Science.gov

Sample records for advanced neonatal nurse

  1. Breaking New Ground: An Exploratory Study of the Role and Education of the Advanced Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. Researching Professional Education. Research Reports Series Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redshaw, M. E.; Harris, A.

    A British research study documented and defined the level of functioning of advanced neonatal nurse practitioners (ANNPs) in comparison with qualified nurses and junior pediatric medical staff working in the same neonatal units. Subjects were ANNPs, ANNP students, and clinician mentors in 10 units. Data were collected through interviews,…

  2. Neonatal nursing: an unmet challenge in India.

    PubMed

    Kalyan, Geetanjli; Vatsa, Manju

    2014-11-01

    Nurses comprise a key component to maternal and newborn health care delivery, including the care of 'at-risk' or sick newborns. However, the efficiency and effectiveness of services rely heavily on adequate numbers of highly skilled neonatal nurses. Currently, in India, a significant shortage of trained nurses in the field of newborn care is contributing to poor neonatal outcomes. Specifically, nurses caring for newborns lack the competency and experience needed to ensure optimal care. This deficiency has been linked to a lack of expert faculty, standardized training and minimal or no exposures to newborn clinical care areas during pre service education. Moreover, in addition to a lack of operational research in the area, nurses who provide care for newborns are often faced with numerous system related issues that impede their ability to provide optimal care. Most notably, frequent changes of work place, poor wages, and lack of continuing education, skill maintenance, recognition, and collaborative team culture further compromise the nursing care. All these lead to poor motivation and competency. To meet this challenge, it is essential that emphasis be placed on the identification and support of nursing faculty with expertise in newborn and neonatal care who are able to ensure that nurses receive standardized education for pre-service, in-service and ongoing care. In addition, importance should be placed on encouraging newborn nursing research as well as on governmental increases in salary compensation. Lastly, given the shortage of physicians to take care of sick neonates in remote areas, the creation of a cadre of Neonatal nurse practitioner/ advanced practice nurses would be an invaluable solution in developing countries. Furthermore, centralized oversight of newborn education and training would be best served, if responsibility was placed with Reproductive maternal newborn child health (RMNCH) workers and district level officers.

  3. Neonatal nurse practitioner workforce survey executive summary.

    PubMed

    Timoney, Paula; Sansoucie, Debra

    2012-06-01

    The Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey, led by Paula Timoney, DNP, ARNP, NNP-BC, and Debra Sansoucie, EdD, RN, NNP-BC, with the National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NANNP), provides data collected from more than 600 neonatal nurse practitioners to examine workforce characteristics and needs. NANNP commissioned the survey because no comprehensive data existed for the neonatal nurse practitioner workforce. The executive summary given in this article highlights some of the survey's key findings in the areas of demographics, practice environment, scope of responsibilities, and job satisfaction. Readers are encouraged to review the complete text of the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey for more in-depth data and recommendations regarding NNP education, scope of practice, and scope of responsibility in the ever-changing health care environment. The report will be available for purchase at http://www.nannstore.org in summer 2012.

  4. Advanced urology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Helen

    2014-03-01

    Urology nursing has developed as a specialty over the past few decades in response to several factors, workload demands being a prime reason. Nurses are taking on additional roles and activities including procedures such as cystoscopy and prostate biopsy, and running nurse-led clinics for a variety of urological conditions. Audits of advanced urological nursing practice have shown this care to be of a high standard and investigative procedures performed by these nurses match the diagnostic quality of existing services. Professional urological nursing organizations support the professional needs of these nurses, but the provision of education and training for advanced practice activities remains an unaddressed need. A range of confusing advanced urology nursing titles exists, and uncertainty regarding the roles and scope of practice for these nurses remains a concern. Acceptance and support from medical colleagues is required for the success of advanced urological nursing practice, but opinions on these roles remain divided.

  5. Nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K M; Lovich, J E; Lam, C; Camp, M E; Wiley, A A; Bartol, F F; Bagnell, C A

    2014-07-01

    The lactocrine hypothesis suggests a mechanism whereby milk-borne bioactive factors delivered to nursing offspring affect development of neonatal tissues. The objective of this study was to assess whether nursing affects testicular development in neonatal boars as reflected by: (1) Sertoli cell number and proliferation measured by GATA-4 expression and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining patterns; (2) Leydig cell development and steroidogenic activity as reflected by insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3), and P450 side chain cleavage (scc) enzyme expression; and (3) expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A, and relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP) 1. At birth, boars were randomly assigned (n = 6-7/group) to nurse ad libitum or to be pan fed porcine milk replacer for 48 h. Testes were collected from boars at birth, before nursing and from nursed and replacer-fed boars at 50 h on postnatal day (PND) 2. Sertoli cell proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index increased (P < 0.01) from birth to PND 2 in nursed, but not in replacer-fed boars. Sertoli cell number and testicular GATA-4 protein levels increased (P < 0.01) from PND 0 to PND 2 only in nursed boars. Neither age nor nursing affected testicular INSL3, P450scc, ESR1, or VEGFA levels. However, testicular relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) levels increased (P < 0.01) with age and were greater in replacer-fed boars on PND 2. Results suggest that nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development and provide additional evidence for the importance of lactocrine signaling in pigs.

  6. Neonatal resuscitation: advances in training and practice

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Taylor; Umoren, Rachel A; Gray, Megan M

    2017-01-01

    Each year in the US, some four hundred thousand newborns need help breathing when they are born. Due to the frequent need for resuscitation at birth, it is vital to have evidence-based care guidelines and to provide effective neonatal resuscitation training. Every five years, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) reviews the science of neonatal resuscitation. In the US, the American Heart Association (AHA) develops treatment guidelines based on the ILCOR science review, and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) translates the AHA guidelines into an educational curriculum. In this report, we review recent advances in neonatal resuscitation training and practice. We begin with a review of the new 7th edition NRP training curriculum. Then, we examine key changes to the 2015 AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines. The four components of the NRP curriculum reviewed here include eSim®, Performance Skills Stations, Integrated Skills Station, and Simulation and Debriefing. The key changes to the AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines reviewed include initial steps of newborn care, positive-pressure ventilation, endotracheal intubation and use of laryngeal mask, chest compressions, medications, resuscitation of preterm newborns, and ethics and end-of-life care. We hope this report provides a succinct review of recent advances in neonatal resuscitation. PMID:28096704

  7. Advancing leadership capacity in nursing.

    PubMed

    Scott, Elaine S; Miles, Jane

    2013-01-01

    To address the potential shortage of nurse leaders, the profession must evaluate current strategies in both education and practice. While many new graduates dream of becoming a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist, few transition into practice with the goal of becoming a nurse leader. To increase the number of nurses capable of leadership, the profession must address 2 critical issues. First, effort must be made to augment faculty and students' conceptualization of nursing such that leadership is seen as a dimension of practice for all nurses, not just those in formal leadership roles. In so doing, leadership identity development would be seen as a part of becoming an expert nurse. Second, a comprehensive conceptual framework for lifelong leadership development of nurses needs to be designed. This framework should allow for baseline leadership capacity building in all nurses and advanced leadership development for those in formal administrative and advanced practice roles. The knowledge and skill requirements for quality improvement and patient safety have been explored and recommendations made for Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, but parallel work needs to be done to outline educational content, objectives, and effective pedagogy for advancing leadership development in nursing students at all levels.

  8. Clinical Competence and Its Related Factors of Nurses in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Mirlashari, Jila; Qommi, Robabeh; Nariman, Shahin; Bahrani, Nasser; Begjani, Jamaloddin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical competence of nurses working in the neonatal intensive care units together with advancements in medical science and technology increased the survival rate of newborns that need specialized care. To ensure the quality of care and provide the safety of patients, evaluating the clinical competence of nurses seems necessary. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical competence of nurses in the neonatal intensive care units. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 117 nurses working in the neonatal intensive care units of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected by census method. The research tool was Development of Competency Inventory for Registered Nurses questionnaire which completed by self-assessment. The mean clinical competence scores of participants categorized into 3 levels: weak: <225, moderate: 225-273 and good: >273. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13 using the Pearson correlation coefficient, t-test and Chi-square test. Results: The highest levels of competence were related to critical thinking and research attitude and interpersonal relationships, and the lowest level was related to training and mentoring. There was a direct statistically significant relationship between marital status, employment status, level of interest in working in the neonatal intensive-care units and the clinical competence of nurses. Conclusion: Since the clinical competence of nurses in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units is vital, some variables such as interest in the nursing profession, employment status, the neonatal intensive theoretical and practical training courses and the amount of overtime working hours should be taken into consideration. PMID:28032076

  9. Acquisition and maintenance of competencies through simulation for neonatal nurse practitioners: beyond the basics.

    PubMed

    Cates, Leigh Ann; Wilson, Diana

    2011-10-01

    Turmoil in the economy, looming health care reform, and the convergence of a shortage of nursing professionals accompanied by the demand for improving patient safety and decreasing medical errors with limited resources has created an environment likened to the perfect storm. As nurses make up the single largest component of the health care system, it is imperative that nurses achieve and maintain the highest level of competency. The Institute of Medicine's report on the future of nursing identified simulation as a key technological component in facilitating nurses in acquiring and maintaining competencies. This article will review the evidence supporting simulation, define the core elements of health care simulation, describe the bodies that regulate advanced practice nursing, identify the principle areas in which neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) must maintain proficiency and expertise, and illustrate how simulation is utilized in acquisition, maintenance and competency evaluation for NNPs in 1 of the largest NICUs in the country.

  10. Nurses Behave Differentially to Neonates in Terms of Their True Gender Compared to Their Ascribed Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Albert R.; And Others

    Response patterns of 24 female nurses to 2-day-old neonates who had been arbitrarily labeled male or female were studied. A total of 17 reliable behaviors of nurses were scored from videotapes of nurse-infant interaction. Nurses responded differentially to neonates based on true gender rather than ascribed gender. Nurses held boys more by their…

  11. Neonate Pain Management: What do Nurses Really Know?

    PubMed Central

    Asadi-Noghabi, Fariba; Tavassoli-Farahi, Mina; Yousefi, Hadi; Sadeghi, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine knowledge, attitude, and performance vis-à-vis pain management in neonates by nurses working in neonatal units in Bandar Abbas University hospitals. Method: This descriptive and analytical study was executed from March-August 2011 in the neonatal units and NICU in Bandar Abbas educational hospitals. A total of 50 nurses and nurse assistants working in the neonatal units participated in the study. The data collection tool was a structured questionnaire investigating knowledge (28 items), attitude (20 items) and practices (5 items). Data was analyzed using descriptive statistical tests (Frequency, Mean and Standard deviation tables) and inferential statistic (T-test, Variance analysis). Results: The knowledge scores of participants had a mean value of 13.51 (48.2%) out of 28. The mean score of attitude was 54.22 out of 60 and the mean score for the nurses’ level of practices was found to be 4.22 out of 10. There was a significant relationship between nurses’ knowledge scores and the level of education, i.e. nurses with more education had more knowledge. Conclusion: Results showed that the nurses had poor performance regarding the assessment, measurement, and relief of pain. However, they showed positive attitudes towards pain control in neonates. PMID:25168978

  12. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  13. Age and nursing affect the neonatal porcine uterine transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lactocrine hypothesis for maternal programming of neonatal development was proposed to describe a mechanism through which milk-borne bioactive factors, delivered from mother to nursing offspring, could affect development of tissues, including the uterus. Porcine uterine development, initiated be...

  14. Advances in minimally invasive neonatal colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bandi, Ashwath S; Bradshaw, Catherine J; Giuliani, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, advances in laparoscopic surgery and minimally invasive techniques have transformed the operative management of neonatal colorectal surgery for conditions such as anorectal malformations (ARMs) and Hirschsprung’s disease. Evolution of surgical care has mainly occurred due to the use of laparoscopy, as opposed to a laparotomy, for intra-abdominal procedures and the development of trans-anal techniques. This review describes these advances and outlines the main minimally invasive techniques currently used for management of ARMs and Hirschsprung’s disease. There does still remain significant variation in the procedures used and this review aims to report the current literature comparing techniques with an emphasis on the short- and long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:27830038

  15. Effectiveness of a nurse educational oral feeding programme on feeding outcomes in neonates: protocol for an interrupted time series design

    PubMed Central

    Touzet, Sandrine; Beissel, Anne; Denis, Angélique; Pillet, Fabienne; Gauthier-Moulinier, Hélène; Hommey, Sophie; Claris, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral feeding is a complex physiological process. Several scales have been developed to assess the ability of the neonate to begin suck feedings and assist caregivers in determining feeding advancement. However, feeding premature neonates remains an ongoing challenge and depends above all on caregivers' feeding expertise. We will evaluate the effect of a nurse training programme on the achievement of full oral feeding with premature neonates. Methods and analysis The study design will be an interrupted time series design with 3 phases: (1) A 6-month baseline period; (2) a 22-month intervention period and (3) a 6-month postintervention period. The intervention will consist of an educational programme, for nurses and assistant nurses, on feeding patterns in neonates. The training modules will be composed of a 2-day conference, 2 interactive multidisciplinary workshops, and routine practice nurse coaching. A total of 120 nurses and 12 assistant nurses, who work at the neonatal unit during the study period, will participate in the study. All premature neonates of <34 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) will be included. The primary outcome will be the age of tube withdrawal PMA and chronological age are taken into account. The secondary outcomes will be the transition time, length of hospital stay, competent suckle feeding without cardiorespiratory compromise, rate of neonates presenting with feeding issues or feeding rejection signs, and current neonatal pathologies or deaths during hospital stay. A segmented regression analysis will be performed to assess the impact of the programme. Ethics and dissemination Approval for the study was obtained from the Hospital Ethics Committee, and the Institutional Review Board, as well as the French Data Protection Agency. The findings from the study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, national and international conference presentations and public events. Trial registration number NCT02404272 (https

  16. Doctoral education for WOC nurses considering advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Colwell, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Advanced practice nursing education is at a crossroads. Societal changes, increased health care demands, and leadership nursing organizations have identified the need of a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree as the advanced practice degree. WOC nurses need to examine DNP programs when considering returning for an advanced practice degree. This article explores nursing education at the doctorate level and areas the WOC nurse should consider when making a decision about attending a program. The WOC nurse needs to understand the similarities and differences of the doctor of philosophy and the DNP, issues about each program and its completion, personal factors, and the application process. Although selecting a doctoral program is a daunting experience, the education will provide opportunities for the WOC nurse to excel as a scholar, thus influencing the profession and the practice.

  17. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  18. Story theory: advancing nursing practice scholarship.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mary Jane; Liehr, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Stories are a fundamental dimension of human experience and nursing practice. Story theory describes a narrative happening that occurs through intentional nurse-person dialogue. Seven inquiry phases are associated with story theory, including gathering the story, reconstructing the story, connecting it to the literature, naming the complicating health challenge, describing the story plot, identifying movement toward resolving, and gathering additional stories. This article describes the use of story theory to advance nursing practice scholarship in both academic and everyday nursing practice.

  19. Use of a professional organization (Council of International Neonatal Nurses) for global networking.

    PubMed

    Boykova, Marina

    2010-01-01

    The article illustrates the need to belong to professional specialty organizations to foster collaborations across the globe. The Council of International Neonatal Nurses is the exemplar for this professional group. The personal journey of the author to the global community of neonatal nurses is presented.

  20. Education of advanced practice nurses in Canada.

    PubMed

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Harbman, Patricia; Donald, Faith; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Carter, Nancy; Kilpatrick, Kelley; DiCenso, Alba

    2010-12-01

    In Canada, education programs for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) roles began 40 years ago. NP programs are offered in almost all provinces. Education for the CNS role has occurred through graduate nursing programs generically defined as providing preparation for advanced nursing practice. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the literature and key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to describe the following: (1) history of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (2) current status of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (3) curriculum issues, (4) interprofessional education, (5) resources for education and (6) continuing education. Although national frameworks defining advanced nursing practice and NP competencies provide some direction for education programs, Canada does not have countrywide standards of education for either the NP or CNS role. Inconsistency in the educational requirements for primary healthcare NPs continues to cause significant problems and interferes with inter-jurisdictional licensing portability. For both CNSs and NPs, there can be a mismatch between a generalized education and specialized practice. The value of interprofessional education in facilitating effective teamwork is emphasized. Recommendations for future directions for advanced practice nursing education are offered.

  1. High-Fidelity Simulation for Neonatal Nursing Education: An Integrative Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Allyson

    2015-01-01

    The lack of safe avenues to develop neonatal nursing competencies using human subjects leads to the notion that simulation education for neonatal nurses might be an ideal form of education. This integrative literature review compares traditional, teacher-centered education with high-fidelity simulation education for neonatal nurses. It examines the theoretical frameworks used in neonatal nursing education and outlines the advantages of this type of training, including improving communication and teamwork; providing an innovative pedagogical approach; and aiding in skill acquisition, confidence, and participant satisfaction. The importance of debriefing is also examined. High-fidelity simulation is not without disadvantages, including its significant cost, the time associated with training, the need for very complex technical equipment, and increased faculty resource requirements. Innovative uses of high-fidelity simulation in neonatal nursing education are suggested. High-fidelity simulation has great potential but requires additional research to fully prove its efficacy.

  2. Ethical challenges in the neonatal intensive care units: perceptions of physicians and nurses; an Iranian experience

    PubMed Central

    Kadivar, Maliheh; Mosayebi, Ziba; Asghari, Fariba; Zarrini, Pari

    2015-01-01

    The challenging nature of neonatal medicine today is intensified by modern advances in intensive care and treatment of sicker neonates. These developments have caused numerous ethical issues and conflicts in ethical decision-making. The present study surveyed the challenges and dilemmas from the viewpoint of the neonatal intensive care personnel in the teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in the capital of Iran. In this comparative cross-sectional study conducted between March 2013 and February 2014, the physicians’ and nurses’ perceptions of the ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units were compared. The physicians and nurses of the study hospitals were requested to complete a 36-item questionnaire after initial accommodations. The study samples consisted of 284 physicians (36%) and nurses (64%). Content validity and internal consistency calculations were used to examine the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation, t-test, ANOVA, and linear regression using SPSS v. 22. Respecting patients’ rights and interactions with parents were perceived as the most challenging aspects of neonatal care. There were significant differences between sexes in the domains of the perceived challenges. According to the linear regression model, the perceived score would be reduced 0.33 per each year on the job. The results of our study showed that the most challenging issues were related to patients’ rights, interactions with parents, communication and cooperation, and end of life considerations respectively. It can be concluded, therefore, that more attention should be paid to these issues in educational programs and ethics committees of hospitals. PMID:26839675

  3. Infusing gerontological nursing content into advanced practice nursing education.

    PubMed

    Kohlenberg, Eileen; Kennedy-Malone, Laurie; Crane, Patricia; Letvak, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The inclusion of gerontology content in the nursing curriculum is paramount as our population of older adults grows. As one of 10 recipients of the John A. Hartford Foundation/AACN awards for Enhancing Gerontological and Geriatric Nursing Education for Advanced Practice Nursing Programs, we successfully integrated gerontological/ geriatric content throughout core courses for all concentrations taught at the master's level. The Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist Competencies for Older Adult Care were used as a guide to integrate gerontological nursing content across the core courses. We present examples of content, strategies, and evaluation methods that demonstrate infusion of gerontology in a nursing theory course, research course, and healthcare law and policy course. Twenty-two of the competencies are addressed in these core courses and provide a foundation for further development in the support and specialty courses for the nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nursing administrator, nurse educator, and nurse anesthetist. We also present helpful Web-based resources for older adult care.

  4. Using advanced mobile devices in nursing practice--the views of nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pauline; Petersson, Göran; Saveman, Britt-Inger; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2014-09-01

    Advanced mobile devices allow registered nurses and nursing students to keep up-to-date with expanding health-related knowledge but are rarely used in nursing in Sweden. This study aims at describing registered nurses' and nursing students' views regarding the use of advanced mobile devices in nursing practice. A cross-sectional study was completed in 2012; a total of 398 participants replied to a questionnaire, and descriptive statistics were applied. Results showed that the majority of the participants regarded an advanced mobile device to be useful, giving access to necessary information and also being useful in making notes, planning their work and saving time. Furthermore, the advanced mobile device was regarded to improve patient safety and the quality of care and to increase confidence. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of health care, advanced mobile devices adjusted for nursing practice should be further developed, implemented and evaluated in research.

  5. [Advances in the management of neonatal hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Riesgo, Rudimar dos Santos; Becker, Michele M; Ranzan, Josiane; Winckler, Maria Isabel B; Ohlweiler, Lygia

    2013-09-06

    Introduccion. Durante el nacimiento, ocurren cambios fisiologicos en practicamente todos los organos del niño, incluyendo el sistema nervioso central. En esta fase de transicion, es posible un cierto grado de hipoxemia, en general bien tolerado por el neonato. Sin embargo, si la hipoxia neonatal es muy intensa y continuada, puede instalarse una encefalopatia neonatal, lo que caracteriza una situacion critica para el recien nacido. Su abordaje adecuado es imprescindible para garantizar un buen pronostico a largo plazo. Desarrollo. Se actualizan las informaciones acerca de la hipoxia neonatal y se revisan publicaciones recientes acerca de los avances en su abordaje a traves de la medicina basada en evidencias. Conclusiones. La encefalopatia neonatal se puede clasificar desde el punto de vista clinico en tres niveles de intensidad. Usualmente, los casos leves tienen un buen pronostico, los casos de intensidad moderada tienen un 30% de posibilidad de secuelas y los de intensidad grave tienen mas del 70% de mortalidad, pero practicamente todos los supervivientes tendran secuelas. Los avances ocurrieron en dos areas: en el diagnostico, con nuevas tecnicas de EEG y RM, y en el tratamiento, con la aparicion de la hipotermia terapeutica. Existe la posibilidad de un uso futuro para la terapia con celulas madre. El pronostico depende de la clasificacion clinica, de los datos de neuroimagen y del EEG.

  6. Developing the Advanced Practice Nurse in Catalonia.

    PubMed

    Comellas-Oliva, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    The development of advanced practice nurses (APN) has proved a challenge for nurses in countries such as the USA, Canada, Great Britain, and Australia among others. It is only in recent years that the system has been considered in Catalonia and Spain as a way to develop new roles to bring effectiveness and efficiency to the health system. From the standpoint of training and implementation of the above-mentioned new nursing roles, the following article aims to conceptualise APN and its reference models, as well as to contextualise and reflect on APN in Catalonia in order to assimilate them into advanced practice.

  7. Advanced Practice Nursing Education: Challenges and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Cynthia; Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira; Katz, Janet; Hirsch, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Nursing education programs may face significant difficulty as they struggle to prepare sufficient numbers of advanced practice registered nurses to fulfill the vision of helping to design an improved US healthcare system as described in the Institute of Medicine's “Future of nursing” report. This paper describes specific challenges and provides strategies to improve advanced practice nursing clinical education in order to ensure that a sufficient number of APRNs are available to work in educational, practice, and research settings. Best practices are identified through a review of classic and current nursing literature. Strategies include intensive interprofessional collaborations and radical curriculum revisions such as increased use of simulation and domestic and international service work. Nurse educators must work with all stakeholders to create effective and lasting change. PMID:22220273

  8. Developing a strategic plan for a neonatal nurse practitioner service.

    PubMed

    Lee, Laurie A; Jones, Luann R

    2004-10-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) have been in practice for over 3 decades. More recently, NNPs have begun to take ownership for building their group practice models. The purpose of this article is to present a detailed case study demonstrating how one NNP group used a 4-phase strategic planning process to turn a crisis into an opportunity. The article describes data obtained during the strategic planning process from an informal national survey of NNP managers that focused on key benchmarks, such as role definition, responsibilities, protected nonclinical time, NNP salary and benefits, and educational and professional development support. Using the strategic planning process, the group defined mutually agreed upon minimum safe staffing levels for NNPs, interns, residents and neonatologists in their setting. Based on the data generated, the group successfully justified additional NNP positions and organizational support for 10% protected nonclinical time. A sample operational budget, comparison of 3 staffing scenarios, and a timeline are also provided.

  9. Nursing diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Ana Paula de Souza; da Silva, Maria de Lourdes Costa; de Souza, Nilba Lima; Mota, Gabriela Miranda; de França, Débora Feitosa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to elaborate the Nursing Diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a neonatal intensive care unit and characterize the profile of the neonates and their mothers. Method a cross-sectional and quantitative study, with a sample of 41 neonates. A physical examination and consultation of the hospital records were undertaken, using an instrument. The elaboration of the Nursing Diagnoses followed a process of diagnostic inference and was based on the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association 2012-2014. Results the mothers were around 25 years old, had a low average number of pre-natal consultations, and various complications during the pregnancy; and the newborns were predominantly premature and with very low birth weights. Five Nursing Diagnoses predominated, and all the neonates presented Risk of Shock and Risk of fluid volume imbalance. Conclusion the Nursing Diagnoses of the neonates with sepsis can guide the formulating of specific assistential plans. The study contributes to the generation of new knowledge and found various relationships between the Nursing Diagnoses and the variables selected in the characterization of the neonates, which deserve to be elucidated in greater detail based on further research on the issue. PMID:26107833

  10. Nursing role complex in advanced HIV care.

    PubMed

    Kutzen, H S

    1998-01-01

    Nurses in AIDS care need to support patients and promote patient autonomy throughout the continuum of HIV/AIDS. Nurses are essential for assisting patients and family members in making difficult treatment decisions, including choices regarding death. Discussions of end of life issues should be postponed until the patient demonstrates active signs and symptoms of approaching death. These discussions require expert knowledge of subtle cues and knowledge of advancing disease, as well as options for improved symptom management without focusing on curative aspects of care. Through these discussions, the nurse empowers the family in decision making while realizing patients and loved ones are still faced with existential or spiritual crises, psychological pain, and grief associated with terminal illness. Towards the end of life, nursing contacts should increase and be armed with an understanding of palliative care planning with patients with advanced HIV disease.

  11. Advanced Neonatal Medicine in China: A National Baseline Database.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiang-Peng; Chipenda-Dansokho, Selma; Lewin, Antoine; Abdelouahab, Nadia; Wei, Shu-Qin

    2017-01-01

    Previous surveys of neonatal medicine in China have not collected comprehensive information on workforce, investment, health care practice, and disease expenditure. The goal of the present study was to develop a national database of neonatal care units and compare present outcomes data in conjunction with health care practices and costs. We summarized the above components by extracting data from the databases of the national key clinical subspecialty proposals issued by national health authority in China, as well as publicly accessible databases. Sixty-one newborn clinical units from provincial or ministerial hospitals at the highest level within local areas in mainland China, were included for the study. Data were gathered for three consecutive years (2008-2010) in 28 of 31 provincial districts in mainland China. Of the 61 newborn units in 2010, there were 4,948 beds (median = 62 [IQR 43-110]), 1,369 physicians (median = 22 [IQR 15-29]), 3,443 nurses (median = 52 [IQR 33-81]), and 170,159 inpatient discharges (median = 2,612 [IQR 1,436-3,804]). During 2008-2010, the median yearly investment for a single newborn unit was US$344,700 (IQR 166,100-585,800), median length of hospital stay for overall inpatient newborns 9.5 (IQR 8.2-10.8) days, median inpatient antimicrobial drug use rate 68.7% (IQR 49.8-87.0), and median nosocomial infection rate 3.2% (IQR1.7-5.4). For the common newborn diseases of pneumonia, sepsis, respiratory distress syndrome, and very low birth weight (<1,500 grams) infants, their lengths of hospital stay, daily costs, hospital costs, ratios of hospital cost to per-capita disposable income, and ratios of hospital cost to per-capita health expenditure, were all significantly different across regions (North China, Northeast China, East China, South Central China, Southwest China, and Northwest China). The survival rate of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants (Birth weight <1,000 grams) was 76.0% during 2008-2010 in the five hospitals where

  12. Advanced Neonatal Medicine in China: A National Baseline Database

    PubMed Central

    Chipenda-Dansokho, Selma; Lewin, Antoine; Abdelouahab, Nadia; Wei, Shu-Qin

    2017-01-01

    Previous surveys of neonatal medicine in China have not collected comprehensive information on workforce, investment, health care practice, and disease expenditure. The goal of the present study was to develop a national database of neonatal care units and compare present outcomes data in conjunction with health care practices and costs. We summarized the above components by extracting data from the databases of the national key clinical subspecialty proposals issued by national health authority in China, as well as publicly accessible databases. Sixty-one newborn clinical units from provincial or ministerial hospitals at the highest level within local areas in mainland China, were included for the study. Data were gathered for three consecutive years (2008–2010) in 28 of 31 provincial districts in mainland China. Of the 61 newborn units in 2010, there were 4,948 beds (median = 62 [IQR 43–110]), 1,369 physicians (median = 22 [IQR 15–29]), 3,443 nurses (median = 52 [IQR 33–81]), and 170,159 inpatient discharges (median = 2,612 [IQR 1,436–3,804]). During 2008–2010, the median yearly investment for a single newborn unit was US$344,700 (IQR 166,100–585,800), median length of hospital stay for overall inpatient newborns 9.5 (IQR 8.2–10.8) days, median inpatient antimicrobial drug use rate 68.7% (IQR 49.8–87.0), and median nosocomial infection rate 3.2% (IQR1.7–5.4). For the common newborn diseases of pneumonia, sepsis, respiratory distress syndrome, and very low birth weight (<1,500 grams) infants, their lengths of hospital stay, daily costs, hospital costs, ratios of hospital cost to per-capita disposable income, and ratios of hospital cost to per-capita health expenditure, were all significantly different across regions (North China, Northeast China, East China, South Central China, Southwest China, and Northwest China). The survival rate of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants (Birth weight <1,000 grams) was 76.0% during 2008–2010 in the

  13. Making a Difference: Evidence Based Palliative Care Education for Neonatal Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pye, Sherry Elaine

    2016-01-01

    The death of a neonate is a life-changing and tragic experience for the individuals involved in the final moments of the infant's life. As the frontline provider in this clinical scenario, the bedside nurse supports the patient and family through their individual journey of loss. If the nurse does not possess the palliative care educational…

  14. [Neonatal screening for congenital metabolic pathologies. Ethical and social aspects. Implications for nurses and midwives].

    PubMed

    Goberna Tricas, Josefina; Martín-Arribas, M Concepción

    2007-02-01

    The authors describe the diseases which are detectable by means of neonatal screening programs available in the different Spanish Autonomous Communities. They analyze some of the ethical and social implications which may occur and they emphasize what those programs mean for nursing professionals, fundamentally midwives and nurses who work in primary health care units or pediatric units.

  15. The Career Advancement for Registered Nurse Excellence Program.

    PubMed

    Fusilero, Jane; Lini, Linda; Prohaska, Priscilla; Szweda, Christine; Carney, Katie; Mion, Lorraine C

    2008-12-01

    Nurse administrators focus on factors that influence nurses' levels of satisfaction to reduce turnover and improve retention. One important determinant of nurses' satisfaction is the opportunity for professional development. On the basis of feedback from the nurses, a professional development program, Career Advancement for Registered Nurse Excellence, was instituted. The authors describe one approach to create opportunities to improve professional nurse development and the necessity for ongoing assessment of its impact on nurses' job satisfaction.

  16. The Enigma of Graduate Nursing Education: Advanced Generalist? Specialist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Suellen B.; Hoffman, Sharon E.

    1986-01-01

    To pin down the appropriate parameters for graduate nursing education, the authors say we must explore the meanings of advanced generalist and specialist. They discuss the focus, scope, and depth of the community health major, psychiatric mental health nursing, nursing care of children, maternity nursing, medical-surgical nursing, and nursing…

  17. Racial Differences in Parental Satisfaction with Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nursing Care

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ashley E.; D’Agostino, Jo Ann; Passarella, Molly; Lorch, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nurses provide parental support and education in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), but it is unknown if satisfaction and expectations about nursing care differ between racial groups. Study Design A prospective cohort was constructed of families with a premature infant presenting to primary care between 1/1/10-1/1/13 (N = 249, 52% white, 42% Black). Responses to questions about satisfaction with the NICU were analyzed in ATLAS.ti using standard qualitative methodology. Results 120 (48%) parents commented on nursing. 57% of the comments were positive, with black parents more negative (58%) than white parents (33%). Black parents were most dissatisfied with how nurses supported them, wanting compassionate and respectful communication. White parents were most dissatisfied with inconsistent nursing care and lack of education about their child. Conclusions Racial differences were found in satisfaction and expectations with neonatal nursing care. Accounting for these differences will improve parental engagement during the NICU stay. PMID:27583386

  18. Neonatal nurses' perceptions of pain management: survey of the United States and China.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaomei; McGrath, Jacqueline M; Delaney, Colleen; Chen, Hua; Liang, Shuang; Vazquez, Victoria; Keating, Laura; Chang, Kimberly; Dejong, Angela

    2014-12-01

    Despite growing knowledge, neonatal pain remains unrecognized, undertreated, and generally challenging. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted to investigate neonatal nurses' perceptions, knowledge, and practice of infant pain in the United States and China, including 343 neonatal nurses (American nurses [n = 237]; Chinese nurses [n = 106]). Nurses' responses regarding neonatal pain reflected adequate knowledge in general pain concepts, but knowledge deficits related to several topics were found (e.g., preterm infants are more sensitive to pain and long-term consequences of pain). Most reported regular use of pain assessment tools, but fewer agreed that the tool used was appropriate and accurate. More American nurses (83%) than Chinese nurses (58%) felt confident in the use of pain medications, while more Chinese nurses (78%) than American nurses (61%) acknowledged the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic interventions. About half reported that pain in their units was well managed (American: 44.3%; Chinese: 55.7%), and less than half felt that pain guidelines/protocols were research-based (American: 42.6%; Chinese: 34.9%). Nurses' perceptions of well-managed pain in their units were significantly correlated with adequate education/training, use of accurate tools, and use of research-based protocols. Barriers to effective pain management included resistance to change, lack of knowledge, lack of time, fear of side effects of pain medication, and lack of trust in the tools. The survey reflects concerns that pain has not been well managed in many neonatal intensive care units in the United States and China. Further actions are needed to solve the issues of inadequate training, lack of clinically feasible pain tools, and absence of evidence-based guidelines/protocols.

  19. Teaching Research Synthesis to Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upchurch, Sandra; Brosnan, Christine A.; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2002-01-01

    A process for teaching research synthesis to advanced practice nurses includes two courses: a first research applications course in which students build bibliographic databases, practice statistical analysis, and develop search skills; and a second course in which they complete literature reviews or meta analyses of research on clinical practice…

  20. National agenda for advanced practice nursing: the practice doctorate.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Patricia; Sperhac, Arlene M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide the background and rationale for the practice doctorate in nursing. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing's Position Statement on the Practice Doctorate in Nursing, approved in October 2004, will be discussed. Outlined are some of the changes that will be needed in education, regulation, and advanced practice. Common questions and concerns that advanced practice nurses have, including titling, salary, and transitioning to the doctor of nursing practice degree, will be addressed.

  1. Caring for newborns in the presence of their parents: the experience of nurses in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Santin, Karine Ribeiro; de Oliveira, Deíse Moura

    2011-01-01

    The nurse has a key role in involving parents in the care of newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit. The aim of this study was to comprehend how the nurses experience the care provided to newborns in the presence of the parents. This is a qualitative study using social phenomenology, with the participation of seven nurses, interviewed between January and February 2009. The nurses perceived the needs of parents; had positive expectations regarding the care provided and acknowledge themselves to be the link between them, helping them to live with the hospitalized child. However, in emergencies, the nurses had difficulties in caring for the neonate in the presence of the parents. The nurses positively evaluated the presence of parents in the neonatal intensive care unit, involving them permanently in the care of the newborn. The study evokes the emergence of a care context (nurse/neonate/parents) that precedes the proximity between the subjects and the demands presented by them.

  2. Trauma advanced practice nurses: implementing the role.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kathleen D; Molitor-Kirsch, Shirley; Elgart, Heidi; Ruffolo, Daria C; Sicoutris, Corinna; Meredith, Denise

    2004-01-01

    The need for advanced practice nurses (APN) has expanded over the past several decades as a result of the changing healthcare environment. Increased patient acuity and decreased resident work hours have lead to a need for additional clinical expertise at the bedside. APNs are becoming an integral part of the acute care delivery team in many trauma programs and intensive care units. To date little has been published regarding the role of the APN in Trauma Centers. This article outlines the wide variety of responsibilities and services provided by a select group of nurse practitioners who work in trauma centers throughout the United States.

  3. Conscientious objection: a potential neonatal nursing response to care orders that cause suffering at the end of life? Study of a concept.

    PubMed

    Catlin, Anita; Armigo, Christine; Volat, Deborah; Vale, Elnora; Hadley, Mary Ann; Gong, Wendy; Bassir, Ranginah; Anderson, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    This article is an exploratory effort meant to solicit and provoke dialog. Conscientious objection is proposed as a potential response to the moral distress experienced by neonatal nurses. The most commonly reported cause of distress for all nurses is following orders to support patients at the end of their lives with advanced technology when palliative or comfort care would be more humane. Nurses report that they feel they are harming patients or causing suffering when they could be comforting instead. We examined the literature on moral distress, futility, and the concept of conscientious objection from the perspective of the nurse's potential response to performing advanced technologic interventions for the dying patient. We created a small pilot study to engage in clinical verification of the use of our concept of conscientious objection. Data from 66 neonatal intensive care and pediatric intensive care unit nurses who responded in a one-month period are reported here. Interest in conscientious objection to care that causes harm or suffering was very high. This article reports the analysis of conscientious objection use in neonatal care.

  4. Development of a digital storytelling resource to support children's nursing students in neonatal care.

    PubMed

    Petty, Julia; Treves, Richard

    2017-03-06

    A digital storytelling resource focusing on the experience of nursing in neonatal care was developed using the narratives of six undergraduate children's nursing students who had undergone a practice placement on a neonatal unit. An evaluation of the resource in relation to its contribution to learning for students in a new, specialised area of practice revealed that storytelling based on peers' experiences is a valuable and insightful approach to learning. This is particularly important in a specialty such as neonatal care where the unfamiliarity of the environment and patient group can cause anxiety and uncertainty among students. Overall, the resource was seen to be useful to children's nursing students who are preparing for a practice placement in an unfamiliar clinical area.

  5. Nursing support of laboring women. An official position statement of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric & Neonatal Nursing.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) asserts that continuously available labor support from a registered nurse (RN) is a critical component to achieve improved birth outcomes. The RN assesses, develops,implements and evaluates an individualized plan of care based on each woman's physical,psychological and socio-cultural needs, including the woman's desires for and expectations of the laboring process. Labor care and labor support are powerful nursing functions, and it is incumbent on health care facilities to provide an environment that encourages the unique patient-RN relationship during childbirth.

  6. The education of UK specialised neonatal nurses: reviewing the rationale for creating a standard competency framework.

    PubMed

    Turrill, Sue

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the influences surrounding formal education provision for specialised neonatal nurses in the UK and presents a standardised clinical competency framework in response. National drivers for quality neonatal care define links to the numbers and ratios of specialised neonatal nurses in practice. Historical changes to professional nursing governance have led to diversity in supporting education programmes, making achievement of a standard level of clinical competence for this element of the nursing workforce difficult. In addition responsibility for funding specialised education and training has moved from central to local hospital level. Evaluating these key influences on education provision rationalised the development, by a UK professional consensus group, of a criteria based framework to be utilised by both formal education and service providers. The process identified clinical competency (in terms of unique knowledge and skills), evidence of achievement, and quality education principles. Access to specialised education relies on the availability of programmes of study and clear funding strategies. Creating a core syllabus for education provides a tool to standardise course content, commission education and audit clinical competency. In addition partnerships between healthcare and education providers become successful in achieving standard specialised education for neonatal nurses.

  7. Advanced practice nurse as outcomes manager.

    PubMed

    Houston, S; Luquire, R

    1997-01-01

    Outcomes management as a patient management system has been designed to impact and improve select outcomes. Central to the development and implementation of best practice senario identified throughout outcomes management is the advanced practice nurse. SLEH has been in the forefront of development and implementation of an outcomes management program. This article describes the outcomes management position and shares the job description and performance evaluation used at this institution. The tools allow for measuring and quantifying the impact of the outcomes manager position on improving patient outcomes. The improvement of outcomes has increased the value of the advanced practice nurse and provided the institution with a solid future necessary for survival in a managed care market.

  8. Hospital Magnet® Designation and Missed Nursing Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Tubbs-Cooley, Heather L; Pickler, Rita H; Mara, Constance A; Othman, Mohammad; Kovacs, Allison; Mark, Barbara A

    2016-12-09

    Missed nursing care is an emerging measure of front-line nursing care effectiveness in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Given Magnet® hospitals' reputations for nursing care quality, missed care comparisons with non-Magnet® hospitals may yield insights about how Magnet® designation influences patient outcomes. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to evaluate the relationship between hospital Magnet® designation and 1) the occurrence of nurse-reported missed care and 2) reasons for missed nursing care between NICU nurses employed in Magnet® and non-Magnet® hospitals. A random sample of certified neonatal intensive care unit nurses was invited to participate in a cross-sectional survey in 2012; data were analyzed from nurses who provided direct patient care (n=230). Logistic regression was used to model relationships between Magnet® designation and reports of the occurrence of and reasons for missed care while controlling for nurse and shift characteristics. There was no relationship between Magnet® designation and missed care occurrence for 34 of 35 types of care. Nurses in Magnet® hospitals were significantly less likely to report tensions and communication breakdowns with other staff, lack of familiarity with policies/procedures, and lack of back-up support from team members as reasons for missed care. Missed nursing care in NICUs occurs regardless of hospital Magnet® recognition. However, nurses' reasons for missed care systematically differ in Magnet® and non-Magnet® hospitals and these differences merit further exploration.

  9. Materials on Nursing in the Clearinghouse: Bibliography #16, and Neonatal Intensive Care Units: Bibliography #17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Public Health Association, Springfield.

    The first of the two bibliographies in this document contains 38 entries on neonatal nursing, including books and journal articles (originally published from 1973 to 1986) dealing with such topics as high-risk pregnancy and delivery, home care of developmentally disabled newborns, and family dynamics. The second bibliography, titled "Neonatal…

  10. Women's cardiovascular health. An official position statement of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric & Neonatal Nursing.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) maintains that nurses and other clinical professionals should include routine cardiovascular health screening,provide education, and promote awareness at health care visits for women across the lifespan.Advocacy for preventive measures should begin early, and adolescent girls and young women should be encouraged to adopt heart-healthy habits. For adult and senior women, nurses should work to increase patient awareness about risk factors,symptoms and treatment options associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CVD risk.Efforts should extend to women of every age and health status.

  11. Educational outcomes associated with providing a comprehensive guidelines program about nursing care of preterm neonates receiving total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Al-Rafay, Safy S; Al-Sharkawy, Sabah S

    2012-05-01

    Poor understanding or practice of Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) causes devastating complications. Therefore, good Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nursing care for preterm neonates and close monitoring of complications is essential for successful TPN therapy. The study was conducted in NICU at Ain Shams University Hospital in Cairo, Egypt, using a quasi-experimental research design with prepost intervention assessments. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire sheet and an observation checklist (prepost format) and developed a comprehensive guidelines program about nursing care of TPN of preterm neonates. Results revealed that the program had a significant positive impact on nurses' knowledge and practice outcomes.

  12. Advanced practice nursing for congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    McCormick, S A

    1999-02-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is an enormous burden on society and the health care system. The role of the advanced practice nurse (APN) in CHF is multifaceted and combines inpatient, outpatient, and community patient care skills. Case management and quality management have been traditional focuses, with a high level of practice impact on patient care. Outcomes management in the APN role for CHF care is the future for measurable outcomes and maximum impact on organizational values. Because outcomes management is an evolving field for the APN, focus on a chronic disease such as CHF is a very valuable tool for implementation.

  13. The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Future of Nursing" explores how nurses' roles, responsibilities, and education should change significantly to meet the increased demand for care that will be created by health care reform and to advance improvements in America's increasingly complex health system. At more than 3 million in number, nurses make up the single…

  14. [The Role of Nursing Education in the Advancement of the Nursing Profession].

    PubMed

    Chang Yeh, Mei

    2017-02-01

    The present article discusses the role of nursing education in the advancement of the nursing profession in the context of the three facets of knowledge: generation, dissemination, and application. Nursing is an applied science and the application of knowledge in practice is the ultimate goal of the nursing profession. The reform of the healthcare delivery model requires that nurses acquire and utilize evidence-based clinical knowledge, critical thinking, effective communication, and team collaboration skills in order to ensure the quality of patient care and safety. Therefore, baccalaureate education has become the minimal requirement for pre-licensure nursing education. Schools of nursing are responsible to cultivate competent nurses to respond to the demands on the nursing workforce from the healthcare system. Attaining a master's education in nursing helps cultivate Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) to further expand the roles and functions of the nursing profession in order to promote the quality of care in clinical practice. Nursing faculty and scholars of higher education institutions generate nursing knowledge and develop professional scholarship through research. Attaining a doctoral education in nursing cultivates faculties and scholars who will continually generate and disseminate nursing knowledge into the future.

  15. Nurse Staffing in Neonatal Intensive Care Units in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Jeannette A; Staiger, Douglas O; Patrick, Thelma E; Horbar, Jeffrey D; Kenny, Michael J; Lake, Eileen T

    2015-10-01

    The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is a setting with high nurse-to-patient ratios. Little is known about the factors that determine nurse workload and assignment. The goals of this study were to (1) develop a measure of NICU infant acuity; (2) describe the acuity distribution of NICU infants; (3) describe the nurse/infant ratio at each acuity level, and examine the factors other than acuity, including nurse qualifications and the availability of physicians and other providers, that determined staffing ratios; and (4) explore whether nurse qualifications were related to the acuity of assigned infants. In a two-stage cohort study, data were collected in 104 NICUs in 2008 by nurse survey (6,038 nurses and 15,191 infants assigned to them) and administrators reported on unit-level staffing of non-nurse providers; in a subset of 70 NICUs in 2009-2010, census data were collected on four selected shifts (3,871 nurses and 9,276 infants assigned to them). Most NICU infants (62%) were low-acuity (Levels 1 and 2); 12% of infants were high-acuity (Levels 4 and 5). The nurse-to-infant ratio ranged from 0.33 for the lowest-acuity infants to 0.95 for the highest-acuity infants. The staffing ratio was significantly related to the acuity of assigned infants but not to nurse education, experience, certification, or availability of other providers. There was a significant but small difference in the percentage of high-acuity (Levels 4 and 5) infants assigned to nurses with specialty certification (15% vs. 12% for nurses without certification). These staffing patterns may not optimize patient outcomes in this highly intensive pediatric care setting.

  16. Developing practice protocols for advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Paul, S

    1999-08-01

    In most states, the role of an advanced practice nurse is dependent on practice protocols that provide an organized method for analyzing and managing a disease or major symptom. They are also used to control the process of medical care and to specify steps in the delivery of that care. Creating appropriate practice protocols is one of the most important precursors to implementing the advanced practice role, because they virtually drive the clinician's ability to treat or manage clinical situations or disease states. This article outlines the steps involved in developing practice protocols and discusses the content that should be included in a protocol, providing an example of narrative and algorithm format protocols. Pros and cons, as well as legal issues related to practice protocols, are also presented.

  17. A burden of knowledge: A qualitative study of experiences of neonatal intensive care nurses' concerns when keeping information from parents.

    PubMed

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2015-12-01

    Improved life-sustaining technology in the neonatal intensive care has resulted in an increased probability of survival for extremely premature babies. In the neonatal intensive care, the condition of a baby can deteriorate rapidly. Nurses and parents are together for long periods at the bedside and so form close and trusting relationships. Neonatal nurses as the constant caregivers may be presented with contradictory demands in attempting to meet the baby's needs and being a patient and family advocate. This article aims to explore the issues arising for neonatal nurses when holding information about changes to a condition of a baby that they are unable to share with parents. Data were collected via interviews with 24 neonatal nurses in New South Wales, Australia. A qualitative approach was used to analyse the data. The theme 'keeping secrets' was identified and comprised of three sub-themes 'coping with potentially catastrophic news', 'fear of inadvertent disclosure' and 'a burden that could damage trust'. Keeping secrets and withholding information creates internal conflict in the nurses as they balance the principle of confidentiality with the parent's right to know information. The neonatal nurses experienced guilt and shame when they were felt forced by circumstances to keep secrets or withhold information from the parents of extremely premature babies.

  18. Teaching Pediatric Nursing Concepts to Non-Pediatric Nurses Using an Advance Organizer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Julie Ann

    2013-01-01

    Non-pediatric nurses in rural areas often care for children in adult units, emergency departments, and procedural areas. A half-day program about pediatric nursing using constructivist teaching strategies including an advance organizer, case studies, and simulation was offered at a community hospital in Western North Carolina. Nurses reported a…

  19. Antimicriobial resistance patterns of colonizing flora on nurses' hands in the neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Heather A.; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Saiman, Lisa; Larson, Elaine L.

    2007-01-01

    Background The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the use of an alcohol-based handrub for health care worker hand hygiene. The purpose of this study was to examine effects of hand hygiene product and skin condition on the antimicrobial resistance patterns of colonizing hand flora among nurses. Methods Colonizing hand flora of 119 nurses working in 2 neonatal intensive care units was compared during a 22-month crossover study using alcohol handrub or antiseptic soap. Results Altogether, 1442 isolates from 834 hand cultures (mean, 7 cultures/nurse) were obtained. In 3 of 9 regression analyses modeling for resistant staphylococcal flora, the use of antiseptic soap was a significant predictor of resistance, and nurses with damaged skin were 2.79 times more likely to carry Staphylococcus warneri isolates resistant to gentamicin. Conclusion Hand hygiene product and skin condition may influence resistance patterns of hand flora of care providers. PMID:17482994

  20. Nurses' expectations of using music for premature infants in neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Pölkki, Tarja; Korhonen, Anne; Laukkala, Helena

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to describe nurses' expectations of using music for premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and to find out about the related background factors. The subjects consisted of 210 Finnish nurses who were recruited from the country's five university hospitals providing premature infant care in NICU. The data were collected by validated questionnaire, and the response rate was 82%. Most nurses preferred recorded music to live music in the NICU. They expected that music would have positive effects on premature infants, parents, and staff. Few demographic and many background factors of the respondents' music-related experiences correlated significantly with the expectations concerning their preference. In conclusion, the nurses' expectations were positive regarding the use of music in the NICU, which supports evidence regarding the efficacy of music therapy for premature infants.

  1. Role of advanced paediatric nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Lisa, Egerton

    2012-07-01

    Children's attendance at emergency departments (EDs) is increasing every year, yet many children present with minor, self-limiting illnesses that could be managed at home. In light of Williams et al (2009) suggestion that healthcare professionals should improve the care available to patients at point of contact rather than try to change their health-seeking behaviours, this article describes how Tameside and Glossop Primary Care Trust has developed an advanced paediatric nurse practitioner (APNP) service in the ED to improve the care of children, and to reduce the number of admissions. The APNPs treat children in the ED then divert them to more appropriate services where support is given to the families to care for their children at home. The role contributes to meeting ED clinical quality indicators, frees up medical staff to deal with more seriously ill patients, and makes financial savings for the trust.

  2. [Nursing interventions on the physical environment of Neonatal Intensive Care Units].

    PubMed

    Miquel Capó Rn, I

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to analyse nursing interventions regarding noise and lighting that influence neurodevelopment of the preterm infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. A review of the literature was performed using the databases: Cuiden Plus, PubMed, IBECS and Cochrane Library Plus. The inclusion and exclusion criteria were established in accordance with the objectives and limits used in each database. Of the 35 articles used, most were descriptive quantitative studies based on the measurement of sound pressure levels and lighting in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units. The countries included in this study are Brazil and the United States, and the variables analysed were the recording the times of light and noise. Based on the high levels of light and noise recorded in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units, nursing interventions that should be carried out to reduce them are described. The evidence indicates that after the implementation of these interventions, the high levels of both environmental stimuli are reduced significantly. Despite the extensive literature published on this problem, the levels of light and noise continue to exceed the recommended limits. Therefore, nurses need to increase and enhance their efforts in this environment, in order to positively influence neurodevelopment of premature newborn.

  3. Advanced practice geriatric nursing education. New options in Kansas.

    PubMed

    Bonnel, W B

    1999-01-01

    Knowledgeable practitioners with the skills needed to serve in a variety of clinical settings are the primary objective of the Adult-Geriatric Advanced Nursing Program and the FNP elective, Advanced Practice Nursing Care of the Frail Elderly. The continued blending of long term and acute care settings will further cloud and challenge the school responsible for educating APNs in the care of older adults, particularly the frail elderly. Education needs to provide flexibility for students through new service designs such as interactive computer courses. Nurses with an orientation to the future should consider geriatric nursing education.

  4. Ethics and the politics of advancing nursing knowledge.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2015-04-01

    The politics of academia involve intricate human relationships that are political in nature as nurse leaders and scholars struggle to advance nursing science with complex leading-following situations. This article begins a dialogue of considering potential meanings for what it means to be political within competing interest groups in academia, and within the discipline of nursing. What is most important in the struggle for identity and what possibilities surface when potential competing interests in academia collide? The ethical tenets of humanbecoming and the leading-following model are used to illustrate issues surrounding academic integrity and possibilities for the advancement of nursing scholarship in future generations.

  5. An Infrastructure to Advance the Scholarly Work of Staff Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Parkosewich, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    The traditional role of the acute care staff nurse is changing. The new norm establishes an expectation that staff nurses base their practice on best evidence. When evidence is lacking, nurses are charged with using the research process to generate and disseminate new knowledge. This article describes the critical forces behind the transformation of this role and the organizational mission, culture, and capacity required to support practice that is based on science. The vital role of senior nursing leaders, the nurse researcher, and the nursing research committee within the context of a collaborative governance structure is highlighted. Several well-known, evidence-based practice models are presented. Finally, there is a discussion of the infrastructure created by Yale-New Haven Hospital to advance the scholarly work of the nursing staff. PMID:23482435

  6. Broadening horizons: engaging advanced practice nursing students in faculty research.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Josie A

    2009-01-01

    Inviting advanced practice nursing students to participate in faculty research can be an innovative way to interest students in using current evidence as the basis for their practice. The author discusses strategies for effectively engaging graduate nursing students into research projects in ways that broaden the students' perspectives and strengthen their healthcare decision-making skills.

  7. Advance Care Planning in Nursing Homes: Correlates of Capacity and Possession of Advance Directives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rebecca S.; DeLaine, Shermetra R.; Chaplin, William F.; Marson, Daniel C.; Bourgeois, Michelle S.; Dijkstra, Katinka; Burgio, Louis D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The identification of nursing home residents who can continue to participate in advance care planning about end-of-life care is a critical clinical and bioethical issue. This study uses high quality observational research to identify correlates of advance care planning in nursing homes, including objective measurement of capacity. Design…

  8. Advanced Nursing Directives: Integrating Validated Clinical Scoring Systems into Nursing Care in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    deForest, Erin Kate; Thompson, Graham Cameron

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to improve the quality and flow of care provided to children presenting to the emergency department the implementation of nurse-initiated protocols is on the rise. We review the current literature on nurse-initiated protocols, validated emergency department clinical scoring systems, and the merging of the two to create Advanced Nursing Directives (ANDs). The process of developing a clinical pathway for children presenting to our pediatric emergency department (PED) with suspected appendicitis will be used to demonstrate the successful integration of validated clinical scoring systems into practice through the use of Advanced Nursing Directives. Finally, examples of 2 other Advanced Nursing Directives for common clinical PED presentations will be provided. PMID:22778944

  9. Advances in the treatment of invasive neonatal candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Botero-Calderon, Lorena; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Invasive candidiasis is responsible for approximately 10% of nosocomial sepsis in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Over the last 2 decades, the antifungal armamentarium against Candida spp. has increased; however, efficacy and safety studies in this population are lacking. Areas covered We reviewed the medical literature and extracted information on clinical and observational studies evaluating the use of antifungal agents in neonates with invasive candidiasis. Expert opinion Efficacy and safety data for antifungals in neonates are lacking, and the majority of studies conducted to date have concentrated on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluations. Unlike other anti-infective agents, efficacy data in the setting of neonatal candidiasis cannot be extrapolated from adult studies due to differences in the pathophysiology of the disease in this population relative to older children and adults. Data collected thus far or data submitted to regulatory agencies for amphotericin B deoxycholate, fluconazole, and micafungin suggest that these are the current agents of choice for this disease in neonates until data for newer antifungal agents become available. For prophylaxis, data from fluconazole randomized controlled trials will be submitted to the regulatory agencies for labeling. Ultimately, the field of therapeutics for neonatal candidiasis will require multidisciplinary collaboration given the numerous challenges associated with conducting clinical trials in neonates. PMID:25842986

  10. Advancing the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kathleen; White, Kathryn; Roydhouse, Jessica K

    2013-04-01

    Clinical trials nurses play a pivotal role in the conduct of clinical research, but the educational and career pathway for these nurses remains unclear. This article reports findings from a survey of nurses working in cancer clinical trials research in Australia. Most participants held postgraduate qualifications (42 of 61); however, clinical trials education was primarily attained through short professional development courses. Interest in pursuing trial-specific postgraduate education was high, but barriers were identified, including cost, time, and unclear benefit for career advancement. Job titles varied substantially, which is indicative of an unclear employment pathway. These findings suggest that initiatives to improve the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses are needed and should include the following: formal educational preparation, greater consistency in employment status, and clearer career progression. These strategies should be underpinned by broad professional recognition of the clinical trials nurse as a specialized nursing role.

  11. Skills Required for Nursing Career Advancement: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Reza; Fallahi-Khoshnab, Masoud; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Oskouie, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Nurses require certain skills for progression in their field. Identifying these skills can provide the context for nursing career advancement. Objectives This study aimed to identify the skills needed for nurses’ career advancement. Materials and Methods A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted to study a purposive sample of eighteen nurses working in teaching hospitals affiliated with the Qazvin, Shahid Beheshti, and Iran Universities of Medical Sciences. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews, and analyzed using conventional content analysis. Results The three themes extracted from the data included interpersonal capabilities, competency for career success, and personal capacities. The results showed that acquiring a variety of skills is essential for career advancement. Conclusions The findings showed that personal, interpersonal, and functional skills can facilitate nurses’ career advancement. The effects of these skills on career advancement depend on a variety of conditions that require further studies. PMID:27556054

  12. Assuring Quality and Access in Advanced Practice Nursing: A Challenge to Nurse Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundinger, Mary O.; Cook, Sarah Sheets; Lenz, Elizabeth R.; Piacentini, Karen; Auerhahn, Carolyn; Smith, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses are assuming increasingly accountable roles in primary health care. A doctor of nursing practice degree would signify the high level of competency they achieve. Columbia University's training model is an example of the preparation needed for this level of professional practice. (SK)

  13. Neonatal Intensive Care Nurses' Perceptions of Parental Participation in Infant Pain Management: A Comparative Focus Group Study.

    PubMed

    Axelin, Anna; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta; Eriksson, Mats; Pölkki, Tarja; Korhonen, Anne; Franck, Linda S

    2015-01-01

    This comparative focus group study explored nurses' experiences and perceptions regarding parental participation in infant pain management in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A total of 87 nurses from 7 NICUs in Finland, Sweden, and the United States participated in focus-group interviews (n = 25). Data were analyzed using deductive and inductive thematic analysis. Nurses' experiences and perceptions varied considerably, from nurses being in control, to nurses sharing some control with parents, to nurse-parent collaboration in infant pain management. When nurses controlled pain management, parents were absent or passive. In these cases, the nurses believed this led to better pain control for infants and protected parents from emotional distress caused by infant pain. When nurses shared control with parents, they provided information and opportunities for participation. They believed parent participation was beneficial, even if it caused nurses or parents anxiety. When nurses collaborated with parents, they negotiated the optimal pain management approach for an individual infant. The collaborative approach was most evident for the nurses in the Swedish NICUs and somewhat evident in the NICUs in Finland and the United States. Further research is needed to address some nurses' perceptions and concerns and to facilitate greater consistency in the application of evidence-based best practices.

  14. Attitude and beliefs of some nurses in government hospitals in Ibadan, Nigeria to natal/neonatal teeth in infants.

    PubMed

    Bankole, O O; Oke, G A

    2013-09-01

    Eruption of the first deciduous teeth in children has shown much variation and occasionally may erupt prematurely at birth or within one month of life. Myths about natal/neonatal teeth abound in the Nigerian culture. Nurses are health care providers who are in constant close contact with patients and can be invaluable in helping to dispel these associated myths. However, to provide correct information they should be adequately equipped to do so. The aim of this study thus, was to assess the attitudes and beliefs of some nurses in Ibadan, Nigeria to natal/neonatal teeth in infants. A cross sectional survey was conducted among 380 nurses in the teaching, general and local government hospitals and clinics in Ibadan, Nigeria. Results revealed that 41.3% of the respondents would express shock and surprise if they assisted in delivering a baby with natal teeth. Half of the respondents (49.7%) felt that natal/neonatal teeth will be a great source of embarrassment to the family while a smaller proportion (11.8%), believed it was a curse (p = 0.01). On the advice the respondents would give to the mothers, more than a th (39.7%), would recommend immediate extraction of the teeth. A further 42 (11.1%) nurses were of the opinion that spiritual cleansing should be carried out prior to extraction. A greater proportion of the older nurses would advice immediate extraction of the teeth (p = 0.031). Regarding the perceived effect of natal/neonatal teeth on the children, (7.4%), (12.6%) and (29.2%) of the respondents believed that the children will behave strangely, will possess spiritual authority and be victims of stigmatization later in life respectively. This study has revealed that knowledge gaps about natal/neonatal teeth exist among the nurses in Ibadan, Nigeria. Health education programmes targeted at nurses are essential to correct these beliefs.

  15. Nursing scripts and the organizational influences on critical thinking: report of a study of neonatal nurses' clinical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, J; Sullivan, J; Spence, K; McDonald, M

    2000-05-01

    During 1995-1997 a study was undertaken to explore the extent to which theoretical knowledge acquired through a distance education programme in neonatal nursing was brought to bear in the real-world clinical reasoning of course participants. The study utilized a think aloud technique and included both concurrent (on-the-job) and retrospective verbal reports at 0, 6 and 12 months into the programme. Participants (n=4) were also interviewed individually on completion of the study. Results indicated that important inconsistencies existed between participants' theoretical knowledge and their practice; they also pointed to some organizational influences on these theory-practice inconsistencies. Script (or schema) theory provided a useful explanatory framework for these results. The paper includes a brief description of data collection and analysis techniques; its main emphasis, however, is on these theory-practice inconsistencies and their explanation in terms of the nature and acquisition of nursing practice scripts. The implications of nursing scripts for the promotion of critical thinking and evidence-based practice are discussed.

  16. Nursing Management of Advanced Merkel Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Pamela A; Freeman, Morganna L; Russell, Jeffery S

    2016-11-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and lethal skin cancer with few known treatment options. Management of this disease is challenging, and oncology nurses must understand the medical, physical, and psychosocial burden that MCC places on the patient and family caregivers. Patients must navigate a complex medical and insurance network that often fails to support patients with rare cancers. Nurses must advocate for these patients to ensure quality comprehensive cancer care.

  17. Technological Advances in Nursing Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Debra Henline

    2015-12-01

    Technology is rapidly changing the way nurses deliver patient care. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 encourages health care providers to implement electronic health records for meaningful use of patient information. This development has opened the door to many technologies that use this information to streamline patient care. This article explores current and new technologies that nurses will be working with either now or in the near future.

  18. Advanced nurse roles in UK primary care.

    PubMed

    Sibbald, Bonnie; Laurant, Miranda G; Reeves, David

    2006-07-03

    Nurses increasingly work as substitutes for, or to complement, general practitioners in the care of minor illness and the management of chronic diseases. Available research suggests that nurses can provide as high quality care as GPs in the provision of first contact and ongoing care for unselected patients. Reductions in cost are context dependent and rarely achieved. This is because savings on nurses' salaries are often offset by their lower productivity (due to longer consultations, higher patient recall rates, and increased use of tests and investigations). Gains in efficiency are not achieved when GPs continue to provide the services that have been delegated to nurses, instead of focusing on the services that only doctors can provide. Unintended consequences of extending nursing roles include loss of personal continuity of care for patients and increased difficulties with coordination of care as the multidisciplinary team size increases. Rapid access to care is, however, improved. There is a high capital cost involved in moving to multidisciplinary teams because of the need to train staff in new ways of working; revise legislation governing scope of practice; address concerns about legal liability; and manage professional resistance to change. Despite the unintended consequences and the high costs, extending nursing roles in primary care is a plausible strategy for improving service capacity without compromising quality of care or health outcomes for patients.

  19. Nursing staff's understanding expressions of people with advanced dementia disease.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Thomas; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Norberg, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    People with advanced dementia disease (ADD) are known to have communication difficulties and thus it presents a challenge in understanding the expressions of these people. Because successful communication presupposes cooperation at least between 2 individuals, both individual's actions must be acknowledged. The aim of this study is to describe nursing staff's ways of understanding the expressions of people with ADD when communicating with them. Interviews from 8 nursing staff were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Two themes were constructed: "Being in communication" and "Doing communication." Being in communication means that nursing staff perceive people with ADD as being capable of communication. Doing communication means that nursing staff attempt different individualized strategies to understand what people with ADD communicate. Good care of people with ADD presupposes nursing staff that are willing and able to relate to other people and to maintain good care for people with ADD continuous education and supervision are needed.

  20. The covered wagon journey: student chronicles in advanced holistic nursing.

    PubMed

    Purnell, Marguerite J; Lange, Bernadette; Bailey, Christie; Drozdowicz, Aleida; Eckes, Shirley; Kinchen, Elizabeth; Smith-Atkinson, Nikkisha

    2013-01-01

    This article recounts the experiences of a first cohort of graduate students in a newly implemented advanced holistic nursing (AHN) track, one of only a handful in the nation, and the first in Florida. The increasing popularity of complementary and alternative healing processes represents the insufficiency of a health system of fragmented care and a desire for holistic healing that is beyond mainstream allopathic care. Graduate holistic nurse education equips nurses to explore the commitment needed to advance the evolution of health care. The covered wagon journey is a metaphor for this meaningful participation. Students journaled their experiences as cotravelers in a lone wagon: embarking on a courageous journey, forging a path of discovery, and reaching their destination as pioneers. This cohort experience embodied the central tenets of holistic nursing, thus creating conscious change and unity within a learning community. The future of AHN is addressed in the context of the contemporary health care environment.

  1. Cognitive therapy: a training model for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Christine E; McDanel, Heather

    2005-05-01

    1. Mental health needs exist in medically underserved areas and can be addressed in nurse-managed, community-based health centers. 2. Cognitive therapy techniques can be used in community-based health centers to intervene and alleviate patients' distress and improve their adherence to treatment. 3. A training program in cognitive therapy can help advanced practice nurses and other health care providers implement the techniques needed to address many behavioral and mental health problems.

  2. An overview of Medicare reimbursement regulations for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Frakes, Michael A; Evans, Tracylain

    2006-01-01

    The federal government spends nearly 15% of the budget on Medicare services annually, and advanced practice nurses are eligible for reimbursement from that pool. The regulations governing reimbursement are complex because of the social, political, and financial pressures involved in their development. Although economic viability and due diligence considerations make it incumbent on advanced practice nurses to understand the rules, the profession, as a whole, has knowledge deficits in this area. The essentials of regulatory development and structure are reviewed and considerations for optimizing reimbursement are described.

  3. Professional development for an advanced practice nursing team.

    PubMed

    Pye, Sherry; Green, Angela

    2011-05-01

    Since its development in 1998, the Cardiology Advanced Practice Nurse team has been plagued by retention issues. The coordinator for the team developed this leadership project while participating in the 2008 to 2009 Maternal-Child Health Leadership Academy sponsored by Sigma Theta Tau International and Johnson & Johnson. The focus of this project was to develop, implement, and evaluate initiatives to empower the advanced practice nurse team, promote their professional development, and ultimately improve retention of team members. Although evaluation data show progress toward addressing work environment issues, retention remains an ongoing problem.

  4. [Chronic diseases and complexity: new roles in nursing. Advanced practice nurses and chronic patient].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, C Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    The increase in chronic diseases and the progressive ageing of the population is a source of concern for the different agencies with responsibility for health care. This has led to the creation of many documents focused on the analysis of the current situation and care of chronic diseases, including the WHO recommendations intended to assist countries and health services design and implement strategies that will address the existing demand, control and prevention of chronic diseases. In addition, there is a need to respond to the demand generated by chronic diseases in every sense, and from the different systems it is becoming more difficult to get enough support from multidisciplinary teams where the nurse has a central importance. While chronic diseases are becoming a threat due to the costs they generate, it is also an opportunity for nursing to be at the forefront for advanced care requirements, performed by professionals with recognized advanced clinical skills and ability for case management while monitoring and controlling complex chronic patients. The different services of the National Health System have introduced nurses that play different roles (cases managers, liaison nurses, advanced practice nurses and so on). However, it could be argued that they are not being trained to a desirable development level. It is therefore time for health care authorities to determine the role of the advanced practice nurse in relation to functional positions, and allow them to make an advance in the development of unified skills for the whole National Health System. From our experience we have learned that the advanced practice nurse is a resource that helps in the sustainability of services, thanks to the efficiency shown in the results obtained from the care given to both chronic and complex chronic patients.

  5. Kenya and distance education: a model to advance graduate nursing.

    PubMed

    Mutea, Naomi; Cullen, Deborah

    2012-08-01

    Africa is faced with a myriad of challenges, such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and a variety of political and historical complications that have affected the educational system for advanced nursing practice. In Kenya, the current situation in the higher education sector does not give nurses an opportunity to pursue graduate education after they have acquired the basic diploma in nursing due to limited government support and the type of education system existing in the country today. Although distance education has been available in Kenya for professionals such as teachers, in public universities, this kind of opportunity is unreachable for nurses who are working and need to further their education. Nurses desire to have access to advanced practice education to equip them with the relevant knowledge to cope and address the complex health issues arising in the management and care of patients. A collaborative model is presented as a potential solution for this need. Four major constituents are identified including hospitals and agencies, communities of interest, Kenyan universities and international education partners. Each has a part to play including contributions to information, communication of opinion and expertise, money and support, infrastructure and in-kind resources. Distance education is cost-effective and will help in building capacity at various levels of nursing including leadership in clinical practice, teaching, administration and research.

  6. Advanced nursing practice and Newton's three laws of motion.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, David

    This article considers the reasons for the development of advanced practice roles among nurses and other healthcare professions. It explores the implications of financial constraints, consumer preferences and the development of new healthcare services on the reorganization of professional boundaries. It makes use of Sir Isaac Newton's three laws of motion to demonstrate how professional development in nursing has taken place in response to a number of external influences and demands. It also considers the significance of skill mix for the nursing profession, in particular the development and likely expansion of the physician assistant role. The application of different professionals and grades within a healthcare team or organization is central to the Government's Agenda for Change proposals and nurses have successfully adopted a number of roles traditionally performed by doctors. Nurses have demonstrated that they are capable of providing high quality care and contributing directly to positive patient outcome. Advanced nursing roles should not only reflect the changing nature of healthcare work, they should also be actively engaged in reconstructing healthcare boundaries.

  7. The role of the nurse executive in fostering and empowering the advanced practice registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Tukea L

    2012-06-01

    The nurse executive plays a critical role in the design, oversight, and outcomes of the delivery of care and a key role in the success of the integration of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) into an organization. The critical areas that nurse executives must consider to foster and empower APRNs are: (1) knowledge and self preparation, especially of political initiatives that affect the role, (2) visionary leadership and development of clear role expectations and appropriate credentialing, (3) strategies to reduce disconnection between the APRN and their practice setting, and (4) appropriate education and marketing of the role to stakeholders.

  8. Advancing nursing leadership: a model for program implementation and measurement.

    PubMed

    Omoike, Osei; Stratton, Karen M; Brooks, Beth A; Ohlson, Susan; Storfjell, Judy Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    Despite the abundant literature documenting the need for nurse management education and career development, only recently have professional standards been targeted for this group. Competency standards for nurse leaders repeatedly identify systems-level concepts including finance and budget, communication skills, strategic management, human resources management, change management, and computer technology skills. However, educational initiatives to meet these standards are still at the early stages and most nurse leaders continue to acquire knowledge and experience through "on-the-job" training. This article will illustrate the need for partnerships and collaboration between academia and hospitals to advance nursing leadership to the next century. In addition, a tool to measure the impact of a graduate certificate program in nursing administration on nurse leader competencies is presented. Overall, the certificate program has been successful in multiple ways; it has "graduated" almost 80 nurse leaders, improved participant competence in their role at the systems level, as well as providing an impetus for completion of a graduate degree post program.

  9. [Anticoagulant therapy clinic: moving towards Advanced Nursing Practice].

    PubMed

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Parrado Borrego, Gema; Rodríguez González, José; Caparrós Miranda, Isabel S; Vargas Lirio, M Isabel; Ortiz Fernández, Primitiva

    2014-01-01

    There is currently around one million people receiving oral anticoagulants in Spain. The drug most used is acenocoumarol, which requires coagulation monitoring to ensure that the patient is within its normal therapeutic range. Patients usually start this treatment in a hospital clinic and, when they are stabilised, they are referred to primary care, where they are followed-up by their community nurses. The usual practice is that nurses are responsible for changes in the dose when the patients are outside the range. This practice is not performed by hospital nurses, despite having sufficient experience and knowledge to adequately manage these types of patients. An Advanced Nursing Practice model has been introduced into the Haematology management unit of the Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga. This involves various aspects of attention and care of patients on anticoagulant therapy, and includes adjusting the doses of their treatment following a catalogue of therapeutic and diagnostic ranges.

  10. Advanced education for the role of rural nurse generalist.

    PubMed

    Long, K A; Scharff, J E; Weinert, C

    1997-02-01

    The Montana State University College of Nursing has developed a master's degree program which prepares nurses as generalists with advanced knowledge for understanding and addressing rural health care needs. The programs is clear about its goals and objectives and does not attempt to be "all things for all people." The emphasis is on rural nursing, and this emphasis is present in recruiting, teaching, research and publication at the College. Classroom and clinical experiences challenge students to develop a broad range of skills, and most importantly to enhance critical thinking and problem-solving abilities. Since delivering high quality health care in rural areas requires the ability to understand health care from the consumer's perspective, both data collection and clinical experience in rural communities are required. The enthusiasm for rural nursing--practice, teaching and research--displayed by faculty members, alumnae and students is both a major factor in, and an indication of, the program's success.

  11. Advancing Information and Communication Technology Knowledge for Undergraduate Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Paula M

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic profession; for registered nurses their role is increasingly requiring greater information process understanding and the effective management of information to ensure high quality safe patient care. This paper outlines the design and implementation of Systems of eCare. This is a course which advances information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students within a Faculty of Health and Wellbeing appropriately preparing nurses for their professional careers. Systems of eCare entwines throughout the three year programme mapping to the curriculum giving meaning to learning for the student. In conclusion comments from students convey their appreciation of the provision of this element of the undergraduate programme. PMID:24199114

  12. Timing and duration of nursing from birth affect neonatal porcine uterine matrix metalloproteinase 9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1.

    PubMed

    Ho, T Y; Rahman, K M; Camp, M E; Wiley, A A; Bartol, F F; Bagnell, C A

    2017-04-01

    Nursing for 2 d from birth supports neonatal porcine uterine and cervical development. However, it is not clear how timing or duration of lactocrine signaling from birth (postnatal day = PND 0) affects development of neonatal female reproductive tract tissues. Therefore, studies were conducted to determine effects of age at first nursing and duration of nursing from birth on specific elements of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) system in uterine and cervical tissues at PND 2. When nursing was initiated at 0 h or 30 min of age, targeted proteins, including proMMP9 and MMP9, were detected in uterine and cervical tissues on PND 2, as was uterine TIMP1. However, these proteins were undetectable when nursing was delayed for 12 h and when gilts were fed milk replacer for 48 h from birth. Increasing the duration of nursing from 30 min to 12 h from birth increased uterine (P < 0.05) and cervical (P < 0.001) MMP9 levels to those observed in gilts nursed for 48 h. Similarly, uterine TIMP1 levels increased with duration of nursing. Uterine MMP2 levels were detectable but unaffected by age at first nursing or duration of nursing from birth. Uterine MMP2 and MMP9 activities, monitored by zymography, reflected immunoblotting data. Results provide evidence for the utility of MMP9 and TIMP1 as markers of age- and lactocrine-sensitive porcine female reproductive tract development.

  13. Departmental portfolio in nursing - An advanced instrument.

    PubMed

    Rassin, M; Silner, D; Ehrenfeld, M

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we will demonstrate the importance of the departmental portfolio; suggest an execution plan, and present initial impressions from a pilot project of developing the concept of a departmental portfolio. The portfolio is well known in the field of nursing and so far has been used by individuals mainly as a personal tool in furthering one's professional career. In this paper, we will suggest that expanding the use of a portfolio will be also beneficial at a collective level, by creating a departmental portfolio. The main objective of the departmental portfolio is to further the educational and professional development of the department members, by using it as an educating, evaluating, and administrative tool. We argue that a departmental portfolio should consist of several chapters: a professional presentation of the department, including its nursing world view; the work related to the development of the staff and education in service; information that coordinates actions designed to further the nursing treatment for patients, and information that depicts the achievements of the department in fields such as service, education, research, and publication.

  14. Illuminating the clinical nurse specialist role of advanced practice nursing: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Canam, Connie

    2005-12-01

    As the advanced practice nursing initiative in Canada gains momentum, effort is being directed towards clarifying and defining advanced practice roles. A qualitative study was undertaken to increase understanding of the clinical nurse specialist role of advanced practice. Sixteen nurses who worked in advanced practice roles, organizing and providing healthcare for children with complex health needs and their families across the continuum of care, participated in in-depth conversations about the nature of their practice, the knowledge that informs it and the factors that influence it. Findings suggest that clinical nurse specialists have a unique role in the organization and delivery of healthcare for specialized populations with complex health needs in their dual focus on the system level of healthcare and on population health needs. Initiatives directed to children and families within the study participants' specialties included program development, consultation and educational outreach and the development of clinical guidelines and policies. Although the nurses described their practice as focusing both on individual children and families and on the population of children and families within their specialty, it is at the population level that they see their greatest potential for contributing to the delivery of high-quality, cost-effective healthcare.

  15. Advanced nurse practitioner-led abdominal therapeutic paracentesis.

    PubMed

    Aplin, Neal

    2017-03-10

    Liver disease is a common cause of death in England and Wales, and ascites is associated with a 50% mortality rate. Most patients who present with ascites have underlying liver cirrhosis, and often require therapeutic paracentesis for symptomatic relief. This article describes a competency framework that was developed to enable advanced nurse practitioners to perform therapeutic paracentesis in an ambulatory care unit.

  16. A Pilot of a Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurse Preventive Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Joan Earle; Aronow, Harriet Udin

    2005-01-01

    Background: Persons with an intellectual and developmental disability frequently face barriers in accessing preventive services in community-based health care systems. As they age into middle years, they are at increased risk for functional decline. This paper presents a description of an advanced practice nurse (APN) intervention used in a pilot…

  17. Advancing Your Career: Concepts of Professional Nursing. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Rose

    This textbook, intended for registered nurses (RN's) returning to school, is designed to provide practicing RN's with professional concepts to advance their careers. The book contains 22 chapters organized in five sections. Each chapter includes chapter objectives, key terms, key points, chapter exercises, references, and a bibliography. Section I…

  18. Osteogenesis imperfecta types I-XI: implications for the neonatal nurse.

    PubMed

    Womack, Jody

    2014-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), also called "brittle bone disease," is a rare heterozygous connective tissue disorder that is caused by mutations of genes that affect collagen. Osteogenesis imperfecta is characterized by decreased bone mass, bone fragility, and skin hyperlaxity. The phenotype present is determined according to the mutation on the affected gene as well as the type and location of the mutation. Osteogenesis imperfecta is neither preventable nor treatable. Osteogenesis imperfecta is classified into 11 types to date, on the basis of their clinical symptoms and genetic components. This article discusses the definition of the disease, the classifications on the basis of its clinical features, incidence, etiology, and pathogenesis. In addition, phenotype, natural history, diagnosis and management of this disease, recurrence risk, and, most importantly, the implications for the neonatal nurse and management for the family are discussed.

  19. Nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity evaluation of Crocus sativus stigmas in neonates of nursing mice

    PubMed Central

    Bahmani, Mahmoud; Rafieian, Mortaza; Baradaran, Azar; Rafieian, Samira; Rafieian-kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Crocus sativus, known as saffron crocus, is best known for the spice saffron. Saffron use spans more than 3500 years, however, its toxicity on neonates during lactation has not yet evaluated. Objectives: This study was aimed to examine the acute toxicity of saffron on adult mice and its nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity on neonates of lactating mothers that used saffron during lactation. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, following acute toxicity evaluation, 32 pregnant mice were randomly designated into four equal groups. Following delivery, the mothers of groups 1 to 4 were administered orally (by gavage) normal saline (control group), 500, 1000 or 2000 mg/kg/day of saffron for three weeks, respectively. The newborn’s kidney and liver parameters were assessed at the end of the study for possible nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity evaluation. The kidney and liver tissue samples of newborns were histopathologically studied after staining with Hematoxylin & Eosin. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Scheffe’s tests Results: The LD50 value of saffron was calculated to be 4120±556 mg/kg in mice. To evaluate lactating toxicity, saffron was administered orally to the mothers once daily for 21 days, after delivery, during lactating period. Saffron increased serum urea nitrogen (p< 0.05). Histological studies indicated that saffron did not have any toxic effect on liver, however, histopathology changes were seen in the kidney of neonates. Conclusions: From the results of present study, it might be concluded that saffron is a nearly safe spice, however, nursing mothers should avoid high doses of this spice. PMID:24772401

  20. Educational Changes to Support Advanced Practice Nursing Education

    PubMed Central

    LeFlore, Judy L.; Thomas, Patricia E.

    2016-01-01

    Educational factors limit the number of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) graduates to meet the growing workforce demands. Healthcare dynamics are necessitating a shift in how nursing education envisions, creates, and implements clinical learning opportunities. The current clinical education model in APRN programs continues to be the same as it was 45 years ago when the student numbers were much smaller. New approaches in graduate nursing education are needed to address the shortage of APRNs in primary and acute care areas. Determining competency based on the number of clinical hours can be inefficient, ineffective, and costly and limits the ability to increase capacity. Little research exists in graduate nursing education to support the effectiveness and efficiency of current hours of clinical required for nurse practitioner students. Simulation and academic-practice partnership models can offer innovative approaches to nurse practitioner education for clinical training, with the goal of producing graduates who can provide safe, quality care within the complex practice-based environment of the nation's evolving healthcare system. PMID:27465446

  1. Transnationalism: A Framework for Advancing Nursing Research with Contemporary Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S.; Boutain, Doris M.; Mohammed, Selina A.

    2016-01-01

    This article advances nursing research by presenting transnationalism as a framework for inquiry with contemporary immigrants. Transnationalism occurs when immigrants maintain relationships that transcend the geographical borders of their origin and host countries. Immigrants use those relationships to experience health differently within concurrent socioeconomic, political and cultural contexts than national situated populations. Nurse researchers are called upon to consider these trans-border relationships when exploring the health of contemporary immigrants. Such consideration is needed to develop relevant research designs, methods, analysis, and dissemination strategies. PMID:26836998

  2. Nursing entrepreneurship: motivators, strategies and possibilities for professional advancement and health system change.

    PubMed

    Wall, Sarah

    2013-06-01

    In Canada, as well as internationally, efficiency-focused organizational restructuring in healthcare has resulted in stressful job change for nurses, although nurses continue to work in a system that values technology-based, physician-provided services. Employed nurses have had to participate in organizational activities that undermine their professional values and goals. Nursing entrepreneurship presents an opportunity to explore nursing's professional potential in nursing practice that is uniquely independent. In this study, a focused ethnographic approach was used to explore the experiences of self-employed nurses, who see themselves as leaders in advancing the profession of nursing and its contribution to healthcare. Key themes in the findings include the responses of self-employed nurses to health system change, expanded roles for nurses, the consequences of this non-traditional approach to nursing work and the possibilities for change that arise from nursing entrepreneurship. This research has implications for healthcare policy, professional advocacy and nursing education.

  3. Advanced practice nursing in Latin America and the Caribbean: regulation, education and practice

    PubMed Central

    Zug, Keri Elizabeth; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli; Pulcini, Joyce; Garcia, Alessandra Bassalobre; Aguirre-Boza, Francisca; Park, Jeongyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the current state of advanced practice nursing regulation, education and practice in Latin America and the Caribbean and the perception of nursing leaders in the region toward an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional design utilizing a web-based survey of 173 nursing leaders about their perceptions of the state of nursing practice and potential development of advanced practice nursing in their countries, including definition, work environment, regulation, education, nursing practice, nursing culture, and perceived receptiveness to an expanded role in primary health care. Result: the participants were largely familiar with the advanced practice nursing role, but most were unaware of or reported no current existing legislation for the advanced practice nursing role in their countries. Participants reported the need for increased faculty preparation and promotion of curricula reforms to emphasize primary health care programs to train advanced practice nurses. The vast majority of participants believed their countries' populations could benefit from an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care. Conclusion: strong legislative support and a solid educational framework are critical to the successful development of advanced practice nursing programs and practitioners to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. PMID:27508923

  4. Advancing diversity through inclusive excellence in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Michael R; MacWilliams, Brent R; Schmidt, Bonnie J

    2015-01-01

    Nurse leaders call for a more diverse nursing workforce, but too few address the concept of inclusion as a recruitment and retention strategy or as part of improving the academic learning milieu. This article addresses organizational considerations of diversity and inclusion as part of the agenda established by the Association of American Colleges and Universities for inclusive excellence, building on the idea that academic environments only become excellent when an inclusive climate is reached. Six organizational strategies to inclusion are presented from the authors' experiences, some structural and others behavioral: admissions processes, invisibility, absence of community, promotion and tenure, exclusion, and tokenism. A call for structural and behavioral adaptions within nursing education to advance an inclusive excellence agenda is presented.

  5. A primer for nurses on advancing health reform policy.

    PubMed

    Ridenour, Nancy; Trautman, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Health care reform is a high priority on the federal policy agenda. The authors present insights from their experiences as Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellows working in Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office and on the House Committee on Ways and Means. Nursing has many opportunities at this juncture to engage in policy discussions and advance solutions for issues related to increasing quality and access while dampening the escalating cost of care. Strategies where nursing's voice can inform reform conversations include chronic disease management, prevention and health promotion, community-based care, nurse-managed care, interdisciplinary education, safety and quality, use of health information technology, and testing the comparative effectiveness of interventions and delivery systems.

  6. Use of information technology by advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Gaumer, Gary L; Koeniger-Donohue, Rebecca; Friel, Christina; Sudbay, Mary Beth

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the use of information technology by advance practice nurses. A survey of 519 graduates of the Simmons College nurse practitioner program was conducted. Areas of investigation included the nurse practitioner's use of informatics technology, perception of information technology competence, adequacy of information technology training and support in the workplace, specific information technology health functions used in the workplace, and perceived benefits of using information technology. The data on the 249 usable responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. These analyses compare the use of information technology by type of job, specialty, years of practice, and setting of work. Results indicate that more than 90% of nurse practitioners utilize computers at work, yet a large fraction of them still have low self-perception of information technology competence, believe initial training at the work site was inadequate, and believe that academic preparation for information technology was also inadequate. There is considerable variation in these measures across nurse practitioner specialties, settings of care, job characteristics, and experience.

  7. Consultant pharmacists, advanced practice nurses, and the interdisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara

    2014-03-01

    Although in geriatrics we are better than many other clinical disciplines in terms of providing interdisciplinary care to older adults, I hope that we will continue to recognize how much more could actually be done. Before addressing the relationship between advanced practice nurses (APNs) and consultant pharmacists in real world settings, I want to review teamwork in geriatrics in general. It is critical to define what we mean by team, what type of team, and what the goals are of this teamwork.

  8. 78 FR 54255 - HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ...) nearing graduation, in an effort to expeditiously meet the growing demand for primary care nurse practitioners and nurse midwives. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joan Wasserman, DrPH, RN, Advanced...

  9. Discovering the nature of advanced nursing practice in high dependency care: a critical care nurse consultant's experience.

    PubMed

    Fairley, Debra

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes how a critical care nurse consultant's clinical role has evolved within a surgical high dependency unit (SHDU) in a large teaching hospitals trust. In order to provide some background to role development, an overview of the research exploring the nature of advanced nursing practice in the context of critical care will be presented. From the outset, advanced nursing practice was not perceived as the acquisition and application of technical procedures usually undertaken by doctors, but possibly an integration of medicine and nursing where holistic nursing assessment is combined with symptom-focused physical examination. A reflective account of practical problems encountered relating to role integration, professional autonomy, legal and consent issues, non-medical prescribing, and role evaluation will be presented. A model of working that can be applied to high dependency units, integrating the role of the advanced nurse practitioner within the clinical team, will be described.

  10. Computer and laboratory simulation in the teaching of neonatal nursing: innovation and impact on learning 1

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; Aredes, Natália Del' Angelo; Fernandes, Ananda Maria; Batalha, Luís Manuel da Cunha; Apóstolo, Jorge Manuel Amado; Martins, José Carlos Amado; Rodrigues, Manuel Alves

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to evaluate the cognitive learning of nursing students in neonatal clinical evaluation from a blended course with the use of computer and laboratory simulation; to compare the cognitive learning of students in a control and experimental group testing the laboratory simulation; and to assess the extracurricular blended course offered on the clinical assessment of preterm infants, according to the students. Method: a quasi-experimental study with 14 Portuguese students, containing pretest, midterm test and post-test. The technologies offered in the course were serious game e-Baby, instructional software of semiology and semiotechnique, and laboratory simulation. Data collection tools developed for this study were used for the course evaluation and characterization of the students. Nonparametric statistics were used: Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon. Results: the use of validated digital technologies and laboratory simulation demonstrated a statistically significant difference (p = 0.001) in the learning of the participants. The course was evaluated as very satisfactory for them. The laboratory simulation alone did not represent a significant difference in the learning. Conclusions: the cognitive learning of participants increased significantly. The use of technology can be partly responsible for the course success, showing it to be an important teaching tool for innovation and motivation of learning in healthcare. PMID:27737376

  11. Advanced Practice Nursing Competency Assessment Instrument (APNCAI): clinimetric validation

    PubMed Central

    Sastre-Fullana, Pedro; Morales-Asencio, Jose Miguel; Sesé-Abad, Albert; Fernández-Domínguez, Juan Carlos; De Pedro-Gómez, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and clinimetric validation of the Advanced Practice Nursing Competency Assessment Instrument (APNCAI) through several evidence sources about reliability and validity in the Spanish context. Design and setting APNCAI development was based on a multisequential and systematic process: literature review, instrument content consensus through qualitative Delphi method approach (a panel of 51 Advanced Practice in Nursing –APN– experts was selected) and the clinimetric validation process based on a sample of 600 nurses from the Balearic Islands public healthcare setting. Methods An initial step for tool's content development process based on Delphi method approach of expert consensus was implemented. A subsequent phase of tool validation started from the analysis of APN core competencies latent measurement model, including exploratory and confirmatory techniques. Reliability evidence for each latent factor was also obtained. Items' scores were submitted to descriptive analysis, plus univariate and multivariate normality tests. Results An eight-factor competency assessment latent model obtained adequate fit, and it was composed by ‘Research and Evidence-Based Practice’, ‘Clinical and Professional Leadership’, ‘Interprofessional Relationship and Mentoring’, ‘Professional Autonomy’, ‘Quality Management’, ‘Care Management’, ‘Professional Teaching and Education’ and ‘Health Promotion’. Conclusions Adequate empirical evidence of reliability and validity for APNCAI makes it useful for application in healthcare policy programmes for APN competency assessment in Spain. PMID:28235968

  12. The role of the neonatal intensive care nurse in decision-making: advocacy, involvement in ethical decisions and communication.

    PubMed

    Monterosso, Leanne; Kristjanson, Linda; Sly, Peter D; Mulcahy, Mary; Holland, Beng Gee; Grimwood, Sarah; White, Kate

    2005-06-01

    Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses are often faced with complex clinical and ethical problems. Little is known about the role of the NICU nurse in ethical decision-making, or processes that inform decision-making in this setting. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe nurses' perceptions of their role as patient advocate, clinical situations that cause them concern and the extent of their involvement in ethical decision-making. A combined quantitative and qualitative research design was used. A questionnaire was administered to nurses working in the NICU of the sole perinatal tertiary referral centre of Western Australia, Australia. Findings showed that NICU nurses saw their role in ethical decision-making primarily as advocating for the best interests of the infant and family, that they used clinical knowledge and experience to guide ethical decision-making, they were able to clearly articulate ethical problems and respond to them according to the clinical scenario and, while being primarily assertive in presenting their views, some nurses took a more passive approach. These findings support the need for development of a multidisciplinary model for ethical decision-making, where the view of all team members are considered.

  13. Knowledge, attitudes, and predictors of advance directive discussions of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Lipson, Amy R; Hausman, Alice J; Higgins, Patricia A; Burant, Christopher J

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and experiences regarding advance directives. A secondary purpose was to examine predictors of advance directive discussions between nurses and patients. Seven-hundred and nineteen respondents, randomly selected from a list of registered nurses in the state of Ohio, completed mailed questionnaires. Descriptive t test, chi-square, and logistic regression statistics were used in the data analyses. The respondents were knowledgeable and possessed positive attitudes about advance directives. Higher self-perceived confidence in advance directive discussion skills and the experience of caring for at least one patient with a current advance directive were found to be significant predictors of advance directive discussions. These findings suggest that experience with advance directives documents is critical for nurses' comfort and that developing interventions to further nurses' confidence in their discussion skills may increase advance directive discussions.

  14. Blueprint for development of the advanced practice psychiatric nurse workforce.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Nancy P; Delaney, Kathleen R; Stuart, Gail W

    2012-01-01

    The mental health system is inefficient and ineffective in providing behavioral health care services to the 1 in 4 Americans who have a mental illness or a substance abuse problem. Current health care reform initiatives present a significant opportunity for advanced practice psychiatric nurses-psychiatric mental health (APRN-PMH) to develop action-oriented recommendations for developing their workforce and thereby increasing access to high-quality and full-spectrum behavioral health care services. If endorsed by the professional nursing associations and the APRN-PMH workforce, the strategies presented in this paper provide a blueprint for developing the APRN-PMH workforce. Achieving these goals will significantly reform the APRN-PMH workforce, thereby contributing to the overall goal of supporting an integrated model of behavioral health care. No change has as much potential to influence the APRN-PMH workforce as the uniting of all APRN-PMHs in a "Blueprint for APRN-PMH Workforce Development."

  15. Using appreciative inquiry to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance family-centred care: A collaborative workshop.

    PubMed

    Trajkovski, Suza; Schmied, Virginia; Vickers, Margaret; Jackson, Debra

    2015-06-01

    Family-centred care (FCC) has been well recognised, accepted and reported in the literature as an optimised way of caring for hospitalised children. While neonatal units strive to adopt this philosophy, published research suggests there are difficulties implementing FCC principles in daily practice. Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a philosophy and methodology that offers a unique, strength-based approach to promoting organisational learning and positive organisational change. As a participatory approach, AI facilitates change from the ground up and lends itself to building effective partnerships or collaborations. This article reports the findings of a one-day workshop using an AI methodology to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance the FCC within a neonatal intensive care unit in Sydney, Australia. Participants (n = 15) developed collaborative insights of optimal FCC that can be built upon to support neonates and their families in the future. Shared visions were formed, strategies identified and a development plan made for ongoing collaborations and partnerships. AI provides a flexible framework that enables the mandatory collaboration needed to develop action plans that can form the catalyst for organizational change in health-care research and practice.

  16. Advanced practice nursing in performing arts health care.

    PubMed

    Weslin, Anna T; Silva-Smith, Amy

    2010-06-01

    Performing arts medicine is a growing health care profession specializing in the needs of performing artists. As part of the performing arts venue, the dancer, a combination of athlete and artist, presents with unique health care needs requiring a more collaborative and holistic health care program. Currently there are relatively few advanced practice nurses (APNs) who specialize in performing arts health care. APNs, with focus on collaborative and holistic health care, are ideally suited to join other health care professionals in developing and implementing comprehensive health care programs for the performing artist. This article focuses on the dancer as the client in an APN practice that specializes in performing arts health care.

  17. Addressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nokes, Kathleen M.; Stein, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 23 advanced practice nursing programs showed only 3 had HIV-specific graduate-level nursing courses. Recommendations were made for HIV-specific courses, integration of HIV content into other courses, use of Centers for Disease Control and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, and subspecialties in HIV nursing. (SK)

  18. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2016-12-14

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its medical regulations to permit full practice authority of three roles of VA advanced practice registered nurses (APRN) when they are acting within the scope of their VA employment. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA) will not be included in VA's full practice authority under this final rule, but comment is requested on whether there are access issues or other unconsidered circumstances that might warrant their inclusion in a future rulemaking. The final rulemaking establishes the professional qualifications an individual must possess to be appointed as an APRN within VA, establishes the criteria under which VA may grant full practice authority to an APRN, and defines the scope of full practice authority for each of the three roles of APRN. The services provided by an APRN under full practice authority in VA are consistent with the nursing profession's standards of practice for such roles. This rulemaking increases veterans' access to VA health care by expanding the pool of qualified health care professionals who are authorized to provide primary health care and other related health care services to the full extent of their education, training, and certification, without the clinical supervision of physicians, and it permits VA to use its health care resources more effectively and in a manner that is consistent with the role of APRNs in the non-VA health care sector, while maintaining the patient-centered, safe, high-quality health care that veterans receive from VA.

  19. Career advancement and educational opportunities: experiences and perceptions of internationally educated nurses.

    PubMed

    Salma, Jordana; Hegadoren, Kathleen M; Ogilvie, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The number of internationally educated nurses is increasing in the Canadian workforce. Recruitment of internationally educated nurses is often seen as a solution to ongoing nursing shortages. However, international recruitment needs to be accompanied by strategies to ensure long-term retention. One of the criteria for successful retention is the availability and accessibility of career advancement and educational opportunities. Little research exists on the opportunities for career advancement and education for internationally educated nurses in Canada. This interpretive descriptive study was conducted to look at the perceptions of internationally educated nurses regarding career advancement and educational opportunities in Alberta, Canada. Eleven internationally educated nurses, working as registered nurses in Alberta, were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Five themes were identified: motherhood as a priority, communication and cultural challenges, process of skill recognition, perceptions of opportunity and need for mentorship.

  20. Advancing a program of research within a nursing faculty role.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Marie T; Wenzel, Jennifer; Han, Hae-Ra; Allen, Jerilyn K; Paez, Kathryn A; Mock, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Doctoral students and new faculty members often seek advice from more senior faculty on how to advance their program of research. Students may ask whether they should choose the manuscript option for their dissertation or whether they should seek a postdoctoral fellowship. New faculty members wonder whether they should pursue a career development award and whether they need a mentor as they strive to advance their research while carrying out teaching, service, and practice responsibilities. In this article, we describe literature on the impact of selected aspects of pre- and postdoctoral training and faculty strategies on scholarly productivity in the faculty role. We also combine our experiences at a school of nursing within a research-intensive university to suggest strategies for success. Noting the scarcity of research that evaluates the effect of these strategies, we are actively engaged in collecting data on their relationship to the scholarly productivity of students and faculty members within our own institution.

  1. Professional excellence and career advancement in nursing: a conceptual framework for clinical leadership development.

    PubMed

    Adeniran, Rita Kudirat; Bhattacharya, Anand; Adeniran, Anthony A

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, stakeholders in the health care community are recognizing nursing as key to solving the nation's health care issues. This acknowledgment provides a unique opportunity for nursing to demonstrate leadership by developing clinical nurse leaders to collaborate with the multidisciplinary care team in driving evidence-based, safe quality, cost-effective health care services. One approach for nursing success is standardizing the entry-level education for nurses and developing a uniform professional development and career advancement trajectory with appropriate incentives to encourage participation. A framework to guide and provide scientific evidence of how frontline nurses can be engaged will be paramount. The model for professional excellence and career advancement provides a framework that offers a clear path for researchers to examine variables influencing nurses' professional development and career advancement in a systematic manner. Professional Excellence and Career Advancement in Nursing underscores professional preparedness of a registered nurse as central to leadership development. It also describes the elements that influence nurses' participation in professional development and career advancement under 4 main categories emphasizing mentorship and self-efficacy as essential variables.

  2. Effectiveness of Advanced Illness Care Teams for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Dennis G.; Toseland, Ronald W.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of advanced illness care teams (AICTs) for nursing home residents with advanced dementia. The AICTs used a holistic approach that focused on four domains: (1) medical, (2) meaningful activities, (3) psychological, and (4) behavioral. The authors recruited 118 residents in two nursing homes for this study and…

  3. [Pain at the neonatal unit under a perspective of nursing staff from a university hospital, Rbeiraõ Peto, SP, Bazil].

    PubMed

    Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; Carletti, Mariângela; Nunes, Rachel; Furtado, Maria Cândida de Carvalho; Leite, Adriana Moraes

    2006-01-01

    This descriptive study from a qualitative approach aims to describe how the nursing team understands pain assessment and management in newborns at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The subjects are 16 nursing professionals. The nursing staff identifies pain when behavioral and physiological changes are present. They use the NIPS scale, although it is not effective in clinical practice. Subjects reveal difficulties in making a difference between pain and stress responses in daily work. They are worried about correct pain management in newborns. The search of knowledge about pain is still incipient, and subjects mostly obtain it through their experiences in newborn care and by exchanging experiences with other professionals. The nursing team needs greater access to specific literature about neonatal pain and training courses that can optimize pain management, thus contributing to a better care capacity and to the newborn's quality of life.

  4. Primary healthcare NZ nurses' experiences of advance directives: understanding their potential role.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Raewyn; Banister, Elizabeth; de Vries, Kay

    2013-07-01

    Advance directives are one aspect of advance care planning designed to improve end of life care. The New Zealand Nurses Organisation released their first mission statement in 2010 concerning advance directives suggesting an increase in the use of these. A burgeoning older population, expected to rise over the next few years, places the primary healthcare nurse in a pivotal role to address the challenges in constructing advance directives. While literature supports the role for primary healthcare nurses in promoting advance directives, no research was found on this role in the New Zealand context. This paper presents results of a qualitative study conducted in New Zealand with 13 senior primary healthcare nurses with respect to their knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of advance directives. Results of the analysis revealed a dynamic process involving participants coming to understand their potential role in this area. This process included reflection on personal experience with advance directives; values and ethics related to end of life issues; and professional actions.

  5. A comparison of the bacteria found on the hands of ‘homemakers’ and neonatal intensive care unit nurses

    PubMed Central

    Aiello, A.E.; Cimiotti, J.; Della-Latta, P.; Larson, E.L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary This prevalence study was conducted to compare the counts, types and antimicrobial resistance profiles of bacterial flora on the hands of individuals in the community to that of nurses at a nearby university teaching hospital, with an intense hand hygiene regimen. Hand cultures were obtained from 204 individuals during a home visit and 119 nurses in two neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The mean total log counts of organisms were 5.73 and 5.24 for the homemakers [defined as the person (usually the mother) who is the primary person responsible for arranging childcare, cooking, cleaning etc] and nurse hands, respectively (P < 0.0001). Significantly more homemakers had Acinetobacter lwoffii, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens/putida, and Staphylococcus aureus on their hands compared with the nurses (all P < 0.05). However, significantly more nurses had Enterococcus faecalis, S. epidermidis, and S. warneri on their hands (P < 0.05). Of note, the hands of nurses harboured significantly more S. epidermidis strains resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefazolin, clindamycin, erythromycin, and oxacillin and S. warneri resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefazolin, clindamycin, and oxacillin (P < 0.05). Surprisingly, significantly more trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant S. epidermidis and ciprofloxacin-resistant S. warneri was recovered from the hands of homemakers (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates differences in prevalence, bacterial composition and antimicrobial resistance of hand flora of hospital personnel compared with homemakers. Moreover, the hands of homemakers may serve as community reservoirs for antimicrobial resistant strains of clinical importance. PMID:12919763

  6. Advancing palliative and end-of-life science in cardiorespiratory populations: The contributions of nursing science.

    PubMed

    Grady, Patricia A

    Nursing science has a critical role to inform practice, promote health, and improve the lives of individuals across the lifespan who face the challenges of advanced cardiorespiratory disease. Since 1997, the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) has focused attention on the importance of palliative and end-of-life care for advanced heart failure and advanced pulmonary disease through the publication of multiple funding opportunity announcements and by supporting a cadre of nurse scientists that will continue to address new priorities and future directions for advancing palliative and end-of-life science in cardiorespiratory populations.

  7. Emerging areas of science: Recommendations for Nursing Science Education from the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science Idea Festival.

    PubMed

    Henly, Susan J; McCarthy, Donna O; Wyman, Jean F; Heitkemper, Margaret M; Redeker, Nancy S; Titler, Marita G; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Stone, Patricia W; Moore, Shirley M; Alt-White, Anna C; Conley, Yvette P; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science aims to "facilitate and recognize life-long nursing science career development" as an important part of its mission. In light of fast-paced advances in science and technology that are inspiring new questions and methods of investigation in the health sciences, the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science convened the Idea Festival for Nursing Science Education and appointed the Idea Festival Advisory Committee (IFAC) to stimulate dialogue about linking PhD education with a renewed vision for preparation of the next generation of nursing scientists. Building on the 2005 National Research Council report Advancing The Nation's Health Needs and the 2010 American Association of Colleges of Nursing Position Statement on the Research-Focused Doctorate Pathways to Excellence, the IFAC specifically addressed the capacity of PhD programs to prepare nursing scientists to conduct cutting-edge research in the following key emerging and priority areas of health sciences research: omics and the microbiome; health behavior, behavior change, and biobehavioral science; patient-reported outcomes; big data, e-science, and informatics; quantitative sciences; translation science; and health economics. The purpose of this article is to (a) describe IFAC activities, (b) summarize 2014 discussions hosted as part of the Idea Festival, and (c) present IFAC recommendations for incorporating these emerging areas of science and technology into research-focused doctoral programs committed to preparing graduates for lifelong, competitive careers in nursing science. The recommendations address clearer articulation of program focus areas; inclusion of foundational knowledge in emerging areas of science in core courses on nursing science and research methods; faculty composition; prerequisite student knowledge and skills; and in-depth, interdisciplinary training in supporting area of science content and methods.

  8. A protocol for the use of amorphous hydrogel to support wound healing in neonatal patients: an adjunct to nursing skin care.

    PubMed

    Cisler-Cahill, Lorna

    2006-01-01

    The care registered nurses offer makes a critical difference in the quality and cost-effectiveness of patient outcomes. The prevention and treatment of alterations in skin integrity remain primary nurse-sensitive quality indicators. Although wound prevention is a primary goal for nurses, iatrogenic wounds do occur. Neonatal patients are at greater risk for alterations in skin integrity because of the fragile nature of their skin. When skin breakdown occurs, nurses must have knowledge of effective treatment alternatives. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of a collaborative practice protocol to introduce and document patient outcomes with the use of amorphous hydrogel as a treatment modality for iatrogenic neonatal wounds. All hospitals collect data on the quality of patient care, and it has been known for some time that registered nurses can make a critical difference in the quality of patient care and the effectiveness of patient outcomes. The American Nurses Association has identified ten specific quality measures that are impacted by nursing care. Referred to as nurse-sensitive quality indicators, these measures include the maintenance of skin integrity.

  9. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction in Advanced Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Hants; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Tanabe, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss how advanced practice nurses (APNs) can incorporate mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) as a nonpharmacologic clinical tool in their practice. Over the last 30 years, patients and providers have increasingly used complementary and holistic therapies for the nonpharmacologic management of acute and chronic diseases. Mindfulness-based interventions, specifically MBSR, have been tested and applied within a variety of patient populations. There is strong evidence to support that the use of MBSR can improve a range of biological and psychological outcomes in a variety of medical illnesses, including acute and chronic pain, hypertension, and disease prevention. This article will review the many ways APNs can incorporate MBSR approaches for health promotion and disease/symptom management into their practice. We conclude with a discussion of how nurses can obtain training and certification in MBSR. Given the significant and growing literature supporting the use of MBSR in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease, increased attention on how APNs can incorporate MBSR into clinical practice is necessary. PMID:25673578

  10. Parents' perceptions of continuity of care in the neonatal intensive care unit: pilot testing an instrument and implications for the nurse-parent relationship.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Elizabeth Gingell; Miles, Alison; Rovnyak, Virginia; Baernholdt, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Nurse-parent relationships are a key aspect of high-quality family-centered care in the neonatal intensive care unit. Few studies have examined nursing continuity of care that includes (a) chronological continuity, that is, the number of nurses caring for an infant over time, (b) the consistency of information transferred to the parent and colleagues, and (c) the consistency of interactions between parent and nurse as an important factor in the nurse-parent relationship. The aims of this pilot study were to develop and test a scale of parental perceptions of nursing continuity of care in the newborn intensive care setting and to characterize the association between parents' perceptions and chronological nursing continuity. Fifty-four parents completed the Parents' Perceptions of Continuity Scale and a demographic questionnaire. Also, medical record and a count of the number of nurses caring for infant in past 7 days were collected. The Parents' Perceptions of Continuity Scale demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbachα, 0.81). Parents' Perceptions of Continuity Scale scores were significantly associated with chronological nursing continuity, suggesting that the number of nurses caring for an infant plays a role in parents' perceptions of overall nursing continuity.

  11. Quality nursing care for hospitalized patients with advanced illness: concept development.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Shigeko; Baggs, Judith G; Knafl, Kathleen A

    2010-08-01

    The quality of nursing care as perceived by hospitalized patients with advanced illness has not been examined. A concept of quality nursing care for this population was developed by integrating the literature on constructs defining quality nursing care with empirical findings from interviews of 16 patients with advanced illness. Quality nursing care was characterized as competence and personal caring supported by professionalism and delivered with an appropriate demeanor. Although the attributes of competence, caring, professionalism, and demeanor were identified as common components of quality care across various patient populations, the caring domain increased in importance when patients with advanced illness perceived themselves as vulnerable. Assessment of quality nursing care for patients with advanced illness needs to include measures of patient perceptions of vulnerability.

  12. A clinical advancement program for registered nurses with an outpatient focus.

    PubMed

    Streeter, Bonnie L

    2007-01-01

    Clinical advancement programs have been in use for almost 30 years. Although clinical advancement programs have been designed for many areas, it appears that one has never been developed specific to the outpatient-focused registered nurse. This article describes the development of a clinical advancement program for non-hospital-based registered nurses employed at the Guthrie Clinic in Sayre, Pennsylvania and highlights recommendations for instituting this program in any outpatient setting.

  13. Social justice considerations in neonatal care for nurse managers and executives.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Linda; Walden, Marlene; Verklan, M Terese

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the struggle between social justice and market justice within the current health care system, specifically issues affecting neonatal care. Community benefit is described and discussed as an aspect of social justice demonstrated by hospitals. The federal and state Children's Health Insurance Program also is discussed in relation to social justice and health care costs. Implications for managers and executives overseeing neonatal care are presented in relation to the economic and social issues.

  14. The Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program, part 3: managing an advancement process.

    PubMed

    Steaban, Robin; Fudge, Mitzie; Leutgens, Wendy; Wells, Nancy

    2003-11-01

    Consistency of performance standards across multiple clinical settings is an essential component of a credible advancement system. Our advancement process incorporates a central committee, composed of nurses from all clinical settings within the institution, to ensure consistency of performance in inpatient, outpatient, and procedural settings. An analysis of nurses advanced during the first 18 months of the program indicates that performance standards are applicable to nurses in all clinical settings. The first article (September 2003) in this 3-part series described the foundation for and the philosophical background of the Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program (VPNPP), the career advancement program underway at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Part 2 described the development of the evaluation tools used in the VPNPP, the implementation and management of this new system, program evaluation, and improvements since the program's inception. The purpose of this article is to review the advancement process, review the roles of those involved in the process, and to describe outcomes and lessons learned.

  15. 'Something normal in a very, very abnormal environment'--Nursing work to honour the life of dying infants and children in neonatal and paediatric intensive care in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Melissa J; Endacott, Ruth; Copnell, Beverley; O'Connor, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    The majority of deaths of children and infants occur in paediatric and neonatal intensive care settings. For nurses, managing an infant/child's deterioration and death can be very challenging. Nurses play a vital role in how the death occurs, how families are supported leading up to and after the infant/child's death. This paper describes the nurses' endeavours to create normality amidst the sadness and grief of the death of a child in paediatric and neonatal ICU. Focus groups and individual interviews with registered nurses from NICU and PICU settings gathered data on how neonatal and paediatric intensive care nurses care for families when a child dies and how they perceived their ability and preparedness to provide family care. Four themes emerged from thematic analysis: (1) respecting the child as a person; (2) creating opportunities for family involvement/connection; (3) collecting mementos; and (4) planning for death. Many of the activities described in this study empowered parents to participate in the care of their child as death approached. Further work is required to ensure these principles are translated into practice.

  16. Master’s programs in advanced nursing practice: new strategies to enhance course design for subspecialty training in neonatology and pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Colin; Barry, Catherine; Barnes, Katie

    2012-01-01

    The advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) role first developed in the USA in the 1960s in primary care. Since then, it has evolved in many different countries and subspecialties, creating a variety of challenges for those designing and implementing master’s programs for this valuable professional group. We focus on ANPs in the neonatal and pediatric intensive care setting to illustrate the complexity of issues faced by both faculty and students in such a program. We review the impact of limited resources, faculty recruitment/accreditation, and the relationship with the medical profession in establishing a curriculum. We explore the evidence for the importance of ANP role definition, supervision, and identity among other health professionals to secure a successful role transition. We describe how recent advances in technology can be used to innovate with new styles of teaching and learning to overcome some of the difficulties in running master’s programs for small subspecialties. We illustrate, through our own experience, how a thorough assessment of the available literature can be used to innovate and develop strategies to create an individual MSc programs that are designed to meet the needs of highly specialized advanced neonatal and pediatric nursing practice. PMID:23762011

  17. Cost-effectiveness of a WOC Advanced Practice Nurse in the Acute Care and Outpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of advanced practice nurses who practice within the WOC specialty are challenged by the need to justify their role by demonstrating clinical and fiscal benefits to the employing agency. This View From Here column describes the steps I took while completing such an analysis for a position for a nurse practitioner with WOC certification in upstate New York. PMID:24918767

  18. The Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program, part 2: Integrating a professional advancement and performance evaluation system.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Nancy F; Duvanich, Mary; Foss, Julie; Wells, Nancy

    2003-10-01

    Developing a performance-based advancement system requires evaluation tools that capture essential behaviors and outcomes reflective of key nursing functions. To ensure relevance to clinical practice and enhance buy-in from nursing staff, the behaviors and outcomes were defined by a broad cross-section of nursing staff and administrators. The first article (September 2003) in this 3-part series described the foundation for and the philosophical background of the Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program (VPNPP), the career advancement program under way at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. This second article describes the development of the evaluation tools used in the VPNPP, the implementation and management of this new system, program evaluation, and improvements since the inception of the program. Additionally, the authors present the challenges and lessons we learned in development and implementation of a dynamic evaluation system that supports our career advancement program. The process of advancing within the program will be described in part 3.

  19. Advancing general practice nursing in Australia: roles and responsibilities of primary healthcare organisations.

    PubMed

    Lane, Riki; Halcomb, Elizabeth; McKenna, Lisa; Zwar, Nicholas; Naccarella, Lucio; Davies, Gawaine Powell; Russell, Grant

    2016-04-21

    Objectives Given increased numbers and enhanced responsibilities of Australian general practice nurses, we aimed to delineate appropriate roles for primary health care organisations (PHCOs) to support this workforce.Methods A two-round online Delphi consensus process was undertaken between January and June 2012, informed by literature review and key informant interviews. Participants were purposively selected and included decision makers from government and professional organisations, educators, researchers and clinicians from five Australian states and territoriesResults Of 56 invited respondents, 35 (62%) and 31 (55%) responded to the first and second invitation respectively. Participants reached consensus on five key roles for PHCOs in optimising nursing in general practice: (1) matching workforce size and skills to population needs; (2) facilitating leadership opportunities; (3) providing education and educational access; (4) facilitating integration of general practice with other primary care services to support interdisciplinary care; and (5) promoting advanced nursing roles. National concerns, such as limited opportunities for postgraduate education and career progression, were deemed best addressed by national nursing organisations, universities and peak bodies.Conclusions Advancement of nursing in general practice requires system-level support from a range of organisations. PHCOs play a significant role in education and leadership development for nurses and linking national nursing organisations with general practices.What is known about the topic? The role of nurses in Australian general practice has grown in the last decade, yet they face limited career pathways and opportunities for career advancement. Some nations have forged interprofessional primary care teams that use nurses' skills to the full extent of their scope of practice. PHCOs have played important roles in the development of general practice nursing in Australia and internationally

  20. Institutional Influences on Nurse-Academics' Instructional Planning Decisions in the Implementation of Basic Nursing Curricula in Colleges of Advanced Education in New South Wales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Kathryn L.

    A study examined institutional influences on the instructional planning decisions of nurse-academics presenting basic nursing curricula in colleges of advanced education (CAEs) in New South Wales. Data were collected from the following sources: survey of 86 selected nurse-academics from 12 of New South Wales' 15 tertiary institutions running basic…

  1. Assessment of advanced practice palliative care nursing competencies in nurse practitioner students: implications for the integration of ELNEC curricular modules.

    PubMed

    Shea, Joyce; Grossman, Sheila; Wallace, Meredith; Lange, Jean

    2010-04-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APRNs) have key roles in the care of patients who are nearing death and those living with a disabling chronic disease. This article describes a mixed-method formative assessment of 36 graduate nursing students' knowledge about and attitudes toward palliative care preliminary to curricular integration of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) graduate core modules. Students' knowledge about palliative care was assessed using the 106-item ELNEC examination. In addition, qualitative data were gathered regarding students' definitions of palliative care, the role of the APRN in palliative care, and their definitions of a "good" and "bad" death. Results revealed students' limited knowledge about palliative care. Qualitative findings indicated that most students exclusively linked palliative care with end-of-life care and believed that the treatment they provide should have the goal of prolonging life over maintaining quality of life. Implications for curriculum design, advanced practice role development, and collaboration with community health partners are discussed.

  2. Nothing out of the ordinary: advanced fertility nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Allan, Helen; Barber, Debbie

    2004-12-01

    This paper discusses data from a case study of fertility nursing practice. An ethnographic case study approach using participant observation and nine semi-structured interviews with staff and patients was undertaken. The data were analysed thematically and these themes are discussed in this paper. We present the meaning a small group of nurses working in a fertility unit in the UK attach to new roles and the ways in which changes in practice may be influenced. The nurses in this study believed that nature of the task demanded changes to practice and they identified personal, interpersonal and socio-cultural factors which influenced these changes. These new roles facilitated greater continuity of care for patients. This paper discusses the effects of these new roles on knowing and intimacy in nurse - patient relationships. The data suggests that new nursing roles, which are based on "traditional" nursing and "new" technical skills, are fragile and may not be shared across a professional community.

  3. A spirit-focused conceptual model of nursing for the advanced practice nurse.

    PubMed

    Swanson, C S

    1995-01-01

    A spirit-focused conceptual model of nursing views the person as a spiritual being whose life and purpose arise from a personal relationship with God. The individual's definition of God determines how he or she responds to stimuli, sets goals, and establishes purpose in life. Consequently, this definition influences the professional nursing relationship, and the nurse's and patient's concepts of health and perceptions of the environment. The pediatric nurse practitioner and client are the primary examples of practice examined in this study.

  4. Advancing Nursing Informatics in the Next Decade: Recommendations from an International Survey.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Maxim; Ronquillo, Charlene; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Badger, Martha K; Ali, Samira; Lewis, Adrienne; Georgsson, Mattias; Jeon, Eunjoo; Tayaben, Jude L; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Islam, Tasneem; Sommer, Janine; Jung, Hyunggu; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Alhuwail, Dari

    2016-01-01

    In the summer of 2015, the International Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA NISIG) Student Working Group developed and distributed an international survey of current and future trends in nursing informatics. The survey was developed based on current literature on nursing informatics trends and translated into six languages. Respondents were from 31 different countries in Asia, Africa, North and Central America, South America, Europe, and Australia. This paper presents the results of responses to the survey question: "What should be done (at a country or organizational level) to advance nursing informatics in the next 5-10 years?" (n responders = 272). Using thematic qualitative analysis, responses were grouped into five key themes: 1) Education and training; 2) Research; 3) Practice; 4) Visibility; and 5) Collaboration and integration. We also provide actionable recommendations for advancing nursing informatics in the next decade.

  5. Enhancing Success in Advanced Practice Nursing: a grant-funded project.

    PubMed

    McNeal, Gloria J; Walker, Donita

    2006-01-01

    The Enhancing Success in Advanced Practice Nursing (ESAPN) Project is designed to improve access to a diverse and culturally competent and sensitive health professions workforce by increasing the number of Hispanic, African-American and Asian nurses recruited, enrolled in and graduated from the MSN program at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-School of Nursing (UMDNJ-SN). In addition, the project plan includes the development and implementation of a comprehensive program that incorporates academic support services, career advisement and mentoring activities to retain and graduate an increased number of culturally, racially and ethnically diverse advanced practice nurses for the State of New Jersey. The project also seeks to improve the quality of care by preparing advanced practice nurses to provide culturally competent and sensitive care by assuring that the MSN curriculum includes content and clinical experiences relevant to the development of cultural competence. Faculty participation in workshops, designed to increase knowledge of cultural competence, is a key component. The success of the project will be evaluated using a variety of measures that track increases in the number of diverse students recruited and enrolled, the number of students accessing services associated with the ESAPN program, and increased retention and graduation of Hispanic, African-American and Asian nurses prepared as advanced practice nurses.

  6. Applying the Advancing Excellence in America's Nursing Homes Circle of Success to improving and sustaining quality.

    PubMed

    Bakerjian, Debra; Zisberg, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Looking forward to the Quality Assurance Performance Improvement (QAPI) program to be implemented and required in 2014, and as nursing home staff provide care for residents with increasingly complex health issues, knowledge of how to implement quality improvement (QI) is imperative. The nursing home administrator and director of nursing (DON) provide overall leadership, but it is the primary responsibility of the DON and other registered nurse staff to implement and manage the day to day QI process. This article describes potential roles of nursing leaders and key components of a QI project using a pressure ulcer case study exemplar to illustrate a quality improvement process. The authors suggest specific methods that RN leaders can employ using the Advancing Excellence Campaign Circle of Success as an organizing framework along with evidence-based resources. Nursing home leaders could use this article as a guideline for implementing any clinical quality improvement process.

  7. Competency Recommendations for Advancing Nursing Informatics in the Next Decade: International Survey Results.

    PubMed

    Ronquillo, Charlene; Topaz, Maxim; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Nibber, Raji

    2017-01-01

    The IMIA-NIstudents' and emerging professionals' working group conducted a large international survey in 2015 regarding research trends in nursing informatics. The survey was translated into half-a-dozen languages and distributed through 18 international research collaborators' professional connections. The survey focused on the perspectives of nurse informaticians. A total of 272 participants responded to an open ended question concerning recommendations to advance nursing informatics. Five key areas for action were identified through our thematic content analysis: education, research, practice, visibility and collaboration. This chapter discusses these results with implications for nursing competency development. We propose how components of various competency lists might support the key areas for action. We also identify room to further develop existing competency guidelines to support in-service education for practicing nurses, promote nursing informatics visibility, or improve and facilitate collaboration and integration with other professions.

  8. Successfully incorporating Writing Across the Curriculum with advanced writing in nursing.

    PubMed

    Luthy, Karlen E; Peterson, Neil E; Lassetter, Jane H; Callister, Lynn C

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain the concepts of Writing Across the Curriculum, Writing in the Disciplines, and Writing to Learn, and to describe the incorporation of advanced writing into a baccalaureate nursing program and provide suggestions for accessing resources and promoting success. The goals of incorporating Writing Across the Curriculum, Writing in the Disciplines, and Writing to Learn concepts into nursing curriculum are to assist nursing students to achieve competence in clinically relevant writing assignments; to demonstrate critical thinking and communication skills, both oral and written; to execute useful literature searches; to read and understand research reports; and to encourage the incorporation of evidence into clinical practice. With a strong and established writing foundation, nursing students will be more successful in written and oral communication during their nursing program and throughout their nursing career.

  9. [Screening for melanoma, an advanced practice nurse consultation].

    PubMed

    Farrayre, Annie; Roland, Nathalie; Akotiale, Sophie; Avril, Marie-Françoise

    2014-12-01

    In the dermatology consultation, at Cochin hospital, Paris, a nurse cooperates with a dermatologist in order to insure the clinical follow-up for high-risk melanoma patients. To adopt this innovative public health approach, the nurse has received theoretical, clinical and educational knowledge.

  10. Reaching for the stars: career advancement and the registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kim

    2005-08-01

    Clinical nursing has long struggled to secure the place of primacy it deserves in the profession's hierarchy of importance and worth. It is ironic that, even at the beginning of the 21st century, a clinical nurse is generally not as well-recognized, rewarded or remunerated as a colleague working in nursing management, education or research. Until the profession recognizes and takes serious action to remedy this situation, the crisis of recruitment and retention in nursing currently ravaging the globe is likely to continue. In this paper, I present a discursive account of an exciting initiative by a leading private, acute-care hospital which addresses this very problem. A new ladder for clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) introduces a rigorous and systematic approach to the appointment of three classifications of CNS, each requiring evidence of successively higher levels of competency, and which are accompanied by fiscal reward and stronger peer recognition.

  11. An exemplar for evidence-based nursing practice using the Magnet(®) model as the framework for change: oral feeding practice in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Sables-Baus, Sharon; Zuk, Jeannie

    2012-10-01

    Implementation of research evidence into practice can be challenging in areas such as the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), where the environment is complex and rapidly changing and caregiving goals have shifted from simply infant survival to supporting positive long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. Clinical nurse specialists (CNS) are ideally positioned to use research to obtain new knowledge, innovations, and improvements in care as part of an interdisciplinary team. The authors describe the role of the CNS in changing NICU culture around feeding infants, an important and frequent nursing activity, with the Magnet(®) model as the framework for change.

  12. A survey of role diversity among advanced practice nurses in pediatric gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    McDuffie, Adelina F; Huffman, Shari

    2005-01-01

    A survey of advanced practice nurses in the Association of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses (APGNN) was conducted to assess role diversity in anticipation of sharing these results with our international colleagues at the World Congress in 2004. A single-page, 14-item survey was sent via e-mail or fax to 79 APGNN advanced practice nurses identified by their credentials (MS, PNP, FNP) in the membership database. Forty surveys were returned via e-mail or fax for an overall response rate of 51%. Most reported working full time as nurse practitioners in an outpatient gastrointestinal clinic, yet almost one third were hospital based. Additional job titles included clinical nurse specialist, researcher, and case manager or clinical coordinator. Slightly more than one half reported seeing any patients in their outpatient practice, whereas 43% saw specific populations, with constipation, gastroesophageal reflux, and abdominal pain being the most common diagnoses. Seventy percent had prescriptive privileges. Billing practices were the most diverse, with 30% always billing under their own number, 23% sometimes billing under their own number, and 40% never billing under their own number (5% not applicable). Overall, most advanced practice nurses in APGNN are pediatric nurse practitioners with a primary focus on outpatient care but also are involved in patient and family teaching, nutrition support, home care, and research. Only a few were involved with procedures, which may be surprising to our adult counterparts.

  13. The TriCouncil for Nursing: An Interorganizational Collaboration for Advancing the Profession.

    PubMed

    Bednash, Geraldine Polly

    2015-01-01

    The TriCouncil for Nursing is a coalition of 4 leading nursing organizations: the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the American Nurses Association, the American Organization of Nurse Executives, and the National League for Nursing. This informal, yet highly complex, collaboration has endeavored to advance the profession for almost 4 decades despite the inherent challenges in coalition formation and sustainment. Coalition building occurs when organizations seek the potential to advance common issues or protect individual resources or status, and by their very nature have the potential to fail. The history of the TriCouncil for Nursing provides evidence of the challenges associated with the process of developing consensus and the benefits of working to create consensus to achieve common goals. The commitment of the TriCouncil member organizations to sustain this coalition and find consensus across an array of challenging issues and in complex environments has created significant policy advances for the profession, which provides evidence of the benefits associated with this type of collaborative work. This coalition has continued despite the inherent challenges for organizations seeking consensus. The TriCouncil commitment to lead in advocacy for the profession and create significant policy to change health care models the value of this type of effort.

  14. Advanced Nursing Experience Is Beneficial for Lowering the Peritonitis Rate in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhikai; Xu, Rong; Zhuo, Min; Dong, Jie

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Objectives: We explored the relationship between the experience level of nurses and the peritonitis risk in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. ♦ Methods: Our observational cohort study followed 305 incident PD patients until a first episode of peritonitis, death, or censoring. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the work experience in general medicine of their nurses—that is, least experience (<10 years), moderate experience (10 to <15 years), and advanced experience (≥15 years). Demographic characteristics, baseline biochemistry, and residual renal function were also recorded. Multivariate Cox regression was used to analyze the association of risks for all-cause and gram-positive peritonitis with patient training provided by nurses at different experience levels. ♦ Results: Of the 305 patients, 91 were trained at the initiation of PD by nurses with advanced experience, 100 by nurses with moderate experience, and 114 by nurses with the least experience. Demographic and clinical variables did not vary significantly between the groups. During 13 582 patient–months of follow-up, 129 first episodes of peritonitis were observed, with 48 episodes being attributed to gram-positive organisms. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that training by nurses with advanced experience predicted the longest period free of first-episode gram-positive peritonitis. After adjustment for some recognized confounders, the advanced experience group was still associated with the lowest risk for first-episode gram-positive peritonitis. The level of nursing experience was not significantly correlated with all-cause peritonitis risk. ♦ Conclusions: The experience in general medicine of nurses might help to lower the risk of gram-positive peritonitis among PD patients. These data are the first to indicate that nursing experience in areas other than PD practice can be vital in the training of PD patients. PMID:21719682

  15. Education and Advance Care Planning in Nursing Homes: The Impact of Ownership Type.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Leslie C.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 25 nonprofit and 87 for-profit nursing homes showed both types likely to offer education on advance care planning. However, nonprofits were more likely to have ongoing discussions that covered more than life support decisions and to have ethics committees to support advance care planning. (SK)

  16. Caring for Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer: The Experiences of Zambian Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Maree, Johanna Elizabeth; Mulonda, Jennipher Kombe

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the experiences of Zambian nurses caring for women with advanced breast cancer. Methods: We used a qualitative descriptive design and purposive sampling. Seventeen in-depth interviews were conducted with registered nurses practicing in the Cancer Diseases Hospital and the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia, and analyzed using thematic analyses. Results: Two themes emerged from the data - caring for women with advanced breast cancer is challenging and the good outweighs the bad. The majority of the participants agreed that caring for women with advanced breast cancer and witnessing their suffering were challenging. Not having formal education and training in oncology nursing was disempowering, and one of the various frustrations participants experienced. The work environment, learning opportunities, positive patient outcomes, and the opportunity to establish good nurse–patient experiences were positive experiences. Conclusions: Although negative experiences seemed to be overwhelming, participants reported some meaningful experiences while caring for women with advanced breast cancer. The lack of formal oncology nursing education and training was a major factor contributing to their negative experiences and perceived as the key to rendering the quality of care patients deserved. Ways to fulfill the educational needs of nurses should be explored and instituted, and nurses should be remunerated according to their levels of practice. PMID:28217726

  17. Nurse anesthesia education in the new millennium: outcomes of a federally funded advanced nursing education grant.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M; Kost, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Graduate nursing education is evolving in response to multiple societal influences affecting higher education. Nurse anesthesia education has also been affected by these forces. This article describes the planning, implementation, and evaluation of a new graduate track in nurse anesthesia made possible by an academic partnership, and the positive impact that a federally funded grant had on the venture. The excellent academic outcomes, the changes in diversity of the student body, the innovative curriculum, and lessons learned from the project are described.

  18. Professional Nurse Coaching: Advances in National and Global Healthcare transformation

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Nurse coaches are responding to the mandate of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910)—the foundational philosopher of modern nursing—to advocate, identify, and focus on factors that promote health, healthy people, and healthy communities that are recognized today as environmental and social determinants of health.1,2 The Institute of Medicine report3 and other health initiatives suggest the need for increased education and leadership from nurses to address the healthcare needs of our nation and world. Nurse coaches are strategically pos-i tioned and equipped to implement health-promoting and evidence-based strategies with clients and support behavioral and lifestyle changes to enhance growth, overall health, and well-being. With possibilities not yet imagined, employment opportunities for nurses who incorporate coaching into professional practice are developing across the entire spectrum of health, well-ness, and healing. PMID:24416681

  19. The changing hope trajectory in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Judith Brown; Seda, Julie S; Kardinal, Carl G

    2012-06-01

    As patients with advanced-stage cancer move from the initial diagnosis through treatment, remission, recurrence, and advanced-stage disease, the hope trajectory undergoes a dynamic transformation. By identifying the hope trajectory, nurses can help patients focus on obtainable hope objects while balancing the need to present a realistic prognosis. This, in turn, may help patients find meaning and purpose in advanced-stage cancer and facilitate realistic hope when faced with a life-threatening illness.

  20. The stigmatized patient with AIDS in the intensive care unit: the role of the advanced practice nurse.

    PubMed

    Mosier, L

    1994-11-01

    As the incidence of HIV infection rises, so will cases of HIV positive intensive care unit admissions. Factors affecting nurses' care of these patients include fear of contagion, homophobia, and lack of knowledge. A multidimensional approach must be taken by the advanced practice nurse to decrease stigmatization by changing knowledge and attitudes of intensive care unit nurses.

  1. Culture care theory: a major contribution to advance transcultural nursing knowledge and practices.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Madeleine

    2002-07-01

    This article is focused on the major features of the Culture Care Diversity and Universality theory as a central contributing theory to advance transcultural nursing knowledge and to use the findings in teaching, research, practice, and consultation. It remains one of the oldest, most holistic, and most comprehensive theories to generate knowledge of diverse and similar cultures worldwide. The theory has been a powerful means to discover largely unknown knowledge in nursing and the health fields. It provides a new mode to assure culturally competent, safe, and congruent transcultural nursing care. The purpose, goal, assumptive premises, ethnonursing research method, criteria, and some findings are highlighted.

  2. The psychiatric advanced practice nurse with prescriptive authority: role development, practice issues, and outcomes measurement.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, C; Chiverton, P

    1997-04-01

    Within the rapidly changing health care system, there is an increased need for professionals who can provide cost-effective primary health care for mentally ill patients. This article discusses the role of the Psychiatric Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) with Prescriptive Authority as a cost-effective, high-quality component of comprehensive mental health care delivery. Historical aspects of the development of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) role are discussed, as well as issues specific to the role in psychiatric nursing. The implementation of this role at Rochester is described, followed by recommendations for studying the impact of the psychiatric NP on care delivery, including process and outcome variables.

  3. Being a palliative nurse for persons with severe congestive heart failure in advanced homecare.

    PubMed

    Brännström, Margareta; Brulin, Christine; Norberg, Astrid; Boman, Kurt; Strandberg, Gunilla

    2005-12-01

    Advanced homecare for persons with congestive heart failure is a 'new' challenge for palliative nurses. The aim of this study is to illuminate the meaning of being a palliative nurse for persons with severe congestive heart failure in advanced homecare. Narrative interviews with 11 nurses were conducted, tape-recorded, and transcribed verbatim. A phenomenological-hermeneutic method was used to interpret the text. One meaning of being a palliative nurse is being firmly rooted and guided by the values of palliative culture. Being adaptable to the patient's way of life carries great weight. On one hand nurses live out this value, facilitating for the patients to live their everyday life as good as possible. Being a facilitator is revealed as difficult, challenging, but overall positive. On the other hand nurses get into a tight corner when values of palliative culture clash and do not correspond with the nurses interpretation of what is good for the person with congestive heart failure. Being in such a tight corner is revealed as frustrating and giving rise to feelings of inadequacy. Thus, it seems important to reflect critical on the values of palliative culture.

  4. Hospice referral after inpatient psychiatric treatment of individuals with advanced dementia from a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Epstein-Lubow, Gary; Fulton, Ana Tuya; Marino, Louis J; Teno, Joan

    2015-06-01

    This report addresses the discharge disposition following inpatient psychiatric treatment for advanced dementia. The total population included 685 305 Medicare fee-for-service decedents with advanced cognitive and functional impairment, with a mean age of 85.9 years who had resided in a nursing home. In the last 90 days of life, 1027 (0.15%) persons received inpatient psychiatry treatment just prior to the place of care where the individual died. Discharge dispositions included 132 (12.9%) persons to a medical hospital, 728 (70.9%) to nursing home without hospice services, 73 (7.1%) to hospice services in a nursing home, 32 (3.1%) to home without hospice services, and 16 (1.6%) to hospice services at home. Overall, the rate of referral to hospice services for advanced dementia was relatively low.

  5. Unity of knowledge in the advancement of nursing knowledge.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Karen K; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Lopez, Ruth Palan

    2005-07-01

    During the past 20 years, we have witnessed an explosion in nursing knowledge providing the discipline with diverse and multifaceted theoretical frameworks and paradigms. One knowledge theme that pervades the dialogue in the scholarly literature is that of multiple ways of knowing. With the acknowledgement that the fundamental nature of nursing knowledge is grounded in the understanding of human nature and its response to its environment, comes an imperative for a consilience of knowledge. The purpose of this article is to present such a unified worldview by articulating a vision of nursing knowledge, a meaning of unity of knowledge, and a challenge to the discipline to embrace inclusive rather than exclusive ways of knowing.

  6. Premature rupture of the fetal membranes. An update for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Weitz, B W

    2001-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses in obstetric settings are frequently required to diagnose premature rupture of fetal membranes; co-management of care with physicians is becoming more common in many health care facilities. Therefore, Advanced practice nurses must have an in-depth understanding of this potentially severe obstetric complication. This article presents a review of the current literature focusing on the epidemiology, physiology, pathophysiology, prevention measures, subjective and objective assessment, diagnostic tests, and management of premature rupture of membranes. Psychosocial aspects of this event, often upsetting for the family, are also discussed.

  7. The mindful nurse leader: Advancing executive nurse leadership skills through participation in action learning.

    PubMed

    FitzPatrick, Kate; Doucette, Jeffrey N; Cotton, Amy; Arnow, Debra; Pipe, Teri

    2016-10-01

    In this second installment of a three-part series on mindfulness, we describe the process of producing video vignettes to illustrate how clinical nurses draw on the power of mindfulness to build their own resiliency while delivering compassionate care.

  8. Gerontology found me: gaining understanding of advanced practice nurses in geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Detrixhe, Dia D; Grassley, Jane S; Zeigler, Vicki L

    2013-10-01

    Examining the meanings of the experiences of advanced practice nurses (APNs) who chose to work with older adults and why they continue to work with this population was the focus of this hermeneutic qualitative research study. Twelve geriatric APNs currently practicing in two South Central states were interviewed using an open-ended interview guide. Using Gadamerian hermeneutics, the researchers identified Gerontology Found Me as the significant expression that reflected the fundamental meaning of the experience as a whole. Four themes emerged that further described the meanings of the participants' personal, educational, and professional experiences: Becoming a Gerontology Nurse, Being a Gerontology Nurse, Belonging to Gerontology, and Bringing Others to Gerontology. This study concluded that APNs' personal and professional experiences were more influential than educational experiences to become geriatric nurses, and having these personal and professional experiences of being in relationship with older individuals further contributed to their choice of gerontology.

  9. Palliative care for advanced dementia: a pilot project in 2 nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Daniel R; Forrest, Jeannine M

    2012-02-01

    This article describes a pilot project involving training, case consultations, and administrative coaching over a period of 1 year aimed at introducing palliative care in 2 nursing homes among 31 residents with advanced dementia. Resident outcomes that examined numerous clinical measures were assessed at 3 points in time. Changes in the knowledge and attitudes of 80 staff members and 33 family members who participated in the multimodal intervention were also assessed at 3 points in time. Limited improvements were demonstrated on measures for residents, staff members, and family members at the first nursing home (site 1) and significant improvements were demonstrated at the other nursing home (site 2). Top leadership turned over 3 times at site 1 which limited the integration of palliative care, whereas leadership of site 2 remained stable. Implications for implementing a program of palliative care in nursing homes are discussed.

  10. Advancing the application of systems thinking in health: understanding the dynamics of neonatal mortality in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Of the three million newborns that die each year, Uganda ranks fifth highest in neonatal mortality rates, with 43,000 neonatal deaths each year. Despite child survival and safe motherhood programmes towards reducing child mortality, insufficient attention has been given to this critical first month of life. There is urgent need to innovatively employ alternative solutions that take into account the intricate complexities of neonatal health and the health systems. In this paper, we set out to empirically contribute to understanding the causes of the stagnating neonatal mortality by applying a systems thinking approach to explore the dynamics arising from the neonatal health complexity and non-linearity and its interplay with health systems factors, using Uganda as a case study. Methods Literature reviews and interviews were conducted in two divisions of Kampala district with high neonatal mortality rates with mothers at antenatal clinics and at home, village health workers, community leaders, healthcare decision and policy makers, and frontline health workers from both public and private health facilities. Data analysis and brainstorming sessions were used to develop causal loop diagrams (CLDs) depicting the causes of neonatal mortality, which were validated by local and international stakeholders. Results We developed two CLDs for demand and supply side issues, depicting the range of factors associated with neonatal mortality such as maternal health, level of awareness of maternal and newborn health, and availability and quality of health services, among others. Further, the reinforcing and balancing feedback loops that resulted from this complexity were also examined. The potential high leverage points include special gender considerations to ensure that girls receive essential education, thereby increasing maternal literacy rates, improved socioeconomic status enabling mothers to keep healthy and utilise health services, improved supervision, and

  11. Origination of Medical Advance Directives Among Nursing Home Residents With and Without Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xueya; Cram, Peter; Li, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Objective Nursing home residents with serious mental illness need a high level of general medical and end-of-life services. This study tested whether persons with serious mental illness are as likely as other nursing home residents to make informed choices about treatments through medical advance care plans. Methods Secondary analyses were conducted with data from a 2004 national survey of nursing home residents with serious mental illness (N=1,769) and without (N=11,738). Bivariate and multivariate analyses determined differences in documented advance care plans, including living wills; “do not resuscitate” and “do not hospitalize” orders; and orders concerning restriction of feeding tube, medication, or other treatments. Results The overall rates of having any of the four advance care plans were 57% and 68% for residents with and without serious mental illness, respectively (p<.001). Residents with serious mental illness also showed lower rates for individual advance care plans. In a multivariate analysis that adjusted for resident and facility characteristics (N=1,174 nursing homes) as well as survey procedures, serious mental illness was associated with a 24% reduced odds of having any advance directives (adjusted odds ratio=.76, 95% confidence interval=.66–.87, p<.001). Similar results were found for individual documented plans. Conclusions Among U.S. nursing home residents, those with serious mental illness were less likely than others to have written medical advance directives. Future research is needed to help understand both resident factors (such as inappropriate behaviors, impaired communication skills, and disrupted family support) and provider factors (including training, experience, and attitude) that underlie this finding. PMID:21209301

  12. [An educational software development proposal for nursing in neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rita de Cassia Vieira; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an educational software program for nursing continuing education. This program was intended to incorporate applied methodological research that used the learning management system methodology created by Galvis Panqueva in association with contextualized instructional design for software design. As a result of this study, we created a computerized educational product (CEP) called ENFNET. This study describes all the necessary steps taken during its development. The creation of a CEP demands a great deal of study, dedication and investment as well as the necessity of specialized technical personnel to construct it. At the end of the study, the software was positively evaluated and shown to be a useful strategy to help users in their education, skills development and professional training.

  13. Advanced training for primary care and general practice nurses: enablers and outcomes of postgraduate education.

    PubMed

    Hallinan, Christine M; Hegarty, Kelsey L

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to understand enablers to participation in postgraduate education for primary care nurses (PCNs), and to explore how postgraduate education has advanced their nursing practice. Cross-sectional questionnaires were mailed out in April 2012 to current and past students undertaking postgraduate studies in primary care nursing at The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Questionnaires were returned by 100 out of 243 nurses (response rate 41%). Ninety-one per cent (91/100) of the respondents were first registered as nurses in Australia. Fifty-seven per cent were hospital trained and 43% were university educated to attain their initial nurse qualification. The respondents reported opportunities to expand scope of practice (99%; 97/98), improve clinical practice (98%; 97/99), increase work satisfaction (93%; 91/98) and increase practice autonomy (92%; 89/97) as factors that most influenced participation in postgraduate education in primary care nursing. Major enablers for postgraduate studies were scholarship access (75%; 71/95) and access to distance education (74%; 72/98). Many respondents reported an increased scope of practice (98%; 95/97) and increased job satisfaction (71%; 70/98) as an education outcome. Only 29% (28/97) cited an increase in pay-rate as an outcome. Of the 73 PCNs currently working in general practice, many anticipated an increase in time spent on the preparation of chronic disease management plans (63%; 45/72), multidisciplinary care plans (56%; 40/72) and adult health checks (56%; 40/72) in the preceding 12 months. Recommendations emerging from findings include: (1) increased access to scholarships for nurses undertaking postgraduate education in primary care nursing is imperative; (2) alternative modes of course delivery need to be embedded in primary care nursing education; (3) the development of Australian primary care policy, including policy on funding models, needs to more accurately reflect the

  14. Communicating with Patients Who Have Advanced Dementia: Training Nurse Aide Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Laura E.; Hutchinson, Susan R.; Skala-Cordes, Kristine K.

    2012-01-01

    The increase of dementia in older adults is changing how medical care is delivered. Recognizing symptoms of pain, managing behaviors, and providing quality of life for people who have advanced dementia requires a new skill set for caregivers. Researchers in this study targeted nurse aide students to test an educational module's effect on students'…

  15. A Qualitative Analysis of an Advanced Practice Nurse-Directed Transitional Care Model Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradway, Christine; Trotta, Rebecca; Bixby, M. Brian; McPartland, Ellen; Wollman, M. Catherine; Kapustka, Heidi; McCauley, Kathleen; Naylor, Mary D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe barriers and facilitators to implementing a transitional care intervention for cognitively impaired older adults and their caregivers lead by advanced practice nurses (APNs). Design and Methods: APNs implemented an evidence-based protocol to optimize transitions from hospital to home. An…

  16. Globalization and advances in information and communication technologies: the impact on nursing and health.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Patricia A; Coenen, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Globalization and information and communication technology (ICT) continue to change us and the world we live in. Nursing stands at an opportunity intersection where challenging global health issues, an international workforce shortage, and massive growth of ICT combine to create a very unique space for nursing leadership and nursing intervention. Learning from prior successes in the field can assist nurse leaders in planning and advancing strategies for global health using ICT. Attention to lessons learned will assist in combating the technological apartheid that is already present in many areas of the globe and will highlight opportunities for innovative applications in health. ICT has opened new channels of communication, creating the beginnings of a global information society that will facilitate access to isolated areas where health needs are extreme and where nursing can contribute significantly to the achievement of "Health for All." The purpose of this article is to discuss the relationships between globalization, health, and ICT, and to illuminate opportunities for nursing in this flattening and increasingly interconnected world.

  17. The DNP/MPH Dual Degree: An Innovative Graduate Education Program for Advanced Public Health Nursing.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kathy; Harpin, Scott; Steinke, Geraldine; Stember, Marilyn; Krajicek, Marilyn

    2017-03-01

    Strong professional priorities, evolving Affordable Care Act requirements, and a significantly limited public health nursing workforce prompted the University of Colorado College of Nursing to collaborate with the School of Public Health to implement one of the first Doctor of Nursing Practice/Master of Public Health dual degree programs in the nation. Federal grant funding supported the development, implementation, and evaluation of this unique post-baccalaureate dual degree program, for which there were no roadmaps, models, or best practices to follow. Several key issues emerged that serve as lessons learned in creating a new, novel higher education pathway for Advanced Public Health Nursing. This paper highlights two of those: (1) marketing, admission, and matriculation across two programs, and (2) enhancing curricula through distance coursework and interprofessional education. When collaboration with a school of public health is possible, the Doctor of Nursing Practice/Master of Public Health dual degree is an efficient way to prepare public health nurses' with the highest level of public health knowledge, practice, and leadership expertise.

  18. Factors influencing intentions to integrate tobacco education among advanced practice nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Heath, Janie; Crowell, Nancy A

    2007-01-01

    We report on the findings of a national survey that examined factors that influence faculty's intentions to integrate tobacco education in their advanced practice nursing curricula. The addiction component of tobacco use is taking its toll on the health of 48 million smokers in the United States. Several national health authorities recommend and/or mandate that tobacco prevention and tobacco cessation be addressed at every point of entry in the health care delivery system. However, there is increasing evidence that health care providers may not be adequately prepared to meet national goals and/or standards. One hundred sixty-one advanced practice nursing faculty in the United States completed an 88-item survey regarding external factors (e.g., personal history of tobacco use, clinical practice, and current tobacco topics taught) and components of the Theory of Reasoned Action model (including perceived self-efficacy, behavioral beliefs, subjective norms, and control beliefs related to tobacco education). Descriptive statistics, chi(2) analysis, Pearson correlation, and linear regression were used to analyze the data. The findings revealed that sex (chi(2) = 7.949, P = .024), level of education (chi(2) = 26.853, P = .0005), years of academic teaching (chi(2) = 19.418, P = .013), and combined clinical and course responsibility (chi(2) = 10.430, P = .0236) were significant external (demographic) factors and that behavioral beliefs (attitude about tobacco education) demonstrated the strongest relationship with intention scores (r = 0.876, P < .0005). Overall, 62.7% of nurse practitioners reported high scores (>or=5, on a scale of 1-7) for intentions to integrate tobacco education, as compared with 37.5% of nurse midwives, 30.3% of clinical nurse specialists, and 8.7% of nurse anesthetists. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that nursing curricular gaps with tobacco education exist and that national efforts are needed to ensure that widespread changes occur

  19. The consequences of using advanced physical assessment skills in medical and surgical nursing: A hermeneutic pragmatic study

    PubMed Central

    Zambas, Shelaine I.; Smythe, Elizabeth A.; Koziol-Mclain, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Aims and objectives The aim of this study was to explore the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills on medical and surgical wards. Background Appropriate, accurate, and timely assessment by nurses is the cornerstone of maintaining patient safety in hospitals. The inclusion of “advanced” physical assessment skills such as auscultation, palpation, and percussion is thought to better prepare nurses for complex patient presentations within a wide range of clinical situations. Design This qualitative study used a hermeneutic pragmatic approach. Method Unstructured interviews were conducted with five experienced medical and surgical nurses to obtain 13 detailed narratives of assessment practice. Narratives were analyzed using Van Manen's six-step approach to identify the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills. Results The consequences of using advanced assessment skills include looking for more, challenging interpretations, and perseverance. The use of advanced assessment skills directs what the nurse looks for, what she sees, interpretation of the findings, and her response. It is the interpretation of what is seen, heard, or felt within the full context of the patient situation, which is the advanced skill. Conclusion Advanced assessment skill is the means to an accurate interpretation of the clinical situation and contributes to appropriate diagnosis and medical management in complex patient situations. Relevance to clinical practice The nurse's use of advanced assessment skills enables her to contribute to diagnostic reasoning within the acute medical and surgical setting. PMID:27607193

  20. Health Care Reform and the Federal Transformation Initiatives: Capitalizing on the Potential of Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Delaney, Kathleen; Merwin, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade the US federal government proposed a transformation vision of mental health service delivery; patient-centered, evidence-based and recovery oriented treatment models. Health care reform brings additional expectations for innovation in mental/substance use service delivery, particularly the idea of creating systems where physical health, mental health and substance use treatment is fully integrated. Psychiatric nurses, as one of the four core US mental health professions, have the potential to play a significant role in the both the transformation initiative and health care reform vision. However, psychiatric nurses, particularly advanced practice psychiatric nurses, are an untapped resource due in part to significant state regulatory barriers that limit their scope of practice in many states. The purpose of this paper is to document what is currently known about advanced practice psychiatric nurses and discuss policy implications for tapping into the strengths of this workforce. Strategies for facilitating utilization of advanced practice psychiatric nurses discussed. PMID:21233135

  1. Exploring the district nurse role in facilitating individualised advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Boot, Michelle

    2016-03-01

    Health-care policy recognises the importance of engaging people in making decisions related to the management of their health. Advance care planning (ACP) offers a framework for decision making on end-of-life care. There are positive indicators that ACP enables health professionals to meet people's preferences. However, there are reports of insensitive attempts to engage people in end-of-life care decision making. District nurses are in the ideal position to facilitate ACP, as they have the opportunity to build relationships with the people they are caring for--an antecedent to sensitive ACP--and in recognising and fulfilling this role, they could ameliorate the risk of insensitive ACP. Distric nurse leaders also have a role to play in ensuring that organisational and environmental factors support appropriate ACP facilitation including: training, fostering a team culture that empowers district nurses to recognise and meet their ACP role, and advocating for appropriate ACP evaluation outcome measures.

  2. Barriers to advanced practice registered nurse scope of practice: issue analysis.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Whitney J; Allen, Patricia E

    2012-09-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) have the unique potential to affect the changing needs of health care in the United States, but are restricted in care provision by varying state regulations and reimbursement policies. Although research shows APRN care to be safe, cost-effective, and of high quality, most medical professional organizations continue to oppose the removal of scope-of-practice barriers, citing patient safety concerns. Nursing organizations at the state and national levels have already begun to invest the time and resources needed for policy change. However, empirical evidence of APRN quality of care must be shared with policymakers, funding entities, and the public. Additionally, support must be garnered from the public and other health care disciplines. Scope-of-practice policy change will occur through the emergence of strong individuals within nursing professional organizations and the joining together of organizations to form one voice.

  3. Current status of neonatal intensive care in India.

    PubMed

    Karthik Nagesh, N; Razak, Abdul

    2016-05-01

    Globally, newborn health is now considered as high-level national priority. The current neonatal and infant mortality rate in India is 29 per 1000 live births and 42 per 1000 live births, respectively. The last decade has seen a tremendous growth of neonatal intensive care in India. The proliferation of neonatal intensive care units, as also the infusion of newer technologies with availability of well-trained medical and nursing manpower, has led to good survival and intact outcomes. There is good care available for neonates whose parents can afford the high-end healthcare, but unfortunately, there is a deep divide and the poor rural population is still underserved with lack of even basic newborn care in few areas! There is increasing disparity where the 'well to do' and the 'increasingly affordable middle class' is able to get the most advanced care for their sick neonates. The underserved urban poor and those in rural areas still contribute to the overall high neonatal morbidity and mortality in India. The recent government initiative, the India Newborn Action Plan, is the step in the right direction to bridge this gap. A strong public-private partnership and prioritisation is needed to achieve this goal. This review highlights the current situation of neonatal intensive care in India with a suggested plan for the way forward to achieve better neonatal care.

  4. Proactive nurse management guidelines for managing intensive chemotherapy regimens in patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, J; Ajani, J A

    2008-07-01

    Patients with advanced gastric cancer have a poor prognosis. Intensive chemotherapy regimens may be effective for the treatment of this disease but may be associated with a significant number of severe adverse events. Optimal management of these adverse events can improve outcome for the patient. Currently, there is little information in the literature about the nursing management of this particular group of patients. This American study involved the nursing management of all patients with gastric or gastroesophageal cancer enrolled in clinical trials at a single center. Patients had close contact with research nurses and received education about adverse events and how to deal with them. Patients completed a detailed treatment diary for each cycle of treatment. Protocols were established for the management of emergent adverse events. The guidelines developed during this study could help to underpin the role of the specialist oncology nurse and improve the management of patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for gastric and gastroesophageal cancer, with the potential of improving outcome, or at least quality of life, for the patients. The nurses' role should be pivotal in the management of intensive chemotherapy for gastric and gastroesophageal cancer.

  5. Implications for Advanced Nursing Practice in the Patient with Heat Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    systemic vascular resistance), while elderly patients are hypodynamic (increased heart rate, decreased cardiac output and decreased systemic vascular...resistance). By the time elderly patients are seen, massive volume deficits may exist, requiring hemodynamic monitoring to differentiate pump...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Implications for Advanced Nursing Practice in the Patient with Heat Stress 6. AUTHOR(S) Patricia A Skelton S 7

  6. Advanced practice nursing for enduring health needs management: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Liisa; Mikkonen, Irma; Graham, Iain; Norman, Linda D; Richardson, Jim; Savage, Eileen; Schorn, Mavis

    2012-07-01

    Advanced practice nursing expertise has been acknowledged worldwide as one response to the challenges arising from changes in society and health care. The roots of advanced practice nursing education are at the University of Colorado where the first known programme started in 1965. In many countries advanced practice nurses (APNs) have taken responsibility for routine patient care formerly carried out by physicians in order to reduce their workload. However, more and more, APNs have taken responsibility for new service areas and quality programmes not previously provided. Chronic disease management is one of these new service areas because long-term diseases are increasingly challenging service systems globally. This article is based on an international APN partnership. The aim of the article is to describe how the partnership will design a 15 ECTS credit course on Enduring Health Need Management as a cross-cultural collaborative endeavour. The adaptation of an inquiry based learning framework will be described drawing on four main principles of the theory: authentic learning communities; student encouragement in analysing gradually more complicated problems; networking in knowledge creation and; student engagement and activity. The cross-cultural online course aims to increase APNs' intercultural competence as well as their global and international work orientation.

  7. Can the Institute of Medicine trump the dominant logic of nursing? Leading change in advanced practice education.

    PubMed

    Dreher, Melanie C; Clinton, Patricia; Sperhac, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM; 2010) has called for a transformation of the nursing profession to lead the redesign of health care in the United States. It acknowledges the need for profound change in nursing education, particularly advanced practice education, to produce the next generation of leaders in sufficient quantity to expand access, improve quality, and reduce cost. Although the IOM provides welcome validation of nursing's significant role, most of the recommendations are not new and have been advocated by nurse educators for decades. What has prevented us from creating the nimble and responsive educational programs that would ensure a sufficient corpus of advanced practice nurses with the relevant knowledge and skill to transform our ailing health system? Conceptualizing nursing as a complex, adaptive system (J.W. Begun and K. White, 1997), this article explores three examples of the dominant logic, grounded in a historical legacy that has kept the nursing profession from realizing its promise as a potent force: (a) the continuing preference for experience over education, (b) the belief that only nurses can teach nurses, and (c) the hegemony of the research doctorate.

  8. Exploring the use of standardized patients for simulation-based learning in preparing advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Chow, Yeow Leng; Salam, Zakir Hussian Abdul; Ignacio, Jeanette

    2015-07-01

    The use of standardized patients for simulation-based learning was integrated into the Master of Nursing curriculum in the 2012-2013 academic year. The study aimed to explore the Master of Nursing students' experiences with and perceptions of using standardized patients in simulations, and to identify the students' learning needs in preparing to become advanced practice nurses. The study adopted an exploratory descriptive qualitative design, using a focus group interview. The study was conducted at a university in Singapore. Seven Master of Nursing students who were enrolled in the Acute Care Track of Master of Nursing program in the 2012-2013 academic year participated in the study. The data were gathered at the end of the first semester. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Three main categories - usefulness, clinical limitations, and realism - were identified in the study. The results revealed that the students felt using standardized patients was useful and realistic for developing skills in history taking, communication, and responding to an emergency situation. On the other hand, they found that the standardized patients were limited in providing critical signs and symptoms of case scenarios. To meet the learning objectives, future development and integration of standardized patients in the Master of Nursing curriculum might need to be considered along with the use of a high-fidelity simulator. This can be an alternative strategy to fill the gaps in each method. Obviously, using standardized patients for simulation-based learning has added value to the students' learning experiences. It is highly recommended that future studies explore the impact of using standardized patients on students' performance in clinical settings.

  9. Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Selewski, David T; Charlton, Jennifer R; Jetton, Jennifer G; Guillet, Ronnie; Mhanna, Maroun J; Askenazi, David J; Kent, Alison L

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advancements in our understanding of acute kidney injury (AKI) and its impact on outcomes across medicine. Research based on single-center cohorts suggests that neonatal AKI is very common and associated with poor outcomes. In this state-of-the-art review on neonatal AKI, we highlight the unique aspects of neonatal renal physiology, definition, risk factors, epidemiology, outcomes, evaluation, and management of AKI in neonates. The changes in renal function with gestational and chronologic age are described. We put forth and describe the neonatal modified Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcomes AKI criteria and provide the rationale for its use as the standardized definition of neonatal AKI. We discuss risk factors for neonatal AKI and suggest which patient populations may warrant closer surveillance, including neonates <1500 g, infants who experience perinatal asphyxia, near term/ term infants with low Apgar scores, those treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and those requiring cardiac surgery. We provide recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of these patients, including medications and renal replacement therapies. We discuss the need for long-term follow-up of neonates with AKI to identify those children who will go on to develop chronic kidney disease. This review highlights the deficits in our understanding of neonatal AKI that require further investigation. In an effort to begin to address these needs, the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative was formed in 2014 with the goal of better understanding neonatal AKI, beginning to answer critical questions, and improving outcomes in these vulnerable populations.

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of patients with bipolar disorder: A review for advanced practice nurses

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Bethany; McNew, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose This review article provides an overview of the frequency, burden of illness, diagnosis, and treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) from the perspective of the advanced practice nurses (APNs). Data sources PubMed searches were conducted using the following keywords: “bipolar disorder and primary care,” restricted to dates 2000 to present; “bipolar disorder and nurse practitioner”; and “bipolar disorder and clinical nurse specialist.” Selected articles were relevant to adult outpatient care in the United States, with a prioritization of articles written by APNs or published in nursing journals. Conclusions BD has a substantial lifetime prevalence in the population at 4%. Because the manic or depressive symptoms of BD tend to be severe and recurrent over a patient's lifetime, the condition is associated with significant burden to the individual, caregivers, and society. Clinician awareness that BD may be present increases the likelihood of successful recognition and appropriate treatment. A number of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments are available for acute and maintenance treatments, with the prospect of achieving reduced symptom burden and increased functioning for many patients. Implications for practice Awareness of the disease burden, diagnostic issues, and management choices in BD has the potential to enhance outcome in substantial proportions of patients. PMID:26172568

  11. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  12. Full Practice Authority for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses is a Gender Issue

    PubMed

    Rudner Lugo, Nancy

    2016-05-04

    In the United States, Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) regulations are determined at the state level, through legislation and rule making. The lack of an evidence base to APRN regulation has resulted in a patchwork of varied regulations and requirements for nurse practitioners. The author begins this article by reviewing the history of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) in the United States and describing her study that assessed APRN fullpractice authority in states that ratified the ERA versus states that opposed it. She presents the study findings, limitations of the comparison, and discussion of the findings and implications. In conclusion, the findings demonstrated that progress toward full APRN practice will require building strategies for political support and framing the need to update APRN regulations in a manner that aligns with each state’s social and political values.

  13. [Towards universal access to health care: incorporation of advanced practice nurses in primary care].

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Boza, Francisca; Achondo, Bernardita

    2016-10-01

    To move towards universal access to health, the Pan American Health Organization recommends strengthening primary health care (PHC). One of the strategies is to increase the number qualified professionals, both medical and non-medical, working in PHC. In Chile there is a lack of professionals in this level of care, hampering the provision of health. Physicians still prefer secondary and tertiary levels of health. International experience has shown that advanced practice nurses (APN), specialists in PHC are cost-effective professionals able to deliver a complete and quality care to patients. Strong evidence demonstrates the benefits that APN could provide to the population, delivering nursing care that incorporates medical tasks, for example in patients with chronic diseases, allowing greater availability of medical hours for patients requiring more complex management. The success in the implementation of this new role requires the support of the health team, especially PHC physicians, endorsing and promoting the benefits of the APN for the population.

  14. Neonatal Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Loss & grief > Neonatal death Neonatal death E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... cope with your baby’s death. What is neonatal death? Neonatal death is when a baby dies in ...

  15. Providing a navigable route for acute medicine nurses to advance their practice: a framework of ascending levels of practice.

    PubMed

    Lees-Deutsch, Liz; Christian, Jan; Setchfield, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This article conveys concerns raised by delegates at the International SAM Conference (Manchester, 2015) regarding how to advance nursing practice in acute medicine. It endeavors to capture the essence of 'how to advance practice' and 'how to integrate advanced practice' within the workforce structures of an acute medicine unit (AMU). It addresses the production of tacit knowledge and the recognition and integration of this to developing the nursing workforce. The current context of NHS efficiencies and recruitment issues emphasize the value of retaining tacit knowledge. Uniquely, this article offers an early conceptual framework through which levels of advancement and potential transition points to advance nursing practice in acute medicine are articulated. Determining how to advance requires identification of prior accomplishments such as, tacit knowledge, experiential learning, CPD, specialist courses and management experience. This requires nurses to make judicious decisions to advance their practice and the distinction between 'amassing experience' and 'career progression'. It aims to stimulate thinking around the practicalities of advancement, the value of tacit knowledge and potential realization through the framework trajectory.

  16. [Challenges and opportunities: contributions of the Advanced Practice Nurse in the chronicity. Learning from experiences].

    PubMed

    Appleby, Christine; Camacho-Bejarano, Rafaela

    2014-01-01

    Undoubtedly, our society is facing new economic, political, demographic, social and cultural challenges that require healthcare services able to meet the growing health needs of the population, especially in dealing with chronic conditions. In this new context, some countries such as the United Kingdom have made a firm commitment to develop new models for chronic patients care based on the introduction of new figures of Advanced Practice Nurses, which includes 4 cornerstones of professional practice: advanced clinical skills, clinical management, teaching and research. The implementation of this new figures implies a redefinition of professional competencies and has its own accreditation system and a specific catalogue of services adapted to the population requirements, in order to provide chronic care support from Primary Care settings. This trajectory allows us analysing the process of design and implementation of these new models and the organizational structure where it is integrated. In Spain, there are already experiences in some regions such as Andalucia and the Basque Country, focused on the creation of new advanced nursing roles. At present, it is necessary to consider suitable strategic proposals for the complete development of these models and to achieve the best results in terms of overall health and quality of life of patients with chronic conditions, improving the quality of services and cost-effectiveness through a greater cohesion and performance of healthcare teams towards the sustainability of healthcare services and patient satisfaction.

  17. The Advanced Dementia Prognostic Tool (ADEPT): A Risk Score to Estimate Survival in Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Susan L.; Miller, Susan C.; Teno, Joan M.; Davis, Roger B.; Shaffer, Michele L.

    2010-01-01

    Context Estimating life expectancy is challenging in advanced dementia. Objectives To create a risk score to estimate survival in nursing home (NH) residents with advanced dementia. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study performed in the setting of all licensed US NHs. Residents with advanced dementia living in US NHs in 2002 were identified using Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments. Mortality data from Medicare files were used to determine 12-month survival. Independent variables were selected from the MDS. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model survival. The accuracy of the final model was assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). To develop a risk score, points were assigned to variables in the final model based on parameter estimates. Residents meeting hospice eligibility guidelines for dementia, based on MDS data, were identified. The AUROC assessed the accuracy of hospice guidelines to predict six-month survival. Results Over 12 months, 40.6% of residents with advanced dementia (n=22,405) died. Twelve variables best predicted survival: length of stay, age, male, dyspnea, pressure ulcers, total functional dependence, bedfast, insufficient intake, bowel incontinence, body mass index, weight loss, and congestive heart failure. The AUROC for the final model was 0.68. The risk score ranged from 0–32 points (higher scores indicate worse survival). Only 15.9% of residents met hospice eligibility guidelines for which the AUROC predicting six-month survival was 0.53. Conclusion A mortality risk score derived from MDS data predicted six-month survival in advanced dementia with moderate accuracy. The predictive ability of hospice guidelines, simulated with MDS data, was poor. PMID:20621437

  18. Design and contents of an advanced distance-based statistics course for a PhD in nursing program.

    PubMed

    Azuero, Andres; Wilbanks, Bryan; Pryor, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Doctoral nursing students and researchers are expected to understand, critique, and conduct research that uses advanced quantitative methodology. The authors describe the design and contents of a distance-based course in multivariate statistics for PhD students in nursing and health administration, compare the design to recommendations found in the literature for distance-based statistics education, and compare the course contents to a tabulation of the methodologies used in a sample of recently published quantitative dissertations in nursing. The authors conclude with a discussion based on these comparisons as well as with experiences in course implementation and directions for future course development.

  19. Creating a framework for clinical nursing practice to advance in the West Midlands region.

    PubMed

    Dunn, L; Morgan, E

    1998-05-01

    The West Midlands Regional Health Authority identified a lack of opportunities for nurses to develop advanced clinical practice through a recognized programme at Postgraduate diploma/Masters degree level. Education for clinical practice must be equally grounded in theory and practice. Advanced clinical practice requires more than just skills acquisition, it has a much wider remit incorporating elements of clinical expertise and higher level decision making, research awareness, teaching and role modelling, informing policy making and leading in the provision of patient care within individual Trusts. This initiative has encouraged universities, trusts and provider units to work together to identify and prepare students and staff for their changes in role, and to review existing boundaries for practice which will enable new approaches to team work and the provision of holistic patient care.

  20. A Review and Critique of Advances in Nursing Science Articles That Focus on Sexual Health and Sexual Rights: A Call to Leadership and Policy Development.

    PubMed

    Rew, Lynn; Thurman, Whitney; McDonald, Kari

    Sexual health and sexual rights are integral to nursing science but ignored in nursing publications. We searched Advances in Nursing Science for prevalence of these topics. Fifteen articles (1.3%) met our criteria. No nursing theories were used as frameworks, and few concrete suggestions were made for further theory development. Discussion of sociopolitical influences on sexual health and/or sexual rights was limited, mostly unrelated to health care. Information to influence nursing practice, theory development, further research, or policy across the life span, for both males and females, and for variant-gender individuals, was limited. We urge authors to contribute further to this field of discourse in nursing.

  1. Developing a professional poster: four "ps" for advanced practice nurses to consider.

    PubMed

    Bindon, Susan L; Davenport, Joan M

    2013-01-01

    Professional posters play an important role in the dissemination of knowledge and the professional development of advanced practice nurses, graduate students, and clinical faculty. Posters should be considered an integral component in communication of professional work in practice, research, and education. The invitation to submit a poster abstract is an important opportunity for clinicians and faculty alike to consider. Though sometimes misperceived as less prestigious than a podium presentation, posters add a unique element to professional and academic events. The argument is made for posters as an equal among scholarly presentation formats. The poster serves as a tremendous opportunity for collaboration between partners and a way to communicate important findings and advertise the presenters' work. For the advanced practice nurse who is a novice in presenting best practice or evidence from research trials, the poster format may be less intimidating while allowing the invaluable sharing of results. Four critical elements of professional poster development are deciding on a clear Purpose, targeting the right People, outlining key steps in the Process, and delivering a memorable Presentation. Using the "4 Ps" as cornerstones for the work of developing, preparing, and delivering the poster to an audience, the authors aim to help organize the entire process into these essential considerations. The poster, as a means of scholarly work, is a viable and essential activity, as interdisciplinary collaboration and sharing of best practice becomes the expectation for all professional development.

  2. Implementing an MSN nursing program at a distance through an urban-rural partnership.

    PubMed

    Zukowsky, Ksenia; Swan, Beth Ann; Powell, Mary; Frisby, Tony; Lauver, Lori; West, Margaret Mary; Marsella, Alexis

    2011-04-01

    Recruiting, retaining, and educating advanced practice nurses is essential to meet the growing need for advanced practice nurses in rural and urban communities. Through the support of Health Resources and Services Administration funding, the urban school of nursing expanded its MSN program and implemented the graduate curriculum on its rural campus by utilizing emerging online and distance education technologies. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide an overview of expanding an existing MSN program offered in an urban, traditional classroom setting to rural graduate nursing students via an online synchronous format. In addition, the article will describe the rural growth of the existing neonatal nurse practitioner program as an exemplar and the different methodologies that are being used in each program to engage the rural nurse practitioner students in clinical courses. In addition, strategies to address barriers related to rural nurse practitioner student recruitment and retention will be discussed.

  3. Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma & Society of Trauma Nurses Advanced Practitioner Position Paper: Optimizing the integration of advanced practitioners in trauma and critical care.

    PubMed

    Messing, Jonathan; Garces-King, Jasmine; Taylor, Dennis; Van Horn, Jonathan; Sarani, Babak; Christmas, A Britton

    2017-03-21

    Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants, collectively known as advanced practitioners (APs), enhance the provision of care for the acutely injured patient. Despite their prevalence, institutions employ, train, and utilize these providers with significant variability. The Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST), the Society of Trauma Nurses (STN), and the American Association of Surgical Physicians Assistants (AASPA) acknowledge the value of APs and support their utilization in the management of injured and critically ill patients. This position paper offers insight into the history of, scope of practice for, and opportunities for optimal utilization of APs in trauma, critical care, and acute care surgery services.

  4. Advanced Practice Nursing: A Strategy for Achieving Universal Health Coverage and Universal Access to Health

    PubMed Central

    Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Valaitis, Ruta; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Donald, Faith; Peña, Laura Morán; Brousseau, Linda

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to examine advanced practice nursing (APN) roles internationally to inform role development in Latin America and the Caribbean to support universal health coverage and universal access to health. Method: we examined literature related to APN roles, their global deployment, and APN effectiveness in relation to universal health coverage and access to health. Results: given evidence of their effectiveness in many countries, APN roles are ideally suited as part of a primary health care workforce strategy in Latin America to enhance universal health coverage and access to health. Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Mexico are well positioned to build this workforce. Role implementation barriers include lack of role clarity, legislation/regulation, education, funding, and physician resistance. Strong nursing leadership to align APN roles with policy priorities, and to work in partnership with primary care providers and policy makers is needed for successful role implementation. Conclusions: given the diversity of contexts across nations, it is important to systematically assess country and population health needs to introduce the most appropriate complement and mix of APN roles and inform implementation. Successful APN role introduction in Latin America and the Caribbean could provide a roadmap for similar roles in other low/middle income countries. PMID:28146177

  5. Using saliva to measure endogenous cortisol in nursing home residents with advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Woods, Diana Lynn; Kovach, Christine R; Raff, Hershel; Joosse, Laura; Basmadjian, Alicia; Hegadoren, Kathleen M

    2008-06-01

    Two research teams determined the feasibility of saliva collection for cortisol measurement in nursing home residents with advanced dementia. Study aims were to: (a) determine if sufficient saliva could be obtained for assay and (b) examine whether cortisol values exhibited range and variability for meaningful interpretation. Useable samples were consistent across sites, suggesting that saliva collection for cortisol assay is a viable method in this setting. Cortisol values showed range and variability. More than half of the residents showed the normal adult pattern of high morning levels decreasing throughout the day. A third of the participants demonstrated an increase in the evening cortisol levels, while the remaining profiles were flat, suggesting hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) dysregulation in this population.

  6. Opioid therapy for chronic low back pain: prescribing considerations for advanced practice registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Lall, Maureen Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common, disabling, and costly condition, and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) must carefully evaluate patients before considering long-term opioid therapy as a management strategy. APRNs should refer patients suspected of having a serious condition, or identifiable etiology, for specialist evaluation, as many patients improve with physical therapy, interventional pain management procedures, or surgical intervention. For patients unresponsive to nonopioid treatment, APRNs with an understanding of opioids, and the experience to assess and manage the risks of opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion, may consider long-term opioid therapy as part of a multimodal management plan. Such prescribing necessitates careful patient selection; informed consent; prudent opioid dosing and titration; and monitoring for response to treatment, adverse effects, and aberrant drug-taking behavior. Treatment and regulatory guidelines can assist APRNs in providing safe and effective care to patients with chronic low back pain.

  7. [Development of an advanced education program for community medicine by Nagasaki pharmacy and nursing science union consortium].

    PubMed

    Teshima, Mugen; Nakashima, Mikiro; Hatakeyama, Susumi

    2012-01-01

    The Nagasaki University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences has conducted a project concerning "development of an advanced education program for community medicine" for its students in collaboration with the University's School of Nursing Sciences, the University of Nagasaki School of Nursing Sciences, and the Nagasaki International University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. The project was named "formation of a strategic base for the integrated education of pharmacy and nursing science specially focused on home-healthcare and welfare", that has been adopted at "Strategic University Cooperative Support Program for Improving Graduate" by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan from the 2009 academic year to the 2011 academic year. Our project is a novel education program about team medical care in collaboration with pharmacist and nurse. In order to perform this program smoothly, we established "Nagasaki pharmacy and nursing science union consortium (Nagasaki University, The University of Nagasaki, Nagasaki International University, Nagasaki Pharmaceutical Association, Nagasaki Society of Hospital Pharmacists, Nagasaki Nursing Association, Nagasaki Medical Association, Nagasaki Prefectural Government)". In this symposium, we introduce contents about university education program and life learning program of the project.

  8. A Framework of Complex Adaptive Systems: Parents As Partners in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    DʼAgata, Amy L; McGrath, Jacqueline M

    2016-01-01

    Advances in neonatal care are allowing for increased infant survival; however, neurodevelopmental complications continue. Using a complex adaptive system framework, a broad analysis of the network of agents most influential to vulnerable infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is presented: parent, nurse, and organization. By exploring these interconnected relationships and the emergent behaviors, a model of care that increases parental caregiving in the NICU is proposed. Supportive parent caregiving early in an infant's NICU stay has the potential for more sensitive caregiving and enhanced opportunities for attachment, perhaps positively impacting neurodevelopment.

  9. Mini Review of Integrated Care and Implications for Advanced Practice Nurse Role

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Diana; Startsman, Laura F.; Perraud, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Literature related to primary care and behavioral health integration initiatives is becoming abundant. The United States’ 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act included provisions encouraging increased collaboration of care for individuals with behavioral and physical health service needs in the public sector. There is relatively little known of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs) roles with integrating primary and behavioral healthcare. The goal of this review article is to: (a) define integration of physical and behavioral healthcare and potential models; (b) answer the question as to what are effective evidence based models/strategies for integrating behavioral health and primary care; (c) explore the future role and innovations of APRNs in the integration of physical and behavioral healthcare. Results: The evidence- based literature is limited to three systematic reviews and six randomized controlled trials. It was difficult to generalize the data and the effective integration strategies varied from such interventions as care management to use of sertraline to depression management and to access. There were, though, implications for the integrated care advanced practice nurse to have roles inclusive of competencies, leadership, engagement, collaboration and advocacy. PMID:27347258

  10. Enhancing presentation skills for the advanced practice nurse: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Vollman, Kathleen M

    2005-01-01

    Professional speaking is a component of the professional practice role of the advanced practice nurse (APN). The skills to communicate effectively to one person or an audience of 100 provide the APN with the essential tools for implementing change, collaborating effectively, presenting information at professional meetings, or communicating the impact of clinical outcomes in the boardroom. Public speaking skills, a professional image, and improved communication can facilitate advancement along any career ladder. The greater your fear, the more self-confidence you will gain by stepping up to a challenge and conquering it. This article describes strategies for organizing and presenting your message in a clear and concise format. Techniques to manage the anxiety produced when attempting to articulate your thoughts is essential for effective communication. Skills for enhancing the delivery of your message through effective body language, professional image, voice modulation, and use of audiovisual aids are addressed. Creative techniques for fielding questions are key in promoting a dynamic closure and provide consistent reinforcement of the key message content.

  11. Partnership for the Advancement of Information Literacy in a Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Sheila; Blake-Campbell, Barbara; McKay, Devin

    2012-01-01

    Nursing educators know that healthcare stakeholders expect nursing graduates to be able to manage information. Consequently, many nursing education programs are exploring ways of integrating information literacy across the curriculum not only to bolster evidence-based practice, but also to enhance professional development and encourage lifelong…

  12. Advanced Practice Nursing: Is the Physician's Assistant an Accident of History or a Failure to Act?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman, Luther

    1998-01-01

    The responses of some nursing organizations regarding the establishment of collaborative relationships in the nursing profession may be responsible for the development of the physician assistant profession. The nursing profession should examine these responses while planning strategies to cope with the current chaos in health care. (JOW)

  13. Feminist and queer phenomenology: a framework for perinatal nursing practice, research, and education for advancing lesbian health.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Lisa; Ryan, Annette; Sawchyn, Jody

    2009-06-01

    A queer phenomenology would involve an orientation toward queer, a way to inhabit the world that gives "support" to those whose lives and loves make them appear oblique, strange, and out of place. (Ahmed, 2006) The climate of the health care system is a reflection of society, which often hesitates to support individuals who choose paths other than those, that are heteronormatively constructed. Consequences of such limited directedness include fear, misunderstanding, avoidance, and discrimination on the part of nurses toward individuals involved in same-sex partnerships (Goldberg, 2005/2006). A feminist and queer phenomenological framework offers an approach for perinatal nurses to advance lesbian health and, in particular, lesbian couples' experiences of birthing, in the context of nursing practice, research, and education.

  14. The outcome of interprofessional education: Integrating communication studies into a standardized patient experience for advanced practice nursing students.

    PubMed

    Defenbaugh, Nicole; Chikotas, Noreen E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the impact of standardized patient experiences (SPE) in the education of the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN). The education of the APN requires educators to make every attempt to promote competency in the areas of communication and clinical-decision making. SPE programs have been found to improve the interpersonal, problem solving, and critical thinking skills of nursing students. For this research twenty-nine APN students participated in SPEs over the course of two semesters. Fifteen student volunteers of those 29 participants were then interviewed three months after the experience. Results revealed that having an expert in the field of communication studies increased awareness of communication skills and how to improve nurse-patient encounters in the clinical setting. The interprofessional collaboration during the SPEs assisted in facilitating the application of learned communication skills into patient-centered care of the APN student.

  15. Changing the way that I am: students experience of educational preparation for advanced nursing roles in the community.

    PubMed

    Illingworth, Andrea; Aranda, Kay F; De Goeas, Sharon M; Lindley, Penny J

    2013-09-01

    The redesign of the healthcare workforce in the United Kingdom (UK) has resulted in the rapid introduction of more 'advanced' community nursing roles. This presents varying challenges for universities seeking to prepare practitioners for these roles. This paper reports on a qualitative study conducted at one university in England which sought to explore the educational experiences of students preparing for and engaging in advanced nursing roles. Data was collected through focus groups and semi-structured interviews. This study found that educational preparation for advanced nursing roles in the community is varied and complex and involved a number of claims, concerns and issues, captured in three themes: 1. Re-inventing roles; 2. Re-creating selves; and 3. Re-engaging with learning. The findings reveal how those in advanced roles work across occupational boundaries and manage conflicts, using differentiated and complex sources and forms of knowledge and skills. Learning occurs in non-linear ways and is a good example of expansive or sideways learning. There is a need for further research on the type of curriculum and methods to best support students preparing for these roles and further study on the impact on patient experience and outcomes.

  16. Neonatal hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Purves, Erica

    2005-01-01

    Neonatal hematology is a complex subspecialty of pediatric hematology, combining the unique aspects of the maternal/fetal relationship, the delicate balance of coagulation factors, and the distinctive physiologic conditions of the newborn period. The objective of this article is to briefly review specific hematologic disorders that commonly present in the newborn period. Alloimmune cytopenias, polycythemia, thrombosis and bleeding associated with vitamin K deficiency will be discussed through a focus on pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, current treatment strategies, and implications for nursing care.

  17. Abdominal surgery in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Bryant, James E; Gaughan, Earl M

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal surgery in foals under 30 days old has become more common with improved neonatal care. Early recognition of a foal at risk and better nursing care have increased the survival rates of foals that require neonatal care. The success of improved neonatal care also has increased the need for accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal, umbilical, and bladder disorders in these foals. This chapter focuses on the early and accurate diagnosis of specific disorders that require abdominal exploratory surgery and the specific treatment considerations and prognosis for these disorders.

  18. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... and professional practice in nursing." Demonstration of professional development support and clinical advancement programs are hallmarks of a professional nursing practice environment and critical components of Nursing Magnet status. The ...

  19. Advanced practice nursing, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an extensive review of the organizational and health care literature of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness. Teams have a long history in health care. Managers play an important role in mobilizing resources, guiding expectations of APN roles in teams and within organizations, and facilitating team process. Researchers have identified a number of advantages to the addition of APN roles in health care teams. The process within health care teams are dynamic and responsive to their surrounding environment. It appears that teams and perceptions of team effectiveness need to be understood in the broader context in which the teams are situated. Key team process are identified for team members to perceive their team as effective. The concepts of teamwork, perceptions of team effectiveness, and the introduction of APN roles in teams have been studied disparately. An exploration of the links between these concepts may further our understanding the health care team's perceptions of team effectiveness when APN roles are introduced. Such knowledge could contribute to the effective deployment of APN roles in health care teams and improve the delivery of health care services to patients and families.

  20. Advanced practice nursing, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an extensive review of the organizational and health care literature of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness. Teams have a long history in health care. Managers play an important role in mobilizing resources, guiding expectations of APN roles in teams and within organizations, and facilitating team process. Researchers have identified a number of advantages to the addition of APN roles in health care teams. The process within health care teams are dynamic and responsive to their surrounding environment. It appears that teams and perceptions of team effectiveness need to be understood in the broader context in which the teams are situated. Key team process are identified for team members to perceive their team as effective. The concepts of teamwork, perceptions of team effectiveness, and the introduction of APN roles in teams have been studied disparately. An exploration of the links between these concepts may further our understanding the health care team's perceptions of team effectiveness when APN roles are introduced. Such knowledge could contribute to the effective deployment of APN roles in health care teams and improve the delivery of health care services to patients and families.

  1. Right person, right skills, right job: the contribution of objective structured clinical examinations in advancing staff nurse experts.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Marion; Strube, Petra; Vaux, Amanda; West, Nicky; Auditore, Anthony

    2013-10-01

    Recruitment processes need to discriminate among candidates to ensure that the right person with the right skills is selected for advancement opportunities. An innovative recruitment process using an objective structured clinical examination grounded in best practice guidelines resulted in improved recruitment practices for senior nursing clinical expert roles. Candidates' skills, knowledge, and attitudes in the areas of patient focus, clinical expertise, teamwork, and leadership were assessed using a clinical simulation. Candidates achieving advancement were assessed at 6 months to validate the efficacy of the process.

  2. Advancing HIV Nursing Practice: The Doctor of Nursing Practice HIV Specialty at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Willard, Suzanne; Nelson, John; Reyes, Darcel; Linn, Annē

    2016-01-01

    The move to integrate HIV treatment and care into primary care is a major obstacle for the current U.S. health care workforce. Many HIV specialty providers will soon retire, while few primary care clinicians have been adequately trained in the diagnosis, care, and treatment of people living with HIV. The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has supported the development of a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program with an HIV specialty at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, to assure successful transition to an HIV primary care workforce. The Rutgers School of Nursing has been at the forefront of the DNP education movement and is among the first to develop an HIV-focused DNP program. Thirty-seven students have enrolled in the 3-year program, and two have graduated from the first cohort. Here we discuss the planning, implementation, successes, and recommendations of the new program.

  3. Neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Iva Mihatov

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the most common cause of neonatal deaths with high mortality despite treatment. Neonatal sepsis can be classified into two subtypes depending upon onset of symptoms. There are many factors that make neonates more susceptable to infection. Signs of sepsis in neonates are often non-specific and high degree of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis. Some laboratory parameters can be helpful for screening of neonates with neonatal sepsis, but none of it is specific and sensitive enough to be used singly. Diagnostic approach mostly focuses on history and review of non specific signs and symptoms. Antibiotic treatment is the mainstay of treatment and supportive care is equally important. The aim of this review is to give an overview of neonatal sepsis, including incidence, etiology, clinical picture, diagnostics and therapy.

  4. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BE. Perinatal viral infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ... K. Postnatal bacterial infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ...

  5. Advance care planning uptake among patients with severe lung disease: a randomised patient preference trial of a nurse-led, facilitated advance care planning intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Craig; Auret, Kirsten Anne; Evans, Sharon Frances; Williamson, Fiona; Dormer, Siobhan; Greeve, Kim; Koay, Audrey; Price, Dot; Brims, Fraser

    2017-01-01

    Objective Advance care planning (ACP) clarifies goals for future care if a patient becomes unable to communicate their own preferences. However, ACP uptake is low, with discussions often occurring late. This study assessed whether a systematic nurse-led ACP intervention increases ACP in patients with advanced respiratory disease. Design A multicentre open-label randomised controlled trial with preference arm. Setting Metropolitan teaching hospital and a rural healthcare network. Participants 149 participants with respiratory malignancy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or interstitial lung disease. Intervention Nurse facilitators offered facilitated ACP discussions, prompted further discussions with doctors and loved ones, and assisted participants to appoint a substitute medical decision-maker (SDM) and complete an advance directive (AD). Outcome measures The primary measure was formal (AD or SDM) or informal (discussion with doctor) ACP uptake assessed by self-report (6 months) and medical notes audit. Secondary measures were the factors predicting baseline readiness to undertake ACP, and factors predicting postintervention ACP uptake in the intervention arm. Results At 6 months, formal ACP uptake was significantly higher (p<0.001) in the intervention arm (54/106, 51%), compared with usual care (6/43, 14%). ACP discussions with doctors were also significantly higher (p<0.005) in the intervention arm (76/106, 72%) compared with usual care (20/43, 47%). Those with a strong preference for the intervention were more likely to complete formal ACP documents than those randomly allocated. Increased symptom burden and preference for the intervention predicted later ACP uptake. Social support was positively associated with ACP discussion with loved ones, but negatively associated with discussion with doctors. Conclusions Nurse-led facilitated ACP is acceptable to patients with advanced respiratory disease and effective in increasing ACP discussions and completion

  6. Through the lens of Merleau-Ponty: advancing the phenomenological approach to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandra P

    2005-01-01

    Phenomenology has proved to be a popular methodology for nursing research. I argue, however, that phenomenological nursing research could be strengthened by greater attention to its philosophical underpinnings. Many research reports devote more page space to procedure than to the philosophy that purportedly guided it. The philosophy of Maurice Merleau-Ponty is an excellent fit for nursing, although his work has received less attention than that of Husserl and Heidegger. In this paper, I examine the life and thought of Merleau-Ponty, with emphasis on concepts, such as perception, intentionality and embodiment, which have particular relevance to the discipline of nursing.

  7. From Nurse to Nurse Anesthetist: The Influence of Age and Gender on Professional Socialization and Career Commitment of Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugaman, Wynne R.; Lohrer, Donna J.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 1,106 student nurse anesthetists (40% male) showed that increasing age was negatively correlated with socioeconomic rewards. Male gender was positively correlated with administrative/supervisory roles, female gender with holistic patient care. Men achieved socialization more readily in occupational orientation. (SK)

  8. Integrating Advanced Practice Nurses in Home Care. Recommendations for a Teaching Home Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitty, Ethel; Mezey, Mathy

    1998-01-01

    A telephone survey of home care agencies and providers revealed a need for the following: evidence of the effectiveness of nurse practitioners in home care, regulatory and financial support for nurse practitioner home care, and development of home care agencies as clinical sites for training. (SK)

  9. Leading the revolution in nursing practice: advancing health in the digital age.

    PubMed

    Porter-O'Grady, Tim

    2014-06-01

    Nursing is on the verge of a major shift in both its work and its value due to increasing pressure to move out of acute-care hospitals and into the community; and the influence of digitization in how nurses are able to provide care.

  10. Updating the definition and role of public health nursing to advance and guide the specialty.

    PubMed

    Bekemeier, Betty; Walker Linderman, Tessa; Kneipp, Shawn; Zahner, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    National changes in the context for public health services are influencing the nature of public health nursing practice. Despite this, the document that defines public health nursing as a specialty--The Definition and Role of Public Health Nursing--has remained in wide use since its publication in 1996 without a review or update. With support from the American Public Health Association (APHA) Public Health Nursing Section, a national Task Force, was formed in November 2012 to update the definition of public health nursing, using processes that reflected deliberative democratic principles. A yearlong process was employed that included a modified Delphi technique and various modes of engagement such as online discussion boards, questionnaires, and public comment to review. The resulting 2013 document consisted of a reaffirmation of the one-sentence 1996 definition, while updating supporting documentation to align with the current social, economic, political, and health care context. The 2013 document was strongly endorsed by vote of the APHA Public Health Nursing Section elected leadership. The 2013 definition and document affirm the relevance of a population-focused definition of public health nursing to complex systems addressed in current practice and articulate critical roles of public health nurses (PHN) in these settings.

  11. Community of inquiry model: advancing distance learning in nurse anesthesia education.

    PubMed

    Pecka, Shannon L; Kotcherlakota, Suhasini; Berger, Ann M

    2014-06-01

    The number of distance education courses offered by nurse anesthesia programs has increased substantially. Emerging distance learning trends must be researched to ensure high-quality education for student registered nurse anesthetists. However, research to examine distance learning has been hampered by a lack of theoretical models. This article introduces the Community of Inquiry model for use in nurse anesthesia education. This model has been used for more than a decade to guide and research distance learning in higher education. A major strength of this model learning. However, it lacks applicability to the development of higher order thinking for student registered nurse anesthetists. Thus, a new derived Community of Inquiry model was designed to improve these students' higher order thinking in distance learning. The derived model integrates Bloom's revised taxonomy into the original Community of Inquiry model and provides a means to design, evaluate, and research higher order thinking in nurse anesthesia distance education courses.

  12. Severe Impairment Rating Scale: A Useful and Brief Cognitive Assessment Tool for Advanced Dementia for Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Cindy; Lim, Wee Shiong; Chan, Mark; Ho, Xin Qin; Anthony, Philomena Vasantha; Han, Huey Charn; Chong, Mei Sian

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the utility of the Severe Impairment Rating Scale (SIRS) as a cognitive assessment tool among nursing home residents with advanced dementia, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 96 residents in 3 nursing homes with Functional Assessment Staging Test (FAST) stage 6a and above. We compared the discriminatory ability of SIRS with the Chinese version of Mini-Mental State Examination, Abbreviated Mental Test, and Clock Drawing Test. Among the cognitive tests, SIRS showed the least "floor" effect and had the best capacity to distinguish very severe (FAST stages 7d-f) dementia (area under the curve 0.80 vs 0.46-0.76 for the other tools). The SIRS had the best correlation with FAST staging (r = -.59, P < .01) and, unlike the other 3 tools, exhibited only minimal change in correlation when adjusted for education and ethnicity. Our results support the utility of SIRS as a brief cognitive assessment tool for advanced dementia in the nursing home setting.

  13. Natural History of Feeding Tube Use in Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Sylvia; Rhodes, Ramona L.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Mor, Vincent; Teno, Joan M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Despite the evidence that feeding tube use in persons with advanced dementia is not associated improved outcomes, there remains striking area variation in their use. Yet, little is known about the national incidence of feeding tube insertions, the circumstances of their insertion, and post-insertion health care utilization. Design Secondary analysis of Minimum Data Set merged onto Medicare Claims Files Setting and Participants Nursing home residents (NHR) without a feeding tube Measurements NHR were followed for up to one year to see whether a feeding tube was inserted and then followed for one year post insertion to examine health care utilization and survival. Results The incidence of feeding tube insertion was 53.6/1000 residents. The majority (68.1%) of feeding tube insertions were performed in an acute care hospital with the most common reasons for admission being pneumonia, dehydration, and dysphagia. One year post-insertion mortality was 64.1% with median survival of 56 days. Within one year, 19.3% of those who had a feeding tube inserted required a tube replacement or repositioning within a median 145 days after the initial insertion. Over one year, tube-feeding was associated with an average of 9.1 hospitalized days per person, 1.0 hospitalizations, 0.3 emergency room visits that did not result in a hospital admission. Conclusion The majority of feeding tubes are inserted in an acute care hospital. Feeding tube insertions are also associated with poor survival and significant rate of health care utilization post insertion. PMID:19426943

  14. Use of modified Delphi to plan knowledge translation for decision makers: an application in the field of advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Nancy; Lavis, John N; MacDonald-Rencz, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Disseminating research to decision makers is difficult. Interaction between researchers and decision makers can identify key messages and processes for dissemination. To gain agreement on the key findings from a synthesis on the integration of advanced practice nurses, we used a modified Delphi process. Nursing decision makers contributed ideas via e-mail, discussed and clarified ideas face to face, and then prioritized statements. Sixteen (89%) participated and 14 (77%) completed the final phase. Priority key messages were around access to care and outcomes. The majority identified "NPs increase access to care" and "NPs and CNSs improve patient and system outcomes" as priority messaging statements. Participants agreed policy makers and the public were target audiences for messages. Consulting with policy makers provided the necessary context to develop tailored policy messages and is a helpful approach for research dissemination.

  15. Incorporating a health policy practicum in a graduate training program to prepare advanced practice nursing health services researchers.

    PubMed

    DiCenso, Alba; Housden, Laura; Heale, Roberta; Carter, Nancy; Canitz, Brenda; MacDonald-Rencz, Sandra; Buckley, Christine Rieck

    2012-11-01

    Health services research benefits from the active engagement of researchers and policy makers from generation through to application of research-based knowledge. One approach to help graduate students learn about the policy world is through participation in a policy practicum. This is an opportunity to work for a defined period of time in a setting where policy decisions are made. This article focuses on the integration of the policy practicum into graduate nursing education for advanced practice nurses. Ten graduate students and two postdoctoral fellows who had recently completed their practicums and three policy makers who had recently supervised students in provincial, federal, and international practicum projects were invited to submit a narrative about the experience. Based on qualitative analysis of the narratives, this article outlines objectives of the practicum, the policy practicum journey, student learning, and finally, the benefits and challenges of the experience.

  16. Effect of simulation on knowledge of advanced cardiac life support, knowledge retention, and confidence of nursing students in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Tawalbeh, Loai I; Tubaishat, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of simulation on nursing students' knowledge of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), knowledge retention, and confidence in applying ACLS skills. An experimental, randomized controlled (pretest-posttest) design was used. The experimental group (n = 40) attended an ACLS simulation scenario, a 4-hour PowerPoint presentation, and demonstration on a static manikin, whereas the control group (n = 42) attended the PowerPoint presentation and a demonstration only. A paired t test indicated that posttest mean knowledge of ACLS and confidence was higher in both groups. The experimental group showed higher knowledge of ACLS and higher confidence in applying ACLS, compared with the control group. Traditional training involving PowerPoint presentation and demonstration on a static manikin is an effective teaching strategy; however, simulation is significantly more effective than traditional training in helping to improve nursing students' knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention, and confidence about ACLS.

  17. Stress and pain relief in the care of the surgical neonate.

    PubMed

    Currie, John M

    2008-11-01

    In recent years, there has been a major change in our thinking about the way neonates experience stress. This understanding has led to advances in anesthetic technique and the pre- and postoperative care of the surgical neonate. Stress can develop before birth due to placental insufficiency. This can lead to preterm delivery, and the preterm infant is much more vulnerable to stressful stimulus. Stress is detrimental to the neonate in the short term and can also have adverse effects on the future wellbeing of the child. Limiting stress is not just about good pain control. The nursing environment is vitally important. Much can be achieved with good attention to detail in this respect. The effects of stress and the ways they can be minimized are discussed.

  18. Advancing nursing home practice: the International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tolson, Debbie; Morley, John E; Rolland, Yves; Vellas, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of the urgent need to improve the provision of long-term care, as well as the known variations in standards of nursing home care around the world, prompted the International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology (IAGG), in association with the World Health Organization (WHO), to form a task force. This task force was charged with the identification of the key concerns, research priorities, and actions that would enhance the care provided to older people in nursing homes. Nurses are equipped with the knowledge to take a leadership role in the IAGG/WHO initiative, and the task force eagerly seeks their input.

  19. Understanding Advance Care Documents: What the Nurse Advocate Needs to Know.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Erika

    2017-04-03

    The emergency department is a critical care area for those with immediate health care needs, and death is not an uncommon outcome. The discussion regarding end-of-life care is often a subject nurses feel uncomfortable or unprepared to address. Additionally, nurses often encounter obstacles when providing end-of-life care in the emergency department environment. It is vital that emergency nurses are educated about the many aspects of end-of-life care to feel better prepared to address the topic which will ultimately improve patient care.

  20. Nurses' knowledge of advance directives and perceived confidence in end-of-life care: a cross-sectional study in five countries.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Alice; McCarthy, Geraldine; Weathers, Elizabeth; Friedman, M Isabel; Gallo, Katherine; Ehrenfeld, Mally; Chan, Sophia; Li, William H C; Poletti, Piera; Zanotti, Renzo; Molloy, D William; McGlade, Ciara; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Itzhaki, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Nurses' knowledge regarding advance directives may affect their administration and completion in end-of-life care. Confidence among nurses is a barrier to the provision of quality end-of-life care. This study investigated nurses' knowledge of advance directives and perceived confidence in end-of-life care, in Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy and the USA using a cross-sectional descriptive design (n = 1089). In all countries, older nurses and those who had more professional experience felt more confident managing patients' symptoms at end-of-life and more comfortable stopping preventive medications at end-of-life. Nurses in the USA reported that they have more knowledge and experience of advance directives compared with other countries. In addition, they reported the highest levels of confidence and comfort in dealing with end-of-life care. Although legislation for advance directives does not yet exist in Ireland, nurses reported high levels of confidence in end-of-life care.

  1. Cost-utility analysis of an advanced pressure ulcer management protocol followed by trained wound, ostomy, and continence nurses.

    PubMed

    Kaitani, Toshiko; Nakagami, Gojiro; Iizaka, Shinji; Fukuda, Takashi; Oe, Makoto; Igarashi, Ataru; Mori, Taketoshi; Takemura, Yukie; Mizokami, Yuko; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of severe pressure ulcers (PUs) is an important issue that requires to be highlighted in Japan. In a previous study, we devised an advanced PU management protocol to enable early detection of and intervention for deep tissue injury and critical colonization. This protocol was effective for preventing more severe PUs. The present study aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness of the care provided using an advanced PU management protocol, from a medical provider's perspective, implemented by trained wound, ostomy, and continence nurses (WOCNs), with that of conventional care provided by a control group of WOCNs. A Markov model was constructed for a 1-year time horizon to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of advanced PU management compared with conventional care. The number of quality-adjusted life-years gained, and the cost in Japanese yen (¥) ($US1 = ¥120; 2015) was used as the outcome. Model inputs for clinical probabilities and related costs were based on our previous clinical trial results. Univariate sensitivity analyses were performed. Furthermore, a Bayesian multivariate probability sensitivity analysis was performed using Monte Carlo simulations with advanced PU management. Two different models were created for initial cohort distribution. For both models, the expected effectiveness for the intervention group using advanced PU management techniques was high, with a low expected cost value. The sensitivity analyses suggested that the results were robust. Intervention by WOCNs using advanced PU management techniques was more effective and cost-effective than conventional care.

  2. Advancing medical-surgical nursing practice: improving management of the changing patient condition.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Heidi; Plylar, Peggy; Krugman, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Higher patient acuities and more novice nurses on medical-surgical units have Educators focused on achieving positive outcomes with changes in patient condition. An educational program was developed to enhance nurses' knowledge, skill, and confidence in assessing hemodynamics, recognizing early signs of instability, and administering vasoactive medications. The program was successful with significant knowledge improvement as well as an increased use of the Medical Emergency Team while maintaining a low number of code calls.

  3. Factors associated with the use of advanced practice nurses/physician assistants in a fee-for-service nursing home practice: a comparison with primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Bakerjian, Debra; Harrington, Charlene

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine factors associated with the use of advanced practice nurse and physician assistant (APN/PA) visits to nursing home (NH) patients compared with those by primary care physicians (PCPs). This was a secondary analysis using Medicare claims data. General estimation equations were used to determine the odds of NH residents receiving APN/PA visits. Ordinary least squares analyses were used to examine factors associated with these visits. A total of 5,436 APN/PAs provided care to 27% of 129,812 residents and were responsible for 16% of the 1.1 million Medicare NH fee-for-service visits in 2004. APN/PAs made an average of 33 visits annually compared with PCPs (21 visits). Neuropsychiatric and acute diagnoses and patients with a long-stay status were associated with more APN/PA visits. APN/PAs provide a substantial amount of care, but regional variations occur, and Medicare regulations constrain the ability of APN/PAs to substitute for physician visits.

  4. Neonatal jaundice.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Pat

    2012-06-01

    Neonatal jaundice lasting greater than 2 weeks should be investigated. Pale stools and dark or yellow urine are evidence of liver disease, which should be urgently investigated. The neonatal hepatitis syndrome has many causes, and a structured approach to investigation is mandatory. It should be possible to confirm or exclude biliary atresia within one week, so that definitive surgery is not delayed unnecessarily. Babies with the neonatal hepatitis syndrome should have vigorous fat-soluble vitamin supplementation, including parenteral vitamin K if coagulation is abnormal. The prognosis for infants with idiopathic neonatal hepatitis and multifactorial cholestasis is excellent.

  5. Managing common neonatal respiratory conditions during transport.

    PubMed

    Coe, Kristi L; Jamie, Scott F; Baskerville, Rosland M

    2014-10-01

    As neonatal care in the tertiary setting advances, neonatal transport teams are challenged with incorporating these innovations into their work environment. One of the largest areas of advancement over the last decade involves respiratory support and management. Many major respiratory treatments and the equipment required have been adapted for transport, whereas others are not yet feasible. This article reviews the history of respiratory management during neonatal transport and discusses current methodologies and innovations in transport respiratory management.

  6. The Development of Evidence Briefs to Transfer Knowledge About Advanced Practice Nursing Roles to Providers, Policymakers and Administrators.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Carter, Nancy; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Charbonneau-Smith, Renee; DiCenso, Alba

    2015-03-01

    The transfer of health-related research knowledge between producers and users is a complex, dynamic and iterative process. There has been little research describing the preferred knowledge transfer strategies used by different stakeholder groups, including healthcare providers, policymakers and administrators. The purpose of the survey was to gain an understanding of the content and preferred dissemination strategies of knowledge users of briefing notes about the effectiveness of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles in Canada. An on-line cross-sectional survey was conducted from December 2011 to January 2012. Purposeful sampling was used to identify the target audience. The questionnaire included six items. The response rate was 44% (n=75/170). Participants identified that the briefing note should concisely summarize definitions for APN roles and information about the safety, effectiveness, cost savings and effective role implementation strategies. Multiple approaches were favoured to disseminate the information. Preferred dissemination strategies included personalized emails, meeting with briefing note recipients, engaging nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists in organizations where APN roles have been successfully implemented, engaging the media and using social media. The use of briefing notes has shown promise. More research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of tailored briefing notes.

  7. 'I Used to Fight with Them but Now I Have Stopped!': Conflict and Doctor-Nurse-Anaesthetists' Motivation in Maternal and Neonatal Care Provision in a Specialist Referral Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Aberese-Ako, Matilda; Agyepong, Irene Akua; Gerrits, Trudie; Van Dijk, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives This paper analyses why and how conflicts occur and their influence on doctors and nurse-anaesthetists' motivation in the provision of maternal and neonatal health care in a specialist hospital. Methodology The study used ethnographic methods including participant observation, conversation and in-depth interviews over eleven months in a specialist referral hospital in Ghana. Qualitative analysis software Nvivo 8 was used for coding and analysis of data. Main themes identified in the analysis form the basis for interpreting and reporting study findings. Ethics Statement Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ghana Health Service Ethics Review board (approval number GHS-ERC:06/01/12) and from the University of Wageningen. Written consent was obtained from interview participants, while verbal consent was obtained for conversations. To protect the identity of the hospital and research participants pseudonyms are used in the article and the part of Ghana in which the study was conducted is not mentioned. Results Individual characteristics, interpersonal and organisational factors contributed to conflicts. Unequal power relations and distrust relations among doctors and nurse-anaesthetists affected how they responded to conflicts. Responses to conflicts including forcing, avoiding, accommodating and compromising contributed to persistent conflicts, which frustrated and demotivated doctors and nurse-anaesthetists. Demotivated workers exhibited poor attitudes in collaborating with co-workers in the provision of maternal and neonatal care, which sometimes led to poor health worker response to client care, consequently compromising the hospital's goal of providing quality health care to clients. Conclusion To improve health care delivery in health facilities in Ghana, health managers and supervisors need to identify conflicts as an important phenomenon that should be addressed whenever they occur. Effective mechanisms including training managers

  8. Effects of an advanced nursing assistant education program on job satisfaction, turnover rate, assistant education program on and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Megan; Redfern, Roberta E; Bressler, Katrina; Swicegood, Tamara May; Molnar, Marianne

    2013-10-01

    Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) have become an integral part of the health care system, spend the most amount of time with residents, and yet have the least amount of training. Recent reports demonstrate that CNAs believe their salary is not commensurate with their workload, and turnover rates in this field have indicated low job satisfaction. In light of these issues, we developed an advanced training program for CNAs in our institution to determine whether investing in our employees would increase job satisfaction and therefore impact turnover rates and clinical outcomes. Although overall job satisfaction improved slightly during the study period, satisfaction with training offered was the only area significantly affected by the intervention; however, significant decreases in turnover rates were observed between the pre- and postintervention periods. Clinical indicators were slightly improved, and the number of resident urinary tract infections decreased significantly. Offering an advanced training program for CNAs may be an effective way to improve morale, turnover rates, and clinical outcomes.

  9. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses and Physician Assistants in Sleep Centers and Clinics: A Survey of Current Roles and Educational Background

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Loretta; Cartwright, Ann; Collop, Nancy; Freedman, Neil; McLeod, Don; Weaver, Terri E.; Rogers, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To survey Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) and Physician Assistant (PA) utilization, roles and educational background within the field of sleep medicine. Methods: Electronic surveys distributed to American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) member centers and APRNs and PAs working within sleep centers and clinics. Results: Approximately 40% of responding AASM sleep centers reported utilizing APRNs or PAs in predominantly clinical roles. Of the APRNs and PAs surveyed, 95% reported responsibilities in sleep disordered breathing and more than 50% in insomnia and movement disorders. Most APRNs and PAs were prepared at the graduate level (89%), with sleep-specific education primarily through “on the job” training (86%). All APRNs surveyed were Nurse Practitioners (NPs), with approximately double the number of NPs compared to PAs. Conclusions: APRNs and PAs were reported in sleep centers at proportions similar to national estimates of NPs and PAs in physicians' offices. They report predominantly clinical roles, involving common sleep disorders. Given current predictions that the outpatient healthcare structure will change and the number of APRNs and PAs will increase, understanding the role and utilization of these professionals is necessary to plan for the future care of patients with sleep disorders. Surveyed APRNs and PAs reported a significant deficiency in formal and standardized sleep-specific education. Efforts to provide formal and standardized educational opportunities for APRNs and PAs that focus on their clinical roles within sleep centers could help fill a current educational gap. Citation: Colvin L, Cartwright Ann, Collop N, Freedman N, McLeod D, Weaver TE, Rogers AE. Advanced practice registered nurses and physician assistants in sleep centers and clinics: a survey of current roles and educational background. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(5):581-587. PMID:24812545

  10. Pathophysiology of the Cardiovascular System and Neonatal Hypotension.

    PubMed

    Shead, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    Hypotension is common in low birth weight neonates and less common in term newborns and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Determining an adequate blood pressure in neonates remains challenging for the neonatal nurse because of the lack of agreed-upon norms. Values for determining norms for blood pressure at varying gestational and postnatal ages are based on empirical data. Understanding cardiovascular pathophysiology, potential causes of hypotension, and assessment of adequate perfusion in the neonatal population is important and can assist the neonatal nurse in the evaluation of effective blood pressure. This article reviews cardiovascular pathophysiology as it relates to blood pressure and discusses potential causes of hypotension in the term and preterm neonate. Variation in management of hypotension across centers is discussed. Underlying causes and pathophysiology of hypotension in the neonate are described.

  11. Defining Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review Although infection rates have modestly decreased in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as a result of ongoing quality improvement measures, neonatal sepsis remains a frequent and devastating problem among hospitalized preterm neonates. Despite multiple attempts to address this unmet need, there have been minimal advances in clinical management, outcomes, and accuracy of diagnostic testing options over the last three decades. One strong contributor to a lack of medical progress is a variable case definition of disease. The inability to agree on a precise definition greatly reduces the likelihood of aligning findings from epidemiologists, clinicians, and researchers, which, in turn, severely hinders progress towards improving outcomes. Recent findings Pediatric consensus definitions for sepsis are not accurate in term infants and are not appropriate for preterm infants. In contrast to the defined multi-stage criteria for other devastating diseases encountered in the NICU (e.g., bronchopulmonary dysplasia), there is significant variability in the criteria used by investigators to substantiate the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Summary The lack of an accepted consensus definition for neonatal sepsis impedes our efforts towards improved diagnostic and prognostic options as well as accurate outcomes information for this vulnerable population. PMID:26766602

  12. Evaluation of the Penn Macy Initiative To Advance Academic Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Lois K.; Swan, Beth Ann; Lang, Norma E.

    2003-01-01

    In the Penn Macy Initiative, 21 nursing schools participated in summer institutes and follow-up consultations to refine practice. Evaluation data from participants' daily and postinstitute feedback, institutional self-evaluations, and comparison of school accomplishments identified critical indicators of progress in academic practice. A key…

  13. Advances in prevention and therapy of neonatal dairy calf diarrhoea: a systematical review with emphasis on colostrum management and fluid therapy.

    PubMed

    Meganck, Vanessa; Hoflack, Geert; Opsomer, Geert

    2014-11-25

    Neonatal calf diarrhoea remains the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in preweaned dairy calves worldwide. This complex disease can be triggered by both infectious and non-infectious causes. The four most important enteropathogens leading to neonatal dairy calf diarrhoea are Escherichia coli, rota- and coronavirus, and Cryptosporidium parvum. Besides treating diarrhoeic neonatal dairy calves, the veterinarian is the most obvious person to advise the dairy farmer on prevention and treatment of this disease. This review deals with prevention and treatment of neonatal dairy calf diarrhoea focusing on the importance of a good colostrum management and a correct fluid therapy.

  14. Neonatal medications.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert M; Stiers, Justin; Buchi, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is reaching epidemic proportions related to perinatal use of opioids. There are many approaches to assess and manage NAS, including one we have outlined. A standardized approach is likely to reduce length of stay and variability in practice. Circumcision is a frequent, painful procedure performed in the neonatal period. The rationale for providing analgesia is presented as well as a review of methods. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics have expanded our understanding of diseases and their drug therapy. Some applications of pharmacogenomics to the neonatal period are presented, along with pediatric challenges of developmental expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  15. Integrating advanced writing content into a scholarly inquiry in nursing course.

    PubMed

    Mandleco, Barbara L; Bohn, Christina; Callister, Lynn C; Lassetter, Jane; Carlton, Troy

    2012-02-17

    Since there are few data examining methods to help students learn to write in a scholarly manner, the purposes of this project were to (1) evaluate students' learning of writing content integrated into a Scholarly Inquiry in Nursing course by examining differences in scores on a writing assessment taken at the beginning and end of the course; and (2) examine student confidence ratings relative to writing to see if it improved during the course. After obtaining IRB approval and informed consent, the CLIPS pre and post assessment mean scores of 82 students in a Scholarly Inquiry in Nursing course were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Confidence ratings in formal and informal writing were also obtained from a subsample of 47 students. Mean scores improved in 12 out of 26 assessment categories related to punctuation, correct usage of words, and sentence construction. Student mean confidence ratings increased each month.

  16. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    PubMed

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum.

  17. An innovative approach to enhance dermatology competencies for advanced practice nurses: service–learning with a migrant farm worker health clinic.

    PubMed

    Downes, Elizabeth A; Connor, Ann; Howett, Maeve

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a novel service–learning opportunity for graduate nursing students that promotes competency in dermatology. A hybrid service–learning course with online didactic content is described, along with tools for evaluation of dermatology competencies. Student evaluation of the course is discussed, and selected research articles are reviewed. Advanced practice nursing and medical education frequently does not adequately prepare primary care providers to be competent in the assessment and management of dermatologic conditions. Embedding dermatology content in a service–learning program can optimize the provision of care, strengthen competencies in dermatology and inter-professional care, and allow students to gain a deeper understanding of the population with which they work. The innovative service–learning program presented is a model for advanced practice nursing education. Tools for evaluating clinical competency and courses often need validation.

  18. Exploring the theoretical basis of nursing using advanced techniques of concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Morse, J M

    1995-03-01

    In this article, the traditional methods of concept development are critiqued, and alternative methods that use qualitative methods of inquiry are presented. Variations of concept development techniques appropriate to the maturity of the concept being explored are then described, including methods for concept delineation, concept comparison, concept clarification, concept correction, and concept identification. To illustrate the application of concept development methods to nursing theory, a research program to delineate the construct of comfort is described.

  19. Diversifying the Pipeline Into Doctoral Nursing Programs: Developing the Doctoral Advancement Readiness Self-Assessment.

    PubMed

    DeWitty, Vernell P; Tabloski, Patricia A; Millett, Catherine M; Hambrick, Marion Evan; Shreffler, Megan; Downing, Christine A; Huerta, Carolina G

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development and psychometric analysis of the Doctoral Readiness Self-Assessment for Doctoral Study. This survey was developed as the first step of a Web-based, on-line mentoring platform for nurses who are considering a doctoral degree program. By identifying and anticipating the predictors and barriers of success in doctoral nursing education, including practical (finances, time, geographical restriction) and personal factors (motivation, attitudes, perceived ability to navigate the application process), students are guided through a self-reflective process to determine readiness. Factor analysis revealed that interest, readiness, and support represent 3 distinct factors that may be used for additional analysis to predict future enrollment in doctoral nursing degree programs. The internal reliability analysis revealed that removing 3 items from the 15-item scale increased Cronbach's alpha from 0.75 to 0.80, and these factors explained 51.25% of variance. The self-assessment results can inform faculty's work as they mentor and guide students through the application, admission, and financial support processes for doctoral study.

  20. Using an academic-community partnership model and blended learning to advance community health nursing pedagogy.

    PubMed

    Ezeonwu, Mabel; Berkowitz, Bobbie; Vlasses, Frances R

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a model of teaching community health nursing that evolved from a long-term partnership with a community with limited existing health programs. The partnership supported RN-BSN students' integration in the community and resulted in reciprocal gains for faculty, students and community members. Community clients accessed public health services as a result of the partnership. A blended learning approach that combines face-to-face interactions, service learning and online activities was utilized to enhance students' learning. Following classroom sessions, students actively participated in community-based educational process through comprehensive health needs assessments, planning and implementation of disease prevention and health promotion activities for community clients. Such active involvement in an underserved community deepened students' awareness of the fundamentals of community health practice. Students were challenged to view public health from a broader perspective while analyzing the impacts of social determinants of health on underserved populations. Through asynchronous online interactions, students synthesized classroom and community activities through critical thinking. This paper describes a model for teaching community health nursing that informs students' learning through blended learning, and meets the demands for community health nursing services delivery.

  1. Association of Increasing Use of Mechanical Ventilation Among Nursing Home Residents With Advanced Dementia and Intensive Care Unit Beds

    PubMed Central

    Teno, Joan M.; Gozalo, Pedro; Khandelwal, Nita; Curtis, J. Randall; Meltzer, David; Engelberg, Ruth; Mor, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Mechanical ventilation may be lifesaving, but in certain persons, such as those with advanced dementia, it may prolong patient suffering without a clear survival benefit. OBJECTIVE To describe the use and outcomes of mechanical ventilation and its association with the increasing numbers of intensive care unit (ICU) beds in the United States for patients with advanced dementia residing in a nursing home 120 days before that hospital admission. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This retrospective cohort study evaluated Medicare beneficiaries with advanced dementia hospitalized from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2013, using the Minimum Data Set assessments linked with Medicare part A claims. A hospital fixed-effect, multivariable logistic regression model examined the effect of changes in ICU beds within individual hospitals and the likelihood of receiving mechanical ventilation, controlling for patients’ demographic characteristics, function, and comorbidities. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Mechanical ventilation. RESULTS From 2000 to 2013, a total of 635 008 hospitalizations of 380 060 eligible patients occurred (30.5% male and 69.5% female; mean [SD] age, 84.4 [7.4] years). Use of mechanical ventilation increased from 39 per 1000 hospitalizations in 2000 to 78 per 1000 hospitalizations in 2013 (P < .001, test of linear trend). As the number of ICU beds in a hospital increased over time, patients with advanced dementia were more likely to receive mechanical ventilation (ie, adjusted odds ratio per 10 ICU bed increase, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.05–1.07). In 2013, hospitals in the top decile in the number of ICU beds were reimbursed $9611.89 per hospitalization compared with $8050.24 per hospitalization in the lower decile (P < .001) without an improvement in 1-year mortality (65.2% vs 64.6%; P = 54). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among hospitalized nursing home residents with advanced dementia, we found an increase in the use of mechanical ventilation over time

  2. Neonatal conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn conjunctivitis; Conjunctivitis of the newborn; Ophthalmia neonatorum; Eye infection - neonatal conjunctivitis ... diseases spread through sexual contact to prevent newborn conjunctivitis caused by these infections. Putting eye drops into ...

  3. The initiation and administration of drugs for advanced life support by critical care nurses in the absence of a medical practitioner.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Rochelle; Lodder, Teresa; Trapani, Tony; Hanlon, Gabrielle; Cleary, Carmel

    2002-08-01

    Current legislation does not permit the administration of first line resuscitation medications by suitably qualified Division 1 registered nurses (RNs) in the absence of a medical officer. This omission by the Drugs, Poisons and Controlled Substances Act 1981 (Vic) and the Drugs, Poisons and The Controlled Substances Regulations 1995 (Vic) leaves many critical care nurses in a vulnerable legal position. The primary aim of this study was to gauge the view of critical care nurses with respect to lobbying for change to the current legislation. In addition, the study aimed to explore and describe the educational preparation, practice perceptions and experiences of RNs working in critical care regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the administration of first line advanced life support (ALS) medications in the absence of a medical officer. It was anticipated that data collected would demonstrate some of the dilemmas associated with the initiation and administration of ALS medications for practising critical care nurses and could be used to inform controlling bodies in order for them to gain an appreciation of the issues facing critical care nurses during resuscitation. A mailout survey was sent to all members of the Victorian Branch of the Australian College of Critical Care Nurses (ACCCN). The results showed that the majority of nurses underwent an annual ALS assessment and had current ALS accreditation. Nurses indicated that they felt educationally prepared and were confident to manage cardiopulmonary resuscitation without a medical officer; indeed, the majority had done so. The differences in practice issues for metropolitan, regional and rural nurses were highlighted. There is therefore clear evidence to suggest that legislative amendments are appropriate and necessary, given the time critical nature of cardiopulmonary arrest. There was overwhelming support for ACCCN Vic. Ltd to lobby the Victorian government for changes to the law.

  4. Implications for Advanced Nursing Practice in the Use of Therapeutic Touch.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Estebany’s annual visits to the U.S. to set up temporary healing clinics with Dora Kunz; "a well known observer of paranormal healing" (Krieger, 1.975b, p. 785...terminology or one’s belief system, the four levels describe the driving factors behind any nurse-patient intervention. Therapeutic Touch 7 La g on...not. 4. Therapeutic Touch is not dependent on the recipient’s conscious belief in the method. Therapeutic Touch 15 Rocers’ Conceta Frmeor Rogers

  5. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  6. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  7. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) consensus on science with treatment recommendations for pediatric and neonatal patients: pediatric basic and advanced life support.

    PubMed

    2006-05-01

    Recommendations. Circulation. 2005;112(suppl):73-90) and Resuscitation (International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. 2005 International Consensus Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations. Resuscitation. 2005;67:271-291). Readers are encouraged to review the 2005 COSTR document in its entirety. It can be accessed through the CPR and ECC link at the AHA Web site: www.americanheart.org. The complete publication represents the largest evaluation of resuscitation literature ever published and contains electronic links to more detailed information about the international collaborative process. To organize the evidence evaluation, ILCOR representatives established 6 task forces: basic life support, advanced life support, acute coronary syndromes, pediatric life support, neonatal life support, and an interdisciplinary task force to consider overlapping topics such as educational issues. The AHA established additional task forces on stroke and, in collaboration with the American Red Cross, a task force on first aid. Each task force identified topics requiring evaluation and appointed international experts to review them. A detailed worksheet template was created to help the experts document their literature review, evaluate studies, determine levels of evidence, develop treatment recommendations, and disclose conflicts of interest. Two evidence evaluation experts reviewed all worksheets and assisted the worksheet reviewers to ensure that the worksheets met a consistently high standard. A total of 281 experts completed 403 worksheets on 275 topics, reviewing more than 22000 published studies. In December 2004 the evidence review and summary portions of the evidence evaluation worksheets, with worksheet author conflict of interest statements, were posted on the Internet at www.C2005.org, where readers can continue to access them. Journal advertisements and e-mails invited public comment. Two hundred forty

  8. Genetics and genomics: impact on perinatal nursing.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Judith A

    2011-01-01

    In 1953, Watson and Crick first described the structure of the DNA molecule, an event that led to a new understanding of the nature of heredity. Just 50 years later, a conference was held in Bethesda, Maryland to announce the completion of the sequencing of the human genome. The era of genomic healthcare has begun, and it has profound implications for nursing education, nursing practice, and nursing research. This article will highlight some important areas in perinatal and neonatal nursing that have been affected by genetics and genomics, as well as some emerging areas of research that will be relevant to perinatal and neonatal nursing.

  9. Neonatal Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Cholestatic jaundice is a common presenting feature of neonatal hepatobiliary and metabolic dysfunction. Any infant who remains jaundiced beyond age 2 to 3 weeks should have the serum bilirubin level fractionated into a conjugated (direct) and unconjugated (indirect) portion. Conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is never physiologic or normal. The differential diagnosis of cholestasis is extensive, and a step-wise approach based on the initial history and physical examination is useful to rapidly identify the underlying etiology. Early recognition of neonatal cholestasis is essential to ensure timely treatment and optimal prognosis. Even when specific treatment is not available, infants who have cholestasis benefit from early medical management and optimization of nutrition. Future studies are necessary to determine the most reliable and cost-effective method of universal screening for neonatal cholestasis. PMID:24244109

  10. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  11. Nursing: Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outlook Occupational Outlook Handbook Handbook of Methods Research Papers Copyright Information Contact & Help Economic Releases Latest Releases » ... and licensed vocational nurses may advance to supervisory positions. Some LPNs and LVNs advance to other healthcare ...

  12. Stem Cell Therapy for Neonatal Disorders: Prospects and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun Sil; Ahn, So Yoon; Sung, Sein

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent advances in neonatal medicine, neonatal disorders, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm neonates and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in term neonates, remain major causes of mortality and morbidities. Promising preclinical research results suggest that stem cell therapies represent the next breakthrough in the treatment of currently intractable and devastating neonatal disorders with complex multifactorial etiologies. This review focuses primarily on the potential role of stem cell therapy in the above mentioned neonatal disorders, highlighting the results of human clinical trials and the challenges that remain to be addressed for their safe and successful translation into clinical care of newborn infants. PMID:28120555

  13. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital.

  14. Neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Birju A; Padbury, James F

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis continues to be a common and significant health care burden, especially in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBW <1500 g). Though intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has decreased the incidence of early-onset group B streptococcal infection dramatically, it still remains a major cause of neonatal sepsis. Moreover, some studies among VLBW preterm infants have shown an increase in early-onset sepsis caused by Escherichia coli. As the signs and symptoms of neonatal sepsis are nonspecific, early diagnosis and prompt treatment remains a challenge. There have been a myriad of studies on various diagnostic markers like hematological indices, acute phase reactants, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, cytokines, and cell surface markers among others. Nonetheless, further research is needed to identify a biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy and validity. Some of the newer markers like inter α inhibitor proteins have shown promising results thereby potentially aiding in early detection of neonates with sepsis. In order to decrease the widespread, prolonged use of unnecessary antibiotics and improve the outcome of the infants with sepsis, reliable identification of sepsis at an earlier stage is paramount. PMID:24185532

  15. Cancer nursing in Ontario: defining nursing roles.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Mings, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of cancer care in Ontario is facing unprecedented challenges. Shortages in nursing, as in all professional disciplines, are having an impact on the delivery of cancer care. Oncology nurses have a major role to play in the delivery of optimum cancer care. Oncology nursing, when adequately defined and supported, can benefit the cancer delivery system, patients, and families. A primary nursing model is seen as being key to the delivery of optimum cancer care. Primary nursing as a philosophy facilitates continuity of care, coordination of a patient's care plan, and a meaningful ongoing relationship with the patient and his/her family. Primary nursing, when delivered in the collaboration of a nurse-physician team, allows for medical resources to be used appropriately. Defined roles enable nurses to manage patients within their scope of practice in collaboration with physicians. Enacting other nursing roles, such as nurse practitioners and advanced practice nurses, can also enable the health care system to manage a broader number of patients with more complex needs. This article presents a position paper originally written as the basis for an advocacy and education initiative in Ontario. It is shared in anticipation that the work may be useful to oncology nurses in other jurisdictions in their efforts to advance oncology nursing and improvement of patient care.

  16. “Picking up the pieces”—Meanings of receiving home nursing care when being old and living with advanced cancer in a rural area

    PubMed Central

    Devik, Siri Andreassen; Hellzen, Ove; Enmarker, Ingela

    2015-01-01

    Rural home nursing care is a neglected area in the research of palliative care offered to older cancer patients. Because access to specialized services is hampered by long distances and fragmented infrastructure, palliative care is often provided through standard home nursing services and delivered by general district nurses. This study aimed to illuminate the lived experience and to interpret the meaning of receiving home nursing care when being old and living with advanced cancer in a rural area in Norway. Narrative interviews were conducted with nine older persons, and a phenomenological hermeneutic approach was used to interpret the meaning of the lived experience. The analysis revealed three themes, each with subthemes: being content with what one gets, falling into place, and losing one's place. The phrase picking up the pieces was found useful to sum up the meaning of this lived experience. The three respective themes refer to how the pieces symbolize the remaining parts of life or available services in their environment, and how the older persons may see themselves as pieces or bricks in a puzzle. A strong place attachment (physical insideness, social insideness, and autobiographical insideness) is demonstrated by the informants in this study and suggests that the rural context may provide an advantageous healthcare environment. Its potential to be a source of comfort, security, and identity concurs with cancer patients’ strong desire for being seen as unique persons. The study shows that district nurses play an essential role in the provision of palliative care for older rural patients. However, the therapeutic value of being in one's familiar landscape seems to depend on how homecare nurses manage to locate it and use it in a more or less person-centred manner. Communication skills and attentiveness to psychosocial aspects of patient care stand out as important attributes for nursing in this context. PMID:26362533

  17. The future of nursing: understanding who nurses are.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, David A

    2013-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health highlights the need for more information about the nursing workforce. Without attention to the problem, OR nursing is likely to continue to experience the nursing shortage more acutely than other practice areas. By changing how they acquire and use nursing data, and by advocating for improved exchange of data between federal and state governments and nursing schools, facilities can be better prepared for future workforce challenges.

  18. Neonatal Infectious Diseases: Evaluation of Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul W.; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. The following chapter reviews recent trends in epidemiology, and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:23481106

  19. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis.

  20. Regulatory Advances in 11 Sub-Saharan Countries in Year 3 of the African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives (ARC).

    PubMed

    Dynes, Michelle; Tison, Laura; Johnson, Carla; Verani, Andre; Zuber, Alexandra; Riley, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa carries the greatest burden of the HIV pandemic. Enhancing the supply and use of human resources through policy and regulatory reform is a key action needed to improve the quality of HIV services in this region. In year 3 of the African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives (ARC), a President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief initiative, 11 country teams of nursing and midwifery leaders ("Quads") received small grants to carry out regulatory improvement projects. Four countries advanced a full stage on the Regulatory Function Framework (RFF), a staged capability maturity model used to evaluate progress in key regulatory functions. While the remaining countries did not advance a full stage on the RFF, important gains were noted. The year-3 evaluation highlighted limitations of the ARC evaluation strategy to capture nuanced progress and provided insight into how the RFF might be adapted for future use.

  1. The role of governance in implementing task-shifting from physicians to nurses in advanced roles in Europe, U.S., Canada, New Zealand and Australia.

    PubMed

    Maier, Claudia B

    2015-12-01

    Task-shifting from physicians to nurses is increasing worldwide; however, research on how it is governed is scarce. This international study assessed task-shifting governance models and implications on practice, based on a literature scoping review; and a survey with 93 country experts in 39 countries (response rate: 85.3%). Governance was assessed by several indicators, regulation of titles, scope of practice, prescriptive authority, and registration policies. This policy analysis focused on eleven countries with task-shifting at the Advanced Practice Nursing/Nurse Practitioner (APN/NP) level. Governance models ranged from national, decentralized to no regulation, but at the discretion of employers and settings. In countries with national or decentralized regulation, restrictive scope of practice laws were shown as barrier, up-to-date laws as enablers to advanced practice. Countries with decentralized regulation resulted in uneven levels of practice. In countries leaving governance to individual settings, practice variations existed, moreover data availability and role clarity was limited. Policy options include periodic reviews to ensure laws are up to date, minimum harmonization in decentralized contexts, harmonized educational and practice-level requirements to reduce practice variation and ensure quality. From a European Union (EU) perspective, regulation is preferred over non-regulation as a first step toward the recognition of qualifications in countries with similar levels of advanced practice. Countries early on in the process need to be aware that different governance models can influence practice.

  2. Toward Advanced Nursing Practice along with People-Centered Care Partnership Model for Sustainable Universal Health Coverage and Universal Access to Health 1

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Tomoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Omori, Junko; Arimori, Naoko; Hishinuma, Michiko; Asahara, Kiyomi; Shimpuku, Yoko; Ohashi, Kumiko; Tashiro, Junko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: this study developed a people-centered care (PCC) partnership model for the aging society to address the challenges of social changes affecting people’s health and the new role of advanced practice nurses to sustain universal health coverage. Method: a people-centered care partnership model was developed on the basis of qualitative meta-synthesis of the literature and assessment of 14 related projects. The ongoing projects resulted in individual and social transformation by improving community health literacy and behaviors using people-centered care and enhancing partnership between healthcare providers and community members through advanced practice nurses. Results: people-centered care starts when community members and healthcare providers foreground health and social issues among community members and families. This model tackles these issues, creating new values concerning health and forming a social system that improves quality of life and social support to sustain universal health care through the process of building partnership with communities. Conclusion: a PCC partnership model addresses the challenges of social changes affecting general health and the new role of advanced practice nurses in sustaining UHC. PMID:28146179

  3. [Quality of advanced practice nurse counseling in home care settings (APN-BQ): psychometric testing of the instrument].

    PubMed

    Petry, Heidi; Suter-Riederer, Susanne; Kerker-Specker, Carmen; Imhof, Lorenz

    2014-12-01

    Hintergrund: Patientenzentrierte und individuell ausgerichtete Angebote, wie die häusliche Beratung durch Pflegeexpertinnen-APN (Advanced Practice Nurses), eignen sich besonders, chronisch kranke alte Menschen in einer möglichst selbstständigen Lebensführung zu unterstützen. Methode: Um die Qualität einer patientenzentrierten Beratung zu evaluieren, wurde ein 23-Item Instrument entwickelt und seine psychometrischen Eigenschaften mit einer Stichprobe von 206 Personen, die 80 Jahre und älter waren getestet. Ziel: Ziel dieses Artikels ist es, die Entwicklung und Evaluation des APN-BQ zu beschreiben. Die psychometrische Testung des Instruments erfolgte anhand einer Hauptkomponentenanalyse mit Varimax-Rotation. Ergebnisse: Die Analyse ergab eine stabile vier Faktorenstruktur (FS = 0,91) mit 19 Items. Alle Faktoren hatten eine Faktorladung > 0,45. Die interne Konsistenz der Gesamtskala ergab einen Wert von Cronbachs alpha 0,86. Die hohe Rücklaufquote der Fragebogen und die Tatsache, dass 98,8 % der Fragen beantwortet wurden, bestätigten die Anwendungsfreundlichkeit und Akzeptanz des Instruments. Schlussfolgerungen: Das APN-BQ erwies sich als zuverlässiges und in Bezug auf Inhalt und Konstrukt valides Instrument, die Struktur-, Prozess- und Ergebnisqualität einer patientenzentrierten Beratungsintervention in der gemeindenahen Versorgung sowie das Ausmaß der Partizipation und Selbstbefähigung (Empowerment) der zu Beratenden zu messen.

  4. Interprofessional education in the clinical setting: A qualitative look at the preceptor's perspective in training advanced practice nursing students.

    PubMed

    Chen, Angel K; Rivera, Josette; Rotter, Nicole; Green, Emily; Kools, Susan

    2016-11-01

    With the shift towards interprofessional education to promote collaborative practice, clinical preceptors are increasingly working with trainees from various professions to provide patient care. It is unclear whether and how preceptors modify their existing precepting approach when working with trainees from other professions. There is little information on strategies for this type of precepting, and how preceptors may foster or impede interprofessional collaboration. The purpose of this qualitative description pilot study was to identify current methods preceptors use to teach trainees from other professions in the clinical setting, particularly advanced practice nursing and medical trainees, and to identify factors that support or impede this type of precepting. Data collected through observations and interviews were analyzed by the research team using thematic analysis procedures. Three major themes were identified: 1) a variety of teaching approaches and levels of engagement with trainees of different professions, 2) preceptor knowledge gaps related to curricula, goals, and scope of practice of trainees from other professions, and 3) administrative, structural and logistical elements that impact the success of precepting trainees from different professions in the clinical setting. This study has implications for faculty development and evaluation of current precepting practices in clinical settings.

  5. [Neonatal intussusception].

    PubMed

    Cuervo, J L

    2015-01-13

    Intussusception in infants and young children is a relatively common entity with a well defined clinical picture and a favorable outcome in most cases.The neonatal intussusceptions is extremely rare and does not have a well-defined clinical picture since its clinical manifestations vary according to the gestational time it occurs, the response of the injured intestine and the gestational age of the child concerned. Two new cases of neonatal intussusceptions are presented and a review of the world literature is performed. Given the stage of intussusceptions (pre- or postnatal) occurs and gestational age of the affected infant (preterm or term), there are three entities with clinical characteristics, topography and evolution rather different: prenatal or intrauterine intussusception, postnatal intussusception in the preterm and postnatal intussusception in the term infant.

  6. Neonatal hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Amy G; Whitington, Peter F

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a clinical condition in which severe liver disease in the newborn is accompanied by extrahepatic siderosis. Gestational alloimmune liver disease (GALD) has been established as the cause of fetal liver injury resulting in nearly all cases of NH. In GALD, a women is exposed to a fetal antigen that she does not recognize as "self" and subsequently begins to produce IgG antibodies that are directed against fetal hepatocytes. These antibodies bind to fetal liver antigen and activate the terminal complement cascade resulting in hepatocyte injury and death. GALD can cause congenital cirrhosis or acute liver failure with and without iron overload and siderosis. Practitioners should consider GALD in cases of fetal demise, stillbirth, and neonatal acute liver failure. Identification of infants with GALD is important as treatment is available and effective for subsequent pregnancies.

  7. Overcoming the barriers to using kangaroo care in neonatal settings.

    PubMed

    Penn, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    Skin-to-skin contact, or kangaroo care (KC), has benefits for babies and parents, improving clinical outcomes, temperature control, breastfeeding rates and child-parent bonding; it reduces morbidity and mortality. Barriers to KC for neonates may include a lack of training for nurses, lack of time, maternal or child physical or mental ill health, and inappropriate settings. With education and helpful management, neonatal nurses can advocate for KC for all babies. Parents may need information and encouragement to begin with. Therefore, nurses can improve the experiences of their patients and, in the long run, free time to perform clinical procedures.

  8. The making of a nurse entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Porter-O'Grady, T

    1998-03-01

    Nursing provides many opportunities for professional and career advancement. The entrepreneurial pathway is especially benefited by a nursing background. Focusing on the opportunities that nursing provides for the entrepreneur opens almost any door in health care.

  9. Neonatal vaccination: Challenges and intervention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew C.; Surendran, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND While vaccines have been tremendously successful in reducing the incidence of serious infectious diseases, newborns remain particularly vulnerable in the first few months of their life to life-threatening infections. A number of challenges exist to neonatal vaccination. However, recent advances in the understanding of neonatal immunology offers insights to overcome many of those challenges. OBJECTIVE This review will present an overview of the features of neonatal immunity which make vaccination difficult, survey the mechanisms of action of available vaccine adjuvants with respect to the unique features of neonatal immunity, and propose a possible mechanism contributing to the inability of neonates to generate protective immune responses to vaccines. METHODS We surveyed recent published findings on the challenges to neonatal vaccination and possible intervention strategies including the use of novel vaccine adjuvants to develop efficacious neonatal vaccines. RESULTS Challenges in the vaccination of neonates include interference from maternal antibody and excessive skewing towards Th2 immunity, which can be counteracted by the use of proper adjuvants. CONCLUSION Synergistic stimulation of multiple Toll-like receptors by incorporating well defined agonist-adjuvant combinations to vaccines is a promising strategy to ensure a protective vaccine response in neonates. PMID:26757146

  10. Interpretation of clotting tests in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sanchita; Curley, Anna; Stanworth, Simon J

    2015-05-01

    There are significant differences between the coagulation system in neonates compared with children and adults. Abnormalities of standard coagulation tests are common within the neonatal population. The laboratory tests of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) were developed to investigate coagulation factor deficiencies in patients with a known bleeding history, and their significance and applied clinical value in predicting bleeding (or thrombotic) risk in critically ill patients is weak. Routine screening of coagulation on admission to the neonatal intensive care unit leads to increased use of plasma for transfusion. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is a human donor plasma frozen within a short specified time period after collection (often 8 h) and then stored at -30°C. FFP has little effect on correcting abnormal coagulation tests when mild and moderate abnormalities of PT are documented in neonates. There is little evidence of effectiveness of FFP in neonates. A large trial by the Northern Neonatal Nursing Initiative assessed the use of prophylactic FFP in preterm infants and reported no improvement in clinical outcomes in terms of mortality or severe disability. An appropriate FFP transfusion strategy in neonates should be one that emphasises the therapeutic use in the face of bleeding rather than prophylactic use in association with abnormalities of standard coagulation tests that have very limited predictive value for bleeding.

  11. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services exploration of positive patient care synergies fueled by consumer demand: care coordination, advanced clinic access, and patient self-management.

    PubMed

    Wertenberger, Sydney; Yerardi, Ruth; Drake, Audrey C; Parlier, Renee

    2006-01-01

    The consumers who utilize the Veterans Health Administration healthcare system are older, and most are learning to live with chronic diseases. Their desires and needs have driven changes within the Veterans Health Administration. Through patient satisfaction initiatives and other feedback sources, consumers have made it clear that they do not want to wait for their care, they want a say in what care is provided to them, and they want to remain as independent as possible. Two interdisciplinary processes/models of healthcare are being implemented on the national level to address these issues: advanced clinic access and care coordination. These programs have a synergistic relationship and are integrated with patient self-management initiatives. Positive outcomes of these programs also meet the needs of our staff. As these new processes and programs are implemented nationwide, skills of both patients and nursing staff who provide their care need to be enhanced to meet the challenges of providing nursing care now and into the 21st century. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services Strategic Planning Work Group is defining and implementing processes/programs to ensure nurses have the knowledge, information, and skills to meet these patient care demands at all levels within the organization.

  12. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: Gateway to Screening for Bipolar Disorder in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel-Gasparro, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this mixed methods descriptive study was to explore Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs’) knowledge of bipolar disorder (BPD) and their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to screening patients with known depression for BPD. Methods: A mixed method study design using surveys on BPD knowledge and screening practices as well as focus group data collection method for facilitators and barriers to screening. Results: 89 APRNs completed the survey and 12 APRNs participated in the focus groups. APRNs in any practice setting had low knowledge scores of BPD. No significant differences in screening for BPD for primary and non primary care APRNs. Qualitative findings revealed screening relates to tool availability; time, unsure of when to screen, fear of sigma, symptoms knowledge of BPD, accessible referral system, personal experiences with BPD, and therapeutic relationships with patients. Conclusion: Misdiagnosis of BPD as unipolar depression is common in primary care settings, leading to a long lag time to optimal diagnosis and treatment. The wait time to diagnosis and treatment could be reduced if APRNs in primary care settings screen patients with a diagnosis of depression by using validated screening tools. These results can inform APRN practice and further research on the effectiveness of screening for reducing the morbidity and mortality of BPDs in primary care settings; underscores the need for integration of mental health care into primary care as well as the need for more APRN education on the diagnosis and management of bipolar disorders. PMID:27347256

  13. Advanced practice registered nurse usability testing of a tailored computer-mediated health communication program.

    PubMed

    Lin, Carolyn A; Neafsey, Patricia J; Anderson, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the usability of a touch-screen-enabled Personal Education Program with advanced practice RNs. The Personal Education Program is designed to enhance medication adherence and reduce adverse self-medication behaviors in older adults with hypertension. An iterative research process was used, which involved the use of (1) pretrial focus groups to guide the design of system information architecture, (2) two different cycles of think-aloud trials to test the software interface, and (3) post-trial focus groups to gather feedback on the think-aloud studies. Results from this iterative usability-testing process were used to systematically modify and improve the three Personal Education Program prototype versions-the pilot, prototype 1, and prototype 2. Findings contrasting the two separate think-aloud trials showed that APRN users rated the Personal Education Program system usability, system information, and system-use satisfaction at a moderately high level between trials. In addition, errors using the interface were reduced by 76%, and the interface time was reduced by 18.5% between the two trials. The usability-testing processes used in this study ensured an interface design adapted to APRNs' needs and preferences to allow them to effectively use the computer-mediated health-communication technology in a clinical setting.

  14. School Nurse Intention to Pursue Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a bachelor's…

  15. An Assessment of North American Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools, Philadelphia, PA.

    This document, prepared under the auspices of the Trilateral Initiative for North American Nursing, a professional organization of nursing, examines and compares nursing standards in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. The report focuses on first-level, general nurses and advanced or specialty practice nurses, and is organized in four parts:…

  16. Can training non-physician clinicians/associate clinicians (NPCs/ACs) in emergency obstetric, neonatal care and clinical leadership make a difference to practice and help towards reductions in maternal and neonatal mortality in rural Tanzania? The ETATMBA project

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, David R; Shemdoe, Aloisia; Mazuguni, Festo; Mbaruku, Godfrey; Davies, David; Kihaile, Paul; Pemba, Senga; Bergström, Staffan; Nyamtema, Angelo; Mohamed, Hamed-Mahfoudh; O'Hare, Joseph Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives During late 2010, 36 trainees including 19 assistant medical officers (AMOs) 1 senior clinical officer (CO) and 16 nurse midwives/nurses were recruited from districts across rural Tanzania and invited to join the Enhancing Human Resources and Use of Appropriate Technologies for Maternal and Perinatal Survival in the sub-Saharan Africa (ETATMBA) training programme. The ETATMBA project was training associate clinicians (ACs) as advanced clinical leaders in emergency obstetric care. The trainees returned to health facilities across the country with the hope of being able to apply their new skills and knowledge. The main aim of this study was to explore the impact of the ETATMBA training on health outcomes including maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality in their facilities. Secondly, to explore the challenges faced in working in these health facilities. Design The study is a pre-examination/postexamination of maternal and neonatal health indicators and a survey of health facilities in rural Tanzania. The facilities surveyed were those in which ETATMBA trainees were placed post-training. The maternal and neonatal indicators were collected for 2011 and 2013 and the survey of the facilities was in early 2014. Results 16 of 17 facilities were surveyed. Maternal deaths show a non-significant downward trend over the 2 years (282–232 cases/100 000 live births). There were no significant differences in maternal, neonatal and birth complication variables across the time-points. The survey of facilities revealed shortages in key areas and some are a serious concern. Conclusions This study represents a snapshot of rural health facilities providing maternal and neonatal care in Tanzania. Enhancing knowledge, practical skills, and clinical leadership of ACs may have a positive impact on health outcomes. However, any impact may be confounded by the significant challenges in delivering a service in terms of resources. Thus, training may be beneficial, but it

  17. American Association of Nurse Anesthetists

    MedlinePlus

    ... us in Seattle on Sept. 8-12 for nurse anesthesia's premier educational, professional, and social event! Register ... on health policy research that will validate the nurse anesthesia profession and advance patient safety. 150 AANA ...

  18. Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography.

    PubMed

    Duffey, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography is a new technique intended to enhance the quality of the photographs provided to families following their loss. Water immersion appears to be most helpful following a second trimester fetal demise. This technique can be used by nurses, professional photographers and others in addition to more traditional neonatal bereavement photography. It does not require special skills or equipment and can be implemented in virtually any perinatal setting. The enhanced quality of photographs produced with this method can potentially provide a source of comfort to grieving families.

  19. The standardization of critical care nursing education and training: strategies for advancing clinical practice in Ontario's adult ICUs.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Patricia; Pinto, Marsha; Fortier, Wendy; Bennett, Jocelyn

    2007-01-01

    In 2004/2005, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC) launched a critical care transformation strategy with a goal to enhance service delivery through improved access, quality and system resource management. Health human resources planning was seen as essential to the success of the strategy, particularly recruitment, education/training and retention of critical care nurses. A nursing task group was invited to articulate core competencies and practice standards that can be applied across Ontario's adult ICUs and to make recommendations for implementation and the training needed to encourage compliance with the initiative. In this article, the opportunity to position nursing within the Ontario MOHLTC vision is described, as well as the work undertaken to prepare for a province-wide approach to critical care nursing education and training.

  20. Nursing and the next millennium.

    PubMed

    Huch, M H

    1995-01-01

    On March 19, 1993, in Toronto, Canada, at Discovery International, Inc.'s, Biennnial Nurse Theorist Conference, five theorists participated in a panel discussion on: caring as an essence of nursing; the value of continuing to develop nursing theory; what constitutes nursing research; the role of advanced practice nurses. The theorists were Imogene M. King, Madeleine M. Leininger, Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, Hildegard E. Peplau, and Martha E. Rogers. Marlaine C. Smith was the moderator and presented the questions to the panel.

  1. Advancing the educational agenda.

    PubMed

    Baker, Cynthia

    2010-12-01

    This timely paper provides a thought-provoking analysis of current advanced practice nursing education in Canada. It comes at a critical juncture in the evolution of Canadian healthcare services and the redefinition of nursing roles. Increasingly, multiple sectors of society are calling for more nurses with advanced practice preparation and for a wider range of advanced practice nursing specialties. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are being proposed as a solution to a financially overburdened national healthcare system, the increasing complexity of healthcare services, and a crisis in access to primary healthcare. Thus, governments seeking greater fiscal efficiency, medical specialists needing sophisticated collaborative support, and healthcare consumers see APNs as the way forward.

  2. AWHONN Position Statement. The Role of Unlicensed Assistive Personnel (Nursing Assistive Personnel) in the Care of Women and Newborns.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) recognizes that unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) also known as nursing assistive personnel (NAP) can function as supportive members of the health care team under the direction of the professional registered nurse (AWHONN, 2010). The professional registered nurse is ultimately responsible for the coordination and delivery of nursing care to women and newborns.

  3. A proof-of-concept implementation of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) role: structural empowerment, role clarity and team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Feistritzer, Nancye R; Jones, Pam O

    2014-03-01

    The quest for decreased cost of care and improved outcomes has created the need for highly effective clinical roles and teams. This article describes the role of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) within a proof-of-concept implementation of a new care delivery model, the Vanderbilt Anticipatory Care Team. Role clarity is central to both structural empowerment of the APRN and team effectiveness. A modified PeaceHealth Team Development Measure tool measured baseline role clarity as a component of overall team effectiveness. A role description for the unit-based APRN based on a comprehensive assessment of the proof-of-concept unit is provided.

  4. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Robles, David T; Jaramillo, Lorena; Hornung, Robin L

    2006-12-10

    An otherwise healthy 5-week-old infant with erythematous plaques predominantly on the face and scalp presented to our dermatology clinic. The mother had been diagnosed with lupus erythematosus 2 years earlier but her disease was quiescent. Neonatal lupus is a rare condition associated with transplacental transfer of IgG anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies from the mother to the fetus. Active connective tissue disease in the mother does not have to be present and in fact is often absent. Although the cutaneous, hematologic and hepatic manifestations are transient, the potential for permanent heart block makes it necessary for this to be carefully ruled out. As in this case, the dermatologist may be the one to make the diagnosis and should be aware of the clinical presentation, work-up, and management of this important disease.

  5. Prenatal cocaine exposure and neonatal/infant outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cambell, Shelly

    2003-01-01

    Illegal drug use throughout the nation is a problem of epidemic proportion. Of particular concern is drug use among pregnant women. In most cases, these women have little hope of achieving a better life for themselves or their children. Illegal drugs, cocaine in particular, can have devastating effects on the neonate. These effects can last well into childhood and can exhibit themselves in academic, social, and family situations. Challenges for the neonatal nurse include early identification of these infants and use of available resources. This article addresses prenatal cocaine use and support services for drug-dependent women, effects of cocaine during the neonatal period, possible neonatal and infant outcomes, and implications for nursing practice.

  6. Nursing in Malawi: nursing theory in the movement to professionalize nursing.

    PubMed

    Bultemeier, Kaye I

    2012-04-01

    Nursing in Malawi has been predominately a technical trade and only recently has begun the transition to a profession with autonomy and advanced degree preparation. Nursing theories provide a framework for the evolution of nursing to an independent profession. Theories provide a means for the articulation of the nursing role to other members of the healthcare team including consumers. Healthcare and human needs are basic and the guidance provided by nursing theories, including Nightingale's, gives language and structure to the education of nurses as the profession moves into advanced practice in a developing country.

  7. Nurse attendee purchasing patterns.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M D; Savik, K; Kjervik, D K

    1993-01-01

    Retention of nursing professionals is crucial in responding to the increasing demand for and complexity of nursing care. Augmenting the decision-making role of nurses is one important retention-related strategy. Purchasing patterns reflect one aspect of nurses' decision-making role. National meetings provide nurses with an opportunity to investigate educational and employment options, as well as to preview technological advances in patient care products and supplies. Yet, the purchasing patterns of nurses related to the marketing of patient care supplies, or educational material at national meetings have rarely been acknowledged or researched. This study investigated the purchasing patterns of nurse attendees as revealed at a national meeting and how attendance influenced purchasing input following the meeting. The study addressed differences in purchasing patterns between specific groups of nurse attendees, as well as the relationship between meeting attendance motivators and purchasing patterns. A descriptive methodology utilizing participant observation at four national nursing meetings and mail survey in four phases was used to determine if there were: (1) identifiable purchasing patterns for nurses attending specific nursing-organization sponsored national meetings, (2) differences in purchasing patterns between nurse attendees from these meetings, (3) differences in self-reported post-meeting purchase input, and (4) relationships between meeting attendance motivators and purchasing patterns. The findings demonstrate that nurse attendee purchasing patterns can be identified and do vary among nursing groups. Nurse attendees at specialty meetings were more likely to act as specifiers, have a more dominant role in purchasing and were more likely to influence product purchases than were nurse attendees from generalist meetings. Self-reports of post-meeting purchasing input demonstrated that nurse attendees utilized information gained at national meetings in

  8. Value of intensified nursing

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Wilhelm; Konta, Brigitte; Prusa, Nina; Raymann, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    The concept "intensified nursing" is mentioned in differentiation to concepts of "nursing care" or "nursing" which intensifies resources or patient contact. Especially psychic and social needs of patients are very appreciated in nursing. A similar type of nursing is known under the concept "advanced nursing practice" (ANP) which means, that a specialised, academically trained nurse offers an extended nursing care in which a focus on the published knowledge of evidence based research is made. From the thin literature to this topic a selection of predetermined topics was analysed where at least two articles with a sufficient high methodical quality were available. The selected topic groups were: „Infant and paediatric nursing", "gerontology" and "oncology". Generally the five publications concerning infant and paediatric nursing could conclusive show a benefit of intensified nursing. Further research is still needed to prove intensified nursing care. Two publications could be found to the gerontological intensified nursing; both used an extended nursing model and an enlarged use of resources. Both studies demonstrated a measurable success in the applied parameters. Two studies also could be analysed in the oncological field in which successes were also provable by the applied parameters. The success was given especially in a higher patient satisfaction, one study showed an improved scheduling (time planning) of nurses. There was not one article concerning economic questions of intensified nursing care. It has to be taken into account that the financial resources have to be used effectively also in nursing nowadays. It has to be assumed that the costs are driven by increased use of resources. Savings can be achieved, however, in the form of avoided therapies and days in hospital by intensified nursing. The intensified nursing can be considered as similar cost-effective as conventional models of nursing. Ethically it is necessary to consider that the possibilities of

  9. Probiotics in neonatal intensive care - back to the future.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Girish; Rao, Shripada; Patole, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Survival of extremely preterm and critically ill neonates has improved significantly over the last few decades following advances in neonatal intensive care. These include antenatal glucocorticoids, surfactant, continuous positive airway pressure support, advanced gentle modes of ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide. Probiotic supplementation is a recent significant milestone in the history of neonatal intensive care. Very few, if any, interventions match the ability of probiotics to significantly reduce the risk of death and definite necrotising enterocolitis while facilitating enteral feeds in high-risk preterm neonates. Probiotics also have a potential to benefit neonates with surgical conditions with significant gastrointestinal morbidity. Current evidence for the benefits of probiotic supplementation for neonates in an intensive care unit is reviewed. The mechanisms for the benefits of probiotics in this population are discussed, and guidelines for clinicians are provided in the context of the regulatory framework in Australia.

  10. UK neonatal intensive care services in 1996

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, J.; Tarnow-Mordi, W.; Gould, C.; Parry, G.; Marlow, N.

    1999-01-01

    A census of activity and staff levels in 1996 was conducted in UK neonatal units and achieved a 100% response from 246 units. Among the 186 neonatal intensive care units, the median (interquartile range) number of total cots was 18(14−22); level 1 intensive care cots 4(2−6); total admissions 318(262−405); very low birthweight admissions 40(28−68); and the number ventilated or given CPAP by endotracheal tube 52(32−83). Forty six (25%) intensive care units lacked the recommended minimum of one consultant with prime responsibility for neonatal medicine. As a conservative estimate 79% of intensive care units had a lower nursing provision than that recommended in previously published guidelines. There was substantial variation in activity and staffing levels among units.

 PMID:10212089

  11. Doctorate in nursing practice: a survey of massachusetts nurses.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Rosanna F; Pulcini, Joyce; Haggerty, Lois A; Tang, Trinh

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) resolved that a new practice degree, the doctorate in nursing practice (DNP), is to become the terminal practice degree and minimum education standard for advanced practice nurses by the year 2015(American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2004). AACN position statement on the practice doctorate in nursing. Retrieved July 1, 2007, from http://www.aacn.nche.edu.html). The DNP will have a clinical-intensive focus. Advanced practice nurses potentially impacted by this resolution will include nurse practitioners, nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and clinical nurse specialists. A task force at the William F. Connell School of Nursing at Boston College conducted an electronic survey in 2006 in an attempt to understand nurses' thoughts about doctoral preparation and the interest of nurses in Massachusetts in pursuing doctoral study. A self-selected group of 376 nurses participated in the study. Nurses identified both positive and negative perceptions related to the degree's viability and practicality, with a majority (55%) preferring the DNP as an educational option.

  12. Regional neonatal oral feeding protocol: changing the ethos of feeding preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Premji, Shahirose S; McNeil, Deborah A; Scotland, Jeanne

    2004-01-01

    The Calgary Health Region Neonatal Oral Feeding Protocol is the culminating work of a broad range of healthcare professionals, including staff nurses, nurse practitioners, nurse educators, nurse managers, dietitians, lactation consultants, clinical nurse specialists, and occupational therapists. The protocol represents a synthesis of research evidence and expert opinion pertaining to the introduction and management of oral milk feedings for high-risk infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. This evidence-based neonatal oral feeding protocol is presented to share knowledge and skill required to create positive feeding experiences while assisting high-risk infants to achieve full oral feedings. Goals of this project include promoting consistent neonatal nursing feeding practices and changing the ethos in relation to feeding interactions between caregiver and infant in the neonatal intensive care unit. This culture change will assist nurses to identify what is unique about their professional practice, which is of particular importance given the skill mix resulting from hospital understaffing and a growing nursing workforce shortage.

  13. [Neonatal resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Burón Martínez, E; Aguayo Maldonado, J

    2006-11-01

    At birth approximately 10 % of term or near-term neonates require initial stabilization maneuvers to establish a cry or regular breathing, maintain a heart rate greater than 100 beats per minute (bpm), and good color and muscular tone. About 1 % requires ventilation and very few infants receive chest compressions or medication. However, birth asphyxia is a worldwide problem and can lead to death or serious sequelae. Recently, the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) published new guidelines on resuscitation at birth. These guidelines review specific questions such as the use of air or 100 % oxygen in the delivery room, dose and routes of adrenaline delivery, the peripartum management of meconium-stained amniotic fluid, and temperature control. Assisted ventilation in preterm infants is briefly described. New devices to improve the care of newborn infants, such as the laryngeal mask airway or CO2 detectors to confirm tracheal tube placement, are also discussed. Significant changes have occurred in some practices and are included in this document.

  14. Nursing informatics competences still challenging nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Rajalahti, Elina; Saranto, Kaija

    2012-01-01

    In recent years nursing documentation has been one of the most important development areas of nursing informatics (NI) in Finland. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of the nurse educators' competences in nursing documentation during a project called eNNI. The eNNI project (2008-2010) was a cooperative project by nurse educators and working life experts. The goal of the project was to implement the national documentation model and thereby improve operational processes at workplaces. The study includes pre- and post-test questioning of NI applications with a web-based questionnaire (n=136). The data were analyzed with distribution, cross-tabulations and average tests and descriptive statistic multivariate method. According to the results, the ICT skills of the nurse educators were good at the end of the project, and they had good information literacy competence. On the other hand, their advanced NI skills left room for improvement.

  15. Nurse Mentors to Advance Quality Improvement in Primary Health Centers: Lessons From a Pilot Program in Northern Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elizabeth A; Jayana, Krishnamurthy; Cunningham, Troy; Washington, Maryann; Mony, Prem; Bradley, Janet; Moses, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    High-quality care during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period is critically important since maternal and child morbidity and mortality are linked to complications that arise during these stages. A nurse mentoring program was implemented in northern Karnataka, India, to improve quality of services at primary health centers (PHCs), the lowest level in the public health system that offers basic obstetric care. The intervention, conducted between August 2012 and July 2014, employed 53 full-time nurse mentors and was scaled-up in 385 PHCs in 8 poor rural districts. Each mentor was responsible for 6 to 8 PHCs and conducted roughly 6 mentoring visits per PHC in the first year. This paper reports the results of a qualitative inquiry, conducted between September 2012 and April 2014, assessing the program's successes and challenges from the perspective of mentors and PHC teams. Data were gathered through 13 observations, 9 focus group discussions with mentors, and 25 individual and group interviews with PHC nurses, medical officers, and district health officers. Mentors and PHC staff and leaders reported a number of successes, including development of rapport and trust between mentors and PHC staff, introduction of team-based quality improvement processes, correct and consistent use of a new case sheet to ensure adherence to clinical guidelines, and increases in staff nurses' knowledge and skills. Overall, nurses in many PHCs reported an increased ability to provide care according to guidelines and to handle maternal and newborn complications, along with improvements in equipment and supplies and referral management. Challenges included high service delivery volumes and/or understaffing at some PHCs, unsupportive or absent PHC leadership, and cultural practices that impacted quality. Comprehensive mentoring can build competence and improve performance by combining on-the-job clinical and technical support, applying quality improvement principles, and promoting team

  16. Management of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection and exposure.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are rare but are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Advances in diagnostic modalities to identify these infants, as well as the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy, have revolutionised the management of affected infants. This review will summarise the epidemiology of neonatal HSV infections and discuss the management of infants with HSV exposure and infection.

  17. Idiopathic Neonatal Colonic Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Oğuz; Melek, Mehmet; Kaba, Sultan; Bulan, Keziban; Peker, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Though the perforation of the colon in neonates is rare, it is associated with more than 50% mortality in high-risk patients. We report a case of idiopathic neonatal perforation of the sigmoid colon in an 8-day-old, healthy, male neonate without any demonstrable cause. PMID:26023477

  18. Hospital Nurse Aide. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This report presents results of a project to revise the current 120-hour advanced nurse aide course to include all recommended minimum competencies. A three-page description of project objectives, activities, and outcomes is followed by a list of the competencies for the 75-hour nurse aide course for long-term care and for the 120-hour advanced…

  19. Nurse Mentors to Advance Quality Improvement in Primary Health Centers: Lessons From a Pilot Program in Northern Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Elizabeth A; Jayana, Krishnamurthy; Cunningham, Troy; Washington, Maryann; Mony, Prem; Bradley, Janet; Moses, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    High-quality care during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period is critically important since maternal and child morbidity and mortality are linked to complications that arise during these stages. A nurse mentoring program was implemented in northern Karnataka, India, to improve quality of services at primary health centers (PHCs), the lowest level in the public health system that offers basic obstetric care. The intervention, conducted between August 2012 and July 2014, employed 53 full-time nurse mentors and was scaled-up in 385 PHCs in 8 poor rural districts. Each mentor was responsible for 6 to 8 PHCs and conducted roughly 6 mentoring visits per PHC in the first year. This paper reports the results of a qualitative inquiry, conducted between September 2012 and April 2014, assessing the program's successes and challenges from the perspective of mentors and PHC teams. Data were gathered through 13 observations, 9 focus group discussions with mentors, and 25 individual and group interviews with PHC nurses, medical officers, and district health officers. Mentors and PHC staff and leaders reported a number of successes, including development of rapport and trust between mentors and PHC staff, introduction of team-based quality improvement processes, correct and consistent use of a new case sheet to ensure adherence to clinical guidelines, and increases in staff nurses’ knowledge and skills. Overall, nurses in many PHCs reported an increased ability to provide care according to guidelines and to handle maternal and newborn complications, along with improvements in equipment and supplies and referral management. Challenges included high service delivery volumes and/or understaffing at some PHCs, unsupportive or absent PHC leadership, and cultural practices that impacted quality. Comprehensive mentoring can build competence and improve performance by combining on-the-job clinical and technical support, applying quality improvement principles, and promoting team

  20. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  1. Interprofessional Obstetric Ultrasound Education: Successful Development of Online Learning Modules; Case-Based Seminars; and Skills Labs for Registered and Advanced Practice Nurses, Midwives, Physicians, and Trainees.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Young-Lin, Nichole; Bearman, Sage; Dau, Kim; Vargas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important aid in the clinical diagnosis and management of normal and complicated pregnancy and childbirth. The technology is widely applied to maternity care in the United States, where comprehensive standard ultrasound examinations are routine. Targeted scans are common and used for an increasing number of clinical indications due to emerging research and a greater availability of equipment with better image resolution at lower cost. These factors contribute to an increased demand for obstetric ultrasound education among students and providers of maternity care, despite a paucity of data to inform education program design and evaluation. To meet this demand, from 2012 to 2015 the University of California, San Francisco nurse-midwifery education program developed and implemented an interprofessional obstetric ultrasound course focused on clinical applications commonly managed by maternity care providers from different professions and disciplines. The course included matriculating students in nursing and medicine, as well as licensed practitioners such as registered and advanced practice nurses, midwives, and physicians and residents in obstetrics and gynecology and family medicine. After completing 10 online modules with a pre- and posttest of knowledge and interprofessional competencies related to teamwork and communication, trainees attended a case-based seminar and hands-on skills practicum with pregnant volunteers. The course aimed to establish a foundation for further supervised clinical training prior to independent practice of obstetric ultrasound. Course development was informed by professional guidelines and clinical and education research literature. This article describes the foundations, with a review of the challenges and solutions encountered in obstetric ultrasound education development and implementation. Our experience will inform educators who wish to facilitate obstetric ultrasound competency development among new and experienced

  2. Filling the gaps: immersing student nurses in specialty nursing and professional associations.

    PubMed

    Vioral, Anna N

    2011-09-01

    The national nursing shortage demands innovative strategies to attract students to the nursing profession. This article provides a potential solution for recruiting and retaining nurses for specialty areas of nursing as well as professional nursing associations by pairing student nurses with professional nurses who belong to nursing associations. An immersion program such as the one described in this article provides a strategy that addresses the nursing work force shortage and professional association membership. The experiential knowledge gained through this type of program may advance the profession throughout the country.

  3. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction in Advanced Nursing Practice: A Nonpharmacologic Approach to Health Promotion, Chronic Disease Management, and Symptom Control.

    PubMed

    Williams, Hants; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Tanabe, Paula

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss how advanced practice nurses (APNs) can incorporate mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) as a nonpharmacologic clinical tool in their practice. Over the last 30 years, patients and providers have increasingly used complementary and holistic therapies for the nonpharmacologic management of acute and chronic diseases. Mindfulness-based interventions, specifically MBSR, have been tested and applied within a variety of patient populations. There is strong evidence to support that the use of MBSR can improve a range of biological and psychological outcomes in a variety of medical illnesses, including acute and chronic pain, hypertension, and disease prevention. This article will review the many ways APNs can incorporate MBSR approaches for health promotion and disease/symptom management into their practice. We conclude with a discussion of how nurses can obtain training and certification in MBSR. Given the significant and growing literature supporting the use of MBSR in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease, increased attention on how APNs can incorporate MBSR into clinical practice is necessary.

  4. Engaging nurses in research utilization.

    PubMed

    Wintersgill, Wendy; Wheeler, Erlinda C

    2012-01-01

    Research skills education is needed for nurses at all levels: novice, intermediate, and advanced. Nurse educators can help novice nurse researchers develop skills such as performing literature searches and critiquing research articles, which are necessary to develop and update clinical practice guidelines and implement evidence-based practice. The purpose of this article is to describe an innovative approach to encourage nurses to perform literature searches and critique research articles as a means to eventually engage in evidence-based practice.

  5. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care: Identifying Parental Needs Through Participatory Design

    PubMed Central

    Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte; Clemensen, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home visits from neonatal nurses. For hospitals covering large regions, home visits may be challenging, time consuming, and expensive and alternative approaches must be explored. Objective To identify parental needs when wanting to provide neonatal home care supported by telemedicine. Methods The study used participatory design and qualitative methods. Data were collected from observational studies, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Two neonatal units participated. One unit was experienced in providing neonatal home care with home visits, and the other planned to offer neonatal home care with telemedicine support. A total of 9 parents with preterm infants assigned to a neonatal home care program and 10 parents with preterm infants admitted to a neonatal unit participated in individual interviews and focus group interviews, respectively. Results Three overall themes were identified: being a family, parent self-efficacy, and nurse-provided security. Parents expressed desire for the following: (1) a telemedicine device to serve as a “bell cord” to the neonatal unit, giving 24-hour access to nurses, (2) video-conferencing to provide security at home, (3) timely written email communication with the neonatal unit, and (4) an online knowledge base on preterm infant care, breastfeeding, and nutrition. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of neonatal home care. NH provides parents with a feeling of being a family, supports their self-efficacy, and gives them a feeling of security when combined with nursing guidance. Parents did not request hands-on support for infant care, but instead expressed a need for communication and guidance, which could be met using

  6. Care coordination for children with complex special health care needs: the value of the advanced practice nurse's enhanced scope of knowledge and practice.

    PubMed

    Looman, Wendy S; Presler, Elizabeth; Erickson, Mary M; Garwick, Ann W; Cady, Rhonda G; Kelly, Anne M; Finkelstein, Stanley M

    2013-01-01

    Efficiency and effectiveness of care coordination depends on a match between the needs of the population and the skills, scope of practice, and intensity of services provided by the care coordinator. Existing literature that addresses the relevance of the advanced practice nurse (APN) role as a fit for coordination of care for children with special health care needs (SHCN) is limited. The objective of this article is to describe the value of the APN's enhanced scope of knowledge and practice for relationship-based care coordination in health care homes that serve children with complex SHCN. The TeleFamilies project is provided as an example of the integration of an APN care coordinator in a health care home for children with SHCN.

  7. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, J P; Rupel, A; Clancy, R M

    2004-01-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes (NLS), while quite rare, carry significant mortality and morbidity in cases of cardiac manifestations. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in > 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with congenital heart block (CHB) in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with CHB was at or below 1 in 50. While the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors (e.g., TGFbeta) from the scavenging macrophages and modulation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroflast scarring phenotype. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to expand, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements which identify first degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. In order to achieve advances at both the bench and bedside, national research registries established in the US and Canada are critical.

  8. The Professionalism of Critical Care Nurse Fellows After Completion of the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship Program.

    PubMed

    Castro, Emily; Click, Elizabeth; Douglas, Sara; Friedman, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Professionalism is paramount to the formation and functioning of new graduate critical care nurses. In this project, a sample of 110 new graduate nurses used a descriptive self-report electronic survey with Hall's Professionalism Inventory Scale. A great percentage of these new graduate critical care nurse fellows with high professionalism scores may be related to their participation in the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship orientation program. Perhaps, Nursing Professional Development specialists should incorporate classes on professional advancement planning for new graduate nurses.

  9. Mothers of Pre-Term Infants in Neonate Intensive Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this study, eight mothers of pre-term infants under the care of nursing staff and neonatologists in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Children's Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, were observed and interviewed about their birth experience and their images of themselves as mothers during their stay. Patterns and themes in the…

  10. Neonatal medicine in ancient art.

    PubMed

    Yurdakök, Murat

    2010-01-01

    There are a limited number of artistic objects from ancient times with particular importance in neonatal medicine. The best examples are figurines from ancient Egypt of Isis nursing Horus, showing the importance of breastfeeding. The earliest images of the human fetus were made by the Olmecs in Mexico around 1200- 400 BCE. One of the earliest representations of congenital anomalies is a figurine of diencephalic twins thought to be the goddess of Anatolia, dated to around 6500 BCE. In addition to these figurines, three sets of twins in the ancient world have medical importance, and Renaissance artists often used them as a subject for their paintings: "direct suckling animals" (Romulus and Remus), "heteropaternal superfecundation" (mother: Leda, fathers: Zeus, the king of the Olympian gods, and Leda's husband, Tyndareus), and "twin-to-twin transfusion" in monozygotic twins (Jacob and Esau).

  11. Futile care and the neonate.

    PubMed

    Romesberg, Tricia L

    2003-10-01

    The concept of futile care is controversial and difficult to define. Efforts to prolong life, once considered an outcome of healing, may now be viewed by some as harmful acts of prolonging suffering. This article reviews a number of cases representing this challenging ethical dilemma, such as Baby K and MacDonald v. Milleville. The Baby Doe regulations, the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA), and the Born-Alive Protection Act of 2001, also are discussed to provide an improved understanding of the legal framework that impacts ethical decision making. Nurses at the bedside must be equipped with the ethical knowledge and communication skills necessary to care for patients and families facing the ethical dilemma of futile care. An increased focus on neonatal palliative care is suggested to provide infants, families, and staff with the necessary tools to work through this painful process.

  12. NICU procedures are getting sweeter: development of a sucrose protocol for neonatal procedural pain.

    PubMed

    Mokhnach, Larisa; Anderson, Marilyn; Glorioso, Rachelle; Loeffler, Katie; Shinabarger, Kelly; Thorngate, Lauren; Yates, Marna; Diercks, Kristi; Berkan, Maureen; Hou, Shwu-Shin; Millar, April; Thomas, Karen A; Walker, Wendy; Zbirun, Ilona

    2010-01-01

    Neonates in the neonatal intensive care nursery experience multiple, painful, tissue-damaging procedures daily. Pain among neonates is often underestimated and untreated, producing untoward consequences. A literature review established strong evidence supporting the use of sucrose as an analgesic for minor procedural pain among neonates. A review of unit practices and nurses' experiential evidence initiated the production of a standardized protocol in our unit at the University of Washington Medical Center NICU in Seattle.Nursing practices surrounding sucrose use differed widely in dose, timing, and patient application. We carefully evaluated evidence documenting the effectiveness as well as the safety of sucrose administration and wrote a protocol and practice standards for our primarily premature patient population. This article describes the development and execution of a standardized, nurse-implemented, sucrose protocol to reduce procedural pain.

  13. State of the art. Neonatal respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Parker, L A

    1999-12-01

    Advances in ventilatory management of respiratory distress in the newborn have made dramatic strides during the last decade. Innovative treatments such as PTV, HFV, liquid ventilation, and NO therapy are just beginning to have an impact on the care of neonates in the NICU. These treatment modalities should continue to have an effect on the care of the newborn infant well into the future.

  14. Beyond Florence Nightingale: The General Professional Education of the Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pounds, Lois A.

    1989-01-01

    Nurses must leave nursing to advance their careers. A rigorous preprofessional science preparation and nursing education at the baccalaureate level followed by a clinical internship is proposed. Nurses would be able to achieve specialty education either by graduate education or through experience and continuing nursing education. (Author/MLW)

  15. Thermoregulation and axillary temperature measurements in neonates: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Keeling, E B

    1992-01-01

    The theoretical and empirical literature were reviewed to examine the current knowledge about thermoregulation and temperature-measurement techniques in neonates. The results indicate that there is a conflict in the literature regarding the length of time needed to obtain neonatal axillary temperature measurements with glass thermometers and a gap in the literature pertaining to the symmetry of axillary temperature measurements in neonates not exposed to an external heat source. Liquid crystal and tympanic thermometers have been demonstrated to be inaccurate fever detectors. The use of electronic thermometers may offer nurses time-saving alternatives to standard glass thermometers for obtaining neonatal temperature measurements.

  16. Integrating Health Information Technology Safety into Nursing Informatics Competencies.

    PubMed

    Borycki, Elizabeth M; Cummings, Elizabeth; Kushniruk, Andre W; Saranto, Kaija

    2017-01-01

    Nursing informatics competencies are constantly changing in response to advances in the health information technology (HIT) industry and research emerging from the fields of nursing and health informatics. In this paper we build off the work of Staggers and colleagues in defining nursing informatics competencies at five levels: the beginning nurse, the experienced nurse, the nursing informatics specialist, the nursing informatics innovator and the nursing informatics researcher in the area of HIT safety. The work represents a significant contribution to the literature in the area of nursing informatics competency development as it extends nursing informatics competencies to include those focused on the area of technology-induced errors and HIT safety.

  17. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  18. Neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters: recommendations for prevention of insertion and postinsertion complications.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Pamela R; Miller, Kellee M

    2008-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) continue to be necessary in neonatal care. They benefit many premature infants and those needing long-term intravenous access. An experienced inserter, early recognition of PICC candidates, early PICC placement, knowledge of anatomy, and correct choice of vein all increase placement success. As with any invasive procedure, there are risks. These include pain, difficulty advancing the catheter, damage to vessels, catheter malposition, and bleeding. Utilizing assessment skills, following the product manufacturer's instructions, and carefully placing the catheter should minimize most of these risks. Additional risks include postinsertion complications such as occlusions, thrombosis, catheter failure, infection, and catheter malposition. Proper nursing care--which includes controlling infection, properly securing the catheter, and changing the dressing as needed--is key to preventing complications and maintaining the PICC until treatment has been completed.

  19. Advancing Nursing Research in the Visual Era: Reenvisioning the Photovoice Process Across Phenomenological, Grounded Theory, and Critical Theory Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Evans-Agnew, Robin A; Boutain, Doris M; Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S

    Photovoice is a powerful research method that employs participant photography for advancing voice, knowledge, and transformative change among groups historically or currently marginalized. Paradoxically, this research method risks exploitation of participant voice because of weak methodology to method congruence. The purposes of this retrospective article are to revisit current interdisciplinary research using photovoice and to suggest how to advance photovoice by improving methodology-method congruence. Novel templates are provided for improving the photovoice process across phenomenological, grounded theory, and critical theory methodologies.

  20. Executive Competencies of Nurses within the Veterans Health Administration: Comparison of Current and Future Nurse Executive Views

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-24

    Commission found widespread support for the funding of nursing education however, there appears to be no coordinated plan for individual development... nursing education programs and are typically part of graduate nursing education . Future nurse executives without advanced nursing degrees must develop

  1. Integrative review of graduate entry programs in nursing.

    PubMed

    Pellico, Linda Honan; Terrill, Eileen; White, Patricia; Rico, Janet

    2012-01-01

    In this integrative review, the authors report on, summarize, and analyze research conducted on non-nurse college graduates enrolled in master's degree programs in nursing in the United States and Canada, leading to preparation for advanced practice nurse roles. This review demonstrated that non-nurse college graduates successfully develop into registered nurses and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) or certified nurse-midwives (CNMs). What is conspicuously absent in the literature is articulation of the process whereby college graduates become nurses and APRNs or CNMs. Given the expansion of graduate entry programs for non-nurse college graduates, along with the recent clarion call to move advanced practice nursing to the postgraduate level, it is time to examine the process. Understanding the process will help faculty refine pedagogy and curricula to support students' transition from non-nurse to both nurse and APRN or CNM.

  2. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement.

  3. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Halder, D; Seng, Q B; Malik, A S; Choo, K E

    1996-09-01

    Neonatal septic arthritis has always been considered as separate from its counterpart in older children. The condition is uncommon but serious. Affected neonates usually survive, but with permanent skeletal deformities. Ten cases of neonatal septic arthritis were diagnosed between January 1989 and December 1993 in the neonatal intensive care units of two referral hospitals in the state of Kelantan, Malaysia. All except one neonate was born prematurely. The mean age of presentation was 15.6 days. Joint swelling (10/10), increased warmth (7/10) and erythema of the overlying skin (7/10) were the common presenting signs. Vague constitutional symptoms preceded the definitive signs of septic arthritis in all cases. The total white cell counts were raised with shift to the left. The knee (60%) was not commonly affected, followed by the hip (13%) and ankle (13%). Three neonates had multiple joint involvement. Coexistence of arthritis with osteomyelitis was observed in seven neonates. The commonest organism isolated was methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (9/10). Needle aspiration was performed in nine neonates and one had incision with drainage. Follow up data was available for five neonates and two of these had skeletal morbidity. Early diagnosis by frequent examination of the joints, prompt treatment and control of nosocomial infection are important for management.

  4. Reducing CBC Clotting Rates in the Neonatal Patient Care Areas

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jennifer; Tichon, Tanya; Narvey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Performing a complete blood count (CBC) is a common test performed in neonatal intensive care. Samples reported as “clotted” are not able to be analyzed and require redraw. A perceived “high” clotting rate elicits frustration among team members and has negative effects on patient flow and patient satisfaction. Process mapping and a root cause analysis determined that an educational intervention was required to optimize blood collection skills of front-line nurses. Through four rapid PDSA cycles over a three year period, the neonatal patient care areas were able to decrease their CBC clotting rates from 30% (monthly rate when the problem was identified) to 16% (yearly average at the end of the project). The CBC clotting rates continue to decease over time due to the integration of a multi-faceted educational plan into biannual education days designed for current staff nurses, as well as into the orientation plan for newly hired and student nurses. PMID:27493749

  5. Conflict engagement: a new model for nurses.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Debra

    2015-03-01

    This article is one in a series on conflict. It is part of an ongoing series on leadership coordinated by the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE), highlighting topics of interest to nurse managers and emerging nurse leaders. The AONE provides leadership, professional development, advocacy, and research to advance nursing practice and patient care, promote nursing leadership excellence, and shape public policy for health care.

  6. Development of a Composite Pain Measure for Persons with Advanced Dementia: Exploratory Analyses in Self-Reporting Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Mary; Polissar, Nayak; Neradilek, Moni Blazej

    2010-01-01

    Context Experts agree that pain assessment in non-communicative persons requires data from sources that do not rely on self-report, including proxy reports, health history, and observation of pain behaviors. However, there is little empirical evidence to guide clinicians in weighting or combining these sources to best approximate the person’s experience. Objectives The aim of this exploratory study was to identify a combination of observer-dependent pain indicators that would be significantly more predictive of self-reported pain intensity than any single indicator. Because self-reported pain is usually viewed as the criterion measure for pain, self-reported usual and worst pain were the dependent variables. Methods The sample consisted of 326 residents (mean age: 83.2 years; 69% female) living in one of 24 nursing homes. Independent variables did not rely on self-report: surrogate reports from certified nursing assistants (CNA IPT), Checklist of Nonverbal Pain Indicators (CNPI), Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD), Pittsburgh Agitation Scale (PAS), number of painful diagnoses, and Minimum Data Set (MDS) pain variables. Results In univariate analyses, the CNA IPT scores were correlated most highly with self-reported pain. The final multivariate model for self-reported usual pain included CNA IPT, CSDD, PAS and education; this model accounted for only 14% of the variance. The more extensive of the two final models for worst pain included MDS pain frequency, CSDD, CNA IPT, CNPI and age (R2 = 0.14). Conclusion Additional research is needed to develop a predictive pain model for nonverbal persons. PMID:21094018

  7. Immunological Defects in Neonatal Sepsis and Potential Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Steven L.; Stortz, Julie A.; Mira, Juan C.; Larson, Shawn D.; Wynn, James L.; Moldawer, Lyle L.

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances in critical care medicine, neonatal sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with the greatest risk affecting very low birth weight, preterm neonates. The presentation of neonatal sepsis varies markedly from its presentation in adults, and there is no clear consensus definition of neonatal sepsis. Previous work has demonstrated that when neonates become septic, death can occur rapidly over a matter of hours or days and is generally associated with inflammation, organ injury, and respiratory failure. Studies of the transcriptomic response by neonates to infection and sepsis have led to unique insights into the early proinflammatory and host protective responses to sepsis. Paradoxically, this early inflammatory response in neonates, although lethal, is clearly less robust relative to children and adults. Similarly, the expression of genes involved in host protective immunity, particularly neutrophil function, is also markedly deficient. As a result, neonates have both a diminished inflammatory and protective immune response to infection which may explain their increased risk to infection, and their reduced ability to clear infections. Such studies imply that novel approaches unique to the neonate will be required for the development of both diagnostics and therapeutics in this high at-risk population. PMID:28224121

  8. Systemic neonatal candidosis: the karyotyping of Candida albicans strains isolated from neonates and health-workers.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdeljelil, J; Ben Saida, N; Saghrouni, F; Fathallah, A; Boukadida, J; Sboui, H; Ben Said, M

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans has become an important cause of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The aim of the present study was to compare C. albicans strains isolated from neonates (NN) suffering from systemic candidosis and from nurses in order to determine the relatedness between NN and health workers' strains. Thirty-one C. albicans strains were isolated from 18 NN admitted to the NICU of the neonatology service of Farhat Hached Hospital of Sousse, Tunisia and suffering from systemic candidosis, together with five strains recovered from nurses suffering from C. albicans onychomycosis. Two additional strains were tested, one from an adult patient who developed a systemic candidosis and the second from an adult with inguinal intertrigo. All strains were karyotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with a CHEF-DR II system. Analysis of PFGE patterns yielded by the 38 strains tested led to the identification of three pulsotypes that were designated I, II and III, and consisted of six chromosomal bands with a size ranging from 700 to >2500 kbp. The most widespread was the pulsotype I, which was shared by 17 NN and the five nurses' strains. The identity between NN and nurses' strains is very suggestive of a nosocomial acquisition from health-workers.

  9. Part 1: recognizing neonatal spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Brand, M Colleen

    2006-02-01

    Neonatal spinal cord injury can occur in utero, as well as after either a difficult delivery or a nontraumatic delivery. Spinal cord injury can also be related to invasive nursery procedures or underlying neonatal pathology. Early clinical signs of spinal cord injury that has occurred in utero or at delivery includes severe respiratory compromise and profound hypotonia. Knowledge of risk factors and awareness of symptoms is required for early recognition and appropriate treatment. This article reviews the embryological development of the spinal column highlighting mechanisms of injury and identifying underlying factors that increase the risk of spinal cord injury in newborns. Signs and symptoms of injury, cervical spine immobilization, and the differential diagnosis are discussed. Nursing implications, general prognosis, and research in spinal cord injury are provided.

  10. Mentoring practices benefiting pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Weese, Meghan M; Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Huth, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies examining predictors of pediatric nurse protégé mentoring benefits demonstrated that protégé perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations promoting mutual mentoring benefits. This descriptive correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet® recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital advances nursing science by demonstrating how mentoring practices benefit pediatric nurse protégés.

  11. Statistics used in current nursing research.

    PubMed

    Zellner, Kathleen; Boerst, Connie J; Tabb, Wil

    2007-02-01

    Undergraduate nursing research courses should emphasize the statistics most commonly used in the nursing literature to strengthen students' and beginning researchers' understanding of them. To determine the most commonly used statistics, we reviewed all quantitative research articles published in 13 nursing journals in 2000. The findings supported Beitz's categorization of kinds of statistics. Ten primary statistics used in 80% of nursing research published in 2000 were identified. We recommend that the appropriate use of those top 10 statistics be emphasized in undergraduate nursing education and that the nursing profession continue to advocate for the use of methods (e.g., power analysis, odds ratio) that may contribute to the advancement of nursing research.

  12. Management of Neonatal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Benjamin, Daniel K; Smith, P Brian

    2009-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis (IC) is common and often fatal in extremely premature neonates. In the last decade, the therapeutic armamentarium for IC has markedly expanded; however, the pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy of most antifungal agents in premature neonates are unknown. We will review the major systemic antifungal agents in clinical use. PMID:9849983

  13. Cytomegalovirus in pregnancy and the neonate

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Vincent C.; Lazzarotto, Tiziana

    2017-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains a leading cause of disability in children. Understanding the pathogenesis of infection from the mother via the placenta to the neonate is crucial if we are to produce new interventions and provide supportive mechanisms to improve the outcome of congenitally infected children. In recent years, some major goals have been achieved, including the diagnosis of primary maternal CMV infection in pregnant women by using the anti-CMV IgG avidity test and the diagnosis and prognosis of foetal CMV infection by using polymerase chain reaction real-time tests to detect and quantify the virus in amniotic fluid. This review summarises recent advances in our understanding and highlights where challenges remain, especially in vaccine development and anti-viral therapy of the pregnant woman and the neonate. Currently, no therapeutic options during pregnancy are available except those undergoing clinical trials, whereas valganciclovir treatment is recommended for congenitally infected neonates with moderately to severely symptomatic disease. PMID:28299191

  14. Pain management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Gall, Olivier; Annequin, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest an increased sensitivity to pain in neonates. Repeated and prolonged pain exposure may affect the subsequent development of pain systems, as well as potentially contribute to alterations in long-term development and behavior. Despite impressive gains in the knowledge of neonatal pain mechanisms and strategies to treat neonatal pain acquired during the last 15 years, a large gap still exists between routine clinical practice and research results. Accurate assessment of pain is crucial for effective pain management in neonates. Neonatal pain management should rely on current scientific evidence more than the attitudes and beliefs of care-givers. Parents should be informed of pain relief strategies and their participation in the health care plan to alleviate pain should be encouraged. The need for systemic analgesia for both moderate and severe pain, in conjunction with behavioral/environmental approaches to pain management, is emphasized. A main sources of pain in the neonate is procedural pain which should always be prevented and treated. Nonpharmacological approaches constitute important treatment options for managing procedural pain. Nonpharmacological interventions (environmental and preventive measures, non-nutritive sucking, sweet solutions, skin-skin contact, and breastfeeding analgesia) can reduce neonatal pain indirectly by reducing the total amount of noxious stimuli to which infants are exposed, and directly, by blocking nociceptive transduction or transmission or by activation of descending inhibitory pathways or by activating attention and arousal systems that modulate pain. Opioids are the mainstay of pharmacological pain treatment but there are other useful medications and techniques that may be used for pain relief. National guidelines are necessary to improve neonatal pain management at the institutional level, individual neonatal intensive care units need to develop specific practice guidelines regarding pain

  15. [Deafness in the neonatal period: basis for screening].

    PubMed

    Bonfils, P; François, M; Aidan, D; Avan, P; Parat, S; Boissinot, C; Narcy, P

    1995-07-01

    Deafness must be recognized in infancy in order to reduce auditory disability to a minimum. To achieve this, it is important to implement screening programmes as soon after birth as possible. In the United States, the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing recommended in 1982 that identification of hearing loss should be screened in the neonatal period. This early detection is now considered critical for optimal rehabilitative outcome. This paper presents the "state of art" neonatal screening principles and procedures. In France, neonatal screening programs for auditory dysfunction are not consistent with these principles. Evoked otoacoustic emissions represent an important advance in screening for hearing loss in normal neonates and babies from neonatal intensive care units. This method records very low intensity sound energy released by the cochlea in response to a brief sound stimulation. These otoacoustic emissions show promise as a rapid, cost-effective means of quickly discharging all babies with normal peripherical auditory systems.

  16. Neonatal Sepsis due to Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Elizabeth A.; Boyce, Guilaine K.; Sadarangani, Manish; Lavoie, Pascal M.

    2013-01-01

    Neonates, especially those born prematurely, are at high risk of morbidity and mortality from sepsis. Multiple factors, including prematurity, invasive life-saving medical interventions, and immaturity of the innate immune system, put these infants at greater risk of developing infection. Although advanced neonatal care enables us to save even the most preterm neonates, the very interventions sustaining those who are hospitalized concurrently expose them to serious infections due to common nosocomial pathogens, particularly coagulase-negative staphylococci bacteria (CoNS). Moreover, the health burden from infection in these infants remains unacceptably high despite continuing efforts. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, immunological risk factors, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and outcomes of neonatal infection due to the predominant neonatal pathogen CoNS. PMID:23762094

  17. Enhancing neonatal wellness with home visitation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Carlo; Warmuskerken, Geene; Sinclair, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    We planned and implemented an evidence-based program to screen for jaundice and to try to increase the proportion of women breastfeeding for 6 months. The program involved home visitation by a registered nurse to provide education on and support of breastfeeding, and to perform physical assessment of both mothers and newborns, including screening for neonatal jaundice. Quantitative data showed increased breastfeeding rates at 6 months. In addition, readmission rates for jaundice were higher when compared to regional benchmarks. However, the average length of stay for treatment of jaundice was shorter than regional benchmarks. Qualitative data indicated that the program was effective at achieving its goals and was valued by participants.

  18. Special Considerations in Neonatal Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Dalgleish, Stacey; Kostecky, Linda; Charania, Irina

    2016-12-01

    Care of infants supported with mechanical ventilation is complex, time intensive, and requires constant vigilance by an expertly prepared health care team. Current evidence must guide nursing practice regarding ventilated neonates. This article highlights the importance of common language to establish a shared mental model and enhance clear communication among the interprofessional team. Knowledge regarding the underpinnings of an open lung strategy and the interplay between the pathophysiology and individual infant's response to a specific ventilator strategy is most likely to result in a positive clinical outcome.

  19. [Gender mainstreaming and nursing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2011-12-01

    Gender mainstreaming is one of the most important strategies in promoting global gender equality. The Taiwan government launched policies on gender mainstreaming and gender impact assessment in 2007 in response to strong public and academic advocacy work. With rising awareness of gender issues, nursing professionals in Taiwan should keep pace with global trends and become actively involved in advancing gender-mainstreaming policies. This article shows that nursing professionals should prepare themselves by cultivating gender competence, understanding gender-related regulations, recognizing the importance of gender impact assessment implementation, integrating gender issues into nursing education, conducting gender-related research and participating in decision-making processes that promote gender mainstreaming. Nursing professionals should enhance their knowledge and understanding of gender mainstreaming-related issues and get involved in the gender-related decision-making process in order to enhance gender awareness and women's health and further the professional development of nurses.

  20. Qualitative Distinctions and Similarities in the Practice of Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Mary V.; Brykczynski, Karen A.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison of results of two studies regarding the actual practice of clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners revealed a shared core of advanced practice competencies as well as distinct differences between practice roles. (JOW)

  1. What's changed and what's stayed the same: a case study in nursing and philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Judge, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Philanthropic resources can help the nursing profession and nurses advance the health of the nation. While progress has been made by nursing organizations, primarily in academia, to fundraise for nursing-focused projects over the last 20 years, nursing receives little of the total annual US giving. The American Nurses Foundation's recent expansion provides an example of changes in philanthropy within the context of how the core principles of fundraising and market change can leverage giving for nursing activities and nurses.

  2. Can training in advanced clinical skills in obstetrics, neonatal care and leadership, of non-physician clinicians in Malawi impact on clinical services improvements (the ETATMBA project): a process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, David R; Chimwaza, Wanangwa; Davies, David; O'Hare, Joseph Paul; Kamwendo, Francis; Quenby, Siobhan; Griffiths, Frances

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The ‘enhancing human resources and the use of appropriate technologies for maternal and perinatal survival in sub-Saharan Africa’ (ETATMBA) project is training emergency obstetric and new-born care (EmONC) non-physician clinicians (NPCs) as advanced clinical leaders. Our objectives were to evaluate the implementation and changes to practice. Design A mixed methods process evaluation with the predominate methodology being qualitative. Setting Rural and urban hospitals in 8 of the 14 districts of northern and central Malawi. Participants 54 EmONC NPCs with 3 years’ plus experience. Intervention Training designed and delivered by clinicians from the UK and Malawi; it is a 2-year plus package of training (classroom, mentorship and assignments). Results We conducted 79 trainee interviews over three time points during the training, as well as a convenience sample of 10 colleagues, 7 district officers and 2 UK obstetricians. Trainees worked in a context of substantial variation in the rates of maternal and neonatal deaths between districts. Training reached trainees working across the target regions. For 46 trainees (8 dropped out of the course), dose delivered in terms of attendance was high and all 46 spent time working alongside an obstetrician. In early interviews trainees recalled course content unprompted indicating training had been received. Colleagues and district officers reported cascading of knowledge and initial changes in practice indicating early implementation. By asking trainees to describe actual cases we found they had implemented new knowledge and skills. These included life-saving interventions for postpartum haemorrhage and eclampsia. Trainees identified the leadership training as enabling them to confidently change their own practice and initiate change in their health facility. Conclusions This process evaluation suggests that trainees have made positive changes in their practice. Clear impacts on maternal and perinatal mortality

  3. Nursing's new paradigm is transcultural nursing: an interview with Madeleine Leininger. Interview by Susan Cummings.

    PubMed

    Leininger, M

    1996-01-01

    Around the world, transcultural nursing is being developed to provide culturally competent, congruent, humanistic health care. In this article, Susan Cummings, Associate Editor of Advanced Practice Nursing Quarterly, interviews Madeleine Leininger, founder of transcultural nursing and leader in human care nursing research. For the past 40 years Dr. Leininger has been instrumental in developing concepts, definitions, and a theoretical and research base for the development of transcultural nursing with a human care focus.

  4. Review of neonatal EEG.

    PubMed

    Husain, Aatif M

    2005-03-01

    Neonatal electroencephalography (EEG) presents some of the most difficult challenges in EEG interpretation. It differs significantly in many ways from EEG of older children and adults. Technologically, acquisition of a neonatal EEG is significantly more difficult and different than an adult EEG. There are numerous features that are age-specific and change almost week-to-week in the preterm infant. Some features may be normal at one age and abnormal if they persist for several weeks. Many of these features also have different implications in neonates as compared to older individuals. These issues mandate a different approach to neonatal EEG interpretation. In this article an overview of neonatal EEG is presented. After a brief discussion of relevant technical issues, various normal EEG features encountered in neonates are discussed. This is followed by a discussion of the ontogeny of EEG, starting from the age of viability to the first few months of life. A description of various abnormalities follows. Finally, an approach to analysis of a neonatal EEG is presented.

  5. AANA journal course: update for nurse anesthetists. The SLAM Emergency Airway Flowchart: a new guide for advanced airway practitioners.

    PubMed

    Rich, James M; Mason, Andrew M; Ramsay, Michael A E

    2004-12-01

    Advanced airway practitioners in anesthesiology, emergency medicine, and prehospital care can suddenly and unexpectedly face difficult airway situations that can surface without warning during mask ventilation or tracheal intubation. Although tracheal intubation remains the "gold standard" in airway management, it is not always achievable, and, when it proves impossible, appropriate alternative interventions must be used rapidly to avoid serious morbidity or mortality. The SLAM Emergency Airway Flowchart (SEAF) is intended to prevent the 3 reported primary causes of adverse respiratory events (ie, inadequate ventilation, undetected esophageal intubation, and difficult intubation). The 5 pathways of the SEAF include primary ventilation, rapid-sequence intubation, difficult intubation, rescue ventilation, and cricothyrotomy. It is intended for use with adult patients by advanced airway practitioners competent in direct laryngoscopy, tracheal intubation, administration of airway drugs, rescue ventilation, and cricothyrotomy. The SEAF has limitations (eg, suitable only for use with adult patients, cannot be used by certain categories of rescue personnel, and depends heavily on assessment of Spo2). A unique benefit is provision of simple alternative techniques that can be used when another technique fails.

  6. Awareness of self and expanding consciousness: using nursing theories to prepare nurse-therapists.

    PubMed

    Vandemark, Lisa M

    2006-07-01

    Psychotherapy is an accepted role of the advanced practice psychiatric nurse. Nursing theorists, notably Hildegard Peplau and Margaret Newman, offer guidance on the psychological and professional development of the nurse. This paper examines Newman's theory of health as expanding consciousness and the concept of awareness of self in Peplau's theory, and suggests that psychiatric advanced practice nursing programs consider the need for nurses to develop self-knowledge to facilitate the nurse-patient relationship and to improve outcomes of patient care in psychotherapy.

  7. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  8. Challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zea-Vera, Alonso

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the third leading cause of neonatal mortality and a major public health problem, especially in developing countries. Although recent medical advances have improved neonatal care, many challenges remain in the diagnosis and management of neonatal infections. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is complicated by the frequent presence of noninfectious conditions that resemble sepsis, especially in preterm infants, and by the absence of optimal diagnostic tests. Since neonatal sepsis is a high-risk disease, especially in preterm infants, clinicians are compelled to empirically administer antibiotics to infants with risk factors and/or signs of suspected sepsis. Unfortunately, both broad-spectrum antibiotics and prolonged treatment with empirical antibiotics are associated with adverse outcomes and increase antimicrobial resistance rates. Given the high incidence and mortality of sepsis in preterm infants and its long-term consequences on growth and development, efforts to reduce the rates of infection in this vulnerable population are one of the most important interventions in neonatal care. In this review, we discuss the most common questions and challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis, with a focus on developing countries. PMID:25604489

  9. Challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zea-Vera, Alonso; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2015-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the third leading cause of neonatal mortality and a major public health problem, especially in developing countries. Although recent medical advances have improved neonatal care, many challenges remain in the diagnosis and management of neonatal infections. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is complicated by the frequent presence of noninfectious conditions that resemble sepsis, especially in preterm infants, and by the absence of optimal diagnostic tests. Since neonatal sepsis is a high-risk disease, especially in preterm infants, clinicians are compelled to empirically administer antibiotics to infants with risk factors and/or signs of suspected sepsis. Unfortunately, both broad-spectrum antibiotics and prolonged treatment with empirical antibiotics are associated with adverse outcomes and increase antimicrobial resistance rates. Given the high incidence and mortality of sepsis in preterm infants and its long-term consequences on growth and development, efforts to reduce the rates of infection in this vulnerable population are one of the most important interventions in neonatal care. In this review, we discuss the most common questions and challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis, with a focus on developing countries.

  10. Understanding neonatal jaundice: UK practice and international profile.

    PubMed

    Shortland, David B; Hussey, Marun; Chowdhury, Ashoka Dey

    2008-07-01

    Over the last 25 years there have been considerable advances in the treatment and technologies used in the care of newborn infants. Most of these advances are related to the care of the premature infants and there have been few changes in the management of conditions commonly seen in term infants. Neonatal jaundice is one of the commonest neonatal disorders and has been recognized since early history. Early neonatal jaundice is usually caused by the physiological destruction of red blood cells in the infant and its importance lies in the ability of the bilirubin pigment so produced to cross the blood brain barrier resulting in neurotoxicity. Prolonged neonatal jaundice (after 14 days of age) may be an indication of an underlying liver disorder. The approach to neonatal jaundice has remained largely unchanged over the last two to three decades. We continue to rely on visual inspection to assess the severity of early neonatal jaundice. We have technology that is effective in reducing the level of bilirubinaemia but in the UK there is no clear consensus as to the level at which jaundice should be treated. We do not have a standardized approach to the management of prolonged jaundice and there is potential for infants with significant liver problems to be diagnosed at a relatively late stage. Some countries (for example the US) have professional bodies who have introduced guidelines to ensure a standardized approach to the jaundice infant. We have little information about neonatal jaundice treatment in other parts of the developing world.

  11. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  12. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  13. Genomics Nursing Faculty Champion Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jean; Calzone, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Nurse faculty are challenged to keep up with the emerging and fast-paced field of genomics and the mandate to prepare the nursing workforce to be able to translate genomic research advances into routine clinical care. Using Faculty Champions and other options, the initiative stimulated curriculum development and promoted genomics curriculum integration. The authors summarize this yearlong initiative for undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty. PMID:24300251

  14. What's funny about nursing?

    PubMed

    Pierlot, D; Warelow, P J

    1999-12-01

    The authors examine the topic of humour and argue that humour is needed as one of many skills within the nurse patient relationship. We advance the view that humour has been well researched as an agent of therapeutic value and as a communication tool which helps to relieve stress, but, to date is not used to its fullest potential and tends therefore to be underestimated in both general and psychiatric nursing areas. Humour has benefits for both the nurse and the patient having psychological benefits and a vast array of physiological advantages and is regarded by those who use it as a social lubricant acting as a positive in nurse patient relationships. We also argue that it is essential that nurses know when to use humour as timing and appropriateness is imperative in order for it to be most effective. Humour can be used in all areas of clinical nursing practice and may prove useful in being a reliable predictor over the course of a patient's illness. The use of humour can help improve the nurse-patient relationship by initially breaking the ice between nurse and patient. This alternative mode of delivery can then be foundational to other areas of the nurse patient relationship such as self-disclosure, the enhancement of learning and relieving stress. Furthermore, it helps to facilitate and promote mutual health and well being for both the patient and the nurse. The usage of humour in psychiatric nurse settings is discussed and the benefits to both the patients and their staff are outlined as being of immense therapeutic value. The literature perhaps tends to skirt around these benefits somewhat, as psychiatry and laughter in partnership are not really considered important discursive topics.

  15. Innovation in transformative nursing leadership: nursing informatics competencies and roles.

    PubMed

    Remus, Sally; Kennedy, Margaret Ann

    2012-12-01

    In a recent brief to the Canadian Nurses Association's National Expert Commission on the Health of Our Nation, the Academy of Canadian Executive Nurses (ACEN) discussed leadership needs in the Canadian healthcare system, and promoted the pivotal role of nursing executives in transforming Canada's healthcare system into an integrated patient-centric system. Included among several recommendations was the need to develop innovative leadership competencies that enable nurse leaders to lead and advance transformative health system change. This paper focuses on an emerging "avant-garde executive leadership competency" recommended for today's health leaders to guide health system transformation. Specifically, this competency is articulated as "state of the art communication and technology savvy," and it implies linkages between nursing informatics competencies and transformational leadership roles for nurse executive. The authors of this paper propose that distinct nursing informatics competencies are required to augment traditional executive skills to support transformational outcomes of safe, integrated, high-quality care delivery through knowledge-driven care. International trends involving nursing informatics competencies and the evolution of new corporate informatics roles, such as chief nursing informatics officers (CNIOs), are demonstrating value and advanced transformational leadership as nursing executive roles that are informed by clinical data.

  16. Neonatal Jaundice Detection System.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Mustafa; Hardalaç, Fırat; Ural, Berkan; Karap, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a common condition that occurs in newborn infants in the first week of life. Today, techniques used for detection are required blood samples and other clinical testing with special equipment. The aim of this study is creating a non-invasive system to control and to detect the jaundice periodically and helping doctors for early diagnosis. In this work, first, a patient group which is consisted from jaundiced babies and a control group which is consisted from healthy babies are prepared, then between 24 and 48 h after birth, 40 jaundiced and 40 healthy newborns are chosen. Second, advanced image processing techniques are used on the images which are taken with a standard smartphone and the color calibration card. Segmentation, pixel similarity and white balancing methods are used as image processing techniques and RGB values and pixels' important information are obtained exactly. Third, during feature extraction stage, with using colormap transformations and feature calculation, comparisons are done in RGB plane between color change values and the 8-color calibration card which is specially designed. Finally, in the bilirubin level estimation stage, kNN and SVR machine learning regressions are used on the dataset which are obtained from feature extraction. At the end of the process, when the control group is based on for comparisons, jaundice is succesfully detected for 40 jaundiced infants and the success rate is 85 %. Obtained bilirubin estimation results are consisted with bilirubin results which are obtained from the standard blood test and the compliance rate is 85 %.

  17. Influences of maternal caffeine on the neonatal rat brains vary with the nutritional states.

    PubMed

    Mori, M; Wilber, J F; Nakamoto, T

    1983-11-21

    The potential effect of maternal caffeine ingestion upon total brain protein and the concentration of two prototype neuropeptides, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and its derivative, cyclo (His-Pro) in neonates was examined during the nursing period in the context of variable maternal protein intake. Maternal caffeine intake (2 mg/100 g body weight) significantly increased the total brain protein of neonates derived from dams fed a 6% casein diet, but not from dams fed a 12%- or 20%-casein diet. Maternal caffeine consumption significantly increased the amount of cyclo (His-Pro) in the neonatal brains in all groups. The percent increments in pups from dams fed 6%, 12%, and 20% casein diets were respectively 137%, 131%, and 120%. By contrast, no significant alterations were observed in TRH concentrations between caffeine and control groups. It is concluded that maternal caffeine can influence neonatal brain protein and cyclo (His-Pro) during nursing under conditions of protein-energy malnutrition.

  18. Neonatal mortality in Utah.

    PubMed

    Woolley, F R; Schuman, K L; Lyon, J L

    1982-09-01

    A cohort study of neonatal mortality (N = 106) in white singleton births (N = 14,486) in Utah for January-June 1975 was conducted. Using membership and activity in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon) as a proxy for parental health practices, i.e., tobacco and alcohol abstinence, differential neonatal mortality rates were calculated. The influence of potential confounding factors was evaluated. Low activity LDS members were found to have an excess risk of neonatal death five times greater than high activity LDS, with an upper bound of a two-sided 95% confidence interval of 7.9. The data consistently indicate a lower neonatal mortality rate for active LDS members. Non-LDS were found to have a lower rate than either medium or low activity LDS.

  19. Neonatal hepatitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Eve A

    2003-10-01

    Conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia in an infant indicates neonatal liver disease. This neonatal hepatitis syndrome has numerous possible causes, classified as infective, anatomic/structural, metabolic, genetic, neoplastic, vascular, toxic, immune and idiopathic. Any infant who is jaundiced at 2-4 weeks old needs to have the serum conjugated bilirubin measured, even if he/she looks otherwise well. If conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia is present, a methodical and comprehensive diagnostic investigation should be performed. Early diagnosis is critical for the best outcome. In particular, palliative surgery for extrahepatic biliary atresia has the best chance of success if performed before the infant is 8 weeks old. Definitive treatments available for many causes of neonatal hepatitis syndrome should be started as soon as possible. Alternatively, liver transplantation may be life saving. Supportive care, especially with attention to nutritional needs, is important for all infants with neonatal hepatitis syndrome.

  20. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  1. Erythropoietin and Neonatal Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Sandra E.; Pet, Gillian C.

    2015-01-01

    Certain groups of neonates are at high risk of developing long-term neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) and might be considered candidates for neuroprotective interventions. This chapter will explore some of these high-risk groups, relevant mechanisms of brain injury, and specific mechanisms of cellular injury and death. The potential of erythropoietin (Epo) to act as a neuroprotective agent for neonatal brain injury will be discussed. Clinical trials of Epo neuroprotection in preterm and term infants are updated. PMID:26250911

  2. An overview of clinical tools used to assess neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Several clinical tools have been developed to quantify the severity of withdrawal signs and symptoms exhibited by infants born to substance-using mothers. Scores from the systematic assessments are used to guide treatment of infants with moderate to severe clinical signs. This article provides an overview of published assessment tools developed for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome. Nurses caring for infants at risk for neonatal abstinence syndrome should be knowledgeable about the tools used to evaluate these infants and guide their treatment. The ideal assessment tool should be published and include item definitions and a protocol for administering the tool. Nurses need education and training to achieve competency and interobserver reliability in the use of a selected tool. Tool-specific materials should be used to standardize training and improve accuracy in assessments. Competent and knowledgeable nurses play a critical role in improving outcomes for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome.

  3. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old What's a Nurse Practitioner? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's a Nurse Practitioner? ... United States. continue Should My Kids See a Nurse Practitioner? Pediatric NPs can deliver much of the ...

  4. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ethics Ethics Topics and Articles About The Center Code of Ethics Health & Safety Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation™ ... VIEWED 2017 Year of the Healthy Nurse About Code of Ethics Join What is Nursing? Career Center ...

  5. Career Preferences of Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Odette N.; MacLennan, Anna; Dupuis-Blanchard, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates novice and experienced student nurses' attitudes about caring for patients across the lifespan. Students were also asked why they would enjoy or not enjoy caring for children and older adults. Both novice (n = 114) and advanced (n = 56) nursing students were relatively positive about caring for patients across the lifespan.…

  6. Prediction of initiation and duration of breast-feeding for neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Lessen, Rachelle; Crivelli-Kovach, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Women who desire to breast-feed their sick newborns often encounter obstacles, including insufficient support and education as well as unsupportive hospital practices. The purpose of this study was to describe maternal, neonatal, and outside influences associated with the intention, initiation, and duration of breast-feeding for women whose newborns were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. One hundred mothers were interviewed. Most mothers (67%) intended to breast-feed exclusively and this was significantly related to maternal characteristics such as age, education, parity, smoking and marital status, pre-breast-feeding experience, and the influences of the neonate's father and prenatal education. Seventy-eight mothers initiated pumping. Initiation was significantly related to maternal education, smoking, parity, previous breast-feeding experience, the neonate's physician, the neonate's father, and postpartum breast-feeding education. Fifty-four mothers were followed up by telephone after discharge until weaning. Thirty percent were exclusively breast-feeding at 2 weeks after discharge, and 15% were breast-feeding at 1 year. Duration of breast-feeding was significantly associated with education, marital status, ethnicity, income, assistance from nurses and lactation consultants, and feeding method along with milk type and milk volume at discharge. Increased family support, timely breast-feeding information, and a supportive neonatal intensive care unit environment are needed for women to succeed in breast-feeding their hospitalized newborns.

  7. [Phenomenologic study about experiences when living the death in the neonatal critical care unit].

    PubMed

    Silva, Laureana Cartaxo Salgado Pereira; Valença, Cecília Nogueira; Germano, Raimunda Medeiros

    2010-01-01

    This research aimed at describing the care experiences of neonatal critical care nurses when facing the death and to understand their feelings before the death of the newborn. Qualitative research with a phenomenological approach, with the guiding question: How do you feel about the death of the newborn ICU where you work? Attended the interview 12 nurses and ICU nursing. Emerging feelings such as guilt, failure and denial. Understanding the phenomenon being studied, we affirm that the death of the newborn within the ICU is an experience of conflicting feelings, sometimes painful for the nurses.

  8. Malaysian nurses' skin care practices of preterm infants: experience vs. knowledge.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Zainah; Newton, Jennifer Margaret; Lau, Rosalind

    2014-04-01

    This study sought to explore the impact of Malaysian nurses' perceptions, knowledge and experiences in preterm infant skin care practices using a descriptive approach. Questionnaires were distributed to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses in one teaching hospital in Malaysia. A knowledge gap was revealed among nurses in both theoretical and practical knowledge of preterm infant skin. Nurses working for more than 5 years in NICU or having a Neonatal Nursing Certificate (NNC) were not predictors of having adequate knowledge of preterm infants' skin care. The results highlight the complex issue of providing effective skin care to preterm infants. However, a specific finding related to nurses' confidence provides some direction for future practice and research initiatives. Clear clinical evidence-based guidelines and Continuing Nursing Education on relevant topics of preterm infants' care may provide the required knowledge for the nurses.

  9. Rural nurses. Part II, Surviving the nurse shortage.

    PubMed

    Fuszard, B; Slocum, L I; Wiggers, D E

    1990-05-01

    Cost containment and the nurse shortage have impacted rural hospitals and their nursing staffs. This impact did not appreciably affect burnout levels among the rural nurses, but did evidence itself in the reports of the directors of nursing and their nurses. Cost containment brought with it layoffs of colleagues in the work setting who were neighbors or relatives. This occurred while the rural areas were already filled with the unemployed and underemployed. Unfamiliar recordkeeping increased two- and three-fold, and the 23-hour admit caused unequal work flow. Downsizing, elimination of some services and reports of rural hospital closings were threatening to the nurses, who were often the sole support of their families. The rural nurse shortage was seen to be different from the national nurse shortage in significant ways. Except for the few study hospitals that were close to population centers, nurses could not be recruited from outside the geographic area. Suggestions from the Secretary's Commission on Nursing are not all appropriate for the rural hospital nurse shortage. Rural hospitals changed in the face of cost containment, and nursing personnel also worked to contain costs. However the nurses have worked within cost and salary constraints for so long that they predict loyalty to their community hospitals can be coming to an end. The nurse shortage is being approached by minor alterations in staffing and mode of care delivery. Federal support is desperately needed by the rural hospitals to permit equitable salaries, and to support financial aid to permanent residents of the rural areas for entrance into or advancement in nursing education.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  11. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  12. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  13. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  14. The practice doctorate: where do Canadian nursing leaders stand?

    PubMed

    Joachim, Gloria

    2008-01-01

    This article calls upon Canadian nursing leaders to examine the merits and downsides of the new practice doctorate degree - the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). The impetus for the DNP arose from within the American nursing profession in order to address the knowledge and skills needed by advanced practice nurses to work in today's complex healthcare environment. The DNP is the newest practice doctorate degree and in 2015 will be the entry to practice degree required of all new advanced practice nurses in the United States. Advanced practice nurses who will have the practice doctorate include clinical nurse specialists, nurse practitioners, nurse midwives and nurse anaesthetists. With the establishment and acceptance of the DNP in the United States, American advanced practice nurses will have a different knowledge base than Canadian advanced practice nurses. The evolution and state of advanced practice nursing in Canada are discussed in this article. Canadian nursing leaders must discuss the DNP, its merits and downsides within the Canadian context and begin to make informed decisions about whether or not the DNP should come to Canada.

  15. Nurse therapists in behavioural psychotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Marks, I M; Hallam, R S; Philpott, R; Connolly, J C

    1975-01-01

    Five registered mental nurses (R.M.N.s) were trained over two years to become behavioural psychotherapists for adult neurotic disorders. They achieved results comparable to those obtained with similar patients and methods by psychologists and psychiatrists. Similar results were maintained when over a third year the therapists were seconded to work in four hospitals and a general practice. Patients were satisfied at being treated by nurses. After initial teething difficulties nurse therapists became valuable members of treatment teams during both training and secondment, becoming accepted by most nurses, psychologists, and psychiatrists with whom they came into contact. The training of further nurse therapists would facilitate treatment of many disabled neurotics who would otherwise go without effective treatment. Training nurse therapists takes less time and money than training psychologists and psychiatrists because less of their education is redundant to the skills involved. The pool of R.M.N.s suitable for training is much larger than that of psychiatrists and psychologists. The nurse therapists can be integrated relatively easily into treatment teams. The present nursing structure imposes restrictions on the advancement of clinical nurse specialists and a clinical tree is badly needed parallel with present administrative and teaching hierarchies. An 18-month course in adult behavioural psychotherapy has been recognized by the Joint Board of Clinical Nursing Studies for England and Wales so that nurse therapists seem destined to be a lasting feature of future treatment teams. PMID:1139262

  16. Neonatal intensive care unit lighting: update and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Roberto G; Pattini, Andrea E

    2016-08-01

    Achieving adequate lighting in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge: in addition to the usual considerations of visual performance, cost, energy and aesthetics, there appear different biological needs of patients, health care providers and family members. Communicational aspects of light, its role as a facilitator of the visual function of doctors and nurses, and its effects on the newborn infant physiology and development were addressed in order to review the effects of light (natural and artificial) within neonatal care with a focus on development. The role of light in regulating the newborn infant circadian cycle in particular and the therapeutic use of light in general were also reviewed. For each aspect, practical recommendations were specified for a proper well-lit environment in neonatal intensive care units.

  17. Fatal Neonatal Herpes Simplex Infection Likely from Unrecognized Breast Lesions.

    PubMed

    Field, Scott S

    2016-02-01

    Type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is very prevalent yet in rare circumstances can lead to fatal neonatal disease. Genital acquisition of type 2 HSV is the usual mode for neonatal herpes, but HSV-1 transmission by genital or extragenital means may result in greater mortality rates. A very rare scenario is presented in which the mode of transmission was likely through breast lesions. The lesions were seen by nurses as well as the lactation consultant and obstetrician in the hospital after delivery of the affected baby but not recognized as possibly being caused by herpes. The baby died 9 days after birth with hepatic failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Peripartum health care workers need to be aware of potential nongenital (including from the breast[s]) neonatal herpes acquisition, which can be lethal.

  18. Effects of an Advanced Practice Nurse In-Home Health Consultation Program for Community-Dwelling Persons Aged 80 and Older

    PubMed Central

    Imhof, Lorenz; Naef, Rahel; Wallhagen, Margaret I; Schwarz, Jürg; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effects of an advanced practice nurse (APN) in-home health consultation program (HCP) on quality of life, health indicators (falls, acute events), and healthcare utilization. Design Randomized clinical trial. Setting One urban area in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Participants Four hundred sixty-one community-dwelling individuals aged 80 and older (mean age 85, 72.7% female, all Caucasian) participated in the intervention (n = 231) and control (n = 230) groups. Intervention After a comprehensive geriatric assessment, participants were randomly assigned to the 9-month HCP with four in-home visits and three phone calls from APNs or to a control group with standard care with no intervention. Measurements The primary outcome was quality of life at 3, 6, and 9 months. Secondary outcomes were incidence of falls, acute events due to health problems, and healthcare utilization measured for 3-month periods at 3, 6, and 9 months. Results The intervention and control groups did not differ significantly on any dimension of the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire but differed significantly over 9 months in self-reported acute events (116 vs 168, relative risk (RR) = 0.70, P = .001), falls (74 vs 101, RR = 0.71, P = .003), consequences of falls (63.1% vs 78.7%, chi-square = 7.39, P = .007), and hospitalizations (47 vs 68, RR = .70, P = .03). Conclusion The in-home HCP provided by APNs and guided by the principles of health promotion, empowerment, partnership, and family-centeredness, can be effective in reducing adverse health outcomes such as falls, acute events, and hospitalizations. PMID:23194103

  19. The Neurointensive Care Nursery and Evolving Roles for Nursing.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, Susan; Carley, Annette; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Glass, Hannah C

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal neurocritical care is an emerging subspecialty that combines the expertise of critical care medicine and neurology with that of nursing and other providers in an interprofessional team approach to care. Neurocritical care of the neonate has roots in adult and pediatric practice. It has been demonstrated that adults with acute neurologic conditions who are treated in a specialized neurocritical care unit have reduced morbidity and mortality, as well as decreased length of stay, lower costs, and reduced need for neurosurgical procedures. In pediatrics, neurocritical care has focused on various primary and secondary neurologic conditions complicating critical care that also contribute to mortality, morbidity, and duration of hospitalization. However, the concept of neurocritical care as a subspecialty in pediatric practice is still evolving, and evidence demonstrating improved outcomes is lacking. In the neonatal intensive care nursery, neurocritical care is also evolving as a subspecialty concept to address both supportive and preventive care and optimize neurologic outcomes for an at-risk neonatal patient population. To enhance effectiveness of this care approach, nurses must be prepared to appropriately recognize acute changes in neurologic status, implement protocols that specifically address neurologic conditions, and carefully monitor neurologic status to help prevent secondary injury. The complexity of this team approach to brain-focused care has led to the development of a specialized role: the neurocritical care nurse (neonatal intensive care nursery [NICN] nurse). This article will review key concepts related to neonatal neurocritical care and the essential role of nursing. It will also explore the emerging role of the NICN nurse in supporting early recognition and management of at-risk infants in this neonatal subspecialty practice.

  20. Before operating room nursing journals: operating room nursing in the pages of the Canadian Nurse 1940-1960.

    PubMed

    Moszczynski, Alice

    2010-09-01

    The Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) values learning from nursing history to provide a contextual perspective in understanding how past events have shaped current nursing practice. Until the publication of operating room nursing journals, Canada's national nursing journal, The Canadian Nurse, served as an educational and professional resource for those nurses working in the operating room and for nurses whose work was related to, or connected with, the operating room. A historical review of early issues of The Canadian Nurse (first published in 1905) reveals a substantial amount of content related to operating room nursing in the twenty year period, beginning in the 1940s, that predated the existence of OR specialty journals. The content was, for the time, both detailed and informative. It was through this journal that operating room nurses, indeed all Canadian nurses, learned about new advances, employment opportunities, educational programs, professional associations, and the achievements of those in the profession. Operating Room Nursing, as an isolated and quickly emerging specialty, was introduced to other nurses via items in The Canadian Nurse journal.

  1. Management of neonatal abstinence syndrome in the newborn nursery.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Valarie

    2014-12-01

    Maternal drug use and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) are being seen across the United States. NAS occurs with withdrawal disturbances in response to the cessation of the pregnancy exposure. The clinical presentation of a newborn with NAS can include gastrointestinal, neurologic, vasomotor and respiratory symptoms. Assessment of newborns with NAS can often present as a challenge to maternal-child nurses. Treatment can include supportive care as well as pharmacologic therapies.

  2. Advancing Evidence in Preterm Neonatal Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Pamela K.; Robinson, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Few interventions and treatments for premature infants have undergone the rigors of a randomized controlled trial (RCT), the cornerstone of evidence-based healthcare. Multiple barriers in establishing a quality evidence base for the care of preterm infants are examined including the systematic exclusion of children from drug trials, vulnerability…

  3. Developing a center for nursing research: an influence on nursing education and research through mentorship.

    PubMed

    Krause-Parello, Cheryl A; Sarcone, Annaruth; Samms, Kimika; Boyd, Zakiya N

    2013-03-01

    Nursing research, education, and mentoring are effective strategies to enhance and generate nursing knowledge. In order to explore new opportunities using an international and interdisciplinary approach, a Center for Nursing Research (CNR) was developed at Kean University a public institution for higher education in the United States. At the CNR, nursing professionals and students collaborate in all aspects of nursing education and the research process from a global perspective and across disciplines. The advancement of knowledge and understanding is of absolute importance to the field of nursing and other collaborative fields. The CNR functions to educate nursing faculty and students through scholarly activities with an ongoing commitment to nursing education and research. Mentorship in nursing education and research fosters professional, scholarly, and personal growth for both the mentor and mentee. The CNR serves as a model vehicle of applied, functional mentoring strategies and provides the venue to allow the mentor and mentee to collaborate in all aspects of nursing education and research.

  4. "Hollywood nurses" in West Germany: biographies, self-images, and experiences of academically trained nurses after 1945.

    PubMed

    Kreutzer, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The School of Nursing at Heidelberg University was founded in 1953 on the initiative of the Rockefeller Foundation to generate new, scientifically trained nursing elite to advance the professionalization of nursing in West Germany. The "American" concept met massive resistance. Its "superior nursing training" was seen as creating "Hollywood nurses"-a threat to the traditional Christian understanding of good, caring nursing. Intense social conflicts also caused problems with other groups of nurses. The school nevertheless played a very important role as a "cadre academy" in the history of professionalization. Many of the first German professors in the nursing sciences trained or underwent further training in Heidelberg.

  5. Collaborative Partnerships: Raising the Professional Practice of Nursing.

    PubMed

    Talley, Linda B

    2016-06-01

    The journey to Magnet® provides the ideal platform to demonstrate the impact of nursing and how strong interprofessional partnerships advance care and problem solving in an increasingly complex healthcare arena. Nurses in Magnet organizations use collaborative partnerships to forge innovative solutions, improve nursing care across the continuum, advance health in populations, effect desired change, and improve outcomes.

  6. Neonatal Haemophilus influenzae infections.

    PubMed Central

    Takala, A K; Pekkanen, E; Eskola, J

    1991-01-01

    Nine cases of neonatal Haemophilus influenzae septicaemia were recorded in Finland during 1985-9; incidence was 2.8/100,000 live births, and 1.6% of all cases of neonatal septicaemia. The onset of the disease was early in all cases, ranging from 0-6 hours after delivery. Seven of the infants were preterm and three died (overall mortality 33%). H influenzae was isolated from blood in seven of the cases, and in two neonates with clinical signs of septicaemia it was found on several surface sites and the placenta. One of the eight strains of H influenzae was capsular type b and biotype I, the rest being non-typable--a distribution similar to those previously reported. Four of the uncapsulated strains were of biotype III, and three were of biotype II. None of the strains of H influenzae was of biotype IV, which has been reported to be characteristic of neonatal and genital isolates of H influenzae. All nine mothers had some sign of infection at the time of or shortly after delivery. H influenzae was isolated from five mothers: from the blood (n = 1) or from the placenta or cervix (n = 4). The use of intrauterine devices may be a possible risk factor for neonatal H influenzae infections; two of the mothers had such devices in place during their pregnancies. PMID:2025040

  7. Monitoring neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Geraldine B; Stevenson, Nathan J; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2013-08-01

    Neonatal seizures are a neurological emergency and prompt treatment is required. Seizure burden in neonates can be very high, status epilepticus a frequent occurrence, and the majority of seizures do not have any clinical correlate. Detection of neonatal seizures is only possible with continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. EEG interpretation requires special expertise that is not available in most neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). As a result, a simplified method of EEG recording incorporating an easy-to-interpret compressed trend of the EEG output (amplitude integrated EEG) from one of the EEG output from one or two channels has emerged as a popular way to monitor neurological function in the NICU. This is not without limitations; short duration and low amplitude seizures can be missed, artefacts are problematic and may mimic seizure-like activity and only a restricted area of the brain is monitored. Continuous multichannel EEG is the gold standard for detecting seizures and monitoring response to therapy but expert interpretation of the EEG output is generally not available. Some centres have set up remote access for neurophysiologists to the cot-side EEG, but reliable interpretation is wholly dependent on the 24 h availability of experts, an expensive solution. A more practical solution for the NICU without such expertise is an automated seizure detection system. This review outlines the current state of the art regarding cot-side monitoring of neonatal seizures in the NICU.

  8. Neonatal follow-up program: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal follow-up program (NFP) is becoming the corner stone of standard, high quality care provided to newborns at risk of future neuorodevelopmental delay. Most of the recognized neonatal intensive care units in the developed countries are adopting NFP as part of their mandatory care for the best long term outcome of high risk infants, especially very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Unfortunately, in the developing and in underdeveloped countries, such early detection and intervention programs are rarely existing, mainly because of the lack of awareness of and exposure to such programs in spite of the increasing numbers of surviving sick newborns due to advancement in neonatal care in these countries. This is a review article to explore the Neonatal follow-up programs looking at historical development, benefts and aims, and standard requirements for successful program development that can be adopted in our countries. In conclusion, proper Neonatal follow-up programs are needed to improve neonatal outcome. Therefore all professionals working in the feld of neonatal care in developing countries should cooperate to create such programs for early detection and hence early intervention for any adverse long term outcome in high-risk newborn infants PMID:27493326

  9. Informatics competencies for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Curran, Christine R

    2003-08-01

    Informatics knowledge and skills are essential if clinicians are to master the large volume of information generated in healthcare today. Thus, it is vital that informatics competencies be defined for nursing and incorporated into both curricula and practice. Staggers, Gassert, and Curran have defined informatics competencies for four general levels of nursing practice. However, informatics competencies by role (eg, those specific for advanced practice nursing) have not been defined and validated. This article presents an initial proposed list of informatics competencies essential for nurse practitioner education and practice. To this list, derived from the work of Staggers et al., 1 has been added informatics competencies related to evidence-based practice. Two nurse informaticists and six nurse practitioners, who are program directors, were involved in the development of the proposed competencies. The next step will be to validate these competencies via research.

  10. A Model for Collaboration: The Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing and the Frontier Nursing Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotny, Jeanne M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The collaboration between the Frontier Nursing Service and the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing provides a way for those with associate degrees in midwifery to obtain a baccalaureate degree in nursing and become eligible for advanced training in midwifery. Distance learning facilitates instruction for the geographically dispersed midwives.…

  11. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  12. Nursing and nursing education in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Richard M; Berryman, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Haiti has long had the largest proportion of people living in poverty and the highest mortality level of any country in the Americas. On January 12, 2010, the most powerful earthquake to hit Haiti in 200 years struck. Before the earthquake, half of all Haitians lacked any access to modern medical care services. Health care professionals in Haiti number around one-fourth of the world average and about one-tenth the ratio present in North America. The establishment of new primary care services in a country where half of the people had no access to modern health care prior to the earthquake requires advanced practice roles for nurses and midwives. With a high burden of infectious, parasitic, and nutritional conditions, Haiti especially needs mid-level community health workers and nurses who can train and supervise them for public health programs. As in many other developing countries, organized nursing lacks many of the management and planning skills needed to move its agenda forward. The public schools prepare 3-year diploma graduates. These programs have upgraded the curriculum little in decades and have mainly trained for hospital service. Primary care, public health program management, and patient education had often not been stressed. Specializations in midwifery and HIV care exist, while only informal programs of specialization exist in administration, surgery, and pediatrics. An advanced practice role, nonetheless, is not yet well established. Nursing has much to contribute to the recovery of Haiti and the revitalization if its health system. Professional nurses are needed in clinics and hospitals throughout the country to care for patients, including thousands in need of rehabilitation and mental health services. Haitian nursing colleagues in North America have key roles in strengthening their profession. Ways of supporting our Haitian colleagues are detailed.

  13. Neonatal brucellosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Alnemri, Abdul Rahman M; Hadid, Adnan; Hussain, Shaik Asfaq; Somily, Ali M; Sobaih, Badr H; Alrabiaah, Abdulkarim; Alanazi, Awad; Shakoor, Zahid; AlSubaie, Sarah; Meriki, Naema; Kambal, Abdelmageed M

    2017-02-28

    Although brucellosis is not uncommon in Saudi Arabia, neonatal brucellosis has been infrequently reported. In this case of neonatal brucellosis, Brucella abortus was isolated by blood culture from both the mother and the neonate. Serology was positive only in the mother.

  14. A Descriptive Study of Military Nurse Practitioners’ Practice Settings and Clinical Practice Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    prevention, wellness promotion and patient education are not new concepts to nurses . For hundreds of years it has been the nurse who carried this...f orward. With this nursing experience and the acquisition of advanced education , the Nurse Practitioner is capable of providing a broad range of...Member . .. . ....... 43 Table 5 : Educational Background of Military Nurse Practitioners . ... ... ............ .. ..... . . . . . 45 Table 6

  15. The Evolution of School Nursing Data Indicators in Massachusetts: Recommendations for a National Data Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gapinski, Mary Ann; Sheetz, Anne H.

    2014-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses' research priorities include the recommendation that data reliability, quality, and availability be addressed to advance research in child and school health. However, identifying a national school nursing data set has remained a challenge for school nurses, school nursing leaders, school nurse professional…

  16. Consultancy pay for nurses.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    Nurses working for NHS Direct could be paid at medical consultant level based on equal pay for equal work initiatives, according to Rob Crouch, Deputy Director and Research Fellow (A&E), Centre for the Advancement of Clinical Practice, University of Surrey.

  17. Just-in-Time Video Laryngoscopy Versus Direct Laryngoscopy for Neonatal Intubation.

    PubMed

    Grgurich, Erin; Arnemann, Cynthia; Amon, Kim; Horton, Rose; Carlson, Jestin N

    As neonatal endotracheal intubation (ETI) is a low-frequency, high-consequence event, it is essential that providers have access to resources to aid in ETI. We sought to determine the impact of video laryngoscopy (VL) with just-in-time training on intubation outcomes over direct laryngoscopy (DL) when performed by neonatal nurses. We conducted a prospective, randomized, crossover study with neonatal nurses employed at a level 2 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Nurses performed both DL and VL on a neonatal mannequin using a CMAC (Karl Storz Corp, Tuttlingen, Germany) either with the assistance of the screen (VL) or without (DL). Before performing the intubation, providers were given a just-in-time, brief education presentation and allowed to practice with the device. Each ETI attempt was reviewed to obtain the percentage of glottic opening (POGO) score, time to intubation (TTI, time from insertion of the blade into the mouth until the first breath was delivered), and time from blade insertion until the best POGO score. We enrolled 19 participants, with a median (interquartile range) of 20 (9-26) years of experience and having a median of 2 (1-3) intubations within the past year. None had used VL in the NICU previously. Median TTI did not differ between DL and VL: 19.9 (15.3-41.5) vs 20.3 (17.9-24.4) (P = 1). POGO scores and the number of attempts also did not differ between DL and VL. In our simulated setting, just-in-time VL training provided similar intubation outcomes compared with DL in ETI performed by neonatal nurses. Just-in-time VL education may be an alternative to traditional DL for neonatal intubations.

  18. Prevention of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Paolo; De Luca, Daniele; Stronati, Mauro; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Ruffinazzi, Giulia; Luparia, Martina; Tavella, Elena; Boano, Elena; Castagnola, Elio; Mostert, Michael; Farina, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes a huge burden of morbidity and mortality and includes bloodstream, urine, cerebrospinal, peritoneal, and lung infections as well as infections starting from burns and wounds, or from any other usually sterile sites. It is associated with cytokine - and biomediator-induced disorders of respiratory, hemodynamic, and metabolic processes. Neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit feature many specific risk factors for bacterial and fungal sepsis. Loss of gut commensals such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli spp., as occurs with prolonged antibiotic treatments, delayed enteral feeding, or nursing in incubators, translates into proliferation of pathogenic microflora and abnormal gut colonization. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment do not protect septic neonates form the risk of late neurodevelopmental impairment in the survivors. Thus prevention of bacterial and fungal infection is crucial in these settings of unique patients. In this view, improving neonatal management is a key step, and this includes promotion of breast-feeding and hygiene measures, adoption of a cautious central venous catheter policy, enhancement of the enteric microbiota composition with the supplementation of probiotics, and medical stewardship concerning H2 blockers with restriction of their use. Additional measures may include the use of lactoferrin, fluconazole, and nystatin and specific measures to prevent ventilator associated pneumonia.

  19. Nursing Informatics Competencies: Psychometric Validation, Dissemination, and Maintenance of Self-Assessment Tool for Nurse Leaders.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Due to rapid advances in technology, HIT competencies for nursing leaders require frequent attention and updating from experts in the field to ensure relevance to nursing leaders' work. This workshop will target nursing informatics researchers and leaders to: 1) learn methods and findings from a study validating a Self-Assessment Scale for Nursing Informatics Competencies for Nurse Leaders, 2) generate awareness of the Self-Assessment scale, 3) discuss strategies for maintenance of competencies overtime and 4) identify strategies to engage nursing leaders in this pursuit.

  20. A Feminist Framework for Nurses on Boards.

    PubMed

    Sundean, Lisa J; Polifroni, E Carol

    Nurses' knowledge, skills, and expertise uniquely situate them to contribute to health care transformation as equal partners in organizational board governance. The Institute of Medicine, the 10,000 Nurses on Boards Coalition, and a growing number of nurse and health care scholars advocate nurse board leadership; however, nurses are rarely appointed as voting board members. When no room is made for nurses to take a seat at the table, the opportunity is lost to harness the power of nursing knowledge for health care transformation and social justice. No philosophical framework underpins the emerging focus on nurse board leadership. The purpose of this article is to add to the extant nursing literature by suggesting feminism as a philosophical framework for nurses on boards. Feminism contributes to the knowledge base of nursing as it relates to the expanding roles of nurses in health care transformation, policy, and social justice. Furthermore, a feminist philosophical framework for nurses on boards sets the foundation for new theory development and validates ongoing advancement of the nursing profession.

  1. Nursing informatics, outcomes, and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Charters, Kathleen G

    2003-08-01

    Nursing informatics actively supports nursing by providing standard language systems, databases, decision support, readily accessible research results, and technology assessments. Through normalized datasets spanning an entire enterprise or other large demographic, nursing informatics tools support improvement of healthcare by answering questions about patient outcomes and quality improvement on an enterprise scale, and by providing documentation for business process definition, business process engineering, and strategic planning. Nursing informatics tools provide a way for advanced practice nurses to examine their practice and the effect of their actions on patient outcomes. Analysis of patient outcomes may lead to initiatives for quality improvement. Supported by nursing informatics tools, successful advance practice nurses leverage their quality improvement initiatives against the enterprise strategic plan to gain leadership support and resources.

  2. Expanding the role of the oncology nurse

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, A

    2008-01-01

    Oncology nursing continues to evolve in response to advances in cancer treatment, information and biotechnology. As new scientific and technological discoveries are integrated into cancer care, oncology nurses need to play a key role in the management of this patient population. The role of the oncology nurse has expanded significantly and can differ greatly across cultures. Sophisticated treatments and the growth of targeted therapies will create the challenge of ensuring that all nurses working in this arena are well-educated, independent thinkers. Thus the future success of oncology nurses will focus on enhancement of nursing practice through advanced education. The increased globalisation of healthcare offers exciting opportunities to accomplish this goal by allowing for collaborative relationships among oncology nurses across the globe. PMID:21611002

  3. Scrotal Swelling in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Amaya M.; Courtier, Jesse; Phelps, Andrew; Copp, Hillary L.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of scrotal swelling in a neonate can be a source of anxiety for parents, clinicians, and sonologists alike. This pictorial essay provides a focused review of commonly encountered scrotal masses and mimics specific to the neonatal setting. Although malignancy is a concern, it is very uncommon, as most neonatal scrotal masses are benign. Key discriminating features and management options are highlighted to improve the radiologist’s ability to diagnose neonatal scrotal conditions and guide treatment decisions. Neonatal scrotal processes ranging from common to uncommon will be discussed. PMID:25715370

  4. Doctorate of nursing practice: blueprint for excellence.

    PubMed

    Sperhac, Arlene M; Clinton, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    A great deal of work has been done during the past several years since the American Association of Colleges of Nursing voted in October 2004 to move advanced practice nursing to the doctoral level by 2015. Following the approval, task forces were formed to address curriculum issues and the strategies for transitioning advanced practice nursing education from the master's level to the doctorate of nursing practice (DNP). The DNP curriculum contains content on leadership, management, and other topics that are needed to address some of the issues in the health care system that traditionally have not been included in most master of science in nursing curricula, as well as additional essential content and nurse practitioner competencies. As pediatric nurse practitioners and other advanced practice nurses go forward in their careers, the DNP may have an impact on their role. In this article, the background of the DNP movement, changes in advanced practice nursing education, and the concerns of currently practicing pediatric nurse practitioners prepared at the master's level will be addressed.

  5. Teaching antenatal counseling skills to neonatal providers.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Theophil A; Watson, Katie L; Boss, Renee D

    2014-02-01

    Counseling a family confronted with the birth of a periviable neonate is one of the most difficult tasks that a neonatologist must perform. The neonatologist's goal is to facilitate an informed, collaborative decision about whether life-sustaining therapies are in the best interest of this baby. Neonatologists are trained to provide families with a detailed account of the morbidity and mortality data they believe are necessary to facilitate a truly informed decision. Yet these complicated and intensely emotional conversations require advanced communication and counseling skills that our current fellowship-training strategies are not adequately providing. We review educational models for training neonatology fellows to provide antenatal counseling at the threshold of viability. We believe that training aimed at teaching these skills should be incorporated into the neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship. The optimal approaches for teaching these skills remain uncertain, and there is a need for continued innovation and outcomes-based research.

  6. The Research Doctorate in Nursing: The PhD.

    PubMed

    Rice, David

    2016-03-01

    When nurses are considering an advanced degree beyond the master's level of educational preparation, a number of considerations may direct the decision-making process. The doctorate of philosophy (PhD) in nursing is a research degree that will well serve nurses who have the desire to apply theory and develop formal programs of research, become faculty of nursing, combine clinical practice with formal research, and advance through professional leadership in the ranks of hospitals and health systems organizations. 
.

  7. Perioperative Clinical Nurse Specialist Role Delineation: A Systematic Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    specialist. Clinical Nurse Specialist. 1(Summer 1987) 81 - 84. 11. Hodson, D.M., The evolving role of advanced practice nurses in surgery AORN Journal 67...The evolving role of advanced practice nurses in surgery . AORN Journal, 67(5), 998-1009. Hulley, S. B., Cummings, S .R., Browner, W. S., Grady, D...Montana. State of Montana Laws, Statutes & Regulations 1996 Jul; 228 p. These nurses are trained to perform minor surgery . Same-Day Surgery 2004 Mar; 28

  8. Diffusion of a nursing education innovation: nursing workforce development through promotion of RN/BSN education.

    PubMed

    Diaz Swearingen, Connie; Clarke, Pamela N; Gatua, Mary Wairimu; Sumner, Christa Cooper

    2013-01-01

    Despite state, national, and organizational objectives to increase the proportion of nurses with a bachelor's degree or higher, a majority of nurses hold an associate's degree in nursing. To address the need for a better-prepared nursing workforce in this rural state, an RN/BSN recruitment and retention project was implemented. The authors discuss the Leadership Education to Advance Practice project and its outcomes.

  9. [Recommendations in neonatal resuscitation].

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    The recommendations for neonatal resuscitation are not always based on sufficient scientific evidence and thus expert consensus based on current research, knowledge, and experience are useful for formulating practical protocols that are easy to follow. The latest recommendations, in 2000, modified previously published recommendations and are included in the present text.

  10. Nurses' self-assessment of their nursing competencies, job demands and job performance in the Taiwan hospital system.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming

    2004-07-01

    This exploratory study investigated nurses' self-assessment of their own nursing competencies, job demands and job performance in Taiwan. Nurses' self-evaluation on their own job performance was conceptualized as an indicator of nursing care quality. A total of 21 competencies were clustered into three groups: basic-level patient care skills, intermediate-level patient care and fundamental management skills, and advanced-level patient care and supervision skills. Nurse subjects were randomly selected from the member roster of Kaohsiung Nurse Association; 850 nurses were invited to participate and questionnaire packets were sent to their homes. The overall response rate was 35.8%. Multiple regression analyses found that nurses' self-assessment of intermediate patient care skills, the difference between nurses' self-assessment and job demands for basic patient care skills, and nurses' overall satisfaction with their own nursing competencies were three significant predictors of overall satisfaction with nurses' own job performance. Nurses' self-assessment on basic patient care skills and advanced patient care skills contributed to nurses' levels of overall satisfaction with their own nursing competencies. These results suggest a relationship between competency and performance. These findings may serve as a guide to amend academic nursing courses and on-job training programs as appropriate to place a greater emphasis on the competencies desired for providing high quality of nursing services.

  11. [Neonatal medicine, past and present].

    PubMed

    Salle, Bernard L; Vert, Paul

    2013-06-01

    This review deals with early neonatal medicine and its rapid development as a medical specialty, starting with the birth of neonatology in the early 19th century. Shaffer first used the term neonatology in 1963 to cover neonatal disorders and their treatment. Between the early 19th century and the 1950s, neonatal care was ensured by obstetricians, whose main goal was to reduce neonatal mortality. After the second world war, and especially the 1960s, the development of neonatal physiology and pathophysiology provided insights into neonatal diseases and their treatment, including respiratory distress, jaundice, malnutrition, and prevention of respiratory distress and brain complications, etc. Currently, neonatal mortality, regardless of birth weight, is below 2/1000, and the survival rate of premature infants, regardless of gestational age and birth weight, exceeds 85%. This represents a resounding success, despite the associated costs, ethical issues, and inevitable morbidity.

  12. Quality improvement initiatives in neonatal intensive care unit networks: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vibhuti; Warre, Ruth; Lee, Shoo K

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care unit networks that encompass regions, states, and even entire countries offer the perfect platform for implementing continuous quality improvement initiatives to advance the health care provided to vulnerable neonates. Through cycles of identification and implementation of best available evidence, benchmarking, and feedback of outcomes, combined with mutual collaborative learning through a network of providers, the performance of health care systems and neonatal outcomes can be improved. We use examples of successful neonatal networks from across North America to explore continuous quality improvement in the neonatal intensive care unit, including the rationale for the formation of neonatal networks, the role of networks in continuous quality improvement, quality improvement methods and outcomes, and barriers to and facilitators of quality improvement.

  13. Neonatal resuscitation in low-resource settings: What, who, and how to overcome challenges to scale up?

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Stephen N.; Lee, Anne CC; Niermeyer, Susan; English, Mike; Keenan, William J.; Carlo, Wally; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Bang, Abhay; Narayanan, Indira; Ariawan, Iwan; Lawn, Joy E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Each year approximately 10 million babies do not breathe immediately at birth, of which about 6 million require basic neonatal resuscitation. The major burden is in low-income settings, where health system capacity to provide neonatal resuscitation is inadequate. Objective To systematically review the evidence for neonatal resuscitation content, training and competency, equipment and supplies, cost, and key program considerations, specifically for resource-constrained settings. Results Evidence from several observational studies shows that facility-based basic neonatal resuscitation may avert 30% of intrapartum-related neonatal deaths. Very few babies require advanced resuscitation (endotracheal intubation and drugs) and these newborns may not survive without ongoing ventilation; hence, advanced neonatal resuscitation is not a priority in settings without neonatal intensive care. Of the 60 million nonfacility births, most do not have access to resuscitation. Several trials have shown that a range of community health workers can perform neonatal resuscitation with an estimated effect of a 20% reduction in intrapartum-related neonatal deaths, based on expert opinion. Case studies illustrate key considerations for scale up. Conclusion Basic resuscitation would substantially reduce intrapartum-related neonatal deaths. Where births occur in facilities, it is a priority to ensure that all birth attendants are competent in resuscitation. Strategies to address the gap for home births are urgently required. More data are required to determine the impact of neonatal resuscitation, particularly on long-term outcomes in low-income settings. PMID:19815203

  14. Maternal, neonatal and community factors influencing neonatal mortality in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, Carla Jorge; Hill, Kenneth

    2005-03-01

    Child mortality (the mortality of children less than five years old) declined considerably in the developing world in the 1990s, but infant mortality declined less. The reductions in neonatal mortality were not impressive and, as a consequence, there is an increasing percentage of infant deaths in the neonatal period. Any further reduction in child mortality, therefore, requires an understanding of the determinants of neonatal mortality. 209,628 birth and 2581 neonatal death records for the 1998 birth cohort from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, were probabilistically matched. Data were from SINASC and SIM, Information Systems on Live Births and Deaths of Brazil. Logistic regression was used to find the association between neonatal mortality and the following risk factors: birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes, delivery mode, plurality, sex, maternal education, maternal age, number of prior losses, prenatal care, race, parity and community development. Infants of older mothers were less likely to die in the neonatal period. Caesarean delivery was not found to be associated with neonatal mortality. Low birth weight, pre-term birth and low Apgar scores were associated with neonatal death. Having a mother who lives in the highest developed community decreased the odds of neonatal death, suggesting that factors not measured in this study are behind such association. This result may also indicate that other factors over and above biological and more proximate factors could affect neonatal death.

  15. Nursing Home Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  16. Microcephaly in north-east Brazil: a retrospective study on neonates born between 2012 and 2015

    PubMed Central

    Soares de Araújo, Juliana Sousa; Regis, Cláudio Teixeira; Gomes, Renata Grigório Silva; Tavares, Thiago Ribeiro; Rocha dos Santos, Cícera; Assunção, Patrícia Melo; Nóbrega, Renata Valéria; Pinto, Diana de Fátima Alves; Bezerra, Bruno Vinícius Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the number of children born with microcephaly in the State of Paraíba, north-east Brazil. Methods We contacted 21 maternity centres belonging to a paediatric cardiology network, with access to information regarding more than 100 000 neonates born between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2015. For 10% of these neonates, nurses were requested to retrieve head circumference measurements data from delivery-room books. We used three separate criteria to classify whether a neonate had microcephaly: (i) the Brazilian Ministry of Health proposed criterion: term neonates (gestational age ≥ 37 weeks) with a head circumference of less than 32 cm; (ii) Fenton curves: neonates with a head circumference of less than −3 standard deviation for age and gender; or (iii) the proportionality criterion: neonates with a head circumference of less than ((height/2))+10) ± 2. Findings Between 1 and 31 December 2015, nurses obtained data for 16 208 neonates. Depending on which criterion we used, the number of neonates with microcephaly varied from 678 to 1272 (4.2–8.2%). Two per cent (316) of the neonates fulfilled all three criteria. We observed temporal fluctuations of microcephaly prevalence from late 2012. Conclusion The numbers of microcephaly reported here are much higher than the 6.4 per 10 000 live births reported by the Brazilian live birth information system. The results raise questions about the notification system, the appropriateness of the diagnostic criteria and future implications for the affected children and their families. More studies are needed to understand the epidemiology and the implications for the Brazilian health system. PMID:27821886

  17. [Reading nursing Literature in English: new inputs for practicing nurses].

    PubMed

    von Klitzing, Waltraut; Stoll, Hansruedi; Trachsel, Edith; Aldorf, Kurt; Bernhard, Annelis; Eze, Germaine; Spirig, Rebecca

    2007-02-01

    A prerequisite to providing evidence-based care is the ability to comprehend the nursing research literature, most of which is published in English. To facilitate this understanding, a course on "reading the research literature for evidence-based practice in English" was developed by an interdisciplinary team for staff nurses at the University Hospital Basel. The pilot course was offered to nurses who specialized in cancer care. It was led by the oncology Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) from the Department of Medicine. Research articles focusing on the management of chronic illness and cancer pain management were assigned and read. The course consisted of ten 90 minute lessons. The evaluation was designed to address the following questions: 1. Did participation in the course improve the oncology related knowledge of the nurses? 2. Did participation in the course improve the nurses' English language skills? 3. At what level of difficulty did the nurse participants perceive the course to be? 4. Were course participants able to use their newly acquired knowledge to teach their nursing colleagues on the ward? The course evaluation demonstrated that the 15 participants significantly improved their oncology knowledge through this process but that their English skills did not improve. The participants were able to present lectures on their wards based on the course literature, which were positively evaluated by their colleagues and the APN course leader. The participants perceived the course as being sophisticated but also effective at demonstrating the use of English-language research literature for one's own nursing practice.

  18. The Doctor of Nursing Practice: Recognizing a Need or Graying the Line Between Doctor and Nurse?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jason E.

    2008-01-01

    The distinction between doctor and nurse has been historically visible to patients, and the scope of practice for each healthcare provider has been clearly marked by a wall of separation rooted in state law. In fact, even the titles by which these providers have been addressed have remained constant, with the term “doctor” being reserved for reference to physicians. With the advent of the new doctor of nursing practice degree, however, the clear distinction between doctor and nurse is in jeopardy. Moreover, accompanying the push toward a practice doctorate for advanced nursing practice is a call for the expansion of the scope of advanced nursing practice. The urgent questions at hand are the following: First, is a practice doctorate necessary or even appropriate for advanced nursing practice? Second, should the scope of advanced nursing practice be extended at this time? In addition to the increased educational requirements placed on aspiring advanced practice nurses and the associated increase in costs of obtaining the requisite education, requiring a practice doctorate for advanced practice nursing risks blurring the line between doctor and nurse and creates a potential for patient confusion. A true need for requiring a practice doctorate for advanced practice nursing has not been demonstrated. Moreover, the states should tread carefully when considering expanded roles for advanced practice nurses to avoid creating conflict within the medical community. Considering the level of qualification of today's medical school applicants, perhaps we should be training more physicians to meet the demand head-on rather than creating a separate practice doctorate to fill the gap. PMID:19099003

  19. Kamikaze nurses.

    PubMed

    1988-01-02

    In Japan nurses have found a somewhat drastic way of ensuring high standards of professional practice it would seem. For, according to a report in the current edition of the International Nursing Review, Fumiko Ohmori, retiring President of the Japanese Nursing Association, is famed for a number of visable achievements.

  20. Career mapping: developing nurse leaders, reinvigorating careers.

    PubMed

    Shermont, Herminia; Krepcio, Deborah; Murphy, Jane M

    2009-10-01

    Nurse leaders must ensure the continued development and learning of all nurses, including those who postpone participation in existing professional development activities. In this article, the authors describe a career mapping program for nurses who have demonstrated reluctance in establishing and pursuing career advancement goals. The program incorporates a 2-tiered mentoring strategy and guides nurses in assessing their strengths and interests, developing career goals, and mapping out and implementing a career plan to meet personal and professional needs. The 18-month program resulted in career advancement for most participants and offers a model for leadership development.

  1. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a big part of the pediatric NP's role. Pediatric and family practice NPs can treat acute ( ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  2. Neonatal thyroid storm accompanied with severe anaemia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu-Ying; Wei, Hong; Wang, Zheng-Li

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal thyroid storm is rare; the diagnostic criteria and management of neonatal thyroid storm have not been well established. In this paper, we report a preterm infant diagnosed with neonatal hyperthyroidism secondary to maternal Graves' disease who was discharged after therapy. Unfortunately, he was rehospitalised for neonatal thyroid storm. We will discuss the diagnosis and general therapy of neonatal thyroid storm.

  3. Neonatal pain management: still in search for the Holy Grail.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, Karel; van den Anker, John N

    2016-07-01

    Inadequate pain management but also inappropriate use of analgesics in early infancy has negative effects on neurodevelopmental outcome. As a consequence, neonatal pain management is still in search for the Holy Grail. At best, effective pain management is based on prevention, assessment, and treatment followed by a re-assessment of the pain to determine if additional treatment is still necessary. Unfortunately, epidemiological observations suggest that neonates are undergoing painful procedures very frequently, unveiling the need for effective preventive, non-pharmacological strategies. In addition, assessment is still based on validated, multimodal, but subjective pain assessment tools. Finally, in neonatal intensive care units, there is a shift in clinical practices (e.g., shorter intubation and ventilation), and this necessitates the development and validation of new pharmacological treatment modalities. To illustrate this, a shift in the use of opioids to paracetamol has occurred and short-acting agents (remifentanil, propofol) are more commonly administered to neonates. In addition to these new modalities and as part of a more advanced approach of the developmental pharmacology of analgesics, pharmacogenetics also emerged as a tool for precision medicine in neonates. To assure further improvement of neonatal pain management the integration of pharmacogenetics with the usual covariates like weight, age and/or disease characteristics is needed.

  4. Healthcare employers' policies on nurse education.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Patricia; Herrera, Carolina-Nicole S; Horton, Katherine; Thompson, Pamela A; Ware, Jamie M; Terry, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The 2010 recommendation that the proportion of registered nurses with BSN (bachelor of science in nursing) degrees in the nursing workforce should increase from the current 40% to 80% by the year 2020 has shifted the focus on nurses educational progression from state legislatures-where changes in entry-level requirements were debated for decades-to the executive suites of large healthcare providers. The recommendation, contained in the report titled The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing at the Institute of Medicine, suggests that human resources policies for nurses have the potential to double the rates of college degree completions (IOM, 2010). We surveyed 447 nurse executives in hospitals, nurse-led clinics, and home and hospice companies to explore the current practices of healthcare employers with regard to this recommendation. Almost 80% of respondents reported that their institution either preferred or required newly hired nurses to have a bachelor's degree, and 94% of the facilities offered some level of tuition reimbursement. Only 25%, however, required their nurses to earn a BSN or offered salary differentials on the basis of educational attainment (9%). We conclude that if employers are serious about wanting a more highly educated nurse workforce, they need to adopt requirements for degree completion and wage differentials in the coming years. The likelihood that such policies will be widely adopted, however, is dramatically affected by the dynamics of nursing supply and demand.

  5. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  6. The future of nursing: domestic agenda, global implications.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Franklin A; Davis, Catherine R; To Dutka, Julia; Richardson, Donna R

    2014-10-01

    The 2010 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, challenges the nursing profession to take a key role in redesigning the health care system. Intended to shape the future of nursing in the United States, the IOM report has implications for nursing worldwide. While individual states and nursing organizations are developing initiatives to implement the IOM recommendations in the United States, there must be a concomitant effort to examine the ripple effect on global health and the nursing community. This article addresses four IOM recommendations that are directly relevant to internationally educated nurses who practice across borders: nurse residency programs, lifelong learning, leading change to advance health, and interprofessional health care workforce data. The article discusses the IOM recommendations through a global perspective and offers policy implications for legislators, health care organizations and nurse educators, regulators and administrators.

  7. The attitudes of GPs towards the nurse-practitioner role.

    PubMed

    Carr, J; Bethea, J; Hancock, B

    2001-09-01

    In recent years, nursing and health-care policy have promoted the advanced role of the nurse -- that of nurse practitioner. But such a role has not been integrated widely into the primary health-care team. This study investigates the knowledge and attitudes of GPs who do not employ nurse practitioners to find out what prevents them doing so. Ten GPs who did not already employ a nurse practitioner took part in semi-structured interviews. Our findings show that GPs, although confused about the role, were generally supportive of advanced nursing practice. Skills identified with the role were prescribing, disease diagnosis and minor-illness management. GPs thought that protocols and guidelines should govern practice, which differs fundamentally from the Royal College of Nursing definition. None of the GPs had encountered the role in primary care, and the lack of professional regulation and role definition for practice nurses and nurse practitioners who work in primary care may have affected GPs' perceptions.

  8. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dan, M

    1983-11-01

    To assess and correlate the microbiology of neonatal septic arthritis with the clinical presentation, we reviewed the records of nine infants with neonatal septic arthritis (NSA) diagnosed at Edmonton hospitals between 1964 and 1981, and evaluated 92 other cases reported in the English literature since 1960. Our analysis revealed that the microbiology of NSA seemed to be dependent on whether it was hospital or community acquired. In the hospital-acquired cases, staphylococci were the predominant isolates (62%), followed by Candida species (17%) and gram-negative enteric bacilli (15%). Community-acquired arthritis was caused most often by streptococci (52%), followed by staphylococci (26%) and gonococci (17%). Since 1970, the relative infrequency of staphylococcal (5%) in favor of streptococcal (75%) isolates in community-acquired NSA is even more pronounced.

  9. Unfractionated heparin: a nursing dilemma.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Lynn B

    2004-08-01

    Nurses face challenges in all aspects of their practice, especially with administering and monitoring drugs in a safe, effective manner. Key factors known to affect drug administration include general drug knowledge, formal nurse education, continuing education needs, clinical experience, and the nationwide nursing shortage. Other factors are advances in technologic aids and quality improvement initiatives. Emphasis on patient safety is growing, especially as it relates to drug therapy and high-alert drugs such as unfractionated heparin (UFH). Specific interventions related to UFH administration can enhance patient care management. Because nurses are at the site of direct patient care, they are often in an opportune position for identifying medication errors. At the same time, and most important, nurses need to collaborate with other health care professionals to actively develop solutions to minimize these errors. Adopting a systems approach and working collaboratively with an interdisciplinary team can result in improved patient outcomes.

  10. [Neonatal conventional ventilation guidelines].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory pathology is a frequent problem in Neonatal Intensive Care Units; the last few years, our knowledge about its management has improved enormously. Conventional Ventilatory support is a high-specialized technique that maintains a correct alveolar gas exchange while the primary aetiology is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory failure improves. The aim of this document is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory pathology

  11. [Neonatal lupus. Case report].

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Salinas, Adriana; Solano-Fiesco, Liborio; Romero-Ramírez, Jorge Armando; Olivera-Solórzano, Florisela; Alonso-Pérez, Nancy Carmencita; Marcos-Cabrera, Liliana; González-Martínez, Rosa Ana

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal lupus has a rare incidence, distinct from systemic lupus erythematosus. This is an acquired autoimmune disease associated with maternal antibodies to proteins Ro / La (SSA /SSB), transferred by the placenta; it represents the prototype of passive transfer of antibodies from mother to child. The disease can affect the skin, heart, and rarely, the hepatobiliary or hematologic systems. Congenital complete heart block is the most severe form of neonatal lupus. In clinical practice it is important to distinguish in utero a complete from an incomplete atrioventricular block (AV) in order to render prompt care. We present the case of a new born female, who was diagnosed with an atrio-ventricular block at 26 weeksí gestation. When the baby was delivered at 38 weeksí gestation, she presented bradycardia (54 xí). On the suspicion of neonatal lupus, we required antinuclear antibodies, anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-SS-A and anti-SS-B, which were positive. A bicameral pacemaker was placed uneventfully.

  12. Nursing outside hospitals: the working experience of community nurses. Educational characteristics and job perceptions.

    PubMed

    Temple-Smith, M J; Johnson, K A; Dunt, D R

    1989-01-01

    The community nursing practice research project reports the results of a mailed questionnaire survey of nurses employed outside hospitals and nursing homes in Victoria in 1985. Two 10 per cent random samples stratified across practice areas were selected from listings of community nurses providing detailed employment information to the Victorian Nursing Council. An 84 per cent response rate was obtained from these listings yielding 689 responses. This paper reports that part of the study relevant to job entry, job satisfaction, job mobility and perceived career options as well as educational preparation. One half of community nurses entered community nursing after five years of hospital experience. The major reasons for choosing employment in community health nursing were its conditions of work, its autonomy and a dissatisfaction with hospital nursing, rather than a specific orientation to community nursing. These can be appreciated in terms of competing demands by the nurse's family life and her sense of growing professional maturity. Job satisfaction was high, with 87 per cent of nurses in the study population being satisfied or very satisfied. Only one quarter considered opportunities for career advancement to exist in their practice area. In the event only one fifth of nurses regarded promotion as important. The high levels of job satisfaction and the low importance attached to promotion are explicable given the nature of female employment and dissatisfaction with hospital nursing. Despite this high level of job satisfaction, one third of nurses believed they would not be nursing in five years time. Less than one third of nurses felt there was adequate opportunity for advancement in their practice area.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Development and validation of a simple algorithm for initiation of CPAP in neonates with respiratory distress in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Hundalani, Shilpa G; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Oden, Maria; Kawaza, Kondwani; Gest, Alfred; Molyneux, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Low-cost bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP) systems have been shown to improve survival in neonates with respiratory distress, in developing countries including Malawi. District hospitals in Malawi implementing CPAP requested simple and reliable guidelines to enable healthcare workers with basic skills and minimal training to determine when treatment with CPAP is necessary. We developed and validated TRY (T: Tone is good, R: Respiratory Distress and Y=Yes) CPAP, a simple algorithm to identify neonates with respiratory distress who would benefit from CPAP. Objective To validate the TRY CPAP algorithm for neonates with respiratory distress in a low-resource setting. Methods We constructed an algorithm using a combination of vital signs, tone and birth weight to determine the need for CPAP in neonates with respiratory distress. Neonates admitted to the neonatal ward of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, in Blantyre, Malawi, were assessed in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Nurses and paediatricians-in-training assessed neonates to determine whether they required CPAP using the TRY CPAP algorithm. To establish the accuracy of the TRY CPAP algorithm in evaluating the need for CPAP, their assessment was compared with the decision of a neonatologist blinded to the TRY CPAP algorithm findings. Results 325 neonates were evaluated over a 2-month period; 13% were deemed to require CPAP by the neonatologist. The inter-rater reliability with the algorithm was 0.90 for nurses and 0.97 for paediatricians-in-training using the neonatologist's assessment as the reference standard. Conclusions The TRY CPAP algorithm has the potential to be a simple and reliable tool to assist nurses and clinicians in identifying neonates who require treatment with CPAP in low-resource settings. PMID:25877290

  14. Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?

    PubMed Central

    Mörelius, Evalotte; Gustafsson, Per A.; Ekberg, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (n = 33) and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP) (n = 14) using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person). Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health. PMID:23878734

  15. A Post-operative Feeding Protocol to Improve Outcomes for Neonates With Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Newcombe, Jennifer; Fry-Bowers, Eileen

    2017-01-04

    Neonates with critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) are vulnerable to malnutrition during the post-operative period due to hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism. To improve nutritional outcomes during hospitalization, a nurse led post-operative enteral feeding protocol was implemented at a large U.S. children's hospital. During an eight-month implementation period, twenty-one neonates met protocol inclusion criteria. Days for neonates to achieve goal caloric feedings (120kcal/kg/day) were decreased. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance showed serum albumin levels and serial anthropometric measurements improved significantly throughout hospitalization (p<0.005). Results from this quality improvement project show standardizing nutritional care for neonates with CCHD during the post-operative period is an effective way to improve nutritional outcomes and shorten length of hospital stay.

  16. [Reasons for non-elective removal of epicutaneous catheters in neonates].

    PubMed

    Paiva, Eny Dórea; Costa, Priscila; Kimura, Amélia Fumiko; Elci de Castro, Talita

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to describe the incidence and reasons for nonelective removal of epicutaneous catheters in neonates, identifying its association with the catheter insertion site. This was a prospective cohort study, conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit of a private tertiary hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. We analyzed 266 epicutaneous catheter insertions. The incidence of non-elective removal was 39.1%. The most frequent post-insertion complications were suspicion of catheter-related bloodstream infection (25%) and rupture (23.1%). Most catheters were inserted through the right side of the body (65%), in upper limbs (77.1%), and using the axillary veins (31.2%). The findings did not suggest association between the incidence of non-elective removal and the insertion site of the epicutaneous catheter in neonates. Nurses should implement strategies to improve care and decrease incidence of non-elective epicutaneous catheter removals among neonates.

  17. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections in neonates: room for improvement.

    PubMed

    Legeay, C; Bourigault, C; Lepelletier, D; Zahar, J R

    2015-04-01

    Infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are highly susceptible to infection due to the immaturity of their immune systems. Healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) are associated with prolonged hospital stay, and represent a significant risk factor for neurological development problems and death. Improving HCAI control is a priority for NICUs. Many factors contribute to the occurrence of HCAIs in neonates such as poor hand hygiene, low nurse-infant ratios, environmental contamination and unnecessary use of antibiotics. Prevention is based on improving neonatal management, avoiding unnecessary use of central venous catheters, restricting use of antibiotics and H2 blockers, and introducing antifungal prophylaxis if necessary. Quality improvement interventions to reduce HCAIs in neonates seem to be the cornerstone of infection control.

  18. Restrictive management of neonatal polycythemia.

    PubMed

    Morag, Iris; Strauss, Tzipora; Lubin, Daniel; Schushan-Eisen, Irit; Kenet, Gili; Kuint, Jacob

    2011-10-01

    Partial exchange transfusion (PET) is traditionally suggested as treatment for neonates diagnosed with polycythemia. Nevertheless, justification of this treatment is controversial. We evaluated the risk for short-term complications associated with a restrictive treatment protocol for neonatal polycythemia. A retrospective cross-sectional analytical study was conducted. Three treatment groups were defined and managed according to their degree of polycythemia, defined by capillary tube filled with venous blood and manually centrifuged hematocrit: group 1, hematocrit 65 to 69% and no special treatment was recommended; group 2, hematocrit 70 to 75% and intravenous fluids were given and feedings were withheld until hematocrit decreased to < 70%; and group 3, hematocrit ≥ 76% or symptomatic neonates and PET was recommended. During the study period, 190 neonates were diagnosed with polycythemia. The overall rate of short-term complications was 15% (28 neonates). Seizures, proven necrotizing enterocolitis, or thrombosis did not occur in any participating neonates. PET was performed in 31 (16%) neonates. The groups did not differ in their rate of early neonatal morbidities or length of hospitalization. Restrictive treatment for neonatal asymptomatic polycythemia is not associated with an increased risk of short-term complications.

  19. Neonatal cystic fibrosis screening test

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis screening - neonatal; Immunoreactive trypsinogen; IRT test; CF - screening ... better nutrition, growth, and lung function. This screening test helps doctors identify children with CF before they ...

  20. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections are uncommon, but because of the morbidity and mortality associated with the infection they are often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. The use of polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of these infants. Initiation of long-term antiviral suppressive therapy in these infants has led to significant improvement in morbidity. This article summarizes the epidemiology of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections and discusses clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow up of infants with neonatal herpes disease.

  1. 2004 survey of ECMO in the neonate after open heart surgery: circuitry and team roles.

    PubMed

    Searles, Bruce; Gunst, Gordy; Terry, Bryan; Melchior, Richard; Darling, Edward

    2005-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, the bulk of the literature and texts published about extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been written by physicians and nurses. The consensus of this body of printed information would suggest, among other things, that (1) despite significant advancements in extracorporeal technology, the standard ECMO circuit has remained fundamentally unchanged since originally described in 1982, and (2) perfusionists are nearly absent from the staffing algorithm at most centers. While these conclusions may be representative of the extracorporeal life support (ELSO) reporting centers, they may not be representative of the field as a whole. We hypothesized that the use of modern extracorporeal equipment and the involvement of perfusionists in ECMO patient care is largely underreported in previous studies. To study this hypothesis, we developed a standard survey instrument and queried perfusion teams from the hospitals listed on the American Society of Extra-Corporeal Technology Pediatric Registry. All centers were contacted by phone and were asked questions regarding their caseload, circuitry, and staffing algorithms. Data are reported as a percentage of respondents. ECMO is used as a method of mechanical support after neonatal open heart surgery in 94% of centers surveyed. For 60% of the centers, a silicone membrane oxygenator is used exclusively, whereas 40% of the centers have used a hollow fiber oxygenator (HFO), and of that group, 19% use a HFO routinely for neonatal post-cardiopulmonary bypass ECMO. Roller pumps are used exclusively at 65% of the centers, whereas centrifugal pumps are used routinely in 12%, and 23% have used both. Perfusionists are responsible for set-up/initiation (79%) and daily rounding/troubleshooting (71%), and provide around-the-clock bedside care (46%) at the surveyed centers. These data suggest that previously published ELSO-centric ECMO studies may significantly underestimate the contemporary application of modern

  2. Addressing barriers to achieving nursing certification: development of a certification achievement program on a medical-surgical unit.

    PubMed

    Perlstein, Lori; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Lindberg, Judy; Petras, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Nursing certification is recognized as advanced competency and knowledge beyond basic preparation, thus empowering nurses to contribute to improved outcomes by demonstrating expertise in their specialties. It has been recognized that nurses do not seek certification because of identified barriers. Through a structured Certification Achievement Program that reduced barriers, a cohort of nurses was able to achieve certification in medical-surgical nursing.

  3. Induction of transient hyperprolactinaemia in neonatal rats by direct or maternal treatment with the dopamine receptor blocker, sulpiride.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M; Howie, P W

    1987-07-01

    Prolactin was measured in the plasma of neonatal rats after iv and ip injection of the dopamine receptor blocking drug sulpiride, and after its ip injection to neonatal rats' nursing mothers. The sulpiride dose PRL response relationship in 10-25 day old neonatal rats was similar to that found in lactating rats, with a threshold sensitivity around 29 nmol sulpiride/kg body weight and a maximal response at about 2.9 mumol/kg. Absolute levels of PRL in the neonate (both peak and increment-over-basal) were, however, 90% lower than in adults. Treatment of lactating mothers with a maximally stimulatory dose of sulpiride (2.9 mumol/kg) twice daily for 4 days resulted in small but highly significant increases in neonatal PRL on days 1 and 2 but complete loss of response by day 4. These data demonstrate that there is a close similarity between the responses of maternal and neonatal rats to sulpiride and that transfer of the drug to the neonate via milk can induce neonatal hyperprolactinaemia. The subsequent loss of the neonatal PRL response on chronic exposure to sulpiride may indicate a degree of disturbance of hypothalamic dopaminergic mechanisms. In the clinical situation this would suggest that doses of dopamine receptor-blocking drugs used to enhance maternal milk production should be carefully chosen.

  4. Health providers' perception of quality of care for neonates in health facilities in a municipality in Southern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Elikplim Pomevor, Kokui; Adomah-Afari, Augustine

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess available human resources for neonatal care and their skills, in order to explore health providers' perceptions of quality of neonatal care in health facilities in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach Data were gathered using qualitative interviews with health providers working in the maternity and paediatric wards and midwives; direct observation; and documentary review at a regional hospital, a municipal hospital and four health centres in a municipality in a region in Southern Ghana. Data were analysed using thematic framework through the process of coding in six phases to create and establish meaningful patterns. Findings The study revealed that health providers were concerned about the number of staff available, their competence and also equipment available for them to work more efficiently. Some essential equipment for neonatal care was either not available or was non-functional where it was available, while aseptic procedures were not adhered to. Moreover, personal protective equipment such as facemask, caps, aprons were not used except in the labour wards where staff had to change their footwear before entering. Research limitations/implications Limited number of health providers and facilities used, lack of exploration of parents of neonates' perspective of quality of neonatal care in this study and other settings, including the teaching hospitals. The authors did not examine issues related to the ineffective use of IV cannulation for neonates by nurses as well as referral of neonates. Additionally, the authors did not explore the perspectives of management of the municipal and regional health directorates or policy makers of the Ministry of Health and Ghana Health Service regarding the shortage of staff, inadequate provision of medical equipment and infrastructure. Practical implications This paper suggests the need for policy makers to redirect their attention to the issues that would improve the quality of

  5. Nursing Education in Western Australia. Joint Report to the Minister for Education and the Minister for Health from the Committee on Enquiry into Nursing Education. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Australian Post Secondary Education Commission, Nedlands.

    The final report and recommendations of the Nursing Education Committee of the Western Australian Post Secondary Education Commission are presented, with specific attention to articulation between hospital general nursing schools and colleges of advanced education. After reviewing general issues in nursing, nurse supply and demand, access to the…

  6. Obstetrical staff nurses experiences of clinical learning.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    The clinical learning experience is used in nursing programs of study worldwide to prepare nurses for professional practice. This study's purpose was to use Naturalistic Inquiry to understand the experiences of staff nurses in an obstetrical unit with undergraduate nursing students present for clinical learning. A convenience sample of 12 staff nurses, employed on a Family Birth Center, participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparative method as modified by Lincoln and Guba was used to analyze data. Five themes related to staff nurses experiences of clinical learning were identified: Giving and Receiving; Advancing Professionally and Personally; Balancing Act; Getting to Know and Working with You; and Past and Present. This research highlights staff nurses' experiences of clinical learning in undergraduate nursing education. Staff nurses exert a powerful, long lasting influence on students. A need exists to prepare and judiciously select nurses to work with students. Clinical agencies and universities can take joint responsibility providing tangible incentives, financial compensation, and recognition to all nurses working with nursing students.

  7. Transmission of murine cytomegalovirus in breast milk: a model of natural infection in neonates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Carol A; Paveglio, Sara A; Lingenheld, Elizabeth G; Zhu, Li; Lefrançois, Leo; Puddington, Lynn

    2011-05-01

    Vertical transmission of viruses in breast milk can expose neonates to infectious pathogens at a time when the capacity of their immune system to control infections is limited. We developed a mouse model to study the outcomes of acquisition of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) when neonates are breastfed by mothers with acute or latent infection. Breast milk leukocytes collected from lactating mice were examined for the presence of MCMV IE-1 mRNA by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with Southern analysis. As determined by this criterion, breast milk leukocytes from both acute and latent mothers were positive for MCMV. This mimics the outcome seen in humans with latent cytomegalovirus infection, where reactivation of virus occurs specifically in the lactating mammary gland. Interestingly, intraperitoneal injection of breast milk collected from mothers with latent infection was sufficient to transfer MCMV to neonatal mice, demonstrating that breast milk was a source of virus. Furthermore, we found that MCMV was transmitted from infected mothers to breastfed neonates, with MCMV IE-1 mRNA or infectious virus present in multiple organs, including the brain. In fact, 1 day of nursing was sufficient to transmit MCMV from latent mothers to breastfed neonatal mice. Together, these data validate this mouse model of vertical transmission of MCMV from mothers with acute or latent MCMV infection to breastfed neonates. Its relevance to human disease should prove useful in future studies designed to elucidate the immunological and pathological ramifications of neonatal infection acquired via this natural route.

  8. Conscientious objection: a call to nursing leadership.

    PubMed

    Ford, Natalie J; Fraser, Kimberly D; Marck, Patricia B

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we argue that nurse leaders need to work actively to create morally supportive environments for nurses in Canada that provide adequate room to exercise conscientious objection. Morally supportive environments engender a safe atmosphere to engage in open dialogue and action regarding conflict of conscience. The CNA's 2008 Code of Ethics for Registered Nurses has recognized the importance of conscientious objection in nursing and has created key guidelines for the registered nurse to follow when a conflict in conscience is being considered or declared. Nurse leaders need to further develop the understanding of conflicts of conscience through education, well-written guidelines for conscientious objection in workplaces and engagement in research to uncover underlying barriers to the enactment of conscientious objections. With advancements in technology, changing healthcare policies and increasing scope of practice, both reflection and dialogue on conscientious objection are critical for the continuing moral development of nurses in Canada.

  9. Perceived roles of oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO) Standards of Care (2001) provides a framework that delineates oncology nursing roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to explore how oncology nurses perceive their roles and responsibilities compared to the CANO Standards of Care. Six focus groups were conducted and 21 registered nurses (RNs) from a community-based hospital participated in this study. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative inductive content analysis. Three themes were identified: (1) Oncology nurses perceive a gap between their defined roles and the reality of daily practice, as cancer care becomes more complex and as they provide advanced oncology care to more patients while there is no parallel adaptation to the health care system to support them, such as safe staffing; (2) Oncology nursing, as a specialty, requires sustained professional development and leadership roles; and (3) Oncology nurses are committed to providing continuous care as a reference point in the health care team by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration andfacilitating patient's navigation through the system. Organizational support through commitment to appropriate staffing and matching scope ofpractice to patient needs may lead to maximize the health and well-being of nurses, quality of patient care and organizational performance.

  10. The Role of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists in Patient Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    As advanced practice nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) have a responsibility to engage in patient education about health...Categories and themes include; engaging in perioperative patient education , focusing on explanations about anesthesia and surgery, prior nursing...experiences make patient education easier, documenting patient education is important and uncertainty about where to document it. Common topics and themes

  11. The Future of Nursing Education: 10 Trends To Watch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Barbara R.; Oros, Marla T.; Durney-Crowley, Jane

    2000-01-01

    Ten trends affecting nursing are as follows: changing demographics, technology, globalization, educated consumers, population-based care, health care costs/managed care, health policy and regulation, need for interdisciplinary education and collaboration, nursing shortage, and advances in nursing science and research. (SK)

  12. Education and Practice Barriers for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Malina, Debra P; Izlar, Janice J

    2014-05-31

    Of the recognized advanced practice registered nursing (APRN) specialties, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) have historically experienced the most vigorous and organized resistance from outside entities regarding rights to practice to the full scope of their education and experience. Opposition to nurse anesthetists practicing to the full scope of their education and training is present in the clinical arena and educational milieu.

  13. The History of Care of Premature Infants: From Neonate Intensive Care to Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douret, L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Outlines the history of and reviews the literature on the care of premature infants. Focuses on the medicalization of birth; early neonatology; the effect of advances in medicine on the survival and safety of neonates; and the importance of early mother-neonate interactions. (BC)

  14. A History of Neonatal Medicine—Past Accomplishments, Lessons Learned, and Future Challenges. Part 1—The First Century

    PubMed Central

    Lussky, Richard C.; Cifuentes, Raul F.; Siddappa, Ashajyothi M.

    2005-01-01

    This is the first of two articles that will review the history of neonatal medicine. This article will describe the beginnings of the modern era of newborn medicine, review pharmacological misadventures, and describe recent advances in the fields of neonatal and perinatal medicine. PMID:23118629

  15. Neonatal screening: ethical aspects.

    PubMed

    Hermerén, G

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the ethical issues raised by neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis and to propose a structure for the ethical analysis of these issues. The structure is based on an analysis of some of the most common shortcomings of ethical analyses. The structure needs to be supplemented by facts about the present state of the art concerning effects and costs of the various screening and treatment alternatives. Such information is provided by other contributions to these proceedings.

  16. Eye pathologies in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Nyaish; Mansoor, Tihami; Ahmed, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, newborn assessment incorporates a screening eye examination for any structural abnormalities, observation of neonate's visual behaviour and direct ophthalmoscopy examination looking for red reflex. Early identification and immediate management of eye related pathologies should commence soon after birth as early diagnosis and prompt intervention may have significant impact on the prognosis for many potentially blinding but treatable disorders such as congenital cataracts and retinoblastoma. If left undetected and untreated, such problems may potentially lead to irreversible damage to the vision which persists into adulthood resulting in lack of self-confidence together with difficulties in educational attainment and job opportunities. PMID:28003988

  17. Neonatal drug withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Mark L; Tan, Rosemarie C

    2012-02-01

    Maternal use of certain drugs during pregnancy can result in transient neonatal signs consistent with withdrawal or acute toxicity or cause sustained signs consistent with a lasting drug effect. In addition, hospitalized infants who are treated with opioids or benzodiazepines to provide analgesia or sedation may be at risk for manifesting signs of withdrawal. This statement updates information about the clinical presentation of infants exposed to intrauterine drugs and the therapeutic options for treatment of withdrawal and is expanded to include evidence-based approaches to the management of the hospitalized infant who requires weaning from analgesics or sedatives.

  18. The Nursing Faculty Shortage: Is There Hope?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeYoung, Sandra; Bliss, Julie; Tracy, Janet P.

    2002-01-01

    Recent solutions to the nursing faculty shortage (expanded certification programs, aggressive recruitment, delayed retirement) have had some success. New solutions might include fast-track bachelor-to-doctorate curricula, recruitment of advanced practice nurses, image enhancement, national certification, and linking of the faculty and nurse…

  19. Men Who Enter Nursing: A Sociological Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auster, Donald; Auster, Nancy R.

    Little is known about the relationship between the choice of a sex discrepant occupation and the selection of a nursing career, attitudes toward training, and professional socialization. The research design included a cross-sectional attitude survey of both beginning and advanced nursing school students. Data were obtained from a…

  20. Inclusion of temporal priors for automated neonatal EEG classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temko, Andriy; Stevenson, Nathan; Marnane, William; Boylan, Geraldine; Lightbody, Gordon

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to use recent advances in the clinical understanding of the temporal evolution of seizure burden in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy to improve the performance of automated detection algorithms. Probabilistic weights are designed from temporal locations of neonatal seizure events relative to time of birth. These weights are obtained by fitting a skew-normal distribution to the temporal seizure density and introduced into the probabilistic framework of the previously developed neonatal seizure detector. The results are validated on the largest available clinical dataset, comprising 816.7 h. By exploiting these priors, the receiver operating characteristic area is increased by 23% (relative) reaching 96.74%. The number of false detections per hour is decreased from 0.45 to 0.25, while maintaining the correct detection of seizure burden at 70%.

  1. Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: progress and ongoing debates.

    PubMed

    Bussel, James B; Primiani, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT) is a result of a parental incompatibility of platelet-specific antigens and the transplacental passage of maternal alloantibodies against the platelet antigen shared by the father and the fetus. It occurs in approximately 1 in 1000 live births and is the most common cause of severe thrombocytopenia in fetuses and term neonates. As screening programs are not routinely performed, most affected fetuses are identified after birth when neonatal thrombocytopenia is recognized. In severe cases, the affected fetus is identified as a result of suffering from an in utero intracranial hemorrhage. Once diagnosed, AIT must be treated antenatally as the disease can be more severe in subsequent pregnancies. While there have been many advances regarding the diagnosis and treatment of AIT, it is still difficult to predict the severity of disease and which therapy will be effective.

  2. Private practice--an advanced practice option.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Anne; Jarman, Heather

    2002-10-01

    Currently there is considerable debate on the role and function of nurses in Australia and internationally. This debate stems from developments within the nursing profession itself from political and economic issues in health platforms, due to restructuring of the health care system, consumer expectations of health care and nurses' expectations of a career. This paper provides the opportunity to reflect on the development of the role of the private practice (independent nurse) and where that role is situated in the nursing profession. This forms the basis for discussion of the development of specialty practice at an advanced level in Australia and to demonstrate its relationship with the nurse practitioner movement in Australia.

  3. End-of-Life Decision Making for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: A Survey of Nursing Home Social Services Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Debra

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to describe nursing home social services staff roles and perceptions related to end-of-life medical decision making for nursing home residents in endstage dementia. Using a self-designed questionnaire, 138 nursing home social services staff from across New York State answered questions about advance directives,…

  4. Genomic-Based Health Care in Nursing: A Bidirectional Approach to Bringing Genetics into Nursing's Body of Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lea, Dale Halsey; Feetham, Suzanne L.; Monsen, Rita Black

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 15 genetics nurses reveals both grassroots and top-down approaches to advancing genetics in nursing practice, research, and education. As genome-based health care spreads, nursing should concentrate on bringing genetics into clinical practice and scholarship. (Contains 33 references.) (SK)

  5. Jump starting your nursing career: toolbox for success.

    PubMed

    Jakubik, Louise D

    2008-03-01

    While there is no single path to career advancement in nursing, there are developmental tools and organizational systems to promote nurses' career advancement and to assist in the organization of professional accomplishments. As nurses achieve additional credentialing, certification, licensure and academic credentials, it is important that they list these credentials after their names to market their career accomplishments and expertise. Career tool boxes such as a file system, resume and professional portfolio, are key organizational systems for nurses to keep track of their success and to promote their careers in nursing.

  6. Developing leadership talent: a statewide nurse leader mentorship program.

    PubMed

    Rich, Mary; Kempin, Bettyann; Loughlin, Mary Jo; Vitale, Tracy R; Wurmser, Theresa; Thrall, Terese Hudson

    2015-02-01

    Nurse leaders continue to seek support programs essential for advancement to senior roles. Providing such support presents a challenge for the future of nursing in the state of New Jersey and on a national level. This article discusses the creation of a mentorship program by the Organization of Nurse Executives of New Jersey (ONE NJ). In recognition of the program, which has contributed to the advancement of New Jersey nursing leadership, the ONE NJ received the 2014 American Organization of Nurse Executives Chapter Achievement Award.

  7. Improving neonatal mortality in an Ethiopian referral hospital

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Crawford

    2014-01-01

    Ethiopia has one of the world's poorest neonatal mortality rates (1). As a British paediatrician working for one year, the main aim was to improve neonatal care in a referral hospital's neonatal unit. An initial project looking at all admissions to the unit over the month of October 2012, revealed the death rate within the unit was 21% of all admissions. Of the 55 admissions only 43 (75%) had a temperature recorded at admission. 29 (67%) of these were hypothermic, and of these 29 initially hypothermic babies, 19 (65%) remained hypothermic or did not have another temperature documented during their stay. Only 33 (56%) had a heart rate and respiratory rate recorded on admission and only 11 (19%) had any further vital signs recorded during their stay. 19 of the admitted infants had a diagnosis of low birth weight and 10 (53%) of these either died or left against medical advice. With this information regular basic neonatal care teaching sessions for doctors and nursing staff were initiated. Vital signs charts were introduced and unit specific protocols were written. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) was trialled and found to be effective, and CPAP training was given to all nurses and doctors on the unit. A room was set aside to be used solely as Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC). The nurses were taken to a very effective neonatal unit as an ‘experience sharing’ trip to help with motivation and a grant was also obtained for basic equipment. After 6 months the project was repeated for all the admissions during February 2013. The death rate had progressively fallen and was 10% in February. 54 patients (98%) had a temperature taken on admission and of these, 27 (49%) were hypothermic. 25 (93%) of these hypothermic infants had subsequent temperatures documented which were normal. 54 (98%) had heart rate and respiratory rate recorded on admission and 50 (90%) had them recorded at least daily during their stay. Of the 22 babies with low birth weight (40%), only 4 (18

  8. Circadian rhythms of prolactin secretion in neonatal female rabbits after acute separation from their mothers.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M P; Jiménez, V; Cano, P; Rebollar, P; Cardinali, D P; Esquifino, A I

    2006-05-01

    Newborn rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are only nursed for 3-5 min every 24 h and show a circadian increase in activity in anticipation of nursing. The objective of this study was to determine, in neonatal female rabbits after acute separation from the doe for 48 h, the changes in 24-h rhythms of plasma prolactin and median eminence and anterior pituitary concentration of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT). In addition, median eminence concentration of the excitatory amino acid transmitters glutamate (GLU) and aspartate (ASP) and of the inhibitory amino acid transmitters gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine (TAU) was measured. A significant 21% increase of circulating prolactin occurred in isolated pups. In controls pups, plasma prolactin levels showed two peaks, during the first half of the light phase and at the beginning of the scotophase, respectively. In the isolated pups, a phase advance of about 4 h occurred for the two prolactin peaks. Hemicircadian changes of median eminence DA were found in controls, whereas a single daily peak (at 17:00 h) was found in the separated pups. Plasma prolactin and median eminence DA correlated significantly and inversely in the control group only. Pituitary DA content exhibited a single peak in controls and a hemicircadian pattern in isolated pups. Plasma prolactin and pituitary DA correlated significantly in isolated pups only 00000. Pup isolation decreased median eminence 5HT levels, augmented pituitary 5HT levels and disrupted their 24 h rhythmicity. Circulating prolactin correlated inversely with median eminence 5HT and directly with adenohypophysial 5HT only in controls. Isolation of pups generally modified the 24 h pattern of median eminence excitatory and inhibitory amino acid content by causing a prominent decrease at the beginning of the light phase. The results indicate that circadian rhythmicity of prolactin secretory mechanisms in female rabbit pups is significantly affected by pup's isolation from the doe.

  9. The frequency of painful procedures in neonatal intensive care units in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ihn Sook; Park, Soon Mi; Lee, Jeon Ma; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Joohyun

    2014-08-01

    This study was to evaluate the performed painful procedures among all sick neonates cared for at two university hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the Republic of Korea. This prospective study was done with all newborns admitted to the NICUs between 1 October and 20 November 2010. Data collection was done with self-administered questionnaire by each nurse for the first 2 weeks of admission and discontinued if the neonate was discharged, transferred or died. The number of painful procedures, according to general characteristics of the neonates, were compared using Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Oral suctioning was the most frequently performed procedure, followed by tracheal suctioning and nasal suctioning. The number of painful procedures increased as the gestation period became shorter and birthweight decreased. In conclusion, nurses should reappraise the need for painful procedures, in particular, among neonates with a gestation period of ≤ 27 weeks and babies with ≤ 1000 g of birthweight, and execute their performance only if necessary.

  10. Travel Recommendations for the Nursing Mother

    MedlinePlus

    ... many potential obstacles. A mother planning a long separation from her nursing infant or child might wish ... over many weeks in advance of the planned separation. Infants who have never consumed milk from a ...

  11. Hypernatremia in the Neonate: Neonatal Hypernatremia and Hypernatremic Dehydration in Neonates Receiving Exclusive Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Mujawar, Nilofer Salim; Jaiswal, Archana Nirmal

    2017-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Evaluation of neonatal hypernatremia and hypernatremic dehydration in neonates receiving exclusive breastfeeding. Introduction: Neonatal hypernatremia is a serious condition in the newborn period. We present infants with hypernatremic dehydration due to breast milk (BM) hypernatremia. Hypernatremic dehydration in breast-fed newborns is usually secondary to insufficient lactation. We present the neonatal hypernatremia and hypernatremic dehydration encountered between January and December, 2012, its causes and treatment. Methodology: This was a retrospective study. We analyzed records of babies admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit who were investigated and found to have hypernatremia and whose mother's BM sodium (BM Na) was done. Inclusion Criteria: (1) Babies with serum Na >145 meq/l, (2) euglycemia, (3) normocalcemic, (4) no clinical and lab evidence of sepsis, (5) exclusive breast feeds. Exclusion Criteria: Neonates not satisfying any mentioned criterion. Results: BM Na correlated strongly with neonatal hypernatremia in exclusively breast-fed babies who did not otherwise have any risk factor. Conclusion: Elevated BM Na is an important etiological factor in neonatal hypernatremia. PMID:28197048

  12. Nova Scotia: late career nurse and new graduate transition.

    PubMed

    Bellefontaine, Pat; Eden, Valerie

    2012-03-01

    Addressing Canada's growing shortage of nurses requires effective strategies for their education, retention and recruitment. Although Nova Scotia produces more than 250 registered nurses and 125 licensed practical nurses each year, some 20% of these graduates leave the province to work elsewhere. The Nova Scotia Research to Action project focused on three retention and recruitment projects: (a) a new-nurse graduate orientation/transition framework, (b) guidelines for nursing mentorship and (c) an online employment tool to assist in the hiring of new nurse graduates. Project partners continue to work collaboratively to advance these provincial initiatives.

  13. The future shortage of doctoral prepared nurses and the impact on the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Deb; Somera, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Nursing remains at the top of the job growth market and has the potential to positively or negatively impact changes in the delivery of health care today. Professional nurses play a crucial role in the prevention of medication errors, decreasing infection rates, and facilitating a patient's safe transition from acute care into the home environment. Nurses must make critical life-saving decisions associated with caring for the more acutely ill patient. Doctoral prepared nurses have the unique position to assist the direct care nurse because of their advanced education. The doctor in nursing practice concentrates on direct care, specifically research utilization for improved delivery of care, patient outcomes, and clinical systems management There is a future shortage of doctoral prepared nurses, and a resolution is needed. Doctoral prepared nurses with advanced degrees play an important role in mentoring the bedside nurse to promote an interdisciplinary collaborative relationship. The doctor in nursing practice has the ability to effect change in health care systems, organizations, and policy through focusing on the essence of nursing-the care.

  14. Neonatal compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martin, B; Treharne, L

    2016-01-01

    A term neonate was born with a grossly swollen and discoloured left hand and forearm. He was transferred from the local hospital to the plastic surgical unit, where a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was made and he underwent emergency forearm fasciotomies at six hours of age. Following serial debridements of necrotic tissue, he underwent split-thickness skin grafting of the resultant defects of his forearm, hand and digits. At the clinic follow-up appointment two months after the procedure, he was found to have developed severe flexion contractures despite regular outpatient hand therapy and splintage. He has had further reconstruction with contracture release, use of artificial dermal matrix, and K-wire fixation of the thumb and wrist. Despite this, the long term outcome is likely to be an arm with poor function. The key learning point from this case is that despite prompt transfer, diagnosis and appropriate surgical management, the outcome for neonatal compartment syndrome may still be poor. PMID:27138850

  15. Hypothalamic control of the male neonatal testosterone surge.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Jenny; Herbison, Allan E

    2016-02-19

    Sex differences in brain neuroanatomy and neurophysiology underpin considerable physiological and behavioural differences between females and males. Sexual differentiation of the brain is regulated by testosterone secreted by the testes predominantly during embryogenesis in humans and the neonatal period in rodents. Despite huge advances in understanding how testosterone, and its metabolite oestradiol, sexually differentiate the brain, little is known about the mechanism that actually generates the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge. This review examines the evidence for the role of the hypothalamus, and particularly the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, in generating the neonatal testosterone surge in rodents and primates. Kisspeptin-GPR54 signalling is well established as a potent and critical regulator of GnRH neuron activity during puberty and adulthood, and we argue here for an equally important role at birth in driving the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge in rodents. The presence of a male-specific population of preoptic area kisspeptin neurons that appear transiently in the perinatal period provide one possible source of kisspeptin drive to neonatal GnRH neurons in the mouse.

  16. Hypothalamic control of the male neonatal testosterone surge

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Jenny; Herbison, Allan E.

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences in brain neuroanatomy and neurophysiology underpin considerable physiological and behavioural differences between females and males. Sexual differentiation of the brain is regulated by testosterone secreted by the testes predominantly during embryogenesis in humans and the neonatal period in rodents. Despite huge advances in understanding how testosterone, and its metabolite oestradiol, sexually differentiate the brain, little is known about the mechanism that actually generates the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge. This review examines the evidence for the role of the hypothalamus, and particularly the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, in generating the neonatal testosterone surge in rodents and primates. Kisspeptin–GPR54 signalling is well established as a potent and critical regulator of GnRH neuron activity during puberty and adulthood, and we argue here for an equally important role at birth in driving the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge in rodents. The presence of a male-specific population of preoptic area kisspeptin neurons that appear transiently in the perinatal period provide one possible source of kisspeptin drive to neonatal GnRH neurons in the mouse. PMID:26833836

  17. Nursing Education and Training: Alternative Federal Approaches. Budget Issue Paper for Fiscal Year 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Congressional Budget Office.

    Key issues pertinent to federal support of nursing education and training are considered. Policy options for nurse training include: support for programs to increase aggregate supply, support for programs to improve geographic distribution of nurses, support for programs to increase the availability of nurses with advanced training, and support…

  18. The national perspective on the future of nursing: where we are going.

    PubMed

    Hassmiller, Susan B

    2011-01-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the AARP have embarked on The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action to strengthen nursing education, enable nurses to practice to the full extent of their education and training, advance interprofessional collaboration, expand nurse leadership, and improve collection of data about the health care workforce.

  19. E-Mentoring: Confidence Intervention for Senior Nursing Students Preparing for Readiness to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRose, Patrick S., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the registered nurse has evolved over the years as technology has changed and the practice of nursing has advanced. There are many factors that influence how a new nurse enters practice; however, confidence appears to play a large role in the way nursing students see themselves and how this self perception regulates transition to…

  20. Neonatal Conjunctivitis Leading to Neonatal Sepsis--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis is the most common occular disease in neonates. Most infections are acquired during vaginal delivery. In spite most of these cases are benign; some of them may progress to systemic complications like loss of vision if left untreated. The authors present a case of a newborn who developed late onset neonatal sepsis from E. coli positive conjunctivitis. The baby was treated with Injection Meropenem and Injection Amikacin for 10 days. The course was uneventful, after that baby responded well and discharged home on 24th day.