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Sample records for advanced neutral particle

  1. Development of an integrated energetic neutral particle measurement system on experimental advanced full superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y. B. Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhang, J. Z.; Qi, M. Z.; Xia, S. B.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.

    2014-11-15

    Full function integrated, compact silicon photodiode based solid state neutral particle analyzers (ssNPA) have been developed for energetic particle (EP) relevant studies on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The ssNPAs will be mostly operated in advanced current mode with a few channels to be operated in conventional pulse-counting mode, aiming to simultaneously achieve individually proved ultra-fast temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution capabilities. The design details together with considerations on EAST specific engineering realities and physics requirements are presented. The system, including a group of single detectors on two vertical ports and two 16-channel arrays on a horizontal port, can provide both active and passive charge exchange measurements. ssNPA detectors, with variable thickness of ultra thin tungsten dominated foils directly deposited on the front surface, are specially fabricated and utilized to achieve about 22 keV energy resolution for deuterium particle detection.

  2. Solar Neutral Particles

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows a neutral solar particle's path leaving the sun, following the magnetic field lines out to the heliosheath. The solar particle hits a hydrogen atom, stealing its electron, and ...

  3. Neutral particle lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craver, Barry Paul

    Neutral particle lithography (NPL) is a high resolution, proximity exposure technique where a broad beam of energetic neutral particles floods a stencil mask and transmitted beamlets transfer the mask pattern to resist on a substrate, such that each feature is printed in parallel, rather than in the serial manner of electron beam lithography. It preserves the advantages of ion beam lithography (IBL), including extremely large depth-of-field, sub-5 nm resist scattering, and the near absence of diffraction, yet is intrinsically immune to charge-related artifacts including line-edge roughness and pattern placement errors due to charge accumulation on the mask and substrate. In our experiments, a neutral particle beam is formed by passing an ion beam (e.g., 30 keV He+) through a high pressure helium gas cell (e.g., 100 mTorr) to convert the ions to energetic neutrals through charge transfer scattering. The resolution of NPL is generally superior to that of IBL for applications involving insulating substrates, large proximity gaps, and ultra-small features. High accuracy stepped exposures with energetic neutral particles, where magnetic or electrostatic deflection is impossible, have been obtained by clamping the mask to the wafer, setting the proximity gap with a suitable spacer, and mechanically inclining the mask/wafer stack relative to the beam. This approach is remarkably insensitive to vibration and thermal drift; nanometer scale image offsets have been obtained with +/-2 nm placement accuracy for experiments lasting over one hour. Using this nanostepping technique, linewidth versus dose curves were obtained, from which the NPL lithographic blur was determined as 4.4+/-1.4 nm (1sigma), which is 2-3 times smaller than the blur of electron beam lithography. Neutral particle lithography has the potential to form high density, periodic patterns with sub-10 nm resolution.

  4. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  5. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  6. Neutral particle beams for space defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botwin, Robert; Favale, Anthony

    Neutral particle beam (NPB) weapons direct highly focused high energy streams of electrically neutral atomic particles traveling at nearly the speed of light, escaping deflection from the earth's magnetic field and acting on the subatomic structure of a target, destroying it from within. The beam's brief contact with a reentry vehicle produces a nuclear reaction in the latter that yields particle emissions; by detecting and identifying those particles, it becomes possible to effectively distinguish warheads from decoys. Attention is given to the NPB program roles to be played by the Beam Experiment Aboard Rocket and Neutral Particle Beam Integrated Space Experiment projects.

  7. Transport of sputtered neutral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.J.; Hitchon, W.N.G.; Koch, D.J. ||

    1995-04-01

    The initial deposition rate of sputtered material along the walls of a trench is calculated numerically. The numerical scheme is a nonstatistical description of long-mean-free-path transport in the gas phase. Gas-phase collisions are included by using a ``transition matrix`` to describe the particle motion, which in the present work is from the source through a cylindrical chamber and into a rectangular trench. The method is much faster and somewhat more accurate than Monte Carlo methods. Initial deposition rates of sputtered material along the walls of the trench are presented for various physical and geometrical situations, and the deposition rates are compared to other computational and experimental results.

  8. Turbulence attenuation by large neutrally buoyant particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisse, M.; Saw, E.-W.; Gibert, M.; Bodenschatz, E.; Bec, J.

    2015-06-01

    Turbulence modulation by inertial-range-size, neutrally buoyant particles is investigated experimentally in a von Kármán flow. Increasing the particle volume fraction Φv, maintaining constant impellers Reynolds number attenuates the fluid turbulence. The inertial-range energy transfer rate decreases as ∝ Φv 2 / 3 , suggesting that only particles located on a surface affect the flow. Small-scale turbulent properties, such as structure functions or acceleration distribution, are unchanged. Finally, measurements hint at the existence of a transition between two different regimes occurring when the average distance between large particles is of the order of the thickness of their boundary layers.

  9. Landau-like states in neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Ågren, Hans; Balatsky, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    We show the emergence of a new type of dispersion relation for neutral atoms with an interesting similarity to the spectrum of two-dimensional electrons in an applied perpendicular constant magnetic field. These neutral atoms can be confined in toroidal optical traps and give quasi-Landau spectra. In strong contrast to the equidistant infinitely degenerate Landau levels for charged particles, the spectral gap for such two-dimensional neutral particles increases in particular electric-field configurations. The idea in the paper is motivated by the development in cold atom experiments and builds on the seminal paper of Aharonov and Casher [Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 319 (1984), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.53.319].

  10. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Stagner, L.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2014-11-15

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, “Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry,” J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, “Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes,” Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5–11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  11. Dual neutral particle transmutation in CINDER2008

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W. J.; De Oliveira, C. R. E.

    2012-07-01

    A capability has been built for the CINDER2008 (beta) transmutation code that expands the capability from only neutron induced reactions to photon induced reactions. This allows for two incident neutral particles to cause nuclear transmutation in a given material simultaneously. The CINDER2008 code, a modular rewrite of the CINDER'90 transmutation code from Los Alamos National Laboratory, was modified to allow for the dual sets of physics. A photonuclear cross section and photofission product yield library was also created using ENDF-B/VII data and translated neutron fission product yields. The code and library have been combined to create a unique transmutation code. The scope of use is broad; it is capable of modeling the transmutation caused by photons released from the decay of daughter and fission products as well as transmutation in photon rich environments. A brief code description and a verification and validation of the contributions are given. (authors)

  12. Neutral particle beam sensing and steering

    DOEpatents

    Maier, II, William B.; Cobb, Donald D.; Robiscoe, Richard T.

    1991-01-01

    The direction of a neutral particle beam (NPB) is determined by detecting Ly.alpha. radiation emitted during motional quenching of excited H(2S) atoms in the beam during movement of the atoms through a magnetic field. At least one detector is placed adjacent the beam exit to define an optical axis that intercepts the beam at a viewing angle to include a volume generating a selected number of photons for detection. The detection system includes a lens having an area that is small relative to the NPB area and a pixel array located in the focal plane of the lens. The lens viewing angle and area pixel array are selected to optimize the beam tilt sensitivity. In one embodiment, two detectors are placed coplanar with the beam axis to generate a difference signal that is insensitive to beam variations other than beam tilt.

  13. Neutral particle mass spectrometry with nanomechanical systems

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Eric; Brenac, Ariel; Alava, Thomas; Morel, Robert; Dupré, Cécilia; Hanay, Mehmet Selim; Roukes, Michael L.; Duraffourg, Laurent; Masselon, Christophe; Hentz, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to mass spectrometry (MS) require ionization of the analytes of interest. For high-mass species, the resulting charge state distribution can be complex and difficult to interpret correctly. Here, using a setup comprising both conventional time-of-flight MS (TOF-MS) and nano-electromechanical systems-based MS (NEMS-MS) in situ, we show directly that NEMS-MS analysis is insensitive to charge state: the spectrum consists of a single peak whatever the species’ charge state, making it significantly clearer than existing MS analysis. In subsequent tests, all the charged particles are electrostatically removed from the beam, and unlike TOF-MS, NEMS-MS can still measure masses. This demonstrates the possibility to measure mass spectra for neutral particles. Thus, it is possible to envisage MS-based studies of analytes that are incompatible with current ionization techniques and the way is now open for the development of cutting-edge system architectures with unique analytical capability. PMID:25753929

  14. Magnetostatic traps for charged and neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomer, V.; Harms, O.; Haubrich, D.; Schadwinkel, H.; Strauch, F.; Ueberholz, B.; Aus der Wiesche, S.; Meschede, D.

    1997-08-01

    We have constructed magnetostatic traps from permanent magnets for trapping charged and neutral atoms. Two storage experiments are presented: a compact Penning trap for light ions and magnetic trapping of single neutral atoms. The dynamics of cold neutral atoms and their loss mechanisms in a quadrupole magnetostatic trap are discussed.

  15. Neutral Particle Analysis on ITER and requirements for DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasyev, V. I.; Mironov, M. I.; Khudoleev, A. V.; Petrov, M. P.; Nesenevich, V. G.; Petrov, S. Ya.; Kislyakov, A. I.; Chernyshev, F. V.; Melnik, A. D.; Konovalov, S. V.; Kozlovsky, S. S.; Lyublin, B. V.

    2008-03-12

    The use of the neutral particle analysis (NPA) to study the ion component of plasma on ITER has been reviewed. Both thermal (10-200 keV) and supra-thermal (0.2-4 MeV) energy ranges of neutral fluxes are studied in respect to feasibility of the fusion fuel isotopic composition measurements. Influence of heating neutral beams and diagnostic neutral beam on the measurements is also shown. Possible application of the NPA to measure the energy distribution function of fusion alpha particles is discussed. Low- and high-energy NPA monitors have been proposed for DEMO machine to control the DT fuel isotope ratio.

  16. Massive neutral particles on heterotic string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, Marco; Villanueva, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    The motion of massive particles in the background of a charged black hole in heterotic string theory, which is characterized by a parameter α, is studied in detail in this paper. Since it is possible to write this space-time in the Einstein frame, we perform a quantitative analysis of the time-like geodesics by means of the standard Lagrange procedure. Thus, we obtain and solve a set of differential equations and then we describe the orbits in terms of the elliptic ℘-Weierstraß function. Also, by making an elementary derivation developed by Cornbleet (Am. J. Phys. 61(7):650-651, 1993) we obtain the correction to the angle of advance of perihelion to first order in α, and thus, by comparing with Mercury's data we give an estimation for the value of this parameter, which yields an heterotic solar charge Q ⊙≃0.728 [Km]=0.493 M ⊙. Therefore, in addition to the study on null geodesics performed by Fernando (Phys. Rev. D 85:024033, 2012), this work completes the geodesic structure for this class of space-time.

  17. Neutral Particle Analyzer Measurements of Ion Behavior in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. Medley; R.E. Bell; D.S. Darrow; A.L. Roquemore

    2002-02-06

    Initial results obtained with the Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are presented. Magnetohydrodynamic activity and reconnection events cause depletion of the deuterium energetic ion distribution created by neutral-beam injection. Adding High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating to neutral-beam-heated discharges results in the generation of an energetic ion tail above the beam injection energy. NPA measurements of the residual hydrogen ion temperature are in good agreement with those from recombination spectroscopy.

  18. Particle reflection and TFTR neutral beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; O`Connor, T.E.; Newman, R.A.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1992-04-01

    Determination of two critical neutral beam parameters, power and divergence, are affected by the reflection of a fraction of the incident energy from the surface of the measuring calorimeter. On the TFTR Neutral Beam Test Stand, greater than 30% of the incident power directed at the target chamber calorimeter was unaccounted for. Most of this loss is believed due to reflection from the surface of the flat calorimeter, which was struck at a near grazing incidence (12{degrees}). Beamline calorimeters, of a ``V``-shape design, while retaining the beam power, also suffer from reflection effects. Reflection, in this latter case, artificially peaks the power toward the apex of the ``V``, complicating the fitting technique, and increasing the power density on axis by 10 to 20%; an effect of import to future beamline designers. Agreement is found between measured and expected divergence values, even with 24% of the incident energy reflected.

  19. Particle reflection and TFTR neutral beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; O'Connor, T.E.; Newman, R.A.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1992-04-01

    Determination of two critical neutral beam parameters, power and divergence, are affected by the reflection of a fraction of the incident energy from the surface of the measuring calorimeter. On the TFTR Neutral Beam Test Stand, greater than 30% of the incident power directed at the target chamber calorimeter was unaccounted for. Most of this loss is believed due to reflection from the surface of the flat calorimeter, which was struck at a near grazing incidence (12{degrees}). Beamline calorimeters, of a V''-shape design, while retaining the beam power, also suffer from reflection effects. Reflection, in this latter case, artificially peaks the power toward the apex of the V'', complicating the fitting technique, and increasing the power density on axis by 10 to 20%; an effect of import to future beamline designers. Agreement is found between measured and expected divergence values, even with 24% of the incident energy reflected.

  20. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer for fusion reactor ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, V.; Amosov, V.; Kaschuck, Yu.; Skopintsev, D.

    2014-08-01

    A compact diamond neutral particle spectrometer with digital signal processing has been developed for fast charge-exchange atoms and neutrons measurements at ITER fusion reactor conditions. This spectrometer will play supplementary role for Neutral Particle Analyzer providing 10 ms time and 30 keV energy resolutions for fast particle spectra in non-tritium ITER phase. These data will also be implemented for independent studies of fast ions distribution function evolution in various plasma scenarios with the formation of a single fraction of high-energy ions. In tritium ITER phase the DNPS will measure 14 MeV neutrons spectra. The spectrometer with digital signal processing can operate at peak counting rates reaching a value of 106 cps. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer is applicable to future fusion reactors due to its high radiation hardness, fast response and high energy resolution.

  1. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer for fusion reactor ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Krasilnikov, V.; Amosov, V.; Kaschuck, Yu.; Skopintsev, D.

    2014-08-21

    A compact diamond neutral particle spectrometer with digital signal processing has been developed for fast charge-exchange atoms and neutrons measurements at ITER fusion reactor conditions. This spectrometer will play supplementary role for Neutral Particle Analyzer providing 10 ms time and 30 keV energy resolutions for fast particle spectra in non-tritium ITER phase. These data will also be implemented for independent studies of fast ions distribution function evolution in various plasma scenarios with the formation of a single fraction of high-energy ions. In tritium ITER phase the DNPS will measure 14 MeV neutrons spectra. The spectrometer with digital signal processing can operate at peak counting rates reaching a value of 10{sup 6} cps. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer is applicable to future fusion reactors due to its high radiation hardness, fast response and high energy resolution.

  2. Neutral particle analyzer diagnostics on the TCV tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Karpushov, Alexander N.; Duval, Basil P.; Schlatter, Christian; Afanasyev, Valery I.; Chernyshev, Fedor V.

    2006-03-15

    Experimental apparatus and data analysis techniques used in neutral particle analyzer (NPA) diagnostics on the Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV) are described. Two NPAs are used on TCV to measure the energy spectrum of neutral particle fluxes from the plasma. The 'five-channel energy analyzer of atomic particles' used in double electrical analysis mode with fast voltage sweeping detect particles without atomic mass discrimination in the energy range of 0.6-8.0 keV with a time resolution of 0.5-2.0 ms and an energy resolution of 7%-20%. The 28-channel ''compact neutral particle analyzer'' (CNPA) is an EIIB spectrometer with mass and energy separations designed for medium sized fusion machines featuring a carbon neutral stripping foil, a permanent magnet for dispersion, and channel-electron multiplier detectors. The CNPA simultaneously detects two mass species [hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) or D and helium (He)] in the 0.5-50 keV energy range with a resolution of 60%-10% and a time resolution of 0.5-4.0 ms. The CNPA views the plasma across the path of the diagnostic neutral beam and can perform active charge-exchange NPA measurement. Data analysis procedures and numerical algorithms developed for NPA measurement are routinely used on TCV to obtain information on the plasma ion temperature, ion energy distribution function, plasma isotope ratios, and other plasma characteristics.

  3. Neutral source and particle balance in the HSX edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephey, Laurie; Kumar, Santhosh; Bader, Aaron; Akerson, Adrian; Schmitz, Oliver; Anderson, David; A, Simon; Talmadge, Joseph; Hegna, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The ability to control the neutral particle and impurity source in fusion devices is critical to obtaining high purity, high confinement plasmas. The neutral particle source defines the edge density gradients and plasma flows. To understand the relationship between the neutral particle source, plasma density gradients and plasma edge and core transport in HSX, a single reservoir particle balance is being used to provide a complete particle inventory. Detailed spectroscopic measurements of hydrogen and helium emission have yielded neutral and plasma profiles and ionization length estimations. The plasma puff source rate has been directly measured. To determine the recycling source rate, two specially designed limiters will be inserted to intercept 99% of the field lines, resulting in a well-defined LCFS and plasma interaction zone. Single limiter insertion resulted in a 50% reduction in global line emission, implying a reduction in wall recycling. Future camera and probe measurements will provide a recycling source rate. HSX neutral physics is also being investigated using EMC3-EIRENE. All results are discussed along with complementary plans for the Wendelstein 7-X startup phase. This work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-93ER54222 and DE-SC0006103.

  4. Optical trapping and manipulation of neutral particles using lasers

    PubMed Central

    Ashkin, Arthur

    1997-01-01

    The techniques of optical trapping and manipulation of neutral particles by lasers provide unique means to control the dynamics of small particles. These new experimental methods have played a revolutionary role in areas of the physical and biological sciences. This paper reviews the early developments in the field leading to the demonstration of cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in atomic physics and to the first use of optical tweezers traps in biology. Some further major achievements of these rapidly developing methods also are considered. PMID:9144154

  5. Physics Opportunities with the Neutral Particle Spectrometer in Hall C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Tanja; NPS Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The two-arm combination of neutral-particle detection and a high-resolution magnetic spectrometer offers unique scientific capabilities to push the energy scale for studies of the transverse spatial and momentum structure of the nucleon through reactions with neutral particles requiring precision and high luminosity. It enables precision measurements of the deeply-virtual Compton scattering cross section at different beam energies to extract the real part of the Compton form factor without any assumptions. It allows measurements to push the energy scale of real Compton scattering, the process of choice to explore factorization in a whole class of wide-angle processes, and its extension to neutral pion photo-production. It further makes possible measurements of the basic semi-inclusive neutral-pion cross section in a kinematic region where the QCD factorization scheme is expected to hold, which is crucial to validate the foundation of this cornerstone of 3D transverse momentum imaging. Adding the option of polarized targets to such a setup, allows for exploration of further scientific directions, e.g., timelike Compton scattering. We describe the unique science program as enabled by the Neutral-Particle Spectrometer and the magnetic spectrometer pair in Hall C at JLab. Supported in part by NSF Grants PHY-1530874 and PHY-1306227.

  6. Settling of almost neutrally buoyant particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, Michel; Clercx, Herman; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Settling of particles in a turbulent flow occurs in various industrial and natural phenomena, examples are clouds and waste water treatment. It is well known that turbulence can enhance the settling velocity of particles. Many studies have been done, numerically and experimentally to investigate this behavior for the case of ``heavy'' particles, with particle to fluid density ratios above 100. Here we investigate the case of almost neutrally buoyant particles, i.e. density ratios between 1 and 100. In the case of light particles the Maxey-Riley equations cannot be simplified to only the Stokes drag and gravity force as pressure gradient, added mass and Basset history force are important as well. We investigate the influence of these forces on the settling velocity of particles and show that the extra forces can both increase or decrease the settling velocity, depending on the combination of the Stokes number and gravity applied.

  7. Neutral particle measurements of fusion tritons in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasyev, V. I.; Khudoleev, A. V.

    2010-08-15

    A neutral particle analyzer [A.D. Izvozchikov et al., JET Report No. JET-R(91)-12, 1991] operating in the MeV energy range was used to measure the flux of neutralized d-d fusion tritons emitted from the hot-ion H-mode deuterium plasma heated by deuterium neutral beams. It was found that tritons in the energy range of 0.3-1.1 MeV were largely neutralized by the beam atoms and the beam halo atoms. This enabled us to find the localized energy distribution function of the fusion tritons in the central plasma region. Simulation of the triton energy distribution function shows that MeV ions in the JET hot-ion H-mode plasma behave classically.

  8. Neutral particle dynamics in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczewski, A.P.

    1995-08-01

    This thesis presents an experimental study of neutral particle dynamics in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The primary diagnostic used is a set of six neutral pressure gauges, including special-purpose gauges built for in situ tokamak operation. While a low main chamber neutral pressure coincides with high plasma confinement regimes, high divertor pressure is required for heat and particle flux dispersion in future devices such as ITER. Thus we examine conditions that optimize divertor compression, defined here as a divertor-to-midplane pressure ratio. We find both pressures depend primarily on the edge plasma regimes defined by the scrape-off-layer heat transport. While the maximum divertor pressure is achieved at high core plasma densities corresponding to the detached divertor state, the maximum compression is achieved in the high-recycling regime. Variations in the divertor geometry have a weaker effect on the neutral pressures. For otherwise similar plasmas the divertor pressure and compression are maximum when the strike point is at the bottom of the vertical target plate. We introduce a simple flux balance model, which allows us to explain the divertor neutral pressure across a wide range of plasma densities. In particular, high pressure sustained in the detached divertor (despite a considerable drop in the recycling source) can be explained by scattering of neutrals off the cold plasma plugging the divertor throat. Because neutrals are confined in the divertor through scattering and ionization processes (provided the mean-free-paths are much shorter than a typical escape distance) tight mechanical baffling is unnecessary. The analysis suggests that two simple structural modifications may increase the divertor compression in Alcator C-Mod by a factor of about 5. Widening the divertor throat would increase the divertor recycling source, while closing leaks in the divertor structure would eliminate a significant neutral loss mechanism. 146 refs., 82 figs., 14 tabs.

  9. The three-dimensional, discrete ordinates neutral particle transport code TORT: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The centerpiece of the Discrete Ordinates Oak Ridge System (DOORS), the three-dimensional neutral particle transport code TORT is reviewed. Its most prominent features pertaining to large applications, such as adjustable problem parameters, memory management, and coarse mesh methods, are described. Advanced, state-of-the-art capabilities including acceleration and multiprocessing are summarized here. Future enhancement of existing graphics and visualization tools is briefly presented.

  10. An Update on the Retarding Potential Grid System for a Neutral Particle Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezonlin, Ephrem D.; Titus, James B.; Anderson, Jay K.; Reusch, Josh A.

    2014-10-01

    The ion energy distribution in a magnetically confined plasma can be inferred from the neutral particles that escape the plasma. On the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST), deuterium neutrals are measured in the energy range 0.34 to 45 keV by the Florida A&M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA) and the MST advanced neutral particle analyzer (ANPA). The CNPA energy range covers the bulk ions from the thermal to the beginning of the fast-ion tail (0.34 to 5.2 keV) with high energy resolution (25 channels) while the ANPA covers the vast majority of the fast-ion tail distribution (up to 45 keV) with low energy resolution (10 channels). MST has gained a wealth of information about the fast-ion distribution, but much more information could be gleaned from a higher energy resolution analyzer over the fast-ion tail. Retarding potential analyzers have been used on spacecraft for decades to measure ion distributions in extraterrestrial atmospheres by slowing down charged particles before they reach the detectors. Recent work has been done to design and implement a retarding potential between the vacuum chamber of MST and the CNPA to be able to use the CNPA's high energy resolution over any 5 keV range between 0 and 35 keV. An update of the construction and implementation of the retarding potential grid system will be presented.

  11. Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; O'Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1989-09-01

    Data from an E {parallel} B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer Array on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    K. Shinohara; D.S. Darrow; A.L. Roquemore; S.S. Medley; F.E. Cecil

    2004-05-13

    A Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) array has been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The array consists of four chords viewing through a common vacuum flange. The tangency radii of the viewing chords are 60, 90, 100, and 120 cm. They view across the three co-injection neutral beam lines (deuterium, 80 keV (typ.) with tangency radii 48.7, 59.2, and 69.4 cm) on NSTX and detect co-going energetic ions. A silicon photodiode used was calibrated by using a mono-energetic deuteron beam source. Deuterons with energy above 40 keV can be detected with the present setup. The degradation of the performance was also investigated. Lead shots and epoxy are used for neutron shielding to reduce handling any hazardous heavy metal. This method also enables us to make an arbitrary shape to be fit into the complex flight tube.

  13. Plasma-parameter measurements using neutral-particle-beam attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, J H; Molvik, A W; Turner, W C

    1982-07-07

    Intense and energetic neutral-particle-beam injection used for fueling or heating magnetically confined, controlled-fusion experimental plasmas can also provide diagnostic measurements of the plasmas. The attenuation of an atomic beam (mainly from charge-exchange and ionization interactions) when passing through a plasma gives the plasma line density. Orthogonal arrays of highly collimated detectors of the secondary-electron-emission type have been used in magnetic-mirror experiments to measure neutral-beam attenuation along chords through the plasma volume at different radial and axial positions. The radial array is used to infer the radial plasma-density profile; the axial array, to infer the axial plasma-density profile and the ion angular distribution at the plasma midplane.

  14. Design of a retarding potential grid system for a neutral particle analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B. Mezonlin, E. D.; Anderson, J. K.; Reusch, J. A.

    2014-11-15

    The ion energy distribution in a magnetically confined plasma can be inferred from charge exchange neutral particles. On the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST), deuterium neutrals are measured by the Florida A and M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA) and the advanced neutral particle analyzer (ANPA). The CNPA energy range covers the bulk deuterium ions to the beginning of the fast ion tail (0.34–5.2 keV) with high-energy resolution (25 channels) while the ANPA covers the vast majority of the fast ion tail distribution (∼10–45 keV) with low energy resolution (10 channels). Though the ANPA has provided insight into fast ion energization in MST plasma, more can be gained by increasing the energy resolution in that energy range. To utilize the energy resolution of the CNPA, fast ions can be retarded by an electric potential well, enabling their detection by the diagnostic. The ion energy distribution can be measured with arbitrary resolution by combining data from many similar MST discharges with different energy ranges on the CNPA, providing further insight into ion energization and fast ion dynamics on MST.

  15. Amine bearing polymeric particles as acid neutralizers for engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, A.N.; Chattha, M.S.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a lubricating oil composition consisting of a major proportion of a lubricating base oil and about 0.1 to 15 weight percent of an acid neutralizing additive which consists of polymer particles (a) bearing pendant amine groups, and (b) having a diameter of about 500 A and 10,000 A. The amine functional particles are formed by reacting polymer particles bearing pendant epoxide groups with a secondary amine in an amount so as to react essentially all of the epoxide groups on the epoxide bearing polymer particles with the secondary amine. The polymer particles bearing pendant epoxide groups are formed by the free radical addition polymerization of: (a) between about 50 and about 100 weight percent of an ethylenically unsaturated monomers bearing an epoxide group, and (b) 0 up to about 50 weight percent of other monoethylenically unsaturated monomers; in the presence of: (I) a non-polar organic liquid which is a solvent for the polymerizable monomers, but a non-solvent for the resultant polymer, and (II) polymeric dispersion stabilizer containing at least two segments, with one segment being solvated by the non-polar organic liquid and the second segment being of different polarity than the first segment and relatively insoluble in the non-polar organic liquid. The second segment of the stabilizer is chemically attached to the polymerized particle.

  16. Compact solid-state neutral particle analyzer in current mode.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y B; Bortolon, A; Heidbrink, W W; Celle, S L; Roquemore, A L

    2012-10-01

    Solid state neutral particle analyzer (ssNPA) arrays are operated in current mode on the DIII-D tokamak and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Compared with conventional pulse-counting NPAs, current-mode operation sacrifices energy resolution to obtain economical, high-bandwidth, pitch-angle resolved measurements. With the success from a new three-channel near-vertical-view current mode ssNPA on DIII-D, the apertures on an existing array on NSTX were expanded to increase the particle influx. The sightlines of both arrays intersect heating beams, enabling both active and passive charge exchange measurements. The spatial resolution at beam intersection is typically 5 cm on both devices. Directly deposited ultra-thin foils on the detector surface block stray photons below the energy of 1 keV and also set low energy threshold about 25 keV for deuterium particle detection. Oscillations in neutral flux produced by high frequency magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities are readily detected. PMID:23126831

  17. Momentum Flux Measuring Instrument for Neutral and Charged Particle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Schafer, Charles F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An instrument to measure the momentum flux (total pressure) of plasma and neutral particle jets onto a surface has been developed. While this instrument was developed for magnetized plasmas, the concept works for non-magnetized plasmas as well. We have measured forces as small as 10(exp -4) Newtons on a surface immersed in the plasma where small forces are due to ionic and neutral particles with kinetic energies on the order of a few eV impacting the surface. This instrument, a force sensor, uses a target plate (surface) that is immersed in the plasma and connected to one end of an alumina rod while the opposite end of the alumina rod is mechanically connected to a titanium beam on which four strain gauges are mounted. The force on the target generates torque causing strain in the beam. The resulting strain measurements can be correlated to a force on the target plate. The alumina rod electrically and thermally isolates the target plate from the strain gauge beam and allows the strain gauges to be located out of the plasma flow while also serving as a moment arm of several inches to increase the strain in the beam at the strain gauge location. These force measurements correspond directly to momentum flux and may be used with known plasma conditions to place boundaries on the kinetic energies of the plasma and neutral particles. The force measurements may also be used to infer thrust produced by a plasma propulsive device. Stainless steel, titanium, molybdenum, and aluminum flat target plates have been used. Momentum flux measurements of H2, D2, He, and Ar plasmas produced in a magnetized plasma device have been performed.

  18. Westinghouse Advanced Particle Filter System

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Sanjana, Z.N.; Newby, R.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) are being developed and demonstrated for commercial, power generation application. Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful implementation of IGCC and PFBC in power generation gas turbine cycles. The objective of this work is to develop and qualify through analysis and testing a practical hot gas ceramic barrier filter system that meets the performance and operational requirements of PFBC and IGCC systems. This paper reports on the development and status of testing of the Westinghouse Advanced Hot Gas Particle Filter (W-APF) including: W-APF integrated operation with the American Electric Power, 70 MW PFBC clean coal facility--approximately 6000 test hours completed; approximately 2500 hours of testing at the Hans Ahlstrom 10 MW PCFB facility located in Karhula, Finland; over 700 hours of operation at the Foster Wheeler 2 MW 2nd generation PFBC facility located in Livingston, New Jersey; status of Westinghouse HGF supply for the DOE Southern Company Services Power System Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama; the status of the Westinghouse development and testing of HGF`s for Biomass Power Generation; and the status of the design and supply of the HGF unit for the 95 MW Pinon Pine IGCC Clean Coal Demonstration.

  19. Identification of Neutral Particle Sources in MST Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norval, Ryan; Munaretto, Stefano; Goetz, John; Schmitz, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    The plasma wall interaction (PWI) in the MST RFP has yet to be studied systematically to determine the effects of the edge plasma on overall plasma performance. Two imaging views of the MST plasma currently exist. The first views the outboard toroidal and poloidal belt limiters at the main poloidal gap limiter. The second views the inboard poloidal limiter, as well as a section of the outboard toroidal limiter away from the man gap limiter. Data from viewing outboard limiters reveals PWI structures correlate with the plasma conditions. In standard RFP plasmas at lower plasma currents the PWI is dominated by non-axisymmetric radiation belts. As the RFP plasma current rises, increasing axisymmetry is seen from the edge. When in the 3D equilibria of the quasi-single helicity (QSH) state the PWI correlates with the main magnetic mode of the plasma. The dominant source of light observed from the MST edge is from hydrogen recycling. This will be used to inform neutral particle sourcing in the EIRENE neutral transport code. EIRENE will be used to compare how variations in fueling could affect the neutral profile in MST. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Memory effect in the adsorption phenomena of neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zola, R. S.; Lenzi, E. K.; Evangelista, L. R.; Barbero, G.

    2007-04-01

    The adsorption-desorption phenomenon of neutral particles dissolved in an isotropic fluid is investigated by using a nonsingular kernel in the kinetic equation at the limiting surfaces. To account for the relevance of a memory effect, three types of kernels in the kinetic equation are considered. Similar kernels have been used to investigate nonexponential relaxation including several contexts such as dielectric relaxation, diffusion-controlled relaxation in liquids, liquid crystals, and amorphous polymers. A suitable choice for a temporal kernel can account for the relative importance of physisorption or chemisorption, according to the time scale governing the adsorption phenomena, and can be the key mechanism to understand the specific roles of both processes. By using a general procedure, the time evolution of the density of particles is determined in closed analytical form. The analysis is relevant in the description of the adsorption phenomena in general.

  1. Novel electrodynamic trapping mechanism for neutral, polar particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümel, R.

    2011-09-01

    A conceptually new trapping mechanism for neutral, polar particles is introduced and discussed. Unlike existing mechanisms that are based on oscillating saddle-point potentials or rotating electric dipole fields, the new mechanism is based on a superposition of ac and dc electric monopolefields that dynamically generate a minimum of the effective ponderomotive potential in which the particles are trapped. Extensive numerical simulations of the dynamics and the stability properties of trapped HC17N molecules and ferroelectric rods (made of barium titanate or croconic acid crystals) prove the validity of the new mechanism. The examples show that the same mechanism is applicable to the trapping of macroscopic as well as microscopic particles. The numerical results are backed by a physical pseudo-potential picture and an analytical stability analysis that provide physical insight into why and how the new mechanism works. A semi-quantum, Born-Oppenheimer-type calculation that treats the intrinsic rotational degree of freedom of HC17N quantum mechanically is also presented. A detailed discussion of engineering aspects shows that laboratory implementation of the new mechanism is within current technological reach.

  2. Westinghouse advanced particle filter system

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Sanjana, Z.N.; Newby, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and Advanced PFBC (APFB) are being developed and demonstrated for commercial power generation application. Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful implementation of IGCC, PFBC and APFB in power generation gas turbine cycles. The objective of this work is to develop and qualify through analysis and testing a practical hot gas ceramic barrier filter system that meets the performance and operational requirements of these advanced, solid fuel power generation cycles.

  3. ADVANCES IN PARTICLE SAMPLING AND MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper, by five authorities who contributed significantly to the second symposium on advances to particle sampling and measurement (October 1979 in Daytona Beach, FL) summarizes salient developments in the field. Current techniques were described as being expensive, complicate...

  4. Dual neutral particle induced transmutation in CINDER2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, W. J.; de Oliveira, C. R. E.; Hecht, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Although nuclear transmutation methods for fission have existed for decades, the focus has been on neutron-induced reactions. Recent novel concepts have sought to use both neutrons and photons for purposes such as active interrogation of cargo to detect the smuggling of highly enriched uranium, a concept that would require modeling the transmutation caused by both incident particles. As photonuclear transmutation has yet to be modeled alongside neutron-induced transmutation in a production code, new methods need to be developed. The CINDER2008 nuclear transmutation code from Los Alamos National Laboratory is extended from neutron applications to dual neutral particle applications, allowing both neutron- and photon-induced reactions for this modeling with a focus on fission. Following standard reaction modeling, the induced fission reaction is understood as a two-part reaction, with an entrance channel to the excited compound nucleus, and an exit channel from the excited compound nucleus to the fission fragmentation. Because photofission yield data-the exit channel from the compound nucleus-are sparse, neutron fission yield data are used in this work. With a different compound nucleus and excitation, the translation to the excited compound state is modified, as appropriate. A verification and validation of these methods and data has been performed. This has shown that the translation of neutron-induced fission product yield sets, and their use in photonuclear applications, is appropriate, and that the code has been extended correctly.

  5. SIMULATION OF ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOMS FROM SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Linghua; Li, Gang; Shih, Albert Y.; Lin, Robert P.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2014-10-01

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) provide the only way to observe the acceleration site of coronal-mass-ejection-driven (CME-driven) shock-accelerated solar energetic particles (SEPs). In gradual SEP events, energetic protons can charge exchange with the ambient solar wind or interstellar neutrals to become ENAs. Assuming a CME-driven shock with a constant speed of 1800 km s{sup –1} and compression ratio of 3.5, propagating from 1.5 to 40 R{sub S} , we calculate the accelerated SEPs at 5-5000 keV and the resulting ENAs via various charge-exchange interactions. Taking into account the ENA losses in the interplanetary medium, we obtain the flux-time profiles of these solar ENAs reaching 1 AU. We find that the arriving ENAs at energies above ∼100 keV show a sharply peaked flux-time profile, mainly originating from the shock source below 5 R{sub S} , whereas the ENAs below ∼20 keV have a flat-top time profile, mostly originating from the source beyond 10 R{sub S} . Assuming the accelerated protons are effectively trapped downstream of the shock, we can reproduce the STEREO ENA fluence observations at ∼2-5 MeV/nucleon. We also estimate the flux of ENAs coming from the charge exchange of energetic storm protons, accelerated by the fast CME-driven shock near 1 AU, with interstellar hydrogen and helium. Our results suggest that appropriate instrumentation would be able to detect ENAs from SEPs and to even make ENA images of SEPs at energies above ∼10-20 keV.

  6. Advances in holographic particle velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Scott; Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle; Liu, David

    1993-12-01

    Holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) is a promising technique for 3D flow velocity and hence vorticity measurements to study turbulence, coherent structures and vortex interactions. We discuss various aspects in the development of this technique ranging from hologram recording configurations such as in-line, off-axis and multibeam to data processing. Difficulties in implementation are analyzed and solutions are discussed. We also present preliminary measurement results in a 3D vortex flow using one of our prototype HPV systems.

  7. Neutral particle dynamics in a high-power RF source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, D.; Paunska, Ts.; Tarnev, Kh.; Shivarova, A.

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies on the spatial discharge structure in the SPIDER source of negative hydrogen/deuterium ions carried out at low applied power are extended towards description of the discharge maintenance under the conditions of the actual rf power deposition of 100 kW planned for a single driver of the source. In addition to the expected higher electron density, the results show strong increase of the electron temperature and of the temperatures of the neutral species (hydrogen atoms and molecules). In the discussions, not only the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters but also that of the fluxes in the discharge (particle and energy fluxes) is involved. The obtained results come in confirmation of basic concepts for low-pressure discharge maintenance: (i) mutually related electron density and temperature as a display of the generalized Schottky condition, (ii) discharge behavior governed by the fluxes, i.e. strong nonlocality in the discharge, and (iii) a non-ambipolarity in the discharge regime, which originates from shifted maxima of the electron density and temperature and shows evidence in a vortex electron flux and in a dc current in a rf discharge, the latter resulting from a shift in the positions of the maxima of the electron density and plasma potential.

  8. Neutral particle beam scoring system proof-of-principle experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, D.A.; Pontau, A.E.; Antolak, A.J.

    1986-10-01

    A method of scoring a ground-based neutral particle beam pointing experiment is described. Beam scoring in this context means performing beam direction measurements in the near field (tens of meters) sufficient to determine whether energy would be concentrated on a far-field target as desired in a pointing experiment. The principle of operation is to impress a high-resolution spatial modulation on the beam by inserting an array of shadow wires into the beam upstream of the steering magnet. At the downstream end of the beam line the shadows are detected using one or more scintillation screens and video cameras. Beam direction is determined by measuring the location of the shadows at a known distance downstream of the point of steering. A proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates that: (1) wire shadows can be created in a 50 MeV beam and propagate over the distances required; (2) images of sufficient brightness and resolution can be formed on scintillating screens excited by 50 MeV protons; and (3) CCD array cameras can operate in the radiation environment created near the beam line.

  9. Neutral particle dynamics in a high-power RF source

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, D. Paunska, Ts.; Shivarova, A.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2015-04-08

    Previous studies on the spatial discharge structure in the SPIDER source of negative hydrogen/deuterium ions carried out at low applied power are extended towards description of the discharge maintenance under the conditions of the actual rf power deposition of 100 kW planned for a single driver of the source. In addition to the expected higher electron density, the results show strong increase of the electron temperature and of the temperatures of the neutral species (hydrogen atoms and molecules). In the discussions, not only the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters but also that of the fluxes in the discharge (particle and energy fluxes) is involved. The obtained results come in confirmation of basic concepts for low-pressure discharge maintenance: (i) mutually related electron density and temperature as a display of the generalized Schottky condition, (ii) discharge behavior governed by the fluxes, i.e. strong nonlocality in the discharge, and (iii) a non-ambipolarity in the discharge regime, which originates from shifted maxima of the electron density and temperature and shows evidence in a vortex electron flux and in a dc current in a rf discharge, the latter resulting from a shift in the positions of the maxima of the electron density and plasma potential.

  10. Towards a Revised Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Surface Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler

    2005-06-09

    The components of the neutral- and plasma-surface interaction model used in the Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS 2 are reviewed. The idealized surfaces and processes handled by that model are inadequate for accurately simulating neutral transport behavior in present day and future fusion devices. We identify some of the physical processes missing from the model, such as mixed materials and implanted hydrogen, and make some suggestions for improving the model.

  11. Charged and Neutral Particles Channeling Phenomena Channeling 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.; Palumbo, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    On the discovery of coherent Bremsstrahlung in a single crystal at the Frascati National Laboratories / C. Barbiellini, G. P. Murtas and S. B. Dabagov -- Advances in coherent Bremsstrahlung and LPM-effect studies (to the lOOth anniversary from the birth of L. D. Landau) / N. F. Shul'ga -- Spectra of radiation and created particles at intermediate energy in oriented crystal taking into account energy loss / V. N. Baier and V. M. Katkov -- The coherent Bremsstrahlung beam at MAX-lab facility / K. Fissum ... [et al.] -- Radiation from thin, structured targets (CERN NA63) / A. Dizdar -- Hard incoherent radiation in thick crystals / N. F. Shul'ga, V. V. Syshchenko and A. I. Tarnovsky -- Coherent Bremsstrahlung in periodically deformed crystals with a complex base / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Induction of coherent x-ray Bremsstrahlung in crystals under the influence of acoustic waves / A. R. Mkrtchyan and V. V. Parazian -- Coherent processes in bent single crystals / V. A. Maisheev -- Experimental and theoretical investigation of complete transfer phenomenon for media with various heat exchange coefficients / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. E. Movsisyan and V. R. Kocharyan -- Coherent pair production in crystals / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Negative particle planar and axial channeling and channeling collimation / R. A. Carrigan, Jr. -- CERN crystal-based collimation in modern hadron colliders / W. Scandale -- Studies and application of bent crystals for beam steering at 70 GeV IHEP accelerator / A. G. Afonin ... [et al.] -- Crystal collimation studies at the Tevatron (T-980) / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of crystals for channeling of particles in accellerators / A. Mazzolari ... [et al.] -- New possibilities to facilitate collimation of both positively and negatively charged particle beams by crystals / V. Guidi, A. Mazzolari and V. V. Tikhomirov -- Increase of probability of particle capture into the channeling

  12. DANTSYS: a system for deterministic, neutral particle transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Alcouffe, R.E.; Baker, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    The THREEDANT code is the latest addition to our system of codes, DANTSYS, which perform neutral particle transport computations on a given system of interest. The system of codes is distinguished by geometrical or symmetry considerations. For example, ONEDANT and TWODANT are designed for one and two dimensional geometries respectively. We have TWOHEX for hexagonal geometries, TWODANT/GQ for arbitrary quadrilaterals in XY and RZ geometry, and THREEDANT for three-dimensional geometries. The design of this system of codes is such that they share the same input and edit module and hence the input and output is uniform for all the codes (with the obvious additions needed to specify each type of geometry). The codes in this system are also designed to be general purpose solving both eigenvalue and source driven problems. In this paper we concentrate on the THREEDANT module since there are special considerations that need to be taken into account when designing such a module. The main issues that need to be addressed in a three-dimensional transport solver are those of the computational time needed to solve a problem and the amount of storage needed to accomplish that solution. Of course both these issues are directly related to the number of spatial mesh cells required to obtain a solution to a specified accuracy, but is also related to the spatial discretization method chosen and the requirements of the iteration acceleration scheme employed as will be noted below. Another related consideration is the robustness of the resulting algorithms as implemented; because insistence on complete robustness has a significant impact upon the computation time. We address each of these issues in the following through which we give reasons for the choices we have made in our approach to this code. And this is useful in outlining how the code is evolving to better address the shortcomings that presently exist.

  13. Plasma precipitation and neutral particle emission at Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massetti, S.; Milillo, A.; Mura, A.; Orsini, S.; Plainaki, C.; Mangano, V.

    2012-04-01

    Ganymede, the largest moon of Jupiter is characterized by a tiny magnetosphere produced by an intrinsic magnetic moment; it is linked to the Jovian magnetosphere and embedded in its energetic plasma environment. In addition, since the plasma co-rotating with Jupiter impinges on Ganymede trailing side at subsonic speed, there is no bow-shock formation. Here we present preliminary results of Monte Carlo simulations aimed to evaluate the expected ion precipitation onto the polar caps of Ganymede, by means of the magnetic and electric fields derived by a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model that realistically describe Ganymede's magnetospheric environment. We discuss precipitation pattern differences between the simulated ion species (H+, O+ and S+) at different energies in the range 10-100 keV. Plasma precipitating onto the surface of Ganymede modifies it both physically (via ion sputtering) and chemically (via radiolysis). Directly sputtered H2O molecules as well as products of H2O decomposition, that may recombine and produce diverse molecules, such as O2 and H2 are released. The yields of these processes have been estimated by means of accurate function that includes the dependence of the release on impacting ion species and energy as well as on the moon's surface temperature. In this study we attempted to isolate the temperature dependent part of this yield function and to assign it exclusively to the chemical processes taking place on ice and to the subsequent release of new molecules. In this way we make a rough preliminary distinction between the sputtering and radiolysis exospheric contributions. In our estimations we take into account also the energy spectra of precipitating plasma. A MonteCarlo model has been used to simulate the neutral density of escaping particles. Here we present results in terms of density and fluxes.

  14. A field-ionization neutral detector - FIND. [neutral particle mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, C. C.; Hsieh, K. C.; Fan, C. Y.; Swanson, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The field ionization neutral detector FIND operates according to the following principle: Neutral atoms are attracted toward the field ionization tips since they are polarized by the electric field of the tips. The atoms are singly ionized and repelled by the positive potential of the tips toward the detector situated behind a grid at ground potential. The ions deposit in the detector their kinetic energies, typically 26 keV, corresponding to the potential difference between the ionization region and the detector. Laboratory results show that FIND can have the resolution, sensitivities and durability required to perform in situ measurements of neutral H and He fluxes in interplanetary space, cometary halos and exospheres.

  15. Loss cone boundary measurement using diagnostic neutral beam and neutral particle analyzer in a compact helical system

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, H.; Ida, K.; Okamura, S.; Isobe, M.; Akiyama, R.; Yoshimura, Y.

    2004-10-01

    A horizontally scannable diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) has been installed on the compact helical system (CHS) in order to study the confinement of energetic ions with different pitch angles by varying the injection angle. The DNB has been designed to provide energetic ions as a test particle source with (1) no heating to background plasma and (2) small divergence angle. A charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer (NPA) to measure energetic ions injected by the DNB is also scannable and varies the observation angle on the equatorial plane in CHS. A combination of horizontally scannable DNB and NPA provides information on whether the energetic ions with different pitch angle are confined in the plasma or immediately lost. The experimental results are consistent with the prediction of single particle full orbit calculation in CHS.

  16. Fishbone activity in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injection plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liqing; Zhang, Jizong; Chen, Kaiyun E-mail: lqhu@ipp.cas.cn; Hu, Liqun E-mail: lqhu@ipp.cas.cn; Li, Erzhong; Lin, Shiyao; Shi, Tonghui; Duan, Yanmin; Zhu, Yubao

    2015-12-15

    Repetitive fishbones near the trapped ion procession frequency were observed for the first time in the neutral beam injection high confinement plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) tokamak, and diagnosed using a solid-state neutral particle analyzer based on a compact silicon photodiode together with an upgraded high spatial-temporal-resolution multi-arrays soft X-ray (SX) system. This 1/1 typical internal kink mode propagates in the ion-diamagnetism direction with a rotation speed faster than the bulk plasma in the plasma frame. From the SX measurements, this mode frequency is typical of chirping down and the energetic particle effect related to the twisting mode structure. This ion fishbone was found able to trigger a multiple core sawtooth crashes with edge-2/1 sideband modes, as well as to lead to a transition from fishbone to long lived saturated kink mode to fishbone. Furthermore, using SX tomography, a correlation between mode amplitude and mode frequency was found. Finally, a phenomenological prey–predator model was found to reproduce the fishbone nonlinear process well.

  17. Charged and Neutral Particles Channeling Phenomena Channeling 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.; Palumbo, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    On the discovery of coherent Bremsstrahlung in a single crystal at the Frascati National Laboratories / C. Barbiellini, G. P. Murtas and S. B. Dabagov -- Advances in coherent Bremsstrahlung and LPM-effect studies (to the lOOth anniversary from the birth of L. D. Landau) / N. F. Shul'ga -- Spectra of radiation and created particles at intermediate energy in oriented crystal taking into account energy loss / V. N. Baier and V. M. Katkov -- The coherent Bremsstrahlung beam at MAX-lab facility / K. Fissum ... [et al.] -- Radiation from thin, structured targets (CERN NA63) / A. Dizdar -- Hard incoherent radiation in thick crystals / N. F. Shul'ga, V. V. Syshchenko and A. I. Tarnovsky -- Coherent Bremsstrahlung in periodically deformed crystals with a complex base / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Induction of coherent x-ray Bremsstrahlung in crystals under the influence of acoustic waves / A. R. Mkrtchyan and V. V. Parazian -- Coherent processes in bent single crystals / V. A. Maisheev -- Experimental and theoretical investigation of complete transfer phenomenon for media with various heat exchange coefficients / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. E. Movsisyan and V. R. Kocharyan -- Coherent pair production in crystals / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Negative particle planar and axial channeling and channeling collimation / R. A. Carrigan, Jr. -- CERN crystal-based collimation in modern hadron colliders / W. Scandale -- Studies and application of bent crystals for beam steering at 70 GeV IHEP accelerator / A. G. Afonin ... [et al.] -- Crystal collimation studies at the Tevatron (T-980) / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of crystals for channeling of particles in accellerators / A. Mazzolari ... [et al.] -- New possibilities to facilitate collimation of both positively and negatively charged particle beams by crystals / V. Guidi, A. Mazzolari and V. V. Tikhomirov -- Increase of probability of particle capture into the channeling

  18. Time-of-flight neutral particle analyzer and calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W. S.; Garate, E. P.; Heidbrink, W. W.; McWilliams, R.; Roche, T.; Trask, E.; Zhang Yang

    2008-10-15

    A time-of-flight diagnostic has been implemented on the Irvine field reversed configuration (IFRC) to obtain an energy distribution function from charge-exchanged neutral hydrogen. The diagnostic includes a 13 cm radius slotted disk rotating at 165 Hz in vacuum which chops the emitted neutrals at a rate of 26 kHz. In situ timing verification was performed with a dc xenon discharge lamp with an uncertainty less than 100 ns for a 38 {mu}s chopping period. Energy calibration was accomplished with a singly ionized lithium source in the range of 300-1500 eV, achieving an average energy uncertainty, {delta}E/E, of 0.11. The diagnostic has measured neutrals in the range of 20-80 eV from the IFRC and the corresponding energy distribution function has been obtained.

  19. Advanced analysis methods in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Each generation of high energy physics experiments is grander in scale than the previous - more powerful, more complex and more demanding in terms of data handling and analysis. The spectacular performance of the Tevatron and the beginning of operations of the Large Hadron Collider, have placed us at the threshold of a new era in particle physics. The discovery of the Higgs boson or another agent of electroweak symmetry breaking and evidence of new physics may be just around the corner. The greatest challenge in these pursuits is to extract the extremely rare signals, if any, from huge backgrounds arising from known physics processes. The use of advanced analysis techniques is crucial in achieving this goal. In this review, I discuss the concepts of optimal analysis, some important advanced analysis methods and a few examples. The judicious use of these advanced methods should enable new discoveries and produce results with better precision, robustness and clarity.

  20. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  1. Maximizing Ion Current by Space Charge Neutralization using Negative Ions and Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2005-01-25

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space charge neutralization are introduced. Space charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  2. Maximizing ion current by space-charge neutralization using negative ions and dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2005-05-15

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space-charge neutralization are introduced. Space-charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space-charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  3. Maximizing ion current by space-charge neutralization using negative ions and dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2005-05-01

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space-charge neutralization are introduced. Space-charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space-charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  4. Use of amine neutralized sulfonated polystyrenes for particle flocculation

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, D.J.; Peiffer, D.G.; Thaler, W.A.; Duvdevani, I.

    1987-10-20

    A process is described for flocculating solid fines selected from the group consisting of coke films, catalyst fines, synthetic fuel fines, coal fines, and shale fines from a solution comprising the solid fines and an organic liquid which comprises the steps of: (a) adding with mixing about 5 to about 10,000 ppm of the water insoluble unneutralized or neutralized sulfonated polystyrene to the solution wherein the sulfonated polystyrene is dissolved in a dissolving organic liquid at a concentration level of about 0.01 to about 20 weight percent, and has about 0.5 to about 100 mole percent of sulfonate groups; and (b) heating at about 25/sup 0/C to about 350/sup 0/C for about 1 to about 45 minutes the mixture of the solution and the unneutralized or neutralized polystyrene wherein the sulfonated polystrene is absorbed on the surface of the solid fines, and the solid fines collide to form agglomerates which precipitate out of the solution.

  5. Virus replicon particle based Chikungunya virus neutralization assay using Gaussia luciferase as readout

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has been responsible for large epidemic outbreaks causing fever, headache, rash and severe arthralgia. So far, no specific treatment or vaccine is available. As nucleic acid amplification can only be used during the viremic phase of the disease, serological tests like neutralization assays are necessary for CHIKV diagnosis and for determination of the immune status of a patient. Furthermore, neutralization assays represent a useful tool to validate the efficacy of potential vaccines. As CHIKV is a BSL3 agent, neutralization assays with infectious virus need to be performed under BSL3 conditions. Our aim was to develop a neutralization assay based on non-infectious virus replicon particles (VRPs). Methods VRPs were produced by cotransfecting baby hamster kidney-21 cells with a CHIKV replicon expressing Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) and two helper RNAs expressing the CHIKV capsid protein or the remaining structural proteins, respectively. The resulting single round infectious particles were used in CHIKV neutralization assays using secreted Gluc as readout. Results Upon cotransfection of a CHIKV replicon expressing Gluc and the helper RNAs VRPs could be produced efficiently under optimized conditions at 32°C. Infection with VRPs could be measured via Gluc secreted into the supernatant. The successful use of VRPs in CHIKV neutralization assays was demonstrated using a CHIKV neutralizing monoclonal antibody or sera from CHIKV infected patients. Comparison of VRP based neutralization assays in 24- versus 96-well format using different amounts of VRPs revealed that in the 96-well format a high multiplicity of infection is favored, while in the 24-well format reliable results are also obtained using lower infection rates. Comparison of different readout times revealed that evaluation of the neutralization assay is already possible at the same day of infection. Conclusions A VRP based CHIKV neutralization assay using Gluc as readout

  6. Bound states of neutral particles in external electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiong-Gui

    2000-02-01

    Neutral fermions of spin 12 with magnetic moment can interact with electromagnetic fields through nonminimal coupling. The Dirac-Pauli equation for such a fermion coupled to a spherically symmetric or central electric field can be reduced to two simultaneous ordinary differential equations by separation of variables in spherical coordinates. For a wide variety of central electric fields, bound-state solutions of critical energy values can be found analytically. The degeneracy of these energy levels turns out to be numerably infinite. This reveals the possibility of condensing infinitely many fermions into a single energy level. For radially constant and radially linear electric fields, the system of ordinary differential equations can be completely solved, and all bound-state solutions are obtained in closed forms. The radially constant field supports scattering solutions as well. For radially linear fields, more energy levels (in addition to the critical one) are infinitely degenerate. The simultaneous presence of central magnetic and electric fields is discussed.

  7. Interaction energy and closest approach of moving charged particles on a plasma and neutral gas background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Øien, Alf H.

    2012-02-01

    Electric interaction between two negatively charged particles of different sizes on a mixed background of positive, negative, and neutral particles is complex and has relevance both to dusty plasmas and to transports in ionized fluids in general. We consider particularly effects during interaction that particle velocity and neutrals in the background may have on the well-known “dressing” and electric shielding that is due to the charged part of the background and how the interaction energy is modified because of this. Without such effects earlier works show the interaction becomes attractive when the distance between the two particles is a bit larger than the Debye length. We use a model where one of the two interacting particles has a radius much larger than the Debye length and the other a radius shorter than the Debye length. Then, the complex interaction may be more easily determined for particle separation up to a few Debye lengths. We consider the larger particle as stationary while the smaller may move. We find quite simple analytic expressions for the dressed particle interaction energy over the whole range of speed of the incoming smaller particle, assumed coming head on the larger particle, and the whole range of neutral particle densities. We also derive a distance of closest approach of small and large particles for all such parameter values. This distance is important for excluded volume estimations for moving small charged particles in media populated by large charged particles on a background as described above, and hence, important for determining the speed of flow of the smaller particles through such media.

  8. Charged and Neutral Particle Interactions on Aerospace Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Wilkins, Richard; Huff, Harold

    2002-07-01

    Various candidate aircraft and spacecraft materials were analyzed and compared in a neutron environment using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code and in Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) and Trapped environments using the HZETRN code. These candidate materials are being used in aerospace vehicles, have been tested in particle beams, or seemed reasonable to analyze in this manner before deciding to manufacture and test them. This analysis shows that hydrogen bearing materials are better than the metal alloys for reducing the number of reflected and transmitted particles. It also shows that neutrons above 1 MeV are reflected out of the face of the slab better when larger quantities of carbon are present in the material. If a neutron absorber is added to the material, fewer neutrons are transmitted through and reflected from the material. This analysis focused on combinations of scatterers and absorbers to optimize these reaction channels on the higher energy neutron component. The absorber addition did not substantially change the charged particle transmission from the value obtained for polyethylene. The ultimate goal of this type of analysis is the selection of a layered material or material type that will optimize dose, dose equivalent, and electronic error rates inside the vehicle (and outside the vehicle if necessary for the mission). This analysis focuses on how the different material types and additives behave in the atmospheric and space related particle fields. As a secondary issue, as the amount of hydrogen bearing materials increase, larger fluxes of thermal neutrons are expected. It has been observed experimentally that large thicknesses of hydrogen bearing materials increase the error rates per neutron that occurs in SRAM memory chips. This effect is still being investigated, but it has been narrowed down to the larger mean neutron energy produced by the hydrogen bearing material. (authors)

  9. The influence of blobs on neutral particles in the scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrysøe, Alexander S.; Tophøj, Laust E. H.; Naulin, Volker; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders H.

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between plasma and neutrals are investigated with particular attention to the influence of large amplitude blob structures that mediate a significant particle and energy transport through the scrape-off layer (SOL). We perform a statistical analysis of the mean-field approximation for plasma parameters in the SOL, and this approximation is shown to be poor in a SOL with a high level of fluctuations, as the plasma fields are strongly correlated. A 1D neutral fluid model which account for both cold and hot neutrals is formulated and the effects of blobs on the ionization in the SOL and edge are investigated. Simulations suggest that neutrals originating from dissociation of hydrogen molecules only fuel in the outermost edge region of the plasma, whereas hot neutrals from charge exchange collisions penetrate deep into the bulk plasma. The results are recovered in a simplified 2D model.

  10. Landau quantization for a neutral particle in the presence of topological defects

    SciTech Connect

    Bakke, K.; Ribeiro, L. R.; Furtado, C.; Nascimento, J. R.

    2009-01-15

    In this paper we study the Landau levels in the nonrelativistic dynamics of a neutral particle which possesses a permanent magnetic dipole moment interacting with an external electric field in the curved space-time background with the presence or absence of a torsion field. The eigenfunction and eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian are obtained. We show that the presence of the topological defect breaks the infinite degeneracy of the Landau levels arising in this system. We also apply a duality transformation to discuss this same quantization for a dynamics of a neutral particle with a permanent electric dipole moment.

  11. Geometric phase for a neutral particle in the presence of a topological defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, K.; Nascimento, J. R.; Furtado, C.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we study the quantum dynamics of a neutral particle in the presence of a topological defect. We investigate the appearance of a geometric phase in the relativistic quantum dynamics of a neutral particle which possesses permanent magnetic and electric dipole moments in the presence of an electromagnetic field in this curved space-time. The nonrelativistic quantum dynamics are investigated using the Foldy-Wouthuysen expansion. The gravitational Aharonov-Casher and He-McKellar-Wilkens effects are investigated for a series of electric and magnetic field configurations.

  12. DESTRUCTION OF NEUTRAL PARTICLES IN A DEVICE FOR PRODUCING A HIGH DENSITY PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Simon, A.

    1962-05-01

    A method and apparatus are described for burning out neutral particles in an evacuated region and within a strong magnetic field. The method comprises injecting energetic molecular ions into the region perpendicular to the magnetic field and into the path of a dissociating, energetic arc discharge, the atomic ions formed in the dissociating process being trapped by the magnetic field, and then increasing the value of the trapped atomic ion current to such a value that the neutral particles are destroyed faster than they are formed, thereby causing a dense, energetic plasma to be built up and sustained by the magnetic field. (AEC)

  13. Neural network based neutral particles reconstruction with the E687 hadron calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, V.; Boca, G.; Bonomi, G.; Gérard, G.; Gianini, G.; Marchesotti, M.; Merlo, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Viola, L.; Vitulo, P.; Buchholz, D.; Claes, D.; O'Reilly, B.

    1996-02-01

    We present a neutral particle reconstruction algorithm based on a neural network approach applied to the E687 hadron calorimeter. A measurement of the invariant mass of the Σ± → nπ± is presented to verify the reliability of the reconstruction. The reconstructed invariant mass of the charmed meson D + → K L0π+π+π- is also presented to show the possible application of this technique to charmed particles decaying into a neutral hadron. An example of this would be Λc+ → nK -π+π+.

  14. Anisotropic diffusion of neutral particles in stochastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasques, Richard

    This work introduces a new homogenization theory for the transport of particles in stochastic media. This theory utilizes a nonclassical form of the Boltzmann equation in which the locations of the scattering centers in the system are correlated and the distance-to-collision is not exponentially distributed. We take the diffusion limit of this equation and derive an anisotropic diffusion equation. (The diffusion is anisotropic because the mean and mean square distances between collisions in the horizontal and vertical directions are slightly different.) We then generate different possible realizations of modeled 2-D and 3-D Pebble-Bed Reactor cores, divided into crystal (honeycomb in 2-D, face-centered in 3-D) and random structures. (To generate the random structures, we developed 2-D and 3-D ballistic deposition algorithms.) We apply Monte Carlo codes (which we also developed) in these structures to simulate neutron transport in both 2-D and 3-D systems; results from these simulations are presented. We show that the results predicted using the new theory more closely agree with the numerical experiments than the atomic mix results and its corrections, and that the new theory can accurately predict small anisotropic effects detected in the simulations. We conclude by discussing the general anisotropic behavior of particles that are born close to the wall of the core, and by showing that the new theory can be used to accurately estimate this effect.

  15. Performance of the solid state neutral particle analyzer array on the national spherical torus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Darrow, D. S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Medley, S. S.; Shinohara, K.

    2006-10-15

    The solid state neutral particle analyzer (SSNPA) array on the national spherical torus experiment (NSTX) consists of four chords with tangency radii of 60, 90, 100, and 120 cm that view across the three coinjection neutral beam lines. Each chord utilizes a silicon photodiode that is coupled to fast digitizers to measure the energy distribution of charge exchange fast neutral particles (30-100 keV). By the end of the NSTX 2005 experimental campaign, the electromagnetic noise in the SSNPA was reduced by half and reasonable signals were obtained with good electromagnetic shielding, fast digitization of raw signals, software-based pulse height analysis, and pulse shape discrimination. Energy resolution of {approx}10 keV and time resolution of 2 ms have been achieved. Temporal evolutions of energetic neutral flux obtained with the SSNPA are in good agreement with those obtained with the E(parallel sign)B-type neutral particle analyzer. With these improvements, the SSNPA can be used to study magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and fast ion redistribution. Example data from plasma discharges are presented along with the noise reduction techniques and postshot pulse height analysis methods.

  16. A coarse-grained kinetic equation for neutral particles in turbulent fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mekkaoui, A.; Marandet, Y.; Genesio, P.; Rosato, J.; Stamm, R.; Capes, H.; Koubiti, M.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Catoire, F.

    2012-06-15

    A coarse-grained kinetic equation for neutral particles (atoms, molecules) in magnetized fusion plasmas, valid on time scales large compared to the turbulence correlation time, is presented. This equation includes the effects of plasma density fluctuations, described by gamma statistics, on the transport of neutral particles. These effects have so far been neglected in plasma edge modeling, in spite of the fact that the amplitude of fluctuations can be of order unity. Density fluctuations are shown to have a marked effect on the screening of neutrals and on the spatial localization of the ionization source, in particular at high density. The coarse-grained equations obtained in this work are readily implemented in edge code suites currently used for fusion plasma analysis and future divertor design (ITER, DEMO).

  17. Maturation-Induced Cloaking of Neutralization Epitopes on HIV-1 Particles

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, Amanda S.; Willis, Jordan R.; Crowe, James E.; Aiken, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    To become infectious, HIV-1 particles undergo a maturation process involving proteolytic cleavage of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins. Immature particles contain a highly stable spherical Gag lattice and are impaired for fusion with target cells. The fusion impairment is relieved by truncation of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail (CT), indicating that an interaction between the immature viral core and gp41 within the particle represses HIV-1 fusion by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that the conformation of Env on the viral surface is regulated allosterically by interactions with the HIV-1 core during particle maturation. To test this, we quantified the binding of a panel of monoclonal antibodies to mature and immature HIV-1 particles by immunofluorescence imaging. Surprisingly, immature particles exhibited markedly enhanced binding of several gp41-specific antibodies, including two that recognize the membrane proximal external region (MPER) and neutralize diverse HIV-1 strains. Several of the differences in epitope exposure on mature and immature particles were abolished by truncation of the gp41 CT, thus linking the immature HIV-1 fusion defect with altered Env conformation. Our results suggest that perturbation of fusion-dependent Env conformational changes contributes to the impaired fusion of immature particles. Masking of neutralization-sensitive epitopes during particle maturation may contribute to HIV-1 immune evasion and has practical implications for vaccine strategies targeting the gp41 MPER. PMID:21931551

  18. Preparation of thin films for use in generating neutral particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, W.S.; Zevenbergen, L.A.; Adair, H.L.

    1986-01-01

    Large-area, thin aluminum foils were prepared for use in beam neutralization experiments. The foils were made using either electron beams of resistance heating. Foil thickness and uniformity were determined using alpha particles. The foils perform very well when bombarded by energetic H/sup -/ ions. (DLC)

  19. Time-Dependent Neutral Particle Transport Benchmarks in Two and Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Barry D. Ganapol

    2007-10-12

    The main objective of NEER grant was to generate highly accurate 2D and 3D time-dependent neutral particle intensity maps from 3D pulsed wire sources through integration of the analytical representation of a time-dependent point source.

  20. Energetic neutral particles detection in the environment of Jupiter's icy moons: Ganymede's and Europa's neutral imaging experiment (GENIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, A.; Orsini, S.; Plainaki, C.; Fierro, D.; Argan, A.; Vertolli, N.; Dandouras, I.; Leoni, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Scheer, J.; Selci, S.; Soffitta, P.; Baragiola, R. A.; Brienza, D.; Cassidy, T. A.; Chassela, O.; Colasanti, L.; D'Alessandro, M.; Daglis, I.; De Angelis, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Di Persio, G.; Fabiani, S.; Gaggero, A.; Ganushkina, N.; Garnier, P.; Gilbert, J. A.; Hansen, K. C.; Hsieh, K. C.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lepri, S. T.; Mangano, V.; Massetti, S.; Mattioli, F.; Mura, A.; Palumbo, M. E.; Rispoli, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubini, A.; Teolis, B.; Tosi, F.; Tosti, D.; Toublanc, D.

    2013-11-01

    The detection of Energetic Neutral Particles (ENP) above 10 eV can unequivocally relate a surface-bound exosphere to surface features and can monitor instantaneously the effect of plasma precipitation onto the surface. In the framework of a mission to Jupiter's moons, 2D imaging of plasma precipitation will provide important information on the plasma circulation at the orbits of the moons. Furthermore, a joint measurement of precipitating ions will permit an estimation of the efficiency of the release process. Coupled measurements of ENP and gas composition will improve our knowledge of surface release mechanisms. Ganymede's and Europa's Neutral Imaging Experiment (GENIE) is a high-angular-resolution detector, based on the ToF (Time of Flight) technique, that can detect ENP (energy range >10 eV-few keV) in the Jupiter environment thanks to an innovative design and technology. Its objective is to map the sites of origin of the ENP of the icy moons' exospheres to investigate the interaction between the surface and the environment. Finally, coupling GENIE with an ion sensor and a mass spectrometer will be an outstanding opportunity to better understand the magnetosphere-moon coupling within the Jupiter system and compare the surface interaction with plasma in the diverse moons. In this paper, the scientific objectives and requirements of ENP detection are summarized and the description of the innovative design concept of GENIE is given, together with the signal and background noise simulation.

  1. Energetic Neutral Particles detection in the environment of Jupiter's icy moons: Ganymede's and Europa's Neutral Imaging Experiment (GENIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, Anna; Orsini, Stefano; Plainaki, Christina; Fierro, Davide; Argan, Andrea; Vertolli, Nello; Dandouras, Iannis; Leoni, Roberto; Liemohn, Michael; Scheer, Jurgen; Selci, Stefano; Soffitta, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    The detection of Energetic Neutral Particles (ENP) above 10 eV can univocally relate a surface-bound exosphere to surface features and to monitor instantaneously the effect of plasma precipitation onto the surface. The 2D imaging of plasma precipitation will provide important information on the plasma circulation at the orbits of the moons. Furthermore, a joint measurement of precipitating ions will permit an estimation the efficiency of the release process. Coupled measurements of ENP and gas composition will improve our knowledge of surface release mechanisms. GENIE (Ganymede Europa Neutral Imaging Experiment) is a high-angular-resolution detector, based on the ToF (Time of Flight) technique able to detect ENP (energy range 10 eV - few keV) in the Jupiter environment thanks to an innovative design and technology. Its objective is to map the sites of origin of the ENP of the icy moons' exospheres, to investigate the interaction between the surface and the environment. Finally, GENIE jointly with an ion-sensor and a mass spectrometer in the JUICE mission will be an outstanding opportunity to better understand also the magnetosphere-moon coupling within the Jupiter's system. In particular, a comparison between the surface interaction with the intense radiation at Europa and with the plasma shielding by the internal magnetic field at Ganymede, will provide a unique opportunity to investigate different surface evolution scenarios of Jupiter's moons.

  2. Modelling neutral beams in fusion devices: Beamlet-based model for fast particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asunta, O.; Govenius, J.; Budny, R.; Gorelenkova, M.; Tardini, G.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Salmi, A.; Sipilä, S.

    2015-03-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) will be one of the main sources of heating and non-inductive current drive in ITER. Due to high level of injected power the beam induced heat loads present a potential threat to the integrity of the first wall of the device, particularly in the presence of non-axisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field. Neutral beam injection can also destabilize Alfvén eigenmodes and energetic particle modes, and act as a source of plasma rotation. Therefore, reliable and accurate simulation of NBI is important for making predictions for ITER, as well as for any other current or future fusion device. This paper introduces a new beamlet-based neutral beam ionization model called BBNBI. It takes into account the fine structure of the injector, follows the injected neutrals until ionization, and generates a source ensemble of ionized NBI test particles for slowing down calculations. BBNBI can be used as a stand-alone model but together with the particle following code ASCOT it forms a complete and sophisticated tool for simulating neutral beam injection. The test particle ensembles from BBNBI are found to agree well with those produced by PENCIL for JET, and those produced by NUBEAM both for JET and ASDEX Upgrade plasmas. The first comprehensive comparisons of beam slowing down profiles of interest from BBNBI + ASCOT with results from PENCIL and NUBEAM/TRANSP, for both JET and AUG, are presented. It is shown that, for an axisymmetric plasma, BBNBI + ASCOT and NUBEAM agree remarkably well. Together with earlier 3D studies, these results further validate using BBNBI + ASCOT also for studying phenomena that require particle following in a truly three-dimensional geometry.

  3. A photodiode-based neutral particle bolometer for characterizing charge-exchanged fast-ion behavior.

    PubMed

    Clary, R; Smirnov, A; Dettrick, S; Knapp, K; Korepanov, S; Ruskov, E; Heidbrink, W W; Zhu, Y

    2012-10-01

    A neutral particle bolometer (NPB) has been designed and implemented on Tri Alpha Energy's C-2 device in order to spatially and temporally resolve the charge-exchange losses of fast-ion populations originating from neutral beam injection into field-reversed configuration plasmas. This instrument employs a silicon photodiode as the detection device with an integrated tungsten filter coating to reduce sensitivity to light radiation. Here we discuss the technical aspects and calibration of the NPB, and report typical NPB measurement results of wall recycling effects on fast-ion losses. PMID:23126887

  4. Pellet charge exchange helium measurement using neutral particle analyzer in large helical device.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, T; Goncharov, P; Veshchev, E; Tamura, N; Sudo, S; Seki, T; Kasahara, H; Takase, Y; Ohsako, T

    2008-10-01

    It is very important to investigate the confinement of alpha particles, which will be produced by nuclear reactions in ITER and fusion reactors. The pellet charge exchange (PCX) measurement is one of the most powerful methods because it can directly provide the profile of the alpha particle energy spectra in a plasma. In the large helical device, PCX using tracer encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) has been tried in many hydrogen and helium plasmas, including helium accelerated by using the cyclotron resonance heating. In the PCX, we use the compact neutral particle analyzer without simultaneous mass separation ability. The helium particle measurement can be achieved by the application of voltage in the condenser plate. The scattering of hydrogen particle is carefully considered during the estimation of the helium amount. The radial helium profiles can also be obtained by comparing four TESPEL injection shots with/without higher harmonic fast wave heating and at applied plate voltages for He or H, respectively. PMID:19044500

  5. Design of solid state neutral particle analyzer array for National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y. B.; Tritz, K.; Roquemore, A. L.; Medley, S. S.

    2014-11-15

    A new compact, multi-channel Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) diagnostic based on silicon photodiode array has been designed and is being fabricated for the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U). The SSNPA system utilizes a set of vertically stacked photodiode arrays in current mode viewing the same plasma region with different filter thickness to obtain fast temporal resolution (∼120 kHz bandwidth) and coarse energy information in three bands of >25 keV, >45 keV, and >65 keV. The SSNPA system consists of 15 radial sightlines that intersect existing on-axis neutral beams at major radii between 90 and 130 cm, 15 tangential sightlines that intersect new off-axis neutral beams at major radii between 120 and 145 cm. These two subsystems aim at separating the response of passing and trapped fast ions. In addition, one photodiode array whose viewing area does not intersect any neutral beams is used to monitor passive signals produced by fast ions that charge exchange with background neutrals.

  6. Particle Dynamics Discrimination Between Current Sheet Magnetic Field Reversal and Magnetic Neutral Line Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. F., Jr.; Holland, D. L.; Svetich, J.

    2014-12-01

    We consider dynamical signatures of ion motion that discriminate between a current sheet magnetic field reversal and a magnetic neutral line field. These two related dynamical systems have been studied previously as chaotic scattering systems with application to the Earth's magnetotail. Both systems exhibit chaotic scattering over a wide range of parameter values. The structure and properties of their respective phase spaces have been used to elucidate potential dynamical signatures that affect spacecraft measured ion distributions. In this work we consider the problem of discrimination between these two magnetic structures using charged particle dynamics. For example we show that signatures based on the well known energy resonance in the current sheet field provide good discrimination since the resonance is not present in the neutral line case. While both fields can lead to fractal exit region structuring, their characteristics are different and also may provide some field discrimination. Application to magnetotail field and particle parameters will be presented

  7. Neutral particle background in cosmic ray telescopes composed of silicon solid state detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The energy loss-spectrum of secondary charged particles produced by the interaction of gamma-rays and energetic neutrons in silicon solid state detectors has been measured with a satellite-borne cosmic ray telescope. In the satellite measurements presented here two distinct neutral background effects are identified: secondary protons and alpha particles with energies of about 2 to 100 MeV produced by neutron interactions, and secondary electrons with energies of about 0.2 to 10 MeV produced by X-ray interactions. The implications of this neutral background for satellite measurements of low energy cosmic rays are discussed, and suggestions are given for applying these results to other detector systems in order to estimate background contamination and optimize detector system design.

  8. Integrability and supersymmetry of Schrödinger-Pauli equations for neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. G.

    2012-12-01

    Integrable quantum mechanical systems for neutral particles with spin 1/2 and nontrivial dipole momentum are classified. It is demonstrated that such systems give rise to new exactly solvable problems of quantum mechanics with clear physical content. Solutions for three of them are given in explicit form. The related symmetry algebras and superalgebras are discussed. The presented classification is restricted to two-dimensional systems, which admit matrix integrals of motion linear in momenta.

  9. Integrability and supersymmetry of Schroedinger-Pauli equations for neutral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, A. G.

    2012-12-15

    Integrable quantum mechanical systems for neutral particles with spin (1/2) and nontrivial dipole momentum are classified. It is demonstrated that such systems give rise to new exactly solvable problems of quantum mechanics with clear physical content. Solutions for three of them are given in explicit form. The related symmetry algebras and superalgebras are discussed. The presented classification is restricted to two-dimensional systems, which admit matrix integrals of motion linear in momenta.

  10. Performing three-dimensional neutral particle transport calculations on tera scale computers

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, C S; Brown, P N; Chang, B; Dorr, M R; Hanebutte, U R

    1999-01-12

    A scalable, parallel code system to perform neutral particle transport calculations in three dimensions is presented. To utilize the hyper-cluster architecture of emerging tera scale computers, the parallel code successfully combines the MPI message passing and paradigms. The code's capabilities are demonstrated by a shielding calculation containing over 14 billion unknowns. This calculation was accomplished on the IBM SP ''ASCI-Blue-Pacific computer located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  11. Advance particle and Doppler measurement methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, C.

    1985-01-01

    Particle environments, i.e., rain, ice, and snow particles are discussed. Two types of particles addressed are: (1) the natural environment in which airplanes fly and conduct test flights; and (2) simulation environments that are encountered in ground-test facilities such as wind tunnels, ranges, etc. There are characteristics of the natural environment that one wishes to measure. The liquid water content (LWC) is the one that seems to be of most importance; size distribution may be of importance in some applications. Like snow, the shape of the particle may be an important parameter to measure. As one goes on to environment in simulated tests, additional parameters may be required such as velocity distribution, the velocity lag of the particle relative to the aerodynamic flow, and the trajectory of the particle as it goes through the aerodynamic flow and impacts on the test object.

  12. A coarse-grained transport model for neutral particles in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mekkaoui, A.; Reiter, D.; Boerner, P.; Marandet, Y.; Genesio, P.; Rosato, J.; Capes, H.; Koubiti, M.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Stamm, R.

    2012-12-15

    The transport of neutral particles in turbulent plasmas is addressed from the prospect of developing coarse-grained transport models which can be implemented in code suites like B2-EIRENE, currently used for designing the ITER divertor. The statistical properties of turbulent fluctuations are described by a multivariate Gamma distribution able to retain space and time correlations through a proper choice of covariance function. We show that in the scattering free case, relevant for molecules and impurity atoms, the average neutral particle density obeys a Boltzmann equation with an ionization rate renormalized by fluctuations. This result lends itself to a straightforward implementation in the EIRENE Monte Carlo solver for neutral particles. Special emphasis is put on the inclusion of time correlations, and in particular on the ballistic motion of coherent turbulent structures. The role of these time dependent effects is discussed for D{sub 2} molecules and beryllium atoms. The sensitivity of our results to the assumptions on the statistical properties of fluctuations is investigated.

  13. Characterization of Lead Tungstate for Neutral Particle Spectrometer at 12 GeV JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runyon, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Precision measurements of the deeply-virtual Compton scattering cross section at different beam energies to extract the real part of the Compton form factor, measurements to push the energy scale of real Compton scattering, and measurements of the basic semi-inclusive neutral-pion cross section in a kinematical region where the QCD factorization scheme is expected to hold all have something in common: the need for detecting neutral particles with high precision and high luminosity. The Neutral Particle Spectrometer (NPS) is a crystal electromagnetic calorimeter preceded by a sweeping magnet to sweep away charged particles. In this presentation I will show the results of PbWO4 crystal quality studies for the NPS. PbWO4 is optimal for the NPS due to its small Moliere radius and radiation hardness. The critical aspect for crystal quality, and thus resolution/precision, is the combination of high light output and radiation hardness, which depend strongly on the manufacturing process. We have tested the performance of PbWO4 crystals, and in particular, measured their light yield, optical transmission, and uniformity and radiation hardness. The homogeneity of the crystal was investigated based on the variation of the transverse optical transmission. Supported in part by NSF-PHY-1306227.

  14. Electric current-driven migration of electrically neutral particles in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinfang E-mail: r.qin@imperial.ac.uk; Qin, Rongshan E-mail: r.qin@imperial.ac.uk

    2014-03-17

    We design and experimentally demonstrate a migration of electrically neutral particles in liquids driven by electric current according to the discrepancies of their electrical conductivities. A force from electric current to electrically neutral particles has been identified to drive the particles toward the lateral surface from the centre of suspension via three distinguishable zones, namely, pushing, trapping, and expelling zones. The driving force can overtake gravity in practical cases. The property of the force is found neither similar to that of the force in electromagnetophoresis nor similar to that of the electromigration force in terms of direction and magnitude. An expression for the force at the pushing zone has been developed based on the numerical calculation of the thermodynamics of suspension fluids. The excellent agreement between numerical calculations and experimental data demonstrates that our calculation provides fundamental and predictive insight into particles separation from the liquids. Therefore, it is possible to use the force in many engineering applications such as separation of particles according to the differences of their electrical conductivities.

  15. Long-term tracking of neutrally buoyant tracer particles in two-dimensional fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervez, M. S.; Solomon, T. H.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental technique has been developed to produce and to track neutrally buoyant particles in a two-dimensional fluid flow. The key aspect of the technique is the ability to track particles for extended intervals (over an hour), which is essential for quantitative studies of transport and mixing. The approach is composed of two stages. In the first stage, digital image processing hardware partially processes the images, reducing the data rate to 50 kbyte/s (typically) and allowing several hours of data to be stored on a conventional computer disk. In the second stage, programs extract particle trajectories from the reduced data. The approach is tested in an experiment on planetary-type flows in a rotating annulus. In an appendix, a technique is discussed for fabricating wax or crayon particles with arbitrary density.

  16. Compact multichannel neutral particle analyzer for measurement of energetic charge-exchanged neutrals in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V.; Liptac, J.; Parker, R. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Fiore, C. L.; Granetz, R. S.; Irby, J. H.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Leiter, R.; Mcduffee, S.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2006-08-15

    A four-channel compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA) based on operating small Si diode detectors in pulse-height analysis (PHA) mode is used to measure energetic hydrogen minority ions with energies between {approx}50 and 350 keV stemming from ion-cyclotron range-of-frequency heated D(H) Alcator C-Mod plasmas with both active and passive charge exchange (CX). First core minority ion distribution results from Alcator C-Mod discharges and a detailed description of the diagnostic are presented. The diagnostic employs integrated electronics and fast digitization of the shaping amplifier voltage. The digitized data are stored for postshot PHA, which removes the constraints of real-time PHA and allows for improved performance via elimination of base line shift effects and potentially relieving pileup through Gaussian fitting routines. The CNPA is insensitive to the large gamma and neutron background in Alcator C-Mod discharges but is susceptible to the plasma's soft x-ray flux. The soft x-ray flux limits the CNPA energy resolution to {approx}15-20 keV. A simple model is used to interpret the active CNPA data which permits rapid estimates of the core hydrogen minority temperatures and anisotropy with a time resolution of {approx}100 ms. Hydrogenlike boron is identified as an important electron donor for the CX signal.

  17. Particle size alterations of feedstuffs during in situ neutral detergent fiber incubation.

    PubMed

    Krämer, M; Nørgaard, P; Lund, P; Weisbjerg, M R

    2013-07-01

    Particle size alterations during neutral detergent fiber (NDF) determination and in situ rumen incubation were analyzed by dry sieving and image analysis to evaluate the in situ procedure for estimation of NDF degradation parameters and indigestible NDF concentration in terms of particle size. Early-cut and late-cut grass silages, corn silage, alfalfa silage, rapeseed meal, and dried distillers grains were examined. Treatments were (1) drying and grinding of forage samples and grinding of concentrates; (2) neutral detergent-soluble (NDS) extraction; (3) machine washing and NDS extraction; (4) 24-h rumen incubation, machine washing, and NDS extraction; and (5) 288-h rumen incubation, machine washing, and NDS extraction. Degradation profiles for potentially degradable NDF were determined and image analysis was used to estimate particle size profiles and thereby the risk for particle loss. Particle dimensions changed during NDF determination and in situ rumen incubation and variations depended on feedstuff and treatment. Corn silage and late-cut grass silage varied most in particle area among feedstuffs, with an increase of 139% between 0 and 24h and a decrease of 77% between 24 and 288 h for corn silage and a decrease of 74% for late-cut grass silage between 24- and 288-h in situ rumen incubation. Especially for late-cut grass silage residues after 288 h in situ rumen incubation, a high mass proportion in the critical zone for escape was found. Particle area decreased linearly with increasing incubation time. Particle loss during in situ rumen incubation cannot be excluded and is likely to vary among feedstuffs. PMID:23684027

  18. Measurements of the Charged and Neutral Particle Spectra on the Martian Surface with MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Jan

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) onboard Mars Science Laboratory’s rover Curiosity is the first ever instrument to measure the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars. Charged particles are a major component of this environment, both galactic cosmic rays propagating to the Martian surface and secondary particles created by interactions of these cosmic rays with the atoms of the Martian atmosphere and soil. Another important factor for determining the biological impact of the Martian surface radiation is the specific contribution of neutrons, which possess a high biological effectiveness. In contrast to charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays are generally only measured indirectly. Their measurement is the result of a complex convolution of the incident particle spectrum with the measurement process. We apply an inversion method to calculate the gamma/neutron spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. Here we show first surface measurements of the Martian particle spectra and compare them to theoretical predictions. Measuring the Martian particle spectra is an essential step for determining the mutagenic influences to past or present life at or beneath the Martian surface as well as the radiation hazard for future human exploration, including the shielding design of a potential habitat.

  19. Particle acceleration through multiple conversions from a charged into a neutral state and back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derishev, E. V.; Aharonian, F. A.; Kocharovsky, V. V.; Kocharovsky, Vl. V.

    2003-08-01

    We propose a new means for a quick and efficient acceleration of protons and/or electrons in relativistic bulk flows. The maximum attainable particle energies are limited either by radiative losses or by the condition of confinement in the magnetic field. The new mechanism takes advantage of a conversion of particles from the charged state (protons, electrons or positrons) into a neutral state (neutrons or photons) and back. In most cases, the conversion is photon induced and requires the presence of intense radiation fields, but under special circumstances the converter acceleration mechanism may operate via other charge-changing reactions, for example, inelastic nucleon-nucleon collisions. As in the traditional, “stochastic” (or diffusive) acceleration models, the acceleration cycle in the proposed scenario consists of the escape of particles from the relativistic flow followed by their return back after deflection from the ambient magnetic field. The difference is that the charge-changing reactions, which occur during the cycle, allow accelerated particles to increase their energies in each cycle by a factor much larger than 2 and usually roughly equal to the bulk Lorentz factor squared. The emerging spectra of accelerated particles can be very hard and their maximum energy in some cases is larger than in the standard mechanism. This significantly reduces the required energy budget of the sources of the highest-energy particles observed in cosmic rays. The proposed acceleration mechanism has a distinctive feature—it unavoidably creates neutral beams, consisting of photons, neutrinos, or neutrons, whose beam pattern may be much broader than the inverse Lorentz factor of the relativistic flow. Also, the new mechanism may serve as an efficient means of transferring the energy of bulk motion to gamma radiation and, if the accelerated particles are nucleons, inevitably produces high-energy neutrinos at a relative efficiency approaching ≳50%.

  20. Angular emission distributions of neutrals and ions in laser ablated particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thum-Jager, Andrea; Rohr, Klaus

    1999-11-01

    The present work represents investigations of angular emission distributions in laser-produced particle beams resolved for the different ion groups (up to q=4) and the neutral particle component. The measurements are for a spectrum of target masses: 12 C, 27Al, 48 Ti, 59Ni, 96Mo and 181Ta. The plasma was produced by obliquely incident Q-switched pulses (TAU=5~ns and LAMBDA=1.06~MU m) of a Nd-YAG laser focused to energy densities ranging from about 20 to 180~J~cm-2. For the first time the results reveal in detail that the emission distributions systematically depend on the degree of ionization of the particles in the cloud. While for the neutral particles the angular emission is always dominated by a broad background with an additional, but less pronounced, peaked component, the background component rapidly but continuously diminishes with the increasing charge state of the ions. If, in the usual way, the emission distribution is approximated by the superposition of a cosine and a cosn fit function, the distribution of ions with qgeq 2 can already be well fitted by a cosn function alone. It seems highly probable, that this behaviour essentially is a result of the recombination dynamics during the expansion. It was found that the effect holds for all atomic masses investigated, whereby the mass dependence of the exponent n for all species behaves alike, approximately following a A3/4 law.

  1. Interstellar Neutral Helium in the Heliosphere from IBEX Observations. II. The Warsaw Test Particle Model (WTPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokół, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Bzowski, M.; Swaczyna, P.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a refined and optimized version of the Warsaw Test Particle Model of interstellar neutral gas in the heliosphere, specially tailored for analysis of IBEX-Lo observations. The former version of the model was used in the analysis of neutral He observed by IBEX that resulted in an unexpected conclusion that the interstellar neutral He flow vector was different than previously thought and that a new population of neutral He, dubbed the Warm Breeze, exists in the heliosphere. It was also used in the reanalysis of Ulysses observations that confirmed the original findings on the flow vector, but suggested a significantly higher temperature. The present version of the model has two strains targeted for different applications, based on an identical paradigm, but differing in the implementation and in the treatment of ionization losses. We present the model in detail and discuss numerous effects related to the measurement process that potentially modify the resulting flux of ISN He observed by IBEX, and identify those of them that should not be omitted in the simulations to avoid biasing the results. This paper is part of a coordinated series of papers presenting the current state of analysis of IBEX-Lo observations of ISN He. Details of the analysis method are presented by Swaczyna et al. and results of the analysis are presented by Bzowski et al.

  2. Neutralized solar energetic particles in the inner heliosphere: a parameter study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Klecker, Berndt; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Cipriani, Fabrice; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The large fluxes of solar energetic particles (SEPs) in Gradual Events, dominated by protons, are believed to be produced by the acceleration of shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). As SEPs propagate in the lower corona, there is a chance for them to be neutralized via the charge exchange and/or recombination processes and become energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). These ENAs retain the velocity of their parent SEPs and propagate in straight lines without the influence of the interplanetary magnetic field, and therefore might potentially serve as a new window to observe the particle acceleration processes in the solar corona. STEREO/Low Energy Telescope reported the first probable observation of hydrogen ENAs between 1.6 MeV - 5 MeV from the Sun prior to an X-class flare/CME [Mewaldt et al., 2009]. While such observations were somehow controversial, Wang et al. [2014] simulated the neutralization of solar energetic protons in the corona lower than 40 RS, and the result agreed with the STEREO observation. In this work, we further developed a production model of the ENA near the sun together with a transport model toward the inner planets, and explore the dependences of the ENA characteristics against the model parameters. These parameters include the angular width of the CME, its propagation direction with respect to the Sun-observer line, the propagation speed, the particle density in the corona, the abundances of O6+ and C4+, and the reaction rate of electron impact ionization in the loss of ENAs, and the heliospheric distance of the observer. The calculated ENA flux shows that at lower energy the expected ENA flux depends most sensitively on the CME apex angle and the CME propagation direction. At higher energy the dependence on the coronal density is more prominent. References Mewaldt, R. A., R. A. Leske, E. C. Stone, A. F. Barghouty, A. W. Labrador, C. M. S. Cohen, A. C. Cummings, A. J. Davis, T. T. von Rosenvinge, and M. E. Wiedenbeck (2009), STEREO

  3. Analysis of secondary particle behavior in multiaperture, multigrid accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, T; Taniguchi, M; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Tobari, H; Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Sakamoto, K; Inoue, T

    2010-02-01

    Heat load on acceleration grids by secondary particles such as electrons, neutrals, and positive ions, is a key issue for long pulse acceleration of negative ion beams. Complicated behaviors of the secondary particles in multiaperture, multigrid (MAMuG) accelerator have been analyzed using electrostatic accelerator Monte Carlo code. The analytical result is compared to experimental one obtained in a long pulse operation of a MeV accelerator, of which second acceleration grid (A2G) was removed for simplification of structure. The analytical results show that relatively high heat load on the third acceleration grid (A3G) since stripped electrons were deposited mainly on A3G. This heat load on the A3G can be suppressed by installing the A2G. Thus, capability of MAMuG accelerator is demonstrated for suppression of heat load due to secondary particles by the intermediate grids. PMID:20192410

  4. Analysis of secondary particle behavior in multiaperture, multigrid accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Sakamoto, K.; Inoue, T.

    2010-02-15

    Heat load on acceleration grids by secondary particles such as electrons, neutrals, and positive ions, is a key issue for long pulse acceleration of negative ion beams. Complicated behaviors of the secondary particles in multiaperture, multigrid (MAMuG) accelerator have been analyzed using electrostatic accelerator Monte Carlo code. The analytical result is compared to experimental one obtained in a long pulse operation of a MeV accelerator, of which second acceleration grid (A2G) was removed for simplification of structure. The analytical results show that relatively high heat load on the third acceleration grid (A3G) since stripped electrons were deposited mainly on A3G. This heat load on the A3G can be suppressed by installing the A2G. Thus, capability of MAMuG accelerator is demonstrated for suppression of heat load due to secondary particles by the intermediate grids.

  5. Solid state neutral particle analyzer array on National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, K.; Darrow, D.S.; Roquemore, A.L.; Medley, S.S.; Cecil, F.E.

    2004-10-01

    A solid state neutral particle analyzer array has been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The array consists of four chords viewing through a common vacuum flange. The tangency radii of the viewing chords are 60, 90, 100, and 120 cm. They view across the three co-injection neutral beam lines [deuterium, 80 keV (typically) with tangency radii 48.7, 59.2, and 69.4 cm] on NSTX and detect co-going energetic ions. A silicon photodiode was calibrated by using a monoenergetic deuteron beam source. Deuterons with energy above 40 keV can be detected with the present setup. The degradation of the performance was also investigated. Lead shot and epoxy are used for neutron shielding to reduce handling any hazardous heavy metal. This method also enables us to make an arbitrary shape to be fit into the complex flight tube.

  6. Comparative measurement of the neutral density and particle confinement time in EBT

    SciTech Connect

    Glowienka, John C.; Richards, Roger K.

    1985-11-01

    The neutral density and particle confinement time in the ELMO Bumpy Torus-Scale Experiment (EBT-S) have been determined by two different techniques. These involve a spectroscopic measurement of molecular and atomic hydrogen emissions and a time-decay measurement of a fast-ion population using a diagnostic neutral beam. The results from both diagnostics exhibit identical trends for either estimate, although the absolute values differ by a factor of 2 to 3. The observed variations with fill gas pressure and microwave power from either technique are consistent with measurements of electron density and temperature. In this paper, the measurement techniques are discussed, and the results are compared in the context of consistency with independently observed plasma behavior.

  7. An alpha particle measurement system using an energetic neutral helium beam in ITER (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, M.; Tanaka, N.; Terai, K.; Kaneko, O.; Kisaki, M.; Kobuchi, T.; Tsumori, K.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Shinto, K.; Wada, M.

    2012-02-15

    An energetic helium neutral beam is involved in the beam neutralization measurement system of alpha particles confined in a DT fusion plasma. A full size strong-focusing He{sup +} ion source (2 A, the beam radius of 11.3 mm, the beam energy less than 20 keV). Present strong-focusing He{sup +} ion source shows an emittance diagram separated for each beamlet of multiple apertures without phase space mixing, despite the space charge of a beamlet is asymmetric and the beam flow is non-laminar. The emittance of beamlets in the peripheral region was larger than that of center. The heat load to the plasma electrode was studied to estimate the duty factor for the ITER application.

  8. Specific features of measuring the isotopic composition of hydrogen ions in ITER plasma by using neutral particle diagnostics under neutral beam injection conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasyev, V. I.; Goncharov, P. R.; Mironov, M. I.; Nesenevich, V. G. Petrov, M. P.; Petrov, S. Ya.; Sergeev, V. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    Results of numerical simulation of signals from neutral particle analyzers under injection of the heating and diagnostic neutral beams in different operating modes of the ITER tokamak are presented. The distribution functions of fast ions in plasma are simulated, and the corresponding neutral particle fluxes escaping from the plasma along the line of sight of the analyzers are calculated. It is shown that the injection of heating deuterium (D{sup 0}) beams results in the appearance of an intense background signal hampering measurements of the ratio between the densities of deuterium and tritium fuel ions in plasma in the thermal energy range. The injection of a diagnostic hydrogen (H{sup 0}) beam does not affect measurements owing to the high mass resolution of the analyzers.

  9. Specific features of measuring the isotopic composition of hydrogen ions in ITER plasma by using neutral particle diagnostics under neutral beam injection conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, V. I.; Goncharov, P. R.; Mironov, M. I.; Nesenevich, V. G.; Petrov, M. P.; Petrov, S. Ya.; Sergeev, V. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    Results of numerical simulation of signals from neutral particle analyzers under injection of the heating and diagnostic neutral beams in different operating modes of the ITER tokamak are presented. The distribution functions of fast ions in plasma are simulated, and the corresponding neutral particle fluxes escaping from the plasma along the line of sight of the analyzers are calculated. It is shown that the injection of heating deuterium (D0) beams results in the appearance of an intense background signal hampering measurements of the ratio between the densities of deuterium and tritium fuel ions in plasma in the thermal energy range. The injection of a diagnostic hydrogen (H0) beam does not affect measurements owing to the high mass resolution of the analyzers.

  10. Description of the Majorana properties of neutral particles within pauli symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gaponov, Yu. V.

    2006-04-15

    A mathematical model that makes it possible to describe the Majorana properties of a system of free left-and right-handed neutral fermions belonging to the same type is constructed on the basis of transformations that include the chiral U (1) group and the Pauli SU (2) group, which mixes particle and antiparticle states. For massless particles, Pauli symmetry is exact and leads to conserved charges, a chiral and a generalized lepton one; the latter is a vector in Pauli isospace, where various directions are associated with Dirac or generalized Majorana properties. In the case of a nonzero mass, the scheme in question describes the combined Dirac-Majorana properties of particles belonging to A and B ({eta}{sub P}{sup 2} = -1) and C and D ({eta}{sub P}{sup 2} = 1) inversion classes, the condition M{sub L} = -M{sub R} being satisfied for their Majorana masses. For particles of C and D classes, the mass term in the Lagrangian and the Pauli charge can be related through the generalized-lepton-charge operator. For particles of A and B classes, these features are complementary, an alternative description of particles in terms of the lepton charge or two independent Majorana fields being possible in the Dirac case. In general, however, only representations of the latter type are realized, in which case the eigenvalues of the operator that determines the structure of the mass term in the Lagrangian serve as basic features.

  11. Advances in the operation of the DIII-D neutral beam computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.C.; Busath, J.L.; Penaflor, B.G.; Piglowski, D.; Kellman, D.H.; Chiu, H.K.; Hong, R.M.

    1998-02-01

    The DIII-D neutral beam system routinely provides up to 20 MW of deuterium neutral beam heating in support of experiments on the DIII-D tokamak, and is a critical part of the DIII-D physics experimental program. The four computer systems previously used to control neutral beam operation and data acquisition were designed and implemented in the late 1970`s and used on DIII and DIII-D from 1981--1996. By comparison to modern standards, they had become expensive to maintain, slow and cumbersome, making it difficult to implement improvements. Most critical of all, they were not networked computers. During the 1997 experimental campaign, these systems were replaced with new Unix compliant hardware and, for the most part, commercially available software. This paper describes operational experience with the new neutral beam computer systems, and new advances made possible by using features not previously available. These include retention and access to historical data, an asynchronously fired ``rules`` base, and a relatively straightforward programming interface. Methods and principles for extending the availability of data beyond the scope of the operator consoles will be discussed.

  12. Search for a Neutral Long-Lived Particle Decaying to B-Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Chad

    2009-04-01

    The existence of the Higgs boson is required by the Standard Model of particle physics, yet it has not been observed. The precise nature of the Higgs boson is unknown and the mechanism by which it interacts with known Standard Model particles is also not known. Long-lived, electrically neutral hadrons have recently been proposed in hidden-valley models and could constitute a pathway through which the Higgs boson communicates with the Standard Model. Such a scenario may provide a novel path to Higgs discovery at the Tevatron. This thesis describes a search for a neutral, long-lived particle produced in decays of Higgs bosons in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV, which decays to b-jets and lives long enough to travel at least 1.6 cm before decaying. This analysis uses 3.65 fb -1 of data recorded with the Run II D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider from April 2002 to August of 2008. We perform a search for eight possible hidden-valley scenarios resulting from a Higgs decay. No significant excess over background is observed and cross-section limits are placed at 95% CL.

  13. Single discharge of the matrix source of negative hydrogen ions: Influence of the neutral particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Paunska, Ts.; Todorov, D. Shivarova, A.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2015-04-08

    The study presents two-dimensional (2D) fluid-plasma-model description of a planar-coil inductively-driven discharge, considered as a single element of a matrix source of volume-produced negative hydrogen ions. Whereas the models developed up to now have been directed towards description of the charged particle behavior in the discharge, including that of the negative ions, this model stresses on the role of the neutral particle dynamics and of the surface processes in the formation of the discharge structure. The latter is discussed based on comparison of results obtained for discharges in a flowing gas and at a constant gas pressure as well as for different values of the coefficient of atom recombination on the walls. The conclusions are that the main plasma parameters – electron density and temperature and plasma potential – determining the gas discharge regime stay stable, regardless of changes in the redistribution of the densities of the neutral particles and of the positive ions. With regards to the volume production of the ions, which requires high density of (vibrationally excited) molecules, the impact on the degree of dissociation of the coefficient of atom recombination on the wall is discussed.

  14. Mass analysis of neutral particles and ions released during electrical breakdowns on spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1985-01-01

    Charged-particle fluxes from breakdown events were studied. Methods to measure mass spectra and total emitted flux of neutral particles were developed. The design and construction of the specialized mass spectrometer was completed. Electrical breakdowns were initiated by a movable blunt contact touching the insulating surface. The contact discharge apparatus was used for final development of two different high-speed recording systems and for measurements of the composition of the materials given off by the discharge. It was shown that intense instantaneous fluxes of neutral particles were released from the sites of electrical breakdown events. A laser micropulse mass analyzer showed that visible discoloration at breakdown sites were correllated with the presence of iron on the polymer side of the film, presumably caused by punch-through to the Inconel backing. Kapton samples irradiated by an oxygen ion beam were tested. The irradiated samples were free of surface hydrocarbon contamination but otherwise behaved in the same way as the Kapton samples tested earlier. Only the two samples exposed to oxygen ion bombardment were relatively clean. This indicates an additional variable that should be considered when testing spacecraft materials in the laboratory.

  15. Charge-exchange neutral particle measurement in MeV energy range on JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusama, Y.; Nemoto, M.; Satoh, M.; Tsukahara, Y.; Tobita, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Petrov, S.; Afanassiev, V.; Kozlovskij, S.; Kislyakov, A.; Petrov, M.

    1995-01-01

    A charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer for the measurement of the MeV energy range ions produced by nuclear fusion or radio frequency heating has been developed and installed in JT-60U. Neutral particles entering the analyzer are ionized with a carbon foil of thickness 400 Å. The energy and mass of the stripped ions are resolved by magnetic and electrostatic fields (E∥B type). The analyzer has eight CsI(Tl) scintillator detectors. The energy range is 0.5-4 MeV for 4He0, the dynamic range is 4.08 and the energy resolution is 6%-11%. The detection efficiency for 4He0 with energy above 1 MeV is 30%-40%. A pulse height analysis (PHA) with 16 channels was adopted to distinguish particle signals from noise arising from neutrons, γ rays and optical lights emitted by JT-60U plasmas. The validity of the PHA was confirmed in a calibration experiment using a neutron source and in a high power heating experiment in JT-60U.

  16. Quantum hydrodynamics approach to the formation of waves in polarized two-dimensional systems of charged and neutral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, P. A.; Kuzmenkov, L. S.; Trukhanova, M. I.

    2011-12-15

    In this paper, we explicate a method of quantum hydrodynamics (QHD) for the study of the quantum evolution of a system of polarized particles. Although we focused primarily on the two-dimensional (2D) physical systems, the method is valid for three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) systems too. The presented method is based upon the Schroedinger equation. Fundamental QHD equations for charged and neutral particles were derived from the many-particle microscopic Schroedinger equation. The fact that particles possess the electric dipole moment (EDM) was taken into account. The explicated QHD approach was used to study dispersion characteristics of various physical systems. We analyzed dispersion of waves in a two-dimensional ion and hole gas placed into an external electric field, which is orthogonal to the gas plane. Elementary excitations in a system of neutral polarized particles were studied for 1D, 2D, and 3D cases. The polarization dynamics in systems of both neutral and charged particles is shown to cause formation of a new type of waves as well as changes in the dispersion characteristics of already known waves. We also analyzed wave dispersion in 2D exciton systems, in 2D electron-ion plasma, and in 2D electron-hole plasma. Generation of waves in 3D-system neutral particles with EDM by means of the beam of electrons and neutral polarized particles is investigated.

  17. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  18. Coordinated investigation of plasma and neutral density fluctuations and particles during the MaCWAVE/MIDAS summer 2002 program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croskey, Charles L.; Mitchell, John D.; Goldberg, Richard A.; Blix, Tom A.; Rapp, Markus; Latteck, Ralph; Friedrich, Martin; Smiley, Byron

    2004-10-01

    The MaCWAVE/MIDAS program for investigating high-latitude mesospheric dynamics has produced an extensive set of charged particle, plasma and neutral density measurements. We report on the results from one rocket salvo involving a MaCWAVE and two MIDAS payloads launched within a one-hour period. Each payload carried probes for evaluating the plasma and charged particle environment, and additionally, neutral density measurements were obtained by the CONE instrument on the MIDAS payloads. With the combination of particle and electron/ion density measurements, regions with and without charged particles have been clearly identified, and the plasma measurements outside the particle layers have proven useful to characterize the turbulent activity of the neutral gas.

  19. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  20. Improved discrete ordinates calculations for an approximate model of neutral particle transport in ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, R.D.M.; Ono, S.

    1999-09-01

    An improved implementation of the discrete ordinates method for computing neutral particle transport in ducts is presented. The considered one-dimensional model makes use of two basic functions to represent the transverse and azimuthal dependencies of the particle angular flux in the duct. It is shown that if the problem is decomposed into uncollided and collided problems prior to using the discrete ordinates approximation, the number of ordinates necessary to achieve a desired degree of accuracy in the solution can be greatly reduced, especially for long ducts with significant wall absorption. Further savings in computer time can be attained by employing a composite quadrature based on a (nonstandard) half-range quadrature that can be generated in an effective and efficient way with one of the classical methods in the constructive theory of orthogonal polynomials.

  1. Preacceleration in collapsing magnetic neutral sheets and anomalous abundances of solar flare particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.; Levine, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Levine's (1974) concept of a collapsing magnetic neutral sheet which can accelerate ambient protons to several times the mean thermal speed, provided that the collapse time scale is shorter than the proton Coulomb loss time, is applied to heavier elements in an investigation of the composition of the particles which can be accelerated by such a sheet. Tables of ionization equilibrium are combined with the thermal structure of a constant pressure loop in order to calculate phi sub x (the fraction of an element x which is accelerated) of 18 heavy elements, from carbon to nickel which satisfy a maximum-ionization criterion. Normalizing phi sub x to oxygen, it is found that relative to the composition of the ambient materials, C and N can be depleted by factors of up to 2-10, while other heavy elements, along with hydrogen, are enhanced. The numerical results obtained are qualitatively similar to anomalous abundances reported among solar flare particles.

  2. Workshop on advances in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Miller, W.A.

    1993-12-31

    This proceedings contains viewgraphs presented at the 1993 workshop held at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Discussed topics include: negative stress, reactive flow calculations, interface problems, boundaries and interfaces, energy conservation in viscous flows, linked penetration calculations, stability and consistency of the SPH method, instabilities, wall heating and conservative smoothing, tensors, tidal disruption of stars, breaking the 10,000,000 particle limit, modelling relativistic collapse, SPH without H, relativistic KSPH avoidance of velocity based kernels, tidal compression and disruption of stars near a supermassive rotation black hole, and finally relativistic SPH viscosity and energy.

  3. Advanced hand-held mine detector and mine detection neutralization and route marking system overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, Ian A.; Allsopp, David J.

    2000-08-01

    An overview of the UK MOD Applied Research Program for Land Mine Detection. The Defense Evaluation and Research Agency carries out and manages the whole of the UK MOD's Counter Minewarfare Applied Research program both within its own laboratories and in partnership with industrial and academic research organizations. This paper will address two specific counter Minewarfare programs, the Advanced Hand Held Mine Detector which started in April 1995 and the Mine Detection Neutralization and Route Marking System which started in April 1997. Both are multi-sensor systems, incorporating between the metal detection, ground penetrating radar, nuclear quadrupole resonance, ultra-wideband radar, and polarized thermal imaging.

  4. Mass spectra of neutral particles released during electrical breakdown of thin polymer films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A special type of time-of-flight mass spectrometer triggered from the breakdown event was developed to study the composition of the neutral particle flux released during the electrical breakdown of polymer films problem. Charge is fed onto a metal-backed polymer surface by a movable smooth platinum contact. A slowly increasing potential from a high-impedance source is applied to the contact until breakdown occurs. The breakdown characteristics is made similar to those produced by an electron beam charging system operating at similar potentials. The apparatus showed that intense instantaneous fluxes of neutral particles are released from the sites of breakdown events. For Teflon FEP films of 50 and 75 microns thickness the material released consists almost entirely of fluorocarbon fragments, some of them having masses greater than 350 atomic mass units amu, while the material released from a 50 micron Kapton film consists mainly of light hydrocarbons with masses at or below 44 amu, with additional carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The apparatus is modified to allow electron beam charging of the samples.

  5. Particle-in-cell charged-particle simulations, plus Monte Carlo collisions with neutral atoms, PIC-MCC

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, C.K. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences)

    1991-04-01

    Many-particle (meaning 100's) charged-particle plasma simulations using spatial meshes for the electromagnetic field solutions, particle-in-cell (PIC) merged with Monte Carlo collision (MCC) calculations, are coming into wide use for application to partially ionized gases. This paper emphasizes the development of PIC computer experiments since the 1950's starting with one-dimensional (1-D) charged-sheet models, the addition of the mesh, and fast direct Poisson equation solvers for 2-D and 3-D. The finite-size particle-in-mesh (finite {Delta}{chi}, {Delta}t) theory of Langdon is presented in part to display the effects of too small {lambda}{sub D}/{Delta}{chi}, even for Maxwellian velocity distributions, as a caution, for example, when some ions are cooled to background gas temperatures by charge exchange. Early work on adding collisions to 1-D charge-sheet models by Burger and Shanny et al. are presented, with many of the elements of current Monte Carlo codes. Bounded plasma modeling is presented with electrode charges and external R, L, C, and V(t), I(t) sources now in use on fast desktop computers as real-time computer experiments, complementing analytic modeling and laboratory experiments. This paper reports that the addition of Monte Carlo collisions (usually done with irregular timesteps) to PIC (usually done with uniform {Delta}t's) is displayed as a developing art, relying on experimental total cross sections and approximate analytical differential cross sections to produce changes in charged-particle speed and direction due to collisions with neutrals, so far including elastic, excitation, ionization, charge exchange, and attachment processes.

  6. Regular and chaotic aspects of charged particle motion in a magnetotail-like field with a neutral line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savenkov, Boris V.; Zelenyi, Lev M.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Buechner, Jorg

    1991-01-01

    The motion of charged particles is studied numerically and analytically using a test particle approach. Acceleration near the X-type neutral line is described in terms of adiabatic invariants and separatrix crossings. The relation between regular and chaotic properties of the process is discussed for a realistic source in the plasma mantle.

  7. Jet Electrochemical Machining of Particle Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites with Different Neutral Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Lehnert, N.; Martin, A.; Schubert, A.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional mechanical machining of particle reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) is challenging because the hard ceramic particles in the soft aluminum matrix lead to an increased tool wear. Furthermore, the mechanical and thermal impact during conventional machining affects the microstructure of the AMCs. Electrochemical machining (ECM) is an alternative method to machine AMCs. Based on anodic dissolution, ECM has a slight influence on the work piece material structure and is independent of material strength and hardness. So the microstructure of the work piece remains unaffected. One method of ECM is electrochemical machining with continuous electrolytic free jet (Jet-ECM). Hereby the electrochemical removal is localized by the geometry of the electrolyte jet. By moving the electrolyte jet micro-structures and microgeometries can be generated quickly and flexibly in metallic parts [1]. Another advantage of Jet-ECM is the low consumption of electrolyte which allows an easy and inexpensive change of electrolyte for investigations with different types of electrolyte. In this study AMCs reinforced with different amounts of SiC-particles are machined with two pH-neutral electrolytes using Jet-ECM. The results provide information about the suitability of the selected electrolytes for the machining of AMCs. In addition, the influence of the particle content on the electrochemical removal result will be evaluated.

  8. Observations of neutral mesospheric smoke particles using triboelectric current measurements from a multi-surface Langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barjatya, A.; Friedrich, M.; Strelnikov, B.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from two recent mesospheric rocket flights which were part of the German WADIS campaign from Andoya Rocket Range. One rocket was flown in polar summer, and the other in early winter. The payloads carried a novel multi-surface Langmuir probe. Three fixed bias Langmuir probes with different surfaces: Stainless Steel, Nickel and Platinum were exposed to the mesospheric plasma environment. In addition to collecting thermal electrons, each surface is expected to interact differently with the neutral constituents of the mesosphere: neutral metal atoms, mesospheric smoke particles, ice particles, etc. We estimate these particle densities from the measured electric current data.

  9. COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED MEDIUM. I. NEUTRAL RETURN FLUX AND ITS EFFECTS ON ACCELERATION OF TEST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Blasi, P.; Morlino, G.; Bandiera, R.; Amato, E.; Caprioli, D.

    2012-08-20

    A collisionless shock may be strongly modified by the presence of neutral atoms through the processes of charge exchange between ions and neutrals and ionization of the latter. These two processes lead to exchange of energy and momentum between charged and neutral particles both upstream and downstream of the shock. In particular, neutrals that suffer a charge exchange downstream with shock-heated ions generate high-velocity neutrals that have a finite probability of returning upstream. These neutrals might then deposit heat in the upstream plasma through ionization and charge exchange, thereby reducing the fluid Mach number. A consequence of this phenomenon, which we refer to as the neutral return flux, is a reduction of the shock compression factor and the formation of a shock precursor upstream. The scale length of the precursor is determined by the ionization and charge-exchange interaction lengths of fast neutrals moving toward upstream infinity. In the case of a shock propagating in the interstellar medium, the effects of ion-neutral interactions are especially important for shock velocities <3000 km s{sup -1}. Such propagation velocities are common among shocks associated with supernova remnants, the primary candidate sources for the acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays. We then investigate the effects of the return flux of neutrals on the spectrum of test particles accelerated at the shock. We find that, for shocks slower than {approx}3000 km s{sup -1}, the particle energy spectrum steepens appreciably with respect to the naive expectation for a strong shock, namely, {proportional_to}E{sup -2}.

  10. The effects of neutralized particles on the sampling efficiency of polyurethane foam used to estimate the extrathoracic deposition fraction.

    PubMed

    Tomyn, Ronald L; Sleeth, Darrah K; Thiese, Matthew S; Larson, Rodney R

    2016-01-01

    In addition to chemical composition, the site of deposition of inhaled particles is important for determining the potential health effects from an exposure. As a result, the International Organization for Standardization adopted a particle deposition sampling convention. This includes extrathoracic particle deposition sampling conventions for the anterior nasal passages (ET1) and the posterior nasal and oral passages (ET2). This study assessed how well a polyurethane foam insert placed in an Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) sampler can match an extrathoracic deposition sampling convention, while accounting for possible static buildup in the test particles. In this way, the study aimed to assess whether neutralized particles affected the performance of this sampler for estimating extrathoracic particle deposition. A total of three different particle sizes (4.9, 9.5, and 12.8 µm) were used. For each trial, one particle size was introduced into a low-speed wind tunnel with a wind speed set a 0.2 m/s (∼40 ft/min). This wind speed was chosen to closely match the conditions of most indoor working environments. Each particle size was tested twice either neutralized, using a high voltage neutralizer, or left in its normal (non neutralized) state as standard particles. IOM samplers were fitted with a polyurethane foam insert and placed on a rotating mannequin inside the wind tunnel. Foam sampling efficiencies were calculated for all trials to compare against the normalized ET1 sampling deposition convention. The foam sampling efficiencies matched well to the ET1 deposition convention for the larger particle sizes, but had a general trend of underestimating for all three particle sizes. The results of a Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test also showed that only at 4.9 µm was there a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.03) between the foam sampling efficiency using the standard particles and the neutralized particles. This is interpreted to mean that static

  11. Comparison of transient and stationary neutral pressure response in the DIII-D advanced divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C.C.; Hogan, J.T.; Owen, L.W.; Mioduszewski, P.K. ); Maingi, R. ); Hill, D.N. ); Buchenauer, D. ); Ali Mahdavi, M.; Schaffer, M.J.; Petrie, T.W.; Jackson, G.L.; Evans, T.E. (General Atomics,

    1992-05-01

    The DIII-D divertor baffle system was designed to facilitate density control in long pulse H-mode discharges by removing a particle flux equal to the neutral beam fueling rate ({approximately}20 Torr-1/s) with a {approximately}1mTorr neutral pressure under the baffle (p{sub 0}). Initial measurements of the baffle pressure indicated that p{sub 0}{approximately} 10 mTorr (without pumping or biasing), a value much in excess of that required for long pulse density control. Radial sweeps of the X-point position have been employed to determine the maximum p{sub 0}, as well as to establish the dependence of this pressure on geometry. An estimate of the particle equilibration time for the baffle system has been made by studying the baffle pressure response to giant'' ELM effects. Steady state'' experiments in which the X-point position was fixed for {approximately}2.5s have also been carried out and steady baffle pressures were observed. The scaling of baffle pressure with plasma parameters has been found to be similar under transient and steady state'' conditions. Detailed modeling of these experiments with the B2, DEGAS, and WDIFFUSE (wall model) codes has been made.

  12. Comparison of transient and stationary neutral pressure response in the DIII-D advanced divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C.C.; Hogan, J.T.; Owen, L.W.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Maingi, R.; Hill, D.N.; Buchenauer, D.; Ali Mahdavi, M.; Schaffer, M.J.; Petrie, T.W.; Jackson, G.L.; Evans, T.E.; Haas, G.

    1992-05-01

    The DIII-D divertor baffle system was designed to facilitate density control in long pulse H-mode discharges by removing a particle flux equal to the neutral beam fueling rate ({approximately}20 Torr-1/s) with a {approximately}1mTorr neutral pressure under the baffle (p{sub 0}). Initial measurements of the baffle pressure indicated that p{sub 0}{approximately} 10 mTorr (without pumping or biasing), a value much in excess of that required for long pulse density control. Radial sweeps of the X-point position have been employed to determine the maximum p{sub 0}, as well as to establish the dependence of this pressure on geometry. An estimate of the particle equilibration time for the baffle system has been made by studying the baffle pressure response to ``giant`` ELM effects. ``Steady state`` experiments in which the X-point position was fixed for {approximately}2.5s have also been carried out and steady baffle pressures were observed. The scaling of baffle pressure with plasma parameters has been found to be similar under transient and ``steady state`` conditions. Detailed modeling of these experiments with the B2, DEGAS, and WDIFFUSE (wall model) codes has been made.

  13. Seiberg-Witten map and quantum phase effects for neutral Dirac particle on noncommutative plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kai; Wang, Jian-Hua; Yang, Huan-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    We provide a new approach to study the noncommutative effects on the neutral Dirac particle with anomalous magnetic or electric dipole moment on the noncommutative plane. The advantages of this approach are demonstrated by investigating the noncommutative corrections on the Aharonov-Casher and He-McKellar-Wilkens effects. This approach is based on the effective U (1) gauge symmetry for the electrodynamics of spin on the two dimensional space. The Seiberg-Witten map for this symmetry is then employed when we study the noncommutative corrections. Because the Seiberg-Witten map preserves the gauge symmetry, the noncommutative corrections can be defined consistently with the ordinary phases. Based on this approach we find the noncommutative corrections on the Aharonov-Casher and He-McKellar-Wilkens phases consist of two terms. The first one depends on the beam particle velocity and consistence with the previous results. However the second term is velocity-independent and then completely new. Therefore our results indicate it is possible to investigate the noncommutative space by using ultra-cold neutron interferometer in which the velocity-dependent term is negligible. Furthermore, both these two terms are proportional to the ratio between the noncommutative parameter θ and the cross section Ae/m of the electrical/magnetic charged line enclosed by the trajectory of beam particles. Therefore the experimental sensitivity can be significantly enhanced by reducing the cross section of the charge line Ae/m.

  14. Dynamics of energetic particles and neutrals in Saturn's variable magnetosphere: results from the MIMI investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hamilton, D. C.; Krupp, N.; Livi, S.; Roelof, E. C.; Dandouras, J.; Mauk, B. H.; Brandt, P. C.; Paranicas, C. P.; Saur, J.; Armstrong, T. P.; Bolton, S.; Cheng, A. F.; Gloeckler, G.; Hill, M. E.; Hsieh, K. C.; Ip, W. H.; Lagg, A.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; McEntire, R. W.; Williams, D. J.

    2005-08-01

    The Magnetospheric IMaging Instrument (MIMI) comprises three sensors: the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) provides images using energetic neutral atoms (ENA) and ions; the Charge-Energy-Mass-Spectrometer (CHEMS) determines the mass and charge state of ions; and the Low Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System (LEMMS) measures ion and electron distributions using a dual field-of-view telescope (Krimigis et al, Space Sci Rev,114, 2333-329, 2004). Measurements by MIMI after Saturn orbit insertion on 1 July 2004 have elucidated several new features of the planet's magnetosphere. These include: (1) A dynamical magnetosphere with an11-hour periodicity. (2) The first remotely-sensed radiation belt inside Saturn's D-ring. (3) Abundant water products in the magnetospheric plasma > or = 10 kev/charge, but little nitrogen (N+/O+<0.05); neutral gas is found to be a major mechanism for particle loss. (4) Injections of plasma in the ˜4-11Rs and also >20Rs corotate with the planet and can last for several days. (5) Activity (possibly analogous to Earth's substorms) occurs in Saturn's magnetotail in the 20-40 Rs region during large magnetospheric disturbances; this has not been observed during quiet times. (6) Field-aligned electron beams occur in the dawn to early morning sector as close as ˜10 Rs, and map to latitudes of observed Saturn aurora. (7) A gas cloud around Titan with dimensions > 1 Rs, with strong high ( 3200 km) altitude ENA emissions forms a continuous, asymmetric ``halo." (8) Titan's emission is centered on moon--hot plasma interaction with the exosphere; changing intensity depends on variable (x10-100) ion population and magnetic field orientation about Titan. (9) Upstream ion events have been measured to large (<50 to > 800 Rs) distances; several are enriched in oxygen ions, suggesting a magnetospheric origin. The observations will be presented and discussed in the context of current models of Saturn's magnetosphere.

  15. Electrostatic Charging of Insulating Rods and Resulting Particle Transport in the Columbia Non-neutral Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senter, Aaron; Rath, Nikolaus; Brenner, Paul; Sarasola, Xabier; Pedersen, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    The Columbia Non-neutral Torus (CNT) is a stellarator created to study non-neutral plasmas confined on magnetic surfaces. To create and diagnose the electron plasma, filaments supported by ceramic rods are inserted into the plasma. These rods charge negatively allowing particles to E xB drift across the confining magnetic surfaces and out of the plasma. A simple model of this process has yielded good qualitative agreement with experimentally observed radial transport[1]. However, when the rod is retracted, it perturbs the plasma more than expected. To better understand the rod perturbations, externally biased conducting rods are now being used. We find the effect of the ceramic rods by measuring the increase in filament emission current with a rod installed. Comparing the radial transport rates of the ceramic and conducting rods, we aim to understand the charge distribution on the former, and to minimize the rod driven transport. Initial experiments show that a uniformly biased rod does not reproduce the transport observed. Experiments using a rod with a varying radial potential profile are being conducted and will be reported on. [1] J.W. Berkery et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 062503 (2007).

  16. Mass analysis of neutral particles and ions released during electrical breakdowns on spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1983-01-01

    A specialized spectrometer was designed and developed to measure the mass and velocity distributions of neutral particles (molecules and molecular clusters) released from metal-backed Teflon and Kapton films. Promising results were obtained with an insulation breakdown initiation system based on a moveable contact touching the insulated surfaces. A variable energy, high voltage pulse is applied to the contact. The resulting surface damage sites can be made similar in size and shape to those produced by a high voltage electron beam system operating at similar discharge energies. The point discharge apparatus was used for final development of several high speed recording systems and for measurements of the composition of the materials given off by the discharge. Results with this apparatus show evolution of large amounts of fluorocarbon fragments from discharge through Teflon FEP, while discharges through Kapton produce mainly very light hydrocarbon fragments at masses below about 80 a.m.u.

  17. On Influence of Neutrals on Dust Particle Charging in Complex Plasmas in the Presence of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, S. I.; Morzhakova, A. A.; Popel, S. I.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-11-29

    Effects associated with neutral component of complex (dusty) ionospheric plasmas which affect dust particle charging are studied. Microscopic ion currents on dust particles with taking into account ion-neutral interaction are presented. Calculations are performed both for the case of negative charges of dust particles, when the influence of Solar radiation on dust particle charging processes is negligible, and for the case of positive charges which is realized in the presence of sufficiently intensive UV or X-ray radiation. We also carry out investigation of the electron heating due to the photoelectric effect. We show that the efficiency of electron heating depends on the density of neutral component of the plasma. As result, we determine altitudes where the influence of the neutral plasma component on dust particle charging processes as well as the electron heating effect are significant and should be taken into account under consideration of the ionospheric complex plasmas. In particular, we show that the effects considered could be important for the description of noctilucent clouds, polar mesosphere summer echoes, and some other physical phenomena associated with dust particles in the ionosphere.

  18. Polarization of the Sigma Minus Hyperon Produced by a Polarized Neutral Particle Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, An Nhatton

    A spin transfer technique has been tried in an attempt to produce a beam of polarized hyperons. The method makes use of a two-stage targeting scheme where unpolarized protons from Fermilab's Tevatron incident on target number one (Cu) at production angles of +/-2.0 mrad would produce a beam of particles containing polarized Lambdas and Xis as well as neutrons and Ks. This secondary beam would then be swept magnetically to retain only neutral particles and brought to bear on target number two (Cu) at 0.0 mrad, producing a tertiary beam of hyperons. The polarization of some 1.3 millions reconstructed Sigma^{-} to npi^{-} events in this tertiary beam (the Sigma^{ -} having been produced in the inclusive reaction neutrals + Cu to Sigma^{ -} + X) has been measured at average Sigma^{-} momenta 320 GeV/c (1.14 millions events) and 410 GeV/c (135,000 events) and found to be |P| = 3.9 +/- 3.2 +/- 1.8% and |P| = 13.9 +/- 8.1 +/- 2.0% respectively, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. These polarizations are small and consistent with zero, and preclude a meaningful measurement of the Sigma^{-} magnetic moment by the spin precession method. The sign of the polarizations at the target is ambiguous, giving rise to two possible different solutions for the magnetic moment--one of which distinctly disagrees with the world average value for the moment. However, this solution fits the data slightly better than the other. This inconsistency would not exist if the polarization is, in fact, zero.

  19. How to reliably detect molecular clusters and nucleation mode particles with Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, Hanna E.; Mirme, Sander; Mirme, Aadu; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-08-01

    To understand the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation and growth processes, information on the size where the atmospheric nucleation and cluster activation occurs, is crucially needed. The current understanding of the concentrations and dynamics of charged and neutral clusters and particles is based on theoretical predictions and experimental observations. This paper gives a standard operation procedure (SOP) for Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) measurements and data processing. With the NAIS data, we have improved the scientific understanding by (1) direct detection of freshly formed atmospheric clusters and particles, (2) linking experimental observations and theoretical framework to understand the formation and growth mechanisms of aerosol particles, and (3) parameterizing formation and growth mechanisms for atmospheric models. The SOP provides tools to harmonize the world-wide measurements of small clusters and nucleation mode particles and to verify consistent results measured by the NAIS users. The work is based on discussions and interactions between the NAIS users and the NAIS manufacturer.

  20. Correlations of neutral and charged particles in 40Ar- 58Ni reaction at 77 MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosińska, K.; Pluta, J.; Hanappe, F.; Stuttge, L.; Angelique, J. C.; Benoit, B.; de Goes Brennand, E.; Bizard, G.; Colin, J.; Costa, G.; Desesquelles, P.; Dorvaux, O.; Durand, D.; Erazmus, B.; Kuleshov, S.; Lednicky, R.; Marques, M.; Materna, Th.; Mikhailov, K.; Papatheofanous, G.; Pawlak, T.; Staranowicz, A.; Stavinskiy, A.; Tamain, B.; Vlasov, A.; Vorobyev, L.

    2007-04-01

    The measurement of the two-particle correlation function for different particle species allows to obtain information about the development of the particle emission process: the space-time properties of emitting sources and the emission time sequence of different particles. The single-particle characteristics and two-particle correlation functions for neutral and charged particles registered in forward direction are used to determine that the heavy fragments (deuterons and tritons) are emitted in the first stage of the reaction (pre-equilibrium source) while the majority of neutrons and protons originates from the long-lived quasi-projectile. The emission time sequence of protons, neutrons and deuterons has been obtained from the analysis of non-identical particle correlation functions.

  1. Spectra of accelerated particles at supernova shocks in the presence of neutral hydrogen: the case of Tycho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlino, G.; Blasi, P.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The presence of neutral hydrogen in the shock proximity changes the structure of the shock and affects the spectra of particles accelerated through the first-order Fermi mechanism. This phenomenon has profound implications for the interpretation of the multifrequency spectra of radiation from supernova remnants. Aims: Neutrals that undergo charge exchange with hot ions downstream of the shock may result in fast neutrals moving towards the upstream gas, where they can suffer additional charge exchange or ionisation reactions, thereby depositing energy and momentum upstream. Here we discuss the implications of this neutral return flux, which was already predicted in our previous work on neutral mediated supernova shocks, and show how the spectra of accelerated particles turn out to be appreciably steeper than p-4, thereby affecting the gamma ray spectra from supernova remnants in general and from Tycho specifically. Methods: The theory that describes non-linear diffusive shock acceleration in the presence of neutral hydrogen has been developed in recent years. Here we use a semi-analytical theory developed in previous work and specialise our predictions to the case of the Tycho supernova shock, where there is evidence from gamma ray observations that the spectrum of the parent cosmic rays is steeper than expected from the traditional theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Results: We show that, if the fraction of neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of the Tycho supernova shock is, as suggested by observations, ~70-90%, then spectra of accelerated protons steeper than p-4 may be a natural consequence of charge exchange reactions and the associated neutral return flux. The spectral shape is affected by this phenomenon for particles with energies below ~100-1000 GeV, for which the diffusion length is less than or at most comparable to the path length of charge exchange and ionisation upstream of the shock.

  2. Off-axis Neutral Beam Current Drive for Advanced Scenario Development in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M; Park, J; Petty, C; Luce, T; Heidbrink, W; Osborne, T; Wade, M; Austin, M; Brooks, N; Budny, R; Challis, C; DeBoo, J; deGrassie, J; Ferron, J; Gohil, P; Hobirk, J; Holcomb, C; Hollmann, E; Hong, R; Hyatt, A; Lohr, J; Lanctot, M; Makowski, M; McCune, D; Politzer, P; Prater, R; John, H S; Suzuki, T; West, W; Unterberg, E; Van Zeeland, M; Yu, J

    2008-10-13

    Modification of the two existing DIII-D neutral beam lines is proposed to allow vertical steering to provide off-axis neutral beam current drive (NBCD) as far off-axis as half the plasma radius. New calculations indicate very good current drive with good localization off-axis as long as the toroidal magnetic field, B{sub T}, and the plasma current, I{sub p}, are in the same direction (for a beam steered downward). The effects of helicity can be large: e.g., ITER off-axis NBCD can be increased by more than 20% if the B{sub T} direction is reversed. This prediction has been tested by an off-axis NBCD experiment using reduced size plasmas that are vertically shifted with the existing NBI on DIII-D. The existence of off-axis NBCD is evident in sawtooth and internal inductance behavior. By shifting the plasma upward or downward, or by changing the sign of the toroidal field, measured off-axis NBCD profiles, determined from MSE data, are consistent with predicted differences (40%-45%) arising from the NBI orientation with respect to the magnetic field lines. Modification of the DIII-D NB system will strongly support scenario development for ITER and future tokamaks as well as providing flexible scientific tools for understanding transport, energetic particles and heating and current drive.

  3. Poiseuille flow of a mixture of neutrally buoyant particles in a fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Reinerrsman, P.N.

    1988-01-01

    Constitutive equations are given for the stress, couple stress, and interphase momentum transfer in a mixture consisting of neutrally buoyant particles in a fluid. The interphase momentum transfer terms include objective expressions quantifying Stokes; drag, Faxen force, shear life, Magnus lift, and rotational drag. Coefficients of the drag and lift terms are deduced from macroscopic theory. The viscosity of the solid phase and the cross viscosities are estimated to coincide with previous work in micropolar flow theory. The resulting equations of motion are solved numerically for this general model and for the subset of this model which complies with the principle of phase separation. These solutions are compared with the flows predicted by micropolar theory. Although the micropolar theory may provide a good approximation for multiphase flow in some regimes, micropolar theory cannot model the phase velocity differences and volume fraction gradients that occur in high pressure, small channel flow. The effect of controlling the boundary values of particle and fluid spin is investigated, including the effect of back spin and symmetric spin.

  4. Turbulent channel flow laden with finite-size neutrally-buoyant particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picano, Francesco; Breugem, Wim-Paul; Brandt, Luca

    2014-11-01

    Dense suspensions are widely encountered in many applications and in environmental flows. While their rheological features in laminar flows have been longly studied, much less is known on their behavior in turbulent/inertial regime. The present works aims to fill this gap by investigating the turbulent channel flow of a Newtonian fluid laden with rigid neutrally-buoyant spheres at relatively high volume fractions. An Immersed Boundary Method has been used to account for the phase interaction performing Direct Numerical Simulation in the range of volume fractions Φ = 0 - 0 . 2 and a typical particle radius of 10 wall units. The results show that the mean velocity profiles are significantly altered by the presence of a solid phase with a decrease of the von Karman constant in the log-law. The overall drag is found to monotonically increase with the volume fraction. At the highest volume fraction here investigated, Φ = 0 . 2 , the velocity fluctuation intensities and the Reynolds shear stress are found to decrease. The analysis of the mean momentum balance shows that the particle-induced stresses govern the dynamics in the dense cases and are responsible of the the overall drag increase since the turbulent shear stress is reduced with respect the unladen case. This work was supported by the European Research Council Grant No. ERC-2013-CoG-616186, TRITOS.

  5. Advanced visualization technology for terascale particle accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, K-L; Schussman, G.; Wilson, B.; Ko, K.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.

    2002-11-16

    This paper presents two new hardware-assisted rendering techniques developed for interactive visualization of the terascale data generated from numerical modeling of next generation accelerator designs. The first technique, based on a hybrid rendering approach, makes possible interactive exploration of large-scale particle data from particle beam dynamics modeling. The second technique, based on a compact texture-enhanced representation, exploits the advanced features of commodity graphics cards to achieve perceptually effective visualization of the very dense and complex electromagnetic fields produced from the modeling of reflection and transmission properties of open structures in an accelerator design. Because of the collaborative nature of the overall accelerator modeling project, the visualization technology developed is for both desktop and remote visualization settings. We have tested the techniques using both time varying particle data sets containing up to one billion particle s per time step and electromagnetic field data sets with millions of mesh elements.

  6. Middle atmospheric ion chemistry during energetic particle events, and impacts on the neutral chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnhuber, M.; Winkler, H.; Wieters, N.; Kazeminejad, S.; Wissing, J. M.; Kallenrode, M.-B.; Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.

    2009-04-01

    It is well established that solar proton events (SPEs) are sources of distinct chemical disturbances in the Earth's polar atmosphere. While the observed SPE caused production of NOx, and the subsequent destruction of ozone can be reproduces quite well by atmospheric models using basic parametrizations for NOx and HOx release as a function of the particle impact ionisation rate, there are significant differences between measurements and model predictions concerning several other chemical compounds. For instance, during the October 2003 SPE, measurements of a number of species were obtained from the MIPAS instrument on-board the ENVISAT satellite. These measurements show significant enhancements of HNO3 and N2O5 as well as an increase of several chlorine species, i.e., ClO, HOCl and ClONO2. Atmospheric models cannot reproduce these chemical effects if only production of NOx and HOx is considered. The impact of positive and negative ion chemistry on the neutral composition of the middle atmosphere is investigated combining model results from the University of Bremen Ion Chemistry model UBIC with different neutral stratosphere-mesosphere models, particularly the new Bremen three-dimensional Chemistry and Transport model of the middle atmosphere. Focus of the investigation will be the impact of negative ion chemistry on the activation of chlorine radicals, and on the partitioning of NOy species. Model results will be compared to measurement data of different satellite instruments (HALOE, MIPAS, MLS) for several large SPEs (e.g., the July 2000, Oct/Nov 2003, and January 2005 events) to show that the observed chlorine activation and the increase of HNO3 can be reproduced much better if full negative ion chemistry is considered additionally to the NOx and HOx production.

  7. Recent advances in the Mercury Monte Carlo particle transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P. S.; Dawson, S. A.; McKinley, M. S.; O'Brien, M. J.; Stevens, D. E.; Beck, B. R.; Jurgenson, E. D.; Ebbers, C. A.; Hall, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    We review recent physics and computational science advances in the Mercury Monte Carlo particle transport code under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We describe recent efforts to enable a nuclear resonance fluorescence capability in the Mercury photon transport. We also describe recent work to implement a probability of extinction capability into Mercury. We review the results of current parallel scaling and threading efforts that enable the code to run on millions of MPI processes. (authors)

  8. MULTIDIMENSIONAL COUPLED PHOTON-ELECTRON TRANSPORT SIMULATIONS USING NEUTRAL PARTICLE SN CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan; Williams, Mark L; Peplow, Douglas E.; Kirk, Bernadette Lugue

    2008-01-01

    During the past two years a study was underway at ORNL to assess the suitability of the popular SN neutral particle codes ANISN, DORT and TORT for coupled photon-electron calculations specific to external beam therapy of medical physics applications. The CEPXS-BFP code was used to generate the cross sections. The computational tests were performed on phantoms typical of those used in medical physics for external beam therapy, with materials simulated by water at different densities and the comparisons were made against Monte Carlo simulations that served as benchmarks. Although the results for one-dimensional calculations were encouraging, it appeared that the higher dimensional transport codes had fundamental difficulties in handling the electron transport. The results of two-dimensional simulations using the code DORT with an S16 fully symmetric quadrature set agree fairly with the reference Monte Carlo results but not well enough for clinical applications. While the photon fluxes are in better agreement (generally, within less than 5% from the reference), the discrepancy increases, sometimes very significantly, for the electron fluxes. The paper, however, focuses on the results obtained with the three-dimensional code TORT which had convergence difficulties for the electron groups. Numerical instabilities occurred in these groups. These instabilities were more pronounced with the degree of anisotropy of the problem.

  9. Massive Vector Particles Tunneling from the Neutral Rotating Anti-de Sitter Black Holes in Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Zhao, Jun-Kun

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the massive vector particles' Hawking radiation from the neutral rotating Anti-de Sitter (AdS) black holes in conformal gravity by using the tunneling method. It is well known that the dynamics of massive vector particles are governed by the Proca field equation. Applying WKB approximation to the Proca equation, the tunneling probabilities and radiation spectrums of the emitted particles are derived. Hawking temperature of the neutral rotating AdS black holes in conformal gravity is recovered, which is consistent with the previous result in the literature. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11205048, and the Foundation for Young Key Teacher of Henan Normal University

  10. Meteor Smoke Particles in the D-Region Ionosphere - Implications from the Sic Model on Ions and Other Neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, C.; Rapp, M.; Verronen, P. T.; Enell, C. F. T.; Kero, A.

    2014-12-01

    Meteor smoke particles (MSP) play an important role in the aeronomy of the middle atmosphere as shown by satellite, groundbased and in-situ measurements. Especially the MSPs influence on the D-region charge balance has been studied recently by rocket borne measurements and a simplified ionospheric model. Here, the influence of MSP on the ionosphere and also the neutral atmosphere is studied within the complete chemistry of the Sodankylä Ion and Neutral Chemistry Model (SIC). The SIC model is a time dependent ionospheric model with 43 positive ion species, 29 negative ion species and 15 neutral species. In addition the output of an aerosol microphysics model is used to initialize the MSP distribution. The chemistry of these ions and neutrals is realised through more than 300 different reactions, e.g. photoionization, electron-ion recombination and ion-neutral interaction. The interaction between MSP and the charged components of the SIC model is expressed by MSP size dependent capture rates. By implementing MSP as new components into the reaction scheme of the SIC-model we can identify their influence on both, the D-region ionosphere and the neutral mesosphere. This influence is studied during polar night were electrons are effectively captured between 80 and 100 km. This lack of electrons causes an increase of positive ion numberdensity due to reduced electron-ion recombination. We concentrate in this paper on the changes in the negative and positive ion chemistry due to the presence of MSP.

  11. Neutral hydrogen shell structure near Comet P/Halley deduced from Vega-1 and Giotto energetic particle data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verigin, M. I.; McKenna-Lawlor, S.; Richter, A. K.; Szego, K.; Veselovskii, I. S.

    An existing model based on Vega-1 (Tunde-M) and Giotto (EPONA) energetic particle data, representing neutral gas shells expanding about Comet Halley, has been updated by incorporating additional information concerning energetic particles recorded by Tunde-M, and neutral gas measurements recorded aboard the Vega-1 and Vega-2 spacecraft, in the original data set. The modified model reproduces reasonably well the positions of the maxima in the intensity profiles of energetic cometary ions observed along the Vega and Giotto trajectories, and it is estimated that the velocity of gas in the envisioned neutral shells is about 7.3 km/s, i.e., close to the velocity (about 8 km/s) of the slow hydrogen component of cometary neutrals. Detailed arguments are presented to support the suggestion that, at distances of 2-10 x exp 6 km from the comet nucleus, the energetic particles recorded in the quasi-periodic structures identified by the Tunde-M and EPONA instruments were protons.

  12. Enveloped Virus-Like Particle Expression of Human Cytomegalovirus Glycoprotein B Antigen Induces Antibodies with Potent and Broad Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kirchmeier, Marc; Fluckiger, Anne-Catherine; Soare, Catalina; Bozic, Jasminka; Ontsouka, Barthelemy; Ahmed, Tanvir; Diress, Abebaw; Pereira, Lenore; Schödel, Florian; Plotkin, Stanley; Dalba, Charlotte; Klatzmann, David

    2014-01-01

    A prophylactic vaccine to prevent the congenital transmission of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in newborns and to reduce life-threatening disease in immunosuppressed recipients of HCMV-infected solid organ transplants is highly desirable. Neutralizing antibodies against HCMV confer significant protection against infection, and glycoprotein B (gB) is a major target of such neutralizing antibodies. However, one shortcoming of past HCMV vaccines may have been their failure to induce high-titer persistent neutralizing antibody responses that prevent the infection of epithelial cells. We used enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs), in which particles were produced in cells after the expression of murine leukemia virus (MLV) viral matrix protein Gag, to express either full-length CMV gB (gB eVLPs) or the full extracellular domain of CMV gB fused with the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G protein (gB-G eVLPs). gB-G-expressing eVLPs induced potent neutralizing antibodies in mice with a much greater propensity toward epithelial cell-neutralizing activity than that induced with soluble recombinant gB protein. An analysis of gB antibody binding titers and T-helper cell responses demonstrated that high neutralizing antibody titers were not simply due to enhanced immunogenicity of the gB-G eVLPs. The cells transiently transfected with gB-G but not gB plasmid formed syncytia, consistent with a prefusion gB conformation like those of infected cells and viral particles. Two of the five gB-G eVLP-induced monoclonal antibodies we examined in detail had neutralizing activities, one of which possessed particularly potent epithelial cell-neutralizing activity. These data differentiate gB-G eVLPs from gB antigens used in the past and support their use in a CMV vaccine candidate with improved neutralizing activity against epithelial cell infection. PMID:24334684

  13. Enveloped virus-like particle expression of human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B antigen induces antibodies with potent and broad neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Kirchmeier, Marc; Fluckiger, Anne-Catherine; Soare, Catalina; Bozic, Jasminka; Ontsouka, Barthelemy; Ahmed, Tanvir; Diress, Abebaw; Pereira, Lenore; Schödel, Florian; Plotkin, Stanley; Dalba, Charlotte; Klatzmann, David; Anderson, David E

    2014-02-01

    A prophylactic vaccine to prevent the congenital transmission of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in newborns and to reduce life-threatening disease in immunosuppressed recipients of HCMV-infected solid organ transplants is highly desirable. Neutralizing antibodies against HCMV confer significant protection against infection, and glycoprotein B (gB) is a major target of such neutralizing antibodies. However, one shortcoming of past HCMV vaccines may have been their failure to induce high-titer persistent neutralizing antibody responses that prevent the infection of epithelial cells. We used enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs), in which particles were produced in cells after the expression of murine leukemia virus (MLV) viral matrix protein Gag, to express either full-length CMV gB (gB eVLPs) or the full extracellular domain of CMV gB fused with the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G protein (gB-G eVLPs). gB-G-expressing eVLPs induced potent neutralizing antibodies in mice with a much greater propensity toward epithelial cell-neutralizing activity than that induced with soluble recombinant gB protein. An analysis of gB antibody binding titers and T-helper cell responses demonstrated that high neutralizing antibody titers were not simply due to enhanced immunogenicity of the gB-G eVLPs. The cells transiently transfected with gB-G but not gB plasmid formed syncytia, consistent with a prefusion gB conformation like those of infected cells and viral particles. Two of the five gB-G eVLP-induced monoclonal antibodies we examined in detail had neutralizing activities, one of which possessed particularly potent epithelial cell-neutralizing activity. These data differentiate gB-G eVLPs from gB antigens used in the past and support their use in a CMV vaccine candidate with improved neutralizing activity against epithelial cell infection. PMID:24334684

  14. Secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS)-recent methodical progress and applications to fundamental studies in particle/surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oechsner, Hans

    1995-05-01

    Recent instrumental developments of the conventional secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) technique based on electron gas post-ionization are described with regard to its application to non-conducting samples and its implementation in a novel secondary neutral microprobe. The use of molecular SNMS signals for quantitative surface analysis, and a standard free technique for absolute depth calibration from the mass spectrometric signals are discussed and elucidated by appropriate examples. Finally, some applications of electron gas SNMS to fundamental studies on low energy particle/surface interaction are presented.

  15. Lattice summations for spread out particles: applications to neutral and charged systems.

    PubMed

    Heyes, D M; Brańka, A C

    2013-01-21

    This work is concerned with the lattice energy of periodic assemblies of mass and charge distributions of the form, exp (-αp(2)), where α is an adjustable positive variable and p(̱) is the vector from the lattice site or average position. The energy of interaction between two distributions is the density-weighted integral of the interactions between the volume elements of each distribution. Reciprocal space lattice summation formulas derived for particles represented by gaussian smeared-out density distributions are applied to the gaussian potential and a bounded version of the soft-sphere potential for a range of exponents. Two types of spatial broadening are considered, continuous or physical broadening (PB) and broadening resulting from the time average of point particle positions, so-called "time" broadening (TB). For neutral mass distributions a reciprocal space lattice summation formula is derived which is applied to the bounded soft-sphere potential. For the charged systems, the methodology described in Heyes [J. Chem. Phys. 74, 1924 (1981)] is used, which for the PB case gives the Ewald-like formulas derived by Gingrich and Wilson [Chem. Phys. Lett. 500, 178 (2010)] using a different method. Another expression for the lattice energy of the spread out charge distributions is derived which is cast entirely in terms of a summation over the reciprocal lattice vectors, without the arbitrary charge spreading function used in the Ewald method. The effects of charge spreading on a generalized definition of the Madelung constant (M) for a selection of crystal lattices are shown to be insignificant for route mean square displacements up to values typical of melting of an ionic crystal. When the length scale of the charge distribution becomes comparable to or greater than the mean inter particle spacing, however, the effects of charge broadening on the lattice energy are shown to be significant. In the PB case, M → 0 for the uniform charge density or α → 0

  16. Characterization of the interactions within fine particle mixtures in highly concentrated suspensions for advanced particle processing.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Akira; Bryant, Gary

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to summarize recent investigations into the dispersion of fine particles, and the characterization of their interactions, in concentrated suspensions. This summary will provide a better understanding of the current status of this research, and will provide useful feedback for advanced particle processing. Such processes include the fabrication of functional nanostructures and the sustainable beneficiation of complex ores. For example, there has been increasing demand for complex ore utilization due to the noticeable decrease in the accessibility of high grade and easily extractable ores. In order to maintain the sustainable use of mineral resources, the effective beneficiation of complex ores is urgently required. It can be successfully achieved only with selective particle/mineral dispersion/liberation and the assistance of mineralogical and particle characterization. PMID:26298173

  17. Angular-divergence calculation for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak neutral beam injection ion source based on spectroscopic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Yuan; Hu, Chundong; Zhuang, Ge

    2014-02-15

    Calorimetric method has been primarily applied for several experimental campaigns to determine the angular divergence of high-current ion source for the neutral beam injection system on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). A Doppler shift spectroscopy has been developed to provide the secondary measurement of the angular divergence to improve the divergence measurement accuracy and for real-time and non-perturbing measurement. The modified calculation model based on the W7AS neutral beam injectors is adopted to accommodate the slot-type accelerating grids used in the EAST's ion source. Preliminary spectroscopic experimental results are presented comparable to the calorimetrically determined value of theoretical calculation.

  18. Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles in afterglow in neon at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejović, Milić M.; Nešić, Nikola T.; Pejović, Momčilo M.

    2014-04-01

    Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles formed during breakdown and successive discharge in neon-filled tube at 6.6 millibars pressure had been analyzed. This analysis was performed on the basis of mean value of electrical breakdown time delay t¯d dependence on afterglow period τ (memory curve). It was shown that positive ions are present in the 1μs < τ < 30 ms interval, which is manifested through t ¯d slow increase with the increase of τ. A rapid t¯d increase in the 30 ms < τ < 3 s interval is a consequence of significant decrease of positive ions concentration and dominant role in breakdown initiation have ground state nitrogen atoms, which further release secondary electrons from the cathode by catalytic recombination process. These atoms are formed during discharge by dissociation of ground state nitrogen molecules that are present as impurities in neon. For τ > 3 s, breakdown is initiated by cosmic rays and natural radioactivity. The increase of discharge current leads to decrease of t¯d due to the increase of positive ions concentration in inter electrode gap. The increase of applied voltage also decreases t¯d for τ > 30 ms due to the increase of the probability for initial electron to initiate breakdown. The presence of UV radiation leads to the decrease of t¯d due to the increased electron yield caused by photoelectrons. The influence of photoelectrons on breakdown initiation can be noticed for τ > 0.1 ms, while they dominantly determine t¯d for τ > 30 ms.

  19. Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles in afterglow in neon at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Pejović, Milić M. Nešić, Nikola T.; Pejović, Momčilo M.

    2014-04-15

    Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles formed during breakdown and successive discharge in neon-filled tube at 6.6 millibars pressure had been analyzed. This analysis was performed on the basis of mean value of electrical breakdown time delay t{sup ¯}{sub d} dependence on afterglow period τ (memory curve). It was shown that positive ions are present in the 1μs < τ < 30 ms interval, which is manifested through t{sup ¯}{sub d} slow increase with the increase of τ. A rapid t{sup ¯}{sub d} increase in the 30 ms < τ < 3 s interval is a consequence of significant decrease of positive ions concentration and dominant role in breakdown initiation have ground state nitrogen atoms, which further release secondary electrons from the cathode by catalytic recombination process. These atoms are formed during discharge by dissociation of ground state nitrogen molecules that are present as impurities in neon. For τ > 3 s, breakdown is initiated by cosmic rays and natural radioactivity. The increase of discharge current leads to decrease of t{sup ¯}{sub d} due to the increase of positive ions concentration in inter electrode gap. The increase of applied voltage also decreases t{sup ¯}{sub d} for τ > 30 ms due to the increase of the probability for initial electron to initiate breakdown. The presence of UV radiation leads to the decrease of t{sup ¯}{sub d} due to the increased electron yield caused by photoelectrons. The influence of photoelectrons on breakdown initiation can be noticed for τ > 0.1 ms, while they dominantly determine t{sup ¯}{sub d} for τ > 30 ms.

  20. Production of energetic neutral particles and low energy electrons from four anode rods ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafa, O. A.; El-Khabeary, H.; Abdel Reheem, A. M.

    2013-11-15

    The factors affecting the energetic neutral current, the low energy electron current, and the positive ion current emerging from a four-anode-rods ion source have been studied using argon gas. The neutral and electron current were measured using a simple, new technique. It was found that the energetic neutral current and the electron current depend on the positive ion current and the gas pressure. The ratio of the neutral and electron current to the positive ion current increases by increasing the gas pressure. Also it was found that at a pressure equal to 9 × 10{sup −4} mmHg, the ratio of the neutral to the positive ion current reaches 2.34 while the ratio of the electron current to the positive ion current reaches 1.7.

  1. Data driven search in the displaced pair channel for a Higgs boson decaying to long-lived neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halyo, Valerie; Lou, Hou Keong; Lujan, Paul; Zhu, Wenhan

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a proposal for a new search channel for the Higgs boson decaying to two long-lived neutral particles, each of which decays to at a displaced vertex. The decay length considered is such that the decay takes place within the LHC beampipe. We present a new data-driven analysis using jet substructure and properties of the tracks from the highly-displaced vertices. We consider a model with a 125 GeV Higgs boson with a significant branching fraction to decay via this mode, with the long-lived neutral particle having a mass in the range of 15-40 GeV and a decay length commensurate with the beam pipe radius. Such a signal can be readily observed with an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1 at 8 TeV at the LHC.

  2. Collisionless tearing instability of a bi-Maxwellian neutral sheet - An integrodifferential treatment with exact particle orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Chen, J.

    1989-01-01

    The integrodifferential equation describing the linear tearing instability in the bi-Maxwellian neutral sheet is solved without approximating the particle orbits or the eigenfunction psi. Results of this calculation are presented. Comparison between the exact solution and the three-region approximation motivates the piecewise-straight-line approximation, a simplification that allows faster solution of the integrodifferential equation, yet retains the important features of the exact solution.

  3. A transmission/escape probabilities model for neutral particle transport in the outer regions of a diverted tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W.M.

    1992-12-01

    A new computational model for neutral particle transport in the outer regions of a diverted tokamak plasma chamber is presented. The model is based on the calculation of transmission and escape probabilities using first-flight integral transport theory and the balancing of fluxes across the surfaces bounding the various regions. The geometrical complexity of the problem is included in precomputed probabilities which depend only on the mean free path of the region.

  4. Orbital motion of dust particles in an rf magnetron discharge. Ion drag force or neutral atom wind force

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, A. F.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.; Dyatko, N. A.; Starostin, A. N.; Filippov, A. V.

    2012-03-15

    Microparticles with sizes up to 130 {mu}m have been confined and the velocity and diameter of particles in a plasma trap of an rf magnetron discharge with an arc magnetic field have been simultaneously measured. The motion of the gas induced by electron and ion cyclotron currents has been numerically simulated using the Navier-Stokes equation. The experimental and numerical results confirm the mechanism of the orbital motion of dust particles in the magnetron discharge plasma that is associated with the orbital motion of the neutral gas accelerated by electron and ion drift flows in crossed electric and magnetic fields.

  5. Modeling of Localized Neutral Particle Sources in 3D Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V; Rognlien, T D; Fenstermacher, M E; Borchardt, M; Mutzke, A; Riemann, J; Schneider, R; Owen, L W

    2002-05-23

    A new edge plasma code BoRiS [1] has a fully 3D fluid plasma model. We supplement BoRiS with a 3D fluid neutral model including equations for parallel momentum and collisional perpendicular diffusion. This makes BoRiS an integrated plasma-neutral model suitable for a variety of applications. We present modeling results for a localized gas source in the geometry of the NCSX stellarator.

  6. The motion of a neutrally buoyant particle of an elliptic shape in two dimensional shear flow: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Lin; Chen, Shih-Di; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Chu, Chin-Chou

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we investigate the motion of a neutrally buoyant particle of an elliptic shape freely moving in two dimensional shear flow by direct numerical simulation. An elliptic shape particle in shear flow, when initially being placed at the middle between two walls, either keeps rotating or has a stationary inclination angle depending on the particle Reynolds number R e = G r ra 2 / ν , where Gr is the shear rate, ra is the semi-long axis of the elliptic particle, and ν is the kinetic viscosity of the fluid. The critical particle Reynolds number Recr for the transition from a rotating motion to a stationary orientation depends on the aspect ratio AR = rb/ra and the confined ratio K = 2ra/H, where rb is the semi-short axis of the elliptic particle and H is the distance between two walls. Although the increasing of either parameters makes an increase in Recr, the dynamic mechanism is distinct. The AR variation causes the change of geometry shape; however, the K variation influences the wall effect. The stationary inclination angle of non-rotating slender elliptic particle with smaller confined ratio seems to depend only on the value of Re - Recr. An expected equilibrium position of the particle mass center in shear flow is the centerline between two walls. When placing the particle away from the centerline initially, it migrates either toward an equilibrium height away from the middle between two walls or back to the middle depending on the confined ratio and particle Reynolds number; but for higher particle Reynolds numbers, besides the previous two positions, the elliptic particle placed close to the middle just moves parallel to the wall with a stationary orientation.

  7. Synergism between low-energy neutral particles and energetic ions in the pulsed glow discharge deposition of diamond-like carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev-Charkin, I. V.; Nastasi, M.

    2004-08-01

    Diamond-like carbon films were deposited using pulsed glow discharge deposition at 4kV. The duty factor was varied and all other parameters were kept constant. It was shown that the contribution of neutral particles to the total number of deposition atoms is much larger than that of energetic ions. At the same time, there is a relationship between the deposition of neutral particles and ion bombardment. The sticking coefficient of the neutral particles in proportional to the flux of energetic ions and does not exceed 5×10-4 for the deposition parameters used in our experiment.

  8. Pseudovirion Particles Bearing Native HIV Envelope Trimers Facilitate a Novel Method for Generating Human Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies against HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hicar, Mark D.; Chen, Xuemin; Briney, Bryan; Hammonds, Jason; Wang, Jaang-Jiun; Kalams, Spyros; Spearman, Paul W.; Crowe, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Monomeric HIV envelope vaccines fail to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or to protect against infection. Neutralizing antibodies against HIV bind to native, functionally active Env trimers on the virion surface. Gag-Env pseudovirions recapitulate the native trimer, and could serve as an effective epitope presentation platform for study of the neutralizing antibody response in HIV-infected individuals. To address if pseudovirions can recapitulate native HIV virion epitope structures, we carefully characterized these particles, concentrating on the antigenic structure of the coreceptor binding site. By blue native gel shift assays, Gag-Env pseudovirions were shown to contain native trimers that were competent for binding to neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. In ELISA, pseudovirions exhibited increased binding of known CD4-induced antibodies following addition of CD4. Using flow cytometric analysis, fluorescently labeled pseudovirions specifically identified a subset of antigen-specific B cells in HIV-infected subjects. Interestingly, the sequence of one of these novel human antibodies, identified during cloning of single HIV-specific B cells and designated 2C6, exhibited homology to mAb 47e, a known anti-CD4-induced coreceptor binding site antibody. The secreted monoclonal antibody 2C6 did not bind monomeric gp120, but specifically bound envelope on pseudovirions. A recombinant form of the antibody 2C6 acted as a CD4-induced epitope-specific antibody in neutralization assays, yet did not bind monomeric gp120. These findings imply specificity against a quaternary epitope presented on the pseudovirion envelope spike. These data demonstrate that Gag-Env pseudovirions recapitulate CD4 and coreceptor binding pocket antigenic structures and can facilitate identification of B cell clones that secrete neutralizing antibodies. PMID:20531016

  9. Calculation of low-Z impurity pellet induced fluxes of charge exchange neutral particles escaping from magnetically confined toroidal plasmas.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, P R; Ozaki, T; Sudo, S; Tamura, N; Tolstikhina, I Yu; Sergeev, V Yu

    2008-10-01

    Measurements of energy- and time-resolved neutral hydrogen and helium fluxes from an impurity pellet ablation cloud, referred to as pellet charge exchange or PCX experiments, can be used to study local fast ion energy distributions in fusion plasmas. The estimation of the local distribution function f(i)(E) of fast ions entering the cloud requires knowledge of both the fraction F(0)(E) of incident ions exiting the cloud as neutral atoms and the attenuation factor A(E,rho) describing the loss of fast atoms in the plasma. Determination of A(E,rho), in turn, requires the total stopping cross section sigma(loss) of neutral atoms in the plasma and the Jacobian reflecting the measurement geometry and the magnetic surface shape. The obtained functions F(0)(E) and A(E,rho) enter multiplicatively into the probability density for escaping neutral particle kinetic energy. A general calculation scheme has been developed and realized as a FORTRAN code, which is to be applied for the calculation of f(i)(E) from PCX experimental results obtained with low-Z impurity pellets. PMID:19044625

  10. Ion and neutral particle emission from polytetrafluoroethyene under 157-nm irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, Stephen; John, Sharon; Dickinson, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PFTE) is an important electronic material. Interactions with 157-nm laser radiation are of interest in the deposition and patterning of thin films of PTFE and similar materials. We have characterized the desorption of neutral and charged species from PTFE surfaces during 157-nm irradiation by time-resolved quadrupole mass spectroscopy. The principal neutral species are (CF2)x units. The neutral time-of-flight signals have a fast component with kinetic energies on the order of an eV, consistent with direct photochemical emission. These energetic neutrals are presumably created by scission of the C-C backbone by UV excitation. Slower neutral emissions are consistent with thermal emission from the surface at temperatures of several hundred kelvin above ambient. Much of the slower emission is attributed to thermally activated unzipping of the polymer backbone after photoelectronic scission. The principal positive and negative ions are C^+ and F^-. A large number of positive and negative charges are electrostatically coupled and travel together until separated by the electric fields of the mass filter.

  11. Study of nanoscale structural biology using advanced particle beam microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boseman, Adam J.

    This work investigates developmental and structural biology at the nanoscale using current advancements in particle beam microscopy. Typically the examination of micro- and nanoscale features is performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in order to decrease surface charging, and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface. As magnification increases, this layer begins to limit the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. A new technology, Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), is used to examine uncoated surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant fruit flies. Corneal nanostructures observed with HIM are further investigated by FIB/SEM to provide detailed three dimensional information about internal events occurring during early structural development. These techniques are also used to reconstruct a mosquito germarium in order to characterize unknown events in early oogenesis. Findings from these studies, and many more like them, will soon unravel many of the mysteries surrounding the world of developmental biology.

  12. Relativistic quantum dynamics of a neutral particle in external electric fields: An approach on effects of spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, F. S.; Silva, Edilberto O.; Castro, Luis B.; Filgueiras, Cleverson; Cogollo, D.

    2015-11-01

    The planar quantum dynamics of a spin-1/2 neutral particle interacting with electrical fields is considered. A set of first order differential equations is obtained directly from the planar Dirac equation with nonminimum coupling. New solutions of this system, in particular, for the Aharonov-Casher effect, are found and discussed in detail. Pauli equation is also obtained by studying the motion of the particle when it describes a circular path of constant radius. We also analyze the planar dynamics in the full space, including the r = 0 region. The self-adjoint extension method is used to obtain the energy levels and wave functions of the particle for two particular values for the self-adjoint extension parameter. The energy levels obtained are analogous to the Landau levels and explicitly depend on the spin projection parameter.

  13. Development of thin foils for use in generating neutral particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, W.S.; Zevenbergen, L.A.; Adair, H.L.; Culpepper, C.A.; McCulla, W.H.; Nolan, T.A.; Hughes, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML) was requested to prepare large-area, ultrathin aluminum and carbon foils for use in beam neutralization experiments. There were two major parts to this request. The first was to immediately provide a number of 5-cm-dia foils 5 to 20 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ thick for use in experiments at the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility and at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The second, longer-term request was to develop methods to prepare 25-cm x 25-cm, 10-..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ aluminum neutralizer foils. Both parts of the request have been successfully met.

  14. First Measurements of Neutral Atmospheric Cluster and 1–2 nm Particle Number Size Distributions During Nucleation Events

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Kuang, C.; Zhao, J.; Chen, M.; Eisele, F. L.; Scheckman, J.; Williams, B. J.; McMurry, P. H.

    2011-02-01

    Recent observations throughout the atmosphere have shown that nucleation occurs frequently (Kulmala et al. 2004). Modeling studies and observations have shown that nucleated particles contribute significantly to concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (Spracklen et al. 2008), thereby affecting climate (IPCC 2007). Size-resolved measurements extending down to molecular dimensions can provide information on processes that lead to nucleation and would enable development and verification of theories for particle nucleation and growth in the atmosphere and other aerosol systems. This article describes measurements of the complete number size distribution, spanning the size range from vapor molecules and molecular clusters to submicrometer particles, during atmospheric nucleation events. The measurements used two new instruments, the cluster chemical ionization mass spectrometer (Cluster CIMS) and the DEG SMPS. The Cluster CIMS measures neutral molecular clusters from 50 to 900 amu. The DEG SMPS is a scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS) equipped with a diethylene glycol (DEG)-based condensation particle counter (CPC) capable of 1.1 nm mobility diameter particle detection, and overlapping the sizes detected by the Cluster CIMS (Iida et al. 2009; Jiang et al. 2011). The Cluster CIMS distinguishes neutral clusters from ions formed by ion-induced clustering by varying the reaction time for ions with the sampled air (Zhao et al. 2010). It distinguishes clusters from high molecular weight gases by measuring the incremental signal at a specified mass detected during nucleation events. The clusters that were measured in this study contain sulfuric acid, which is known to participate in atmospheric nucleation (Kuang et al. 2008).

  15. Registration characteristics of neutral particles with power 0.6 - 2.0 keV channel electron multiplier with funnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, M. A.; Kalinin, A. P.

    1978-01-01

    Operating a channel electron multiplier with a VEU-6 funnel shaped opening is studied. Different procedures were used when recording neutral particles. The results obtained make it possible to optimally use the multiplier in actual physical studies.

  16. Weibel and Two-Stream Instabilities for Intense Charged Particle Beam Propagation through Neutralizing Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald C. Davidson; Igor Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev

    2004-04-09

    Properties of the multi-species electromagnetic Weibel and electrostatic two-stream instabilities are investigated for an intense ion beam propagating through background plasma. Assuming that the background plasma electrons provide complete charge and current neutralization, detailed linear stability properties are calculated within the framework of a macroscopic cold-fluid model for a wide range of system parameters.

  17. A new compact solid-state neutral particle analyser at ASDEX Upgrade: Setup and physics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P. A.; Blank, H.; Geiger, B.; Mank, K.; Martinov, S.; Ryter, F.; Weiland, M.; Weller, A.

    2015-07-01

    At ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), a new compact solid-state detector has been installed to measure the energy spectrum of fast neutrals based on the principle described by Shinohara et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3640 (2004)]. The diagnostic relies on the usual charge exchange of supra-thermal fast-ions with neutrals in the plasma. Therefore, the measured energy spectra directly correspond to those of confined fast-ions with a pitch angle defined by the line of sight of the detector. Experiments in AUG showed the good signal to noise characteristics of the detector. It is energy calibrated and can measure energies of 40-200 keV with count rates of up to 140 kcps. The detector has an active view on one of the heating beams. The heating beam increases the neutral density locally; thereby, information about the central fast-ion velocity distribution is obtained. The measured fluxes are modeled with a newly developed module for the 3D Monte Carlo code F90FIDASIM [Geiger et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 65010 (2011)]. The modeling allows to distinguish between the active (beam) and passive contributions to the signal. Thereby, the birth profile of the measured fast neutrals can be reconstructed. This model reproduces the measured energy spectra with good accuracy when the passive contribution is taken into account.

  18. A new compact solid-state neutral particle analyser at ASDEX Upgrade: Setup and physics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, P. A.; Blank, H.; Geiger, B.; Mank, K.; Martinov, S.; Ryter, F.; Weiland, M.; Weller, A.

    2015-07-15

    At ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), a new compact solid-state detector has been installed to measure the energy spectrum of fast neutrals based on the principle described by Shinohara et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3640 (2004)]. The diagnostic relies on the usual charge exchange of supra-thermal fast-ions with neutrals in the plasma. Therefore, the measured energy spectra directly correspond to those of confined fast-ions with a pitch angle defined by the line of sight of the detector. Experiments in AUG showed the good signal to noise characteristics of the detector. It is energy calibrated and can measure energies of 40-200 keV with count rates of up to 140 kcps. The detector has an active view on one of the heating beams. The heating beam increases the neutral density locally; thereby, information about the central fast-ion velocity distribution is obtained. The measured fluxes are modeled with a newly developed module for the 3D Monte Carlo code F90FIDASIM [Geiger et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 65010 (2011)]. The modeling allows to distinguish between the active (beam) and passive contributions to the signal. Thereby, the birth profile of the measured fast neutrals can be reconstructed. This model reproduces the measured energy spectra with good accuracy when the passive contribution is taken into account.

  19. Design of a neutral three-dimensional electro-Fenton system with foam nickel as particle electrodes for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a novel three-dimensional electro-Fenton system (3D-E-Fenton) for wastewater treatment with foam nickel, activated carbon fiber and Ti/RuO(2)-IrO(2) as the particle electrodes, the cathode, and the anode respectively. This 3D-E-Fenton system could exhibit much higher rhodamine B removal efficiency (99%) than the counterpart three-dimensional electrochemical system (33%) and E-Fenton system (19%) at neutral pH in 30 min. The degradation efficiency enhancement was attributed to much more hydroxyl radicals generated in the 3D-E-Fenton system because foam nickel particle electrodes could activate molecular oxygen to produce O(2)(-) via a single-electron transfer pathway to subsequently generate more H(2)O(2) and hydroxyl radicals. This is the first observation of molecular oxygen activation over the particle electrodes in the three-dimensional electrochemical system. These interesting findings could provide some new insight on the development of high efficient E-Fenton system for wastewater treatment at neutral pH. PMID:23141376

  20. Self-consistent modelling of charged and neutral particle dynamics in short-gap helium and hydrogen discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugroot, M.; Bayle, P.; Yousfi, M.; Eichwald, O.

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent model of charged and neutral particle dynamics is developed for the case of high pressure short-gap discharges in helium 0022-3727/32/2/007/img7 and hydrogen 0022-3727/32/2/007/img8 and 0022-3727/32/2/007/img9. Boundary wall effects on the electron swarm parameters are first investigated by a Monte Carlo method in order to verify the validity of the classical local field approximation in short-gap discharges. The hydrodynamic transport equations of the self-consistent model are then described with an emphasis on the different terms involved in the close coupling between charged and neutral particles and the electric field. These equations are solved by powerful two-dimensional numerical schemes for both transport and electrical field equations. The discharges are studied from an initial electronic cloud to the first stages of breakdown. Cathode emission is discussed in terms of its prime importance in the spatio-temporal evolution of the short-gap discharges and it is shown that the principal difference between helium and hydrogen discharges is due to the mode of cathode emission. The particular observations in the luminosity in hydrogen are discussed in terms of ionization of the gas and secondary emission processes at the surface. A detailed analysis reveals a complex distribution of charged particles due to the superposition of ionization and transport effects. Furthermore, Joule heating of the neutral medium is evaluated in the entire time scale of the discharge and its influence on the discharge evolution is discussed.

  1. The ESO UVES Advanced Data Products Quasar Sample: Neutral Gas Mass and Metal Abundances in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, T.; Péroux, C.; Vladilo, G.; Centurión, M.; Molaro, P.; D'Odorico, V.; Abbas, K.; Popping, A.; Milliard, B.; Deharveng, J.-M.; Frank, S.

    2015-06-01

    Damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs), seen in the spectra of background quasars, are unique probes to select HI-rich galaxies. We selected a dataset of 250 quasars observed with the Ultraviolet Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) and available through the ESO UVES Advanced Data Products (EUADP) archive, to study the gas and metal properties of 150 damped absorbers. These high-redshift absorbers contain information on the physical state and chemical composition of the interstellar medium and the neutral gas mass, a possible indicator of gas consumption as star formation proceeds. We find no evolution of the neutral gas mass density, with sub-DLAs contributing 8-20% (increasing with redshift). The EUADP dataset provides insights into the nucleosynthetic origin of nitrogen, confirming the bimodal behaviour of [N/α], and also confirms the deficiency of argon in DLAs.

  2. Application of Natural Diamond Detector to Energetic Neutral Particle Measurements on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    A.G. Alekseyev; D.S. Darrow; A.L. Roquemore; V.N. Amosov; A.V. Krasilnikov; D.V. Prosvirin; A.Yu. Tsutskikh

    2003-03-01

    Two natural diamond detectors have been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to look at escaping neutrals at or near the neutral-beam-injection energy. Time-resolved measurements have been obtained from these detectors at various tangency radii. The close proximity of the detector to the vessel required the development of a very fast low-noise preamplifier, which has been shown to be superior to similar commercial units. With this amplifier arrangement, electromagnetic pick-up noise was reduced to acceptable levels. However, radiation shielding was required to reduce the background levels from neutron-induced pulses in the detector. Calibration data along with the measured energy resolution is presented in the useful energy range of NSTX. Example data from plasma discharges will also be presented.

  3. Neutral-particle densities outside the TMX-U plasma edge

    SciTech Connect

    Pickles, W.L.; Jong, R.A.

    1986-03-04

    Neutral molecular densities just outside the plasma edge are measured at 11 axial locations in Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). These densities are time dependent and vary greatly with different modes of TMX-U plasma operation. The densities are low in the ion-cyclotron resonance heated central cell because of plasma pumping. The density is high in the plug near the sloshing-ion turning point. These densities are measured with a combination of new retractable, and fixed, magnetically unshielded Bayard-Alpert gauges that can be oriented to provide calibrated operation in the high (7-kG) MX-U magnetic fields. The role of the neutral density in simultaneously fueling and charge exchanging away the plug density is modeled using SMOKE, a Fokker-Planck code.

  4. Introduction: advances and opportunities in cluster research. [Neutral (metal) and ionic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Examples of neutral and ionic clusters include these in the upper and lower atmosphere, interstellar grain formation, combustion, radiation physics and chemistry, surface bombardment, fission product transport in reactors, corrosion, etc. This paper is a brief overview of some recent developments in cluster research. (DLC)

  5. Particle and momentum confinement in tokamak plasmas with unbalanced neutral beam injection and strong rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    There is a self-consistent theory of the effects of neutral beam injection on impurity transport in tokamak plasmas. The theory predicts that co-injection drives impurities outward and that counter-injection enhances the normally inward flow of impurities. The theory was applied to carry out a detailed analysis of the large experimental database from the PLT and the ISX-B tokamaks. The theory was found to generally model the experimental data quite well. It is, therefore, concluded that neutral beam co-injection can drive impurities outward to achieve clean central plasmas and a cool radiating edge. Theoretical predictions for future thermonuclear reactors such as INTOR, TIBER II, and ITER indicated that neutral beam driven flow reversal might be an effective impurity control method if the rate of beam momentum deposited per plasma ion is adequate. The external momentum drag, which is a pivotal concept in impurity flow reversal theory, is correctly predicted by the gyroviscous theory of momentum confinement. The theory was applied to analyze experimental data from the PLT and the PDX tokamaks with exact experimental conditions. The theory was found to be in excellent agreement with experiment over a wide range of parameters. It is, therefore, possible to formulate the impurity transport theory from first principles, without resort to empiricism.

  6. Novel particle and radiation sources and advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mako, Frederick

    2016-03-01

    The influence Norman Rostoker had on the lives of those who had the pleasure of knowing him is profound. The skills and knowledge I gained as a graduate student researching collective ion acceleration has fueled a career that has evolved from particle beam physics to include particle and radiation source development and advanced materials research, among many other exciting projects. The graduate research performed on collective ion acceleration was extended by others to form the backbone for laser driven plasma ion acceleration. Several years after graduate school I formed FM Technologies, Inc., (FMT), and later Electron Technologies, Inc. (ETI). Currently, as the founder and president of both FMT and ETI, the Rostoker influence can still be felt. One technology that we developed is a self-bunching RF fed electron gun, called the Micro-Pulse Gun (MPG). The MPG has important applications for RF accelerators and microwave tube technology, specifically clinically improved medical linacs and "green" klystrons. In addition to electron beam and RF source research, knowledge of materials and material interactions gained indirectly in graduate school has blossomed into breakthroughs in materials joining technologies. Most recently, silicon carbide joining technology has been developed that gives robust helium leak tight, high temperature and high strength joints between ceramic-to-ceramic and ceramic-to-metal. This joining technology has the potential to revolutionize the ethylene production, nuclear fuel and solar receiver industries by finally allowing for the practical use of silicon carbide as furnace coils, fuel rods and solar receptors, respectively, which are applications that have been needed for decades.

  7. Monoclonal neutralizing antibodies against EV71 screened from mice immunized with yeast-produced virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Xianyu, Lingzhi; Lyu, Songya

    2015-06-01

    Periodic outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occur in children under 5 years old, and can cause death in some cases. The C4 strain of enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main pathogen that causes HFMD in China. Although no drugs against EV71 are available, some studies have shown that candidate vaccines or viral capsid proteins can produce anti-EV71 immunity. In this study, female BABL/c mice (6-8 weeks old) were immunized with virus-like particles (VLPs) of EV71 produced in yeast to screen for anti-EV71 antibodies. Two hybridomas that could produce neutralizing antibodies against EV71 were obtained. Both neutralizing mAbs (D4 and G12) were confirmed to bind the VP1 capsid protein of EV71, and could protect >95% cells from 100 TCID50 EV71 infection at 25 µg/mL solution (lowest concentration). Those two neutralizing mAbs identified in the study may be promising candidates in development for mAbs to treat EV71 infection, and utilized as suitable reagents for use in diagnostic tests and biological studies. PMID:26040893

  8. Exponential characteristic spatial quadrature for discrete ordinates neutral particle transport in two-dimensional cartesian coordinates. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, B.M.

    1993-09-01

    The exponential characteristic spatial quadrature for discrete ordinates neutral particle transport with rectangular cells is developed. Numerical problems arising in the derivation required the development of exponential moment functions. These functions are used to remove indeterminant forms which can cause catastrophic cancellations. The EC method is positive and nonlinear. It conserves particles and satisfies first moment balance. Comparisons of the EC method's performance to other methods in optically thin and thick spatial cells were performed. For optically thin cells, the EC method was shown to converge to the correct answer, with third order truncation error in the thin cell limit. In deep penetration problems, the EC method attained its highest computational efficiencies compared to the other methods. For all the deep penetration problems examined, the number of spatial cells required by the EC method to attain a desired accuracy was less than the other methods.... Mathematics functions, Nuclear radiation, Nuclear engineering, Radiation attenuation, Radiation shielding, Transport theory, Radiation transport.

  9. `Majorana Mass' Fermions as Untrue Majorana Particles, Rather Endowed with Pseudoscalar-Type Charges than Genuinely Neutral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziino, G.

    2016-03-01

    The idea of a `Majorana mass' to make a chiral neutrino really neutral is here reconsidered. It is pointed out that such an approach, unlike Majorana's (non-chiral) old one, does not strictly lead, in general, to a true self-conjugate particle. This can be seen on directly using the basic definition (or fundamental representation) of charge conjugation C in Quantum Field Theory, as an operation just acting on annihilation and creation operators and just expressing particle-antiparticle interchange. It is found, indeed, that the `active' and `sterile' whole fields which can be obtained from mixing the chiral components of two mutually charge-conjugate Dirac fields are themselves `charge conjugate' to each other (rather than individually self-conjugate). These fields, taken as mass eigenfields (as in the `Majorana mass' case), are shown to describe particles carrying pseudoscalar-type charges and being neutral relative to scalar-type charges only. For them, ` CP symmetry' would be nothing but pure mirror symmetry, and C violation (already implied in their respective `active' and `sterile' behaviors) should then involve time-reversal violation as well. The new (no longer strictly chargeless) `Majorana mass' neutrino model still proves, however, neither to affect the usual expectation for a neutrinoless double β-decay, nor to prevent `active' and `sterile' neutrino varieties from generally taking different mass values. One has, on the other hand, that any fermion being just a genuine (i.e. really self-conjugate) Majorana particle cannot truly exist in two distinct—`active' and `sterile'—versions, and it can further bear only a unified mass kind which may at once be said to be either a `Majorana-like' or a `Dirac-like' mass kind.

  10. A Lentiviral Vector Expressing Japanese Encephalitis Virus-like Particles Elicits Broad Neutralizing Antibody Response in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Souque, Philippe; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Paulous, Sylvie; Garcìa-Nicolàs, Obdulio; Summerfield, Artur; Charneau, Pierre; Desprès, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the major cause of viral encephalitis in Southeast Asia. Vaccination of domestic pigs has been suggested as a “one health” strategy to reduce viral disease transmission to humans. The efficiency of two lentiviral TRIP/JEV vectors expressing the JEV envelope prM and E glycoproteins at eliciting protective humoral response was assessed in a mouse model and piglets. Methodology/Principal Findings A gene encoding the envelope proteins prM and E from a genotype 3 JEV strain was inserted into a lentiviral TRIP vector. Two lentiviral vectors TRIP/JEV were generated, each expressing the prM signal peptide followed by the prM protein and the E glycoprotein, the latter being expressed either in its native form or lacking its two C-terminal transmembrane domains. In vitro transduction of cells with the TRIP/JEV vector expressing the native prM and E resulted in the efficient secretion of virus-like particles of Japanese encephalitis virus. Immunization of BALB/c mice with TRIP/JEV vectors resulted in the production of IgGs against Japanese encephalitis virus, and the injection of a second dose one month after the prime injection greatly boosted antibody titers. The TRIP/JEV vectors elicited neutralizing antibodies against JEV strains belonging to genotypes 1, 3, and 5. Immunization of piglets with two doses of the lentiviral vector expressing JEV virus-like particles led to high titers of anti-JEV antibodies, that had efficient neutralizing activity regardless of the JEV genotype tested. Conclusions/Significance Immunization of pigs with the lentiviral vector expressing JEV virus-like particles is particularly efficient to prime antigen-specific humoral immunity and trigger neutralizing antibody responses against JEV genotypes 1, 3, and 5. The titers of neutralizing antibodies elicited by the TRIP/JEV vector are sufficient to confer protection in domestic pigs against different genotypes of JEV and this could be of a great

  11. Structural Studies of Chikungunya Virus-Like Particles Complexed with Human Antibodies: Neutralization and Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Mangala Prasad, Vidya; Wang, Cheng-I; Akahata, Wataru; Ng, Lisa F. P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus is a positive-stranded RNA alphavirus. Structures of chikungunya virus-like particles in complex with strongly neutralizing antibody Fab fragments (8B10 and 5F10) were determined using cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography. By fitting the crystallographically determined structures of these Fab fragments into the cryo-electron density maps, we show that Fab fragments of antibody 8B10 extend radially from the viral surface and block receptor binding on the E2 glycoprotein. In contrast, Fab fragments of antibody 5F10 bind the tip of the E2 B domain and lie tangentially on the viral surface. Fab 5F10 fixes the B domain rigidly to the surface of the virus, blocking exposure of the fusion loop on glycoprotein E1 and therefore preventing the virus from becoming fusogenic. Although Fab 5F10 can neutralize the wild-type virus, it can also bind to a mutant virus without inhibiting fusion or attachment. Although the mutant virus is no longer able to propagate by extracellular budding, it can, however, enter the next cell by traveling through junctional complexes without being intercepted by a neutralizing antibody to the wild-type virus, thus clarifying how cell-to-cell transmission can occur. IMPORTANCE Alphaviral infections are transmitted mainly by mosquitoes. Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), which belongs to the Alphavirus genus, has a wide distribution in the Old World that has expanded in recent years into the Americas. There are currently no vaccines or drugs against alphaviral infections. Therefore, a better understanding of CHIKV and its associated neutralizing antibodies will aid in the development of effective treatments. PMID:26537684

  12. Advances in sublimation studies for particles of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Nguyen, Viet; Fischer, Thomas; Abrishami, Tara; Papantonakis, Michael; Kendziora, Chris; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    When handling explosives, or related surfaces, the hands routinely become contaminated with particles of explosives and related materials. Subsequent contact with a solid surface results in particle crushing and deposition. These particles provide an evidentiary trail which is useful for security applications. As such, the opto-physico-chemical characteristics of these particles are critical to trace explosives detection applications in DOD or DHS arenas. As the persistence of these particles is vital to their forensic exploitation, it is important to understand which factors influence their persistence. The longevity or stability of explosives particles on a substrate is a function of several environmental parameters or particle properties including: Vapor pressure, particle geometry, airflow, particle field size, substrate topography, humidity, reactivity, adlayers, admixtures, particle areal density, and temperature. In this work we deposited particles of 2,4-dinitrotoluene on standard microscopy glass slides by particle sieving and studied their sublimation as a function of airflow velocity, areal particle density and particle field size. Analysis of 2D microscopic images was used to compute and track particle size and geometrical characteristics. The humidity, temperature and substrate type were kept constant for each experiment. A custom airflow cell, using standard microscopy glass slide, allowed in-situ photomicroscopy. Areal particle densities and airflow velocities were selected to provide relevant loadings and flow velocities for a range of potential applications. For a chemical of interest, we define the radial sublimation velocity (RSV) for the equivalent sphere of a particle as the parameter to characterize the sublimation rate. The RSV is a useful parameter because it is independent of particle size. The sublimation rate for an ensemble of particles was found to significantly depend on airflow velocity, the areal density of the particles, and the

  13. Advance in Vertical Buffered Electropolishing on Niobium for Particle Accelerators*

    SciTech Connect

    A.T. Wu, S. Jin, J.D. Mammosser, C.E. Reece, R.A. Rimmer,L. Lin, X.Y. Lu, K. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    Niobium (Nb) is the most popular material that has been employed for making superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to be used in various particle accelerators over the last couple of decades. One of the most important steps in fabricating Nb SRF cavities is the final chemical removal of 150 {mu}m of Nb from the inner surfaces of the SRF cavities. This is usually done by either buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP). Recently a new Nb surface treatment technique called buffered electropolishing (BEP) has been developed at Jefferson Lab. It has been demonstrated that BEP can produce the smoothest surface finish on Nb ever reported in the literature while realizing a Nb removal rate as high as 10 {mu}m/min that is more than 25 and 5 times quicker than those of EP and BCP(112) respectively. In this contribution, recent advance in optimizing and understanding BEP treatment technique is reviewed. Latest results from RF measurements on BEP treated Nb single cell cavities by our unique vertical polishing system will be reported.

  14. NEUTRAL INTERSTELLAR HELIUM PARAMETERS BASED ON IBEX-Lo OBSERVATIONS AND TEST PARTICLE CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bzowski, M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Sokol, J. M.; Hlond, M.; Moebius, E.; Bochsler, P.; Leonard, T.; Heirtzler, D.; Kucharek, H.; Schwadron, N. A.; Crew, G. B.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-02-01

    Because of its high ionization potential and weak interaction with hydrogen, neutral interstellar helium (NISHe) is almost unaffected at the heliospheric interface with the interstellar medium and freely enters the solar system. This second most abundant species provides some of the best information on the characteristics of the interstellar gas in the local interstellar cloud. The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is the second mission to directly detect NISHe. We present a comparison between recent IBEX NISHe observations and simulations carried out using a well-tested quantitative simulation code. Simulation and observation results compare well for times when measured fluxes are dominated by NISHe (and contributions from other species are small). Differences between simulations and observations indicate a previously undetected secondary population of neutral helium, likely produced by interaction of interstellar helium with plasma in the outer heliosheath. Interstellar neutral parameters are statistically different from previous in situ results obtained mostly from the GAS/Ulysses experiment, but they do agree with the local interstellar flow vector obtained from studies of interstellar absorption: the newly established flow direction is ecliptic longitude 79.{sup 0}2, latitude -5.{sup 0}1, the velocity is {approx}22.8 km s{sup -1}, and the temperature is 6200 K. These new results imply a markedly lower absolute velocity of the gas and thus significantly lower dynamic pressure on the boundaries of the heliosphere and different orientation of the Hydrogen Deflection Plane compared to prior results from Ulysses. A different orientation of this plane also suggests a new geometry of the interstellar magnetic field, and the lower dynamic pressure calls for a compensation by other components of the pressure balance, most likely a higher density of interstellar plasma and strength of interstellar magnetic field.

  15. Search for neutral, penetrating, metastable particles produced in the SLAC beam dump

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.

    1984-03-01

    A search was made for neutral objects which might be produced by 20 GeV electrons incident on the SLAC beam dump, penetrate the downstream natural shielding, and decay upstream of an electromagnetic shower calorimeter. With about 30 coulombs of electrons dumped, no candidate events were found above an energy of approx. 2 GeV. Preliminary analysis implies the 95% confidence level limit on the product of mass and lifetime of light axion-like bosons decaying primarily into two photons to be greater than 0.8 keV-sec. Preliminary limits on photino parameters are also given.

  16. Crude protein, ash, phosphorus, neutral detergent fiber and starch concentrations in particle size distributions of corn steam flaked to varying bulk densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The particle size distribution that results from steam flaking cereal grains could be related to differences in the chemical composition of steam-flaked (SF) vs. unprocessed grain. Particle size distribution and associated crude protein (CP), phosphorus (P), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and starch...

  17. A case study of nondelamination glass dissolution resulting in visible particles: implications for neutral pH formulations.

    PubMed

    Ratnaswamy, Gayathri; Hair, Alison; Li, Gary; Thirumangalathu, Renuka; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser; Brych, Lejla; Dharmavaram, Vasumathi; Wen, Zai-Qing; Fujimori, Kiyoshi; Jing, Wendy; Sethuraman, Ananth; Swift, Rob; Ricci, Margaret Speed; Piedmonte, Deirdre Murphy

    2014-04-01

    Visible particles were unexpectedly observed in a neutral-pH placebo formulation stored in glass vials but were not observed in the same formulation composition that contained protein. The particles were identified as silica gel (SiO2 ) and polysorbate 20, suggesting dissolution of the glass vial. Time course studies were performed to assess the effect of variables such as pH, excipients, storage temperature, and duration on particle formation. Data suggest that glass dissolution occurred during the storage in the liquid state, as shown by increased Si levels in solution. Upon freezing, the samples underwent freeze concentration and likely became supersaturated, which resulted in the appearance of visible silica particles upon thawing. The glass degradation described here is unique and differs from the more commonly reported delamination, defined by the presence of reflective, shard-like glass flakes in solution that are often termed lamellae. This case study underscores the importance of an early assessment (during formulation development) of potential incompatibility of the formulation with the primary container. PMID:24496956

  18. Comparisons Between Model Predictions and Spectral Measurements of Charged and Neutral Particles on the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald M.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Boettcher, Stephan; Boehm, Eckart; Guo, Jingnan; Koehler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Posner, Arik

    2014-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars have been made by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Curiosity rover since August 2012. RAD is a particle detector that measures the energy spectrum of charged particles (10 to approx. 200 MeV/u) and high energy neutrons (approx 8 to 200 MeV). The data obtained on the surface of Mars for 300 sols are compared to the simulation results using the Badhwar-O'Neill galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment model and the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code. For the nuclear interactions of primary GCR through Mars atmosphere and Curiosity rover, the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used. For describing the daily column depth of atmosphere, daily atmospheric pressure measurements at Gale Crater by the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) are implemented into transport calculations. Particle flux at RAD after traversing varying depths of atmosphere depends on the slant angles, and the model accounts for shielding of the RAD "E" dosimetry detector by the rest of the instrument. Detailed comparisons between model predictions and spectral data of various particle types provide the validation of radiation transport models, and suggest that future radiation environments on Mars can be predicted accurately. These contributions lend support to the understanding of radiation health risks to astronauts for the planning of various mission scenarios

  19. Cross Section and Asymmetry Measurement of Very Forward Neutral Particle Production at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    Although air shower observations at the surface of the earth have been developed in order to understand the origin of the ultra high energy cosmic rays, the observations have uncertainties in interpretation of the observed data from the present phenomenological nuclear collision models. Precision measurements of the very forward particle production in the collider experiments improve understanding of particle production processes in the nuclear collisions, and provide large influences on interpretation of the observed data and the origin of the cosmic rays. On the other hand, a large 10% single transverse-spin asymmetry in neutron production from transversely polarized proton collisions was found at the RHIC collider at BNL. It has provided a valuable input for understanding particle production processes in the polarized proton collisions. We will have a new collider experiment at RHIC which has a high resolution and a wide coverage of transverse momentum measurements in order to figure out elementary processes of the air shower generation.

  20. Production of neutral strange particles in muon-nucleon scattering at 490 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aderholz, M.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kadija, K.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salgado, C. W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H. J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, R.; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1994-12-01

    The production of K 0, Λ andbar Λ particles is studied in the E665 muon-nucleon experiment at Fermilab. The average multiplicities and squared transverse momenta are measured as a function of x F and W 2. Most features of the data can be well described by the Lund model. Within this model, the data on the K0/π± ratios and on the average K 0 multiplicity in the forward region favor a strangeness suppression factor s/u in the fragmentation process near 0.20. Clear evidence for QCD effects is seen in the average squared transverse momentum of K 0 and Λ particles.

  1. Production in yeast of pseudotype virus-like particles harboring functionally active antibody fragments neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recombinant antibodies can be produced in different formats and different expression systems. Single chain variable fragments (scFvs) represent an attractive alternative to full-length antibodies and they can be easily produced in bacteria or yeast. However, the scFvs exhibit monovalent antigen-binding properties and short serum half-lives. The stability and avidity of the scFvs can be improved by their multimerization or fusion with IgG Fc domain. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possibilities to produce in yeast high-affinity scFv-Fc proteins neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin (VLY), the main virulence factor of Gardnerella vaginalis. Results The scFv protein derived from hybridoma cell line producing high-affinity neutralizing antibodies against VLY was fused with human IgG1 Fc domain. Four different variants of anti-VLY scFv-Fc fusion proteins were constructed and produced in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The non-tagged scFv-Fc and hexahistidine-tagged scFv-Fc proteins were found predominantly as insoluble aggregates and therefore were not suitable for further purification and activity testing. The addition of yeast α-factor signal sequence did not support secretion of anti-VLY scFv-Fc but increased the amount of its intracellular soluble form. However, the purified protein showed a weak VLY-neutralizing capability. In contrast, the fusion of anti-VLY scFv-Fc molecules with hamster polyomavirus-derived VP2 protein and its co-expression with VP1 protein resulted in an effective production of pseudotype virus-like particles (VLPs) that exhibited strong VLY-binding activity. Recombinant scFv-Fc molecules displayed on the surface of VLPs neutralized VLY-mediated lysis of human erythrocytes and HeLa cells with high potency comparable to that of full-length antibody. Conclusions Recombinant scFv-Fc proteins were expressed in yeast with low efficiency. New approach to display the scFv-Fc molecules on the surface of

  2. GB virus type C envelope protein E2 elicits antibodies that react with a cellular antigen on HIV-1 particles and neutralize diverse HIV-1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Emma L; Xiang, Jinhua; McLinden, James H; Kaufman, Thomas M; Chang, Qing; Montefiori, David C; Klinzman, Donna; Stapleton, Jack T

    2010-10-01

    Broadly neutralizing Abs to HIV-1 are well described; however, identification of Ags that elicit these Abs has proven difficult. Persistent infection with GB virus type C (GBV-C) is associated with prolonged survival in HIV-1-infected individuals, and among those without HIV-1 viremia, the presence of Ab to GBV-C glycoprotein E2 is also associated with survival. GBV-C E2 protein inhibits HIV-1 entry, and an antigenic peptide within E2 interferes with gp41-induced membrane perturbations in vitro, suggesting the possibility of structural mimicry between GBV-C E2 protein and HIV-1 particles. Naturally occurring human and experimentally induced GBV-C E2 Abs were examined for their ability to neutralize infectious HIV-1 particles and HIV-1-enveloped pseudovirus particles. All GBV-C E2 Abs neutralized diverse isolates of HIV-1 with the exception of rabbit anti-peptide Abs raised against a synthetic GBV-C E2 peptide. Rabbit anti-GBV-C E2 Abs neutralized HIV-1-pseudotyped retrovirus particles but not HIV-1-pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus particles, and E2 Abs immune-precipitated HIV-1 gag particles containing the vesicular stomatitis virus type G envelope, HIV-1 envelope, GBV-C envelope, or no viral envelope. The Abs did not neutralize or immune-precipitate mumps or yellow fever viruses. Rabbit GBV-C E2 Abs inhibited HIV attachment to cells but did not inhibit entry following attachment. Taken together, these data indicate that the GBV-C E2 protein has a structural motif that elicits Abs that cross-react with a cellular Ag present on retrovirus particles, independent of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. The data provide evidence that a heterologous viral protein can induce HIV-1-neutralizing Abs. PMID:20826757

  3. Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Santosh P; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D; Govindarajan, J

    2013-02-01

    Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a = 25 cm and major radius, R = 75 cm) using a 45° parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and ΔE∕E of high-energy channel has been found to be ∼10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature Ti(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically Te(0) ∼ 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here. PMID:23464207

  4. Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Santosh P.; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D.; Govindarajan, J.

    2013-02-15

    Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a= 25 cm and major radius, R= 75 cm) using a 45 Degree-Sign parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and {Delta}E/E of high-energy channel has been found to be {approx}10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature T{sub i}(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically T{sub e}(0) {approx} 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here.

  5. Laminar, turbulent, and inertial shear-thickening regimes in channel flow of neutrally buoyant particle suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lashgari, Iman; Picano, Francesco; Breugem, Wim-Paul; Brandt, Luca

    2014-12-19

    The aim of this Letter is to characterize the flow regimes of suspensions of finite-size rigid particles in a viscous fluid at finite inertia. We explore the system behavior as a function of the particle volume fraction and the Reynolds number (the ratio of flow and particle inertia to viscous forces). Unlike single-phase flows, where a clear distinction exists between the laminar and the turbulent states, three different regimes can be identified in the presence of a particulate phase, with smooth transitions between them. At low volume fractions, the flow becomes turbulent when increasing the Reynolds number, transitioning from the laminar regime dominated by viscous forces to the turbulent regime characterized by enhanced momentum transport by turbulent eddies. At larger volume fractions, we identify a new regime characterized by an even larger increase of the wall friction. The wall friction increases with the Reynolds number (inertial effects) while the turbulent transport is weakly affected, as in a state of intense inertial shear thickening. This state may prevent the transition to a fully turbulent regime at arbitrary high speed of the flow. PMID:25554885

  6. A Massively Parallel Particle Code for Rarefied Ionized and Neutral Gas Flows in Earth and Planetary Atmospheres, Ionospheres and Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the global structure, dynamics, and physical and chemical processes occurring in the upper atmospheres, exospheres, and ionospheres of the Earth, the other planets, comets and planetary satellites and their interactions with their outer particles and fields environs, it is often necessary to address the fundamentally non-equilibrium aspects of the physical environment. These are regions where complex chemistry, energetics, and electromagnetic field influences are important. Traditional approaches are based largely on hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic MHD) formulations and are very important and highly useful. However, these methods often have limitations in rarefied physical regimes where the molecular collision rates and ion gyrofrequencies are small and where interactions with ionospheres and upper neutral atmospheres are important.

  7. Search for a heavy neutral particle decaying into an electron and a muon using 1 fb(-1) of ATLAS data

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbia, E; Acharya, BS; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, JA

    2011-12-01

    A search is presented for a high mass neutral particle that decays directly to the e{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {+-}} final state. The data sample was recorded by the ATLAS detector in {radical}s = 7 TeV pp collisions at the LHC from March to June 2011 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 1.07 fb{sup -1}. The data are found to be consistent with the Standard Model background. The high e{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {+-}} mass region is used to set 95% confidence level upper limits on the production of two possible new physics processes: tau sneutrinos in an R-parity violating supersymmetric model and Z'-like vector bosons in a lepton flavor violating model.

  8. Interpretation of time-of-flight distributions for neutral particles under pulsed laser evaporation using direct Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Alexey A.

    2013-12-21

    A theoretical study of the time-of-flight (TOF) distributions under pulsed laser evaporation in vacuum has been performed. A database of TOF distributions has been calculated by the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. It is shown that describing experimental TOF signals through the use of the calculated TOF database combined with a simple analysis of evaporation allows determining the irradiated surface temperature and the rate of evaporation. Analysis of experimental TOF distributions under laser ablation of niobium, copper, and graphite has been performed, with the evaluated surface temperature being well agreed with results of the thermal model calculations. General empirical dependences are proposed, which allow indentifying the regime of the laser induced thermal ablation from the TOF distributions for neutral particles without invoking the DSMC-calculated database.

  9. The magnetotails of Jupiter and Saturn: Comparison of charged (and neutral) particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupp, N.; Roussos, E.; Mitchell, D.; Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Sergis, N.; Jackman, C.

    2013-09-01

    Galileo and Cassini in-situ energetic particle measurements over 8 years of the two largest magnetospheres in our solar system have provided the opportunity to study their global configuration and well as their dynamics on various time scales. We will show astonishing similarities and huge discrepancies in the responses of energetic particles in those magnetospheres measured onboard the two spacecraft with the Galileo/EPD and the Cassini/MIMI instruments. In addition we will discuss results of the New Horizons Spacecraft which passed through region of the Jovian magnetotail in 2007 where no other measurements are available. Both magnetospheres are powered by the fast rotation of the systems. The major particle sources filling the magnetospheres are internal with Io (and Europa) in the Jovian case and Enceladus for Saturn. The composition of the plasma and energetic particles, however, are different (H, S, O, SO2, etc. in contrast to H, H2O, OH- etc.). Both magnetospheres show similar transport processes like particle injections and interchange motion. Time scales, duration and frequencies, local time dependencies are different. Both magnetospheres show an equatorial magnetodisc where most of the heavy ion plasma is located. However, in the Jovian case this pancake-like magnetodisc is wobbles up and down because of the tilt angle of 9.6 degrees between the rotation axis and the magnetic dipole axis of the planet while in the case of Saturn dipole - and rotation axis are perfectly aligned. The plasma lags rigid corotation in both magnetospheres creating large-scale current systems. Deep in the magnetotails out to 60-150 planetary radii partial corotation is still present and seem to be around 200 km/s in both cases. Both magnetospheres exhibit large-scale reconnection processes in their magnetotails. However, if the trigger mechanisms are solar wind-driven or internally driven is not clear yet. If those reconnection processes are local time dependent or if they

  10. Particle Dynamics in Neutral-Gas Confined Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong W.

    2001-10-01

    Laser-produced plasma from a metallic target can be confined to higher plasma densities by immersing the target in an inert gas medium at increasingly high density. The plasma becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, however, when the mass density of the neutral gas exceeds the plasma mass density substantially.[1] A new plasma diagnostic method is developed to help examine the early time development of the gas-plasma interfacial structure. A preliminary study based on plasma polarization spectroscopy is presented, in which the dynamics of atoms and ions are visualized in the presence of electromagnetic fields due to charge separation. The ambient gas pressure of argon is varied as active control in the low-pressure regime. Time-resolved multi-directional projections of an aluminum plasma are obtained in line and continuum emissions, polarization and spectral broadening including Doppler shifts. The electrostatic potential of the target is also followed. The results indicate a bifurcation of the phase-space distribution function and structural segmentation of the plasma into a thermalized core and a crown with highly aligned, energetic atoms and ions. Reconstruction of the plasma structure appears possible by generalization of the two new algorithms we have developed.[1,2] 1. Y.W. Kim and J.-C. Oh, Rev. Sci. Inst. 72, 948 (2001). 2. Y.W. Kim and C.D. Lloyd-Knight, Rev. Sci. Inst. 72, 944 (2001).

  11. Mucosal but Not Parenteral Immunization with Purified Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Virus-Like Particles Induces Neutralizing Titers of Antibodies throughout the Estrous Cycle of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise; Roden, Richard; Balmelli, Carole; Potts, Alexandra; Schiller, John; De Grandi, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    We have recently shown that nasal immunization of anesthetized mice with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) virus-like particles (VLPs) is highly effective at inducing both neutralizing immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG in genital secretions, while parenteral immunization induced only neutralizing IgG. Our data also demonstrated that both isotypes are similarly neutralizing according to an in vitro pseudotyped neutralization assay. However, it is known that various amounts of IgA and IgG are produced in genital secretions along the estrous cycle. Therefore, we have investigated how this variation influences the amount of HPV16 neutralizing antibodies induced after immunization with VLPs. We have compared parenteral and nasal protocols of vaccination with daily samplings of genital secretions of mice. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis showed that total IgA and IgG inversely varied along the estrous cycle, with the largest amounts of IgA in proestrus-estrus and the largest amount of IgG in diestrus. This resulted in HPV16 neutralizing titers of IgG only being achieved during diestrus upon parenteral immunization. In contrast, nasal vaccination induced neutralizing titers of IgA plus IgG throughout the estrous cycle, as confirmed by in vitro pseudotyped neutralization assays. Our data suggest that mucosal immunization might be more efficient than parenteral immunization at inducing continuous protection of the female genital tract. PMID:10516071

  12. Frequency of collisions between ion and neutral particles from the cloning characteristics of filamentary currents in an atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Bing; Zhang, Mengdie; Pan, Lizhu; Zhou, Qiujiao; Huang, Jianjun; Liu, Ying

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a cold He atmospheric pressure plasma jet that is generated using a dielectric barrier discharge configuration device is presented. This device is equipped with double-grounded ring electrodes that are driven by a sinusoidal excitation voltage. The properties of the cloning of filamentous current are studied. The frequency of the collisions between the ion and the neutral particles is calculated by measuring the current phase difference between the filamentous current and its corresponding clone. The frequency of the collisions between the ion and the neutral particles is of the order of 108 Hz.

  13. A comparative study of the treatment of ethylene plant spent caustic by neutralization and classical and advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hawari, Alaa; Ramadan, Hasanat; Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim; Ouederni, Mabrouk

    2015-03-15

    The treatment of spent caustic produced from an ethylene plant was investigated. In the case of neutralization alone it was found that the maximum removal of sulfide was at pH values below 5.5. The higher percentage removal of sulfides (99% at pH = 1.5) was accompanied with the highest COD removal (88%). For classical oxidation using H2O2 the maximum COD removal percentage reached 89% at pH = 2.5 and at a hydrogen peroxide concentration of 19 mM/L. For the advanced oxidation using Fenton's process it was found that the maximum COD removal of 96.5% was achieved at a hydrogen peroxide/ferrous sulfate ratio of (7:1). PMID:25546845

  14. Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells exhibit dendritic cell stimulating activity and induce neutralizing antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling; Lin Jianguo; Sun Yuliang; Bennouna, Soumaya; Lo, Michael; Wu Qingyang; Bu Zhigao; Pulendran, Bali; Compans, Richard W. . E-mail: compans@microbio.emory.edu; Yang Chinglai . E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses (rBV) expressing Ebola virus VP40 (rBV-VP40) or GP (rBV-GP) proteins were generated. Infection of Sf9 insect cells by rBV-VP40 led to assembly and budding of filamentous particles from the cell surface as shown by electron microscopy. Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by coinfection of Sf9 cells with rBV-VP40 and rBV-GP, and incorporation of Ebola GP into VLPs was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Recombinant baculovirus infection of insect cells yielded high levels of VLPs, which were shown to stimulate cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells similar to VLPs produced in mammalian cells. The immunogenicity of Ebola VLPs produced in insect cells was evaluated by immunization of mice. Analysis of antibody responses showed that most of the GP-specific antibodies were of the IgG2a subtype, while no significant level of IgG1 subtype antibodies specific for GP was induced, indicating the induction of a Th1-biased immune response. Furthermore, sera from Ebola VLP immunized mice were able to block infection by Ebola GP pseudotyped HIV virus in a single round infection assay, indicating that a neutralizing antibody against the Ebola GP protein was induced. These results show that production of Ebola VLPs in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses represents a promising approach for vaccine development against Ebola virus infection.

  15. On the Lorentz symmetry breaking effects on a Dirac neutral particle inside a two-dimensional quantum ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, K.; Belich, H.

    2014-07-01

    We study the effects of the Lorentz symmetry violation in the nonrelativistic quantum dynamics of a spin-1/2 neutral particle interacting with external fields confined to a two-dimensional quantum ring (W.-C. Tan, J.C. Inkson, Semicond. Sci. Technol. 11, 1635 (1996)). We show a possible scenario for the Lorentz symmetry breaking that permits us to make an analogy with the Landau-Aharonov-Casher system (M. Ericsson, E. Sjöqvist, Phys. Rev. A 65, 013607 (2001)), where a change in the angular frequency characteristic of the confinement of a quantum particle to a two-dimensional ring is obtained. Then, we show that an upper bound for the Lorentz symmetry breaking parameters may be set up. Besides, we analyse another possible scenario of the Lorentz symmetry violation by showing the presence of an analogue of the Coulomb potential. We obtain the bound states solutions to the Schrödinger-Pauli equation and discuss a quantum effect characterized by the dependence of the angular frequency on the quantum numbers of the system.

  16. Application of a Java-based, univel geometry, neutral particle Monte Carlo code to the searchlight problem

    SciTech Connect

    Charles A. Wemple; Joshua J. Cogliati

    2005-04-01

    A univel geometry, neutral particle Monte Carlo transport code, written entirely in the Java programming language, is under development for medical radiotherapy applications. The code uses ENDF-VI based continuous energy cross section data in a flexible XML format. Full neutron-photon coupling, including detailed photon production and photonuclear reactions, is included. Charged particle equilibrium is assumed within the patient model so that detailed transport of electrons produced by photon interactions may be neglected. External beam and internal distributed source descriptions for mixed neutron-photon sources are allowed. Flux and dose tallies are performed on a univel basis. A four-tap, shift-register-sequence random number generator is used. Initial verification and validation testing of the basic neutron transport routines is underway. The searchlight problem was chosen as a suitable first application because of the simplicity of the physical model. Results show excellent agreement with analytic solutions. Computation times for similar numbers of histories are comparable to other neutron MC codes written in C and FORTRAN.

  17. User's manual for ONEDANT: a code package for one-dimensional, diffusion-accelerated, neutral-particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, R.D.; Brinkley, F.W. Jr.; Marr, D.R.

    1982-02-01

    ONEDANT is designed for the CDC-7600, but the program has been implemented and run on the IBM-370/190 and CRAY-I computers. ONEDANT solves the one-dimensional multigroup transport equation in plane, cylindrical, spherical, and two-angle plane geometries. Both regular and adjoint, inhomogeneous and homogeneous (k/sub eff/ and eigenvalue search) problems subject to vacuum, reflective, periodic, white, albedo, or inhomogeneous boundary flux conditions are solved. General anisotropic scattering is allowed and anisotropic inhomogeneous sources are permitted. ONEDANT numerically solves the one-dimensional, multigroup form of the neutral-particle, steady-state form of the Boltzmann transport equation. The discrete-ordinates approximation is used for treating the angular variation of the particle distribution and the diamond-difference scheme is used for phase space discretization. Negative fluxes are eliminated by a local set-to-zero-and-correct algorithm. A standard inner (within-group) iteration, outer (energy-group-dependent source) iteration technique is used. Both inner and outer iterations are accelerated using the diffusion synthetic acceleration method. (WHK)

  18. A solution of the monoenergetic neutral particle transport equation for adjacent half-spaces with anisotropic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapol, B. D.; Mostacci, D.; Previti, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present highly accurate solutions to the neutral particle transport equation in a half-space. While our initial motivation was in response to a recently published solution based on Chandrasekhar's H-function, the presentation to follow has taken on a more comprehensive tone. The solution by H-functions certainly did achieved high accuracy but was limited to isotropic scattering and emission from spatially uniform and linear sources. Moreover, the overly complicated nature of the H-function approach strongly suggests that its extension to anisotropic scattering and general sources is not at all practical. For this reason, an all encompassing theory for the determination of highly precise benchmarks, including anisotropic scattering for a variety of spatial source distributions, is presented for particle transport in a half-space. We illustrate the approach via a collection of cases including tables of 7-place flux benchmarks to guide transport methods developers. The solution presented can be applied to a considerable number of one and two half-space transport problems with variable sources and represents a state-of-the-art benchmark solution.

  19. Advanced design of positive-ion sources for neutral-beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Marguerat, E.F.; Haselton, H.H.; Menon, M.M.; Schechter, D.E.; Stirling, W.L.; Tsai, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    The APIS ion source is being developed to meet a goal of producing ion beams of less than or equal to 200 keV, 100 A, with 10-30-s pulse lengths. In a continuing effort to advance the state of the art and to produce long pulse ion beams, APIS ion sources with grid dimensions of 10 x 25 cm, 13 x 43 cm, and 16 x 48 cm are being developed. In the past year, the 10- x 25-cm ion source has been operated to produce ion beams in excess of 100 keV for many seconds pulse length. An advanced design concept is being pursued with the primary objectives to improve radiation protection, reduce fabrication costs, and simplify maintenance. The source magnetic sheild will be designed as a vacuum enclosure to house all source components. The electrical insulation requirements of energy recovery are also considered. Because of the frequent maintenance requirements, the electron emitter assembly will be designed with a remote handling capability. A new accelerator design which incorporates the necessary neutron shielding and associated steering gimbal system is also described.

  20. A massively parallel method of characteristic neutral particle transport code for GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, W. R.; Smith, K.; Forget, B.

    2013-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, parallel computing has enabled computers to grow ever larger and more powerful while scientific applications have advanced in sophistication and resolution. This trend is being challenged, however, as the power consumption for conventional parallel computing architectures has risen to unsustainable levels and memory limitations have come to dominate compute performance. Heterogeneous computing platforms, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), are an increasingly popular paradigm for solving these issues. This paper explores the applicability of GPUs for deterministic neutron transport. A 2D method of characteristics (MOC) code - OpenMOC - has been developed with solvers for both shared memory multi-core platforms as well as GPUs. The multi-threading and memory locality methodologies for the GPU solver are presented. Performance results for the 2D C5G7 benchmark demonstrate 25-35 x speedup for MOC on the GPU. The lessons learned from this case study will provide the basis for further exploration of MOC on GPUs as well as design decisions for hardware vendors exploring technologies for the next generation of machines for scientific computing. (authors)

  1. Advances in the Exploration of Particle Dark Matter Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornengo, Nicolao

    2011-10-01

    The particle physics interpretation of the missing-mass, or dark-matter, problem of cosmological and astrophysical nature is going to be posed under deep scrutiny in the next years. From the particle physics side, accelerator physics will deeply test theoretical ideas of new physics beyond the Standard Model, where a particle physics candidate to dark matter is often naturally obtained. From the astrophysical side, many probes are already providing a great deal of independent information on the signals which can be produced by the galactic or extra-galactic dark matter. The ultimate hope is in fact to be able to disentangle a dark matter signal from the various sources of backgrounds and to extract a coherent picture of new physics from the accelerator physics, astrophysics and cosmology side. A very ambitious and far-reaching project, indeed!

  2. Advances in Bayesian Model Based Clustering Using Particle Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Merl, D M

    2009-11-19

    Recent work by Carvalho, Johannes, Lopes and Polson and Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy introduced a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) alternative to traditional iterative Monte Carlo strategies (e.g. MCMC and EM) for Bayesian inference for a large class of dynamic models. The basis of SMC techniques involves representing the underlying inference problem as one of state space estimation, thus giving way to inference via particle filtering. The key insight of Carvalho et al was to construct the sequence of filtering distributions so as to make use of the posterior predictive distribution of the observable, a distribution usually only accessible in certain Bayesian settings. Access to this distribution allows a reversal of the usual propagate and resample steps characteristic of many SMC methods, thereby alleviating to a large extent many problems associated with particle degeneration. Furthermore, Carvalho et al point out that for many conjugate models the posterior distribution of the static variables can be parametrized in terms of [recursively defined] sufficient statistics of the previously observed data. For models where such sufficient statistics exist, particle learning as it is being called, is especially well suited for the analysis of streaming data do to the relative invariance of its algorithmic complexity with the number of data observations. Through a particle learning approach, a statistical model can be fit to data as the data is arriving, allowing at any instant during the observation process direct quantification of uncertainty surrounding underlying model parameters. Here we describe the use of a particle learning approach for fitting a standard Bayesian semiparametric mixture model as described in Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy. In Section 2 we briefly review the previously presented particle learning algorithm for the case of a Dirichlet process mixture of multivariate normals. In Section 3 we describe several novel extensions to the original

  3. PARTICULATE CONTROL HIGHLIGHTS: ADVANCED CONCEPTS IN ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS: PARTICLE CHARGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives highlights of an EPA research program aimed at developing and verifying an accurate theory of particle charging for conditions that are typically found in industrial electrostatic precipitators. A new theory was developed, in which the thermal motion of ions is a...

  4. Intranasal Delivery of Recombinant Parvovirus-Like Particles Elicits Cytotoxic T-Cell and Neutralizing Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sedlik, C.; Dridi, A.; Deriaud, E.; Saron, M. F.; Rueda, P.; Sarraseca, J.; Casal, J. I.; Leclerc, C.

    1999-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that chimeric porcine parvovirus-like particles (PPV:VLP) carrying heterologous epitopes, when injected intraperitoneally into mice without adjuvant, activate strong CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses specific for the foreign epitopes. In the present study, we investigated the immunogenicity of PPV:VLP carrying a CD8+ T-cell epitope from the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) administered by mucosal routes. Mice immunized intranasally with recombinant PPV:VLP, in the absence of adjuvant, developed high levels of PPV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and/or IgA in their serum, as well as in mucosal sites such as the bronchoalveolar and intestinal fluids. Antibodies in sera from mice immunized parenterally or intranasally with PPV:VLP were strongly neutralizing in vitro. Intranasal immunization with PPV:VLP carrying the LCMV CD8+ T-cell epitope also elicited a strong peptide-specific cytotoxic-T-cell (CTL) response. In contrast, mice orally immunized with recombinant PPV:VLP did not develop any antibody or CTL responses. We also showed that mice primed with PPV:VLP are still able to develop strong CTL responses after subsequent immunization with chimeric PPV:VLP carrying a foreign CD8+ T-cell epitope. These results highlight the attractive potential of PPV:VLP as a safe, nonreplicating antigen carrier to stimulate systemic and mucosal immunity after nasal administration. PMID:10074120

  5. The effect of a radial electric field on ripple-trapped ions observed by neutral particle fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A.; Herrmann, W.; Kurki-Suonio, T.

    1997-10-01

    The effect of a radial electric field on nonthermal ripple-trapped ions is investigated using toroidal Monte Carlo simulations for edge tokamak plasmas. The increase in the neutral particle flux from the ions trapped in local magnetic wells observed by the charge exchange (CX) detector at a low confinement to high confinement transition at ASDEX (Axially Symmetric Divertor Experiment). Upgrade tokamak [{ital Proceedings of the 20th European Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics}, Lisbon (European Physical Society, Petit-Lancy, Switzerland, 1993), Vol. 17C, Part I, p. 267] is reproduced in the simulations by turning on a radial electric field near the plasma periphery. The poloidal and toroidal angles at which the CX detector signal is most sensitive to the radial electric field are determined. A fast response time of the signal in the range of 50{endash}100 {mu}s to the appearance of the electric field can be found in the simulations with a relatively large half-width of the negative electric field region. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Goal-based angular adaptivity applied to a wavelet-based discretisation of the neutral particle transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Goffin, Mark A.; Buchan, Andrew G.; Dargaville, Steven; Pain, Christopher C.; Smith, Paul N.; Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.

    2015-01-15

    A method for applying goal-based adaptive methods to the angular resolution of the neutral particle transport equation is presented. The methods are applied to an octahedral wavelet discretisation of the spherical angular domain which allows for anisotropic resolution. The angular resolution is adapted across both the spatial and energy dimensions. The spatial domain is discretised using an inner-element sub-grid scale finite element method. The goal-based adaptive methods optimise the angular discretisation to minimise the error in a specific functional of the solution. The goal-based error estimators require the solution of an adjoint system to determine the importance to the specified functional. The error estimators and the novel methods to calculate them are described. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the methods. It is shown that the methods can significantly reduce the number of unknowns and computational time required to obtain a given error. The novelty of the work is the use of goal-based adaptive methods to obtain anisotropic resolution in the angular domain for solving the transport equation. -- Highlights: •Wavelet angular discretisation used to solve transport equation. •Adaptive method developed for the wavelet discretisation. •Anisotropic angular resolution demonstrated through the adaptive method. •Adaptive method provides improvements in computational efficiency.

  7. Exponential-characteristic spatial quadrature for discrete-ordinates neutral-particle transport in slab geometry. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoden, G.E.

    1992-03-01

    A new discrete ordinates spatial quadrature scheme is presented for solving neutral particle transport problems. This new scheme, called the exponential characteristic method, is developed here in slab geometry with isotropic scattering. This method uses a characteristic integration of the Boltzmann transport equation with an exponential function as the assumed from of the source distribution, continuous across each spatial cell. The exponential source function is constructed to globally conserve zeroth and first spatial source moments and is non-negative. Characteristic integration ensures non-negative fluxes and flux moments. Numerical testing indicates that convergence of the exponential characteristic scheme is fourth order in the limit of vanishingly thin cells. Highly accurate solutions to optically thick problems can result using this scheme with very coarse meshes. Comparing accuracy and computational cost with existing spatial quadrature schemes (diamond difference, linear discontinuous, linear characteristic, linear adaptive, etc.), the exponential characteristic scheme typically performed best. This scheme is expected to be expandable to two dimensions in a straight forward manner. Due to the high accuracies achievable using coarse meshes, this scheme may allow researchers to obtain solutions to transport problems once thought too large or too difficult to be adequately solved conventional computer systems.

  8. A Northern Sky Survey for Point-like Sources of EeV Neutral Particles with the Telescope Array Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the search for steady point-like sources of neutral particles around 1018 eV between 2008 and 2013 May with the scintillator SD of the Telescope Array experiment. We found overall no significant point-like excess above 0.5 EeV in the northern sky. Subsequently, we also searched for coincidence with the Fermi bright Galactic sources. No significant coincidence was found within the statistical uncertainty. Hence, we set an upper limit on the neutron flux that corresponds to an averaged flux of 0.07 km-2 yr-1 for E\\gt 1 EeV in the northern sky at the 95% confidence level. This is the most stringent flux upper limit in a northern sky survey assuming point-like sources. The upper limit at the 95% confidence level on the neutron flux from Cygnus X-3 is also set to 0.2 km-2 yr-1 for E\\gt 0.5 EeV. This is an order of magnitude lower than previous flux measurements.

  9. Intranasal delivery of recombinant parvovirus-like particles elicits cytotoxic T-cell and neutralizing antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sedlik, C; Dridi, A; Deriaud, E; Saron, M F; Rueda, P; Sarraseca, J; Casal, J I; Leclerc, C

    1999-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that chimeric porcine parvovirus-like particles (PPV:VLP) carrying heterologous epitopes, when injected intraperitoneally into mice without adjuvant, activate strong CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses specific for the foreign epitopes. In the present study, we investigated the immunogenicity of PPV:VLP carrying a CD8(+) T-cell epitope from the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) administered by mucosal routes. Mice immunized intranasally with recombinant PPV:VLP, in the absence of adjuvant, developed high levels of PPV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and/or IgA in their serum, as well as in mucosal sites such as the bronchoalveolar and intestinal fluids. Antibodies in sera from mice immunized parenterally or intranasally with PPV:VLP were strongly neutralizing in vitro. Intranasal immunization with PPV:VLP carrying the LCMV CD8(+) T-cell epitope also elicited a strong peptide-specific cytotoxic-T-cell (CTL) response. In contrast, mice orally immunized with recombinant PPV:VLP did not develop any antibody or CTL responses. We also showed that mice primed with PPV:VLP are still able to develop strong CTL responses after subsequent immunization with chimeric PPV:VLP carrying a foreign CD8(+) T-cell epitope. These results highlight the attractive potential of PPV:VLP as a safe, nonreplicating antigen carrier to stimulate systemic and mucosal immunity after nasal administration. PMID:10074120

  10. Advances in Virus-Like Particle Vaccines for Filoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Aman, M. Javad

    2011-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) are among the deadliest human pathogens, with no vaccines or therapeutics available. Multiple vaccine platforms have been tested for efficacy as prophylactic pretreatments or therapeutics for prevention of filovirus hemorrhagic fever. Most successful vaccines are based on a virus-vectored approach expressing the protective glycoprotein (GP); protein-based subunit and DNA vaccines have been tested with moderate success. Virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines have realized promising results when tested in both rodents and nonhuman primates. VLPs rely on the natural properties of the viral matrix protein (VP) 40 to drive budding of filamentous particles that can also incorporate ≥1 other filovirus protein, including GP, VP24, and nucleoprotein (NP). Filovirus VLP vaccines have used particles containing 2 or 3 (GP and VP40, with or without NP) viral proteins generated in either mammalian or insect cells. Early studies successfully demonstrated efficacy of bivalent VLP vaccines in rodents; more recent studies have shown the ability of the VLP vaccines containing GP, NP, and VP40 to confer complete homologous protection against Ebola virus and Marburg virus in a prophylactic setting against in macaques. This review will discuss published work to date regarding development of the VLP vaccines for prevention of lethal filovirus hemorrhagic fever. PMID:21987741

  11. First plasma of megawatt high current ion source for neutral beam injector of the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak on the test bed

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Chundong; Xie Yahong; Liu Sheng; Xie Yuanlai; Jiang Caichao; Song Shihua; Li Jun; Liu Zhimin

    2011-02-15

    High current ion source is the key part of the neutral beam injector. In order to develop the project of 4 MW neutral beam injection for the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) on schedule, the megawatt high current ion source is prestudied in the Institute of Plasma Physics in China. In this paper, the megawatt high current ion source test bed and the first plasma are presented. The high current discharge of 900 A at 2 s and long pulse discharge of 5 s at 680 A are achieved. The arc discharge characteristic of high current ion source is analyzed primarily.

  12. Arcing and rf signal generation during target irradiation by a high-energy, pulsed neutral particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Robiscoe, R.T.

    1988-02-01

    We present a theory describing the dynamics of arc discharges in bulk dielectric materials on board space-based vehicles. Such ''punch-through'' arcs can occur in target satellites irradiated by high-energy (250 MeV), pulsed (100 mA x 10 ms) neutral particle beams. We treat the arc as a capacitively limited avalanche current in the target dielectric material, and we find expressions for the arc duration, charge transport, currents, and discharge energy. These quantities are adjusted to be consistent with known scaling laws for the area of charge depleted by the arc. After a brief account of the statistical distribution of voltages at which the arc starts and stops, we calculate the signal strength and frequency spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation broadcast by the arc. We find that arcs from thick ()similarreverse arrowto)1 cm) targets can generate rf signals detectable up to 1000 km from the target, bu a radio receiver operating at frequency 80 MHz, bandwidth 100 kHz, and detection threshold -105 dBm. These thick-target arc signals are 10 to 20 dB above ambient noise at the receiver, and they provide target hit assessment if the signal spectrum can be sampled at several frequencies in the nominal range 30-200 MHz. Thin-target ()similarreverse arrowto)1 mm) arc signals are much weaker, but when they are detecable in conjunction with thick-target signals, target discrimination is possible by comparing the signal frequency spectra. 24 refs., 12 figs.

  13. Individual Particle Analysis of Ambient PM 2.5 Using Advanced Electron Microscopy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald J. Keeler; Masako Morishita

    2006-12-31

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate a combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques that can be effectively used to identify and characterize individual particles and their sources. Specific techniques to be used include high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), STEM energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), and energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM). A series of ambient PM{sub 2.5} samples were collected in communities in southwestern Detroit, MI (close to multiple combustion sources) and Steubenville, OH (close to several coal fired utility boilers). High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) -imaging showed a series of nano-metal particles including transition metals and elemental composition of individual particles in detail. Submicron and nano-particles with Al, Fe, Ti, Ca, U, V, Cr, Si, Ba, Mn, Ni, K and S were observed and characterized from the samples. Among the identified nano-particles, combinations of Al, Fe, Si, Ca and Ti nano-particles embedded in carbonaceous particles were observed most frequently. These particles showed very similar characteristics of ultrafine coal fly ash particles that were previously reported. By utilizing HAADF-STEM, STEM-EDX, and EF-TEM, this investigation was able to gain information on the size, morphology, structure, and elemental composition of individual nano-particles collected in Detroit and Steubenville. The results showed that the contributions of local combustion sources - including coal fired utilities - to ultrafine particle levels were significant. Although this combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques by itself can not identify source categories, these techniques can be utilized as complementary analytical tools that are capable of providing detailed information on individual particles.

  14. Elicitation of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies by presentation of 4E10 and 10E8 epitopes on Norovirus P particles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongjiao; Fu, Lu; Shi, Yuhua; Guan, Shanshan; Yang, Lan; Gong, Xin; Yin, He; He, Xiaoqiu; Liu, Dongni; Kuai, Ziyu; Shan, Yaming; Wang, Song; Kong, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Eliciting efficient broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) is a major goal in vaccine development against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Conserved epitopes in the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 are a significant target. In this study, Norovirus P particles (NoV PPs) were used as carriers to display conformational 4E10 and 10E8 epitopes in different patterns with an appropriate linker. Immune responses to the recombinant NoV PPs were characterized in guinea pigs and Balb/c mice and could induce high levels of MPER-binding antibodies. Modest neutralizing activities could be detected in sera of guinea pigs but not of Balb/c mice. The 4E10 or 10E8 epitopes dispersed on three loops on the outermost surface of NoV PPs (4E10-loop123 PP or 10E8-loop123 PP) elicited higher neutralizing activities than the equivalent number of epitopes presented on loop 2 only (4E10-3loop2 PP or 10E8-3loop2 PP). The epitopes on different loops of the PP were well-exposed and likely formed an appropriate conformation to induce neutralizing antibodies. Although sera of immunized guinea pigs could neutralize several HIV envelope-pseudoviruses, a vaccine candidate for efficiently inducing HIV-1 BnAbs remains to be developed. PMID:26455781

  15. A new EV71 VP3 epitope in norovirus P particle vector displays neutralizing activity and protection in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liping; Fan, Rongjun; Sun, Shiyang; Fan, Peihu; Su, Weiheng; Zhou, Yan; Gao, Feng; Xu, Fei; Kong, Wei; Jiang, Chunlai

    2015-11-27

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16), as the main agents causing hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), have become a serious public health concern in the Asia-Pacific region. Recently, various neutralizing B cell epitopes of EV71 were identified as targets for promising vaccine candidates. Structural studies of Picornaviridae indicated that potent immunodominant epitopes typically lie in the hypervariable loop of capsid surfaces. However, cross-neutralizing antibodies and cross-protection between EV71 and CVA16 have not been observed. Therefore, we speculated that divergent sequences of the two viruses are key epitopes for inducing protective neutralizing responses. In this study, we selected 10 divergent epitope candidates based on alignment of the EV71 and CVA16 P1 amino acid sequences using the Multalin interface page, and these epitopes are conserved among all subgenotypes of EV71. Simultaneously, by utilizing the norovirus P particle as a novel vaccine delivery carrier, we identified the 71-6 epitope (amino acid 176-190 of VP3) as a conformational neutralizing epitope against EV71 in an in vitro micro-neutralization assay as well as an in vivo protection assay in mice. Altogether, these results indicated that the incorporation of the 71-6 epitope into the norovirus P domain can provide a promising candidate for an effective synthetic peptide-based vaccine against EV71. PMID:26529072

  16. A spin-orbit coupling for a neutral particle from Lorentz symmetry breaking effects in the CPT-odd sector of the Standard Model Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belich, H.; Bakke, K.

    2015-07-01

    We start by investigating the arising of a spin-orbit coupling and a Darwin-type term that stem from Lorentz symmetry breaking effects in the CPT-odd sector of the Standard Model Extension. Then, we establish a possible scenario of the violation of the Lorentz symmetry that gives rise to a linear confining potential and an effective electric field in which determines the spin-orbit coupling for a neutral particle analogous to the Rashba coupling [E. I. Rashba, Sov. Phys. Solid State 2, 1109 (1960)]. Finally, we confine the neutral particle to a quantum dot [W.-C. Tan and J. C. Inkson, Semicond. Sci. Technol. 11, 1635 (1996)] and analyze the influence of the linear confining potential and the spin-orbit coupling on the spectrum of energy.

  17. Transient Enhancement ('Spike-on-Tail') Observed on Neutral-Beam-Injected Energetic Ion Spectra Using the E||B Neutral Particle Analyzer in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    S. S. Medley; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Bell, R. E.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.; Roquemore, A. L.

    2010-06-01

    An increase of up to four-fold in the E||B Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) charge exchange neutral flux localized at the Neutral Beam (NB) injection full energy is observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Termed the High-Energy Feature (HEF), it appears on the NB-injected energetic ion spectrum only in discharges where tearing or kink-type modes (f < 10 kHz) are absent, TAE activity (f ~ 10-150 kHz) is weak (δBrms < 75 mGauss) and CAE/GAE activity (f ~ 400 – 1200 kHz) is robust. The feature exhibits a growth time of ~ 20 - 80 ms and occasionally develops a slowing down distribution that continues to evolve over periods of 100's of milliseconds, a time scale long compared with the typical ~ 10's ms equilibration time of the NB injected particles. The HEF is observed only in H-mode (not L-mode) discharges with injected NB power of 4 MW or greater and in the field pitch range v||/v ~ 0.7 – 0.9; i.e. only for passing (never trapped) energetic ions. The HEF is suppressed by vessel conditioning using lithium deposition at rates ~ 100 mg/shot, a level sufficient to suppress ELM activity. Increases of ~ 10 - 30 % in the measured neutron yield and total stored energy are observed to coincide with the feature along with broadening of measured Te(r), Ti(r) and ne(r) profiles. However, TRANSP analysis shows that such increases are driven by plasma profile changes and not the HEF phenomenon itself. Though a definitive mechanism has yet to be developed, the HEF appears to be caused by a form of TAE/CAE wave-particle interaction that distorts of the NB fast ion distribution in phase space.

  18. Innovative experimental particle physics through technological advances: Past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Harry W.K.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    This mini-course gives an introduction to the techniques used in experimental particle physics with an emphasis on the impact of technological advances. The basic detector types and particle accelerator facilities will be briefly covered with examples of their use and with comparisons. The mini-course ends with what can be expected in the near future from current technology advances. The mini-course is intended for graduate students and post-docs and as an introduction to experimental techniques for theorists.

  19. A PbWO4-based Neutral Particle Spectrometer in Hall C at 12 GeV JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Tanja

    2015-02-01

    The Neutral Particle Spectrometer is a standalone electromagnetic calorimeter capable of detecting high energy photons from, for instance, DVCS or π0 decay with good energy and spatial resolution in a high rate environment. It can be used together with the Hall C high-momentum spectrometers for a suite of experiments with the underlying scientific objective of studying quark dynamics through exclusive and semi-inclusive reactions.

  20. Design and physicochemical characterization of advanced spray-dried tacrolimus multifunctional particles for inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao; Hayes, Don; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Kuhn, Robert J; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design, develop, and optimize respirable tacrolimus microparticles and nanoparticles and multifunctional tacrolimus lung surfactant mimic particles for targeted dry powder inhalation delivery as a pulmonary nanomedicine. Particles were rationally designed and produced at different pump rates by advanced spray-drying particle engineering design from organic solution in closed mode. In addition, multifunctional tacrolimus lung surfactant mimic dry powder particles were prepared by co-dissolving tacrolimus and lung surfactant mimic phospholipids in methanol, followed by advanced co-spray-drying particle engineering design technology in closed mode. The lung surfactant mimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phosphor-rac-1-glycerol]. Laser diffraction particle sizing indicated that the particle size distributions were suitable for pulmonary delivery, whereas scanning electron microscopy imaging indicated that these particles had both optimal particle morphology and surface morphology. Increasing the pump rate percent of tacrolimus solution resulted in a larger particle size. X-ray powder diffraction patterns and differential scanning calorimetry thermograms indicated that spray drying produced particles with higher amounts of amorphous phase. X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry also confirmed the preservation of the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state for all engineered respirable particles. Furthermore, it was observed in hot-stage micrographs that raw tacrolimus displayed a liquid crystal transition following the main phase transition, which is consistent with its interfacial properties. Water vapor uptake and lyotropic phase transitions in the solid state at varying levels of relative humidity were determined by gravimetric vapor sorption technique. Water content in the various powders was very low and well within the levels necessary

  1. Design and physicochemical characterization of advanced spray-dried tacrolimus multifunctional particles for inhalation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Hayes, Don; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Kuhn, Robert J; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design, develop, and optimize respirable tacrolimus microparticles and nanoparticles and multifunctional tacrolimus lung surfactant mimic particles for targeted dry powder inhalation delivery as a pulmonary nanomedicine. Particles were rationally designed and produced at different pump rates by advanced spray-drying particle engineering design from organic solution in closed mode. In addition, multifunctional tacrolimus lung surfactant mimic dry powder particles were prepared by co-dissolving tacrolimus and lung surfactant mimic phospholipids in methanol, followed by advanced co-spray-drying particle engineering design technology in closed mode. The lung surfactant mimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phosphor-rac-1-glycerol]. Laser diffraction particle sizing indicated that the particle size distributions were suitable for pulmonary delivery, whereas scanning electron microscopy imaging indicated that these particles had both optimal particle morphology and surface morphology. Increasing the pump rate percent of tacrolimus solution resulted in a larger particle size. X-ray powder diffraction patterns and differential scanning calorimetry thermograms indicated that spray drying produced particles with higher amounts of amorphous phase. X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry also confirmed the preservation of the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state for all engineered respirable particles. Furthermore, it was observed in hot-stage micrographs that raw tacrolimus displayed a liquid crystal transition following the main phase transition, which is consistent with its interfacial properties. Water vapor uptake and lyotropic phase transitions in the solid state at varying levels of relative humidity were determined by gravimetric vapor sorption technique. Water content in the various powders was very low and well within the levels necessary

  2. Advanced analysis of polymer emulsions: Particle size and particle size distribution by field-flow fractionation and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Makan, Ashwell C; Spallek, Markus J; du Toit, Madeleine; Klein, Thorsten; Pasch, Harald

    2016-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) is an advanced fractionation technique for the analyses of very sensitive particles. In this study, different FFF techniques were used for the fractionation and analysis of polymer emulsions/latexes. As model systems, a pure acrylic emulsion and emulsions containing titanium dioxide were prepared and analyzed. An acrylic emulsion polymerization was conducted, continuously sampled from the reactor and subsequently analyzed to determine the particle size, radius of gyration in specific, of the latex particles throughout the polymerization reaction. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), coupled to a multidetector system, multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI), respectively, were used to investigate the evolution of particle sizes and particle size distributions (PSDs) as the polymerization progressed. The obtained particle sizes were compared against batch-mode dynamic light scattering (DLS). Results indicated differences between AF4 and DLS results due to DLS taking hydration layers into account, whereas both AF4 and SdFFF were coupled to MALLS detection, hence not taking the hydration layer into account for size determination. SdFFF has additional separation capabilities with a much higher resolution compared to AF4. The calculated radii values were 5 nm larger for SdFFF measurements for each analyzed sample against the corresponding AF4 values. Additionally a low particle size shoulder was observed for SdFFF indicating bimodality in the reactor very early during the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, different emulsions were mixed with inorganic species used as additives in cosmetics and coatings such as TiO2. These complex mixtures of species were analyzed to investigate the retention and particle interaction behavior under different AF4 experimental conditions, such as the mobile phase. The AF4 system was coupled online

  3. Single Particle ICP-MS: Advances toward routine analysis of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Manuel D; Olesik, John W; Barber, Angela G; Challis, Katie; Ranville, James F

    2016-07-01

    From its early beginnings in characterizing aerosol particles to its recent applications for investigating natural waters and waste streams, single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) has proven to be a powerful technique for the detection and characterization of aqueous dispersions of metal-containing nanomaterials. Combining the high-throughput of an ensemble technique with the specificity of a single particle counting technique and the elemental specificity of ICP-MS, spICP-MS is capable of rapidly providing researchers with information pertaining to size, size distribution, particle number concentration, and major elemental composition with minimal sample perturbation. Recently, advances in data acquisition, signal processing, and the implementation of alternative mass analyzers (e.g., time-of-flight) has resulted in a wider breadth of particle analyses and made significant progress toward overcoming many of the challenges in the quantitative analysis of nanoparticles. This review provides an overview of spICP-MS development from a niche technique to application for routine analysis, a discussion of the key issues for quantitative analysis, and examples of its further advancement for analysis of increasingly complex environmental and biological samples. Graphical Abstract Single particle ICP-MS workflow for the analysis of suspended nanoparticles. PMID:27334719

  4. Current Advances in Virus-Like Particles as a Vaccination Approach against HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chongbo; Ao, Zhujun; Yao, Xiaojian

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates against HIV-1 infection. They are capable of preserving the native conformation of HIV-1 antigens and priming CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses efficiently via cross presentation by both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. Progress has been achieved in the preclinical research of HIV-1 VLPs as prophylactic vaccines that induce broadly neutralizing antibodies and potent T cell responses. Moreover, the progress in HIV-1 dendritic cells (DC)-based immunotherapy provides us with a new vision for HIV-1 vaccine development. In this review, we describe updates from the past 5 years on the development of HIV-1 VLPs as a vaccine candidate and on the combined use of HIV particles with HIV-1 DC-based immunotherapy as efficient prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination strategies. PMID:26805898

  5. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between ions and neutrals in a partially ionized plasma are important throughout heliophysics, including near the solar surface in prominences. Understanding how ion-neutral coupling affects formation, support, structure, and dynamics of prominences will advance our physical understanding of magnetized systems involving a transition from a weakly ionized dense gas to a fully ionized tenuous plasma. We address the fundamental physics of prominence support, which is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force, and the implications for observations. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized, it is necessary to consider the support of the both the ionized and neutral components. Support of the neutrals is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material.

  6. Two-stage parallel-plate energy analyzer for simultaneous detection of positive, negative, and neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, D.; Yenen, O.; Wiese, L. M.; Jaecks, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a unique apparatus that simultaneously measures the laboratory energy and angles of several charged particles formed in a single beam. The ability to separate and detect particles of opposite polarity allows one to measure them in coincidence. Equations for the trajectories of the particles are derived and discussed in detail. The expressions for the corresponding resolution of the detected particles are also presented. Data produced in recent experiments illustrate some of the analyzer's more important features.

  7. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J.; Weiland, J.; Zang, Q.

    2013-10-01

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport.

  8. Partial Protection against Porcine Influenza A Virus by a Hemagglutinin-Expressing Virus Replicon Particle Vaccine in the Absence of Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Meret E; Vielle, Nathalie J; Python, Sylvie; Brechbühl, Daniel; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Posthaus, Horst; Zimmer, Gert; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-01-01

    This work was initiated by previous reports demonstrating that mismatched influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines can induce enhanced disease, probably mediated by antibodies. Our aim was, therefore, to investigate if a vaccine inducing opsonizing but not neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (HA) of a selected heterologous challenge virus would enhance disease or induce protective immune responses in the pig model. To this end, we immunized pigs with either whole inactivated virus (WIV)-vaccine or HA-expressing virus replicon particles (VRP) vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Both types of vaccines induced virus neutralizing and opsonizing antibodies against homologous virus as shown by a highly sensitive plasmacytoid dendritic cell-based opsonization assay. Opsonizing antibodies showed a broader reactivity against heterologous IAV compared with neutralizing antibodies. Pigs immunized with HA-recombinant VRP vaccine were partially protected from infection with a mismatched IAV, which was not neutralized but opsonized by the immune sera. The VRP vaccine reduced lung lesions, lung inflammatory cytokine responses, serum IFN-α responses, and viral loads in the airways. Only the VRP vaccine was able to prime IAV-specific IFNγ/TNFα dual secreting CD4(+) T cells detectable in the peripheral blood. In summary, this work demonstrates that with the virus pair selected, a WIV vaccine inducing opsonizing antibodies against HA which lack neutralizing activity, is neither protective nor does it induce enhanced disease in pigs. In contrast, VRP-expressing HA is efficacious vaccines in swine as they induced both potent antibodies and T-cell immunity resulting in a broader protective value. PMID:27446083

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Hypervariable Region 1 Variants Presented on Hepatitis B Virus Capsid-Like Particles Induce Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bankwitz, Dorothea; Osburn, William; Viazov, Sergei; Brovko, Olena; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman; Khudyakov, Yury; Nassal, Michael; Pumpens, Paul; Pietschmann, Thomas; Timm, Jörg; Roggendorf, Michael; Walker, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is still a serious global health burden. Despite improved therapeutic options, a preventative vaccine would be desirable especially in undeveloped countries. Traditionally, highly conserved epitopes are targets for antibody-based prophylactic vaccines. In HCV-infected patients, however, neutralizing antibodies are primarily directed against hypervariable region I (HVRI) in the envelope protein E2. HVRI is the most variable region of HCV, and this heterogeneity contributes to viral persistence and has thus far prevented the development of an effective HVRI-based vaccine. The primary goal of an antibody-based HCV vaccine should therefore be the induction of cross-reactive HVRI antibodies. In this study we approached this problem by presenting selected cross-reactive HVRI variants in a highly symmetric repeated array on capsid-like particles (CLPs). SplitCore CLPs, a novel particulate antigen presentation system derived from the HBV core protein, were used to deliberately manipulate the orientation of HVRI and therefore enable the presentation of conserved parts of HVRI. These HVRI-CLPs induced high titers of cross-reactive antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies. The combination of only four HVRI CLPs was sufficient to induce antibodies cross-reactive with 81 of 326 (24.8%) naturally occurring HVRI peptides. Most importantly, HVRI CLPs with AS03 as an adjuvant induced antibodies with a 10-fold increase in neutralizing capability. These antibodies were able to neutralize infectious HCVcc isolates and 4 of 19 (21%) patient-derived HCVpp isolates. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the induction of at least partially cross-neutralizing antibodies is possible. This approach might be useful for the development of a prophylactic HCV vaccine and should also be adaptable to other highly variable viruses. PMID:25014219

  10. Partial Protection against Porcine Influenza A Virus by a Hemagglutinin-Expressing Virus Replicon Particle Vaccine in the Absence of Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Meret E.; Vielle, Nathalie J.; Python, Sylvie; Brechbühl, Daniel; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Posthaus, Horst; Zimmer, Gert; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-01-01

    This work was initiated by previous reports demonstrating that mismatched influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines can induce enhanced disease, probably mediated by antibodies. Our aim was, therefore, to investigate if a vaccine inducing opsonizing but not neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (HA) of a selected heterologous challenge virus would enhance disease or induce protective immune responses in the pig model. To this end, we immunized pigs with either whole inactivated virus (WIV)-vaccine or HA-expressing virus replicon particles (VRP) vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Both types of vaccines induced virus neutralizing and opsonizing antibodies against homologous virus as shown by a highly sensitive plasmacytoid dendritic cell-based opsonization assay. Opsonizing antibodies showed a broader reactivity against heterologous IAV compared with neutralizing antibodies. Pigs immunized with HA-recombinant VRP vaccine were partially protected from infection with a mismatched IAV, which was not neutralized but opsonized by the immune sera. The VRP vaccine reduced lung lesions, lung inflammatory cytokine responses, serum IFN-α responses, and viral loads in the airways. Only the VRP vaccine was able to prime IAV-specific IFNγ/TNFα dual secreting CD4+ T cells detectable in the peripheral blood. In summary, this work demonstrates that with the virus pair selected, a WIV vaccine inducing opsonizing antibodies against HA which lack neutralizing activity, is neither protective nor does it induce enhanced disease in pigs. In contrast, VRP-expressing HA is efficacious vaccines in swine as they induced both potent antibodies and T-cell immunity resulting in a broader protective value. PMID:27446083

  11. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  12. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  13. Advanced In-Situ Detection and Chemical Analysis of Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Gemer, A.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Maute, K.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Williams, E.; O'brien, L.; Rocha, J. R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ulysses dust detector discovered that interstellar dust particles pass through the solar system. The Hyperdsut instrument is developed for the in-situ detection and analysis of these particles to determine the elemental, chemical and isotopic compositions. Hyperdust builds on the heritage of previous successful instruments, e.g. the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on Cassini. Hyperdust combines a highly sensitive Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) and the high mass resolution Chemical Analyzer (CA). The DTS will detect dust particles as small as 0.3 μm in radius, and the velocity vector information is used to confirm the interstellar origin and/or reveal the dynamics from the interactions within the solar system. The effective target area of the CA is > 600 cm2 achieves mass resolution in excess of 200, which is considerably higher than that of CDA, and is acheved by advanced ion optics design. The Hyperdust instrument is in the final phases of development to TRL 6.

  14. Search for neutral, long-lived particles decaying into two muons in pp[over] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; Cruz-Burelo, E De La; Martins, C De Oliveira; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Bihan, A-C Le; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; McCarthy, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Kooten, R Van; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Toerne, E Von; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-10-20

    We present a search for a neutral particle, pair produced in pp[over] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV, which decays into two muons and lives long enough to travel at least 5 cm before decaying. The analysis uses approximately 380 pb(-1) of data recorded with the D0 detector. The background is estimated to be about one event. No candidates are observed, and limits are set on the pair-production cross section times branching fraction into dimuons + X for such particles. For a mass of 10 GeV and lifetime of 4x10(-11) s, we exclude values greater than 0.14 pb (95% C.L.). These results are used to limit the interpretation of NuTeV's excess of dimuon events. PMID:17155383

  15. Settleability and characteristics of ferrate(VI)-induced particles in advanced wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Deng, Yang

    2016-04-15

    Ferrate(VI) as an emerging water treatment agent has recently recaptured interests for advanced wastewater treatment. A large number of studies were published to report ferrate(VI)-driven oxidation for various water contaminants. In contrast, very few efforts were made to characterize ferrate(VI) resultant particles in water and wastewater. In this study, jar tests were performed to examine the settleability and characteristics of ferrate(VI)-induced iron oxide particles, particularly the non-settable fraction of these particles, after ferrate(VI) reduction in a biologically treated municipal wastewater. The particle settleability was evaluated through the measurement of turbidity and particulate iron concentration in the supernatant with the settling time. Results showed that a majority of ferrate(VI)-induced iron oxide aggregates remained suspended and caused an increased turbidity. For example, at a Fe(VI) dose of 5.0 mg/L and pH 7.50, 82% of the added iron remained in the supernatant and the turbidity was 8.97 NTU against the untreated sample turbidity (2.33 NTU) after 72-h settling. The poor settling property of these particles suggested that coagulation and flocculation did not perform well in the ferrate(VI) treatment. Particle size analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that nano-scale particles were produced after ferrate(VI) decomposition, and gradually aggregated to form micro-scale larger particles in the secondary effluent. Zeta potentials of the non-settable ferrate(VI) resultant aggregates varied between -7.36 and -8.01 mV at pH 7.50 during the 72-h settling. The negative surface charges made the aggregates to be relatively stable in the wastewater matrix. PMID:26900976

  16. Pichia pastoris-expressed dengue 3 envelope-based virus-like particles elicit predominantly domain III-focused high titer neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Lav; Mani, Shailendra; Raut, Rajendra; Poddar, Ankur; Tyagi, Poornima; Arora, Upasana; de Silva, Aravinda; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Khanna, Navin

    2015-01-01

    Dengue poses a serious public health risk to nearly half the global population. It causes ~400 million infections annually and is considered to be one of the fastest spreading vector-borne diseases. Four distinct serotypes of dengue viruses (DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4) cause dengue disease, which may be either mild or extremely severe. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), by pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies, is considered to be the major mechanism underlying severe disease. This mandates that a preventive vaccine must confer simultaneous and durable immunity to each of the four prevalent DENV serotypes. Recently, we used Pichia pastoris, to express recombinant DENV-2 E ectodomain, and found that it assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs), in the absence of prM, implicated in the elicitation of ADE-mediating antibodies. These VLPs elicited predominantly type-specific neutralizing antibodies that conferred significant protection against lethal DENV-2 challenge, in a mouse model. The current work is an extension of this approach to develop prM-lacking DENV-3 E VLPs. Our data reveal that P. pastoris-produced DENV-3 E VLPs not only preserve the antigenic integrity of the major neutralizing epitopes, but also elicit potent DENV-3 virus-neutralizing antibodies. Further, these neutralizing antibodies appear to be exclusively directed toward domain III of the DENV-3 E VLPs. Significantly, they also lack discernible ADE potential toward heterotypic DENVs. Taken together with the high productivity of the P. pastoris expression system, this approach could potentially pave the way toward developing a DENV E-based, inexpensive, safe, and efficacious tetravalent sub-unit vaccine, for use in resource-poor dengue endemic countries. PMID:26441930

  17. A cell-local finite difference discretization of the low-order quasidiffusion equations for neutral particle transport on unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Wieselquist, William A.; Anistratov, Dmitriy Y.; Morel, Jim E.

    2014-09-15

    We present a quasidiffusion (QD) method for solving neutral particle transport problems in Cartesian XY geometry on unstructured quadrilateral meshes, including local refinement capability. Neutral particle transport problems are central to many applications including nuclear reactor design, radiation safety, astrophysics, medical imaging, radiotherapy, nuclear fuel transport/storage, shielding design, and oil well-logging. The primary development is a new discretization of the low-order QD (LOQD) equations based on cell-local finite differences. The accuracy of the LOQD equations depends on proper calculation of special non-linear QD (Eddington) factors from a transport solution. In order to completely define the new QD method, a proper discretization of the transport problem is also presented. The transport equation is discretized by a conservative method of short characteristics with a novel linear approximation of the scattering source term and monotonic, parabolic representation of the angular flux on incoming faces. Analytic and numerical tests are used to test the accuracy and spatial convergence of the non-linear method. All tests exhibit O(h{sup 2}) convergence of the scalar flux on orthogonal, random, and multi-level meshes.

  18. A new instrument to measure charged and neutral cometary dust particles at low and high impact velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economon, T.; Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    A new class of dust particle detector, the PVDF dust detector, was designed for space missions such as the Halley Comet missions where the particle impact velocity is very high. It is demonstrated that this same PVDF detector (operating in a different mode) also has the capability of detecting dust particles having low velocity (approx. 100 m/s). This low velocity detection capability is extremely important in terms of planned missions requiring measurement of low velocity dust particles such as comet rendezvous missions. An additional detecting element (charge induction cylinder) was also developed which, when combined with a PVDF detector, yields a system which will measure the charge (magnitude and sign) carried by a cometary particle as well as the particle velocity and mass for impact velocities in the range 100 to 500 m/s. Since the cylinder-PVDF detector system has a relatively small geometry factors, an array of PVDF detectors was included having a total sensing area of 0.1 sq m for measurements in regions of space where the dust flux is expected to be low. The characteristics of the detectors in this array have been chosen to provide optimum mass sensitivity for both low-velocity cometary dust as well as high-velocity asteroid associated and interplanetary dust.

  19. Advances and future needs in particle production and transport code developments

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    The next generation of accelerators and ever expanding needs of existing accelerators demand new developments and additions to Monte-Carlo codes, with an emphasis on enhanced modeling of elementary particle and heavy-ion interactions and transport. Challenges arise from extremely high beam energies and beam power, increasing complexity of accelerators and experimental setups, as well as design, engineering and performance constraints. All these put unprecedented requirements on the accuracy of particle production predictions, the capability and reliability of the codes used in planning new accelerator facilities and experiments, the design of machine, target and collimation systems, detectors and radiation shielding and minimization of their impact on environment. Recent advances in widely-used general-purpose all-particle codes are described for the most critical modules such as particle production event generators, elementary particle and heavy ion transport in an energy range which spans up to 17 decades, nuclide inventory and macroscopic impact on materials, and dealing with complex geometry of accelerator and detector structures. Future requirements for developing physics models and Monte-Carlo codes are discussed.

  20. Deposition rate and etching rate due to neutral radicals and dust particles measured using QCMs together with a dust eliminating filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ryu; Koga, Kazunori; Yamashita, Daisuke; Kamataki, Kunihiro; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Shiratani, Masaharu; Ashikawa, Naoko; Tokitani, Masayuki; Masuzaki, Suguru; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Sagara, Akio; the LHD experimental Group Team

    2015-09-01

    We have developed an in-situ method for measuring deposition rate of radicals and dust particles using quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) together with a dust eliminating filter. The QCMs have three channels of quartz crystals. Channel 1 was used to measure total deposition rate due to radicals and dust particles. Channel 2 was covered with a dust eliminating filter. Channel 3 was covered with a stainless-steel plate. Moreover, all QCMs are covered with a grounded stainless steel mesh for suppressing influx of charged particles. The measurements were conducted in the Large Helical Device in the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. Although the deposition measurements during the discharges were difficult, we obtained deposition rate and etching rate by comparing the data before and after each discharge. The frequency difference for channel 1 changes from 0.1 Hz (etching) to -0.5 Hz (deposition), while those for channels 2 and 3 are within a range of +/-0.1 Hz and +/-0.05 Hz, respectively. The QCM method gives information on deposition rate and etching rate due to neutral radicals and dust particles.

  1. Investigation of the utility of laser-secondary neutral mass spectrometry for the detection of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in individual atmospheric aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Bonnie J; Dambach, Steffen; Galla, Sebastian; Peterson, Richard E; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient aerosol particles is of importance to both human health and climate forcing. Although time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has proven useful for studying the distribution of organic compounds in individual aerosol particles, it is difficult to detect PAHs at relevant concentrations in individual aerosol particles because of their low ion yield. In this study, we explore the potential of using laser secondary neutral mass spectrometry (Laser-SNMS) to study three PAHs: pyrene, anthracene, and naphthalene. Because of the high volatility of PAHs, a cryostage was required for the analysis to prevent sublimation of the molecules into the vacuum chamber. We studied two laser systems, a 157 nm excimer laser, which is capable of single-photon ionization of the PAHs, and a 193 nm laser, which requires multiphoton ionization. Under optimized conditions for laser power density and primary ion pulse length, 193 nm postionization resulted in a 2-50-fold increase in ion yield over ToF-SIMS. Using the 157 nm laser, the yield was increased by more than 3 orders of magnitude for all 3 PAHs studied. The single-photon postionization process proved superior in terms of both yield enhancement and reduced fragmentation. By using the optimized 157 nm laser system and a cryostage, we were able to detect PAHs on the surface of 2 μm diameter ambient aerosol particles. PMID:21823569

  2. Energetic particle configuration in the magnetosphere of Saturn: Advances and open questions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergis, N.

    2011-12-01

    The energetic particle population in Saturn's magnetosphere was initially sampled during the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 flybys in the early 1980s. It was, however, the far more sophisticated energetic particle suite, the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) on the Cassini spacecraft that offered new insight of the energetic particles in Saturn's environment. Since July 2004, the three energetic particle detectors of MIMI, the Low Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System (LEMMS), the Charge Energy Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS) and the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA), provide energetic ion directional intensities, ion and electron energy spectra and ion composition in a keV-to-MeV energy range. In particular, through detailed energetic neutral atoms (ENA) imaging, INCA resolved the perennial limitation of in situ data (spatial vs. temporal variability), offering an overview of large parts of the magnetosphere and capturing the ongoing dynamical activity (e.g. hot plasma injections), regardless of the spacecraft's position. The results obtained so far have clearly revealed that hot plasma plays a key role in several processes active in a wide range of spatial scales in the Saturnian magnetosphere, such as the formation of high energy trapped particle radiation belts in the inner magnetosphere and of a partial, rotating ring current in the middle and outer magnetosphere, the plasma energization in the midnight-to-dawn local time sector and the variability of the Saturnian auroral UV and radio emissions. The extended coverage provided by the numerous (over 150 as of August 2011) revolutions of Cassini has helped us construct a comprehensive (yet not complete) picture of the hot plasma distribution and composition in Saturn's magnetosphere. The most surprising characteristic was the direct observation that the energetic ion distribution is strongly asymmetric with local time, forming a broadened dayside plasma sheet which becomes thinner and more intense in the

  3. Heterogeneous Nucleation of n-Butanol Vapor on Submicrometer Charged and Neutral Particles of Lactose and Monosodium Glutamate.

    PubMed

    Chen; Tao; Shu

    2000-04-01

    Condensation of a supersaturated vapor of n-butanol on monodisperse submicrometer particles of lactose and monosodium glutamate is investigated in a flow cloud chamber (FCC). The dependence of critical supersaturation S(cr) on the particle size in the range 30 to 90 nm is experimentally examined. The results show that the size dependence of S(cr) qualitatively agrees with that predicted by the Fletcher version of the Volmer theory of heterogeneous nucleation, but to a lesser degree. The experimental S(cr) is smaller than the theoretical prediction even with the line tension and surface diffusion taken into account, and they induce heterogeneous nucleation better than perfectly wetted particles. The discrepancy can not be fully accounted for by the effects of line tension and surface diffusion and the existing theory concerning the curvature-dependent surface tension. The condensation on single positive-charged particles of diameter 30, 60, and 90 nm is also examined. A lowering of S(cr) at an efficiency much larger than the prediction by Volmer's theory for ion-induced nucleation is observed, and the charge effect fades away as particle size increases. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10708489

  4. Arc discharge regulation of a megawatt hot cathode bucket ion source for the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Yahong; Hu Chundong; Liu Sheng; Jiang Caichao; Li Jun; Liang Lizhen; Collaboration: NBI Team

    2012-01-15

    Arc discharge of a hot cathode bucket ion source tends to be unstable what attributes to the filament self-heating and energetic electrons backstreaming from the accelerator. A regulation method, which based on the ion density measurement by a Langmuir probe, is employed for stable arc discharge operation and long pulse ion beam generation. Long pulse arc discharge of 100 s is obtained based on this regulation method of arc power. It establishes a foundation for the long pulse arc discharge of a megawatt ion source, which will be utilized a high power neutral beam injection device.

  5. Trapping neutral particles endowed with a magnetic moment by an electromagnetic wave carrying orbital angular momentum: Semiclassical theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; RadoŻycki, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    The motion of a neutral atom endowed with a magnetic moment interacting with the magnetic field is determined from the Ehrenfest-like equations of motion. These equations for the average values of the translational and spin degrees of freedom are derived from the Schrödinger-Pauli wave equation, and they form a set of nine coupled nonlinear evolution equations. The numerical and analytic solutions of these equations are obtained for the combination of the rotating magnetic field of a wave carrying orbital angular momentum and a static magnetic field. The running wave traps the atom only in the transverse direction, while the standing wave traps the atom also in the direction of the beam.

  6. Role of gas surface interactions in the reduction of OGO-6 neutral gas particle mass spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Hinton, B. B.; Schmitt, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    The gas-surface interaction effects observed by the quadrupole mass spectrometer are described, and the technique developed to account for them in determining ambient neutral densities is summarized. The total ion current and the ion currents for ions with molecular weights 2, 4, 16, 28, and 32 are sampled for 1.125 sec once every 9.216 sec, for 258 sec out of a 368 sec cycle. An equation is given for the number density of any constituent in the ion source region, and source density data are discussed. The mass 28 background gas is considered to be CO rather than N2, and a CO model is developed. A quasi-equilibrium model of the atomic oxygen interactions is constructed, and a set of surface parameters is determined which provides a reasonable fit to the mass 16 and 32 source densities consistent with the predicted ambient atomic oxygen.

  7. Exploring Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry with Advanced High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Particle Imaging Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizkorodov, S.

    2014-12-01

    Physical and chemical complexity of atmospheric aerosols presents significant challenges both to experimentalists working on aerosol characterization and to modelers trying to parameterize critical aerosol properties. Multi-modal approaches that combine state-of-the-art experimental, theoretical, and modeling methods are becoming increasingly important in aerosol research. This presentation will discuss recent applications of unique high-resolution mass spectrometry and particle imaging tools developed at two Department of Energy's user facilities, the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) and Advanced Light Source (ALS), to studies of molecular composition, photochemical aging, and properties of laboratory-generated and field aerosols. Specifically, this presentation will attempt to address the following questions: (a) how do NO2, SO2, and NH3 affect molecular level composition of anthropogenic aerosols?; (b) what factors determine viscosity/surface tension of organic aerosol particles?; (c) how does photolysis affect molecular composition and optical properties of organic aerosols?

  8. Advances in associated-particle neutron probe diagnostics for substance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Edgar A.; Dickerman, Charles E.; Frey, Manfred

    1995-09-01

    The development and investigation of a small associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) shows potential to allow the associated-particle diagnostic method to be moved out of the laboratory into field applications. The APSTNG interrogates the inspected object with 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron inside a cone encompassing the region of interest. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify many nuclides. Flight-times determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles can yield a separate course tomographic image of each identified nuclide, from a single orientation. Chemical substances are identified by comparing relative spectral line intensities with ratios of elements in reference compounds. The high-energy neutrons and gamma-rays penetrate large objects and dense materials. Generally, no collimators or radiation shielding are needed. Proof-of-concept laboratory experiments have been successfully performed for simulated nuclear, chemical warfare, and conventional munitions. Most recently, inspection applications have been investigated for radioactive waste characterization, presence of cocaine in propane tanks, and uranium and plutonium smuggling. Based on lessons learned with the present APSTNG system, an advanced APSTNG tube (along with improved high voltage supply and control units) is being designed and fabricated that will be transportable and rugged, yield a substantial neutron output increase, and provide sufficiently improved lifetime to allow operation at more than an order of magnitude increase in neutron flux.

  9. Advances in associated-particle sealed-tube neutron probe diagnostics for substance detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; Frey, M.

    1995-07-01

    The development and investigation of a small associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) shows potential to allow the associated-particle diagnostic method to be moved out of the laboratory into field applications. The APSTNG interrogates the inspected object with 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron inside a cone encompassing the region of interest. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify many nuclides. Flight-times determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles can yield a separate coarse tomographic image of each identified nuclide, from a single orientation. Chemical substances are identified by comparing relative spectral line intensities with ratios of elements in reference compounds. The high-energy neutrons and gamma-rays penetrate large objects and dense materials. Generally no collimators or radiation shielding are needed. Proof-of-concept laboratory experiments have been successfully performed for simulated nuclear, chemical warfare, and conventional munitions. Most recently, inspection applications have been investigated for radioactive waste characterization, presence of cocaine in propane tanks, and uranium and plutonium smuggling. Based on lessons learned with the present APSTNG system, an advanced APSTNG tube (along with improved high voltage supply and control units) is being designed and fabricated that will be transportable and rugged, yield a substantial neutron output increase, and provide sufficiently improved lifetime to allow operation at more than an order of magnitude increase in neutron flux.

  10. Particles, waves and storms in geospace: Recent advances and persistent gaps in our comprehension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, Ioannis A.

    2016-07-01

    The terrestrial magnetosphere features plasma populations with a wide dynamic range of energies, spanning more than 8 orders of magnitude -- from ≃V in the plasmasphere to tens of MeV in the outer Van Allen belt and hundreds of MeV in the inner Van Allen belt. A wealth of in-situ measurements of particles and waves, and ground-based measurements of waves, has shaped a comprehensive understanding of the interactions of the various plasma populations with electromagnetic waves during geospace magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms. We shall discuss recent advances and persistent gaps in our comprehension of inner magnetosphere dynamics.

  11. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry of ion beam sputtered neutrals for element- and isotope-selective analysis of plutonium in micro-particles.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, N; Kratz, J-V; Trautmann, N; Passler, G

    2009-11-01

    Micro-particles containing actinides are of interest for risk assessments of contaminated areas, nuclear forensic analyses, and IAEA as well as Euratom safeguards programs. For their analysis, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been established as the state-of-the-art standard technique. In the case of actinide mixtures within the particles, however, SIMS suffers from isobaric interferences (e.g., (238)U/(238)Pu, (241)Am/(241)Pu). This can be eliminated by applying resonance ionization mass spectrometry which is based on stepwise resonant excitation and ionization of atoms with laser light, followed by mass spectrometric detection of the produced ions, combining high elemental selectivity with the analysis of isotopic compositions. This paper describes the instrumental modifications for coupling a commercial time-of-flight (TOF)-SIMS apparatus with three-step resonant post-ionization of the sputtered neutrals using a high-repetition-rate (kHz) Nd:YAG laser pumped tunable titanium:sapphire laser system. Spatially resolved ion images obtained from actinide-containing particles in TOF-SIMS mode demonstrate the capability for isotopic and spatial resolution. Results from three-step resonant post-ionization of bulk Gd and Pu samples successfully demonstrate the high elemental selectivity of this process. PMID:19557397

  12. Exclusive neutral strange particle production from double Pomeron exchange produced by proton-proton interactions at radical s = 62 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Skeens, J.

    1990-09-21

    Data are presented for the first time on exclusive Pomeron-Pomeron interactions which produce a neutral strange and neutral antistrange particle pair in a central system X. In this paper, the system, X, is identified as one of the following neutral combinations; K{sub s}{sup 0}K{sub s}{sup 0}, K{sub s}{sup 0}K{sup {plus minus}}{pi}{sup {minus plus}}, {Lambda}{sup 0}{bar {Lambda}}{sup 0}, {Lambda}{sup 0}{bar {Lambda}}{sup 0}*. These data were obtained in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 62 GeV at the CERN ISR. The triggering systems used to obtain these data are described, followed by a description of the data. The central system mass distributions are presented along with differential mass cross section estimates. A broad enhancement is seen in the K{sub s}{sup 0}K{sub s}{sup 0} system at a mass of 1.2 GeV, and is likely to have the quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 0{sup ++}. Total cross section estimates of 1.3 {plus minus} .64 {mu}b in the K{sub 2}{sup 0}K{sub s}{sup 0} system, . 44 {plus minus} .14 {mu}b in the K{sub s}{sup 0}K{sup {plus minus}}{pi}{sup {minus plus}} system, .20 {plus minus} .14 {mu}b in the {Lambda}{sup 0}{bar {Lambda}}{sup 0} system, and .13 {plus minus} .06 {mu}b in the {Lambda}{sup 0}{bar {Lambda}}{sup 0}* system are obtained.

  13. Transfer of a weakly bound electron in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles. I. Long-range interaction effects in the ionic-covalent coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V. S. Narits, A. A.

    2013-10-15

    Ion-pair formation processes are studied in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles possessing small electron affinities. Nonadiabatic transitions from a Rydberg covalent term to an ionic term of a quasi-molecule are considered using the modified Landau-Zener theory supplemented with calculation of survival factors of an anion decaying in the Coulomb field of a positive ion core. Using the technique of irreducible tensor operators and the momentum representation of the wavefunction of a highly excited atom, exact expressions are obtained for transition matrix elements and the ionic-covalent coupling parameter. The approach developed in the paper provides the description beyond the scope of a conventional assumption about a small variation of the wavefunction of the Rydberg atom on the range of electron coordinates determined by the characteristic radius of the wavefunction of the anion. This allows one to correctly consider long-range effects of the interaction between a weakly bound electron and the neutral core of a negative ion in processes under study. It is shown by the example of thermal collisions of Xe(nf) atoms with CH{sub 3}CN molecules that this is very important for a reliable quantitative description of anion formation with a low binding energy. The results are compared with experiments and calculations performed within the framework of a number of approximate methods.

  14. The Response of the Ionospheric Cusp to the Solar Through Two Perspectives: Low Energy Changed Particle In-Situ Measurements and Low- Energy Neutral Atom Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, V. N.; Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Craven, P. D.

    2000-01-01

    The IMAGE mission provides a new perspective on the study of the response of the magnetosphere/ionosphere system to changing solar wind conditions, particularly the variability of ion outflow. Learning to interpret this new type of data becomes an essential step in the process of melding these results with the wealth of in-situ charged particle observations obtained over the past 25 years. In order to understand how the in-situ data correspond to and contrast with IMAGE results we will perform a conjunctive study of event data from two instruments to shed light on the coupling of the solar wind and ionosphere from these different perspectives. We will use the Low Energy Neutral Atom instrument (LENA) which images energetic neutral atom emissions from upward flowing ionospheric ions and the Thermal Ion Dynamics Instrument (TIDE) on the Polar satellite which measures in-situ ion outflow from 0.3-300 eV. Our primary goal will be to understand how comparing the imaging and in-situ perspectives can aid in the analysis of both data sets.

  15. The Response of the Ionospheric Cusp to the Solar Wind Through Two Perspectives: Low Energy Charged Particle In-Situ Measurements and Low-Energy Neutral Atom Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, V. N.; Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Giles, B. L.; Craven, P. D.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission provides a new perspective on the study of the response of the magnetosphere/ionosphere system to changing solar wind conditions, particularly the variability of ion outflow. Learning to interpret this new type of data becomes an essential step in the process of melding these results with the wealth of in-situ charged particle observations obtained over the past 25 years. In order to understand how the in-situ data correspond to and contrast with IMAGE results we will perform a conjunctive study of event data from two instruments to shed light on the coupling of the solar wind and ionosphere from these different perspectives. We will use the Low Energy Neutral Atom instrument (LENA) which images energetic neutral atom emissions from upward flowing ionospheric ions and the Thermal Ion Dynamics Instrument (TIDE) on the Polar satellite which measures in-situ ion outflow from 0.3-300 eV. Our primary goal will be to understand how comparing the imaging and in-situ perspectives can aid in the analysis of both data sets.

  16. Reply to comments by Neugebauer and Coates on "Neutral hydrogen shell structure near comet P/Halley deduced from Vega-1 and Giotto energetic particle data"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verigin, M. I.; McKenna-Lawlor, S.; Richter, A. K.; Szego, K.; Veselovsky, I. S.

    Both Verigin et al [1991](Paper 1) and Neugebauer and Coates [1991](Comments) contain updated information about the problem of interpreting a quasiperiodic variation in energetic particle fluxes recorded on board the Vega-1 and Giotto spacecraft (see references in Paper 1). The present text is a response to Comments. The reality of the flux variations recorded is accepted (Argument 1 of Comments). However, a complete explanation of the effect meets with severe difficulties and our present understanding of it is far from being complete. At the present time there is no other explanation of the quasiperiodicity other then that based on the assumption that it is a consequence of neutral gas production by a rotating cometary nucleus (Argument 2).

  17. Neutral Particle Analyzer Vertically Scanning Measurements of MHD-induced Energetic Ion Redistribution or Loss in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. Medley, R. Andre, R.E. Bell, D.S. Darrow, C.W. Domier, E.D. Fredrickson, N.N. Gorelenkov, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, K.C. Lee, F.M. Levinton, D. Liu, N.C. Luhmann, Jr., J.E. Menard, H. Park, D. Stutman, A.L. Roquemore, K. Tritz, H. Yuh and the NSTX Team

    2007-11-15

    Observations of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) induced redistribution or loss of energetic ions measured using the vertically scanning capability of the Neutral Particle Analyzer diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are presented along with TRANSP and ORBIT code analysis of the results. Although redistribution or loss of energetic ions due to bursting fishbone-like and low-frequency (f ~ 10 kHz) kinktype MHD activity has been reported previously, the primary goal of this work is to study redistribution or loss due to continuous Alfvénic (f ~ 20 – 150 kHz) modes, a topic that heretofore has not been investigated in detail for NSTX plasmas. Initial indications are that the former drive energetic ion loss whereas the continuous Alfvénic modes only cause redistribution and the energetic ions remain confined.

  18. Heterologous prime-boost immunization regimens using adenovirus vector and virus-like particles induce broadly neutralizing antibodies against H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Chang; Liu, Wen-Chun; Lin, Yu-Fen; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2013-11-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses continue to trigger severe diseases in poultry and humans, prompting efforts to develop an effective vaccine. Toward that goal, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus vector encoding influenza hemagglutin (rAd-HA) and a flagellin-containing virus-like particle (FliC-VLP). Using a murine model, we investigated a heterologous prime-boost vaccination regimen combining these two vectors. Our results indicate that priming with the rAd-HA vector followed by a FliC-VLP booster induced the highest HA-specific total IgG, IgG1and IgG2a. Maximum neutralizing antibody titers against homologous and heterologous clades of H5N1 virus strains and hemagglutination inhibition resulted from the heterologous vaccination strategy. Our results are likely to contribute to the development of more effective H5N1 vaccines. PMID:23813782

  19. Neutralizer optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Mohajeri, Kayhan

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary results of a test program to optimize a neutralizer design for 30 cm xenon ion thrusters are discussed. The impact of neutralizer geometry, neutralizer axial location, and local magnetic fields on neutralizer performance is discussed. The effect of neutralizer performance on overall thruster performance is quantified, for thruster operation in the 0.5-3.2 kW power range. Additionally, these data are compared to data published for other north-south stationkeeping (NSSK) and primary propulsion xenon ion thruster neutralizers.

  20. [Polar neutral organic compounds (POCN) in city aerosols. 2. Measuring of emissions from domestic fuel and vehicle exhaust and from immission particles in Berlin (West)].

    PubMed

    Moriske, H J; Freise, R; Schneider, C; Rüden, H

    1987-10-01

    During April and May 1985, some emission samples from private coal firing (domestic fuel) were taken and were fired with two different kind of coal (bituminous and brown coal). Also, measurements were done under different combustion conditions (low and high concentrations of oxygenium during the combustion process). In June and November 1985, some emission samples from heavy diesel-engines were taken in a special tunnel equipment, at different engine conditions. During September 1985, also suspended particulates in a highway traffic tunnel were taken. All these samples were taken using high volume cascade impactors which give a fractionation of the suspended particulates into different particle sizes, according to their retention behaviour in the human respiratory system. The results of these emission samples and samples in the highway tunnel were compared with prior immission measurements of urban suspended particulates in Berlin-West, during January 1984. The etherextractable organic matter (= EEOM) of the total suspended particulate matter (= TPM) was determined using ultrasonic extraction method. The EEOM was separated into an acidic (= AF), a basic (= BF) and a neutral fraction (= NF) by dissolution in acidic and basic agents. Of the neutral fraction (NF), further separation was done into aliphatic compounds (= AIP), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (= PAH) and polar neutral organic compounds (POCN) by using thin layer chromatography. From the PAH and POCN, single compounds were identified by gas chromatographic analysis with dual capillary collumns and internal standard method. All organic fractions were tested to their mutagenic activity in the Salmonella typhimurium mammalian microsome bioassay by Ames. The following results were gained: the neutral fraction (NF) made the highest part of the EEOM (greater than or equal to 60%) whereas the part of the AF amounted to 10-25% and of the basic fraction (BF) to approximatively 5-20%. Making further separation of

  1. Space-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy free of high-energy neutral particle noise in wavelength range of 10–130 Å on the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xianli; Morita, Shigeru; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Goto, Motoshi; Dong, Chunfeng

    2014-04-15

    A flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer system working in wavelength range of 10–130 Å has been constructed in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for profile measurements of bremsstrahlung continuum and line emissions of heavy impurities in the central column of plasmas, which are aimed at studies on Z{sub eff} and impurity transport, respectively. Until now, a large amount of spike noise caused by neutral particles with high energies (≤180 keV) originating in neutral beam injection has been observed in EUV spectroscopy on LHD. The new system has been developed with an aim to delete such a spike noise from the signal by installing a thin filter which can block the high-energy neutral particles entering the EUV spectrometer. Three filters of 11 μm thick beryllium (Be), 3.3 μm thick polypropylene (PP), and 0.5 μm thick polyethylene terephthalate (PET: polyester) have been examined to eliminate the spike noise. Although the 11 μm Be and 3.3 μm PP filters can fully delete the spike noise in wavelength range of λ ≤ 20 Å, the signal intensity is also reduced. The 0.5 μm PET filter, on the other hand, can maintain sufficient signal intensity for the measurement and the spike noise remained in the signal is acceptable. As a result, the bremsstrahlung profile is successfully measured without noise at 20 Å even in low-density discharges, e.g., 2.9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}, when the 0.5 μm PET filter is used. The iron n = 3–2 Lα transition array consisting of FeXVII to FeXXIV is also excellently observed with their radial profiles in wavelength range of 10–18 Å. Each transition in the Lα array can be accurately identified with its radial profile. As a typical example of the method a spectral line at 17.62 Å is identified as FeXVIII transition. Results on absolute intensity calibration of the spectrometer system, pulse height and noise count analyses of the spike noise between holographic and ruled gratings and wavelength

  2. Microstructural Evolution of Boron Nitride Particles in Advanced 9Cr Power Plant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Letian; MacLachlan, Ryan; Jepson, Mark A. E.; Thomson, Rachel

    2013-07-01

    B and N can be used to increase the creep strength of advanced 9Cr power plant steels by means of microstructural stabilization and precipitation strengthening; however, the formation of boron nitride (BN) particles removes B and N from solution and reduces the strengthening effect of B and N simultaneously. In the current study, the BN precipitation/dissolution conditions in 9Cr-3W-3Co-V-Nb steels have been investigated to understand how to prevent the formation of BN. A series of austenitizing heat treatments have been designed using thermodynamic predictions as a guide in an attempt to dissolve the BN present after the production of 9Cr-3W-3Co-V-Nb type steels and to prevent also the precipitation of BN during the subsequent heat treatments. Advanced electron microscopy has been carried out to investigate the evolution of the BN particles in relation to the austenitization temperature. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) has been used to identify the B-containing phases, and a method has been developed using secondary electron images to quantify the amount of BN present within the microstructure. It has been found that BN solubility is sensitive to the B and N levels in the steel composition, as indicated by thermodynamic calculations. However, it is proposed that austenitizing heat treatments at temperatures ranging from 1448 K to 1473 K (from 1175 °C to 1200 °C) with durations from 1 to 7 hours can effectively prevent the precipitation of BN as well as dissolving most of the BN particles formed during initial steel manufacture.

  3. Search for neutral color-octet weak-triplet scalar particles in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Dobur, D.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randleconde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Ali, A.; Aly, R.; Aly, S.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Lotfy, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Masod, R.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Pekkanen, J.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Lomidze, D.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Husemann, U.; Kassel, F.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sudhakar, K.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Sgaravatto, M.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Gabusi, M.; Magnani, A.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Trapani, P. 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F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Mareskas-palcek, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Sen, S.; Snyder, C.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Mcginn, C.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Demortier, L.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Christian, A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2015-09-01

    A search for pair production of neutral color-octet weak-triplet scalar particles (Θ0) is performed in processes where one Θ0 decays to a pair of b quark jets and the other to a Z boson plus a jet, with the Z boson decaying to a pair of electrons or muons. The search is performed with data collected by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV. The number of observed events is found to be in agreement with the standard model predictions. The 95% confidence level upper limit on the product of the cross section and branching fraction is obtained as a function of the Θ0 mass. The 95% confidence level lower bounds on the Θ0 mass are found to be 623 and 426 GeV, for two different octo-triplet theoretical scenarios. These are the first direct experimental bounds on particles predicted by the octo-triplet model. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Search for neutral color-octet weak-triplet scalar particles in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-29

    A search for pair production of neutral color-octet weak-triplet scalar particles0) is performed in processes where one Θ0 decays to a pair of b quark jets and the other to a Z boson plus a jet, with the Z boson decaying to a pair of electrons or muons. The search is performed with data collected by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1 of proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The number of observed events is found to be in agreement with the standard model predictions. The 95% confidence level upper limit on the product of the cross section and branching fraction is obtained as a function of the Θ0 mass. The 95% confidence level lower bounds on the Θ0 mass are found to be 623 and 426 GeV, for two different octo-triplet theoretical scenarios. These are the first direct experimental bounds on particles predicted by the octo-triplet model.

  5. Search for neutral color-octet weak-triplet scalar particles in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-29

    A search for pair production of neutral color-octet weak-triplet scalar particles (Θ0) is performed in processes where one Θ0 decays to a pair of b quark jets and the other to a Z boson plus a jet, with the Z boson decaying to a pair of electrons or muons. The search is performed with data collected by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1 of proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The number of observed events is found to be in agreement with the standard model predictions. The 95% confidence levelmore » upper limit on the product of the cross section and branching fraction is obtained as a function of the Θ0 mass. The 95% confidence level lower bounds on the Θ0 mass are found to be 623 and 426 GeV, for two different octo-triplet theoretical scenarios. These are the first direct experimental bounds on particles predicted by the octo-triplet model.« less

  6. The movement of particles in liquid metals under gravity forces and the interaction of particles with advancing solid-liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, F.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of shrinkage and gas porosity are discussed. Gravity forces enhance the removal of gas bubbles from a metal melt and contribute to the feeding of shrinkage porosity in castings. Experiments are reviewed which determine how large a density difference is required for metal particles to float or sink in a metal melt and to what extent do factors not considered in Stokes Law influence particle movement in a real system. As to the interaction of particles with an advancing solid-liquid interface, the results indicate that the metal particles are not rejected in a metal melt, and that concentrations of particles in a metal following solidification are due to other factors.

  7. New multigroup Monte Carlo scattering algorithm suitable for neutral- and charged-particle Boltzmann and Fokker-Planck calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, D.P.

    1983-05-01

    Morel (1981) has developed multigroup Legendre cross sections suitable for input to standard discrete ordinates transport codes for performing charged-particle Fokker-Planck calculations in one-dimensional slab and spherical geometries. Since the Monte Carlo neutron transport code, MORSE, uses the same multigroup cross section data that discrete ordinates codes use, it was natural to consider whether Fokker-Planck calculations could be performed with MORSE. In order to extend the unique three-dimensional forward or adjoint capability of MORSE to Fokker-Planck calculations, the MORSE code was modified to correctly treat the delta-function scattering of the energy operator, and a new set of physically acceptable cross sections was derived to model the angular operator. Morel (1979) has also developed multigroup Legendre cross sections suitable for input to standard discrete ordinates codes for performing electron Boltzmann calculations. These electron cross sections may be treated in MORSE with the same methods developed to treat the Fokker-Planck cross sections. The large magnitude of the elastic scattering cross section, however, severely increases the computation or run time. It is well-known that approximate elastic cross sections are easily obtained by applying the extended transport (or delta function) correction to the Legendre coefficients of the exact cross section. An exact method for performing the extended transport cross section correction produces cross sections which are physically acceptable. Sample calculations using electron cross sections have demonstrated this new technique to be very effective in decreasing the large magnitude of the cross sections.

  8. Observation of Energetic Particle Driven Modes Relevant to Advanced Tokamak Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    R. Nazikian; B. Alper; H.L. Berk; D. Borba; C. Boswell; R.V. Budny; K.H. Burrell; C.Z. Cheng; E.J. Doyle; E. Edlund; R.J. Fonck; A. Fukuyama; N.N. Gorelenkov; C.M. Greenfield; D.J. Gupta; M. Ishikawa; R.J. Jayakumar; G.J. Kramer; Y. Kusama; R.J. La Haye; G.R. McKee; W.A. Peebles; S.D. Pinches; M. Porkolab; J. Rapp; T.L. Rhodes; S.E. Sharapov; K. Shinohara; J.A. Snipes; W.M. Solomon; E.J. Strait; M. Takechi; M.A. Van Zeeland; W.P. West; K.L. Wong; S. Wukitch; L. Zeng

    2004-10-21

    Measurements of high-frequency oscillations in JET [Joint European Torus], JT-60U, Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, and TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] plasmas are contributing to a new understanding of fast ion-driven instabilities relevant to Advanced Tokamak (AT) regimes. A model based on the transition from a cylindrical-like frequency-chirping mode to the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) has successfully encompassed many of the characteristics seen in experiments. In a surprising development, the use of internal density fluctuation diagnostics has revealed many more modes than has been detected on edge magnetic probes. A corollary discovery is the observation of modes excited by fast particles traveling well below the Alfven velocity. These observations open up new opportunities for investigating a ''sea of Alfven Eigenmodes'' in present-scale experiments, and highlight the need for core fluctuation and fast ion measurements in a future burning-plasma experiment.

  9. Coated Particles Fuel Compact-General Purpose Heat Source for Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    Coated Particles Fuel Compacts (CPFC) have recently been shown to offer performance advantage for use in Radioisotope Heater Units (RHUs) and design flexibility for integrating at high thermal efficiency with Stirling Engine converters, currently being considered for 100 We. Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (ARPS). The particles in the compact consist of 238PuO2 fuel kernels with 5-μm thick PyC inner coating and a strong ZrC outer coating, whose thickness depends on the maximum fuel temperature during reentry, the fuel kernel diameter, and the fraction of helium gas released from the kernels and fully contained by the ZrC coating. In addition to containing the helium generated by radioactive decay of 238Pu for up to 10 years before launch and 10-15 years mission lifetime, the kernels are intentionally sized (>= 300 μm in diameter) to prevent any adverse radiological effects on reentry. This paper investigates the advantage of replacing the four iridium-clad 238PuO2 fuel pellets, the two floating graphite membranes, and the two graphite impact shells in current State-Of-The-Art (SOA) General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) with CPFC. The total mass, thermal power, and specific power of the CPFC-GPHS are calculated as functions of the helium release fraction from the fuel kernels and maximum fuel temperature during reentry from 1500 K to 2400 K. For the same total mass and volume as SOA GPHS, the generated thermal power by single-size particles CPFC-GPHS is 260 W at Beginning-Of-Mission (BOM), versus 231 W for the GPHS. For an additional 10% increase in total mass, the CPFC-GPHS could generate 340 W BOM; 48% higher than SOA GPHS. The corresponding specific thermal power is 214 W/kg, versus 160 W/kg for SOA GPHS; a 34% increase. Therefore, for the same thermal power, the CPFC-GPHS is lighter than SOA GPHS, while it uses the same amount of 238PuO2 fuel and same aeroshell. For the same helium release fraction and fuel temperature, binary-size particles CPFC-GPHS could

  10. Advances in 4D Treatment Planning for Scanned Particle Beam Therapy — Report of Dedicated Workshops

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Christoph; Graeff, Christian; Riboldi, Marco; Nill, Simeon; Baroni, Guido; Knopf, Antje-Christin

    2014-01-01

    We report on recent progress in the field of mobile tumor treatment with scanned particle beams, as discussed in the latest editions of the 4D treatment planning workshop. The workshop series started in 2009, with about 20 people from 4 research institutes involved, all actively working on particle therapy delivery and development. The first workshop resulted in a summary of recommendations for the treatment of mobile targets, along with a list of requirements to apply these guidelines clinically. The increased interest in the treatment of mobile tumors led to a continuously growing number of attendees: the 2012 edition counted more than 60 participants from 20 institutions and commercial vendors. The focus of research discussions among workshop participants progressively moved from 4D treatment planning to complete 4D treatments, aiming at effective and safe treatment delivery. Current research perspectives on 4D treatments include all critical aspects of time resolved delivery, such as in-room imaging, motion detection, beam application, and quality assurance techniques. This was motivated by the start of first clinical treatments of hepato cellular tumors with a scanned particle beam, relying on gating or abdominal compression for motion mitigation. Up to date research activities emphasize significant efforts in investigating advanced motion mitigation techniques, with a specific interest in the development of dedicated tools for experimental validation. Potential improvements will be made possible in the near future through 4D optimized treatment plans that require upgrades of the currently established therapy control systems for time resolved delivery. But since also these novel optimization techniques rely on the validity of the 4DCT, research focusing on alternative 4D imaging technique, such as MRI based 4DCT generation will continue. PMID:24354749

  11. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forwardforward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  12. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forward-forward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  13. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchuk, Kyle

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called "non-blinking" quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  14. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, Kyle

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  15. Development and Validation of a Critical Gradient Energetic Particle Driven Alfvén Eigenmode Transport Model for DIII-D Tilted Neutral Beam Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Bass, E. M.

    2014-10-01

    Recent experiments on DIII-D with tilted neutral beam injection (NBI), which significantly vary the beam energetic particle (EP) source profiles, have provided strong evidence that unstable Alfvén eigenmodes (AE) drive stiff EP transport at a critical EP density gradient. We hope to identify the critical gradient with the condition that the maximum local AE growth rate falls to the local ion temperature gradient (ITG)/trapped electron mode (TEM) rate at the same low toroidal mode number. This condition was supported by early nonlinear local GYRO simulations and more is more optimistic than stiff EP transport at the AE marginal stability gradient used in a recent ITER projection of AE driven alpha confinement losses. The AE and ITG/TEM growth rates are from GYRO with comparison of Maxwellian and slowing down beam-like EP distributions. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FG02-95ER54309 and DE-FC02-08ER54977.

  16. Analysis of plasma and neutral gas flow inside of a PET bottle under PIII condition by particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagawa, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Ikeyama, M.; Nakao, S.; Choi, J.; Miyagawa, S.

    2006-01-01

    The plasma behavior inside of a PET bottle has been simulated under the condition of plasma immersed ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) using the simulation software "PEGASUS". The software uses the "PIC-MCCM" module for the plasma analysis and the "DSMCM" module for the gas flow field analysis. DSMCM gives densities, velocities, fluxes, temperatures and pressures of each neutral species such as the fed gas species and radicals. By coupling PIC-MCCM with DSMCM simulation, the plasma behavior in the flowing Ar gas and N2 gas has been simulated. The gas was injected from the tip of the gas inlet which was inserted into the center of the bottle. The base gas pressure was 1-50 Pa and a positive pulse voltage (maximum voltage = 0.1-1 kV) was applied to the center rod. A two-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system was used. Time evolution of the spacial distribution was obtained for densities of electrons, N2+ ions, N2∗ radicals and N atoms in N2 gas, and Ar+ ions, Ar∗ and Ar∗(4s) radicals in Ar gas. Time evolution of the particle flux and the energy flux of electrons and ions on the target surface was also obtained.

  17. Development and validation of a critical gradient energetic particle driven Alfven eigenmode transport model for DIII-D tilted neutral beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Bass, E. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; VanZeeland, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with the DIII-D tilted neutral beam injection (NBI) varying the beam energetic particle (EP) source profiles have provided strong evidence that unstable Alfven eigenmodes (AE) drive stiff EP transport at a critical EP density gradient [Heidbrink et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 093006]. Here the critical gradient is identified by the local AE growth rate being equal to the local ITG/TEM growth rate at the same low toroidal mode number. The growth rates are taken from the gyrokinetic code GYRO. Simulation show that the slowing down beam-like EP distribution has a slightly lower critical gradient than the Maxwellian. The ALPHA EP density transport code [Waltz and Bass 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104006], used to validate the model, combines the low-n stiff EP critical density gradient AE mid-core transport with the Angioni et al (2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 055013) energy independent high-n ITG/TEM density transport model controling the central core EP density profile. For the on-axis NBI heated DIII-D shot 146102, while the net loss to the edge is small, about half the birth fast ions are transported from the central core r/a  <  0.5 and the central density is about half the slowing down density. These results are in good agreement with experimental fast ion pressure profiles inferred from MSE constrained EFIT equilibria.

  18. Human papillomavirus type 16 virus-like particles expressed in attenuated Salmonella typhimurium elicit mucosal and systemic neutralizing antibodies in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nardelli-Haefliger, D; Roden, R B; Benyacoub, J; Sahli, R; Kraehenbuhl, J P; Schiller, J T; Lachat, P; Potts, A; De Grandi, P

    1997-01-01

    Attenuated strains of Salmonella are attractive live vaccine candidates for eliciting mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. The ability to induce immune responses in the reproductive tract may be critical for the effectiveness of a prophylactic vaccine against genital human papillomaviruses (HPV), which are important etiologic agents in the development of cervical cancer. To examine the potential of a live Salmonella-based vaccine to prevent genital HPV infection, the L1 major capsid protein from HPV type 16 (HPV16) was constitutively expressed in the PhoPc strain of Salmonella typhimurium. As demonstrated by electron microscopy, the L1 protein expressed in these bacteria assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) that resemble authentic papillomavirus virions. This is the first demonstration that papillomavirus VLPs can self-assemble in prokaryotes. BALB/c mice were immunized with the HPV16 L1 recombinant PhoPc strain by the oral and nasal routes. Despite a low stability of the L1-expressing plasmid in vivo, a double nasal immunization was effective in inducing L1-specific serum antibodies that recognized mainly native, but not disassembled, VLPs. These antibodies effectively neutralized HPV16 pseudotyped virions in an in vitro infectivity assay. Conformationally dependent anti-VLP immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG were also detected in oral and vaginal secretions, indicating that potentially protective antibody responses were elicited at mucosal sites. Recombinant attenuated Salmonella expressing HPV capsids may represent a promising vaccine candidate against genital HPV infection. PMID:9234794

  19. On the influence of a Rashba-type coupling induced by Lorentz-violating effects on a Landau system for a neutral particle

    SciTech Connect

    Bakke, K.; Belich, H.

    2015-03-15

    We study a possible scenario of the Lorentz symmetry violation background that allows us to build an analogue of the Landau system for a nonrelativistic Dirac neutral particle interacting with a field configuration of crossed electric and magnetic fields. We also discuss the arising of analogues of the Rashba coupling, the Zeeman term and the Darwin term from the Lorentz symmetry breaking effects, and the influence of these terms on the analogue of the Landau system confined to a two-dimensional quantum ring. Finally, we show that this analogy with the Landau system confined to a two-dimensional quantum ring allows us to establish an upper bound for the Lorentz symmetry breaking parameters. - Highlights: • Landau system from crossed electric and magnetic fields and fixed time-like vector. • Analogues of the Rashba coupling, the Zeeman term and the Darwin term. • Lorentz symmetry breaking effects on a two-dimensional quantum ring. • Upper bound for the Lorentz symmetry breaking parameters.

  20. The glow discharge inception and post-discharge relaxation of charged and neutral active particles in synthetic air at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, A. P.; Marković, V. Lj; Stamenković, S. N.; Stankov, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    The study of dc glow discharge inception and post-discharge relaxation of charged and neutral active particles in synthetic air at low pressure is presented. The breakdown time delay dependence as a function of relaxation time \\overline{{{t}\\text{d}}}(τ ) (the memory curve) is measured and modelled from milliseconds to the saturation region determined by the cosmic rays and natural radioactivity level. Due to fast conversion \\text{N}2++{{\\text{O}}2}\\to {{\\text{N}}2}+\\text{O}2+ , relaxation of dc discharge in synthetic air in the time interval from one to about ninety milliseconds is dominated by the diffusion decay of molecular oxygen {{O}}_2^ + ions. The change of regimes, from ambipolar to the free diffusion limit, is investigated and the variation of effective diffusion coefficients is determined. The late relaxation is explained by the kinetics of nitrogen atoms, recombining on the surfaces of gas discharge tube and stainless steel electrodes and relevant surface recombination coefficients are determined.

  1. Coxsackievirus A16-like particles produced in Pichia pastoris elicit high-titer neutralizing antibodies and confer protection against lethal viral challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Qingwei; Ku, Zhiqiang; Hu, Yang; Ye, Xiaohua; Zhang, Yingyi; Huang, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) is a major causative agent of hand, foot and mouse disease (HFMD) which has been affecting millions of young children annually in the Asia-Pacific region over the last seven years. However, no commercial CA16 vaccines are currently available. In the present study, we investigated the expression of virus-like particles (VLPs) of CA16 in Pichia pastoris yeast and their immunogenicity and protective efficacy in mice. We found that CA16-VLPs could be produced at relatively high levels in P. pastoris yeast transformed with a construct co-expressing the P1 and 3CD proteins of CA16. Mice immunized with the yeast-derived CA16-VLPs produced high-titer serum antibodies with potent neutralization effect specifically on CA16. More importantly, passive immunization with the yeast-derived VLPs fully protected neonatal mice against CA16 lethal challenge in both antisera transfer and maternal immunization experiments. Collectively, our results demonstrate that P. pastoris-derived CA16-VLPs represent a promising CA16 vaccine candidate with proven preclinical efficacy and desirable traits for manufacturing at industrial scale. PMID:26902108

  2. Recent advances in the modeling of plasmas with the Particle-In-Cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Lehe, Remi; Vincenti, Henri; Godfrey, Brendan; Lee, Patrick; Haber, Irv

    2015-11-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach is the method of choice for self-consistent simulations of plasmas from first principles. The fundamentals of the PIC method were established decades ago but improvements or variations are continuously being proposed. We report on several recent advances in PIC related algorithms, including: (a) detailed analysis of the numerical Cherenkov instability and its remediation, (b) analytic pseudo-spectral electromagnetic solvers in Cartesian and cylindrical (with azimuthal modes decomposition) geometries, (c) arbitrary-order finite-difference and generalized pseudo-spectral Maxwell solvers, (d) novel analysis of Maxwell's solvers' stencil variation and truncation, in application to domain decomposition strategies and implementation of Perfectly Matched Layers in high-order and pseudo-spectral solvers. Work supported by US-DOE Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231 and the US-DOE SciDAC program ComPASS. Used resources of NERSC, supported by US-DOE Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  3. Ultracold neutral plasmas.

    PubMed

    Killian, Thomas C

    2007-05-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas occupy an exotic regime of plasma physics in which electrons form a swarming, neutralizing background for ions that sluggishly move in a correlated manner. Strong interactions between the charged particles give rise to surprising dynamics such as oscillations of the average kinetic energy during equilibration and extremely fast recombination. Such phenomena offer stimulating and challenging problems for computational scientists, and the physics can be applied to other environments, such as the interior of gas giant planets and plasmas created by short-pulse laser irradiation of solid, liquid, and cluster targets. PMID:17478712

  4. Neutral beam development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, H S

    1980-08-01

    The national plan is presented for developing advanced injection systems for use on upgrades of existing experiments, and use on future facilities such as ETF, to be built in the late 1980's or early 90's where power production from magnetic fusion will move closer to a reality. Not only must higher power and longer pulse length systems be developed , but they must operate reliably; they must be a tool for the experimenter, not the experiment itself. Neutral beam systems handle large amounts of energy and as such, they often are as complicated as the plasma physics experiment itself. This presents a significant challenge to the neutral beam developer.

  5. A proposed neutral line signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doxas, I.; Speiser, T. W.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Horton, W.

    1992-01-01

    An identifying signature is proposed for the existence and location of the neutral line in the magnetotail. The signature, abrupt density, and temperature changes in the Earthtail direction, was first discovered in test particle simulations. Such temperature variations have been observed in ISEE data (Huang et. al. 1992), but their connection to the possible existence of a neutral line in the tail has not yet been established. The proposed signature develops earlier than the ion velocity space ridge of Martin and Speiser (1988), but can only be seen by spacecraft in the vicinity of the neutral line, while the latter can locate a neutral line remotely.

  6. Advanced multi-frequency radar: Design, preliminary measurements and particle size distribution retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majurec, Ninoslav

    In the spring of 2001 the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory (MIRSL) at the University of Massachusetts began the development of an advanced Multi-Frequency Radar (AMFR) system for studying clouds and precipitation. This mobile radar was designed to consist of three polarimetric Doppler subsystems operating at Ku-band (13.4 GHz), Ka-band (35.6 GHz) and W-band (94.92 GHz). This combination of frequency bands allows a measurement of a wide range of atmospheric targets ranging from weakly reflecting clouds to strong precipitation. The antenna beamwidths at each frequency were intentionally matched, ensuring consistent sampling volume. Multi-frequency radar remote sensing techniques are not widely used because few multi-frequency radars are available to the science community. One exception is the 33 GHz/95 GHz UMass Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS), which AMFR is intended to replace. AMFR's multi-parameter capabilities are designed for characterizing the complex microphysics of layer clouds and precipitation processes in winter storms. AMFR will also play an important role in developing algorithms and validating measurements for an upcoming generation of space-borne radars. The frequency bands selected for AMFR match those of several sensors that have been deployed or are under development. These include the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agencies (JAXA's) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite Ku-band (13 GHz) radar, the CloudSat W-band (95 GHz) radar, and the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) satellite radars at Ku-band and Ka-band. This dissertation describes the AMFR hardware design and development. Compared to CPRS, the addition of one extra frequency band (Ku) will extend AMFR's measurement capabilities towards the larger particle sizes (precipitation). AMFR's design is based around high-power klystron amplifiers. This ensures complete coherency (CPRS uses magnetrons and coherent-on-receive technique). The partial loss in sensitivity due to

  7. Measurements of underlying-event properties using neutral and charged particles in pp collisions at sqrt{s}=900 GeV and sqrt{s}=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Dos Santos Pedrosa, F. Baltasar; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Harpaz, S. Behar; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ami, S. Ben; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Booth, P.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Brambilla, E.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N. D.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Buis, E. J.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byatt, T.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caccia, M.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camard, A.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carpentieri, C.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavallari, A.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cazzato, A.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chen, H.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciba, K.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R. W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Coluccia, R.; Comune, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cuneo, S.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A.; Da Silva, P. V. M.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dahlhoff, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S. J.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dankers, R.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Daum, C.; Dauvergne, J. P.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Oliveira Branco, M.; De Pedis, D.; de Saintignon, P.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Deile, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delpierre, P.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietl, H.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Dogan, O. B.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Drohan, J. G.; Dubbert, J.; Dubbs, T.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Yildiz, H. Duran; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Dzahini, D.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckert, S.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Ely, R.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falou, A. C.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fasching, D.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, I.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Fellmann, D.; Felzmann, C. U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernandes, B.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fischer, P.; Fisher, M. J.; Fisher, S. M.; Flammer, J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Föhlisch, F.; Fokitis, M.; Martin, T. Fonseca; Forbush, D. A.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Foster, J. M.; Fournier, D.; Foussat, A.; Fowler, A. J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Frank, T.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. 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V.; Peng, H.; Pengo, R.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Reale, V. Perez; Peric, I.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Persembe, S.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, O.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A. W.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickford, A.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinto, B.; Pirotte, O.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Plano, W. G.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskach, A. V.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poghosyan, T.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. 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A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, C.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. 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C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Castanheira, M. Teixeira Dias; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y. D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Traynor, D.; Trefzger, T.; Treis, J.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. 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Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo. K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A. V.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; della Porta, G. Zevi; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zilka, B.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2011-05-01

    We present first measurements of charged and neutral particle-flow correlations in pp collisions using the ATLAS calorimeters. Data were collected in 2009 and 2010 at centre-of-mass energies of 900 GeV and 7 TeV. Events were selected using a minimum-bias trigger which required a charged particle in scintillation counters on either side of the interaction point. Particle flows, sensitive to the underlying event, are measured using clusters of energy in the ATLAS calorimeters, taking advantage of their fine granularity. No Monte Carlo generator used in this analysis can accurately describe the measurements. The results are independent of those based on charged particles measured by the ATLAS tracking systems and can be used to constrain the parameters of Monte Carlo generators.

  8. Recent Advances in Analytical Methods on Lipoprotein Subclasses: Calculation of Particle Numbers from Lipid Levels by Gel Permeation HPLC Using "Spherical Particle Model".

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Yamashita, Shizuya

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we developed an analytical method for determining the lipid levels and particle numbers in lipoprotein subclasses covering a wide size range from chylomicrons to small high density lipoproteins, by using gel permeation high-performance liquid chromatography (GP-HPLC). The challenges in analytical methods on lipoprotein subclasses have been addressed from 1980 by Hara and Okazaki using commercial TSK gel permeation columns. Later, the improvements in the hardware, separation and detection of lipoproteins, and the data processing software, using a Gaussian distribution approximation to calculate lipid levels of lipoprotein subclasses, have been extensively utilized in these analytical methods for over thirty years. In this review, we describe on the recent advances in analytical methods on lipoprotein subclasses based on various techniques, and the calculation of particle numbers from lipid levels by GPHPLC using the "spherical particle model". Free/ester ratio of cholesterol in particular lipoprotein subclass was accurately estimated from triglyceride, total cholesterol (free and esterified) and the size of the particle based on this model originally proposed by Shen and Kezdy. PMID:27041512

  9. On-sun testing of an advanced falling particle receiver system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Clifford K.; Christian, Joshua M.; Yellowhair, Julius; Siegel, Nathan; Jeter, Sheldon; Golob, Matthew; Abdel-Khalik, Said I.; Nguyen, Clayton; Al-Ansary, Hany

    2016-05-01

    A 1 MWth high-temperature falling particle receiver was constructed and tested at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The continuously recirculating system included a particle elevator, top and bottom hoppers, and a cavity receiver that comprised a staggered array of porous chevron-shaped mesh structures that slowed the particle flow through the concentrated solar flux. Initial tests were performed with a peak irradiance of ~300 kW/m2 and a particle mass flow rate of 3.3 kg/s. Peak particle temperatures reached over 700 °C near the center of the receiver, but the particle temperature increase near the sides was lower due to a non-uniform irradiance distribution. At a particle inlet temperature of ~440 °C, the particle temperature increase was 27 °C per meter of drop length, and the thermal efficiency was ~60% for an average irradiance of 110 kW/m2. At an average irradiance of 211 kW/m2, the particle temperature increase was 57.1 °C per meter of drop length, and the thermal efficiency was ~65%. Tests with higher irradiances are being performed and are expected to yield greater particle temperature increases and efficiencies.

  10. Use of advanced particle methods in modeling space propulsion and its supersonic expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borner, Arnaud

    This research discusses the use of advanced kinetic particle methods such as Molecular Dynamics (MD) and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model space propulsion systems such as electrospray thrusters and their supersonic expansions. MD simulations are performed to model an electrospray thruster for the ionic liquid (IL) EMIM--BF4 using coarse-grained (CG) potentials. The model is initially featuring a constant electric field applied in the longitudinal direction. Two coarse-grained potentials are compared, and the effective-force CG (EFCG) potential is found to predict the formation of the Taylor cone, the cone-jet, and other extrusion modes for similar electric fields and mass flow rates observed in experiments of a IL fed capillary-tip-extractor system better than the simple CG potential. Later, one-dimensional and fully transient three-dimensional electric fields, the latter solving Poisson's equation to take into account the electric field due to space charge at each timestep, are computed by coupling the MD model to a Poisson solver. It is found that the inhomogeneous electric field as well as that of the IL space-charge improve agreement between modeling and experiment. The boundary conditions (BCs) are found to have a substantial impact on the potential and electric field, and the tip BC is introduced and compared to the two previous BCs, named plate and needle, showing good improvement by reducing unrealistically high radial electric fields generated in the vicinity of the capillary tip. The influence of the different boundary condition models on charged species currents as a function of the mass flow rate is studied, and it is found that a constant electric field model gives similar agreement to the more rigorous and computationally expensive tip boundary condition at lower flow rates. However, at higher mass flow rates the MD simulations with the constant electric field produces extruded particles with higher Coulomb energy per ion, consistent with

  11. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Dahl, David A.; Delmore, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  12. Validity of the sheet demagnetising factor in characterisation of advanced metal particle tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cookson, R. D.; Bissell, P. R.; Kay, G. E.; Parker, D. A.

    2002-04-01

    This paper describes a model to test the validity of using the sheet demagnetising factor for advanced particulate tape magnetic measurements. The model predicts that, as the tape thickness and the volume packing fraction are reduced, the effective demagnetising factor deviates from the sheet value and, for a typical commercial advanced double coated MP tape, is in error by ˜6%.

  13. Heavy Charged Particle Radiobiology: Using Enhanced Biological Effectiveness and Improved Beam Focusing to Advance Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B.; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  14. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  15. Study of electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity into neutral plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, G. Rout, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The major portion of the bulk plasma in magnetospheric space, interplanetary plasma belts and the solar winds contain neutral particles. Evidently these neutral particles undergo binary collisions with the charged particles and among themselves so as to contribute significantly to the transport and diffusion process in a singly charged electron – ion magnetoplasma. The effects of the neutral particles collisions on various diffusion transport coefficients are studied for magnetised electron-ion plasma and appropriately modified coefficients are derived analytically. The results reveal that these coefficients increase significantly owing to the effect of the charge -neutral and neutral-neutral collisions.

  16. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  17. The Interaction Between an Insoluble Particle and an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: Micro-Gravity Experiments and Theoretical Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Ssen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of an insoluble particle with an advancing solid/liquid interface (SLI) has been a subject of investigation for the past four decades. While the original interest stemmed from geology applications (e.g., frost heaving in soil), researchers soon realized that the complex science associated with such an interaction is relevant to many other scientific fields encompassing metal matrix composites (MMCs), high temperature superconductors, inclusion management in steel, growth of monotectics, and preservation of biological cells. During solidification of a liquid containing an insoluble particle, three distinct interaction phenomena have been experimentally observed: instantaneous engulfment of the particle, continuous pushing, and particle pushing followed by engulfment. It was also observed that for given experimental conditions and particle size there is a critical solidification velocity, V(sub cr), above which a particle is engulfed. During solidification of MMCs pushing leads to particle agglomeration at the grain boundaries and this has detrimental effects on mechanical properties of the casting. Consequently, the process must be designed for instantaneous engulfment to occur. This implies the development of accurate theoretical models to predict V(sub cr), and perform benchmark experiments to test the validity of such models. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the pushing/engulfment phenomenon (PEP), its quantification in terms of the material and processing parameters remains a focus of research. Since natural convection currents occurring during terrestrial solidification experiments complicate the study of PEP, execution of experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) has been approved and funded by NASA. Extensive terrestrial (1g) experiments and preliminary micro-gravity (mu g) experiments on two space shuttle missions have been conducted in preparation for future experiments on the ISS. The investigated

  18. Regression modeling of particle size distributions in urban storm water: advancements through improved sample collection methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, Michael N.; Selbig, William R.

    2012-01-01

    A new sample collection system was developed to improve the representation of sediment entrained in urban storm water by integrating water quality samples from the entire water column. The depth-integrated sampler arm (DISA) was able to mitigate sediment stratification bias in storm water, thereby improving the characterization of suspended-sediment concentration and particle size distribution at three independent study locations. Use of the DISA decreased variability, which improved statistical regression to predict particle size distribution using surrogate environmental parameters, such as precipitation depth and intensity. The performance of this statistical modeling technique was compared to results using traditional fixed-point sampling methods and was found to perform better. When environmental parameters can be used to predict particle size distributions, environmental managers have more options when characterizing concentrations, loads, and particle size distributions in urban runoff.

  19. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  20. ADVANCED METHODS FOR THE COMPUTATION OF PARTICLE BEAM TRANSPORT AND THE COMPUTATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND MULTIPARTICLE PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Alex J. Dragt

    2012-08-31

    Since 1980, under the grant DEFG02-96ER40949, the Department of Energy has supported the educational and research work of the University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory (DSAT) Group. The primary focus of this educational/research group has been on the computation and analysis of charged-particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods, and on advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and multiparticle phenomena. This Final Report summarizes the accomplishments of the DSAT Group from its inception in 1980 through its end in 2011.

  1. Modeling Combined Chemotherapy and Particle Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Marco; Tommasino, Francesco; Yamada, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the only cancer for which deaths are predicted to increase in 2014 and beyond. Combined radiochemotherapy protocols using gemcitabine and hypofractionated X-rays are ongoing in several clinical trials. Recent results indicate that charged particle therapy substantially increases local control of resectable and unresectable pancreas cancer, as predicted from previous radiobiology studies considering the high tumor hypoxia. Combination with chemotherapy improves the overall survival (OS). We compared published data on X-ray and charged particle clinical results with or without adjuvant chemotherapy calculating the biological effective dose. We show that chemoradiotherapy with protons or carbon ions results in 1 year OS significantly higher than those obtained with other treatment schedules. Further hypofractionation using charged particles may result in improved local control and survival. A comparative clinical trial using the standard X-ray scheme vs. the best current standard with carbon ions is crucial and may open new opportunities for this deadly disease. PMID:26217585

  2. Characterizing the distribution of particles in urban stormwater: advancements through improved sampling technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, William R.

    2014-01-01

    A new sample collection system was developed to improve the representation of sediment in stormwater by integrating the entire water column. The depth-integrated sampler arm (DISA) was able to mitigate sediment stratification bias in storm water, thereby improving the characterization of particle size distribution from urban source areas. Collector streets had the lowest median particle diameter of 8 μm, followed by parking lots, arterial streets, feeder streets, and residential and mixed land use (32, 43, 50, 80 and 95 μm, respectively). Results from this study suggest there is no single distribution of particles that can be applied uniformly to runoff in urban environments; however, integrating more of the entire water column during the sample collection can address some of the shortcomings of a fixed-point sampler by reducing variability and bias caused by the stratification of solids in a water column.

  3. Electromagnetic field interactions with micro channels, particles and cells: Application to advanced cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatapathi, Murugesan

    This thesis involves a study of the interaction of laser beams with micro channels and micro particles/cells using the electromagnetic field approach. This problem is relevant to the next generation cytometry, in particular to model based design of flow cytometers. The field approach is applied to study light scatter from particles/cells and also internal and scattered fields of cylindrical micro channels that are important for optical interrogation of particles and cells flowing through. Though current flow cytometers use qualitative fluorescence measurements for biological analysis, other viable optical interrogation techniques like light scatter, quantitative fluorescence and Coherent anti-stokes Raman scatter (CARS) are being studied for application to flow cytometry. The light scatter from particles and cells in a flow cytometer has been studied with the objective of extracting useful information about the particles using scatter measurements. First, the correlation between the size of particles and the current forward scatter measurements was both analytically modeled and experimentally determined. These results indicated that integrated scatter measurements currently used in flow cytometry (forward and side scatter) cannot be used to unambiguously estimate size, shape or refractive index of particles for classification. It is shown that multi-angle scatter measurements can be used to classify micro spheres of different sizes/refractive indices and different bacteria species, provided the scatter measurements are designed based on numerical scatter models. The numerical scatter models were then also used to do a preliminary study of correlation of scatter with internal structure of simple cells like stem cells. A few multivariate statistical methods have been applied for the classification of such particles in flow cytometry using scatter and multi-spectral fluorescence measurements. Typically the micro channels used in flow cytometry have square or circular

  4. Measurement of neutral strange particle production in the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-09-01

    Measurements are presented of the production of primary K(S)0 and Lambda particles in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV in the region transverse to the leading charged-particle jet in each event. The average multiplicity and average scalar transverse momentum sum of K(S)0 and Lambda particles measured at pseudorapidities abs(eta) < 2 rise with increasing charged-particle jet pt in the range 1-10 GeV and saturate in the region 10-50 GeV. The rise and saturation of the strange particle yields and transverse momentum sums in the underlying event are similar to those observed for inclusive charged particles, which confirms the impact-parameter picture of multiple parton interactions. The results are compared to recent tunes of the PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generator. The PYTHIA simulations underestimate the data by 15-30% for K(S)0 mesons and by about 50% for Lambda baryons, a deficit similar to that observed for the inclusive strange particle production in non-single-diffractive proton-proton collisions. The constant strange- to charged-particle activity ratios and the similar trends for mesons and baryons indicate that the multiparton-interaction dynamics is decoupled from parton hadronization, which occurs at a later stage.

  5. Advanced 3D electromagnetic and particle-in-cell modeling on structured/unstructured hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, D.B.; Pasik, M.F.; Kiefer, M.L.; Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1998-01-01

    New techniques have been recently developed that allow unstructured, free meshes to be embedded into standard 3-dimensional, rectilinear, finite-difference time-domain grids. The resulting hybrid-grid modeling capability allows the higher resolution and fidelity of modeling afforded by free meshes to be combined with the simplicity and efficiency of rectilinear techniques. Integration of these new methods into the full-featured, general-purpose QUICKSILVER electromagnetic, Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code provides new modeling capability for a wide variety of electromagnetic and plasma physics problems. To completely exploit the integration of this technology into QUICKSILVER for applications requiring the self-consistent treatment of charged particles, this project has extended existing PIC methods for operation on these hybrid unstructured/rectilinear meshes. Several technical issues had to be addressed in order to accomplish this goal, including the location of particles on the unstructured mesh, adequate conservation of charge, and the proper handling of particles in the transition region between structured and unstructured portions of the hybrid grid.

  6. Eddy Current, Magnetic Particle and Hardness Testing, Aviation Quality Control (Advanced): 9227.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This unit of instruction includes the principles of eddy current, magnetic particle and hardness testing; standards used for analyzing test results; techniques of operating equipment; interpretation of indications; advantages and limitations of these methods of testing; care and calibration of equipment; and safety and work precautions. Motion…

  7. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  8. ADVANCING THE ION BEAM THIN FILM PLANARIZATION PROCESS FOR THE SMOOTHING OF SUBSTRATE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkarimi, P B; Spiller, E; Baker, S L; Robinson, J C; Stearns, D G; Liddle, J A; Salmassi, F; Liang, T; Stivers, A R

    2004-10-19

    For a number of technologies small substrate contaminants are undesirable, and for one technology in particular, extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), they can be a very serious issue. We have demonstrated that the Ion Beam Thin Film Planarization Process, a coating process designed to planarize substrate asperities, can be extended to smooth {approx}70 nm and {approx}80 nm diameter particles on EUVL reticle substrates to a height of {approx}0.5 nm, which will render them noncritical in an EUVL printing process. We demonstrate this smoothing process using controlled nanoscale substrate particles and lines fabricated with an e-beam lithography process. The above smoothing process was also modified to yield an excellent reflectance/wavelength uniformity and a good EUV reflectivity for the multilayer, which is required for EUVL reticles. Cross-sectional TEM on a smoothed substrate line defect shows excellent agreement with results obtained from our multilayer growth model.

  9. Advanced methods in global gyrokinetic full f particle simulation of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ogando, F.; Heikkinen, J. A.; Henriksson, S.; Janhunen, S. J.; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Leerink, S.

    2006-11-30

    A new full f nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation code, named ELMFIRE, has been developed for simulating transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas. The code is based on a gyrokinetic particle-in-cell algorithm, which can consider electrons and ions jointly or separately, as well as arbitrary impurities. The implicit treatment of the ion polarization drift and the use of full f methods allow for simulations of strongly perturbed plasmas including wide orbit effects, steep gradients and rapid dynamic changes. This article presents in more detail the algorithms incorporated into ELMFIRE, as well as benchmarking comparisons to both neoclassical theory and other codes.Code ELMFIRE calculates plasma dynamics by following the evolution of a number of sample particles. Because of using an stochastic algorithm its results are influenced by statistical noise. The effect of noise on relevant magnitudes is analyzed.Turbulence spectra of FT-2 plasma has been calculated with ELMFIRE, obtaining results consistent with experimental data.

  10. The Frontier of Modern Calorimetry: Hardware Advances and Application in Particle Physics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Tatiana

    While the last missing components of the SM puzzle seem to be successfully found, particle physicists remain hungry for what might be there, beyond the cosy boundaries of the well studies elementary particle world. However, the sophisticated technique of data analysis and acute Monte Carlo simulations remain fruitless. It appears that the successful intrusion into the realm, in which we were not welcome so far, may require a very different implication of effort. All those results might suggest, though banal, that we need an improvement on the hardware side. Indeed, the hadronic calorimeter of CMS is no competitor to its other state-of-art components. This obstacle in many cases significantly complicates the flow of the physics analysis. Besides, the era of high luminosity LHC operation in the offing is calling for the same. After exploration of the analysis debri with 8TeV collision data, we investigate various approaches for better calorimetry for the CMS detector.

  11. Advances in Thermal Spray Deposition of Billets for Particle Reinforced Light Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzelburger, Martin; Zimmermann, Christian; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-07

    Forming of light-metals in semi-solid state offers some advantages like low process temperatures, improved mould durability, good flow behavior and fine, globular microstructure of the final material. By the introduction of ceramic particles, increased elastic modulus and yield strength as well as wear resistance and creep behavior can be obtained. By semi-solid forging or semi-solid casting, particle reinforced metals (PRM) can be produced with improved matrix microstructure and beneficial forming process parameters compared to conventional MMC manufacturing techniques. The production of this kind of light metal matrix composites requires the supply of dense semi-finished parts with well defined volume fractions of homogeneously distributed particulate reinforcement. A manufacturing method for cylindrical light metal billets is described that applies thermal spraying as a build-up process for simultaneous deposition of matrix and reinforcement phase with cored wires as spraying material. Thermal spraying leads to small grain sizes and prevents dendrite formation. However, long process cycle times lead to billet heating and recrystallization of the matrix microstructure. In order to preserve small grain sizes that enable semi-solid forming, the thermal spraying process was analyzed by in-flight particle analysis and thermography. As a consequence, the deposition process was optimized by adaptation of the thermal spraying parameters and by application of additional cooling, leading to lower billet temperatures and finer PRM billet microstructure.

  12. Remediating radium contaminated legacy sites: Advances made through machine learning in routine monitoring of "hot" particles.

    PubMed

    Varley, Adam; Tyler, Andrew; Smith, Leslie; Dale, Paul; Davies, Mike

    2015-07-15

    The extensive use of radium during the 20th century for industrial, military and pharmaceutical purposes has led to a large number of contaminated legacy sites across Europe and North America. Sites that pose a high risk to the general public can present expensive and long-term remediation projects. Often the most pragmatic remediation approach is through routine monitoring operating gamma-ray detectors to identify, in real-time, the signal from the most hazardous heterogeneous contamination (hot particles); thus facilitating their removal and safe disposal. However, current detection systems do not fully utilise all spectral information resulting in low detection rates and ultimately an increased risk to the human health. The aim of this study was to establish an optimised detector-algorithm combination. To achieve this, field data was collected using two handheld detectors (sodium iodide and lanthanum bromide) and a number of Monte Carlo simulated hot particles were randomly injected into the field data. This allowed for the detection rate of conventional deterministic (gross counts) and machine learning (neural networks and support vector machines) algorithms to be assessed. The results demonstrated that a Neural Network operated on a sodium iodide detector provided the best detection capability. Compared to deterministic approaches, this optimised detection system could detect a hot particle on average 10cm deeper into the soil column or with half of the activity at the same depth. It was also found that noise presented by internal contamination restricted lanthanum bromide for this application. PMID:25847171

  13. Advanced 3D Poisson solvers and particle-in-cell methods for accelerator modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, David B.; McCorquodale, Peter; Colella, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    We seek to improve on the conventional FFT-based algorithms for solving the Poisson equation with infinite-domain (open) boundary conditions for large problems in accelerator modeling and related areas. In particular, improvements in both accuracy and performance are possible by combining several technologies: the method of local corrections (MLC); the James algorithm; and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The MLC enables the parallelization (by domain decomposition) of problems with large domains and many grid points. This improves on the FFT-based Poisson solvers typically used as it doesn't require the all-to-all communication pattern that parallel 3d FFT algorithms require, which tends to be a performance bottleneck on current (and foreseeable) parallel computers. In initial tests, good scalability up to 1000 processors has been demonstrated for our new MLC solver. An essential component of our approach is a new version of the James algorithm for infinite-domain boundary conditions for the case of three dimensions. By using a simplified version of the fast multipole method in the boundary-to-boundary potential calculation, we improve on the performance of the Hockney algorithm typically used by reducing the number of grid points by a factor of 8, and the CPU costs by a factor of 3. This is particularly important for large problems where computer memory limits are a consideration. The MLC allows for the use of adaptive mesh refinement, which reduces the number of grid points and increases the accuracy in the Poisson solution. This improves on the uniform grid methods typically used in PIC codes, particularly in beam problems where the halo is large. Also, the number of particles per cell can be controlled more closely with adaptivity than with a uniform grid. To use AMR with particles is more complicated than using uniform grids. It affects depositing particles on the non-uniform grid, reassigning particles when the adaptive grid changes and maintaining the load

  14. Advances in nuclear data and all-particle transport for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Chadwick, M.B.; Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1994-05-01

    Fast neutrons have been used to treat over 15,000 cancer patients worldwide and proton therapy is rapidly emerging as a treatment of choice for tumors around critical anatomical structures. Neutron therapy requires evaluated data to {approximately}70 MeV while proton therapy requires data to {approximately}250 MeV. Collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the medical physics community has revealed limitations in nuclear cross section evaluations and radiation transport capabilities that have prevented neutron and proton radiation therapy centers from using Monte Carlo calculations to accurately predict dose in patients. These evaluations require energy- and angle-dependent cross sections for secondary neutrons, charged-particles and recoil nuclei. We are expanding the LLNL nuclear databases to higher energies for biologically important elements and have developed a three-dimensional, all-particle Monte Carlo radiation transport code that uses computer-assisted-tomography (CT) images as the input mesh. This code, called PEREGRINE calculates dose distributions in the human body and can be used as a tool to determine the dependence of dose on details of the evaluated nuclear data. In this paper, we will review the status of the nuclear data required for neutron and proton therapy, describe the capabilities of the PEREGRINE package, and show the effects of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution.

  15. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  16. 125I particle implantation combined with chemoradiotherapy to treat advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, J-M; Jiang, H-T; Di, X-Y; Zhu, Y

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapy effects of 125I implantation combined with chemoradiotherapy on pancreatic cancer patients. Methods: 30 patients with Stage III or IV pancreatic cancer were equally divided into two groups (control and treatment group). The patients in the treatment group (nine males, six females) received chemotherapy in the first week and 125I implantation in the third week, followed by combined chemoradiotherapy in the fifth week. The patients in the control group (10 males, 5 females) received the same treatment except 125I implantation. The therapy in the control group and treatment group was repeated every 4 weeks. Results: The median conformal radiotherapy dose in the treatment group (30.62 Gy) was significantly lower than that in the control group (47.86 Gy). The total radiation dose was 88.71 ± 27.39 Gy, and the surface activity was 0.6 mCi in the treatment group. After treatment, the average tumour size decreased both in the treatment group [9.17 cm2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.60–12.74, p < 0.001] and in the control group (4.54 cm2, 95% CI: 2.74–6.35, p < 0.001). The median survival time in the treatment group was 14 months (95% CI: 12.215–14.785) and in the control group was 12 months (95% CI: 10.884–13.116). There was no statistical significance in survival rates between the two groups (χ2 = 0.908, p = 0.341). Conclusion: 125I implanted into tumour combined with chemoradiotherapy has higher local control rate of advanced pancreatic cancer than chemoradiotherapy. Advances in knowledge: We combined chemoradiotherapy with 125I implantation to treat advanced pancreatic cancer and obtained a higher local control rate and better quality of life than when using chemoradiatherapy alone. PMID:24625042

  17. Particle exhaust schemes in the DIII-D advanced divertor configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    For density control in long-pulse operation, the open divertor on the DIII-D tokamak will be equipped with a baffled chamber and a pumping system. The throat of the baffle chamber is sized to provide optimal pumping for the typical plasma equilibrium configuration. Severe limitations on the toroidal conductance of this baffle chamber require the use of in-vessel pumping to achieve the desired particle exhaust of about 25 Torr{center dot}l/s. Two separate pumping schemes are considered: an array of titanium getter modules based on the design developed by the Tore Supra team and a cryocondensation pump. The merits and demerits of each scheme are analyzed, and the design considerations introduced by the tokamak environment are brought out. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Joint inversion of TEM and DC in roadway advanced detection based on particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jiulong; Li, Fei; Peng, Suping; Sun, Xiaoyun; Zheng, Jing; Jia, Jizhe

    2015-12-01

    Transient electromagnetic method (TEM)and direct current method (DC)are two key widely applied methods for practical roadway detection, but both have their limitations. To take the advantage of each method, a synchronous nonlinear joint inversion method is proposed based on TEM and DC by using particle swarm optimization (PSO)algorithm. Firstly, a model with double low resistance anomaly and interference is constructed to test the performance of the method. Then the independent inversion and joint inversion are calculated by using the model built above. It is demonstrated that the joint inversion helped in improving the interpretation of the data to get better results. It is because that the suppression of interference and separation of the resistivity anomalies ahead and the back of the roadway working face using the proposed method. Finally, the proposed method was successfully used in a coalmine in Huainan coalfield in east China to demonstrate its practical usefulness.

  19. Advanced laser particle accelerator development at LANL: from fast ignition to radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine A; Offermann, D T; Cobble, J A; Schmitt, M J; Gautier, D C; Kwan, T J T; Montgomery, D S; Kluge, Thomas; Bussmann, Micheal; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Gall, B; Geissel, M; Korgan, G; Kovaleski, S; Lockard, T; Malekos, S; Schollmeier, M; Sentoku, Y; Cowan, T E

    2010-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, SN M detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high current and high energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology in conjunction with our partners at the ForschungsZentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD). Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent etliciencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  20. Incorporating advanced language models into the P300 speller using particle filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speier, W.; Arnold, C. W.; Deshpande, A.; Knall, J.; Pouratian, N.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The P300 speller is a common brain-computer interface (BCI) application designed to communicate language by detecting event related potentials in a subject’s electroencephalogram signal. Information about the structure of natural language can be valuable for BCI communication, but attempts to use this information have thus far been limited to rudimentary n-gram models. While more sophisticated language models are prevalent in natural language processing literature, current BCI analysis methods based on dynamic programming cannot handle their complexity. Approach. Sampling methods can overcome this complexity by estimating the posterior distribution without searching the entire state space of the model. In this study, we implement sequential importance resampling, a commonly used particle filtering (PF) algorithm, to integrate a probabilistic automaton language model. Main result. This method was first evaluated offline on a dataset of 15 healthy subjects, which showed significant increases in speed and accuracy when compared to standard classification methods as well as a recently published approach using a hidden Markov model (HMM). An online pilot study verified these results as the average speed and accuracy achieved using the PF method was significantly higher than that using the HMM method. Significance. These findings strongly support the integration of domain-specific knowledge into BCI classification to improve system performance.

  1. Incorporating advanced language models into the P300 speller using particle filtering

    PubMed Central

    Speier, W; Arnold, CW; Deshpande, A; Knall, J

    2015-01-01

    Objective The P300 speller is a common brain–computer interface (BCI) application designed to communicate language by detecting event related potentials in a subject’s electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. Information about the structure of natural language can be valuable for BCI communication, but attempts to use this information have thus far been limited to rudimentary n-gram models. While more sophisticated language models are prevalent in natural language processing literature, current BCI analysis methods based on dynamic programming cannot handle their complexity. Approach Sampling methods can overcome this complexity by estimating the posterior distribution without searching the entire state space of the model. In this study, we implement sequential importance resampling, a commonly used particle filtering (PF) algorithm, to integrate a probabilistic automaton language model. Main Result This method was first evaluated offline on a dataset of 15 healthy subjects, which showed significant increases in speed and accuracy when compared to standard classification methods as well as a recently published approach using a hidden Markov model (HMM). An online pilot study verified these results as the average speed and accuracy achieved using the PF method was significantly higher than that using the HMM method. Significance These findings strongly support the integration of domain-specific knowledge into BCI classification to improve system performance. PMID:26061188

  2. The electrostatic co-assembly in non-stoichiometric aqueous mixtures of copolymers composed of one neutral water-soluble and one polyelectrolyte (either positively or negatively charged) block: a dissipative particle dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Šindelka, Karel; Limpouchová, Zuzana; Lísal, Martin; Procházka, Karel

    2016-06-28

    The electrostatic co-assembly in non-stoichiometric aqueous mixtures of diblock copolymers composed of a neutral water-soluble block and an either positively or negatively charged polyelectrolyte (PE) block has been studied by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The employed DPD variant includes explicit electrostatics and enables the investigation of the role of small ions in the co-assembly. The properties of core-shell associates containing insoluble interpolyelectrolyte complex cores and protective neutral shells were investigated as functions of the ratio of positive-to-negative charges in the system. This ratio was varied by increasing the number of positively charged PE chains of the same length as those of negatively charged chains, and by changing the PE length and charge density. The simulation results show that the associates formed in non-stoichiometric mixtures differ from those formed in stoichiometric mixtures: their association numbers are lower, their cores are charged and a fraction of excess chains remain free in the non-associated state. The study demonstrates the important role of the compatibility of the counterions with the polymer blocks. It simultaneously emphasizes the necessity of including the electrostatic interaction of all the charged species in the DPD computational scheme. PMID:27253089

  3. Search for lepton flavor violating decays of a heavy neutral particle in p(-)p collisions at sqrt[s]=1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; De Cecco, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fan, Q; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Gresele, A; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hou, S; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Issever, C; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Niell, F; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Safonov, A; St Denis, R

    2003-10-24

    We report on a search for a high mass, narrow width particle that decays directly to emu, etau, or microtau. We use approximately 110 pb(-1) of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab from 1992 to 1995. No evidence of lepton flavor violating decays is found. Limits are set on the production and decay of sneutrinos with R-parity violating interactions. PMID:14611332

  4. Search for a Heavy Neutral Particle Decaying to eμ, eτ, or μτ in pp Collisions at sqrt[s]=8  TeV with the ATLAS Detector.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; 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Pralavorio, P; Pranko, A; Prasad, S; Prell, S; Price, D; Price, J; Price, L E; Primavera, M; Prince, S; Proissl, M; Prokofiev, K; Prokoshin, F; Protopapadaki, E; Protopopescu, S; Proudfoot, J; Przybycien, M; Ptacek, E; Puddu, D; Pueschel, E; Puldon, D; Purohit, M; Puzo, P; Qian, J; Qin, G; Qin, Y; Quadt, A; Quarrie, D R; Quayle, W B; Queitsch-Maitland, M; Quilty, D; Raddum, S; Radeka, V; Radescu, V; Radhakrishnan, S K; Radloff, P; Rados, P; Ragusa, F; Rahal, G; Rajagopalan, S; Rammensee, M; Rangel-Smith, C; Rauscher, F; Rave, S; Ravenscroft, T; Raymond, M; Read, A L; Readioff, N P; Rebuzzi, D M; Redelbach, A; Redlinger, G; Reece, R; Reeves, K; Rehnisch, L; Reisin, H; Relich, M; Rembser, C; Ren, H; Renaud, A; Rescigno, M; Resconi, S; Rezanova, O L; Reznicek, P; Rezvani, R; Richter, R; Richter, S; Richter-Was, E; Ricken, O; Ridel, M; Rieck, P; Riegel, C J; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimoldi, A; Rinaldi, L; Ristić, B; Ritsch, E; Riu, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rizvi, E; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, J E M; Robson, A; Roda, C; Roe, S; Røhne, O; Rolli, S; Romaniouk, A; Romano, M; Romano Saez, S M; Romero Adam, E; Rompotis, N; Ronzani, M; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosbach, K; Rose, P; Rosendahl, P L; Rosenthal, O; Rossetti, V; Rossi, E; Rossi, L P; Rosten, R; Rotaru, M; Roth, I; Rothberg, J; Rousseau, D; Royon, C R; Rozanov, A; Rozen, Y; Ruan, X; Rubbo, F; Rubinskiy, I; Rud, V I; Rudolph, C; Rudolph, M S; Rühr, F; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakovich, N A; Ruschke, A; Russell, H L; Rutherfoord, J P; Ruthmann, N; Ryabov, Y F; Rybar, M; Rybkin, G; Ryder, N C; Saavedra, A F; Sabato, G; Sacerdoti, S; Saddique, A; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sadykov, R; Safai Tehrani, F; Saimpert, M; Sakamoto, H; Sakurai, Y; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saleem, M; Salek, D; Sales De Bruin, P H; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sampsonidis, D; Sanchez, A; Sánchez, J; Sanchez Martinez, V; Sandaker, H; Sandbach, R L; Sander, H G; Sanders, M P; 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Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stern, S; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Stramaglia, M E; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Strubig, A; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Subramaniam, R; Succurro, A; Sugaya, Y; Suhr, C; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, S; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, Y; Svatos, M; Swedish, S; Swiatlowski, M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Taccini, C; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tam, J Y C; Tan, K G; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tannenwald, B B; Tannoury, N; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; 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Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    2015-07-17

    This Letter presents a search for a heavy neutral particle decaying into an opposite-sign different-flavor dilepton pair, e^{±}μ^{∓}, e^{±}τ^{∓}, or μ^{±}τ^{∓} using 20.3  fb^{-1} of pp collision data at sqrt[s]=8  TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The numbers of observed candidate events are compatible with the standard model expectations. Limits are set on the cross section of new phenomena in two scenarios: the production of ν[over ˜]_{τ} in R-parity-violating supersymmetric models and the production of a lepton-flavor-violating Z^{'} vector boson. PMID:26230783

  5. Neutralization efficiency estimation in a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the optimal conditions of neutral beam generation to maintain a high degree of neutralization and focusing during beam energy variation for a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma with a three-grid ion beam acceleration system. The neutral beam energy distribution was estimated by measuring the energy profiles of ions that "survived" the neutralization after reflection. The energy measurements of the primary and reflected ions showed narrow distribution functions, each with only one peak. At higher beam energies, both the ratio of the ion energy loss to the primary energy and the degree of energy divergence decreased, confirming the precise alignment of the neutral beam. The neutralization efficiency of the neutral beam source with a three-grid acceleration system was found to be affected mainly by the beam angle divergence rather than by the particle translation energy.

  6. Neutralization efficiency estimation in a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the optimal conditions of neutral beam generation to maintain a high degree of neutralization and focusing during beam energy variation for a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma with a three-grid ion beam acceleration system. The neutral beam energy distribution was estimated by measuring the energy profiles of ions that 'survived' the neutralization after reflection. The energy measurements of the primary and reflected ions showed narrow distribution functions, each with only one peak. At higher beam energies, both the ratio of the ion energy loss to the primary energy and the degree of energy divergence decreased, confirming the precise alignment of the neutral beam. The neutralization efficiency of the neutral beam source with a three-grid acceleration system was found to be affected mainly by the beam angle divergence rather than by the particle translation energy.

  7. Advancement of Shock-wave Induced Spraying Process through the Study of Gas and Particle Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi Esfahani, Mohammad

    This research advances the knowledge of the working principles of the Shock-wave Induced Spraying Process (SISP), a thermal spray material deposition technique. Pulses created by a fast acting valve pass through a heated line increasing energy content and interacting with metered batches of heated or non-heated powder introduced into the line. The powder is accelerated to high velocities before bonding to the substrate upon impact. Advantages over other cold spray processes include cost savings and a more effective transfer of thermal energy to the powder. The shock-wave occurring near the substrate in other cold spray processes is avoided. The SISP flow field is resolved by using a computational model. The two-dimensional model accounts for the valve, gas heater, a tapered nozzle at the tip of the device, and preheating of the powder. It is implemented with a commercial computational fluid dynamics code. Comparisons are made with one-dimensional predictions, and measurements of pressure and temperature. Particle flow predictions are validated using particle velocity and adhesion measurements. A flow region of both high temperature and velocity gas, favorable to material deposition, forms which is not present in comparable steady-state cold spray processes. Increasing gas pressure increases the gas speed, while increasing temperature increases speed and temperature of this region. Using helium results in greater energy levels but for shorter periods of time. This indicates the need for a powder feeder which places particles in the flow at correct instants and durations of time. The effects of particle flow parameters on system performance are examined. It is found that the device must be operated at very high main heater and powder heater temperatures: 900 °C and 700 °C respectively to achieve a coating with stainless steel using nitrogen as the driving gas. It is also shown that a heater length range of 0.9 m to 1.4 m results in the greatest likelihood of

  8. Application of the Scintillation Detector on base of BrilLanCe Series Crystal in Neutral Particles Spectrometer for the Satellite Experiment ZINA-NT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, Irene; Arkhangelsky, Andrey; Batischev, Alexey; Naumov, Pietr; Kondratyeva, Natalia

    In a condition of normal gravity, field-induced translational and rotational motions of solids are publically recognized for materials that contain spontaneous magnetic moments. It is believed that a high field above B = 10 T is necessary to induce such movements for ordinary diamagnetic material. Rotation and translation induced by low field of B = 0.5 T were recently reported on diamagnetic single-crystals of corundum [1], calcite, diamond, graphite and silver [2]. Here the crystals were released in microgravity produced by drop capsule(duration 4.5 s), and the motions took place in diffused gas medium (50Pa). In homogeneous field, crystal showed rotational oscillation with respect to field because of diamagnetic anisotropy energy. In a given field intensity, its period was determined by anisotropy of diamagnetic susceptibility. The crystal was ejected from field center by field-gradient force with significant terminal velocity. In a given field distribution, the velocity uniquely depended on intrinsic susceptibility of material. It is expected that the above two motions were independent to mass of sample. Necessity of clarifying magnetic properties of a single particle is increasing with the growing interest on nano-sized materials; data of susceptibility as well as its anisotropy are necessary for characterizing its property. However the values are difficult to obtain by conventional methods because of 2 factors; existence of a sample holder, and necessity of mass measurement. Susceptibility and its anisotropy of a single particle can be determined with high precision from above two motions in microgravity, because the methods are free of sample holder and mass measurement. Moreover, they are based on simple motional equations that consist of an inertia term and a magnetic term. In principle, magnetization is measured for limitlessly small sample, provided that the motions are observed. Attempt to obtain magnetization curve from the above-mentioned translation

  9. Fast ion behavior during neutral beam injection in ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, M.R.; Thomas, C.E.; Colchin, R.J.; Rome, J.A.; England, A.C.; Fowler, R.H.; Aceto, S.C.

    1993-09-01

    In stellarators, single-particle confinement properties can be more complex than in their tokamak counterparts. Fast-ion behavior in tokamaks has been well characterized through an abundance of measurements on various devices and in general has been shown to be consistent with classical slowing-down theory, although anomalous ion behavior has been observed during intense beam injection in ISX-B, during fishbone instabilities in PDX, and in experiments on TFR. In contrast, fast ion behavior in stellarators is not as wel established experimentally with the primary experiments to date focusing o near-perpendicular or perpendicular neutral beam injection (NBI) on the Wendelstein 7-A stellarator (91 and Heliotron-E. This paper addresses fast-ion confinement properties in a large-aspect-ratio, moderate-shear stellarator, the Advanced Toroidal Facility, during tangential NBI. The primary data used in this study are the experimentally measured energy spectra of charge-exchange neutrals escaping from the plasma, using a two-dimensional scanning neutral particle analyzer. This diagnostic method is well established, having been used on several devices since the early 1970`s. Various aspects of fast-ion behavior are investigated by comparing these data with computed theoretical spectra based on energeticion distributions derived from the fastion Fokker-Planck equation. Ion orbits are studied by computer orbit following, by the computation of J* surfaces, and by Monte Carlo calculations.

  10. Simulations of neutralized final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to drive an inertial fusion target or study high energy density physics with heavy ion beams, the beam radius must be focused to < 3 mm and the pulse length must be compressed to < 10 ns. The conventional scheme for temporal pulse compression makes use of an increasing ion velocity to compress the beam as it drifts and beam space charge to stagnate the compression before final focus. Beam compression in a neutralizing plasma does not require stagnation of the compression, enabling a more robust method. The final pulse shape at the target can be programmed by an applied velocity tilt. In this paper, neutralized drift compression is investigated. The sensitivity of the compression and focusing to beam momentum spread, plasma, and magnetic field conditions is studied with realistic driver examples. Using the 3D particle-in-cell code, we examine issues associated with self-field generation, stability, and vacuum-neutralized transport transition and focusing.

  11. Modeling of neutral entrainment in an FRC thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, Jeremiah; Gimelshein, Natalia; Gimelshein, Sergey; Cambier, Jean-Luc; Ketsdever, Andrew

    2012-11-27

    Neutral entrainment in a field reversed configuration thruster is modeled numerically with an implicit PIC code extended to include thermal and chemical interactions between plasma and neutral particles. The contribution of charge exchange and electron impact ionization reactions is analyzed, and the sensitivity of the entrainment efficiency to the plasmoid translation velocity and neutral density is evaluated.

  12. Whole-Chain Tick Saliva Proteins Presented on Hepatitis B Virus Capsid-Like Particles Induce High-Titered Antibodies with Neutralizing Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Philipp; Wallich, Reinhard; Nassal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ticks are vectors for various, including pathogenic, microbes. Tick saliva contains multiple anti-host defense factors that enable ticks their bloodmeals yet also facilitate microbe transmission. Lyme disease-causing borreliae profit specifically from the broadly conserved tick histamine release factor (tHRF), and from cysteine-rich glycoproteins represented by Salp15 from Ixodes scapularis and Iric-1 from Ixodes ricinus ticks which they recruit to their outer surface protein C (OspC). Hence these tick proteins are attractive targets for anti-tick vaccines that simultaneously impair borrelia transmission. Main obstacles are the tick proteins´ immunosuppressive activities, and for Salp15 orthologs, the lack of efficient recombinant expression systems. Here, we exploited the immune-enhancing properties of hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) derived capsid-like particles (CLPs) to generate, in E. coli, nanoparticulate vaccines presenting tHRF and, as surrogates for the barely soluble wild-type proteins, cysteine-free Salp15 and Iric-1 variants. The latter CLPs were exclusively accessible in the less sterically constrained SplitCore system. Mice immunized with tHRF CLPs mounted a strong anti-tHRF antibody response. CLPs presenting cysteine-free Salp15 and Iric-1 induced antibodies to wild-type, including glycosylated, Salp15 and Iric-1. The broadly distributed epitopes included the OspC interaction sites. In vitro, the anti-Salp15 antibodies interfered with OspC binding and enhanced human complement-mediated killing of Salp15 decorated borreliae. A mixture of all three CLPs induced high titered antibodies against all three targets, suggesting the feasibility of combination vaccines. These data warrant in vivo validation of the new candidate vaccines´ protective potential against tick infestation and Borrelia transmission. PMID:26352137

  13. Gas cell neutralizers (Fundamental principles)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehrer, B.

    1985-06-01

    Neutralizing an ion-beam of the size and energy levels involved in the neutral-particle-beam program represents a considerable extension of the state-of-the-art of neutralizer technology. Many different mediums (e.g., solid, liquid, gas, plasma, photons) can be used to strip the hydrogen ion of its extra electron. A large, multidisciplinary R and D effort will no doubt be required to sort out all of the ''pros and cons'' of these various techniques. The purpose of this particular presentation is to discuss some basic configurations and fundamental principles of the gas type of neutralizer cell. Particular emphasis is placed on the ''Gasdynamic Free-Jet'' neutralizer since this configuration has the potential of being much shorter than other type of gas cells (in the beam direction) and it could operate in nearly a continuous mode (CW) if necessary. These were important considerations in the ATSU design which is discussed in some detail in the second presentation entitled ''ATSU Point Design''.

  14. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  15. RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas W. Marshall

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a twoinch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

  16. RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH-DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a two inch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

  17. Neutral gas heating in helium microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugroot, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study details a self-consistent model of charged and neutral particle dynamics which is applied to atmospheric small-space (200 μm) discharges in helium. Hydrodynamic transport equations of the self-consistent and time-dependant model are described with an emphasis on the different terms involved in the close coupling among charged species, neutral species, and the electric field. Those equations are solved by two-dimensional numerical schemes for both species transport and electric field. The microplasmas are studied from an initial cloud until the stages of charged particle overamplification in small spaces, where transients are particularly important. Gas heating, neutral depletion initiation, and electric field reversal are observed, highlighting the close interaction between neutral gas and charged species in governing the evolution of the microplasma.

  18. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in

  19. Toroidal magnetic confinement of non-neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Zensho; Ogawa, Yuichi; Morikawa, Junji; Himura, Haruhiko; Kondo, Shigeo; Nakashima, Chihiro; Kakuno, Shuichi; Iqbal, Muhamad; Volponi, Francesco; Shibayama, Norihisa; Tahara, Shigeru

    1999-12-10

    A new method of toroidal non-neutral plasma trap has been developed with applying the chaos-induced radial transport of particles near a magnetic null point. A pure electron plasma is produced by injecting an electron beam. The poloidal gyroradius of an electron at the energy of 1 keV is of order 10 mm, which determines the length scale of the chaotic region. Amongst various applications of toroidal non-neutral plasmas, a possibility of producing very high-{beta} plasma, which is suitable for advanced fusion, has been examined. The self-electric field of a non-neutral plasma can generate a strong shear flow. When the flow velocity is comparable to the Alfven speed (which is smaller than the ion sound speed, if {beta}>1), a high-{beta} equilibrium can be produced in which the plasma pressure is primarily balanced by the dynamic pressure of the flow. This configuration is described by a generalized Bernoulli law.

  20. Toroidal Magnetic Confinement of Non-Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zensho Yoshida; Yuichi Ogawa; Junji Morikawa; Haruhiko Himura; Shigeo Kondo; Chihiro Nakashima; Shuichi Kakuno; Muhamad Iqbal; Francesco Volponi; Norihisa Shibayama; Shigeru Tahara

    1999-12-31

    A new method of toroidal non-neutral plasma trap has been developed with applying the chaos-induced radial transport of particles near a magnetic null point. A pure electron plasma is produced by injecting an electron beam. The poloidal gyro-radius of an electron at the energy of 1 keV is of order 10 mm, which determines the length scale of the chaotic region. Amongst various applications of toroidal non-neutral plasmas, a possibility of producing very high-{beta} plasma, which is suitable for advanced fusion, has been examined. The self-electric field of a non-neutral plasma can generate a strong shear flow. When the flow velocity is comparable to the Alfven speed (which is smaller than the ion sound speed, if {beta} > 1), a high-{beta} equilibrium can be produced in which the plasma pressure is primarily balanced by the dynamic pressure of the flow. This configuration is described by a generalized Bernoulli law.

  1. MONTE CARLO ADVANCES FOR THE EOLUS ASCI PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    J. S. HENDRICK; G. W. MCKINNEY; L. J. COX

    2000-01-01

    The Eolus ASCI project includes parallel, 3-D transport simulation for various nuclear applications. The codes developed within this project provide neutral and charged particle transport, detailed interaction physics, numerous source and tally capabilities, and general geometry packages. One such code is MCNPW which is a general purpose, 3-dimensional, time-dependent, continuous-energy Monte Carlo fully-coupled N-Particle transport code. Significant advances are also being made in the areas of modern software engineering and parallel computing. These advances are described in detail.

  2. Electron-electron interactions in fast neutral-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D. ); Manson, S.T. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1992-11-01

    Differential electron emission is studied for 50--500 keV H[sup +] and H atom impact on helium. Using the first Born formulation, it is shown that projectile electron-target electron interactions are expected to dominate the differential cross sections for low energy target electron emission induced by fast neutral projectile impact on any target. Measurements of the 15[degrees] electron emission were made in order to investigate this prediction. For low impact energies, a constant ratio between the hydrogen atom and proton impact cross sections was found for emitted electron velocities less than half the projectile velocity, V[sub p] But as the collision energy increased, for electron velocities less than 0.25 V[sub p], the cross section ratio increased as the emitted electron velocity decreased. This is interpreted as a signature of projectile electron-target electron interactions becoming dominant for distant collisions between neutral particles.

  3. Electron-electron interactions in fast neutral-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D.; Manson, S.T.

    1992-11-01

    Differential electron emission is studied for 50--500 keV H{sup +} and H atom impact on helium. Using the first Born formulation, it is shown that projectile electron-target electron interactions are expected to dominate the differential cross sections for low energy target electron emission induced by fast neutral projectile impact on any target. Measurements of the 15{degrees} electron emission were made in order to investigate this prediction. For low impact energies, a constant ratio between the hydrogen atom and proton impact cross sections was found for emitted electron velocities less than half the projectile velocity, V{sub p} But as the collision energy increased, for electron velocities less than 0.25 V{sub p}, the cross section ratio increased as the emitted electron velocity decreased. This is interpreted as a signature of projectile electron-target electron interactions becoming dominant for distant collisions between neutral particles.

  4. Neutral beam monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.

    1981-08-18

    Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

  5. Discrete elements method of neutral particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A new discrete elements (L/sub N/) transport method is derived and compared to the discrete ordinates S/sub N/ method, theoretically and by numerical experimentation. The discrete elements method is more accurate than discrete ordinates and strongly ameliorates ray effects for the practical problems studied. The discrete elements method is shown to be more cost effective, in terms of execution time with comparable storage to attain the same accuracy, for a one-dimensional test case using linear characteristic spatial quadrature. In a two-dimensional test case, a vacuum duct in a shield, L/sub N/ is more consistently convergent toward a Monte Carlo benchmark solution than S/sub N/, using step characteristic spatial quadrature. An analysis of the interaction of angular and spatial quadrature in xy-geometry indicates the desirability of using linear characteristic spatial quadrature with the L/sub N/ method.

  6. Proposed research on advanced accelerator concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.C.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1991-09-01

    This report summarizes technical progress and accomplishments during the proposed three-year research on advanced accelerator concepts supported by the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-88ER40465. A vigorous theoretical program has been pursued in critical problem areas related to advanced accelerator concepts and the basic equilibrium, stability, and radiation properties of intense charged particle beams. Broadly speaking, our research has made significant contributions in the following three major areas: Investigations of physics issues related to particle acceleration including two-beam accelerators and cyclotron resonance laser (CRL) accelerators; Investigations of RF sources including the free- electron lasers, cyclotron resonance masers, and relativistic magnetrons; Studies of coherent structures in electron plasmas and beams ranging from a low-density, nonrelativistic, pure electron plasma column to high-density, relativistic, non-neutral electron flow in a high-voltage diode. The remainder of this report presents theoretical and computational advances in these areas.

  7. Advances in measurements and simulation of gas-particle flows and coal combustion in burners/combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. X.

    2009-02-01

    Innovative coal combustors were developed, and measurement and simulation of gas-particle flows and coal combustion in such combustors were done in the Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University. LDV/PDPA measurements are made to understand the behavior of turbulent gas-particle flows in coal combustors. Coal combustion test was done for the non-slagging cyclone coal combustor. The full two-fluid model developed by the present author was used to simulate turbulent gas-particle flows, coal combustion and NOx formation. It is found by measurements and simulation that the optimum design can give large-size recirculation zones for improving the combustion performance for all the combustors. The combustion test shows that the nonslagging coal combustor can burn 3-5mm coal particles with good combustion efficiency and low NO emission. Simulation in comparison with experiments indicates that the swirl number can significantly affect the NO formation in the swirl coal combustor.

  8. PREFACE: Advanced Science Research Symposium 2009 Positron, Muon and other exotic particle beams for materials and atomic/molecular sciences (ASR2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higemoto, Wataru; Kawasuso, Atsuo

    2010-05-01

    It is our great pleasure to deliver the proceedings of ASR2009, the Advanced Science Research International Symposium 2009. ASR2009 is part of a series of symposia which is hosted by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center (JAEA-ASRC), and held every year with different scientific topics. ASR2009 was held at Tokai in Japan from 10-12 November 2009. In total, 102 participants, including 29 overseas scientists, made 44 oral presentations and 64 poster presentations. In ASR2009 we have focused on material and atomic/molecular science research using positrons, muons and other exotic particle beams. The symposium covered all the fields of materials science which use such exotic particle beams. Positrons, muons and other beams have similar and different features. For example, although positrons and muons are both leptons having charge and spin, they give quite different information about materials. A muon mainly detects the local magnetic state of the solid, while a positron detects crystal imperfections and electron momenta in solids. Other exotic particle beams also provide useful information about materials which is not able to be obtained with muons or positrons. Therefore, the complementary use of particle beams, coupled with an understanding of their relative advantages, leads to greater excellence in materials research. This symposium crossed the fields of muon science, positron science, unstable-nuclei science, and other exotic particle-beam science. We therefore believe that ASR2009 became an especially important meeting for finding new science with exotic particle beams. Finally, we would like to extend our appreciation to all the participants, committee members, and support staff for their great efforts to make ASR2009 a fruitful symposium. ASR2009 Chairs Wataru Higemoto and Atsuo Kawasuso Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Organizing committee Y Hatano, JAEA (Director of ASRC) M Fujinami, Chiba Univ. R H

  9. On neutral plasma oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Morrison, P.J.

    1993-06-01

    We examine the conditions for the existence of spectrally stable neutral modes in a Vlasov-Poisson plasma and show that for stable equilibria of systems that have unbounded spatial domain, the only possible neutral modes are those with phase velocities that correspond to stationary inflection points of the equilibrium distribution function. It is seen that these neutral modes can possess positive or negative free energy.

  10. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  11. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  12. Advances in quasi-elastic scattering of light with emphasis on simultaneous measurements of velocities and sizes of particles embedded in flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, G.; Grehan, G.

    1981-06-01

    Advances in quasi-elastic scattering of light are studied, and the theoretical analysis includes: (1) a generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT), describing the quasi-elastic linear scattering of light; (2) a computer program using the Lentz algorithm to compute ratios of Bessel functions; (3) a comparative analysis of the GLMT and geometrical optics; and (4) a discussion of new monotonic relationships between scattered powers and the sizes of scatter centers. The theoretical results are applied to the experimental study which attempts to measure simultaneously the diameter and velocity of individual particles embedded in laminar and turbulent two-phase flows, illuminated by a laser beam. Results show a satisfactory agreement with the theoretical predictions, and it is concluded that simultaneous velocimetry of single particles can be achieved by superimposing on the sizing probe a classical LDV control volume.

  13. An autoneutralizing neutral molecular beam gun

    SciTech Connect

    Delmore, J.E.; Appelhans, A.D.; Dahl, D.A. )

    1990-01-01

    A high-energy (up to 28 keV) neutral molecular beam gun has been developed and put into routine use that takes advantage of the autoneutralization properties of the sulfur hexafluoride anion for the production of high-energy sulfur hexafluoride neutral molecules. The anions are produced in an electron-capture source, accelerated, and focused in a lens assembly designed to minimize residence time, allowed to drift at their terminal velocity for a suitable distance during which up to 30% auto-eject an electron, and all remaining charged particles are electrostatically skimmed, resulting in a focused neutral beam. Rasterable neutral beams focused to a 5-mm spot size up to 3 m from the source have been produced with beam currents up to 40 pA equivalent. Spot sizes of 1 mm can be produced with intensity levels of a few picoamperes equivalent.

  14. Neutral theory and the species abundance distribution: recent developments and prospects for unifying niche and neutral perspectives.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Thomas J; Whittaker, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Published in 2001, The Unified Neutral Theory of Biodiversity and Biogeography (UNTB) emphasizes the importance of stochastic processes in ecological community structure, and has challenged the traditional niche-based view of ecology. While neutral models have since been applied to a broad range of ecological and macroecological phenomena, the majority of research relating to neutral theory has focused exclusively on the species abundance distribution (SAD). Here, we synthesize the large body of work on neutral theory in the context of the species abundance distribution, with a particular focus on integrating ideas from neutral theory with traditional niche theory. First, we summarize the basic tenets of neutral theory; both in general and in the context of SADs. Second, we explore the issues associated with neutral theory and the SAD, such as complications with fitting and model comparison, the underlying assumptions of neutral models, and the difficultly of linking pattern to process. Third, we highlight the advances in understanding of SADs that have resulted from neutral theory and models. Finally, we focus consideration on recent developments aimed at unifying neutral- and niche-based approaches to ecology, with a particular emphasis on what this means for SAD theory, embracing, for instance, ideas of emergent neutrality and stochastic niche theory. We put forward the argument that the prospect of the unification of niche and neutral perspectives represents one of the most promising future avenues of neutral theory research. PMID:25360266

  15. Neutral theory and the species abundance distribution: recent developments and prospects for unifying niche and neutral perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Thomas J; Whittaker, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Published in 2001, The Unified Neutral Theory of Biodiversity and Biogeography (UNTB) emphasizes the importance of stochastic processes in ecological community structure, and has challenged the traditional niche-based view of ecology. While neutral models have since been applied to a broad range of ecological and macroecological phenomena, the majority of research relating to neutral theory has focused exclusively on the species abundance distribution (SAD). Here, we synthesize the large body of work on neutral theory in the context of the species abundance distribution, with a particular focus on integrating ideas from neutral theory with traditional niche theory. First, we summarize the basic tenets of neutral theory; both in general and in the context of SADs. Second, we explore the issues associated with neutral theory and the SAD, such as complications with fitting and model comparison, the underlying assumptions of neutral models, and the difficultly of linking pattern to process. Third, we highlight the advances in understanding of SADs that have resulted from neutral theory and models. Finally, we focus consideration on recent developments aimed at unifying neutral- and niche-based approaches to ecology, with a particular emphasis on what this means for SAD theory, embracing, for instance, ideas of emergent neutrality and stochastic niche theory. We put forward the argument that the prospect of the unification of niche and neutral perspectives represents one of the most promising future avenues of neutral theory research. PMID:25360266

  16. Advances in the simulation and automated measurement of well-sorted granular material: 2. Direct measures of particle properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Rubin, David M.

    2012-01-01

    1. In this, the second of a pair of papers on the structure of well-sorted natural granular material (sediment), new methods are described for automated measurements from images of sediment, of: 1) particle-size standard deviation (arithmetic sorting) with and without apparent void fraction; and 2) mean particle size in material with void fraction. A variety of simulations of granular material are used for testing purposes, in addition to images of natural sediment. Simulations are also used to establish that the effects on automated particle sizing of grains visible through the interstices of the grains at the very surface of a granular material continue to a depth of approximately 4 grain diameters and that this is independent of mean particle size. Ensemble root-mean squared error between observed and estimated arithmetic sorting coefficients for 262 images of natural silts, sands and gravels (drawn from 8 populations) is 31%, which reduces to 27% if adjusted for bias (slope correction between observed and estimated values). These methods allow non-intrusive and fully automated measurements of surfaces of unconsolidated granular material. With no tunable parameters or empirically derived coefficients, they should be broadly universal in appropriate applications. However, empirical corrections may need to be applied for the most accurate results. Finally, analytical formulas are derived for the one-step pore-particle transition probability matrix, estimated from the image's autocorrelogram, from which void fraction of a section of granular material can be estimated directly. This model gives excellent predictions of bulk void fraction yet imperfect predictions of pore-particle transitions.

  17. Kinetic Simulation and Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced simulation tools and measurement techniques have been developed to study the dynamic magnetosphere and its response to drivers in the solar wind. The Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) is a kinetic code that solves the 3D distribution in space, energy and pitch-angle information of energetic ions and electrons. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imagers have been carried in past and current satellite missions. Global morphology of energetic ions were revealed by the observed ENA images. We have combined simulation and ENA analysis techniques to study the development of ring current ions during magnetic storms and substorms. We identify the timing and location of particle injection and loss. We examine the evolution of ion energy and pitch-angle distribution during different phases of a storm. In this talk we will discuss the findings from our ring current studies and how our simulation and ENA analysis tools can be applied to the upcoming TRIO-CINAMA mission.

  18. Advances in understanding the genesis and evolution solar energetic particle events over the last two solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Rami

    2016-04-01

    I will review the observational and modeling efforts related to solar energetic particle (SEP) events over the 23rd and 24th solar cycles. I will concentrate on large SEP events related to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), but discuss observations related to the possible role of flares in the acceleration of particles in those events, as well. The possible roles of various acceleration and transport processes in understanding the characteristics of the events will be discussed. This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA).

  19. Neutrality in Language Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wee, Lionel

    2010-01-01

    The unavoidability of language makes it critical that language policies appeal to some notion of language neutrality as part of their rationale, in order to assuage concerns that the policies might otherwise be unduly discriminatory. However, the idea of language neutrality is deeply ideological in nature, since it is not only an attempt to treat…

  20. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emissions Project (APBF-DEC): 2,000-Hour Performance of a NOx Adsorber Catalyst and Diesel Particle Filter System for a Medium-Duty, Pick-Up Diesel Engine Platform; Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-03-01

    Presents the results of a 2,000-hour test of an emissions control system consisting of a nitrogen oxides adsorber catalyst in combination with a diesel particle filter, advanced fuels, and advanced engine controls in an SUV/pick-up truck vehicle platform.

  1. Advanced development of particle-beam-probe diagnostic systems. Technical progress report, 1 July 1980-30 April 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hickok, R.L.; Jennings, W.C.; Woo, J.T.; Connor, K.A.

    1981-05-01

    The heavy ion beam probe system on the RENTOR tokamak has been reinstalled with considerably improved performance. The heavy neutral beam probe system on the ALEX baseball facility has demonstrated the capability of measuring space potential in minimum-B geometry. A large amount of data were obtained from the highly successful TMX beam probe system and are presently being analyzed. Technological improvements were made on both the RENTOR and ALEX diagnostic systems, new ion sources and extraction configurations were investigated, and the superiority of off-line processing techniques for beam probe data has been demonstrated. The development of high energy probing beams for application to major confinement experiments has been initiated and cross-over sweep systems to improve spatial resolution, differential pumping, and reduce energy requirements have been designed.

  2. Geometric phases generated by the non-trivial spatial topology of static vector fields linearly coupled to a neutral spin-endowed particle: application to 171Yb atoms trapped in a 2D optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchiat, Marie-Anne; Bouchiat, Claude

    2012-10-01

    We have constructed the geometric phases emerging from the non-trivial topology of a space-dependent magnetic field B(r), interacting with the spin magnetic moment of a neutral particle. Our basic tool, adapted from a previous work on Berry’s phases, is the space-dependent unitary transformation {U}({\\mathbf {r}}), which leads to the identity, {U}({\\mathbf {r}})^{\\dag }\\, {\\mathbf {S}}\\,{\\bm \\cdot}\\, {\\mathbf {B}}({\\mathbf {r}}) \\, {U}({\\mathbf {r}}) = \\vert {\\mathbf {B}}({\\mathbf {r}}) \\vert \\, S_z, at each point r. In the ‘rotated’ Hamiltonian \\widehat{ H}, \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}} is replaced by the non-Abelian covariant derivative \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}}- \\frac{i}{\\hbar } {A}({\\mathbf {r}}) where {A}({\\mathbf {r}}) = i \\hbar \\, {U}^{\\dag }\\,{\\bm\\cdot}\\, \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}} {U} can be written as A1(r)Sx + A2(r)Sy + A3(r)Sz. The Abelian differentials Ak(r)·dr are given in terms of the Euler angles defining the orientation of B(r). The non-Abelian field {A}({\\mathbf {r}}) transforms as a Yang-Mills field; however, its vanishing ‘curvature’ reveals its purely geometric character. We have defined a perturbation scheme based upon the assumption that in \\widehat{ H} the longitudinal field A3(r) dominates the transverse field A1, 2(r) contributions, evaluated to second order. The geometry embedded in both the vector field A3(r) and the geometric magnetic field \\mathbf { B}_3 ({\\mathbf {r}}) = \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}}\\wedge {{\\mathbf {A}}}_3({\\mathbf {r}}) is described by their associated Aharonov-Bohm phase. As an illustration we study the physics of cold 171Yb atoms dressed by overlaying two circularly polarized stationary waves with orthogonal directions, which form a 2D square optical lattice. The frequency is tuned midway between the two hyperfine levels of the (6s6p)3P1 states to protect the optical B(r) field generated by the

  3. Neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 induced by immunization

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Most neutralizing antibodies act at the earliest steps of viral infection and block interaction of the virus with cellular receptors to prevent entry into host cells. The inability to induce neutralizing antibodies to HIV has been a major obstacle to HIV vaccine research since the early days of the epidemic. However, in the past three years, the definition of a neutralizing antibody against HIV has been revolutionized by the isolation of extremely broad and potent neutralizing antibodies from HIV-infected individuals. Considerable hurdles remain for inducing neutralizing antibodies to a protective level after immunization. Meanwhile, novel technologies to bypass the induction of antibodies are being explored to provide prophylactic antibody-based interventions. This review addresses the challenge of inducing HIV neutralizing antibodies upon immunization and considers notable recent advances in the field. A greater understanding of the successes and failures for inducing a neutralizing response upon immunization is required to accelerate the development of an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:23401570

  4. Intense ion beam neutralization using underdense background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Berdanier, William; Roy, Prabir K.; Kaganovich, Igor

    2015-01-15

    Producing an overdense background plasma for neutralization purposes with a density that is high compared to the beam density is not always experimentally possible. We show that even an underdense background plasma with a small relative density can achieve high neutralization of intense ion beam pulses. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we show that if the total plasma electron charge is not sufficient to neutralize the beam charge, electron emitters are necessary for effective neutralization but are not needed if the plasma volume is so large that the total available charge in the electrons exceeds that of the ion beam. Several regimes of possible underdense/tenuous neutralization plasma densities are investigated with and without electron emitters or dense plasma at periphery regions, including the case of electron emitters without plasma, which does not effectively neutralize the beam. Over 95% neutralization is achieved for even very underdense background plasma with plasma density 1/15th the beam density. We compare results of particle-in-cell simulations with an analytic model of neutralization and find close agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations. Further, we show experimental data from the National Drift Compression experiment-II group that verifies the result that underdense plasma can neutralize intense heavy ion beams effectively.

  5. Delivery of Differentiation Factors by Mesoporous Silica Particles Assists Advanced Differentiation of Transplanted Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kozhevnikova, Mariya; König, Niclas; Zhou, Chunfang; Leao, Richardson; Knöpfel, Thomas; Pankratova, Stanislava; Trolle, Carl; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Aldskogius, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation holds great hope for the replacement of damaged cells in the nervous system. However, poor long-term survival after transplantation and insufficiently robust differentiation of stem cells into specialized cell types in vivo remain major obstacles for clinical application. Here, we report the development of a novel technological approach for the local delivery of exogenous trophic factor mimetics to transplanted cells using specifically designed silica nanoporous particles. We demonstrated that delivering Cintrofin and Gliafin, established peptide mimetics of the ciliary neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, respectively, with these particles enabled not only robust functional differentiation of motor neurons from transplanted embryonic stem cells but also their long-term survival in vivo. We propose that the delivery of growth factors by mesoporous nanoparticles is a potentially versatile and widely applicable strategy for efficient differentiation and functional integration of stem cell derivatives upon transplantation. PMID:24089415

  6. New Insights Into the Surface / Atmosphere Exchange of Particles Based on Recent Advances in Measurement Technology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemitz, E.; Phillips, G. J.; Thomas, R.; di Marco, C. F.; Fowler, D.

    2009-12-01

    Dry deposition velocities of particles govern the deposition and atmospheric lifetime of aerosols and their constituents and need to be parameterised in chemical transport models to predict air quality, climate change and ecosystem impacts. The same micrometeorological flux measurement approaches used to measure deposition rates can be used to quantify emissions from area sources such as urban emissions and resuspension. This paper reviews recent measurements of fluxes of particle number and, importantly, individual aerosol chemical compounds, made with wet-chemistry gradient systems and eddy-covariance using aerosol mass spectrometry. The results indicate that aerosol exchange tends to be bi-directional and is modulated by particle dynamics due to evaporation and condensation growth. Often, some aerosol components are emitted or chemically formed below the measurement height, while other components deposit or evaporate. This has important implications on the use of field measurements of number fluxes for the development of model parameterisations. For example, measurements over a range of surfaces show that ammonium nitrate volatilises during the deposition to semi-natural vegetation, forming associated gaseous precursors, which deposit faster than the aerosol species. This evaporation therefore enhances total nitrogen deposition, and models need to use enhanced effective deposition rates to account for the effect. Conversely, the effect of particle dynamics on fluxes can be used to study aerosol processing, such as the in-situ formation of inorganic and organic secondary aerosol and the volatilisation of primary combustion aerosol. Examples will be shown from agricultural, natural and urban environments. Finally, the paper will discuss future research priorities to help improve parameterisations of dry deposition velocities further.

  7. Airborne Particles: What We Have Learned About Their Role in Climate from Remote Sensing, and Prospects for Future Advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Desert dust, wildfire smoke, volcanic ash, biogenic and urban pollution particles, all affect the regional-scale climate of Earth in places and at times; some have global-scale impacts on the column radiation balance, cloud properties, atmospheric stability structure, and circulation patterns. Remote sensing has played a central role in identifying the sources and transports of airborne particles, mapping their three-dimensional distribution and variability, quantifying their amount, and constraining aerosol air mass type. The measurements obtained from remote sensing have strengths and limitations, and their value for characterizing Earths environment is enhanced immensely when they are combined with direct, in situ observations, and used to constrain aerosol transport and climate models. A similar approach has been taken to study the role particles play in determining the climate of Mars, though based on far fewer observations. This presentation will focus what we have learned from remote sensing about the impacts aerosol have on Earths climate; a few points about how aerosols affect the climate of Mars will also be introduced, in the context of how we might assess aerosol-climate impacts more generally on other worlds.

  8. Equivalent Neutral Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Wenqing

    1996-01-01

    The definition of equivalent neutral wind and the rationale for using it as the geophysical product of a spaceborne scatterometer are reviewed. The differences between equivalent neutral wind and actual wind, which are caused by atmospheric density stratification, are demonstrated with measurements at selected locations. A method of computing this parameter from ship and buoy measurements is described and some common fallacies in accounting for the effects of atmospheric stratification on wind shear are discussed. The computer code for the model to derive equivalent neutral wind is provided.

  9. THE ROLE OF NEUTRALS IN H-MODE PEDESTAL FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. GROEBNER; M.A. MAHDAVI; A.W. LEONARD; T.H. OSBORNE; G.D. PORTER; R.J. COLCHIN; L.W.OWEN

    2001-11-01

    An analytic model, derived from coupled continuity equations for the electron and neutral deuterium densities, is consistent with many features of edge electron density profiles in the DIII-D tokamak. For an assumed constant particle diffusion coefficient, the model shows that particle transport and neutral fueling produce electron and neutral density profiles that have the same characteristic scale lengths at the plasma edge. For systematic variations of density in H-mode discharges, the model predicts that the width of the electron density transport barrier decreases and the maximum gradient increases, as observed in the experiments. The widths computed from the model agree quantitatively with the experimental widths for conditions in which the model is valid. These results support models of transport barrier formation in which the H-mode particle barrier is driven by the edge particle flux and the width of the barrier is approximately the neutral penetration length.

  10. Advanced zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron particles for acidic magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited ZnS and other IR materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzman, S.; Giannechini, L. J.; Romanofsky, H. J.; Golini, N.; Taylor, B.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a modified version of zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron (CI) particles that were invented at the University of Rochester in 2008. The amount of zirconia on the coating is increased to further protect the iron particles from corrosion when introduced to an acidic environment. Five low-pH, magnetorheological (MR) fluids were made with five acids: acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric, and hydrofluoric. All fluids were based on the modified zirconia-coated CI particles. Off-line viscosity and pH stability were measured for all acidic MR fluids to determine the ideal fluid composition for acidic MR finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (ZnS) and other infrared (IR) optical materials, such as hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) ZnS, CVD zinc selenide (ZnSe), and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). Results show significant reduction in surface artifacts (millimeter-size, pebble-like structures on the finished surface) for several standard-grade CVD ZnS substrates and good surface roughness for the non-CVD MgF2 substrate when MR finished with our advanced acidic MR fluid.

  11. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  12. A niche for neutrality.

    PubMed

    Adler, Peter B; Hillerislambers, Janneke; Levine, Jonathan M

    2007-02-01

    Ecologists now recognize that controversy over the relative importance of niches and neutrality cannot be resolved by analyzing species abundance patterns. Here, we use classical coexistence theory to reframe the debate in terms of stabilizing mechanisms (niches) and fitness equivalence (neutrality). The neutral model is a special case where stabilizing mechanisms are absent and species have equivalent fitness. Instead of asking whether niches or neutral processes structure communities, we advocate determining the degree to which observed diversity reflects strong stabilizing mechanisms overcoming large fitness differences or weak stabilization operating on species of similar fitness. To answer this question, we propose combining data on per capita growth rates with models to: (i) quantify the strength of stabilizing processes; (ii) quantify fitness inequality and compare it with stabilization; and (iii) manipulate frequency dependence in growth to test the consequences of stabilization and fitness equivalence for coexistence. PMID:17257097

  13. Is dispersal neutral?

    PubMed

    Lowe, Winsor H; McPeek, Mark A

    2014-08-01

    Dispersal is difficult to quantify and often treated as purely stochastic and extrinsically controlled. Consequently, there remains uncertainty about how individual traits mediate dispersal and its ecological effects. Addressing this uncertainty is crucial for distinguishing neutral versus non-neutral drivers of community assembly. Neutral theory assumes that dispersal is stochastic and equivalent among species. This assumption can be rejected on principle, but common research approaches tacitly support the 'neutral dispersal' assumption. Theory and empirical evidence that dispersal traits are under selection should be broadly integrated in community-level research, stimulating greater scrutiny of this assumption. A tighter empirical connection between the ecological and evolutionary forces that shape dispersal will enable richer understanding of this fundamental process and its role in community assembly. PMID:24962790

  14. The Phobos neutral and ionized torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Curry, S. M.; Fatemi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Charged particle sputtering, micrometeoroid impact vaporization, and photon-stimulated desorption are fundamental processes operating at airless surfaces throughout the solar system. At larger bodies, such as Earth's Moon and several of the outer planet moons, these processes generate tenuous surface-bound exospheres that have been observed by a variety of methods. Phobos and Deimos, in contrast, are too gravitationally weak to keep ejected neutrals bound and, thus, are suspected to generate neutral tori in orbit around Mars. While these tori have not yet been detected, the distribution and density of both the neutral and ionized components are of fundamental interest. We combine a neutral Monte Carlo model and a hybrid plasma model to investigate both the neutral and ionized components of the Phobos torus. We show that the spatial distribution of the neutral torus is highly dependent on each individual species (due to ionization rates that span nearly 4 orders of magnitude) and on the location of Phobos with respect to Mars. Additionally, we present the flux distribution of torus pickup ions throughout the Martian system and estimate typical pickup ion fluxes. We find that the predicted pickup ion fluxes are too low to perturb the ambient plasma, consistent with previous null detections by spacecraft around Mars.

  15. Advances in colloid and biocolloid transport in porous media: particle size-dependent dispersivity and gravity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate prediction of colloid and biocolloid transport in porous media relies heavily on usage of suitable dispersion coefficients. The widespread procedure for dispersion coefficient determination consists of conducting conservative tracer experiments and subsequently fitting the collected breakthrough data with a selected advection-dispersion transport model. The fitted dispersion coefficient is assumed to characterize the porous medium and is often used thereafter to analyze experimental results obtained from the same porous medium with other solutes, colloids, and biocolloids. The classical advection-dispersion equation implies that Fick's first law of diffusion adequately describes the dispersion process, or that the dispersive flux is proportional to the concentration gradient. Therefore, the above-described procedure inherently assumes that the dispersive flux of all solutes, colloids and biocolloids under the same flow field conditions is exactly the same. Furthermore, the available mathematical models for colloid and biocoloid transport in porous media do not adequately account for gravity effects. Here an extensive laboratory study was undertaken in order to assess whether the dispersivity, which traditionally has been considered to be a property of the porous medium, is dependent on colloid particle size, interstitial velocity and length scale. The breakthrough curves were successfully simulated with a mathematical model describing colloid and biocolloid transport in homogeneous, water saturated porous media. The results demonstrated that the dispersivity increases very slowly with increasing interstitial velocity, and increases with column length. Furthermore, contrary to earlier results, which were based either on just a few experimental observations or experimental conditions leading to low mass recoveries, dispersivity was positively correlated with colloid particle size. Also, transport experiments were performed with biocolloids (bacteriophages:

  16. Entangling two transportable neutral atoms via local spin exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, A. M.; Lester, B. J.; Foss-Feig, M.; Wall, M. L.; Rey, A. M.; Regal, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    To advance quantum information science, physical systems are sought that meet the stringent requirements for creating and preserving quantum entanglement. In atomic physics, robust two-qubit entanglement is typically achieved by strong, long-range interactions in the form of either Coulomb interactions between ions or dipolar interactions between Rydberg atoms. Although such interactions allow fast quantum gates, the interacting atoms must overcome the associated coupling to the environment and cross-talk among qubits. Local interactions, such as those requiring substantial wavefunction overlap, can alleviate these detrimental effects; however, such interactions present a new challenge: to distribute entanglement, qubits must be transported, merged for interaction, and then isolated for storage and subsequent operations. Here we show how, using a mobile optical tweezer, it is possible to prepare and locally entangle two ultracold neutral atoms, and then separate them while preserving their entanglement. Ground-state neutral atom experiments have measured dynamics consistent with spin entanglement, and have detected entanglement with macroscopic observables; we are now able to demonstrate position-resolved two-particle coherence via application of a local gradient and parity measurements. This new entanglement-verification protocol could be applied to arbitrary spin-entangled states of spatially separated atoms. The local entangling operation is achieved via spin-exchange interactions, and quantum tunnelling is used to combine and separate atoms. These techniques provide a framework for dynamically entangling remote qubits via local operations within a large-scale quantum register.

  17. Neutral Beam Ion Confinement in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; S.S. Medley; and A.L. Roquemore

    2001-07-24

    Neutral-beam (NB) heating in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) began in September 2000 using up to 5 MW of 80 keV deuterium (D) beams. An initial assessment of beam ion confinement has been made using neutron detectors, a neutral particle analyzer (NPA), and a Faraday cup beam ion loss probe. Preliminary neutron results indicate that confinement may be roughly classical in quiescent discharges, but the probe measurements do not match a classical loss model. MHD activity, especially reconnection events (REs) causes substantial disturbance of the beam ion population.

  18. Neoclassical electron transport in tokamaks with neutral-beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Akers, R.J.

    2005-04-15

    The collisional interaction between neutral-beam ions and bulk plasma electrons leads to convective transport of particles and energy similar to the well-known Ware pinch. These transport fluxes are calculated, and it is found that the particle flux is outward when the neutral beams are in the same direction as the plasma current and inward otherwise, while the opposite holds for the electron heat transport. This effectively shifts the neutral-beam fueling profile approximately one fast-ion banana width outward during coinjection and inward during counterinjection, and could help to explain why very different plasma behavior is sometimes observed when the direction of the plasma current is reversed.

  19. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, O.; Wang, J.

    2011-05-20

    Full particle PIC simulations are performed to study the neutralization of an ion beam in the cohesionless, mesothermal regime. Simulations further confirmed that neutralization is achieved through interactions between the trapped electrons and the potential well established by the propagation of the beam front along the beam direction and is not through plasma instabilities as previous studies suggested. In the transverse direction, the process is similar to that of the expansion of mesothermal plasma into vacuum. Parametric simulations are also performed to investigate the effects of beam radius and domain boundary condition on the neutralization process. The results suggests that, while the qualitative behavior may be similar in ground tests, quantitative parameters such as the beam potential will be affected significantly by the vacuum chamber because of the limits imposed on the expansion process by the finite chamber space.

  20. An accessible heavy neutral lepton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao-Hsi

    1982-09-01

    In the SUL(2) ⊗ SUR(2) ⊗ UB-L(1) model, an accessible heavy neutral lepton may exist owing to the mixing of generations. Based on a rough estimate, it is pointed out that the most hopeful experiments to observe this lepton are ν-production in an emulsion (because the track of a particle with lifetime 10-11-10-13 s could be seen) and e-production. The author thanks Professor J.D. Bjorken, Professor He Zuo-Xiu, Professor R.E. Mashark, Professor S.J. Chang, Professor Zhu Cong-Yuan and Professor M. Dine for helpful discussions and comments. He would like to thank the referee for valuable comments.

  1. Acceleration of neutrals in a nanosecond laser produced nickel plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Philip, Reji

    2014-12-15

    Time of flight dynamics of slow neutrals, fast neutrals, and ions from a nanosecond laser produced nickel (Ni) plasma are investigated. Species arrival times confirm the hypothesis that fast neutrals are formed by the recombination of fast ions with free electrons. Both neutrals and ions are found to accelerate for a short interval immediately after ablation, which is attributed to internal Coulomb forces which create electrostatic potentials resulting in the charged particle acceleration. This process is further enhanced by laser-plasma energy coupling. Emission from neutrals could be measured for longer axial distances in the plume compared to that of ions confirming that the ions recombine to form neutrals as they move away from the target surface.

  2. Use of particle beams for lunar prospecting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toepfer, A. J.; Eppler, D.; Friedlander, A.; Weitz, R.

    1993-01-01

    A key issue in choosing the appropriate site for a manned lunar base is the availability of resources, particularly oxygen and hydrogen for the production of water, and ores for the production of fuels and building materials. NASA has proposed two Lunar Scout missions that would orbit the Moon and use, among other instruments, a hard X-ray spectrometer, a neutron spectrometer, and a Ge gamma ray spectrometer to map the lunar surface. This passive instrumentation will have low resolution (tens of kilometers) due to the low signal levels produced by natural radioactivity and the interaction of cosmic rays and the solar wind with the lunar surface. This paper presents the results of a concept definition effort for a neutral particle beam lunar mapper probe. The idea of using particle beam probes to survey asteroids was first proposed by Sagdeev et al., and an ion beam device was fielded on the 1988 Soviet probe to the Mars moon Phobos. During the past five years, significant advances in the technology of neutral particle beams (NPB) have led to a suborbital flight of a neutral hydrogen beam device in the SDIO-sponsored BEAR experiment. An orbital experiment, the Neutral Particle Beam Far Field Optics Experiment (NPB-FOX) is presently in the preliminary design phase. The development of NPB accelerators that are space-operable leads one to consider the utility of these devices for probing the surface of the Moon using gamma ray, X-ray, and optical/UV spectroscopy to locate various elements and compounds. We consider the utility of the NPB-FOX satellite containing a 5-MeV particle beam accelerator as a probe in lunar orbit. Irradiation of the lunar surface by the particle beam will induce secondary and back scattered radiation from the lunar surface to be detected by a sensor that may be co-orbital with or on the particle beam satellite platform, or may be in a separate orbit. The secondary radiation is characteristic of the make-up of the lunar surface. The size of the

  3. Advanced methods for the computation of particle beam transport and the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dragt, A.J.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    1992-11-01

    The University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group carries out research in two broad areas: the computation of charged particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods and advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions. Important improvements in the state of the art are believed to be possible in both of these areas. In addition, applications of these methods are made to problems of current interest in accelerator physics including the theoretical performance of present and proposed high energy machines. The Lie algebraic method of computing and analyzing beam transport handles both linear and nonlinear beam elements. Tests show this method to be superior to the earlier matrix or numerical integration methods. It has wide application to many areas including accelerator physics, intense particle beams, ion microprobes, high resolution electron microscopy, and light optics. With regard to the area of electromagnetic fields and beam cavity interactions, work is carried out on the theory of beam breakup in single pulses. Work is also done on the analysis of the high frequency behavior of longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances, including the examination of methods which may be used to measure these impedances. Finally, work is performed on the electromagnetic analysis of coupled cavities and on the coupling of cavities to waveguides.

  4. Reversal of particle flux in collisional-finite beta tokamak discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Weiland, J.; Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.

    2015-01-15

    The mixed gradient method [Zhong et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 265001 (2013)] is adopted and effects of collisions and finite beta are included in the Weiland 9-equation fluid model. The particle flux and particle pinch, obtained using the Weiland anomalous transport fluid model, are compared with Tore Supra experimental results. Particle transport is also studied using predictive simulation data for an experimental advanced superconducting tokamak discharge in which neutral beam heating is utilized. The effects of collisions on particle transport are studied by turning collisions on and off in the Weiland model. It is found that the particle pinch region is related to the mode structure. The particle pinch region coincides with the region where the strong ballooning modes are present due to large gradients. The general properties of the fluid model are examined by finding regions where collisions can enhance the particle pinch.

  5. Physicochemical characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of organic solution advanced spray-dried cyclosporine A multifunctional particles for dry powder inhalation aerosol delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao; Zhang, Weifen; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    In this systematic and comprehensive study, inhalation powders of the polypeptide immunosuppressant drug – cyclosporine A – for lung delivery as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were successfully designed, developed, and optimized. Several spray drying pump rates were rationally chosen. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, Karl Fischer titration, laser size diffraction, and gravimetric vapor sorption. Aerosol dispersion performance was conducted using a next generation impactor with a Food and Drug Administration-approved DPI device. These DPIs displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance with high values in emitted dose, respirable fraction, and fine particle fraction. In addition, novel multifunctional inhalation aerosol powder formulations of cyclosporine A with lung surfactant-mimic phospholipids were also successfully designed and developed by advanced organic solution cospray drying in closed mode. The lung surfactantmimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-snglycero- 3-(phosphor-rac-1-glycerol). These cyclosporine A lung surfactant-mimic aerosol powder formulations were comprehensively characterized. Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state was preserved following advanced organic solution spray drying in closed mode. These novel multifunctional inhalation powders were optimized for DPI delivery with excellent aerosol dispersion performance and high aerosol performance parameters. PMID:23569375

  6. Benchmark of 3D halo neutral simulation in TRANSP and FIDASIM and application to projected neutral-beam-heated NSTX-U plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Medley, S. S.; Gorelenkova, M. V.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Stagner, L.

    2014-10-01

    A cloud of halo neutrals is created in the vicinity of beam footprint during the neutral beam injection and the halo neutral density can be comparable with beam neutral density. Proper modeling of halo neutrals is critical to correctly interpret neutral particle analyzers (NPA) and fast ion D-alpha (FIDA) signals since these signals strongly depend on local beam and halo neutral density. A 3D halo neutral model has been recently developed and implemented inside TRANSP code. The 3D halo neutral code uses a ``beam-in-a-box'' model that encompasses both injected beam neutrals and resulting halo neutrals. Upon deposition by charge exchange, a subset of the full, one-half and one-third beam energy components produce thermal halo neutrals that are tracked through successive halo neutral generations until an ionization event occurs or a descendant halo exits the box. A benchmark between 3D halo neural model in TRANSP and in FIDA/NPA synthetic diagnostic code FIDASIM is carried out. Detailed comparison of halo neutral density profiles from two codes will be shown. The NPA and FIDA simulations with and without 3D halos are applied to projections of plasma performance for the National Spherical Tours eXperiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) and the effects of halo neutral density on NPA and FIDA signal amplitude and profile will be presented. Work supported by US DOE.

  7. Low energy energetic neutral atom imaging in the Jovian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Wieser, Martin; Barabash, Stas

    2013-04-01

    We modeled low energy energetic neutral atoms fluxes originating from the interaction of Jovian magnetospheric plasma with the surface of Ganymede and from charge exchange reactions in the Io torus. We then calculated the instrument response of the Jovian Neutrals Analyzer instrument (JNA) to these fluxes. JNA is part of the proposed Particle Environment Package (PEP) for ESA's JUICE mission and is based on the Energetic Neutral Atom instrument (ENA) built for the BepiColombo Magnetospheric Orbiter. JNA is an imaging energetic neutral atom instrument for energies from 10eV to 3.3keV and it provides angular as well as mass resolution for major neutral species. Depending on magnetic field configuration magnetospheric plasma is able to precipitate onto the surface of Ganymede. The plasma surface interaction produces energetic neutral atoms by backscattering and/or sputtering that travel on ballistic trajectories. Imaging of the energetic neutral atoms fluxes allows to remotely study the precipitation pattern onto the surface, its dependence on magnetic field configuration and its evolution over time. Simulated JNA images are shown for typical conditions. Energetic neutral atoms are also generated by charge exchange reactions in the Io torus. Energetic neutral atoms allow us to study torus dynamics remotely. We show expected energetic neutral atoms fluxes and simulated JNA data from imaging the Io torus from a vantage point outside of Europa's orbit well reachable by the JUICE mission.

  8. What is a Matter Particle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tsan Ung

    Positive baryon numbers (A>0) and positive lepton numbers (L>0) characterize matter particles while negative baryon numbers and negative lepton numbers characterize antimatter particles. Matter particles and antimatter particles belong to two distinct classes of particles. Matter neutral particles are particles characterized by both zero baryon number and zero lepton number. This third class of particles includes mesons formed by a quark and an antiquark pair (a pair of matter particle and antimatter particle) and bosons which are messengers of known interactions (photons for electromagnetism, W and Z bosons for the weak interaction, gluons for the strong interaction). The antiparticle of a matter particle belongs to the class of antimatter particles, the antiparticle of an antimatter particle belongs to the class of matter particles. The antiparticle of a matter neutral particle belongs to the same class of matter neutral particles. A truly neutral particle is a particle identical with its antiparticle; it belongs necessarily to the class of matter neutral particles. All known interactions of the Standard Model conserve baryon number and lepton number; matter cannot be created or destroyed via a reaction governed by these interactions. Conservation of baryon and lepton number parallels conservation of atoms in chemistry; the number of atoms of a particular species in the reactants must equal the number of those atoms in the products. These laws of conservation valid for interaction involving matter particles are indeed valid for any particles (matter particles characterized by positive numbers, antimatter particles characterized by negative numbers, and matter neutral particles characterized by zero). Interactions within the framework of the Standard Model which conserve both matter and charge at the microscopic level cannot explain the observed asymmetry of our Universe. The strong interaction was introduced to explain the stability of nuclei: there must exist a

  9. Neutralization of thoron progeny in gases.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y S; Yu, C C; Tung, C J; Hopke, P K

    1994-08-01

    This paper reports charge neutralization phenomena of 212Pb particles in nitrogen or oxygen atmospheres with trace amounts of other gases. Newly produced thoron or radon progeny are positively charged, stable molecular clusters that are subsequently neutralized by several mechanisms. The charged clusters have a smaller diffusion coefficient than neutral clusters of the same size due to the interaction of the charge with the surrounding gas molecules. In this study, we have found that the diffusion coefficients of 212Pb in O2, N2, NH3/O2, NH3/N2, and C6H12/N2 (IPs between 15.58 and 9.8 eV) ranged between 0.015 and 0.030 cm2 s-1. In the case of C6H12/O2, NO2/O2, NO/O2, and dimethylamine/O2 (ionization potential between 9.8 and 8.23 eV), the diffusion coefficients have increased to between 0.046 and 0.69 cm2 s-1. These results are consistent with previous results of 218Po, indicating that charged progeny are neutralized by electron transfer from a gas molecule with a lower ionization potential than lead oxide. We estimate the ionization potential of lead oxide to range between 9.8 and 10.2 eV. 212Pb was also neutralized by an electron scavenging mechanism in NO2/nitrogen. PMID:8026969

  10. Low-energy neutral-atom spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, D.E.; Cohen, S.A.

    1982-04-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of a low energy neutral atom spectrometer are described. Time-of-flight analysis is used to measure the energy spectrum of charge-exchange deuterium atoms emitted from the PLT tokamak plasma in the energy range from 20 to 1000 eV. The neutral outflux is gated on a 1 ..mu..sec time scale by a slotted rotating chopper disc, supported against gravity in vacuum by magnetic levitation, and is detected by secondary electron emission from a Cu-Be plate. The energy dependent detection efficiency has been measured in particle beam experiments and on the tokamak so that the diagnostic is absolutely calibrated, allowing quantitative particle fluxes to be determined with 200 ..mu..sec time resolution. In addition to its present application as a plasma diagnostic, the instrument is capable of making a wide variety of measurements relevant to atomic and surface physics.

  11. Neutral line chaos and phase space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, Grant R.; Speiser, Theodore W.; Martin, Richard F., Jr.; Dusenbery, Paul B.

    1991-01-01

    Phase space structure and chaos near a neutral line are studied with numerical surface-of-section (SOS) techniques and analytic methods. Results are presented for a linear neutral line model with zero crosstail electric field. It was found that particle motion can be divided into three regimes dependening on the value of the conserved canonical momentum, Py, and the conserved Hamiltonian, h. The phase space structure, using Poincare SOS plots, is highly sensitive to bn = Bn/B0 variations, but not to h variations. It is verified that the slow motion preserves the action, Jz, as evaluated by Sonnerup (1971), when the period of the fast motion is smaller than the time scale of the slow motion. Results show that the phase space structure and particle chaos depend sensitively upon Py and bn, but are independent of h.

  12. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  13. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  14. Resonant Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (RTAEs) in Neutral Beam Heated Reverse Magnetic Shear Plasmas on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng; G.Y.-Fu; N.N. Gorelenkov; R. Nazikian; R.V. Budny

    1999-11-01

    Resonant Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (RTAEs) [1, 2] excited by neutral beam ions are observed in the region of the internal transport barrier in enhanced reverse shear (ERS) plasmas on TFTR. These modes occur in multiples of the same toroidal mode number in the range n=2-4 and appear as highly localized structures near the minimum in the q-profile with frequency near to that expected for TAEs. Unlike regular TAEs, these modes are observed in plasmas where the birth velocity of beam ions is well below the fundamental or sideband resonance condition. Theoretical analysis indicates that the Toroidicity induced Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) does not exist in these discharges due to strong pressure gradients (of the thermal and fast ions) which moves the mode frequency down into the lower Alfven continuum. However a new non-perturbative analysis (where the energetic particles are allowed to modify the mode frequency and mode structure) indicates that RTAEs can be driven by neutral beam ions in the weak magnetic shear region of ERS plasma, consistent with observations on TFTR. The importance of such modes is that they may affect the alpha particle heating profile or enhance the loss of energetic alpha particles in an advanced tokamak reactor where large internal pressure gradients and reverse magnetic shear operation are required to sustain large bootstrap current.

  15. Modeling thermospheric neutral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Liying

    Satellite drag prediction requires determination of thermospheric neutral density. The NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) and the global-mean Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIMEGCM) were used to quantify thermospheric neutral density and its variations, focusing on annual/semiannual variation, the effect of using measured solar irradiance on model calculations of solar-cycle variation, and global change in the thermosphere. Satellite drag data and the MSIS00 empirical model were utilized to compare to the TIEGCM simulations. The TIEGCM simulations indicated that eddy diffusion and its annual/semiannual variation is a mechanism for annual/semiannual density variation in the thermosphere. It was found that eddy diffusion near the turbopause can effectively influence thermospheric neutral density. Eddy diffusion, together with annual insolation variation and large-scale circulation, generated global annual/semiannual density variation observed by satellite drag. Using measured solar irradiance as solar input for the TIEGCM improved the solar-cycle dependency of the density calculation shown in F10.7 -based thermospheric empirical models. It has been found that the empirical models overestimate density at low solar activity. The TIEGCM simulations did not show such solar-cycle dependency. Using historic measurements of CO2 and F 10.7, simulations of the global-mean TIMEGCM showed that thermospheric neutral density at 400 km had an average long-term decrease of 1.7% per decade from 1970 to 2000. A forecast of density decrease for solar cycle 24 suggested that thermospheric density will decrease at 400 km from present to the end of solar cycle 24 at a rate of 2.7% per decade. Reduction in thermospheric density causes less atmospheric drag on earth-orbiting space objects. The implication of this long-term decrease of thermospheric neutral density is that it will increase the

  16. Studies of Magnetized Plasmas Interacting with Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Gordon San-Yin

    1995-01-01

    Experiments and computer simulations have been performed in a linear magnetized helium and argon plasma column of similar collisionalities to that expected in ITER to examine heat flow and particle parameters. Plasma properties are found to differ significantly at low and high ambient neutral pressures. At pressures below 100 mT, plasmas obey the low -recycling prediction of approximate plasma pressure balance. Density decreases by a factor of about 2 to 3 with respect to that upstream, and T_{e} remains isothermal. Power flow is predominantly convective. Results obtained with varying neutral pressures and input power are consistent with zero-dimensional modeling of particle and energy balances. Ion are found to be heated by the electrons via classical energy equilibration, moderated by charge-exchange. Neutrals are heated above room temperatures. They exhibit a two-temperature population, the hotter neutrals due to charge-exchange with ions, and the colder via electron -neutral elastic collisions. The 2-d fluid code B2 has been modified to simulate the experimental conditions. Results are in good agreement. A novel regime of abrupt collapse in plasma pressure, affecting both density and T_{e} and accompanied by a dramatic increase in neutral line radiation, has been observed in high (>100 mT) pressure discharges. A potential structure akin to a double layer is calculated to exist. This phenomenon of thermal collapse is favored by a high neutral pressure, a large positive target bias, and a sufficiently long column. It is postulated that the disparate rates of momentum exchange between electrons and ions with neutrals are responsible for the formation of such collapses. The large increase in radiation is partly attributed to 3-body recombination during stagnated flow, although the estimated power loss is insufficient to account for the observations. The B2 neutral particle treatment has been found to be inadequate at these higher pressures. These results motivate

  17. Transport of neutral atoms and molecules in TFCX

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C.D.

    1984-09-01

    The distribution of neutrals in the proposed reactor TFCX has been modeled by the 3-D Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS, which has been run in conjunction with the 1-1/2-D time-dependent plasma transport code WHIST. The former code contains the best available treatment of neutral-particle physics, including a selection of wall reflection models. The latter code has a comprehensive set of plasma transport coefficients, an MHD equilibrium package, and provision for source terms such as those involving neutrals. It has a simple scrape-off model involving sound-speed flow to the neutralizer plates. The codes are run in iteration, so that the flux-surface averaged particle and energy sources due to interactions with neutrals are consistent with the plasma profiles. The design considered here has a bottom limiter with a pumping plenum. Results are given for the power balance, the mutually consistent plasma and neutral distributions set up in the edge region, the neutral density in the plenum, and the charge-exchange power deposition and erosion along the limiter.

  18. A General Nonlinear Fluid Model for Reacting Plasma-Neutral Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, E T; Shumlak, U

    2012-04-06

    A generalized, computationally tractable fluid model for capturing the effects of neutral particles in plasmas is derived. The model derivation begins with Boltzmann equations for singly charged ions, electrons, and a single neutral species. Electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge exchange reactions are included. Moments of the reaction collision terms are detailed. Moments of the Boltzmann equations for electron, ion, and neutral species are combined to yield a two-component plasma-neutral fluid model. Separate density, momentum, and energy equations, each including reaction transfer terms, are produced for the plasma and neutral equations. The required closures for the plasma-neutral model are discussed.

  19. The status of neutral currents

    SciTech Connect

    Zwirner, F.

    1987-11-01

    The situation of particle physics today is quite puzzling. On the one hand, the Standard Model (SM) of strong and electroweak interactions is consistent with all confirmed experimental data but theoretically rather unsatisfactory. On the other hand, none of the many theoretical speculations which try to go beyond the SM has (yet) received the slightest experimental support. The solution to this dilemma can only come from new data: either from the detection of a new particle threshold at high energy colliders, or from the appearance of some small discrepancy in high-precision experiments. A crucial sector for testing the SM and its extensions is that of neutral currents (NC), where an impressive amount of data has been collected in recent years. While waiting for the next generation of experiments, it is certainly useful to take stock of our knowledge, determining the NC parameters as precisely as we can and putting limits on possible deviations from the SM. The present talk contains the results of a recent analysis along these lines: the first part illustrates how a set of 'model-independent' parameters can be extracted from the available NC data, the second part particularizes the analysis to the SM and to some superstring-inspired models with an additional Z' in their low-energy spectrum. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. BEAM TRANSPORT AND STORAGE WITH COLD NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, Peter L.

    2012-05-15

    A large class of cold neutral atoms and molecules is subject to magnetic field-gradient forces. In the presence of a field, hyperfine atomic states are split into several Zeeman levels. The slopes of these curves vs. field are the effective magnetic moments. By means of optical pumping in a field, Zeeman states of neutral lithium atoms and CaH molecules with effective magnetic moments of nearly {+-} one Bohr magneton can be selected. Particles in Zeeman states for which the energy increases with field are repelled by increasing fields; particles in states for which the energy decreases with field are attracted to increasing fields. For stable magnetic confinement, field-repelled states are required. Neutral-particle velocities in the present study are on the order of tens to hundreds of m/s and the magnetic fields needed for transport and injection are on the order of in the range of 0.01-1T. Many of the general concepts of charged-particle beam transport carry over into neutral particle spin-force optics, but with important differences. In general, the role of bending dipoles in charged particle optics is played by quadrupoles in neutral particle optics; the role of quadrupoles is played by sextupoles. The neutralparticle analog of charge-exchange injection into storage rings is the use of lasers to flip the state of particles from field-seeking to field-repelled. Preliminary tracking results for two neutral atom/molecule storage ring configurations are presented. It was found that orbit instabilities limit the confinment time in a racetrack-shaped ring with discrete magnetic elements with drift spaces between them; stable behavior was observed in a toroidal ring with a continuous sextupole field. An alternative concept using a linear sextupole or octupole channel with solenoids on the ends is presently being considered.

  1. Between detection and neutralization.

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Mark Kamerer; Green, Mary Wilson; Adams, Douglas Glenn; Pritchard, Daniel Allison

    2005-08-01

    Security system analytical performance analysis is generally based on the probability of system effectiveness. The probability of effectiveness is a function of the probabilities of interruption and neutralization. Interruption occurs if the response forces are notified in sufficient time to engage the adversary. Neutralization occurs if the adversary attack is defeated after the security forces have actively engaged the adversary. Both depend upon communications of data. This paper explores details of embedded communications functions that are often assumed to be inconsequential. It is the intent of the authors to bring focus to an issue in security system modeling that, if not well understood, has the potential to be a deciding factor in the overall system failure or effectiveness.

  2. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  3. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, F.L.; Blank, M.L.

    1984-10-26

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated either-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood presure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  4. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Fred L.; Blank, Merle L.

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated ether-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood pressure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  5. Neutralizing antibodies in Borna disease virus-infected rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hatalski, C G; Kliche, S; Stitz, L; Lipkin, W I

    1995-01-01

    Borna disease is a neurologic syndrome caused by infection with a nonsegmented, negative-strand RNA virus, Borna disease virus. Infected animals have antibodies to two soluble viral proteins, p40 and p23, and a membrane-associated viral glycoprotein, gp18. We examined the time course for the development of neutralization activity and the expression of antibodies to individual viral proteins in sera of infected rats. The appearance of neutralizing activity correlated with the development of immunoreactivity to gp18, but not p40 or p23. Monospecific and monoclonal antibodies to native gp18 and recombinant nonglycosylated gp18 were also found to have neutralizing activity and to immunoprecipitate viral particles or subparticles. These findings suggest that gp18 is likely to be present on the surface of the viral particles and is likely to contain epitopes important for virus neutralization. PMID:7815538

  6. Collective Focusing of a Plasma-Neutralized Intense Ion Beam Propagating Along a Weak Solenoidal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2009-11-01

    Two schemes are considered for focusing intense ion beams utilizing the collective dynamics of plasma electrons. In the first approach, an ion beam propagates through a neutralizing background plasma along a uniform magnetic field. In the second approach, an ion beam passes through a finite size plasma, extracts neutralizing electrons from the plasma, and then enters a magnetic lens. In the both cases, a strong radial electric field is produced due to the collective electron dynamics. This self-electric field provides the enhanced transverse focusing of the ion beam. Detailed analytical and advanced numerical studies using particle-in-cell simulations are performed for both approaches. The radial focusing force acting on beam ions is calculated for an arbitrary ratio between the electron cyclotron and plasma frequencies. Collective focusing effects are shown to be important for the design of heavy ion drivers for high energy density and warm dense matter physics applications.

  7. Neutral Atom Diffusion in a Partially Ionized Prominence Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The support of solar prominences is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. it is necessary to consider in addition the support of the neutral component of the prominence plasma. This support is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material,

  8. Particles in the Heliosphere: Scientific and Technical Challenges in the Next Decade (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    A distinguishing feature of research in solar and space physics is our ability to directly observe the velocity distributions functions and abundances of particles at points in space without disrupting the overall system. This allows us to obtain unique insights into fundamental physical processes including shocks, acceleration, magnetic reconnection, wave-particle interactions, and ion-neutral coupling that are relevant both for heliophysics and for broader plasma applications, including laboratory plasmas and more exotic astrophysical environments. This talk will highlight some of the most exciting scientific challenges in heliophysics related to particles in space, from thermal to relativistic energies, and from neutral gas to highly ionized plasma. Technological advances in instrumentation and spacecraft needed to answer these questions within the next decade will also be examined.

  9. Neutrality between Government and Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1996-01-01

    The overall guiding principle of neutrality between government and religion masks a tension that exists between free exercise of religion and establishment of religion. Reviews the development and current status of "Lemon" as a test for neutrality; proposes a new test for neutrality, evenhandedness, that is common to both the Free Exercise and…

  10. A superconducting NbN detector for neutral nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marksteiner, Markus; Divochiy, Alexander; Sclafani, Michele; Haslinger, Philipp; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Korneev, Alexander; Semenov, Alexander; Gol'tsman, Gregory; Arndt, Markus

    2009-11-01

    We present a proof-of-principle study of superconducting single photon detectors (SSPD) for the detection of individual neutral molecules/nanoparticles at low energies. The new detector is applied to characterize a laser desorption source for biomolecules and allows retrieval of the arrival time distribution of a pulsed molecular beam containing the amino acid tryptophan, the polypeptide gramicidin as well as insulin, myoglobin and hemoglobin. We discuss the experimental evidence that the detector is actually sensitive to isolated neutral particles.

  11. Conceptual Design of Neutral Beam Injection System for EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chundong; NBI Team

    2012-06-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) system with two neutral beam injections will be constructed on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in two stages for high power auxiliary plasmas heating and non-inductive current drive. Each NBI can deliver 2~4 MW beam power with 50~80 keV beam energy in 10~100 s pulse length. Each elements of the NBI system are presented in this contribution.

  12. Neutralization of rainwater acidity at Kanpur, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Sheo Prasad; Sharma, Mukesh

    2010-07-01

    Particulate matter (PM) levels show significant seasonal variability and this can influence the neutralization of rainwater acidity. Months were grouped in two periods: monsoon (July to October) and non-monsoon (November to June) for studying the seasonal variability in PM and rainwater composition. To clearly establish the cause effect relationship of acid rain neutralization, a two tier model was proposed involving source apportionment of particulates at two levels: (i) ambient air and (ii) rainwater particulate interaction. For modelling purpose, PM10 (n = 100), soil (n = 4) and rainwater (n = 83) samples were collected at Kanpur, India during 2000-2002. The collected samples were analysed for metals and water soluble ion composition to employ factor analysis for source identification. Knowledge of statistical correlation and chemistry fundamentals were combined to estimate the sources for acid rain neutralization. NH4+ was a dominating ion responsible for neutralizing the acidity of rainwater in monsoon period and Ca2+ was dominating in non-monsoon period. Components of secondary particles (SO42- and NO3-) showed affinity with NH4+, signifying the major role that ammonia can play if present in excess of stoichiometric requirements.

  13. The San Marco 3 neutral atmosphere composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelz, D. T.; Newton, G. P.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Clem, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    The experimental instrumentation of the San Marco 3 satellite is described along with the calibration and operation. The instrumentation for the following experiments was included: an air density experiment for measuring the instantaneous drag force, and thus the neutral particle total mass density; a neutral atmosphere composition experiment for measuring the densities of helium, atomic and molecular oxygen, molecular nitrogen and argon; and a neutral atmosphere temperature experiment to determine the gas kinetic temperature by measuring molecular nitrogen density variations in an orificed spherical chamber as a function of angle of attack.

  14. Neutral beam species measurements using in situ Rutherford backscatter spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Kaita, R.; Gammel, G.; Williams, M.D.

    1984-12-01

    This work describes a new in situ method for measuring the neutral particle fractions in high power deuterium neutral beams, used to heat magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Deuterium beams, of variable energies, pulse lengths, and powers up to 47 keV, 100 msec, 1.6 MW, were Rutherford backscattered at 135/sup 0/ from TiC inner neutral beam armor of the PDX, and detected using an electrostatic analyzer with microchannel plates. Complete energy scans were made every 20 msec and data were obtained simultaneously from five different positions across the beam profile. The neutral particle fractions were measured to be D/sup 0/(E):D/sup 0/(E/2):D/sup 0/(E/3)=53:32:15. The corresponding neutral power fractions were P/sup 0/(E):P/sup 0/(E/2):P/sup 0/(E/3)=72:21:7, and the associated ionic fractions at the output of the ion source were D/sub 1//sup +/(E):D/sub 2//sup +/(E):D/sub 3//sup +/(E)=74:20:6. The measured neutral particle fractions were relatively constant over more than 70% of the beam power distribution. A decrease in the yield of the full energy component in the outer regions of the beam was observed. Other possible experimental configurations and geometries are discussed.

  15. Westinghouse advanced particle filter system

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Sanjana, Z.N.; Newby, R.A.

    1994-10-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) are being developed and demonstrated for commercial, power generation application. Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful implementation of IGCC and PFBC in power generation gas turbine cycles. The objective of this work is to develop and qualify through analysis and testing a practical hot gas ceramic barrier filter system that meets the performance and operational requirements of PFBC and IGCC systems. This paper updates the assessment of the Westinghouse hot gas filter design based on ongoing testing and analysis. Results are summarized from recent computational fluid dynamics modeling of the plenum flow during back pulse, analysis of candle stressing under cleaning and process transient conditions and testing and analysis to evaluate potential flow induced candle vibration.

  16. Exploring potential Pluto-generated neutral tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard T.; Hill, Matthew; KollMann, Peter; McHutt, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    The NASA New Horizons mission to Pluto is providing unprecedented insight into this mysterious outer solar system body. Escaping molecular nitrogen is of particular interest and possibly analogous to similar features observed at moons of Saturn and Jupiter. Such escaping N2 has the potential of creating molecular nitrogen and N (as a result of molecular dissociation) tori or partial toroidal extended particle distributions. The presence of these features would present the first confirmation of an extended toroidal neutral feature on a planetary scale in our solar system. While escape velocities are anticipated to be lower than those at Enceladus, Io or even Europa, particle lifetimes are much longer in Pluto’s orbit because as a result of much weaker solar interaction processes along Pluto’s orbit (on the order of tens of years). Thus, with a ~248 year orbit, Pluto may in fact be generating an extended toroidal feature along it orbit.For this work, we modify and apply our 3-D Monte Carlo neutral torus model (previously used at Saturn, Jupiter and Mercury) to study/analyze the theoretical possibility and scope of potential Pluto-generated neutral tori. Our model injects weighted particles and tracks their trajectories under the influence of all gravitational fields with interactions with other particles, solar photons and Pluto collisions. We present anticipated N2 and N tori based on current estimates of source characterization and environmental conditions. We also present an analysis of sensitivity to assumed initial conditions. Such results can provide insight into the Pluto system as well as valuable interpretation of New Horizon’s observational data.

  17. The methods of decrease operating pressure of fast neutrals source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchenko, V. T.; Komlev, A. E.; Babinov, N. A.; Vinogradov, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    The fast neutral particles sources are more and more widely used in technologies of surface processing and coatings deposition, especially in the case of dielectric surfaces processing. However for substantial expansion of the sources applications scope it is necessary to decrease the pressure in the vacuum chamber at which they can operate. This article describes the methods to reduce the operating pressure of the fast neutral particles source with combined ions acceleration and its neutralization regions. This combination provide a total absence of the high-energy ions in the particles beam. The main discussed methods are creation of pressure drop between internal and external volumes of the source and working gas preionization which is provided by combustion of auxiliary gas discharge.

  18. 200-mm-diameter neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma etcher and silicon etching

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Tomohiro; Nukaga, Osamu; Ueki, Shinji; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Inamoto, Yoshimasa; Ohtake, Hiroto; Samukawa, Seiji

    2010-09-15

    The authors developed a neutral beam source consisting of a 200-mm-diameter inductively coupled plasma etcher and a graphite neutralization aperture plate based on the design of a neutral beam source that Samukawa et al. [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 2 40, L779 (2001)] developed. They measured flux and energy of neutral particles, ions, and photons using a silicon wafer with a thermocouple and a Faraday cup and calculated the neutralization efficiency. An Ar neutral beam flux of more than 1 mA/cm{sup 2} in equivalent current density and a neutralization efficiency of more than 99% were obtained. The spatial uniformity of the neutral beam flux was within {+-}6% within a 100 mm diameter. Silicon etching using a F{sub 2}-based neutral beam was done at an etch rate of about 47 nm/min, while Cl{sub 2}-based neutral beam realized completely no undercut. The uniformity of etch rate was less than {+-}5% within the area. The etch rate increased by applying bias power to the neutralization aperture plate, which shows that accelerated neutral beam was successfully obtained. These results indicate that the neutral beam source is scalable, making it possible to obtain a large-diameter and uniform neutral beam, which is inevitable for application to mass production.

  19. Time reversal violation for entangled neutral mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, J.

    2013-07-01

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of "in" and "out" states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

  20. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator - Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Skylab's success proved that scientific experimentation in a low gravity environment was essential to scientific progress. A more permanent structure was needed to provide this space laboratory. President Ronald Reagan, on January 25, 1984, during his State of the Union address, claimed that the United States should exploit the new frontier of space, and directed NASA to build a permanent marned space station within a decade. The idea was that the space station would not only be used as a laboratory for the advancement of science and medicine, but would also provide a staging area for building a lunar base and manned expeditions to Mars and elsewhere in the solar system. President Reagan invited the international community to join with the United States in this endeavour. NASA and several countries moved forward with this concept. By December 1985, the first phase of the space station was well underway with the design concept for the crew compartments and laboratories. Pictured are two NASA astronauts, at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS), practicing construction techniques they later used to construct the space station after it was deployed.

  1. Evaluating of scale-up methodologies of gas-solid spouted beds for coating TRISO nuclear fuel particles using advanced measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Neven Y.

    The work focuses on implementing for the first time advanced non-invasive measurement techniques to evaluate the scale-up methodology of gas-solid spouted beds for hydrodynamics similarity that has been reported in the literature based on matching dimensionless groups and the new mechanistic scale up methodology that has been developed in our laboratory based on matching the radial profile of gas holdup since the gas dynamics dictate the hydrodynamics of the gas-solid spouted beds. These techniques are gamma-ray computed tomography (CT) to measure the cross-sectional distribution of the phases' holdups and their radial profiles along the bed height and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) to measure in three-dimension (3D) solids velocity and their turbulent parameters. The measured local parameters and the analysis of the results obtained in this work validate our new methodology of scale up of gas-solid spouted beds by comparing for the similarity the phases' holdups and the dimensionless solids velocities and their turbulent parameters that are non-dimensionalized using the minimum spouting superficial gas velocity. However, the scale-up methodology of gas-solid spouted beds that is based on matching dimensionless groups has not been validated for hydrodynamics similarity with respect to the local parameters such as phases' holdups and dimensionless solids velocities and their turbulent parameters. Unfortunately, this method was validated in the literature by only measuring the global parameters. Thus, this work confirms that validation of the scale-up methods of gas-solid spouted beds for hydrodynamics similarity should reside on measuring and analyzing the local hydrodynamics parameters.

  2. Neutralizer Characterization of a NEXT Multi-Thruster Array With Electrostatic Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael; Pencil, Eric; McEwen, Heather; Diaz, Esther

    2006-01-01

    Neutralizers in a multi-thruster array configuration were characterized using conventional diagnostics such as peak-to-peak keeper oscillation amplitude as well as unconventional methods which featured the application of electrostatic probes. The response of the array local plasma environment to neutralizer flow rate changes were documented using Langmuir probes and retarding potential analyzers. Such characterization is necessary for system efficiency and stability optimization. Because the local plasma environment was measured in conjunction with the neutralizer characterization, particle fluxes at the array and thus array lifetime impacts associated with neutralizer operating mode could also be investigated. Neutralizer operating condition was documented for a number of multithruster array configurations ranging from three-engines, three-neutralizers to a single engine, one-neutralizer all as a function of neutralizer flow rate.

  3. Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  4. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  5. Atmospheric Measurements of Neutral Nucleating Clusters (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Eisele, F. L.; Smith, J. N.; Chen, M.; Jiang, J.; Kuang, C.; McMurry, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    . Correlation between these clusters and nanoparticles measured by several particle counters will be presented. An atmospheric nucleation mechanism involving both sulphuric acid and organic amines will be discussed. Zhao, J., F. L. Eisele, M. Titcombe, C. Kuang and P. H. McMurry (2010). Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometric Measurements of Atmospheric Neutral Clusters using the Cluster-CIMS, J. Geophys. Res., 115, D08205, doi:10.1029/2009JD012606.

  6. Cryoprotectant toxicity neutralization.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Gregory M

    2010-07-01

    Cryoprotectant toxicity is a fundamental limiting factor for the successful cryopreservation of living systems by both freezing and vitrification, and the ability to negate it would be attractive. Past attempts to demonstrate "cryoprotectant toxicity neutralization" (CTN) have had many ups and downs. First convincingly introduced by Baxter and Lathe in 1971, the concept that certain amides can block toxic effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO) was contradicted by direct experiments in 1990. But in 1995, the opposite mode of CTN, in which Me(2)SO blocked the damaging effects of formamide, was robustly demonstrated. Recent experiments have verified the original 1995 results and extended them to urea and acetamide, but no CTN was detected for N-methylamides (N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, and N-methylacetamide). On the theory that the latter amides and acetamide might serve as low-toxicity structural analogs of formamide, urea, or Me(2)SO, competition experiments were carried out between them and formamide or urea, but CTN was not observed for these amide-amide systems. The idea that the N-methylamides might have non-specific rather than specific toxicity was supported by the fact that the concentrations of these amides that cause toxicity are similar to the concentrations that denature model proteins. Clear examples of neutralization of the toxicity of glycerol, propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, or Me(2)SO are presently lacking, but effects of the latter that depend on sulfhydryl oxidation have been reversed with reducing agents. In summary, CTN is a useful phenomenon with significant theoretical and practical implications. PMID:19501081

  7. Transient ion neutralization by electrons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The nonlinear initial-boundary-value problems describing the lateral neutralization of ion beams for the cases that (1) an auxiliary electric field accelerates the electrons into the ion space, and (2) the electrons are injected into the ion space at a prescribed current density are treated. Analytical solutions are derived which give the position and speed of the neutralization front as a function of time, and the temporal development of the electron density, velocity, and electric fields during the neutralization process.

  8. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandri, S.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.; Poggi, C.

    2011-12-01

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  9. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sandri, S.; Poggi, C.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.

    2011-12-13

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  10. Flavor Changing Neutral Current at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Morello, Michael Joseph; CDF, for the; Collaborations, D0

    2009-12-01

    Processes involving flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) provide excellent signatures with which to search for evidence of new physics. They have very small branching fractions in the Standard Model since they are highly suppressed by Glashow-Iliopoulos-Maiani (GIM) mechanism. They occur only through higher order diagrams, and new particles contributions can provide a significant enhancements, which would be an unique vocal signs of physics beyond the Standard Model. In this paper we present the most recent measurements on FCNC processes performed by CDF and D0 Collaborations, while last section is devote to the charm physics at CDF.

  11. Collisionless Relaxation in Non-Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Yan; Pakter, Renato; Teles, Tarcisio N.

    2008-02-01

    A theoretical framework is presented which allows us to quantitatively predict the final stationary state achieved by a non-neutral plasma during a process of collisionless relaxation. As a specific application, the theory is used to study relaxation of charged-particle beams. It is shown that a fully matched beam relaxes to the Lynden-Bell distribution. However, when a mismatch is present and the beam oscillates, parametric resonances lead to a core-halo phase separation. The approach developed accounts for both the density and the velocity distributions in the final stationary state.

  12. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  13. Chemistry of carotenoid neutral radicals.

    PubMed

    Ligia Focsan, A; Magyar, Adam; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-04-15

    Proton loss from the carotenoid radical cations (Car(+)) to form neutral radicals (#Car) was investigated by numerous electrochemical, EPR, ENDOR and DFT studies described herein. The radical cation and neutral radicals were formed in solution electrochemically and stabilized on solid silica-alumina and MCM-41 matrices. Carotenoid neutral radicals were recently identified in Arabidopsis thaliana plant and photosystem II samples. Deprotonation at the terminal ends of a zeaxanthin radical cation could provide a secondary photoprotection pathway which involves quenching excited state chlorophyll by the long-lived zeaxanthin neutral radicals formed. PMID:25687648

  14. Facility for intense diagnostic neutral beam (IDNB) development

    SciTech Connect

    Kasik, R.J.; Hinckley, W.B.; Bartsch, R.R.; Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Greenly, J.B.

    1993-08-01

    An intense, pulsed neutral beam source is under development for use as a probe beam on hot, burning plasmas such as in the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) which is presently in the planning stage. A pulsed, neutral hydrogen beam of 10s of kilo amperes of current can have an alpha particle, charge-exchange-recombination-spectroscopy (alpha-CHERS) signal-to-noise ratio of {approximately} 10. This beam would allow the measurement, on a single pulse of a few hundred nanoseconds duration, of the local alpha particle distribution function as well as other features of the tokamak plasma such as current density profile, impurity density, and microturbulence spectrum. The cross-sections for the CHERS diagnostic dictate operation with proton energies greater than {approximately}50keV. A pulsed neutral hydrogen source of this voltage and intensity can be achieved by neutralizing the ion flux from a magnetized ion-diode. The cross-sections for attachment and stripping, when coupled with scaling from Child-Langmiur, space-charge-limited, ion-current flow imply operation below - 100keV for maximum neutral fluence. The development of a flashover-anode, ion source for forthcoming evaluation of a neutralizing section is described below. This source operates in the accelerator voltage range 70 to 100keV. Eventually, the flashover-anode, magnetized ion-diode will be replaced with a plasma-anode, magnetized ion-diode.

  15. Neutral beam dump with cathodic arc titanium gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.; Korepanov, S. A.; Putvinski, S.; Krivenko, A. S.; Murakhtin, S. V.; Savkin, V. Ya.

    2011-03-15

    An incomplete neutral beam capture can degrade the plasma performance in neutral beam driven plasma machines. The beam dumps mitigating the shine-through beam recycling must entrap and retain large particle loads while maintaining the beam-exposed surfaces clean of the residual impurities. The cathodic arc gettering, which provides high evaporation rate coupled with a fast time response, is a powerful and versatile technique for depositing clean getter films in vacuum. A compact neutral beam dump utilizing the titanium arc gettering was developed for a field-reversed configuration plasma sustained by 1 MW, 20-40 keV neutral hydrogen beams. The titanium evaporator features a new improved design. The beam dump is capable of handling large pulsed gas loads, has a high sorption capacity, and is robust and reliable. With the beam particle flux density of 5 x 10{sup 17} H/(cm{sup 2}s) sustained for 3-10 ms, the beam recycling coefficient, defined as twice the ratio of the hydrogen molecular flux leaving the beam dump to the incident flux of high-energy neutral atoms, is {approx}0.7. The use of the beam dump allows us to significantly reduce the recycling of the shine-through neutral beam as well as to improve the vacuum conditions in the machine.

  16. ExoCube INMS with Neutral Hydrogen Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Paschalidis, N.; Rodriguez, M.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Chornay, D. J.; Cameron, T.; Uribe, P.; Nanan, G.; Noto, J.; Waldrop, L.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Gardner, D.; Nossal, S. M.; Puig-Suari, J.; Bellardo, J.

    2015-12-01

    The ExoCube mission launched on Jan 31 2015 into a polar orbit to acquire global knowledge of in situ densities of neutral and ionized H, He, and O in the upper ionosphere and lower exosphere. The CubeSat platform is used in combination with incoherent scatter radar and optical ground stations distributed throughout the Americas. ExoCube seeks to obtain the first in situ measurement of neutral exospheric hydrogen and will measure in situ atomic oxygen for the first time in decades. The compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) developed by GSFC uses the gated Time of Flight technique for in situ measurements of ions and neutrals (H, He, N, O, N2, O2) with M/dM of approximately 10. The compact sensor has a dual symmetric configuration with ion and neutral sensor heads. Neutral particles are ionized by electron impact using a thermionic emitter. In situ measurements of neutral hydrogen are notoriously difficult as historically the signal has been contaminated by hydrogen outgassing which persists even years after commissioning. In order to obtain neutral atmospheric hydrogen fluxes, either the atmospheric peak and outgassing peak must be well resolved, or the outgassing component subtracted off. The ExoCube INMS employs a separate mode, specifically for measuring neutral Hydrogen. The details of this mode and lessons learned will be presented as well as in flight instrument validation data for the neutral channel and preliminary flight ion spectra. At the time of abstract submission, the ExoCube spacecraft is currently undergoing attitude control maneuvers to orient INMS in the ram direction for science operations.

  17. Magnetospheric imaging with low-energy neutral atoms.

    PubMed Central

    McComas, D J; Barraclough, B L; Elphic, R C; Funsten, H O; Thomsen, M F

    1991-01-01

    Global imaging of the magnetospheric charged particle population can be achieved by remote measurement of the neutral atoms produced when magnetospheric ions undergo charge exchange with cold exospheric neutral atoms. Previously suggested energetic neutral atom imagers were only able to measure neutral atoms with energies typically greater than several tens of keV. A laboratory prototype has been built and tested for a different type of space plasma neutral imaging instrument, which allows neutral atoms to be imaged down to <1 keV. Such low-energy measurements provide greater sensitivity for imaging the terrestrial magnetosphere and allow the bulk of the magnetospheric ion distribution, typically centered below 10 keV, to be observed rather than just the high-energy tail of the distribution. The low-energy neutral atom measurements are made possible by utilizing charge state modifications that occur when an initially neutral atom passes through an ultrathin carbon foil. Oxygen, for example, is highly electronegative, and for energies of approximately 10-30 keV, the O- yield is approximately 30%, essentially independent of the charge state of the incident oxygen atom. These ions are energy per charge analyzed, and the UV background is rejected by using an electrostatic analyzer. Imaging of other ion species, such as hydrogen, could also be accomplished by using ultrathin foil-induced charge state modifications. The technique described in this paper provides a method for imaging charge exchange neutrals from the terrestrial magnetosphere and would also have applications for similar imaging in other planetary or cometary environs. The Inner Magnetosphere Imaging Mission, which the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is presently considering, would provide a nearly ideal platform for low-energy neutral atom imaging, and such measurements would substantially enhance the scientific yield of this mission. PMID:11607229

  18. Surface conversion techniques for low energy neutral atom imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation has focused on development of key technology elements for low energy neutral atom imaging. More specifically, we have investigated the conversion of low energy neutral atoms to negatively charged ions upon reflection from specially prepared surfaces. This 'surface conversion' technique appears to offer a unique capability of detecting, and thus imaging, neutral atoms at energies of 0.01 - 1 keV with high enough efficiencies to make practical its application to low energy neutral atom imaging in space. Such imaging offers the opportunity to obtain the first instantaneous global maps of macroscopic plasma features and their temporal variation. Through previous in situ plasma measurements, we have a statistical picture of large scale morphology and local measurements of dynamic processes. However, with in situ techniques it is impossible to characterize or understand many of the global plasma transport and energization processes. A series of global plasma images would greatly advance our understanding of these processes and would provide the context for interpreting previous and future in situ measurements. Fast neutral atoms, created from ions that are neutralized in collisions with exospheric neutrals, offer the means for remotely imaging plasma populations. Energy and mass analysis of these neutrals provides critical information about the source plasma distribution. The flux of neutral atoms available for imaging depends upon a convolution of the ambient plasma distribution with the charge exchange cross section for the background neutral population. Some of the highest signals are at relatively low energies (well below 1 keV). This energy range also includes some of the most important plasma populations to be imaged, for example the base of the cleft ion fountain.

  19. Energy distributions of sputtered copper neutrals and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Direct quantitative analysis of surfaces by secondary ion mass spectrometry will depend on an understanding of the yield ratio of ions to neutrals. This ratio as a function of the energy of the sputtered particles has been obtained for a clean polycrystalline copper surface sputtered by 1000-3000 eV Ar(+). The energy distributions of both neutral and ionized copper were measured with a retarding potential analyzer using potential modulation differentiation and signal averaging. The maximum for both distributions is identical and occurs near 2.5 eV. The energy distributions of neutrals is more sharply peaked than that of the ions, presumably as a consequence of more efficient nutralization of slow escaping ions by the mobile electrons of copper. The ion-neutral ratio is compared with results from various ionization models.

  20. Higher Throughput Quantification of Neutralizing Antibody to Herpes Simplex Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Tamara P.; Mitchell, Michelle C.; Korom, Maria; Wang, Hong; Yu, Yinyi; Morrison, Lynda A.; Belshe, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    We report a rapid, higher throughput method for measuring neutralizing antibody to herpes simplex virus (HSV) in human sera. Clinical isolates and sera from the Herpevac Trial for Women were used in a colorimetric assay in which infection of tissue culture (lack of neutralization) was indicated by substrate metabolism by beta-galactosidase induced in the ELVIS cell line. The neutralization assay was optimized by addition of guinea pig complement, which particularly enhanced neutralizing antibody titers to HSV-2. Higher neutralizing antibody titers were also achieved using virus particles isolated from the supernatant of infected cells rather than lysate of infected cells as the source of virus. The effect of assay incubation time and incubation time with substrate were also optimized. We found that incubating with substrate until a standard optical density of 1.0 was reached permitted a better comparison among virus isolates, and achieved reliable measurement of neutralizing antibody activity. Interestingly, in contrast to results in the absence of complement, addition of complement allowed sera from HSV-2 gD-vaccinated subjects to neutralize HSV-1 and HSV-2 clinical and laboratory isolates with equal potency. PMID:26658766

  1. Higher Throughput Quantification of Neutralizing Antibody to Herpes Simplex Viruses.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Tamara P; Mitchell, Michelle C; Korom, Maria; Wang, Hong; Yu, Yinyi; Morrison, Lynda A; Belshe, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    We report a rapid, higher throughput method for measuring neutralizing antibody to herpes simplex virus (HSV) in human sera. Clinical isolates and sera from the Herpevac Trial for Women were used in a colorimetric assay in which infection of tissue culture (lack of neutralization) was indicated by substrate metabolism by beta-galactosidase induced in the ELVIS cell line. The neutralization assay was optimized by addition of guinea pig complement, which particularly enhanced neutralizing antibody titers to HSV-2. Higher neutralizing antibody titers were also achieved using virus particles isolated from the supernatant of infected cells rather than lysate of infected cells as the source of virus. The effect of assay incubation time and incubation time with substrate were also optimized. We found that incubating with substrate until a standard optical density of 1.0 was reached permitted a better comparison among virus isolates, and achieved reliable measurement of neutralizing antibody activity. Interestingly, in contrast to results in the absence of complement, addition of complement allowed sera from HSV-2 gD-vaccinated subjects to neutralize HSV-1 and HSV-2 clinical and laboratory isolates with equal potency. PMID:26658766

  2. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  3. Imaging space plasmas in energetic neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Demajistre, R.; Mitchell, D. G.; C:Son Brandt, P.

    2004-11-01

    Many space plasmas contain energetic singly-charged ions immersed in a cold gas of neutral atoms and molecules. When the energetic ions undergo charge-exchange collisions with the background cold neutrals, they become energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). Thus the space plasma Â"glowsÂ" in the ENAs which escape the plasma on straight-line trajectories. Properly designed 2-dimentsional particle telescopes that deflect ions using electro-static fields become ENA Â"camerasÂ". Such cameras are now operating on the NASA IMAGE spacecraft in orbit around Earth and the NASA/ESA Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. They are providing all-sky global images of the singly-charged trapped ion populations of these planets with time resolution of a few minutes. Each pixel contains an energy spectra from 10 to 200 keV/nucleon of the major singly-charged ions (protons and O^+), thus providing a quantitative diagnostic of energetic ion injection, acceleration, and transport. ENA imaging has now taken its place as a fundamental tool in magnetospheric research, and new missions are moving forward to apply ENA imaging to the heliosphere itself (the domain of the solar wind) and its termination ˜100 AU from the Sun where it interacts with the local interstellar gas.

  4. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1992-05-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  5. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I. ); Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics)

    1992-01-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, p