Fifty-eight percent (n = 268) completed the questionnaire. Results showed that 37 percent of the respondents considered pursuing a career in the health sciences. Only 14% percent were interested in nursing. Respondents' comments suggest that the nurse is viewed favorably but the profession is perceived as a career that does not involve pleasant tasks, good working conditions or opportunities for professional advancement. Reasons advocated for choosing nursing were altruistic rather than career-oriented. Students saw nursing practice as occurring mainly in a hospital setting. Half of the respondents who had chosen nursing as a career opted to enroll in a university program and the other half chose a college program. Results suggest that nursing continues to face an image problem regarding its role in the health care system. In these times of job losses and budget cuts, the profession still needs to attract young recruits. This is the challenge we have to face. PMID:1490271

  4. Update on the management of neonatal sepsis in horses.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jon

    2014-08-01

    Despite advances in neonatal intensive care sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock remain the biggest killers of neonatal foals. Management of this severe syndrome remains difficult, requiring intensive intervention. Key aspects of management include infection control, hemodynamic support, immunomodulatory interventions, and metabolic/endocrine support. Infection control largely consists of early antimicrobial therapy, plasma transfusions, and local therapy for the infected focus. In cases with severe sepsis or septic shock, hemodynamic support with fluids, vasoactive agents, and respiratory support insuring oxygen delivery to vital organs is important. Nutritional support is important, but close monitoring is needed to avoid hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

  5. Neonatal haemostasis and the management of neonatal thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Will, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Two detailed reviews of the management of neonatal thrombosis were published in 2012; one was an up-dated version of guidance first issued in 2004 and the other was a comprehensive review. Both of these publications gave very similar advice regarding the practical aspects of the indications, dosage and management of antithrombotic therapy. The authors stated that the evidence supporting most of their recommendations for anti-thrombotic therapy in neonates remained weak and so the therapy for a neonate with a thrombosis has to be based on an individualized assessment of estimated risk versus potential benefit. The aim of this present review is to give the treating physician an outline of the unique physiology of neonatal coagulation and how this affects the monitoring, dosing and even the choice of therapeutic strategy for the management of thrombosis in the neonate.

  6. Developing a social media platform for nurses.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jennifer; Kennedy, Maggie

    2015-11-18

    Social media tools provide opportunities for nurses to connect with colleagues and patients and to advance personally and professionally. This article describes the process of developing an innovative social media platform at a large, multi-centre teaching hospital, The Ottawa Hospital, Canada, and its benefits for nurses. The platform, TOH Nurses, was developed using a nursing process approach, involving assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation. The aim of this initiative was to address the barriers to communication inherent in the large number of nurses employed by the organisation, the physical size of the multi-centre hospital and the shift-work nature of nursing. The platform was used to provide educational materials for clinical nurses, and to share information about professional practice. The implications of using a social media platform in a healthcare setting were considered carefully during its development and implementation, including concerns regarding privacy and confidentiality. PMID:26576914

  7. The Bush Administration's record on nursing issues.

    PubMed

    Conway-Welch, Colleen

    2005-05-01

    The article addresses a number of initiatives taken in 2005 by the Bush Administration to address nursing issues. Summaries are provided of the investments in the Nurse Reinvestment Act, Financial Aid, access issues (including expanded community health centers), costs (including medical liability reform), information technology and the revised fair labor standards. Finally, the author concludes with rationale for complete workforce and workplace system redesign and the need for advanced practice nurses to engage in full scope practice without artificially imposed boundaries.

  8. Neonatal neurosonography: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Bhat, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Neurosonography is a simple, established non-invasive technique for the intracranial assessment of preterm neonate. Apart from established indication in the evaluation of periventricular haemorrhage, it provides clue to wide range of pathology. This presentation provides a quick roadmap to the technique, imaging anatomy and spectrum of pathological imaging appearances encountered in neonates. PMID:25489132

  9. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, Jill P; Clancy, Robert M

    2003-09-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes, although quite rare, provide an excellent opportunity to examine disease from bench to bedside. During the past year numerous publications have reported basic and clinical research. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in more than 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with conduction abnormalities in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with congenital heart block was at or below one in 50. Although the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease, and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors from the scavenging macrophages, and transdifferentiation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroblast scarring phenotype. Cross-reactivity of anti-52-kD SSA/Ro antibodies with a serotoninergic cardiac receptor, 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)4, has been suggested but remains unconfirmed. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to grow, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late-onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements that identify first-degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. Reassuringly, most children with neonatal lupus syndromes do not

  10. [Natal and neonatal teeth].

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Manuela; Lussi, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Natal teeth have been defined as teeth which are present at birth, while neonatal teeth erupt during the first 30 days. Their occurrence is rare, the prevalence ranges from 1:2000 to 1:3000 with a higher frequency in the lip and palate clefts and syndroms. In about 85% natal or neonatal teeth are lower central incisors (60% in pairs), rare are upper teeth, molars and multiple teeth. In almost 90% they are part of the deciduous dentition. A lot of possible causes of early eruption are discussed, but only the relation to hereditary factors seems to be evident. An autosomal dominant trait is often described. The appearance of these teeth is dependent on the degree of maturity, but most of the time it is loose, small, discoloured and hypoplastic. Histologically, enamel hypoplasia with normal prism structure is apparent. No significant disturbances of the dentin structures are observed, only cervically dentin becomes atubular with spaces and enclosed cells. A large vascular pulp and failure of root formation are further investigations. Our microhardness measurements showed values from 24.3-32.4 KHN for enamel and 48.3-62.2 KHN for dentin, while normal deciduous teeth have an enamel hardness of 322.0 +/- 17.5 KHN. The thickness of enamel was never more than 280 microm compared to up to 1200 microm in normal teeth. This shows the retarded development of natal and neonatal teeth, because mineralization has not finished at the time of birth. In accordance with developmental age tooth structure and appearence are normal. In consideration of complications as Riga-Fede-disease, feeding problems, possibility of infection and hypermobility most of the time extraction is the treatment of choice, but in the interest of protecting the child this decision should be made carefully. PMID:17051960

  11. Nursing resilience: a nursing opportunity.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Ellarene Duis

    2015-01-01

    Resilience is a concept that has been explored in many other professions and cultures. Nurses experience many difficult and unanticipated adverse situations that can negatively impact them. Resilience can be cultivated to aid individual nurses and nursing work groups to bounce back from these situations and integrate them into context of their practice. Practices such as meditation and education can support development of resilience. PMID:25714950

  12. Neonatal congenital microvillus atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pecache, N; Patole, S; Hagan, R; Hill, D; Charles, A; Papadimitriou, J

    2004-01-01

    Congenital microvillous atrophy (CMVA) is the leading cause of neonatal secretory diarrhoea with onset either in the first 72 hours of life (early onset) or at 6–8 weeks after birth (late onset). To date over 30 cases have been reported worldwide. The prognosis for this life threatening condition continues to be poor. Therapeutic agents like somatostatin and epidermal growth factor are either ineffective or of marginal benefit. Overall five year survival after small bowel transplantation is currently ∼50%. The following brief review is aimed towards helping neonatologists/perinatologists in the early diagnosis, and management of CMVA and in counselling the parents appropriately. PMID:14970294

  13. Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Leeman, Lawrence; Hsi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome is common due to the current opioid addiction epidemic. Infants born to women covertly abusing prescription opioids may not be identified as at risk until withdrawal signs present. Buprenorphine is a newer treatment for maternal opioid addiction and appears to result in a milder withdrawal syndrome than methadone. Initial treatment is with nonpharmacological measures including decreasing stimuli, however pharmacological treatment is commonly required. Opioid monotherapy is preferred, with phenobarbital or clonidine uncommonly needed as adjunctive therapy. Rooming-in and breastfeeding may decease the severity of withdrawal. Limited evidence is available regarding long-term effects of perinatal opioid exposure.

  14. Transient neonatal tyrosinaemia.

    PubMed

    Rice, D N; Houston, I B; Lyon, I C; Macarthur, B A; Mullins, P R; Veale, A M; Guthrie, R

    1989-01-01

    Children who had presented with transient neonatal tyrosinaemia (TNT) were compared with a group of unaffected controls at 7-9 years of age. A comprehensive psychometric assessment revealed significant differences between the groups in adaptive behaviour, psycholinguistic abilities, and speed of learning. In nearly all components of the tests used, higher levels of TNT were associated with lower levels of performance. This study demonstrates that TNT, a condition commonly regarded as benign in the short term, has long-term effects which may be detrimental to the child in school.

  15. [Essential professional core competencies for nurses].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih

    2010-10-01

    Core competency is vital to the nursing profession. Such helps guarantee the high quality and effectiveness of delivered care and maintains the social value and status of the nursing profession. This article introduces the definition of nursing core competency and its connotations. The core competency profile for the nursing profession embraces basic behavioral attributes as well as mastery of advanced practice skills. The former include such attributes as gentleness, willingness to serve, keen observation and judgment, efficiency, skillfulness, responsibility and accountability. The latter embraces skills in general care, communication and collaboration, management, self-development, innovation and research, and stress-adjustment. To cultivate competent nurses, academic education should emphasize critical thinking skills, integrate problem-based and evidence-based learning approaches into curricula, and use objective structured clinical examination to evaluate learning outcomes. In the healthcare sector, systematic professional training models such as the clinical ladder with multidiscipline rotation hold the potential to train novice nurses as expert professionals. Meanwhile, to advance the professional capabilities of nurses, nursing administrators should provide a positive work environment to fuel and maintain learning motivation. Education and healthcare systems should work closely together to promote the professional competence of nurses and to strengthen the value of the nursing profession. PMID:20878605

  16. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    MedlinePlus

    ... Culture of Safety Professional Standards Nursing Quality Ethics / Genetics & Genomics Code of Ethics Workplace Safety / Safe Patient Handling Needlestick Prevention Environmental Health Policy & Advocacy / Take Action ...

  17. The Future of Nursing Education: 10 Trends To Watch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Barbara R.; Oros, Marla T.; Durney-Crowley, Jane

    2000-01-01

    Ten trends affecting nursing are as follows: changing demographics, technology, globalization, educated consumers, population-based care, health care costs/managed care, health policy and regulation, need for interdisciplinary education and collaboration, nursing shortage, and advances in nursing science and research. (SK)

  18. Men Who Enter Nursing: A Sociological Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auster, Donald; Auster, Nancy R.

    Little is known about the relationship between the choice of a sex discrepant occupation and the selection of a nursing career, attitudes toward training, and professional socialization. The research design included a cross-sectional attitude survey of both beginning and advanced nursing school students. Data were obtained from a…

  19. Disparities in Perinatal Quality Outcomes for Very Low Birth Weight Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Eileen T; Staiger, Douglas; Horbar, Jeffrey; Kenny, Michael J; Patrick, Thelma; Rogowski, Jeannette A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if hospital-level disparities in very low birth weight (VLBW) infant outcomes are explained by poorer hospital nursing characteristics. Data Sources Nurse survey and VLBW infant registry data. Study Design Retrospective study of 8,252 VLBW infants in 98 Vermont Oxford Network hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) nationally. NICUs were classified into three groups based on their percent of infants of black race. Two nurse-sensitive perinatal quality standards were studied: nosocomial infection and breast milk. Data Collection Primary nurse survey (N = 5,773, 77 percent response rate). Principal Findings VLBW infants born in high-black concentration hospitals had higher rates of infection and discharge without breast milk than VLBW infants born in low-black concentration hospitals. Nurse understaffing was higher and practice environments were worse in high-black as compared to low-black hospitals. NICU nursing features accounted for one-third to one-half of the hospital-level health disparities. Conclusions Poorer nursing characteristics contribute to disparities in VLBW infant outcomes in two nurse-sensitive perinatal quality standards. Improvements in nursing have potential to improve the quality of care for seven out of ten black VLBW infants who are born in high-black hospitals in this country. PMID:25250882

  20. The in-vitro anticoagulant effect of rivaroxaban in neonates.

    PubMed

    Attard, Chantal; Monagle, Paul; Kubitza, Dagmar; Ignjatovic, Vera

    2014-04-01

    The use of anticoagulants in neonates is increasing because of the medical advances improving the long-term survival of very sick infants who are at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Current anticoagulation therapy in neonates is less than ideal, because of the physiological differences compared to children and adults regarding the pathophysiology of thrombosis and pharmacology of the drug. Limitations associated with conventional anticoagulants have prompted the development of novel drugs that specifically target the key proteins in the coagulation system. Rivaroxaban is the first oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor available for the prevention of VTE in adults. Its predictable pharmacokinetic profile, high oral bioavailability and once-daily dosing make rivaroxaban an optimal anticoagulant that warrants investigation in neonates. This study was designed to determine whether there are age-related differences in the pharmacodynamic effects of rivaroxaban in vitro amongst neonates. Neonatal and adult plasma pools were created and spiked with increasing concentrations of rivaroxaban (0-500 ng/ml). Commercially available prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and anti-Factor Xa assays as well as a sub-sampling thrombin generation assay were used to measure the rivaroxaban effect. A dose-dependent response was observed for PT, aPTT and lag time in both the age groups. Rivaroxaban caused a significant increase in the clotting time for PT and aPTT as well as an increase in lag time (as measured by thrombin generation) in neonates when compared with adults. In-vivo studies are required to confirm the consistency of dose-response in neonates. PMID:24418940

  1. End-of-Life Decision Making for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: A Survey of Nursing Home Social Services Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Debra

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to describe nursing home social services staff roles and perceptions related to end-of-life medical decision making for nursing home residents in endstage dementia. Using a self-designed questionnaire, 138 nursing home social services staff from across New York State answered questions about advance directives,…

  2. Neonatal hygroscopic condenser humidifier.

    PubMed

    Gedeon, A; Mebius, C; Palmer, K

    1987-01-01

    A hygroscopic condenser humidifier was developed for neonates on mechanical ventilation and was evaluated by laboratory tests and clinically. Humidification provided by the unit was measured in the 10- to 50-ml tidal-volume range at ambient temperatures of 24 degrees C and 38 degrees C. The effect of a leaking patient connection on device performance was investigated. Leakage rates were measured routinely in a neonatal ICU and surgery to determine the clinical significance. In the entire tidal volume and temperature range, the unit provided an inspiratory water content in excess of 30 g/m3 when the leak fraction (volume leaked/volume delivered at Y-piece) was less than 15%. This was found in three out of four cases. In about one out of ten cases, the leak exceeded 30%, which invariably led to corrective action, such as repositioning or changing the endotracheal tube. However, even at a 30% leak, a water content of about 26 g/m3 was still available for humidifying the inspired gas, which corresponds to normal physiologic conditions found in the trachea for nasal breathing of room air.

  3. Developing leadership talent: a statewide nurse leader mentorship program.

    PubMed

    Rich, Mary; Kempin, Bettyann; Loughlin, Mary Jo; Vitale, Tracy R; Wurmser, Theresa; Thrall, Terese Hudson

    2015-02-01

    Nurse leaders continue to seek support programs essential for advancement to senior roles. Providing such support presents a challenge for the future of nursing in the state of New Jersey and on a national level. This article discusses the creation of a mentorship program by the Organization of Nurse Executives of New Jersey (ONE NJ). In recognition of the program, which has contributed to the advancement of New Jersey nursing leadership, the ONE NJ received the 2014 American Organization of Nurse Executives Chapter Achievement Award. PMID:25621746

  4. Ethics in independent nurse consulting: strategies for avoiding ethical quicksand.

    PubMed

    Creel, Eileen L; Robinson, Jennifer C

    2010-11-01

    Changes in health care have created a variety of new roles and opportunities for nurses in advanced practice. One of these changes is the increasing number of advanced practice nurses carrying out independent consultation. Differences in goals between business and health care may create ethical dilemmas for nurse consultants. The purpose of this article is to describe possible ethical pitfalls that nurse consultants may encounter and strategies to prevent or solve these dilemmas. Three themes related to nursing codes of ethics will be discussed: the duty to uphold human rights, the duty to fulfill commitments, and the duty to practice the profession competently. PMID:21097975

  5. PhD or DNP: planning for doctoral nursing education.

    PubMed

    Bednash, Geraldine; Breslin, Eileen T; Kirschling, Jane M; Rosseter, Robert J

    2014-10-01

    Leading authorities from inside and outside of nursing are calling for a rapid increase in the number of nurses holding doctoral degrees. More nurses with the terminal degree are needed to serve as Advanced Practice Registered Nurses, assume faculty roles, embark on research careers, and pursue top leadership positions. Today's prospective nursing student can choose from doctoral programs focused on research or practice. The authors explore the differences in these degree options, expectations for students enrolled in these programs, key questions to ask when selecting a degree type, and the career choices available to doctorally-prepared nurses, including faculty positions. PMID:25248773

  6. Validation of holistic nursing competencies: role-delineation study, 2012.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Helen Lorraine; Erickson, Margaret Elizabeth; Campbell, Joan A; Brekke, Mary E; Sandor, M Kay

    2013-12-01

    The American Holistic Nurses Credentialing Corporation (AHNCC), certifying body for nurses practicing within the precepts of holistic nursing, uses a systematic process to guide program development. A previous publication described their early work that distinguished basic and advanced holistic nursing and development of related examinations. A more recent publication described the work of AHNCC from 2004 to 2012, including a role-delineation study (RDS) that was undertaken to identify and validate competencies currently used by holistic nurses. A final report describes the RDS design, methods, and raw data information. This article discusses AHNCC's goals for undertaking the 2012 Holistic Nursing RDS and the implications for the certification programs.

  7. [Construction of terminology subsets: contributions to clinical nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Clares, Jorge Wilker Bezerra; de Freitas, Maria Célia; Guedes, Maria Vilaní Cavalcante; da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima

    2013-08-01

    The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®) is a classification system that unifies the elements of nursing practice (diagnoses, interventions and outcomes), enabling elucidation of elements of a specific nursing language through the construction of terminology subsets. In this reflective essay, aspects relevant to the construction of ICNP® terminology subsets are highlighted, as well as their contributions to clinical nursing practice. The development of subsets as a tool that contributes to making nursing language universal, facilitates the communication process, as well as the scientific and technological advancement of the profession, is discussed. Therefore, its use by nurses worldwide is encouraged.

  8. Hypothalamic control of the male neonatal testosterone surge.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Jenny; Herbison, Allan E

    2016-02-19

    Sex differences in brain neuroanatomy and neurophysiology underpin considerable physiological and behavioural differences between females and males. Sexual differentiation of the brain is regulated by testosterone secreted by the testes predominantly during embryogenesis in humans and the neonatal period in rodents. Despite huge advances in understanding how testosterone, and its metabolite oestradiol, sexually differentiate the brain, little is known about the mechanism that actually generates the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge. This review examines the evidence for the role of the hypothalamus, and particularly the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, in generating the neonatal testosterone surge in rodents and primates. Kisspeptin-GPR54 signalling is well established as a potent and critical regulator of GnRH neuron activity during puberty and adulthood, and we argue here for an equally important role at birth in driving the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge in rodents. The presence of a male-specific population of preoptic area kisspeptin neurons that appear transiently in the perinatal period provide one possible source of kisspeptin drive to neonatal GnRH neurons in the mouse. PMID:26833836

  9. Neonatal Conjunctivitis Leading to Neonatal Sepsis--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis is the most common occular disease in neonates. Most infections are acquired during vaginal delivery. In spite most of these cases are benign; some of them may progress to systemic complications like loss of vision if left untreated. The authors present a case of a newborn who developed late onset neonatal sepsis from E. coli positive conjunctivitis. The baby was treated with Injection Meropenem and Injection Amikacin for 10 days. The course was uneventful, after that baby responded well and discharged home on 24th day. PMID:26931268

  10. Neonatal Conjunctivitis Leading to Neonatal Sepsis--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis is the most common occular disease in neonates. Most infections are acquired during vaginal delivery. In spite most of these cases are benign; some of them may progress to systemic complications like loss of vision if left untreated. The authors present a case of a newborn who developed late onset neonatal sepsis from E. coli positive conjunctivitis. The baby was treated with Injection Meropenem and Injection Amikacin for 10 days. The course was uneventful, after that baby responded well and discharged home on 24th day.

  11. Generational differences in registered nurse turnover.

    PubMed

    LeVasseur, Sandra A; Wang, Chen-Yen; Mathews, Barbara; Boland, Mary

    2009-08-01

    The chronic nature of the nursing workforce shortage in the United States is a continuing concern. As the nationwide gap between supply and demand grows, it remains unknown what impact turnover will have on nursing, access to care, and efforts to improve quality and safety of health care. It also remains unclear whether the recent turnover trends among new graduate registered nurses differ from past generational cohorts of new nurses. The aims of this study were to identify the reasons why registered nurses turnover by generational cohort (Veterans, Baby Boomers, and GenXMs) and to compare the length of time nurses were employed in their first five nursing positions by generational cohort. The findings suggest the three generational cohorts displayed similar reasons for leaving nursing positions with relocation, career advancement, and personal/family reasons reported most frequently. Except for the first nursing position, significant generational effects were found in the length of time Veterans, Baby Boomer, and GenXMs stayed employed in their nursing positions. It remains unknown why the GenXMs displayed a significantly shorter length of employment time in their second, third, fourth, and fifth nursing positions. The decline in length of employment time displayed in both the Baby Boomers and GenXMs may be an issue of concern requiring future research. PMID:20026454

  12. Global health for nursing...and nursing for global health.

    PubMed

    Merry, Lisa

    2012-12-01

    This article draws on the literature to present a conceptualization of global health (GH) that corresponds with the discipline of nursing and defines the contributions of nursing to GH. The author's perspective is that "health" should be defined and considered holistically to reflect the fact that GH involves more than the eradication of disease and that health as a fundamental right of every human being must be made explicit. "Global" refers to the supraterritorial links among the social determinants of health located at points anywhere on earth within a whole-world context. The focus of GH is the supraterritorial determinants and its ultimate objective is health equity for all nations and all people. The contributions of nurses are advocacy, healing and alleviating suffering through caring, and increasing nursing capacity globally. To truly advance the GH agenda, a new world order is needed, one in which political decision-making is guided by our shared humanity. PMID:23448073

  13. Major full thickness skin burn injuries in premature neonate twins.

    PubMed

    Rimdeika, R; Bagdonas, R

    2005-02-01

    Burns in neonates have been reported following the use of pulse oximeters, various electrodes, chemical disinfecting agents and phototherapy blankets. Burn injuries in premature neonates are very rare and there have been no reports on major full skin thickness injuries. This case reports on preterm neonate male twins delivered at a Community Hospital. After the delivery they were placed on water warmers for 15-20 min and then transported into incubators. Burn injuries were noticed 1h after the delivery. Infant One, weight 1500 g, had an injury of 20% TBSA on his dorsum, waist and buttocks. The other infant, weight 1835 g, had an injury of 14% TBSA on the same areas. The infants were transported to the University Hospital. At the seventh day after the injury they recovered from respiratory distress and surgical procedures started. The eschar was excised deep to fascia and wounds were grafted with 0.1mm thickness skin grafts harvested from the thigh and cut into islets. Autografts were protected by overlay with fresh allograft harvested from the twins' father. Surgery procedures were performed in two steps, each second day, not exceeding 10% of total body area during excision. Donor sites healed at the eighth day after the surgery. Burn wounds healed gradually by way of spontaneous replacement of allograft and wound closure by spontaneous epithelization from the autograft islets. Eighteen days after the surgery all the grafted wounds were found epithelized. We conclude that in premature neonates relatively low temperatures may cause deep burn injuries. We recommend the delivery of preterm childbirths at well equipped facilities with staff qualified in nursing of premature neonates. PMID:15639370

  14. E-Mentoring: Confidence Intervention for Senior Nursing Students Preparing for Readiness to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRose, Patrick S., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the registered nurse has evolved over the years as technology has changed and the practice of nursing has advanced. There are many factors that influence how a new nurse enters practice; however, confidence appears to play a large role in the way nursing students see themselves and how this self perception regulates transition to…

  15. The Current Nature of the Integration of the Humanities within Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Mary L.; Wright, Robert J.

    Baccalaureate nursing educators have built their nursing programs on the philosophical belief that learning in the humanities is essential to prepare reflective nurses. Due to scientific advancements with expanding technology, however, the scientific focus has held prominence in nursing education. The past traditions of both medical and nursing…

  16. Distance Learning Is Changing and Challenging Nursing Education. AACN Issue Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    Technology is enhancing the ability of distance education to reach both aspiring nursing students and professional nurses who want to advance their skills. Distance education also improves access to education and, in doing so, counters the nation's increasing shortage of nurses. It allows nurses to continue to work while enrolling in online…

  17. The Evolution of School Nursing Data Indicators in Massachusetts: Recommendations for a National Data Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gapinski, Mary Ann; Sheetz, Anne H.

    2014-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses' research priorities include the recommendation that data reliability, quality, and availability be addressed to advance research in child and school health. However, identifying a national school nursing data set has remained a challenge for school nurses, school nursing leaders, school nurse…

  18. The realistic job preview as a partial remedy for nursing attrition and shortages: the role of nursing schools.

    PubMed

    Crow, Stephen M; Hartman, Sandra J; McLendon, Christy L

    2009-07-01

    There is often a disconnect between what individuals expect from a chosen profession or organization and what that profession or organization can realistically deliver. In this research, the authors consider the extent to which those considering a nursing career would benefit from advance information, generally described as a "realistic job preview," from human resources professionals. Results of a survey of faculty nurses--those educating aspiring nurses--suggest that such a need exists. Implications for the initial entry into nursing education, continuing education, and retention of nurses that may be of value to policy makers and those involved in the education and development of nurses are presented. PMID:19639853

  19. The Integrality of Situated Caring in Nursing and the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Jarrin, Olga F.

    2012-01-01

    Much emphasis has been placed on the importance of the environment as a determinant of health; however, little theoretical work in nursing has specifically articulated the importance of the nursing practice environment as a factor in patient outcomes. This work advances the unitary-transformative-caring paradigm by focusing on the concept of integrality and exploring the nursing meta-paradigm concepts (nursing, environment, human being, and health) through integral philosophical inquiry. PMID:22222236

  20. Perspectives of an American University of Beirut graduate on nursing scholarship.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Hussein A

    2006-10-01

    Nursing scholarship is necessary for the advancement of the nursing discipline. Engaging in scholarly activities is every nurse's responsibility regardless of job title, position, or practice setting. Scholarship today is no longer limited to the practice of academicians and scientists; rather, it is integral to the work of nurse leaders, clinicians, health policy specialists, researchers, and educators. The scholarly contributions of nurses have been noted at regional, national, even international levels. This article describes a renewed and contemporary view on nursing scholarship and discusses the role of the nurse in promoting the nursing profession using scholarly activities.