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Sample records for advanced neutral particle

  1. First results from solid state neutral particle analyzer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Z.; Zhu, Y. B.; Zhao, J. L.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2016-11-01

    Full function integrated, compact solid state neutral particle analyzers (ssNPA) based on absolute extreme ultraviolet silicon photodiode have been successfully implemented on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak to measure energetic particle. The ssNPA system has been operated in advanced current mode with fast temporal and spatial resolution capabilities, with both active and passive charge exchange measurements. It is found that the ssNPA flux signals are increased substantially with neutral beam injection (NBI). The horizontal active array responds to modulated NBI beam promptly, while weaker change is presented on passive array. Compared to near-perpendicular beam, near-tangential beam brings more passive ssNPA flux and a broader profile, while no clear difference is observed on active ssNPA flux and its profile. Significantly enhanced intensities on some ssNPA channels have been observed during ion cyclotron resonant heating.

  2. First results from solid state neutral particle analyzer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J Z; Zhu, Y B; Zhao, J L; Wan, B N; Li, J G; Heidbrink, W W

    2016-11-01

    Full function integrated, compact solid state neutral particle analyzers (ssNPA) based on absolute extreme ultraviolet silicon photodiode have been successfully implemented on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak to measure energetic particle. The ssNPA system has been operated in advanced current mode with fast temporal and spatial resolution capabilities, with both active and passive charge exchange measurements. It is found that the ssNPA flux signals are increased substantially with neutral beam injection (NBI). The horizontal active array responds to modulated NBI beam promptly, while weaker change is presented on passive array. Compared to near-perpendicular beam, near-tangential beam brings more passive ssNPA flux and a broader profile, while no clear difference is observed on active ssNPA flux and its profile. Significantly enhanced intensities on some ssNPA channels have been observed during ion cyclotron resonant heating.

  3. Solar Neutral Particles

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows a neutral solar particle's path leaving the sun, following the magnetic field lines out to the heliosheath. The solar particle hits a hydrogen atom, stealing its electron, and ...

  4. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  5. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  6. EFFECTS OF LEAKAGE NEUTRAL PARTICLES ON SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2012-10-20

    In this paper, we investigate effects of neutral particles on shocks propagating into the partially ionized medium. We find that for 120 km s{sup -1} < u {sub sh} < 3000 km s{sup -1} (u {sub sh} is the shock velocity), about 10% of upstream neutral particles leak into the upstream region from the downstream region. Moreover, we investigate how the leakage neutral particles affect the upstream structure of the shock and particle accelerations. Using four-fluid approximations (upstream ions, upstream neutral particles, leakage neutral particles, and pickup ions), we provide analytical solutions of the precursor structure due to leakage neutral particles. It is shown that the upstream flow is decelerated in the precursor region and the shock compression ratio becomes smaller than without leakage neutral particles, but the total compression ratio does not change. Even if leakage of neutral particles is small (a few percent of total upstream particles), this smaller compression ratio of the shock can explain steep gamma-ray spectra from young supernova remnants. Furthermore, leakage neutral particles could amplify the magnetic field and heat the upstream region.

  7. Energetic neutral particles from Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    The Voyager 1 spacecraft has detected energetic neutral particles escaping from the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. These energetic neutrals are created in charge exchange reactions between radiation belt ions and ambient atoms or molecules in the magnetosphere. If the Io torus is assumed to be the dominant Jovian source region for energetic neutrals, the Voyager observations can be used to infer upper limits to the average ion intensities there below about 200 keV. No readily interpretable in-situ measurements are available in the Io torus at these energies. The middle and outer Jovian magnetospheres may also be a significant source of energetic neutrals. At Saturn, the observed neutral particle count rates are too high to be explained by charge exchange between fast protons and H atoms of the Titan torus. Most of the energetic neutrals may be produced by charge exchanges between heavy ions and a neutral cloud containing H2O in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. If so, the Voyager measurements of energetic neutral fluxes would be the first detected emissions from this region of Saturn's magnetosphere.

  8. Landau-like states in neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Ågren, Hans; Balatsky, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    We show the emergence of a new type of dispersion relation for neutral atoms with an interesting similarity to the spectrum of two-dimensional electrons in an applied perpendicular constant magnetic field. These neutral atoms can be confined in toroidal optical traps and give quasi-Landau spectra. In strong contrast to the equidistant infinitely degenerate Landau levels for charged particles, the spectral gap for such two-dimensional neutral particles increases in particular electric-field configurations. The idea in the paper is motivated by the development in cold atom experiments and builds on the seminal paper of Aharonov and Casher [Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 319 (1984), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.53.319].

  9. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers.

    PubMed

    Stagner, L; Heidbrink, W W

    2014-11-01

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, "Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry," J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, "Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes," Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5-11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  10. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Stagner, L.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2014-11-15

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, “Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry,” J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, “Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes,” Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5–11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  11. Neutral particle beam sensing and steering

    DOEpatents

    Maier, II, William B.; Cobb, Donald D.; Robiscoe, Richard T.

    1991-01-01

    The direction of a neutral particle beam (NPB) is determined by detecting Ly.alpha. radiation emitted during motional quenching of excited H(2S) atoms in the beam during movement of the atoms through a magnetic field. At least one detector is placed adjacent the beam exit to define an optical axis that intercepts the beam at a viewing angle to include a volume generating a selected number of photons for detection. The detection system includes a lens having an area that is small relative to the NPB area and a pixel array located in the focal plane of the lens. The lens viewing angle and area pixel array are selected to optimize the beam tilt sensitivity. In one embodiment, two detectors are placed coplanar with the beam axis to generate a difference signal that is insensitive to beam variations other than beam tilt.

  12. Massive neutral particles on heterotic string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, Marco; Villanueva, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    The motion of massive particles in the background of a charged black hole in heterotic string theory, which is characterized by a parameter α, is studied in detail in this paper. Since it is possible to write this space-time in the Einstein frame, we perform a quantitative analysis of the time-like geodesics by means of the standard Lagrange procedure. Thus, we obtain and solve a set of differential equations and then we describe the orbits in terms of the elliptic ℘-Weierstraß function. Also, by making an elementary derivation developed by Cornbleet (Am. J. Phys. 61(7):650-651, 1993) we obtain the correction to the angle of advance of perihelion to first order in α, and thus, by comparing with Mercury's data we give an estimation for the value of this parameter, which yields an heterotic solar charge Q ⊙≃0.728 [Km]=0.493 M ⊙. Therefore, in addition to the study on null geodesics performed by Fernando (Phys. Rev. D 85:024033, 2012), this work completes the geodesic structure for this class of space-time.

  13. Fast neutral particle measurements in LHD and CHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, T.; Okamura, S.; Zanza, V.

    1996-12-31

    The development of high energy neutral particle measurement system for ion temperature measurements and high energy particle confinement analysis in Large Helical Device is described here. For NBIs, 180 keV hydrogen beams will be used in Phase 1 of LHD experiment schedule and 360 keV deuterium beams will be used in Phase 2. In ICRF heating experiment, the hydrogen and helium-3 will be used as minorities. It is important to observe the pitch angle distribution to investigate the confinement of high energy particles. For this purpose the neutral particle analyzer should have a wide observation energy range above the maximum energy of NBI and an ability to separate the particle species of hydrogen, deuterium and He-3. In Compact Helical System (CHS), the electrostatic neutral particle analyzer is used. They have compared the spectrum obtained from the measurement by a passive method in CHS with that from the calculation by PROCTR code.

  14. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer for fusion reactor ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Krasilnikov, V.; Amosov, V.; Kaschuck, Yu.; Skopintsev, D.

    2014-08-21

    A compact diamond neutral particle spectrometer with digital signal processing has been developed for fast charge-exchange atoms and neutrons measurements at ITER fusion reactor conditions. This spectrometer will play supplementary role for Neutral Particle Analyzer providing 10 ms time and 30 keV energy resolutions for fast particle spectra in non-tritium ITER phase. These data will also be implemented for independent studies of fast ions distribution function evolution in various plasma scenarios with the formation of a single fraction of high-energy ions. In tritium ITER phase the DNPS will measure 14 MeV neutrons spectra. The spectrometer with digital signal processing can operate at peak counting rates reaching a value of 10{sup 6} cps. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer is applicable to future fusion reactors due to its high radiation hardness, fast response and high energy resolution.

  15. Neutral particle analyzer diagnostics on the TCV tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Karpushov, Alexander N.; Duval, Basil P.; Schlatter, Christian; Afanasyev, Valery I.; Chernyshev, Fedor V.

    2006-03-15

    Experimental apparatus and data analysis techniques used in neutral particle analyzer (NPA) diagnostics on the Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV) are described. Two NPAs are used on TCV to measure the energy spectrum of neutral particle fluxes from the plasma. The 'five-channel energy analyzer of atomic particles' used in double electrical analysis mode with fast voltage sweeping detect particles without atomic mass discrimination in the energy range of 0.6-8.0 keV with a time resolution of 0.5-2.0 ms and an energy resolution of 7%-20%. The 28-channel ''compact neutral particle analyzer'' (CNPA) is an EIIB spectrometer with mass and energy separations designed for medium sized fusion machines featuring a carbon neutral stripping foil, a permanent magnet for dispersion, and channel-electron multiplier detectors. The CNPA simultaneously detects two mass species [hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) or D and helium (He)] in the 0.5-50 keV energy range with a resolution of 60%-10% and a time resolution of 0.5-4.0 ms. The CNPA views the plasma across the path of the diagnostic neutral beam and can perform active charge-exchange NPA measurement. Data analysis procedures and numerical algorithms developed for NPA measurement are routinely used on TCV to obtain information on the plasma ion temperature, ion energy distribution function, plasma isotope ratios, and other plasma characteristics.

  16. Neutral particle analyzer diagnostics on the TCV tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpushov, Alexander N.; Duval, Basil P.; Schlatter, Christian; Afanasyev, Valery I.; Chernyshev, Fedor V.

    2006-03-01

    Experimental apparatus and data analysis techniques used in neutral particle analyzer (NPA) diagnostics on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) are described. Two NPAs are used on TCV to measure the energy spectrum of neutral particle fluxes from the plasma. The "five-channel energy analyzer of atomic particles" used in double electrical analysis mode with fast voltage sweeping detect particles without atomic mass discrimination in the energy range of 0.6-8.0keV with a time resolution of 0.5-2.0ms and an energy resolution of 7%-20%. The 28-channel "compact neutral particle analyzer" (CNPA) is an EIIB spectrometer with mass and energy separations designed for medium sized fusion machines featuring a carbon neutral stripping foil, a permanent magnet for dispersion, and channel-electron multiplier detectors. The CNPA simultaneously detects two mass species [hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) or D and helium (He)] in the 0.5-50keV energy range with a resolution of 60%-10% and a time resolution of 0.5-4.0ms. The CNPA views the plasma across the path of the diagnostic neutral beam and can perform active charge-exchange NPA measurement. Data analysis procedures and numerical algorithms developed for NPA measurement are routinely used on TCV to obtain information on the plasma ion temperature, ion energy distribution function, plasma isotope ratios, and other plasma characteristics.

  17. Particle acceleration near X-type magnetic neutral lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deeg, Hans-Jorg; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Duric, Nebojsa

    1991-01-01

    The behavior of charged particles near X-type magnetic neutral lines is investigated. The magnetic field is taken to be hyperbolic and time stationary, with a uniform electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field. The general properties of the orbits of noninteracting particles in that field geometry are examined. Approximate analytic solutions to the orbit equations are derived by considering a magnetic-insulation picture where there is a hole in the magnetic insulation around the neutral line. Scaling laws for the dependence of the energy gain on strengths of the magnetic and electric fields are derived. The kinetic-energy distribution function for accelerated particles is derived for particles flowing past the neutral line. These analytic derivations are supported by computer simulations, in which the relativistic equations of motion for single test particles are numerically solved and the orbits and kinetic-energy gains of the particles are obtained. A number of simulations were performed and one parameter at a time was varied. Applications of the results to magnetic-neutral-line regions in space physics and astrophysics are possible.

  18. Optical trapping and manipulation of neutral particles using lasers

    PubMed Central

    Ashkin, Arthur

    1997-01-01

    The techniques of optical trapping and manipulation of neutral particles by lasers provide unique means to control the dynamics of small particles. These new experimental methods have played a revolutionary role in areas of the physical and biological sciences. This paper reviews the early developments in the field leading to the demonstration of cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in atomic physics and to the first use of optical tweezers traps in biology. Some further major achievements of these rapidly developing methods also are considered. PMID:9144154

  19. Trapped Particle Asymmetry Modes in Non-Neutral Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-24

    0 0 and thus couple to particle kinetics. These modes exist when axial variations in the wall potential cause the equilibrium plasma to have axially...34 electron column and applied sector voltages. to anomalous plasma transport in tokamak -like and toroidal multipole configurations of neutral plasmas...trapped particle equilibrium . The ubiquitous in I center-of-mass "diocotron" mode is essentially uniform in z (i.e. kz ; 0), and is nominally

  20. Neutral particle measurements of fusion tritons in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasyev, V. I.; Khudoleev, A. V.

    2010-08-15

    A neutral particle analyzer [A.D. Izvozchikov et al., JET Report No. JET-R(91)-12, 1991] operating in the MeV energy range was used to measure the flux of neutralized d-d fusion tritons emitted from the hot-ion H-mode deuterium plasma heated by deuterium neutral beams. It was found that tritons in the energy range of 0.3-1.1 MeV were largely neutralized by the beam atoms and the beam halo atoms. This enabled us to find the localized energy distribution function of the fusion tritons in the central plasma region. Simulation of the triton energy distribution function shows that MeV ions in the JET hot-ion H-mode plasma behave classically.

  1. Return flux of neutral and charged particles in geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P. D.; Fong, Michael C.; Neier, Karen L.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes a model for the return flux of neutral and charged particles to a satellite in geosynchronous earth orbit. For neutral particles, the main return flux mechanisms is back-scattering via self-collisions among molecules outgassed or vented from the satellite; whereas for charged particles, the main mechanism is electrostatic re-attraction of ionized outgassed or vented molecules to a negatively charged satellite. Computer codes that simulate spacecraft charging typically contain a 3D charged particle trajectory-tracking procedure that, in principle, could be used for contamination studies. In practice, however, it is difficult to obtain quantitative results on the return flux distribution by this method. This makes such a code impractical to use as an engineering tool for identifying contamination problems reliably and evaluating corrective measures through simulation. To achieve a practical engineering tool, we prose an alternative to the particle tracking technique. We treat the problem for both neutral and charged particles in a unified manner by direct numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation in the BGK approximation. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by favorable numerical results presented for the simplified geometry of a spherical spacecraft.

  2. Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer Array on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Shinohara, K.; Darrow, D. S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Medley, S. S.; Cecil, F. E.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2004-11-01

    A Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) array has been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to measure the energy distribution of charge exchange fast neutral particles. The array consists of four Si diode detectors on chords with fixed tangency radii (60, 90, 100, and 120 cm), which view across the three co-injection neutral beam (NB) lines. The calibrated energy range is 40 120KeV and its energy resolution is about 10KeV. Time resolved measurements have been obtained and compared with the E//B Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) results. It is observed that particle fluxes increase strongly and then decay rapidly to a steady level just after NB injection commences. Though this temporal behavior is also observed in the E//B NPA, it is not predicted in TRANSP simulations. In addition, the increase and decay rates in the two NPA systems are different. Example data from plasma discharges will be presented with explanations of these differences.

  3. Neutral particle dynamics in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczewski, Artur P.

    1995-08-01

    This thesis presents an experimental study of neutral particle dynamics in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The primary diagnostic used is a set of six neutral pressure gauges, including special-purpose gauges built for in situ tokamak operation. While a low main chamber neutral pressure coincides with high plasma confinement regimes, high divertor pressure is required for heat and particle flux dispersion in future devices such as ITER. Thus we examine conditions that optimize divertor compression, defined here as a divertor-to-midplane pressure ratio. We find both pressures depend primarily on the edge plasma regimes defined by the scrape-off-layer heat transport. While the maximum divertor pressure is achieved at high core plasma densities corresponding to the detached divertor state, the maximum compression is achieved in the high-recycling regime. Variations in the divertor geometry have a weaker effect on the neutral pressures. For otherwise similar plasmas the divertor pressure and compression are maximum when the strike point is at the bottom of the vertical target plate. We introduce a simple flux balance model, which allows us to explain the divertor neutral pressure across a wide range of plasma densities. In particular, high pressure sustained in the detached divertor (despite a considerable drop in the recycling source) can be explained by scattering of neutrals off the cold plasma plugging the divertor throat. Because neutrals are confined in the divertor through scattering and ionization processes (provided the mean-free-paths are much shorter than a typical escape distance) tight mechanical baffling is unnecessary. The analysis suggests that two simple structural modifications may increase the divertor compression in Alcator C-Mod by a factor of about 5. Widening the divertor throat would increase the divertor recycling source, while closing leaks in the divertor structure would eliminate a significant neutral loss mechanism.

  4. EFFECTS OF NEUTRAL PARTICLES ON MODIFIED SHOCKS AT SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio

    2010-09-20

    H{alpha} emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) implies the existence of neutral hydrogens in the ambient medium. In the precursor of an SNR shock modified by cosmic rays (CRs), upstream plasmas are pushed by the CR pressure, but neutral particles are not, so that the relative velocity appears and some neutral particles become pickup ions by the charge exchange process in the precursor. We investigate how the pickup ions generated in the precursor affect the shock structure and the particle acceleration. If the CR pressure is larger than 20% of the shock ram pressure, the compression of the subshock becomes smaller than that without pickup ions because of the pressure of the pickup ions. Moreover, even if the shock is modified by CRs, the total compression ratio can be smaller than 4. In addition, the pickup ions play an important role for the injection into the particle acceleration. If the shock is a quasi-perpendicular shock and if the multiply reflected ion acceleration occurs, the CR spectrum can be harder than that of the test particle diffusive shock acceleration below GeV.

  5. Twist Neutrality and the Diameter of the Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2012-03-01

    The diameter of the nucleosome core particle is the same for all the eukaryotes. Here we discuss the possibility that this selectiveness is consistent with a propensity for twist neutrality, in particular, for the double helical DNA to stay rotationally neutral when strained. Reorganization of DNA cannot be done without some level of temporal tensile stress, and as a consequence chiral molecules, such as helices, will twist under strain. The requirement that the nucleosome, constituting the nucleosome core particle and linker DNA, has a vanishing strain-twist coupling leads to a requirement for the amount of bending. For the diameter of the coiled DNA we obtain the relatively accurate numerical estimate of 2R=82Å.

  6. A mass resolved, high resolution neutral particle analyzer for C-2U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, R.; Roquemore, A.; Douglass, J.; Jaramillo, D.; Korepanov, S.; Magee, R.; Medley, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2016-11-01

    C-2U is a high-confinement, advanced beam driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment which sustains the configuration for >5 ms, in excess of typical MHD and fast particle instability times, as well as fast particle slowing down times. Fast particle dynamics are critical to C-2U performance and several diagnostics have been deployed to characterize the fast particle population, including neutron and proton detectors. To increase our understanding of fast particle behavior and supplement existing diagnostics, an E ∥ B neutral particle analyzer was installed, which simultaneously measures H0 and D0 flux with large dynamic range and high energy resolution. Here we report the commissioning of the E ∥ B analyzer, confirm the instrument has energy resolution Δ E / E ≲ 0 . 1 and a dynamic range E max / E min ˜ 30 , and present measurements of initial testing on C-2U.

  7. Comparison of laser and neutral particle beam discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavan, Gregory H.

    1989-09-01

    The relative ability of lasers and neutral particle beams (NPBs) to discriminate reentry vehicle (RV) and anti-satellite (ASAT) decoys is pivotal in assessing their relative worth as strategic defenses. Their ability is evaluated and their relative contributions are assessed. It is concluded that NPBs can typically discriminate about 100 times as many objects as can lasers, and do so with significantly greater certainty.

  8. Comparison of laser and neutral particle beam discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1989-09-01

    The relative ability of lasers and neutral particle beams (NPBs) to discriminate reentry vehicle (RV) and anti-satellite (ASAT) decoys is pivotal in assessing their relative worth as strategic defenses. This report evaluates their ability and assesses their relative contributions, concluding that NPBs can typically discriminate about 100 times as many objects as can lasers, and do so with significantly greater certainty. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  9. The three-dimensional, discrete ordinates neutral particle transport code TORT: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The centerpiece of the Discrete Ordinates Oak Ridge System (DOORS), the three-dimensional neutral particle transport code TORT is reviewed. Its most prominent features pertaining to large applications, such as adjustable problem parameters, memory management, and coarse mesh methods, are described. Advanced, state-of-the-art capabilities including acceleration and multiprocessing are summarized here. Future enhancement of existing graphics and visualization tools is briefly presented.

  10. Charge neutrality of fine particle (dusty) plasmas and fine particle cloud under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsuji, Hiroo

    2017-03-01

    The enhancement of the charge neutrality due to the existence of fine particles is shown to occur generally under microgravity and in one-dimensional structures under gravity. As an application of the latter, the size and position of fine particle clouds relative to surrounding plasmas are determined under gravity.

  11. Plasma-parameter measurements using neutral-particle-beam attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, J H; Molvik, A W; Turner, W C

    1982-07-07

    Intense and energetic neutral-particle-beam injection used for fueling or heating magnetically confined, controlled-fusion experimental plasmas can also provide diagnostic measurements of the plasmas. The attenuation of an atomic beam (mainly from charge-exchange and ionization interactions) when passing through a plasma gives the plasma line density. Orthogonal arrays of highly collimated detectors of the secondary-electron-emission type have been used in magnetic-mirror experiments to measure neutral-beam attenuation along chords through the plasma volume at different radial and axial positions. The radial array is used to infer the radial plasma-density profile; the axial array, to infer the axial plasma-density profile and the ion angular distribution at the plasma midplane.

  12. Momentum Flux Measuring Instrument for Neutral and Charged Particle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Schafer, Charles F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An instrument to measure the momentum flux (total pressure) of plasma and neutral particle jets onto a surface has been developed. While this instrument was developed for magnetized plasmas, the concept works for non-magnetized plasmas as well. We have measured forces as small as 10(exp -4) Newtons on a surface immersed in the plasma where small forces are due to ionic and neutral particles with kinetic energies on the order of a few eV impacting the surface. This instrument, a force sensor, uses a target plate (surface) that is immersed in the plasma and connected to one end of an alumina rod while the opposite end of the alumina rod is mechanically connected to a titanium beam on which four strain gauges are mounted. The force on the target generates torque causing strain in the beam. The resulting strain measurements can be correlated to a force on the target plate. The alumina rod electrically and thermally isolates the target plate from the strain gauge beam and allows the strain gauges to be located out of the plasma flow while also serving as a moment arm of several inches to increase the strain in the beam at the strain gauge location. These force measurements correspond directly to momentum flux and may be used with known plasma conditions to place boundaries on the kinetic energies of the plasma and neutral particles. The force measurements may also be used to infer thrust produced by a plasma propulsive device. Stainless steel, titanium, molybdenum, and aluminum flat target plates have been used. Momentum flux measurements of H2, D2, He, and Ar plasmas produced in a magnetized plasma device have been performed.

  13. Simulation of Neutral Particle Transport During HiPIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Gallian, Sara; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    In this work the importance of the knowledge of the spatial distribution, its temporal evolution as well as their energy distribution of heavy particles within sputtering processes is discussed. To describe these discharges - typically operated at very low pressures below 1 Pa - specific modeling approaches are required. Our approach comprises a three-dimensional kinetic Lagrangian description of neutral particles. A modified version of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code dsmcFoam is used, with the aim to describe the evolution of background and sputtered particles of a High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) process in a research reactor. Emphasize is put on the influence of the initial angular distribution of sputtered particles, as well as their energy distribution and its angular dependence. Based on the work of Stepanova and Dew a modified Thompson energy distribution is used. Differently distributed sputtered particles provide densities and fluxes concerning the corresponding film formation. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  14. Building a Neutral Particle Detector for the ASPERA Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Red, Jogenia; Bell, Maria; Allred, David D.; Lunt, Shannon; Turley, R. Steven; Olson, Spencer E.; Squires, Matthew B.

    2001-11-01

    We fabricated a start surface for a neutral particle detector to be used in the ASPERA mission sponsored by the European Space Agency. The mirror needed be a poor reflector at 1216 Åbut efficiently provide electrons when struck by particles with nearly elastic collisions. Our design consisted of an oxidized Ti substrate covered with approximately 300 Åof Cr, 110 Å of MgF_2, and 8 Å of WO_x. The thicknesses of the MgF2 and WO_x layers were determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The surfaces had a reflectance of about 24% at 15^circ incidence from grazing. The reflectance was measured using a hydrogen hollow-cathode source connected to a McPherson Vacuum Monochromator and a computer-controlled reflectometer we designed and built. The strong dependence of the reflectance on incident angle made the angular accuracy and uncertainty especially critical.

  15. Westinghouse Advanced Particle Filter System

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Sanjana, Z.N.; Newby, R.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) are being developed and demonstrated for commercial, power generation application. Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful implementation of IGCC and PFBC in power generation gas turbine cycles. The objective of this work is to develop and qualify through analysis and testing a practical hot gas ceramic barrier filter system that meets the performance and operational requirements of PFBC and IGCC systems. This paper reports on the development and status of testing of the Westinghouse Advanced Hot Gas Particle Filter (W-APF) including: W-APF integrated operation with the American Electric Power, 70 MW PFBC clean coal facility--approximately 6000 test hours completed; approximately 2500 hours of testing at the Hans Ahlstrom 10 MW PCFB facility located in Karhula, Finland; over 700 hours of operation at the Foster Wheeler 2 MW 2nd generation PFBC facility located in Livingston, New Jersey; status of Westinghouse HGF supply for the DOE Southern Company Services Power System Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama; the status of the Westinghouse development and testing of HGF`s for Biomass Power Generation; and the status of the design and supply of the HGF unit for the 95 MW Pinon Pine IGCC Clean Coal Demonstration.

  16. Charged particle motion in the vicinity of a neutral plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D.

    1972-01-01

    The motion of a charged particle in a 2-dimensional neutral sheet with linear magnetic field variation is analyzed by Hamiltonian methods. From the basic Hamiltonian formulation, results of Sonnerup are recovered and given intuitive interpretation. The transformed Hamiltonian is used to derive the correct frequency of oscillation and serves as the basis of analytical treatment of perturbed versions of the motion, e.g. with electric field added. For 2-dimensional fields with slightly differing configurations - in particular, with added small field component orthogonal to the sheet, with an X-type null or with a chain of null points - two alternative methods are developed, reducing the problem either to motion in a 2-dimensional potential or to a pair of coupled oscillators.

  17. Confirming the potential for nucleon structure studies with neutral final states and the Neutral Particle Spectrometer at JLab Hall C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uniyal, Rishabh; Horn, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    The two-arm combination of neutral-particle detection and a high-resolution magnetic spectrometer offers unique scientific capabilities to push the energy scale for studies of the transverse spatial and momentum structure of the nucleon through reactions with neutral particles requiring precision and high luminosity. As example, it enables precision measurements of the deeply-virtual Compton scattering cross section and the basic semi-inclusive neutral-pion cross section, which is crucial to validate a cornerstone of 3D transverse momentum imaging. This science program is enabled by a Neutral-Particle Spectrometer (NPS) and the magnetic spectrometer pair in Hall C at the 12 GeV JLab. In this talk we will discuss the experiment the NPS will be used for and its components, for instance, the crystal array and what properties are desirable from the crystals to meet the specifications of the experiments. supported in part by NSF grants PHY-1306227 and PHY-1306418.

  18. SIMULATION OF ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOMS FROM SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Linghua; Li, Gang; Shih, Albert Y.; Lin, Robert P.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2014-10-01

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) provide the only way to observe the acceleration site of coronal-mass-ejection-driven (CME-driven) shock-accelerated solar energetic particles (SEPs). In gradual SEP events, energetic protons can charge exchange with the ambient solar wind or interstellar neutrals to become ENAs. Assuming a CME-driven shock with a constant speed of 1800 km s{sup –1} and compression ratio of 3.5, propagating from 1.5 to 40 R{sub S} , we calculate the accelerated SEPs at 5-5000 keV and the resulting ENAs via various charge-exchange interactions. Taking into account the ENA losses in the interplanetary medium, we obtain the flux-time profiles of these solar ENAs reaching 1 AU. We find that the arriving ENAs at energies above ∼100 keV show a sharply peaked flux-time profile, mainly originating from the shock source below 5 R{sub S} , whereas the ENAs below ∼20 keV have a flat-top time profile, mostly originating from the source beyond 10 R{sub S} . Assuming the accelerated protons are effectively trapped downstream of the shock, we can reproduce the STEREO ENA fluence observations at ∼2-5 MeV/nucleon. We also estimate the flux of ENAs coming from the charge exchange of energetic storm protons, accelerated by the fast CME-driven shock near 1 AU, with interstellar hydrogen and helium. Our results suggest that appropriate instrumentation would be able to detect ENAs from SEPs and to even make ENA images of SEPs at energies above ∼10-20 keV.

  19. Advances in holographic particle velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Scott; Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle; Liu, David

    1993-12-01

    Holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) is a promising technique for 3D flow velocity and hence vorticity measurements to study turbulence, coherent structures and vortex interactions. We discuss various aspects in the development of this technique ranging from hologram recording configurations such as in-line, off-axis and multibeam to data processing. Difficulties in implementation are analyzed and solutions are discussed. We also present preliminary measurement results in a 3D vortex flow using one of our prototype HPV systems.

  20. Kinetic simulation of neutral particle transport in sputtering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Gallian, Sara; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Ries, Stefan; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2013-09-01

    For many physical vapor deposition applications using sputtering processes, knowledge about the detailed spatial and temporal evolution of the involved gas species is of great importance. Modeling of the involved gas dynamic and plasma processes is however challenging, because the operating pressure is typically below 1 Pa. In consequence, only kinetic descriptions are appropriate. In order to approach this problem, the dynamics of sputtered particle transport through a neutral gas background is simulated. For this study, a modified version of the three-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code dsmcFoam is utilized. The impact of a transient sputtering wind is investigated in a generic reactor geometry, which may be used for dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS), High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS), as well as sputtering in capacitively coupled discharges. In the present work a rarefaction of the background gas is observed. Moreover in pulsed mode the temporal dynamics of the rarefaction and subsequent recovery of the background gas is investigated. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of TRR 87.

  1. Neutral particle dynamics in a high-power RF source

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, D. Paunska, Ts.; Shivarova, A.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2015-04-08

    Previous studies on the spatial discharge structure in the SPIDER source of negative hydrogen/deuterium ions carried out at low applied power are extended towards description of the discharge maintenance under the conditions of the actual rf power deposition of 100 kW planned for a single driver of the source. In addition to the expected higher electron density, the results show strong increase of the electron temperature and of the temperatures of the neutral species (hydrogen atoms and molecules). In the discussions, not only the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters but also that of the fluxes in the discharge (particle and energy fluxes) is involved. The obtained results come in confirmation of basic concepts for low-pressure discharge maintenance: (i) mutually related electron density and temperature as a display of the generalized Schottky condition, (ii) discharge behavior governed by the fluxes, i.e. strong nonlocality in the discharge, and (iii) a non-ambipolarity in the discharge regime, which originates from shifted maxima of the electron density and temperature and shows evidence in a vortex electron flux and in a dc current in a rf discharge, the latter resulting from a shift in the positions of the maxima of the electron density and plasma potential.

  2. Neutral particle dynamics in a high-power RF source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, D.; Paunska, Ts.; Tarnev, Kh.; Shivarova, A.

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies on the spatial discharge structure in the SPIDER source of negative hydrogen/deuterium ions carried out at low applied power are extended towards description of the discharge maintenance under the conditions of the actual rf power deposition of 100 kW planned for a single driver of the source. In addition to the expected higher electron density, the results show strong increase of the electron temperature and of the temperatures of the neutral species (hydrogen atoms and molecules). In the discussions, not only the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters but also that of the fluxes in the discharge (particle and energy fluxes) is involved. The obtained results come in confirmation of basic concepts for low-pressure discharge maintenance: (i) mutually related electron density and temperature as a display of the generalized Schottky condition, (ii) discharge behavior governed by the fluxes, i.e. strong nonlocality in the discharge, and (iii) a non-ambipolarity in the discharge regime, which originates from shifted maxima of the electron density and temperature and shows evidence in a vortex electron flux and in a dc current in a rf discharge, the latter resulting from a shift in the positions of the maxima of the electron density and plasma potential.

  3. An SN Application of Homotopy Continuation in Neutral Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Nicholas T.

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate the usefulness of homotopy continuation applied in the context of neutral particle transport where traditional methods of acceleration degrade. This occurs in higher dimensional heterogeneous problems. We focus on utilizing homotopy continuation as a means of providing a better initial guess for difficult problems. We investigate various homotopy formulations for two primary difficult problems: a thick-diffusive fixed internal source, and a k-eigenvalue problem with high dominance ratio. We also investigate the usefulness of homotopy continuation for computationally intensive problems with 30-energy groups. We find that homotopy continuation exhibits usefulness in specific problem formulations. In the thick-diffusive problem it shows benefit when there is a strong internal source in thin materials. In the k-eigenvalue problem, homotopy continuation provides an improvement in convergence speed for fixed point iteration methods in high dominance ratio problems. We also show that one of our imbeddings successfully stabilizes the nonlinear formulation of the k-eigenvalue problem with a high dominance ratio.

  4. Towards a Revised Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Surface Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler

    2005-06-09

    The components of the neutral- and plasma-surface interaction model used in the Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS 2 are reviewed. The idealized surfaces and processes handled by that model are inadequate for accurately simulating neutral transport behavior in present day and future fusion devices. We identify some of the physical processes missing from the model, such as mixed materials and implanted hydrogen, and make some suggestions for improving the model.

  5. Plasma precipitation and neutral particle emission at Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massetti, S.; Milillo, A.; Mura, A.; Orsini, S.; Plainaki, C.; Mangano, V.

    2012-04-01

    Ganymede, the largest moon of Jupiter is characterized by a tiny magnetosphere produced by an intrinsic magnetic moment; it is linked to the Jovian magnetosphere and embedded in its energetic plasma environment. In addition, since the plasma co-rotating with Jupiter impinges on Ganymede trailing side at subsonic speed, there is no bow-shock formation. Here we present preliminary results of Monte Carlo simulations aimed to evaluate the expected ion precipitation onto the polar caps of Ganymede, by means of the magnetic and electric fields derived by a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model that realistically describe Ganymede's magnetospheric environment. We discuss precipitation pattern differences between the simulated ion species (H+, O+ and S+) at different energies in the range 10-100 keV. Plasma precipitating onto the surface of Ganymede modifies it both physically (via ion sputtering) and chemically (via radiolysis). Directly sputtered H2O molecules as well as products of H2O decomposition, that may recombine and produce diverse molecules, such as O2 and H2 are released. The yields of these processes have been estimated by means of accurate function that includes the dependence of the release on impacting ion species and energy as well as on the moon's surface temperature. In this study we attempted to isolate the temperature dependent part of this yield function and to assign it exclusively to the chemical processes taking place on ice and to the subsequent release of new molecules. In this way we make a rough preliminary distinction between the sputtering and radiolysis exospheric contributions. In our estimations we take into account also the energy spectra of precipitating plasma. A MonteCarlo model has been used to simulate the neutral density of escaping particles. Here we present results in terms of density and fluxes.

  6. Recent advances in neutralizing the IL-6 pathway in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Malemud, Charles J

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the mechanism(s) of how IL-6 trans-signaling regulates immune cell function and promotes inflammation in autoimmune arthritis are critically reviewed. Serum and/or synovial fluid (SF) IL-6 is markedly elevated in adult and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and osteoarthritis (OA). IL-6, in concert with IL-17, determines the fate of CD4+ lymphocytes and therefore TH17 cell differentiation. IL-6 also plays a critical role in modulating B-lymphocyte activity. The recognition that IL-6 trans-signaling regulates inflammation resulted in the development of tocilizumab, a fully humanized monoclonal antibody that neutralizes the biological activity of the IL-6-receptor (IL-6R). Significant clinical benefit was demonstrated as well as reduced serum IL-6 levels with suppression of X-ray progression of disease in several clinical trials in which juvenile or adult RA patients were treated with tocilizumab monotherapy or tocilizumab plus methotrexate. However, levels of serum and/or SF IL-6 cytokine protein superfamily members, adiponectin, oncostatin M, pre-B-cell colony enhancing factor/visfatin and leukemia inhibitory factor are also elevated in RA. Additional studies will be required to determine if anti-IL-6 trans-signaling inhibition strategies with tocilizumab or recombinant soluble IL-6R reduce the level of these cytokines. PMID:27789987

  7. Charged and Neutral Particles Channeling Phenomena Channeling 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.; Palumbo, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    On the discovery of coherent Bremsstrahlung in a single crystal at the Frascati National Laboratories / C. Barbiellini, G. P. Murtas and S. B. Dabagov -- Advances in coherent Bremsstrahlung and LPM-effect studies (to the lOOth anniversary from the birth of L. D. Landau) / N. F. Shul'ga -- Spectra of radiation and created particles at intermediate energy in oriented crystal taking into account energy loss / V. N. Baier and V. M. Katkov -- The coherent Bremsstrahlung beam at MAX-lab facility / K. Fissum ... [et al.] -- Radiation from thin, structured targets (CERN NA63) / A. Dizdar -- Hard incoherent radiation in thick crystals / N. F. Shul'ga, V. V. Syshchenko and A. I. Tarnovsky -- Coherent Bremsstrahlung in periodically deformed crystals with a complex base / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Induction of coherent x-ray Bremsstrahlung in crystals under the influence of acoustic waves / A. R. Mkrtchyan and V. V. Parazian -- Coherent processes in bent single crystals / V. A. Maisheev -- Experimental and theoretical investigation of complete transfer phenomenon for media with various heat exchange coefficients / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. E. Movsisyan and V. R. Kocharyan -- Coherent pair production in crystals / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Negative particle planar and axial channeling and channeling collimation / R. A. Carrigan, Jr. -- CERN crystal-based collimation in modern hadron colliders / W. Scandale -- Studies and application of bent crystals for beam steering at 70 GeV IHEP accelerator / A. G. Afonin ... [et al.] -- Crystal collimation studies at the Tevatron (T-980) / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of crystals for channeling of particles in accellerators / A. Mazzolari ... [et al.] -- New possibilities to facilitate collimation of both positively and negatively charged particle beams by crystals / V. Guidi, A. Mazzolari and V. V. Tikhomirov -- Increase of probability of particle capture into the channeling

  8. The Analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm Effect for Bound States for Neutral Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, Knut; Furtado, C.

    We study the analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect for bound states for a neutral particle with a permanent magnetic dipole moment interacting with an external field. We consider a neutral particle confined to moving between two coaxial cylinders and show the dependence of the energy levels on the Aharonov-Casher quantum flux. Moreover, we show that the same flux dependence of the bound states can be found when the neutral particle is confined to a one-dimensional quantum ring and a quantum dot, and we also calculate the persistent currents in each case.

  9. Fishbone activity in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injection plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liqing; Zhang, Jizong; Chen, Kaiyun; Hu, Liqun; Li, Erzhong; Lin, Shiyao; Shi, Tonghui; Duan, Yanmin; Zhu, Yubao

    2015-12-01

    Repetitive fishbones near the trapped ion procession frequency were observed for the first time in the neutral beam injection high confinement plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) tokamak, and diagnosed using a solid-state neutral particle analyzer based on a compact silicon photodiode together with an upgraded high spatial-temporal-resolution multi-arrays soft X-ray (SX) system. This 1/1 typical internal kink mode propagates in the ion-diamagnetism direction with a rotation speed faster than the bulk plasma in the plasma frame. From the SX measurements, this mode frequency is typical of chirping down and the energetic particle effect related to the twisting mode structure. This ion fishbone was found able to trigger a multiple core sawtooth crashes with edge-2/1 sideband modes, as well as to lead to a transition from fishbone to long lived saturated kink mode to fishbone. Furthermore, using SX tomography, a correlation between mode amplitude and mode frequency was found. Finally, a phenomenological prey-predator model was found to reproduce the fishbone nonlinear process well.

  10. Fishbone activity in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injection plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liqing; Zhang, Jizong; Chen, Kaiyun E-mail: lqhu@ipp.cas.cn; Hu, Liqun E-mail: lqhu@ipp.cas.cn; Li, Erzhong; Lin, Shiyao; Shi, Tonghui; Duan, Yanmin; Zhu, Yubao

    2015-12-15

    Repetitive fishbones near the trapped ion procession frequency were observed for the first time in the neutral beam injection high confinement plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) tokamak, and diagnosed using a solid-state neutral particle analyzer based on a compact silicon photodiode together with an upgraded high spatial-temporal-resolution multi-arrays soft X-ray (SX) system. This 1/1 typical internal kink mode propagates in the ion-diamagnetism direction with a rotation speed faster than the bulk plasma in the plasma frame. From the SX measurements, this mode frequency is typical of chirping down and the energetic particle effect related to the twisting mode structure. This ion fishbone was found able to trigger a multiple core sawtooth crashes with edge-2/1 sideband modes, as well as to lead to a transition from fishbone to long lived saturated kink mode to fishbone. Furthermore, using SX tomography, a correlation between mode amplitude and mode frequency was found. Finally, a phenomenological prey–predator model was found to reproduce the fishbone nonlinear process well.

  11. Module for dielectric surfaces modification by fast neutral particles beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchenko, V. T.; Lisenkov, A. A.; Babinov, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we describe the module for dielectric and wide-gap semiconductor surfaces modification by fast neutral beam. The module can be used for cleaning, etching or assisting of films deposition. The surface proceeding by neutral beam can prevent an accumulation of surface charge without using current compensation by inserting electrons to the beam or RF power supply. The module beside cathode and anode contains an electrode with floating potential. Insertion of the additional electrode causes electron retention in an electrostatic trap resulting the reducing of the module operating pressure. Moreover, the electrode with floating potential allows increasing the current efficient of the module. An important feature of the module is that neutralization of the ions extracted from the plasma occurs in the cathode potential well. Thereby ions that have not neutralized cannot leave nearcathode region and there are no fast ions in the output beam. Module does not contain sources of the magnetic fields or elements heated by external sources. Module operates with free cooling. Thus, the module does not need water cooling and can be freely moved in the vacuum chamber.

  12. Advanced analysis methods in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Each generation of high energy physics experiments is grander in scale than the previous - more powerful, more complex and more demanding in terms of data handling and analysis. The spectacular performance of the Tevatron and the beginning of operations of the Large Hadron Collider, have placed us at the threshold of a new era in particle physics. The discovery of the Higgs boson or another agent of electroweak symmetry breaking and evidence of new physics may be just around the corner. The greatest challenge in these pursuits is to extract the extremely rare signals, if any, from huge backgrounds arising from known physics processes. The use of advanced analysis techniques is crucial in achieving this goal. In this review, I discuss the concepts of optimal analysis, some important advanced analysis methods and a few examples. The judicious use of these advanced methods should enable new discoveries and produce results with better precision, robustness and clarity.

  13. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  14. First Results from the Neutral Particle Analyzer at the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezonlin, Ephrem; Titus, James; Johnson, Joseph, III; Chernyshev, F. V.

    2010-11-01

    A neutral particle analyzer has been used at the Madison Symmetric Torus to (MST) to study Ti with Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). The Compact Neutral Particle Analyzer (CNPA), formerly on the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) with Hydrogen plasmas, has been modified and calibrated for MST's deuterium plasmas. The new calibration has measured the flux of D^0 atoms emitted by the plasma which strip the neutrals in a stripping cell with Helium gas (10-2 Torr). The ions are focused by two permanent magnets into 25 channels with an energy range from .34 -- 5.2 keV. From the channels in the keV range, Teff (Ti) has been measured to be around 600 eV during sawtooth events and 200 eV in between events. Further Ti studies will compare on and off neutral beam shots.

  15. Maximizing Ion Current by Space Charge Neutralization using Negative Ions and Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2005-01-25

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space charge neutralization are introduced. Space charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  16. Advanced satellite sensors: Low Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) imager

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Imaging of low energy neutral atoms (LENDs) created by electron capture by magnetospheric plasma ions from interactions with cold geocoronal neutrals promises to be a revolutionary technique for providing unprecedented information about the global structure and dynamics of the terrestrial magnetosphere. This has significant implications in space weather forecasting, weather-induced satellite upset diagnostics, and revolutionary insights into global magnetospheric physics. The Los Alamos Space and Atmospheric Sciences Group has completed extensive neutral atom simulations and detailed instrument definition, and we designed a proof-of-concept demonstration prototype and have obtained externally- funded programs for full instrument development

  17. Advances in Neutral Transport Modeling with DEGAS 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karney, C. F. F.; Stotler, D. P.; Braams, B. J.; Rognlien, T. D.; Rensink, M. E.; Kanzleiter, R. J.

    1997-11-01

    With the next major release of the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code(D. Stotler and C. Karney, Contrib. Plasma Phys.) 34, 392 (1994)., the user will have access to a flexible scoring capability; a standard set of neutral and background plasma scores will be included by default. A separate set of scoring arrays will be used for time-dependent coupling to fluid plasma codes. Implicit techniques are being investigated as a way to increase the time-step relative to the explicit approach(D. Reiter, Chr. May, D. Coster, and R. Schneider, J. Nucl. Mater.) 220-222, 987 (1995).. Satisfactory execution times will be achieved by running the coupled system on massively parallel computers. Handling of high neutral density regions will be improved via a hybrid fluid-Monte Carlo model of the neutral transport. The DG grid generation and surface data input facility is being adapted for use with DEGAS 2 to provide an easy way for the user to transform equilibrium data and CAD hardware files into DEGAS 2 geometry input.

  18. Advances in low energy neutral atom imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, E.E.; Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Moore, K.R. ); Gruntman, M. . Space Sciences Center)

    1993-01-01

    Recently proposed low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging techniques use a collisional process to convert the low energy neutrals into ions before detection. At low energies, collisional processes limit the angular resolution and conversion efficiencies of these devices. However, if the intense ultraviolet light background can be suppressed, direct LENA detection is possible. We present results from a series of experiments designed to develop a novel filtering structure based on free-standing transmission gratings. If the grating period is sufficiently small, free standing transmission gratings can be employed to substantially polarize ultraviolet (UV) light in the wavelength range 300 [Angstrom] to 1500 [Angstrom]. If a second grating is placed behind the first grating with its axis of polarization oriented at a right angle to the first's, a substantial attenuation of UV radiation is achievable. ne neutrals will pass through the remaining open area of two gratings and be detected without UV background complications. We have obtained nominal 2000 [Angstrom] period (1000 [Angstrom] bars with 1000 [Angstrom] slits) free standing, gold transmission gratings and measured their UV and atomic transmission characteristics. The geometric factor of a LENA imager based on this technology is comparable to that of other proposed LENA imagers. In addition, this of imager does not distort the neutral trajectories, allowing for high angular resolution.

  19. High Altitude Neutral Particle Transport Using the Monte Carlo Simulation Code MCNP with Variable Density Atmosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    Monti Captain# USAF AFIT.’GNE/F•P/91M-6 (LO IA Approved for public release; distribution unlimited AFIT/IGNE/ENP/91M-6 HIGH ALTITUDE NEUTRAL... distribution unlimited Preface The purpose of this study was to perform Monte Carlo simulations of neutral particle transport with primary and secondary...21 4. Spatial Cell Geometry for Co-Altitude Detectors .................... .................. 44 5. MCNP vs. SMAUG Neutron Fluence at Source Co

  20. Quantum Walks with Neutral Atoms: Quantum Interference Effects of One and Two Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robens, Carsten; Brakhane, Stefan; Meschede, Dieter; Alberti, A.

    We report on the state of the art of quantum walk experiments with neutral atoms in state-dependent optical lattices. We demonstrate a novel state-dependent transport technique enabling the control of two spin-selective sublattices in a fully independent fashion. This transport technique allowed us to carry out a test of single-particle quantum interference based on the violation of the Leggett-Garg inequality and, more recently, to probe two-particle quantum interference effects with neutral atoms cooled into the motional ground state. These experiments lay the groundwork for the study of discrete-time quantum walks of strongly interacting, indistinguishable particles to demonstrate quantum cellular automata of neutral atoms.

  1. A Parasitic Effect in Neutral Particle Diagnostic Using a Helium Probing Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobita, Kenji; Kusama, Yoshinori; Itoh, Takao; Nemoto, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Tsukahara, Yoshimitsu

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes the characteristic and the physical picture of a parasitic disturbance, which can occur because of the drift motion of probing beam ions trapped at the plasma edge, in active neutral particle measurements for magnetically confined fusion devices. In the JT-60 experiments, the disturbance is observed under the condition in which a neutral particle analyzer views the high recycling region, i.e., the divertor, and the occurrence of the parasitic effect is substantially dependent on the safety factor at the plasma boundary. Also discussed are the validity of our interpretation and some measures for avoiding the disturbance.

  2. DESTRUCTION OF NEUTRAL PARTICLES IN A DEVICE FOR PRODUCING A HIGH DENSITY PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Simon, A.

    1962-05-01

    A method and apparatus are described for burning out neutral particles in an evacuated region and within a strong magnetic field. The method comprises injecting energetic molecular ions into the region perpendicular to the magnetic field and into the path of a dissociating, energetic arc discharge, the atomic ions formed in the dissociating process being trapped by the magnetic field, and then increasing the value of the trapped atomic ion current to such a value that the neutral particles are destroyed faster than they are formed, thereby causing a dense, energetic plasma to be built up and sustained by the magnetic field. (AEC)

  3. Spectroscopic Measurement of Neutral Particle Influx Ratio on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingying; Fu, Jia; Shi, Yuejiang; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Yongcai; Wang, Fudi; Lu, Bo; Huang, Juan; Zhang, Ling; Xu, Jingcui; Zhou, Qian

    2013-06-01

    The spectra of HeI (587.6 nm), Hα (656.28 nm) and Dα (656.1 nm) of the helium discharges as well as the normal deuterium discharges have been measured with two optical spectroscopic multi-channel analysis (OMA) systems on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The influx ratio of the sum of H and D to He spectral lines and the influx ratio of H to D are given. In this way the ratio of hydrogen/deuterium ion (S/XB)H/D to (S/XB)He as well as (S/XB)H/D is not very sensitive to the variation in the edge density and temperature. The low-density helium discharges are operated in order to reduce the recycling hydrogen fluxes; however, the effect is not obvious. The possible reason is that the number of helium discharges is not enough and the content of hydrogen in the wall is still very abundant, which is caused by frequent wall conditionings and the vacuum leakage. The H/(H+D) ratio decreases quickly after one lithium coating and reduces to less than 10% using several accumulated lithium wall conditioning. It is found that the deposited He atoms on the carbon wall will remain at a low level after several D2 discharges.

  4. An initial measurement of a fast neutral spectrum for ion cyclotron range of frequency heated plasma using two-channel compact neutral particle analyzers in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Wang, S. J.; Park, M.; Kim, S. K.

    2013-11-01

    The accurate measurement of fast neutral particles from high energy ion tails is very important since it is a measure of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) or neutral beam (NB) ion heating. In KSTAR, fast neutral measurements have been carried out using a compact neutral particle analyzer based on the silicon photo diode since 2010. As a result, the fast neutral spectrum was observed consistent with the ion temperature, diamagnetic energy, and neutron flux in 2011. However, there was fast neutral count beyond the injected neutral beam energy in NB-only heating. Since it is difficult to expect the count unless the temperature is high enough to diffuse the fast ions beyond the beam energy it was required to identify what it is. During the 2012 campaign, the two-channel diode detectors with and without a particle stopper were used to distinguish fast neutral counts and other counts by a hard X-ray or neutrons. As a result, it was confirmed that the high energy component beyond the beam energy originated from a hard X-ray or neutrons. Finally, it was observed that faster neutrals are generated by ICRF heating and enhanced by electron cyclotron heating compared to NB-only heating.

  5. An initial measurement of a fast neutral spectrum for ion cyclotron range of frequency heated plasma using two-channel compact neutral particle analyzers in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. H.; Park, M.; Kim, S. K.; Wang, S. J.

    2013-11-15

    The accurate measurement of fast neutral particles from high energy ion tails is very important since it is a measure of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) or neutral beam (NB) ion heating. In KSTAR, fast neutral measurements have been carried out using a compact neutral particle analyzer based on the silicon photo diode since 2010. As a result, the fast neutral spectrum was observed consistent with the ion temperature, diamagnetic energy, and neutron flux in 2011. However, there was fast neutral count beyond the injected neutral beam energy in NB-only heating. Since it is difficult to expect the count unless the temperature is high enough to diffuse the fast ions beyond the beam energy it was required to identify what it is. During the 2012 campaign, the two-channel diode detectors with and without a particle stopper were used to distinguish fast neutral counts and other counts by a hard X-ray or neutrons. As a result, it was confirmed that the high energy component beyond the beam energy originated from a hard X-ray or neutrons. Finally, it was observed that faster neutrals are generated by ICRF heating and enhanced by electron cyclotron heating compared to NB-only heating.

  6. Relativistic bounds states for a neutral particle confined to a parabolic potential induced by noninertial effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, K.

    2010-10-01

    We obtain the solutions of the Dirac equation when the noninertial effects of the Fermi-Walker reference frame break the relativistic Landau-Aharonov-Casher quantization, but they provide bound states in an analogous way to a Dirac neutral particle subject to Tan-Inkson quantum dot potential [W.-C. Tan, J.C. Inkson, Semicond. Sci. Technol. 11 (1996) 1635].

  7. Modeled Ion and Neutral Particle Distributions around Jupiter’s Moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M.; Tenishev, V.; Hansen, K. C.; Jia, X.; Combi, M. R.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2009-12-01

    Jupiter’s moon Europa has a thin gravitationally bound neutral atmosphere which is mostly created through sputtering of high energy ions impacting on its icy surface. In a first step we will simulate the interaction of Europa with the Jovian magnetosphere by using the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model BATSRUS. Starting from the model used by Kabin et al. [JGR, Vol. 104, No. A9, (1999)] which accounts for the exospheric mass loading, ion-neutral charge exchange, and recombination we will further use the resistive MHD equations addressing the finite electron diffusivity. These results, including the magnetic field topology, are then used to calculate the Lorentz forces for our test particle Monte Carlo model. We use this model to simulate Europa’s plasma and neutral environment by tracking particles created on the moon’s surface by sputtering or sublimation, through dissociation and/or ionization in the atmosphere, or entering the system from Jupiter’s magnetosphere as high energy ions. Neutral particle trajectories are followed by solving the equation of motion in Europa’s gravity field whereas the ion population is additionally subject to the Lorentz force. We will show preliminary results of this work with application to the missions to the Jupiter system currently under consideration by NASA (JEO) and ESA (JGO).

  8. Discrimination of charged particles in a neutral beam line by using a solid scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Jong-Kwan; Ko, Jewou; Liu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    In the past several decades, many studies have been conducted to search for non-baryonic dark matter, such as weakly interactive massive particles (WIMPs). In the search for WIMPs, charged particles incident on the detector are background particles because WIMPs are neutral. Charged particles originate from various sources, such as cosmic rays and laboratory materials surrounding the main detector. Therefore, a veto that discriminates charged particles can improve the particle-detection efficiency of the entire experiment for detecting WIMPs. Here, we investigate in the thickness range of 1 mm to 5 mm, the optimal thickness of a polystyrene scintillator as a chargedparticle veto detector. We found that 3-mm-thick polystyrene provides the best performance to veto charged particles and the charged-particle background in the search for the WIMP signal. Furthermore, we fabricated 3-mm-thick and 5-mm-thick polystyrene charged particle veto detectors that will be used in an underground laboratory in the search for WIMP dark matter. After exposing those detectors are the actual beam line, we compared the rate of charged particles measured using those detectors and the rate simulated through a Monte Carlo simulation.

  9. Advanced Kinetic-Based Modeling Applied to Plasma and Neutral Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Advanced Kinetic-Based Modeling Applied to Plasma and Neutral Flows Briefers: Andrew Ketsdever Sergey Gimelshein PIs: Andrew Ketsdever...number. 1. REPORT DATE SEP 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Kinetic-Based Modeling ...magnetic field in opposite direction of applied field Extreme pressure tends to drive plasma out of discharge chamber Difficulties in modeling FRCs High

  10. Particle Dynamics in the Magnet Region of the DIII-D Neutral Beam System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackford, C. A.; Crowley, B. J.; Rauch, J. M.; Scoville, J. T.

    2016-10-01

    The Neutral Beam system on the DIII-D tokamak consists of eight ion sources on four beam lines using the Common Long Pulse Source (CLPS) developed at Berkeley in the 1980s. This poster presents the results of modeling efforts aimed to understand the anomalous power deposition in the bending magnet region of the neutral beam system at DIII-D. The code tracks individual particles in 3D electric and magnetic fields. In these fields, the particles intercept solid boundaries and deposit power on the magnet pole shields as well as various collimators, the ion dump, and the beam dump calorimeter. This code allows investigation of phenomena including the non-uniformity of the magnetic field, the space charge effects on the neutral beam, and deviant ion trajectories within the system. These phenomena are expected to contribute largely to the power deposition within the bending magnet region. Results of the analysis may lead to adjustments that could increase the efficiency of the neutral beam system at the DIII-D facility. Work supported by U.S. DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  11. Energetic particles in the vicinity of a possible neutral line in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moebius, E.; Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Paschmann, G.; Gloeckler, G.

    1983-01-01

    Combined plasma, magnetic field, and energetic particle data obtained from ISEE-1 in the geomagnetic tail during two successive energetic particle burst events are presented. The behavior of protons with energies of more than about 100 keV is very different from that of the 30-100 keV protons which represent the suprathermal tail of the plasma sheet distribution. The more energetic ions appear on a time scale of several minutes following a northward turning of the tail magnetic field. At about the same time the plasma measurements show a velocity of about 200 km/s in the tailward direction. From these results, it is argued that two successive magnetic neutral lines are created well within the plasma sheet and move close to the satellite position in the earthward direction. The extent of the neutral line is then limited to the dusk side of the tail.

  12. Neutral particle background in cosmic ray telescopes composed of silicon solid state detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The energy loss-spectrum of secondary charged particles produced by the interaction of gamma-rays and energetic neutrons in silicon solid state detectors has been measured with a satellite-borne cosmic ray telescope. In the satellite measurements presented here two distinct neutral background effects are identified: secondary protons and alpha particles with energies of about 2 to 100 MeV produced by neutron interactions, and secondary electrons with energies of about 0.2 to 10 MeV produced by X-ray interactions. The implications of this neutral background for satellite measurements of low energy cosmic rays are discussed, and suggestions are given for applying these results to other detector systems in order to estimate background contamination and optimize detector system design.

  13. Design of solid state neutral particle analyzer array for National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y. B.; Tritz, K.; Roquemore, A. L.; Medley, S. S.

    2014-11-15

    A new compact, multi-channel Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) diagnostic based on silicon photodiode array has been designed and is being fabricated for the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U). The SSNPA system utilizes a set of vertically stacked photodiode arrays in current mode viewing the same plasma region with different filter thickness to obtain fast temporal resolution (∼120 kHz bandwidth) and coarse energy information in three bands of >25 keV, >45 keV, and >65 keV. The SSNPA system consists of 15 radial sightlines that intersect existing on-axis neutral beams at major radii between 90 and 130 cm, 15 tangential sightlines that intersect new off-axis neutral beams at major radii between 120 and 145 cm. These two subsystems aim at separating the response of passing and trapped fast ions. In addition, one photodiode array whose viewing area does not intersect any neutral beams is used to monitor passive signals produced by fast ions that charge exchange with background neutrals.

  14. Mode particle resonances during near-tangential neutral beam injection in large tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; White, R.B.; Morris, A.W.; Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.M.; Medley, S.S.; Scott, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Coherent magnetohydrodynamic modes have been observed during neutral beam injection in TFTR and JET. Periodic bursts of oscillations were detected with several plasma diagnostics, and Fokker-Planck calculations show that the populations of trapped particles in both tokamaks are sufficient to account for fishbone destabilization. Estimates of mode parameters are in reasonable agreement with the experiments, and they indicate that the fishbone mode may continue to affect the performance of intensely heated tokamaks. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Performing three-dimensional neutral particle transport calculations on tera scale computers

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, C S; Brown, P N; Chang, B; Dorr, M R; Hanebutte, U R

    1999-01-12

    A scalable, parallel code system to perform neutral particle transport calculations in three dimensions is presented. To utilize the hyper-cluster architecture of emerging tera scale computers, the parallel code successfully combines the MPI message passing and paradigms. The code's capabilities are demonstrated by a shielding calculation containing over 14 billion unknowns. This calculation was accomplished on the IBM SP ''ASCI-Blue-Pacific computer located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  16. Searching for Axionlike Particles in Flavor-Changing Neutral Current Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Eder; Lin, Tongyan; Shuve, Brian

    2017-03-01

    We propose new searches for axionlike particles (ALPs) produced in flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC) processes. This proposal exploits the often-overlooked coupling of ALPs to W± bosons, leading to FCNC production of ALPs even in the absence of a direct coupling to fermions. Our proposed searches for resonant ALP production in decays such as B →K(*)a , a →γ γ , and K →π a , a →γ γ could greatly improve upon the current sensitivity to ALP couplings to standard model particles. We also determine analogous constraints and discovery prospects for invisibly decaying ALPs.

  17. Long-term tracking of neutrally buoyant tracer particles in two-dimensional fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervez, M. S.; Solomon, T. H.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental technique has been developed to produce and to track neutrally buoyant particles in a two-dimensional fluid flow. The key aspect of the technique is the ability to track particles for extended intervals (over an hour), which is essential for quantitative studies of transport and mixing. The approach is composed of two stages. In the first stage, digital image processing hardware partially processes the images, reducing the data rate to 50 kbyte/s (typically) and allowing several hours of data to be stored on a conventional computer disk. In the second stage, programs extract particle trajectories from the reduced data. The approach is tested in an experiment on planetary-type flows in a rotating annulus. In an appendix, a technique is discussed for fabricating wax or crayon particles with arbitrary density.

  18. Electric current-driven migration of electrically neutral particles in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinfang E-mail: r.qin@imperial.ac.uk; Qin, Rongshan E-mail: r.qin@imperial.ac.uk

    2014-03-17

    We design and experimentally demonstrate a migration of electrically neutral particles in liquids driven by electric current according to the discrepancies of their electrical conductivities. A force from electric current to electrically neutral particles has been identified to drive the particles toward the lateral surface from the centre of suspension via three distinguishable zones, namely, pushing, trapping, and expelling zones. The driving force can overtake gravity in practical cases. The property of the force is found neither similar to that of the force in electromagnetophoresis nor similar to that of the electromigration force in terms of direction and magnitude. An expression for the force at the pushing zone has been developed based on the numerical calculation of the thermodynamics of suspension fluids. The excellent agreement between numerical calculations and experimental data demonstrates that our calculation provides fundamental and predictive insight into particles separation from the liquids. Therefore, it is possible to use the force in many engineering applications such as separation of particles according to the differences of their electrical conductivities.

  19. A coarse-grained transport model for neutral particles in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mekkaoui, A.; Reiter, D.; Boerner, P.; Marandet, Y.; Genesio, P.; Rosato, J.; Capes, H.; Koubiti, M.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Stamm, R.

    2012-12-15

    The transport of neutral particles in turbulent plasmas is addressed from the prospect of developing coarse-grained transport models which can be implemented in code suites like B2-EIRENE, currently used for designing the ITER divertor. The statistical properties of turbulent fluctuations are described by a multivariate Gamma distribution able to retain space and time correlations through a proper choice of covariance function. We show that in the scattering free case, relevant for molecules and impurity atoms, the average neutral particle density obeys a Boltzmann equation with an ionization rate renormalized by fluctuations. This result lends itself to a straightforward implementation in the EIRENE Monte Carlo solver for neutral particles. Special emphasis is put on the inclusion of time correlations, and in particular on the ballistic motion of coherent turbulent structures. The role of these time dependent effects is discussed for D{sub 2} molecules and beryllium atoms. The sensitivity of our results to the assumptions on the statistical properties of fluctuations is investigated.

  20. Particle size alterations of feedstuffs during in situ neutral detergent fiber incubation.

    PubMed

    Krämer, M; Nørgaard, P; Lund, P; Weisbjerg, M R

    2013-07-01

    Particle size alterations during neutral detergent fiber (NDF) determination and in situ rumen incubation were analyzed by dry sieving and image analysis to evaluate the in situ procedure for estimation of NDF degradation parameters and indigestible NDF concentration in terms of particle size. Early-cut and late-cut grass silages, corn silage, alfalfa silage, rapeseed meal, and dried distillers grains were examined. Treatments were (1) drying and grinding of forage samples and grinding of concentrates; (2) neutral detergent-soluble (NDS) extraction; (3) machine washing and NDS extraction; (4) 24-h rumen incubation, machine washing, and NDS extraction; and (5) 288-h rumen incubation, machine washing, and NDS extraction. Degradation profiles for potentially degradable NDF were determined and image analysis was used to estimate particle size profiles and thereby the risk for particle loss. Particle dimensions changed during NDF determination and in situ rumen incubation and variations depended on feedstuff and treatment. Corn silage and late-cut grass silage varied most in particle area among feedstuffs, with an increase of 139% between 0 and 24h and a decrease of 77% between 24 and 288 h for corn silage and a decrease of 74% for late-cut grass silage between 24- and 288-h in situ rumen incubation. Especially for late-cut grass silage residues after 288 h in situ rumen incubation, a high mass proportion in the critical zone for escape was found. Particle area decreased linearly with increasing incubation time. Particle loss during in situ rumen incubation cannot be excluded and is likely to vary among feedstuffs.

  1. Advance particle and Doppler measurement methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, C.

    1985-01-01

    Particle environments, i.e., rain, ice, and snow particles are discussed. Two types of particles addressed are: (1) the natural environment in which airplanes fly and conduct test flights; and (2) simulation environments that are encountered in ground-test facilities such as wind tunnels, ranges, etc. There are characteristics of the natural environment that one wishes to measure. The liquid water content (LWC) is the one that seems to be of most importance; size distribution may be of importance in some applications. Like snow, the shape of the particle may be an important parameter to measure. As one goes on to environment in simulated tests, additional parameters may be required such as velocity distribution, the velocity lag of the particle relative to the aerodynamic flow, and the trajectory of the particle as it goes through the aerodynamic flow and impacts on the test object.

  2. Measurements of the Charged and Neutral Particle Spectra on the Martian Surface with MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Jan

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) onboard Mars Science Laboratory’s rover Curiosity is the first ever instrument to measure the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars. Charged particles are a major component of this environment, both galactic cosmic rays propagating to the Martian surface and secondary particles created by interactions of these cosmic rays with the atoms of the Martian atmosphere and soil. Another important factor for determining the biological impact of the Martian surface radiation is the specific contribution of neutrons, which possess a high biological effectiveness. In contrast to charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays are generally only measured indirectly. Their measurement is the result of a complex convolution of the incident particle spectrum with the measurement process. We apply an inversion method to calculate the gamma/neutron spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. Here we show first surface measurements of the Martian particle spectra and compare them to theoretical predictions. Measuring the Martian particle spectra is an essential step for determining the mutagenic influences to past or present life at or beneath the Martian surface as well as the radiation hazard for future human exploration, including the shielding design of a potential habitat.

  3. Interstellar Neutral Helium in the Heliosphere from IBEX Observations. II. The Warsaw Test Particle Model (WTPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokół, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Bzowski, M.; Swaczyna, P.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a refined and optimized version of the Warsaw Test Particle Model of interstellar neutral gas in the heliosphere, specially tailored for analysis of IBEX-Lo observations. The former version of the model was used in the analysis of neutral He observed by IBEX that resulted in an unexpected conclusion that the interstellar neutral He flow vector was different than previously thought and that a new population of neutral He, dubbed the Warm Breeze, exists in the heliosphere. It was also used in the reanalysis of Ulysses observations that confirmed the original findings on the flow vector, but suggested a significantly higher temperature. The present version of the model has two strains targeted for different applications, based on an identical paradigm, but differing in the implementation and in the treatment of ionization losses. We present the model in detail and discuss numerous effects related to the measurement process that potentially modify the resulting flux of ISN He observed by IBEX, and identify those of them that should not be omitted in the simulations to avoid biasing the results. This paper is part of a coordinated series of papers presenting the current state of analysis of IBEX-Lo observations of ISN He. Details of the analysis method are presented by Swaczyna et al. and results of the analysis are presented by Bzowski et al.

  4. Neutralized solar energetic particles in the inner heliosphere: a parameter study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Klecker, Berndt; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Cipriani, Fabrice; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The large fluxes of solar energetic particles (SEPs) in Gradual Events, dominated by protons, are believed to be produced by the acceleration of shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). As SEPs propagate in the lower corona, there is a chance for them to be neutralized via the charge exchange and/or recombination processes and become energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). These ENAs retain the velocity of their parent SEPs and propagate in straight lines without the influence of the interplanetary magnetic field, and therefore might potentially serve as a new window to observe the particle acceleration processes in the solar corona. STEREO/Low Energy Telescope reported the first probable observation of hydrogen ENAs between 1.6 MeV - 5 MeV from the Sun prior to an X-class flare/CME [Mewaldt et al., 2009]. While such observations were somehow controversial, Wang et al. [2014] simulated the neutralization of solar energetic protons in the corona lower than 40 RS, and the result agreed with the STEREO observation. In this work, we further developed a production model of the ENA near the sun together with a transport model toward the inner planets, and explore the dependences of the ENA characteristics against the model parameters. These parameters include the angular width of the CME, its propagation direction with respect to the Sun-observer line, the propagation speed, the particle density in the corona, the abundances of O6+ and C4+, and the reaction rate of electron impact ionization in the loss of ENAs, and the heliospheric distance of the observer. The calculated ENA flux shows that at lower energy the expected ENA flux depends most sensitively on the CME apex angle and the CME propagation direction. At higher energy the dependence on the coronal density is more prominent. References Mewaldt, R. A., R. A. Leske, E. C. Stone, A. F. Barghouty, A. W. Labrador, C. M. S. Cohen, A. C. Cummings, A. J. Davis, T. T. von Rosenvinge, and M. E. Wiedenbeck (2009), STEREO

  5. Analysis of secondary particle behavior in multiaperture, multigrid accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, T; Taniguchi, M; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Tobari, H; Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Sakamoto, K; Inoue, T

    2010-02-01

    Heat load on acceleration grids by secondary particles such as electrons, neutrals, and positive ions, is a key issue for long pulse acceleration of negative ion beams. Complicated behaviors of the secondary particles in multiaperture, multigrid (MAMuG) accelerator have been analyzed using electrostatic accelerator Monte Carlo code. The analytical result is compared to experimental one obtained in a long pulse operation of a MeV accelerator, of which second acceleration grid (A2G) was removed for simplification of structure. The analytical results show that relatively high heat load on the third acceleration grid (A3G) since stripped electrons were deposited mainly on A3G. This heat load on the A3G can be suppressed by installing the A2G. Thus, capability of MAMuG accelerator is demonstrated for suppression of heat load due to secondary particles by the intermediate grids.

  6. An alpha particle measurement system using an energetic neutral helium beam in ITER (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, M.; Tanaka, N.; Terai, K.; Kaneko, O.; Kisaki, M.; Kobuchi, T.; Tsumori, K.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Shinto, K.; Wada, M.

    2012-02-15

    An energetic helium neutral beam is involved in the beam neutralization measurement system of alpha particles confined in a DT fusion plasma. A full size strong-focusing He{sup +} ion source (2 A, the beam radius of 11.3 mm, the beam energy less than 20 keV). Present strong-focusing He{sup +} ion source shows an emittance diagram separated for each beamlet of multiple apertures without phase space mixing, despite the space charge of a beamlet is asymmetric and the beam flow is non-laminar. The emittance of beamlets in the peripheral region was larger than that of center. The heat load to the plasma electrode was studied to estimate the duty factor for the ITER application.

  7. Effect of the Edge Radial Electric Field on Neutral Particle Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guldi, C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Beitzel, T. A.; Burrell, K. H.

    2000-10-01

    Neutral particle measurements in ASDEX were originally interpreted as evidence that the edge radial electric field Er changes gradually at the L-H transition.(W. Herrmann et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 (1995) 4401. We have relocated an analyzer to an orientation similar to the ASDEX analyzer: at the outer midplane viewing perpendicular ions midway between toroidal field coils. The electric field is measured by charge-exchange recombination and motional stark effect diagnostics. The passive charge exchange signal from the relocated analyzer is usually undetectable but, in discharges with large E_r, the flux of 5 keV neutrals can resemble ASDEX signals. The combined effects of ripple trapping and E_r× B_φ drifts(J.A. Heikkinen et al.), Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 40 (1998) 679. may explain the results.

  8. Description of the Majorana properties of neutral particles within pauli symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gaponov, Yu. V.

    2006-04-15

    A mathematical model that makes it possible to describe the Majorana properties of a system of free left-and right-handed neutral fermions belonging to the same type is constructed on the basis of transformations that include the chiral U (1) group and the Pauli SU (2) group, which mixes particle and antiparticle states. For massless particles, Pauli symmetry is exact and leads to conserved charges, a chiral and a generalized lepton one; the latter is a vector in Pauli isospace, where various directions are associated with Dirac or generalized Majorana properties. In the case of a nonzero mass, the scheme in question describes the combined Dirac-Majorana properties of particles belonging to A and B ({eta}{sub P}{sup 2} = -1) and C and D ({eta}{sub P}{sup 2} = 1) inversion classes, the condition M{sub L} = -M{sub R} being satisfied for their Majorana masses. For particles of C and D classes, the mass term in the Lagrangian and the Pauli charge can be related through the generalized-lepton-charge operator. For particles of A and B classes, these features are complementary, an alternative description of particles in terms of the lepton charge or two independent Majorana fields being possible in the Dirac case. In general, however, only representations of the latter type are realized, in which case the eigenvalues of the operator that determines the structure of the mass term in the Lagrangian serve as basic features.

  9. Specific features of measuring the isotopic composition of hydrogen ions in ITER plasma by using neutral particle diagnostics under neutral beam injection conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasyev, V. I.; Goncharov, P. R.; Mironov, M. I.; Nesenevich, V. G. Petrov, M. P.; Petrov, S. Ya.; Sergeev, V. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    Results of numerical simulation of signals from neutral particle analyzers under injection of the heating and diagnostic neutral beams in different operating modes of the ITER tokamak are presented. The distribution functions of fast ions in plasma are simulated, and the corresponding neutral particle fluxes escaping from the plasma along the line of sight of the analyzers are calculated. It is shown that the injection of heating deuterium (D{sup 0}) beams results in the appearance of an intense background signal hampering measurements of the ratio between the densities of deuterium and tritium fuel ions in plasma in the thermal energy range. The injection of a diagnostic hydrogen (H{sup 0}) beam does not affect measurements owing to the high mass resolution of the analyzers.

  10. Single discharge of the matrix source of negative hydrogen ions: Influence of the neutral particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Paunska, Ts.; Todorov, D. Shivarova, A.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2015-04-08

    The study presents two-dimensional (2D) fluid-plasma-model description of a planar-coil inductively-driven discharge, considered as a single element of a matrix source of volume-produced negative hydrogen ions. Whereas the models developed up to now have been directed towards description of the charged particle behavior in the discharge, including that of the negative ions, this model stresses on the role of the neutral particle dynamics and of the surface processes in the formation of the discharge structure. The latter is discussed based on comparison of results obtained for discharges in a flowing gas and at a constant gas pressure as well as for different values of the coefficient of atom recombination on the walls. The conclusions are that the main plasma parameters – electron density and temperature and plasma potential – determining the gas discharge regime stay stable, regardless of changes in the redistribution of the densities of the neutral particles and of the positive ions. With regards to the volume production of the ions, which requires high density of (vibrationally excited) molecules, the impact on the degree of dissociation of the coefficient of atom recombination on the wall is discussed.

  11. Search for a Neutral Long-Lived Particle Decaying to B-Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Chad

    2009-04-01

    The existence of the Higgs boson is required by the Standard Model of particle physics, yet it has not been observed. The precise nature of the Higgs boson is unknown and the mechanism by which it interacts with known Standard Model particles is also not known. Long-lived, electrically neutral hadrons have recently been proposed in hidden-valley models and could constitute a pathway through which the Higgs boson communicates with the Standard Model. Such a scenario may provide a novel path to Higgs discovery at the Tevatron. This thesis describes a search for a neutral, long-lived particle produced in decays of Higgs bosons in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV, which decays to b-jets and lives long enough to travel at least 1.6 cm before decaying. This analysis uses 3.65 fb -1 of data recorded with the Run II D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider from April 2002 to August of 2008. We perform a search for eight possible hidden-valley scenarios resulting from a Higgs decay. No significant excess over background is observed and cross-section limits are placed at 95% CL.

  12. Mass analysis of neutral particles and ions released during electrical breakdowns on spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1985-01-01

    Charged-particle fluxes from breakdown events were studied. Methods to measure mass spectra and total emitted flux of neutral particles were developed. The design and construction of the specialized mass spectrometer was completed. Electrical breakdowns were initiated by a movable blunt contact touching the insulating surface. The contact discharge apparatus was used for final development of two different high-speed recording systems and for measurements of the composition of the materials given off by the discharge. It was shown that intense instantaneous fluxes of neutral particles were released from the sites of electrical breakdown events. A laser micropulse mass analyzer showed that visible discoloration at breakdown sites were correllated with the presence of iron on the polymer side of the film, presumably caused by punch-through to the Inconel backing. Kapton samples irradiated by an oxygen ion beam were tested. The irradiated samples were free of surface hydrocarbon contamination but otherwise behaved in the same way as the Kapton samples tested earlier. Only the two samples exposed to oxygen ion bombardment were relatively clean. This indicates an additional variable that should be considered when testing spacecraft materials in the laboratory.

  13. Analogue of the quantum Hall effect for neutral particles with magnetic dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, L. R.; Passos, E.; Furtado, C.; Sergeenkov, S.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we investigate a possibility for the existence of an analog of the Quantum Hall Effect for neutral particles with a permanent magnetic moment μ in the presence of crossed inhomogeneous magnetic and electric fields. We predict the appearance of Hall conductivity σH = (e2 / h) ν (μ) with the Landau filling factor ν (μ) ∝μ2. The estimates of the model parameters suggest quite an optimistic possibility to experimentally verify this prediction in optically trapped clouds of atomic BEC.

  14. Effect of magnetic configuration on the neutral particle transport in compact helical system edge region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, H.; Suzuki, C.; Okamura, S.

    2007-06-01

    Neutral particle behavior in compact helical system (CHS) was studied with the Monte Carlo simulation code DEGAS. By shifting the magnetic axis position, magnetic configuration of CHS device changes from the material limiter to the magnetic divertor. We estimated Hα emission from excited hydrogen atoms and dissociated molecules with a collisional radiation model, and compared experimental observations to study the change of recycling condition. With the comparison of simulation result with Hα detector signal, the change of recycling source by the magnetic axis shift was qualitatively confirmed.

  15. Spectroscopy, manipulation and trapping of neutral atoms, molecules, and other particles using optical nanofibers: a review.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Michael J; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-08-13

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications.

  16. A fast model for spreading of neutral particles injected locally into hot plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tokar, M. Z.

    2014-08-15

    A fast model for calculation of non-stationary 3-D profiles of the density for neutral particles locally released into a hot plasma is elaborated. The approach reduces non-stationary three-dimensional transport equations to a set of one-dimensional ones describing the time evolution of the radial profiles for several parameters characterizing adequately the three-dimensional structure. The method is applied to model the spreading process of carbon atoms released by laser desorption in an experimental device and the local injection of working gas into a fusion reactor. The associated heat loads onto the first wall are assessed.

  17. Computational modeling of monoenergetic neutral particle inverse transport problems in slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Rodrigo R.; Barros, Ricardo C.

    2012-09-01

    Presented here is an analytical numerical method applied to three different types of monoenergetic neutral particle inverse transport problems in the discrete ordinates (SN) formulation: (a) boundary condition estimation; (b) interior source estimation; and (c) effective slab length estimation. These three types of inverse problems governed by the linear integrodifferential transport equation in SN formulation are related respectively to medical physics (a); nuclear waste storage (b); and non-destructive testing in industry (c). Numerical results and a brief discussion are given to conclude this paper.

  18. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  19. Energetic particles in the vicinity of a possible neutral line in the plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Moebius, E.; Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Paschmann, G.; Gloeckler, G.

    1983-10-01

    We have analyzed energetic protons in the energy range 30 to 500 keV and energetic electrons > or =75 keV obtained with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system on ISEE-1 during a plasma sheet crossing on March 26, 1978. The behavior of protons with energies of more than approx.100 keV is very different from that of the approx.30 to approx.100 keV protons which represent the suprathermal tail of the plasma sheet distribution. The more energetic ions appear on a time scale of serveral minutes following a northward turning of the tail magnetic field. At about the same time the plassma measurements show a velocity of approx.200 km/s in the tailward direction. This velocity enhancement is first seen at ISEE-1 and later on at ISEE-2, which is earthward of ISEE-1. The temporal sequence of the energetic particle, magnetic field, and plasma observations and the proton and electron anisotropies are discussed in terms of acceleration near a magnetic neutral line which occurs well within the plasma sheet. In this framework the magnetic neutral line would move earthward, followed by a magnetic island. The extent of the neutral line would be limited to the dusk side of the tail. No disruption of the plasma sheet is observed as compared to large-scale substorm activity.

  20. Advanced Crew Escape Suits (ACES): Particle Impact Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) requested NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility to assist in determining the effects of impaired anodization on aluminum parts in advanced crew escape suits (ACES). Initial investigation indicated poor anodization could lead to an increased risk of particle impact ignition, and a lack of data was prevalent for particle impact of bare (unanodized) aluminum; therefore, particle impact tests were performed. A total of 179 subsonic and 60 supersonic tests were performed with no ignition of the aluminum targets. Based on the resulting test data, WSTF found no increased particle impact hazard was present in the ACES equipment.

  1. Developing QSPR model of gas/particle partition coefficients of neutral poly-/perfluoroalkyl substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Quan; Ma, Guangcai; Xu, Ting; Serge, Bakire; Yu, Haiying; Chen, Jianrong; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-10-01

    Poly-/perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a class of synthetic fluorinated organic substances that raise increasing concern because of their environmental persistence, bioaccumulation and widespread presence in various environment media and organisms. PFASs can be released into the atmosphere through both direct and indirect sources, and the gas/particle partition coefficient (KP) is an important parameter that helps us to understand their atmospheric behavior. In this study, we developed a temperature-dependent predictive model for log KP of PFASs and analyzed the molecular mechanism that governs their partitioning equilibrium between gas phase and particle phase. All theoretical computation was carried out at B3LYP/6-31G (d, p) level based on neutral molecular structures by Gaussian 09 program package. The regression model has a good statistical performance and robustness. The application domain has also been defined according to OECD guidance. The mechanism analysis shows that electrostatic interaction and dispersion interaction play the most important role in the partitioning equilibrium. The developed model can be used to predict log KP values of neutral fluorotelomer alcohols and perfluor sulfonamides/sulfonamidoethanols with different substitutions at nitrogen atoms, providing basic data for their ecological risk assessment.

  2. Mass spectra of neutral particles released during electrical breakdown of thin polymer films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A special type of time-of-flight mass spectrometer triggered from the breakdown event was developed to study the composition of the neutral particle flux released during the electrical breakdown of polymer films problem. Charge is fed onto a metal-backed polymer surface by a movable smooth platinum contact. A slowly increasing potential from a high-impedance source is applied to the contact until breakdown occurs. The breakdown characteristics is made similar to those produced by an electron beam charging system operating at similar potentials. The apparatus showed that intense instantaneous fluxes of neutral particles are released from the sites of breakdown events. For Teflon FEP films of 50 and 75 microns thickness the material released consists almost entirely of fluorocarbon fragments, some of them having masses greater than 350 atomic mass units amu, while the material released from a 50 micron Kapton film consists mainly of light hydrocarbons with masses at or below 44 amu, with additional carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The apparatus is modified to allow electron beam charging of the samples.

  3. Workshop on advances in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Miller, W.A.

    1993-12-31

    This proceedings contains viewgraphs presented at the 1993 workshop held at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Discussed topics include: negative stress, reactive flow calculations, interface problems, boundaries and interfaces, energy conservation in viscous flows, linked penetration calculations, stability and consistency of the SPH method, instabilities, wall heating and conservative smoothing, tensors, tidal disruption of stars, breaking the 10,000,000 particle limit, modelling relativistic collapse, SPH without H, relativistic KSPH avoidance of velocity based kernels, tidal compression and disruption of stars near a supermassive rotation black hole, and finally relativistic SPH viscosity and energy.

  4. Jet Electrochemical Machining of Particle Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites with Different Neutral Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Lehnert, N.; Martin, A.; Schubert, A.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional mechanical machining of particle reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) is challenging because the hard ceramic particles in the soft aluminum matrix lead to an increased tool wear. Furthermore, the mechanical and thermal impact during conventional machining affects the microstructure of the AMCs. Electrochemical machining (ECM) is an alternative method to machine AMCs. Based on anodic dissolution, ECM has a slight influence on the work piece material structure and is independent of material strength and hardness. So the microstructure of the work piece remains unaffected. One method of ECM is electrochemical machining with continuous electrolytic free jet (Jet-ECM). Hereby the electrochemical removal is localized by the geometry of the electrolyte jet. By moving the electrolyte jet micro-structures and microgeometries can be generated quickly and flexibly in metallic parts [1]. Another advantage of Jet-ECM is the low consumption of electrolyte which allows an easy and inexpensive change of electrolyte for investigations with different types of electrolyte. In this study AMCs reinforced with different amounts of SiC-particles are machined with two pH-neutral electrolytes using Jet-ECM. The results provide information about the suitability of the selected electrolytes for the machining of AMCs. In addition, the influence of the particle content on the electrochemical removal result will be evaluated.

  5. Regular and chaotic aspects of charged particle motion in a magnetotail-like field with a neutral line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savenkov, Boris V.; Zelenyi, Lev M.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Buechner, Jorg

    1991-01-01

    The motion of charged particles is studied numerically and analytically using a test particle approach. Acceleration near the X-type neutral line is described in terms of adiabatic invariants and separatrix crossings. The relation between regular and chaotic properties of the process is discussed for a realistic source in the plasma mantle.

  6. The effects of neutralized particles on the sampling efficiency of polyurethane foam used to estimate the extrathoracic deposition fraction.

    PubMed

    Tomyn, Ronald L; Sleeth, Darrah K; Thiese, Matthew S; Larson, Rodney R

    2016-01-01

    In addition to chemical composition, the site of deposition of inhaled particles is important for determining the potential health effects from an exposure. As a result, the International Organization for Standardization adopted a particle deposition sampling convention. This includes extrathoracic particle deposition sampling conventions for the anterior nasal passages (ET1) and the posterior nasal and oral passages (ET2). This study assessed how well a polyurethane foam insert placed in an Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) sampler can match an extrathoracic deposition sampling convention, while accounting for possible static buildup in the test particles. In this way, the study aimed to assess whether neutralized particles affected the performance of this sampler for estimating extrathoracic particle deposition. A total of three different particle sizes (4.9, 9.5, and 12.8 µm) were used. For each trial, one particle size was introduced into a low-speed wind tunnel with a wind speed set a 0.2 m/s (∼40 ft/min). This wind speed was chosen to closely match the conditions of most indoor working environments. Each particle size was tested twice either neutralized, using a high voltage neutralizer, or left in its normal (non neutralized) state as standard particles. IOM samplers were fitted with a polyurethane foam insert and placed on a rotating mannequin inside the wind tunnel. Foam sampling efficiencies were calculated for all trials to compare against the normalized ET1 sampling deposition convention. The foam sampling efficiencies matched well to the ET1 deposition convention for the larger particle sizes, but had a general trend of underestimating for all three particle sizes. The results of a Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test also showed that only at 4.9 µm was there a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.03) between the foam sampling efficiency using the standard particles and the neutralized particles. This is interpreted to mean that static

  7. From Neutral Clusters to Nano-particles: Recent Progress in Laboratory and Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Kuang, C.; Titcombe, M.; Rathbone, J.; Eisele, F.; McMurry, P.

    2008-12-01

    Nano-particles produced by nucleation are believed to contribute significantly to the formation of aerosol particles and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and hence affect the cloud formation and the atmospheric radiation budget. Nano-particles have also been found to have more adverse human health effect than larger particles. Molecular clusters bridge the gap between molecules and macroscopic nano-particles in the atmosphere. Information on the composition and concentrations of molecular clusters will help to elucidate the nucleation process and reduce the uncertainty of the nucleation rates used in global climate models. We have recently developed a novel chemical ionization mass spectrometer, the cluster chemical ionization mass spectrometer (the Cluster-CIMS), which is capable of measuring the pre-nucleation clusters in the laboratory and in the atmosphere. Together with the recently-implemented particle instruments, we measured the size distribution of the nano particles (~ 1-3 nm) simultaneously with the cluster-CIMS. Here we present the results from recent laboratory studies and field measurements at two distinct sites (Boulder and Manitou Forest). We show an experimental approach to distinguish neutral clusters from the secondary ion clusters under the current configuration of the cluster-CIMS. For the laboratory measurements, we added additional in-situ generated sulfuric acid (~108-109 molecule cm-3) and ammonia (0.1-10ppb) to the ambient air to simulate the cluster formation during the winter time when the ambient sulfuric acid concentration is low and obtained the sulfuric acid/ammonia cluster (up to 7-mers) distribution. For ambient measurements in Boulder, where we occasionally sampled in plumes from power plants, we observed high correlations of sulfur dioxide, sulfuric acid and its dimer with 1.2-1.8 nm nano-particles. We also observed that nano-particle concentrations were well correlated with certain meteorological parameters (e.g. UV radiation, RH

  8. Seiberg-Witten map and quantum phase effects for neutral Dirac particle on noncommutative plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kai; Wang, Jian-Hua; Yang, Huan-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    We provide a new approach to study the noncommutative effects on the neutral Dirac particle with anomalous magnetic or electric dipole moment on the noncommutative plane. The advantages of this approach are demonstrated by investigating the noncommutative corrections on the Aharonov-Casher and He-McKellar-Wilkens effects. This approach is based on the effective U (1) gauge symmetry for the electrodynamics of spin on the two dimensional space. The Seiberg-Witten map for this symmetry is then employed when we study the noncommutative corrections. Because the Seiberg-Witten map preserves the gauge symmetry, the noncommutative corrections can be defined consistently with the ordinary phases. Based on this approach we find the noncommutative corrections on the Aharonov-Casher and He-McKellar-Wilkens phases consist of two terms. The first one depends on the beam particle velocity and consistence with the previous results. However the second term is velocity-independent and then completely new. Therefore our results indicate it is possible to investigate the noncommutative space by using ultra-cold neutron interferometer in which the velocity-dependent term is negligible. Furthermore, both these two terms are proportional to the ratio between the noncommutative parameter θ and the cross section Ae/m of the electrical/magnetic charged line enclosed by the trajectory of beam particles. Therefore the experimental sensitivity can be significantly enhanced by reducing the cross section of the charge line Ae/m.

  9. Observation of ``Anomalous'' Energetic Ion Spectra by the E||B Neutral Particle Analyzer on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medley, S. S.; Bell, R. E.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Leblanc, B. P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Podesta, M.

    2009-11-01

    An ``anomalous'' increase in E||B NPA charge exchange neutral flux (˜4x) localized at the neutral beam (NB) injection full energy, Eb = 90 keV, is observed in NSTX. This so-called ``High-Energy Feature (HEF)'' appears in discharges only when kink-type modes (f < 10 kHz) are absent, TAE activity ( f ˜ 10-150 kHz) is weak (δBrms< 75 mGauss) and CAE activity (f ˜ 400 -- 1200 kHz) is robust. The HEF exhibits a growth time of ˜ 20-80 ms and develops a slowing down distribution that evolves over 100-400 ms, a time scale long compared with the ˜ 50 ms equilibration time of the NB injected particles. Increases of ˜ 10-30% in the measured neutron yield and total stored energy are observed to coincide with the HEF along with broadening of the CHERS Ti(r) profile. The HEF is observed only in H-mode (not L-mode) discharges with injected NB power above 4 MW and is suppressed by vessel conditioning using lithium deposition at rates ˜ 100 mg/shot sufficient to suppress ELM activity. Though a definitive mechanism has yet to be develop, the HEF appears to be driven by a form of CAE resonance.

  10. H{alpha} measurements and neutral particle transport in Heliotron J

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, S.; Yabutani, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Higashizono, Y.; Nagasaki, K.; Mizuuchi, T.; Okada, H.; Sano, F.; Cappa, A.; Kondo, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Suzuki, Y.

    2006-10-15

    A multichannel system of the H{alpha}-line emission detector is developed in order to investigate the neutral particle transport in the Heliotron J plasma. The application of a multianode photomultiplier tube to the filter measurement system enables us to observe the H{alpha} emission profile with 32 chords. The absolute calibration with a standard lamp is performed and the cross-talk between each of the adjoining channels is evaluated to be less than 6%, while the photomultiplier tube has a typical cross-talk of 3% in nominal value. The temporal and spatial profiles of the H{alpha} emission are measured in detail in the plasma breakdown by electron cyclotron heating (ECH). The H{alpha} emission profile in the ECH plasma is calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation using a three-dimensional mesh model. The fueling rates of the wall recycling and the gas puffing are estimated by means of the simulation and the measurement.

  11. Comparison of transient and stationary neutral pressure response in the DIII-D advanced divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C.C.; Hogan, J.T.; Owen, L.W.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Maingi, R.; Hill, D.N.; Buchenauer, D.; Ali Mahdavi, M.; Schaffer, M.J.; Petrie, T.W.; Jackson, G.L.; Evans, T.E.; Haas, G.

    1992-05-01

    The DIII-D divertor baffle system was designed to facilitate density control in long pulse H-mode discharges by removing a particle flux equal to the neutral beam fueling rate ({approximately}20 Torr-1/s) with a {approximately}1mTorr neutral pressure under the baffle (p{sub 0}). Initial measurements of the baffle pressure indicated that p{sub 0}{approximately} 10 mTorr (without pumping or biasing), a value much in excess of that required for long pulse density control. Radial sweeps of the X-point position have been employed to determine the maximum p{sub 0}, as well as to establish the dependence of this pressure on geometry. An estimate of the particle equilibration time for the baffle system has been made by studying the baffle pressure response to ``giant`` ELM effects. ``Steady state`` experiments in which the X-point position was fixed for {approximately}2.5s have also been carried out and steady baffle pressures were observed. The scaling of baffle pressure with plasma parameters has been found to be similar under transient and ``steady state`` conditions. Detailed modeling of these experiments with the B2, DEGAS, and WDIFFUSE (wall model) codes has been made.

  12. On Influence of Neutrals on Dust Particle Charging in Complex Plasmas in the Presence of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, S. I.; Morzhakova, A. A.; Popel, S. I.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-11-29

    Effects associated with neutral component of complex (dusty) ionospheric plasmas which affect dust particle charging are studied. Microscopic ion currents on dust particles with taking into account ion-neutral interaction are presented. Calculations are performed both for the case of negative charges of dust particles, when the influence of Solar radiation on dust particle charging processes is negligible, and for the case of positive charges which is realized in the presence of sufficiently intensive UV or X-ray radiation. We also carry out investigation of the electron heating due to the photoelectric effect. We show that the efficiency of electron heating depends on the density of neutral component of the plasma. As result, we determine altitudes where the influence of the neutral plasma component on dust particle charging processes as well as the electron heating effect are significant and should be taken into account under consideration of the ionospheric complex plasmas. In particular, we show that the effects considered could be important for the description of noctilucent clouds, polar mesosphere summer echoes, and some other physical phenomena associated with dust particles in the ionosphere.

  13. How to reliably detect molecular clusters and nucleation mode particles with Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, Hanna E.; Mirme, Sander; Mirme, Aadu; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-08-01

    To understand the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation and growth processes, information on the size where the atmospheric nucleation and cluster activation occurs, is crucially needed. The current understanding of the concentrations and dynamics of charged and neutral clusters and particles is based on theoretical predictions and experimental observations. This paper gives a standard operation procedure (SOP) for Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) measurements and data processing. With the NAIS data, we have improved the scientific understanding by (1) direct detection of freshly formed atmospheric clusters and particles, (2) linking experimental observations and theoretical framework to understand the formation and growth mechanisms of aerosol particles, and (3) parameterizing formation and growth mechanisms for atmospheric models. The SOP provides tools to harmonize the world-wide measurements of small clusters and nucleation mode particles and to verify consistent results measured by the NAIS users. The work is based on discussions and interactions between the NAIS users and the NAIS manufacturer.

  14. Asymptotic-Preserving Particle-In-Cell methods for the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the quasi-neutral limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degond, P.; Deluzet, F.; Doyen, D.

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we design Asymptotic-Preserving Particle-In-Cell methods for the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the quasi-neutral limit, this limit being characterized by a Debye length negligible compared to the space scale of the problem. These methods are consistent discretizations of the Vlasov-Maxwell system which, in the quasi-neutral limit, remain stable and are consistent with a quasi-neutral model (in this quasi-neutral model, the electric field is computed by means of a generalized Ohm law). The derivation of Asymptotic-Preserving methods is not straightforward since the quasi-neutral model is a singular limit of the Vlasov-Maxwell model. The key step is a reformulation of the Vlasov-Maxwell system which unifies the two models in a single set of equations with a smooth transition from one to another. As demonstrated in various and demanding numerical simulations, the Asymptotic-Preserving methods are able to treat efficiently both quasi-neutral plasmas and non-neutral plasmas, making them particularly well suited for complex problems involving dense plasmas with localized non-neutral regions.

  15. Spectra of accelerated particles at supernova shocks in the presence of neutral hydrogen: the case of Tycho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlino, G.; Blasi, P.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The presence of neutral hydrogen in the shock proximity changes the structure of the shock and affects the spectra of particles accelerated through the first-order Fermi mechanism. This phenomenon has profound implications for the interpretation of the multifrequency spectra of radiation from supernova remnants. Aims: Neutrals that undergo charge exchange with hot ions downstream of the shock may result in fast neutrals moving towards the upstream gas, where they can suffer additional charge exchange or ionisation reactions, thereby depositing energy and momentum upstream. Here we discuss the implications of this neutral return flux, which was already predicted in our previous work on neutral mediated supernova shocks, and show how the spectra of accelerated particles turn out to be appreciably steeper than p-4, thereby affecting the gamma ray spectra from supernova remnants in general and from Tycho specifically. Methods: The theory that describes non-linear diffusive shock acceleration in the presence of neutral hydrogen has been developed in recent years. Here we use a semi-analytical theory developed in previous work and specialise our predictions to the case of the Tycho supernova shock, where there is evidence from gamma ray observations that the spectrum of the parent cosmic rays is steeper than expected from the traditional theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Results: We show that, if the fraction of neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of the Tycho supernova shock is, as suggested by observations, ~70-90%, then spectra of accelerated protons steeper than p-4 may be a natural consequence of charge exchange reactions and the associated neutral return flux. The spectral shape is affected by this phenomenon for particles with energies below ~100-1000 GeV, for which the diffusion length is less than or at most comparable to the path length of charge exchange and ionisation upstream of the shock.

  16. Off-axis Neutral Beam Current Drive for Advanced Scenario Development in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M; Park, J; Petty, C; Luce, T; Heidbrink, W; Osborne, T; Wade, M; Austin, M; Brooks, N; Budny, R; Challis, C; DeBoo, J; deGrassie, J; Ferron, J; Gohil, P; Hobirk, J; Holcomb, C; Hollmann, E; Hong, R; Hyatt, A; Lohr, J; Lanctot, M; Makowski, M; McCune, D; Politzer, P; Prater, R; John, H S; Suzuki, T; West, W; Unterberg, E; Van Zeeland, M; Yu, J

    2008-10-13

    Modification of the two existing DIII-D neutral beam lines is proposed to allow vertical steering to provide off-axis neutral beam current drive (NBCD) as far off-axis as half the plasma radius. New calculations indicate very good current drive with good localization off-axis as long as the toroidal magnetic field, B{sub T}, and the plasma current, I{sub p}, are in the same direction (for a beam steered downward). The effects of helicity can be large: e.g., ITER off-axis NBCD can be increased by more than 20% if the B{sub T} direction is reversed. This prediction has been tested by an off-axis NBCD experiment using reduced size plasmas that are vertically shifted with the existing NBI on DIII-D. The existence of off-axis NBCD is evident in sawtooth and internal inductance behavior. By shifting the plasma upward or downward, or by changing the sign of the toroidal field, measured off-axis NBCD profiles, determined from MSE data, are consistent with predicted differences (40%-45%) arising from the NBI orientation with respect to the magnetic field lines. Modification of the DIII-D NB system will strongly support scenario development for ITER and future tokamaks as well as providing flexible scientific tools for understanding transport, energetic particles and heating and current drive.

  17. Fabrication of advanced particles and particle-based materials assisted by droplet-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Tao; Wang, Juan; Han, Jun-Jie

    2011-07-04

    Recent advances in the fabrication of complex particles and particle-based materials assisted by droplet-based microfluidics are reviewed. Monodisperse particles with expected internal structures, morphologies, and sizes in the range of nanometers to hundreds of micrometers have received a good deal of attention in recent years. Due to the capability of generating monodisperse emulsions and of executing precise control and operations on the suspended droplets inside the microchannels, droplet-based microfluidic devices have become powerful tools for fabricating complex particles with desired properties. Emulsions and multiple-emulsions generated in the microfluidic devices can be composed of a variety of materials including aqueous solutions, gels, polymers and solutions containing functional nanoparticles. They are ideal microreactors or fine templates for synthesizing advanced particles, such as polymer particles, microcapsules, nanocrystals, and photonic crystal clusters or beads by further chemical or physical operations. These particles are promising materials that may be applicable for many fields, such as photonic materials, drug delivery systems, and bio-analysis. From simple to complex, from spherical to nonspherical, from polymerization and reaction crystallization to self-assembly, this review aims to help readers be aware of the many aspects of this field.

  18. Perihelion advance of a test particle in the Kerr field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Enamul

    2017-01-01

    Here I represent a Perihelion advance of a test particle in the Kerr field. I assume that the spin of the central body to be very small and planar motion occurs only in the equatorial plane. I find some physical picture which is different from the case of Schwarzschild field and can recover the picture for Schwarzschild field. We use perturbation method to solve the equation of motion.

  19. Nucleon transverse spatial and momentum structure with the Neutral Particle Spectrometer at Jefferson Lab Hall C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Andres; Horn, Tanja; NPS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A representation of the proton's true inner structure requires one to describe orbital angular momentum, and important aspect for nucleon spin, for which one needs to describe the correlation between the momentum and spatial coordinates. A three-dimensional description of the nucleon has been developed through the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) and the Transverse Momentum-Dependent parton distributions (TMDs). The tomography of the nucleon is one of the flagship science programs at the Jefferson Lab and the characterization of the anticipated GPD and TMD behavior as enabled by the Neutral Particle Spectrometer in Hall C is an important aspect. The NPS will allow accurate access to measurements of the hard exclusive and semi-inclusive scattering processes. The default readout of the NPS PbWO4-based calorimeter will be with conventional photomultipliers. However, reading out with SiPMs or other sensors with tolerance to radiation and magnetic fields may have advantages. In this talk we will review the experiment requirements and discuss an alternative readout system with silicon-based sensors. Supported in part by NSF grants PHY-1306227 and PHY-1306418.

  20. Approximate models for neutral particle transport in ducts with wall migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Arnulfo

    The problem of monoenergetic neutral particle transport in a duct with wall migration for various shielding materials is treated using an approximate one-dimensional model and a Monte Carlo-based multivariate logistic regression model. The one-dimensional model is a third-order approximation in a hierarchy of approximations derived by a weighted residual procedure that accounts for wall migration by means of a kernel density. Physical constants required for the one-dimensional model--scattering probability (c) and the average distance traveled in walls (d) -- are calculated using MCNP's PTRAC and a corresponding parsing code. Numerical results for the one-dimensional model are based on a discrete ordinates solution and compared to MCNP. The logistic regression models are developed using the R language in statistical computing for three explanatory variables-- duct radius (r), length (L), and shield thickness plus inner radius (S)-- where each parameter is explored via univariate models. Data for the models is collected from MCNP via automated processes using Python and shell scripts. The logistic regression models lead to analytical expressions, which are evaluated by randomly dividing our data set into training and test sets, and calculating predictions.

  1. Search for light neutral scalar and pseudoscalar particles in pFe interactions at 70 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikeev, V. B.; Bamburov, N. S.; Bozhko, N. I.

    A search has been performed for weakly interacting neutral light scalar and pseudoscalar particles in a proton beam dump experiment. No positive signal is observed. Limits on the mass and lifetime of these particles are set in the frame of the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension. The Higgs particle of the SU(2L) x U(1) Standard Model is excluded for masses in the range 1 MeV less than m less than 80 MeV at 95 percent CL. Limits on the Peccei Quinn like axions are also derived.

  2. Lattice summations for spread out particles: Applications to neutral and charged systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.; Brańka, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    This work is concerned with the lattice energy of periodic assemblies of mass and charge distributions of the form, exp (-αp2), where α is an adjustable positive variable and {p} is the vector from the lattice site or average position. The energy of interaction between two distributions is the density-weighted integral of the interactions between the volume elements of each distribution. Reciprocal space lattice summation formulas derived for particles represented by gaussian smeared-out density distributions are applied to the gaussian potential and a bounded version of the soft-sphere potential for a range of exponents. Two types of spatial broadening are considered, continuous or physical broadening (PB) and broadening resulting from the time average of point particle positions, so-called "time" broadening (TB). For neutral mass distributions a reciprocal space lattice summation formula is derived which is applied to the bounded soft-sphere potential. For the charged systems, the methodology described in Heyes [J. Chem. Phys. 74, 1924 (1981), 10.1063/1.441285] is used, which for the PB case gives the Ewald-like formulas derived by Gingrich and Wilson [Chem. Phys. Lett. 500, 178 (2010), 10.1016/j.cplett.2010.10.010] using a different method. Another expression for the lattice energy of the spread out charge distributions is derived which is cast entirely in terms of a summation over the reciprocal lattice vectors, without the arbitrary charge spreading function used in the Ewald method. The effects of charge spreading on a generalized definition of the Madelung constant (M) for a selection of crystal lattices are shown to be insignificant for route mean square displacements up to values typical of melting of an ionic crystal. When the length scale of the charge distribution becomes comparable to or greater than the mean inter particle spacing, however, the effects of charge broadening on the lattice energy are shown to be significant. In the PB case, M → 0

  3. Characterization of the interactions within fine particle mixtures in highly concentrated suspensions for advanced particle processing.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Akira; Bryant, Gary

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to summarize recent investigations into the dispersion of fine particles, and the characterization of their interactions, in concentrated suspensions. This summary will provide a better understanding of the current status of this research, and will provide useful feedback for advanced particle processing. Such processes include the fabrication of functional nanostructures and the sustainable beneficiation of complex ores. For example, there has been increasing demand for complex ore utilization due to the noticeable decrease in the accessibility of high grade and easily extractable ores. In order to maintain the sustainable use of mineral resources, the effective beneficiation of complex ores is urgently required. It can be successfully achieved only with selective particle/mineral dispersion/liberation and the assistance of mineralogical and particle characterization.

  4. Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles in afterglow in neon at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Pejović, Milić M. Nešić, Nikola T.; Pejović, Momčilo M.

    2014-04-15

    Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles formed during breakdown and successive discharge in neon-filled tube at 6.6 millibars pressure had been analyzed. This analysis was performed on the basis of mean value of electrical breakdown time delay t{sup ¯}{sub d} dependence on afterglow period τ (memory curve). It was shown that positive ions are present in the 1μs < τ < 30 ms interval, which is manifested through t{sup ¯}{sub d} slow increase with the increase of τ. A rapid t{sup ¯}{sub d} increase in the 30 ms < τ < 3 s interval is a consequence of significant decrease of positive ions concentration and dominant role in breakdown initiation have ground state nitrogen atoms, which further release secondary electrons from the cathode by catalytic recombination process. These atoms are formed during discharge by dissociation of ground state nitrogen molecules that are present as impurities in neon. For τ > 3 s, breakdown is initiated by cosmic rays and natural radioactivity. The increase of discharge current leads to decrease of t{sup ¯}{sub d} due to the increase of positive ions concentration in inter electrode gap. The increase of applied voltage also decreases t{sup ¯}{sub d} for τ > 30 ms due to the increase of the probability for initial electron to initiate breakdown. The presence of UV radiation leads to the decrease of t{sup ¯}{sub d} due to the increased electron yield caused by photoelectrons. The influence of photoelectrons on breakdown initiation can be noticed for τ > 0.1 ms, while they dominantly determine t{sup ¯}{sub d} for τ > 30 ms.

  5. Framework to model neutral particle flux in convex high aspect ratio structures using one-dimensional radiosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manstetten, Paul; Filipovic, Lado; Hössinger, Andreas; Weinbub, Josef; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2017-02-01

    We present a computationally efficient framework to compute the neutral flux in high aspect ratio structures during three-dimensional plasma etching simulations. The framework is based on a one-dimensional radiosity approach and is applicable to simulations of convex rotationally symmetric holes and convex symmetric trenches with a constant cross-section. The framework is intended to replace the full three-dimensional simulation step required to calculate the neutral flux during plasma etching simulations. Especially for high aspect ratio structures, the computational effort, required to perform the full three-dimensional simulation of the neutral flux at the desired spatial resolution, conflicts with practical simulation time constraints. Our results are in agreement with those obtained by three-dimensional Monte Carlo based ray tracing simulations for various aspect ratios and convex geometries. With this framework we present a comprehensive analysis of the influence of the geometrical properties of high aspect ratio structures as well as of the particle sticking probability on the neutral particle flux.

  6. Collisionless tearing instability of a bi-Maxwellian neutral sheet - An integrodifferential treatment with exact particle orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Chen, J.

    1989-01-01

    The integrodifferential equation describing the linear tearing instability in the bi-Maxwellian neutral sheet is solved without approximating the particle orbits or the eigenfunction psi. Results of this calculation are presented. Comparison between the exact solution and the three-region approximation motivates the piecewise-straight-line approximation, a simplification that allows faster solution of the integrodifferential equation, yet retains the important features of the exact solution.

  7. A Measurement of Charged and Neutral Elementary Particles Emitted from Antiproton Annihilation at Rest in Heavy Nuclei

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-15

    1991 SUMMARY Yields and ,nergy spectra of nuclear fragments and mesons emitted from antiproton crnihilation at rest in carbon, bismuth and uranium...anti- proton annihilation at rest in nuclei (carbon and uranium). These particles include (charged) pions, kaons, protons, light nuclear fragments ...included in order to demonstrate as discussed in [10], and escape of excess neutral pions the effect of pion absorption in the nuclear environment , due to

  8. A transmission/escape probabilities model for neutral particle transport in the outer regions of a diverted tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W.M.

    1992-12-01

    A new computational model for neutral particle transport in the outer regions of a diverted tokamak plasma chamber is presented. The model is based on the calculation of transmission and escape probabilities using first-flight integral transport theory and the balancing of fluxes across the surfaces bounding the various regions. The geometrical complexity of the problem is included in precomputed probabilities which depend only on the mean free path of the region.

  9. Orbital motion of dust particles in an rf magnetron discharge. Ion drag force or neutral atom wind force

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, A. F.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.; Dyatko, N. A.; Starostin, A. N.; Filippov, A. V.

    2012-03-15

    Microparticles with sizes up to 130 {mu}m have been confined and the velocity and diameter of particles in a plasma trap of an rf magnetron discharge with an arc magnetic field have been simultaneously measured. The motion of the gas induced by electron and ion cyclotron currents has been numerically simulated using the Navier-Stokes equation. The experimental and numerical results confirm the mechanism of the orbital motion of dust particles in the magnetron discharge plasma that is associated with the orbital motion of the neutral gas accelerated by electron and ion drift flows in crossed electric and magnetic fields.

  10. Angular-divergence calculation for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak neutral beam injection ion source based on spectroscopic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Yuan; Hu, Chundong; Zhuang, Ge

    2014-02-15

    Calorimetric method has been primarily applied for several experimental campaigns to determine the angular divergence of high-current ion source for the neutral beam injection system on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). A Doppler shift spectroscopy has been developed to provide the secondary measurement of the angular divergence to improve the divergence measurement accuracy and for real-time and non-perturbing measurement. The modified calculation model based on the W7AS neutral beam injectors is adopted to accommodate the slot-type accelerating grids used in the EAST's ion source. Preliminary spectroscopic experimental results are presented comparable to the calorimetrically determined value of theoretical calculation.

  11. Behaviour of advanced materials impacted by high energy particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Cerutti, F.; Dallocchio, A.; Garlasché, M.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N.; Marques dos Santos, S. D.; Peroni, L.; Scapin, M.; Boccone, V.

    2013-07-01

    Beam Intercepting Devices (BID) are designed to operate in a harsh radioactive environment and are highly loaded from a thermo-structural point of view. Moreover, modern particle accelerators, storing unprecedented energy, may be exposed to severe accidental events triggered by direct beam impacts. In this context, impulse has been given to the development of novel materials for advanced thermal management with high thermal shock resistance like metal-diamond and metal-graphite composites on top of refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and copper alloys. This paper presents the results of a first-of-its-kind experiment which exploited 440 GeV proton beams at different intensities to impact samples of the aforementioned materials. Effects of thermally induced shockwaves were acquired via high speed acquisition system including strain gauges, laser Doppler vibrometer and high speed camera. Preliminary information of beam induced damages on materials were also collected. State-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes (like Autodyn®), relying on complex material models including equation of state (EOS), strength and failure models, have been used for the simulation of the experiment. Preliminary results confirm the effectiveness and reliability of these numerical methods when material constitutive models are completely available (W and Cu alloys). For novel composite materials a reverse engineering approach will be used to build appropriate constitutive models, thus allowing a realistic representation of these complex phenomena. These results are of paramount importance for understanding and predicting the response of novel advanced composites to beam impacts in modern particle accelerators.

  12. Modeling of Localized Neutral Particle Sources in 3D Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V; Rognlien, T D; Fenstermacher, M E; Borchardt, M; Mutzke, A; Riemann, J; Schneider, R; Owen, L W

    2002-05-23

    A new edge plasma code BoRiS [1] has a fully 3D fluid plasma model. We supplement BoRiS with a 3D fluid neutral model including equations for parallel momentum and collisional perpendicular diffusion. This makes BoRiS an integrated plasma-neutral model suitable for a variety of applications. We present modeling results for a localized gas source in the geometry of the NCSX stellarator.

  13. Quantification of Lyssavirus-Neutralizing Antibodies Using Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Pseudotype Particles

    PubMed Central

    Moeschler, Sarah; Locher, Samira; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Krämer, Beate; Zimmer, Gert

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a highly fatal zoonotic disease which is primarily caused by rabies virus (RABV) although other members of the genus Lyssavirus can cause rabies as well. As yet, 14 serologically and genetically diverse lyssaviruses have been identified, mostly in bats. To assess the quality of rabies vaccines and immunoglobulin preparations, virus neutralization tests with live RABV are performed in accordance with enhanced biosafety standards. In the present work, a novel neutralization test is presented which takes advantage of a modified vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) from which the glycoprotein G gene has been deleted and replaced by reporter genes. This single-cycle virus was trans-complemented with RABV envelope glycoprotein. Neutralization of this pseudotype virus with RABV reference serum or immune sera from vaccinated mice showed a strong correlation with the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Importantly, pseudotype viruses containing the envelope glycoproteins of other lyssaviruses were neutralized by reference serum to a significantly lesser extent or were not neutralized at all. Taken together, a pseudotype virus system has been successfully developed which allows the safe, fast, and sensitive detection of neutralizing antibodies directed against different lyssaviruses. PMID:27649230

  14. Chimeric Virus-Like Particle Vaccines Displaying Conserved Enterovirus 71 Epitopes Elicit Protective Neutralizing Antibodies in Mice through Divergent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaohua; Ku, Zhiqiang; Liu, Qingwei; Wang, Xiaoli; Shi, Jinping; Zhang, Yunfang; Kong, Liangliang; Cong, Yao

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand, food, and mouth disease, which frequently occurs in young children. Since there are 11 subgenotypes (A, B1 to B5, and C1 to C5) within EV71, an EV71 vaccine capable of protecting against all of these subgenotypes is desirable. We report here the vaccine potential and protective mechanism of two chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) presenting conserved neutralizing epitopes of EV71. We show that fusions of hepatitis B core antigen (HBc) with the SP55 or SP70 epitope of EV71, designated HBcSP55 and HBcSP70, respectively, can be rapidly generated and self-assembled into VLPs with the epitopes displayed on the surface. Immunization with the chimeric VLPs induced carrier- and epitope-specific antibody responses in mice. Anti-HBcSP55 and anti-HBcSP70 sera, but not anti-HBc sera, were able to neutralize in vitro multiple genotypes and strains of EV71. Importantly, passive immunization with anti-HBcSP55 or anti-HBcSP70 sera protected neonatal mice against lethal EV71 infections. Interestingly, anti-HBcSP70 sera could inhibit EV71 attachment to susceptible cells, whereas anti-HBcSP55 sera could not. However, both antisera were able to neutralize EV71 infection in vitro at the postattachment stage. The divergent mechanism of neutralization and protection conferred by anti-SP70 and anti-SP55 sera is in part attributed to their respective ability to bind authentic viral particles. Collectively, our study not only demonstrates that chimeric VLPs displaying the SP55 and SP70 epitopes are promising candidates for a broad-spectrum EV71 vaccine but also reveals distinct mechanisms of neutralization by the SP55- and SP70-targeted antibodies. PMID:24131712

  15. Observation of ions and particles near busy roads using a neutral cluster and air ion spectrometer (NAIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaratne, E. R.; Ling, X.; Morawska, L.

    2014-02-01

    Motor vehicles emit large quantities of ions in the form of both charged particles and molecular cluster ions. While, the health effects of inhalation of charged particles is largely unexplored, the concentrations near busy roads and the distance to which these particles and ions are carried have important implications for the exposure of the large percentage of the population that lives close to such roadways. We measured ion concentrations using a neutral cluster and air ion spectrometer (NAIS) near seven busy roads carrying on the average approximately 7000 vehicles h-1 including about 15% heavy duty diesel vehicles. In this study, charged particle concentrations were measured as a function of downwind distance from the road for the first time. We show that, at a moderate wind speed of 2.0 m s-1, mean charged particle concentrations at the kerb were of the order of 2 × 104 cm-3 and, more importantly, decreased as d-0.6 where d is the distance from the road. While cluster ions were rapidly depleted by attachment to particles and were not carried to more than about 20 m from the road, elevated concentrations of charged particle were detected up to at least 400 m from the road. Most of the charge on the downwind side was carried on the larger particles, with no excess charge on particles smaller than about 10 nm. At 30 nm, particles carried more than double the charge they would normally carry in equilibrium. There are very few measurements of ions near road traffic and this is the first study of the spatial dispersion of charged particles from a road.

  16. Relativistic quantum dynamics of a neutral particle in external electric fields: An approach on effects of spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, F. S.; Silva, Edilberto O.; Castro, Luis B.; Filgueiras, Cleverson; Cogollo, D.

    2015-11-01

    The planar quantum dynamics of a spin-1/2 neutral particle interacting with electrical fields is considered. A set of first order differential equations is obtained directly from the planar Dirac equation with nonminimum coupling. New solutions of this system, in particular, for the Aharonov-Casher effect, are found and discussed in detail. Pauli equation is also obtained by studying the motion of the particle when it describes a circular path of constant radius. We also analyze the planar dynamics in the full space, including the r = 0 region. The self-adjoint extension method is used to obtain the energy levels and wave functions of the particle for two particular values for the self-adjoint extension parameter. The energy levels obtained are analogous to the Landau levels and explicitly depend on the spin projection parameter.

  17. Particle and Joule heating of the neutral polar thermosphere in cusp region using atmosphere Explorer-C satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffis, M.; Nisbet, J. S.; Bleuler, E.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that thermospheric heating in the auroral zone and polar cap is of great importance to the variations in the high-latitude neutral wind and the resulting global temperature and densities. The considered investigation is concerned with relating in a quantitative manner the energy inputs from the Joule heating and particle inputs with the thermospheric responses, taking into account the cusp region, and the region of the eastward auroral electrojet. The data used in the investigation were obtained by the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite in late December 1974. Attention is given to electric fields derived from ion drift measurements, electric field strength and particle energy flux measured by the low energy electron experiment for AE-C orbit 4708, electron density contours, Joule heating contours, and height integrated Joule heating and particle energy flux.

  18. Comparison of measured electron density rise and calculated neutral beam particle deposition in the TFTR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.; Budny, R.; McCune, D.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M.C. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Barnes, C.W. )

    1991-12-01

    The initial rate of rise of the central electron density during {approximately}100 keV deuterium neutral beam injection is found to agree well with calculations of the beam deposition rate. The best agreement is with beam deposition calculations using older tabulations of the atomic cross-sections; the effects of using new tabulations or including multi-step ionization processes appear to approximately cancel. The neutral-beam deposition profile is a strong function of both the magnitude and the shape of the target plasma density. Peaked heating profiles can be achieved at high target densities only from peaked target density profiles. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Study of nanoscale structural biology using advanced particle beam microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boseman, Adam J.

    This work investigates developmental and structural biology at the nanoscale using current advancements in particle beam microscopy. Typically the examination of micro- and nanoscale features is performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in order to decrease surface charging, and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface. As magnification increases, this layer begins to limit the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. A new technology, Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), is used to examine uncoated surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant fruit flies. Corneal nanostructures observed with HIM are further investigated by FIB/SEM to provide detailed three dimensional information about internal events occurring during early structural development. These techniques are also used to reconstruct a mosquito germarium in order to characterize unknown events in early oogenesis. Findings from these studies, and many more like them, will soon unravel many of the mysteries surrounding the world of developmental biology.

  20. Performance of Advanced Light Source particle beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, is complete. The particle beam diagnostics have been installed and tested. The beam injection systems have been running for two years. We have performance data on beam position monitors, beam intensity monitors, scintillators, beam collimators, a 50 {Omega} Faraday cup, and broad-band striplines and kickers used in the linac, transport lines, and the booster synchrotron. The single-turn monitoring capability of the booster beam position monitoring system has been particularly useful for studying beam dynamics. Beam diagnostics for the storage ring are being commissioned. In this paper we describe each instrument, show its performance, and outline how the instruments are controlled and their output data displayed.

  1. Registration characteristics of neutral particles with power 0.6 - 2.0 keV channel electron multiplier with funnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, M. A.; Kalinin, A. P.

    1978-01-01

    Operating a channel electron multiplier with a VEU-6 funnel shaped opening is studied. Different procedures were used when recording neutral particles. The results obtained make it possible to optimally use the multiplier in actual physical studies.

  2. Atmospheric concentrations and gas/particle partitioning of neutral poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances in northern German coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Xie, Zhiyong; Möller, Axel; Mi, Wenying; Wolschke, Hendrik; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2014-10-01

    Total 58 high volume air samples were collected in Büsum, Germany, from August 2011 to October 2012 to investigate air concentrations of 12 per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and their gas/particle partitioning. The total concentration (vapor plus particle phases) of the 12 PFASs (ΣPFASs) ranged from 8.6 to 155 pg/m3 (mean: 41 pg/m3) while fluorotelomer alcohols 8:2 (8:2 FTOH) dominated all samples accounting for 61.9% of ΣPFASs and the next most species were 10:2 FTOH (12.7%). Air mass back trajectory analysis showed that atmospheric PFASs in most samples were from long range atmospheric transport processes and had higher ratios of 8:2 to 6:2 FTOH compared to the data obtained from urban/industrial sources. Small portion of particle PFASs in the atmosphere was observed and the average percent to ΣPFASs was 2.0%. The particle-associated fractions of different PFASs decreased from perfluorooctane sulfonamidoethanols (FOSEs) (15.5%) to fluorotelomer acrylates (FTAs) (7.6%) to perfluorooctane sulfonamides (FOSAs) (3.1%) and FTOHs (1.8%), indicating the functional group obviously influenced their gas/particle partitioning. For neutral compounds with acid dissociation constant (pKa) > 7.0 (i.e., FTOHs, FOSEs and FOSAs), a significant log-linear relationship was observed between their gas/particle partition coefficients (KSP) and vapor pressures (pºL), suggesting the gas/particle partitioning of neutral PFASs agreed with the classical logKSP-logpºL relation. Due to the pKa values of 6:2 and 8:2 FTA below the typical environmental pH conditions, they mainly exist as ionic form in aerosols, and the corrected logKSP (neutral form) were considerably lower than those of FTOHs, FOSEs and FOSAs with similar vapor pressures. Considering the strong partitioning potential to aqueous phases for ionic PFASs at higher pH values, a need exists to develop a model taking account of the ad/absorption mechanism to the condensed phase of aerosols for ionizable PFASs (e

  3. A new compact solid-state neutral particle analyser at ASDEX Upgrade: Setup and physics modeling.

    PubMed

    Schneider, P A; Blank, H; Geiger, B; Mank, K; Martinov, S; Ryter, F; Weiland, M; Weller, A

    2015-07-01

    At ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), a new compact solid-state detector has been installed to measure the energy spectrum of fast neutrals based on the principle described by Shinohara et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3640 (2004)]. The diagnostic relies on the usual charge exchange of supra-thermal fast-ions with neutrals in the plasma. Therefore, the measured energy spectra directly correspond to those of confined fast-ions with a pitch angle defined by the line of sight of the detector. Experiments in AUG showed the good signal to noise characteristics of the detector. It is energy calibrated and can measure energies of 40-200 keV with count rates of up to 140 kcps. The detector has an active view on one of the heating beams. The heating beam increases the neutral density locally; thereby, information about the central fast-ion velocity distribution is obtained. The measured fluxes are modeled with a newly developed module for the 3D Monte Carlo code F90FIDASIM [Geiger et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 65010 (2011)]. The modeling allows to distinguish between the active (beam) and passive contributions to the signal. Thereby, the birth profile of the measured fast neutrals can be reconstructed. This model reproduces the measured energy spectra with good accuracy when the passive contribution is taken into account.

  4. A new compact solid-state neutral particle analyser at ASDEX Upgrade: Setup and physics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, P. A.; Blank, H.; Geiger, B.; Mank, K.; Martinov, S.; Ryter, F.; Weiland, M.; Weller, A.

    2015-07-15

    At ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), a new compact solid-state detector has been installed to measure the energy spectrum of fast neutrals based on the principle described by Shinohara et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3640 (2004)]. The diagnostic relies on the usual charge exchange of supra-thermal fast-ions with neutrals in the plasma. Therefore, the measured energy spectra directly correspond to those of confined fast-ions with a pitch angle defined by the line of sight of the detector. Experiments in AUG showed the good signal to noise characteristics of the detector. It is energy calibrated and can measure energies of 40-200 keV with count rates of up to 140 kcps. The detector has an active view on one of the heating beams. The heating beam increases the neutral density locally; thereby, information about the central fast-ion velocity distribution is obtained. The measured fluxes are modeled with a newly developed module for the 3D Monte Carlo code F90FIDASIM [Geiger et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 65010 (2011)]. The modeling allows to distinguish between the active (beam) and passive contributions to the signal. Thereby, the birth profile of the measured fast neutrals can be reconstructed. This model reproduces the measured energy spectra with good accuracy when the passive contribution is taken into account.

  5. Energetic particle imaging: The evolution of techniques in imaging high-energy neutral atom emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Brandt, P. C.; Westlake, J. H.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Andrews, G. B.; Nelson, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    Energetic neutral atom imaging instruments have been flown on a variety of space missions to satisfy a variety of science requirements. In this paper we discuss the most recent developments that lead to improvements in energy range, angular resolution, and background rejection for the high-energy range, as represented in the past by the Cassini magnetosphere imaging instrument Ion and Neutral Camera, the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission High-Energy Neutral Atom instrument, and to some degree the IMAGE mission Medium-Energy Neutral Atom instrument. The new approaches discussed here rely on the use of ultrathin foils without UV filters and on very high speed coincidence logic to reduce accidentals from intense background sources. We present laboratory results demonstrating an electrostatic design that meets the coincidence timing requirements, position, and scattering performance consistent with angular resolution (full width at half maximum) of 2° for hydrogen above 10 keV and a hydrogen energy threshold ≤1 keV.

  6. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements.

    PubMed

    Clark, G; Cohen, I; Westlake, J H; Andrews, G B; Brandt, P; Gold, R E; Gkioulidou, M A; Hacala, R; Haggerty, D; Hill, M E; Ho, G C; Jaskulek, S E; Kollmann, P; Mauk, B H; McNutt, R L; Mitchell, D G; Nelson, K S; Paranicas, C; Paschalidis, N; Schlemm, C E

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  7. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  8. Studies on the role of neutralizing antibodies against envelope genes in resolving HCV pseudo-particles infection.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Shazia; Idrees, Muhammad; Ali, Amjad; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2014-06-01

    Characterization of antibodies targeting the attachment and entry of the viral particles into host cells is important for studding antibody mediated neutralization. Antibodies against the envelope glycoproteins (EGP) have neutralizing capacity and can prevent HCV infections. System based on HCV pseudo typed-particles (HCVpp) stably expressing EGP can be used for screening of HCV anti envelope neutralizing antibodies in the serum of patients with acute and chronic HCV infections. The aim of the current study was to check HCVpp as a useful tool for the detection of anti-HCV envelope antibodies in the serum of HCV infected patients and to test the binding potential of these antiviral molecules to EGP of HCV 3a. Previously developed HCVpp harboring unmodified glycoproteins from local isolates in 293T cell line were used in this study. HCVpp were pre incubated with different concentrations of anti E1 antibody and different E2 antibodies to check antiviral activity. Further we used serum samples with low/medium (≤800,000 IU/mL), and high (>800,000 IU/mL) viral titer from chronic HCV male and female patients. Infection was done in Huh-7 cells for 1 h at 37 oC. Infectivity was checked through Luciferase assay. Considerable decrease in HCVpp infectivity with anti-envelope antibodies was observed in dose dependent manner. Maximum inhibition was seen when 5 µg/ml of monoclonal anti E1 antibody used. Further increase in concentration exhibited no decrease in infectivity which suggests that other factors are also involved in causing infection. Various well characterized E2-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been screened for their capability to reduce infection in Huh-7 cells. Three of the four mAbs specific for the E2 had no effect on the infectivity of HCVpp. Confirmation sensitive antibody H53 showed maximum inhibition of infectivity. HCV ELISA positive samples from both male and female patients were used to neutralize the HCVpp. The neutralizing antibody response

  9. Major contribution of neutral clusters to new particle formation at the interface between the boundary layer and the free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, C.; Sellegri, K.; Asmi, E.; Hervo, M.; Freney, E.; Colomb, A.; Junninen, H.; Duplissy, J.; Sipilä, M.; Kontkanen, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-03-01

    The formation of new aerosol particles in the atmosphere is a key process influencing the aerosol number concentration as well as the climate, in particular at high altitude, where the newly formed particles directly influence cloud formation. However, free tropospheric new particle formation (NPF) is poorly documented due to logistic limitations and complex atmospheric dynamics around high-altitude stations that make the observation of this day-time process challenging. Recent improvements in measurement techniques make now possible the detection of neutral clusters down to ~ 1 nm sizes, which opens new horizons in our understanding of the nucleation process. Indeed, only the charged fraction of clusters has been reported in the upper troposphere up to now. Here we report day-time concentrations of charged and neutral clusters (1 to 2.5 nm mobility diameter) recorded at the interface between the boundary layer (BL) and the FT as well as in the FT at the altitude site of Puy de Dôme (1465 m a.s.l.), central France, between 10 and 29 February 2012. Our findings demonstrate that in the FT, and especially at the interface between the BL and the FT, the formation of 1.5 nm neutral clusters significantly exceeds the one of ionic clusters during NPF events, clearly indicating that they dominate in the nucleation process. We also observe that the total cluster concentration significantly increases during NPF events compared to the other days, which was not clearly observed for the charged cluster population in the past. During the studied period, the nucleation process does not seem to be sulfuric acid-limited and could be promoted by the transport of pollutants to the upper troposphere, coupled with low temperatures.

  10. Momentum transfer collision frequency of O(+)-O. [interactions between ions and neutral particles in planetary ionospheres and thermospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Omidvar, Kazem; Hoegy, Walter R.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of the thermosphere and ionosphere is largely governed by collisions between ions and neutral particles. On Venus and the Earth, O(+) is a dominant ion, and atomic O dominates throughout much of the thermosphere; therefore an accurate O(+)-O cross section is an important prerequisite for understanding the dynamics of planetary upper atmospheres. The cross section and momentum transfer collision frequency are calculated with a quantum mechanical code which includes resonance charge exchange, polarization, and charge-quadrupole effects. Our results agree well with earlier calculations of Stubbe (1968) and Stallcop et al. (1991).

  11. Mode--particle resonances during near-tangential neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; White, R.B.; Morris, A.W.; Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.M.; Medley, S.S.; Murphy, T.J.; Scott, S.D. )

    1990-07-01

    Coherent magnetohydrodynamic modes have been observed previously during neutral beam injection in the PDX tokamak (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 50}, 891 (1983)) and they have now been seen in the TFTR tokamak (Phys. Fluids {bold 26}, 2958 (1983)). Periodic bursts of oscillations were detected with several plasma diagnostics, and Fokker--Planck calculations show that the populations of trapped particles in both tokamaks are sufficient to account for fishbone destabilization if a resonant interaction, between the mode and the beam ions, is assumed. Estimates of mode parameters are in reasonable agreement with the experiments, and they indicate that the fishbone mode may continue to affect the performance of intensely heated tokamaks.

  12. Cherenkov friction on a neutral particle moving parallel to a dielectric.

    PubMed

    Pieplow, Gregor; Henkel, Carsten

    2015-06-03

    We describe a simple mechanism of quantum friction for a particle moving parallel to a dielectric, based on a fully relativistic framework and the assumption of local equilibrium. The Cherenkov effect explains how the bare ground state becomes globally unstable and how fluctuations of the electromagnetic field and the particle's dipole are converted into pairs of excitations. Modeling the particle as a silver nano-sphere, we investigate the spectrum of the force and its velocity dependence. We find that the damping of the plasmon resonance in the silver particle has a relatively strong impact near the Cherenkov threshold velocity. We also present an expansion of the friction force near the threshold velocity for both damped and undamped particles.

  13. Particle and momentum confinement in tokamak plasmas with unbalanced neutral beam injection and strong rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    There is a self-consistent theory of the effects of neutral beam injection on impurity transport in tokamak plasmas. The theory predicts that co-injection drives impurities outward and that counter-injection enhances the normally inward flow of impurities. The theory was applied to carry out a detailed analysis of the large experimental database from the PLT and the ISX-B tokamaks. The theory was found to generally model the experimental data quite well. It is, therefore, concluded that neutral beam co-injection can drive impurities outward to achieve clean central plasmas and a cool radiating edge. Theoretical predictions for future thermonuclear reactors such as INTOR, TIBER II, and ITER indicated that neutral beam driven flow reversal might be an effective impurity control method if the rate of beam momentum deposited per plasma ion is adequate. The external momentum drag, which is a pivotal concept in impurity flow reversal theory, is correctly predicted by the gyroviscous theory of momentum confinement. The theory was applied to analyze experimental data from the PLT and the PDX tokamaks with exact experimental conditions. The theory was found to be in excellent agreement with experiment over a wide range of parameters. It is, therefore, possible to formulate the impurity transport theory from first principles, without resort to empiricism.

  14. Monoclonal neutralizing antibodies against EV71 screened from mice immunized with yeast-produced virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Xianyu, Lingzhi; Lyu, Songya

    2015-06-01

    Periodic outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occur in children under 5 years old, and can cause death in some cases. The C4 strain of enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main pathogen that causes HFMD in China. Although no drugs against EV71 are available, some studies have shown that candidate vaccines or viral capsid proteins can produce anti-EV71 immunity. In this study, female BABL/c mice (6-8 weeks old) were immunized with virus-like particles (VLPs) of EV71 produced in yeast to screen for anti-EV71 antibodies. Two hybridomas that could produce neutralizing antibodies against EV71 were obtained. Both neutralizing mAbs (D4 and G12) were confirmed to bind the VP1 capsid protein of EV71, and could protect >95% cells from 100 TCID50 EV71 infection at 25 µg/mL solution (lowest concentration). Those two neutralizing mAbs identified in the study may be promising candidates in development for mAbs to treat EV71 infection, and utilized as suitable reagents for use in diagnostic tests and biological studies.

  15. Novel particle and radiation sources and advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mako, Frederick

    2016-03-01

    The influence Norman Rostoker had on the lives of those who had the pleasure of knowing him is profound. The skills and knowledge I gained as a graduate student researching collective ion acceleration has fueled a career that has evolved from particle beam physics to include particle and radiation source development and advanced materials research, among many other exciting projects. The graduate research performed on collective ion acceleration was extended by others to form the backbone for laser driven plasma ion acceleration. Several years after graduate school I formed FM Technologies, Inc., (FMT), and later Electron Technologies, Inc. (ETI). Currently, as the founder and president of both FMT and ETI, the Rostoker influence can still be felt. One technology that we developed is a self-bunching RF fed electron gun, called the Micro-Pulse Gun (MPG). The MPG has important applications for RF accelerators and microwave tube technology, specifically clinically improved medical linacs and "green" klystrons. In addition to electron beam and RF source research, knowledge of materials and material interactions gained indirectly in graduate school has blossomed into breakthroughs in materials joining technologies. Most recently, silicon carbide joining technology has been developed that gives robust helium leak tight, high temperature and high strength joints between ceramic-to-ceramic and ceramic-to-metal. This joining technology has the potential to revolutionize the ethylene production, nuclear fuel and solar receiver industries by finally allowing for the practical use of silicon carbide as furnace coils, fuel rods and solar receptors, respectively, which are applications that have been needed for decades.

  16. Structural Studies of Chikungunya Virus-Like Particles Complexed with Human Antibodies: Neutralization and Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Mangala Prasad, Vidya; Wang, Cheng-I; Akahata, Wataru; Ng, Lisa F. P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus is a positive-stranded RNA alphavirus. Structures of chikungunya virus-like particles in complex with strongly neutralizing antibody Fab fragments (8B10 and 5F10) were determined using cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography. By fitting the crystallographically determined structures of these Fab fragments into the cryo-electron density maps, we show that Fab fragments of antibody 8B10 extend radially from the viral surface and block receptor binding on the E2 glycoprotein. In contrast, Fab fragments of antibody 5F10 bind the tip of the E2 B domain and lie tangentially on the viral surface. Fab 5F10 fixes the B domain rigidly to the surface of the virus, blocking exposure of the fusion loop on glycoprotein E1 and therefore preventing the virus from becoming fusogenic. Although Fab 5F10 can neutralize the wild-type virus, it can also bind to a mutant virus without inhibiting fusion or attachment. Although the mutant virus is no longer able to propagate by extracellular budding, it can, however, enter the next cell by traveling through junctional complexes without being intercepted by a neutralizing antibody to the wild-type virus, thus clarifying how cell-to-cell transmission can occur. IMPORTANCE Alphaviral infections are transmitted mainly by mosquitoes. Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), which belongs to the Alphavirus genus, has a wide distribution in the Old World that has expanded in recent years into the Americas. There are currently no vaccines or drugs against alphaviral infections. Therefore, a better understanding of CHIKV and its associated neutralizing antibodies will aid in the development of effective treatments. PMID:26537684

  17. Advances in sublimation studies for particles of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Nguyen, Viet; Fischer, Thomas; Abrishami, Tara; Papantonakis, Michael; Kendziora, Chris; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    When handling explosives, or related surfaces, the hands routinely become contaminated with particles of explosives and related materials. Subsequent contact with a solid surface results in particle crushing and deposition. These particles provide an evidentiary trail which is useful for security applications. As such, the opto-physico-chemical characteristics of these particles are critical to trace explosives detection applications in DOD or DHS arenas. As the persistence of these particles is vital to their forensic exploitation, it is important to understand which factors influence their persistence. The longevity or stability of explosives particles on a substrate is a function of several environmental parameters or particle properties including: Vapor pressure, particle geometry, airflow, particle field size, substrate topography, humidity, reactivity, adlayers, admixtures, particle areal density, and temperature. In this work we deposited particles of 2,4-dinitrotoluene on standard microscopy glass slides by particle sieving and studied their sublimation as a function of airflow velocity, areal particle density and particle field size. Analysis of 2D microscopic images was used to compute and track particle size and geometrical characteristics. The humidity, temperature and substrate type were kept constant for each experiment. A custom airflow cell, using standard microscopy glass slide, allowed in-situ photomicroscopy. Areal particle densities and airflow velocities were selected to provide relevant loadings and flow velocities for a range of potential applications. For a chemical of interest, we define the radial sublimation velocity (RSV) for the equivalent sphere of a particle as the parameter to characterize the sublimation rate. The RSV is a useful parameter because it is independent of particle size. The sublimation rate for an ensemble of particles was found to significantly depend on airflow velocity, the areal density of the particles, and the

  18. NEUTRAL INTERSTELLAR HELIUM PARAMETERS BASED ON IBEX-Lo OBSERVATIONS AND TEST PARTICLE CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bzowski, M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Sokol, J. M.; Hlond, M.; Moebius, E.; Bochsler, P.; Leonard, T.; Heirtzler, D.; Kucharek, H.; Schwadron, N. A.; Crew, G. B.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-02-01

    Because of its high ionization potential and weak interaction with hydrogen, neutral interstellar helium (NISHe) is almost unaffected at the heliospheric interface with the interstellar medium and freely enters the solar system. This second most abundant species provides some of the best information on the characteristics of the interstellar gas in the local interstellar cloud. The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is the second mission to directly detect NISHe. We present a comparison between recent IBEX NISHe observations and simulations carried out using a well-tested quantitative simulation code. Simulation and observation results compare well for times when measured fluxes are dominated by NISHe (and contributions from other species are small). Differences between simulations and observations indicate a previously undetected secondary population of neutral helium, likely produced by interaction of interstellar helium with plasma in the outer heliosheath. Interstellar neutral parameters are statistically different from previous in situ results obtained mostly from the GAS/Ulysses experiment, but they do agree with the local interstellar flow vector obtained from studies of interstellar absorption: the newly established flow direction is ecliptic longitude 79.{sup 0}2, latitude -5.{sup 0}1, the velocity is {approx}22.8 km s{sup -1}, and the temperature is 6200 K. These new results imply a markedly lower absolute velocity of the gas and thus significantly lower dynamic pressure on the boundaries of the heliosphere and different orientation of the Hydrogen Deflection Plane compared to prior results from Ulysses. A different orientation of this plane also suggests a new geometry of the interstellar magnetic field, and the lower dynamic pressure calls for a compensation by other components of the pressure balance, most likely a higher density of interstellar plasma and strength of interstellar magnetic field.

  19. A case study of nondelamination glass dissolution resulting in visible particles: implications for neutral pH formulations.

    PubMed

    Ratnaswamy, Gayathri; Hair, Alison; Li, Gary; Thirumangalathu, Renuka; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser; Brych, Lejla; Dharmavaram, Vasumathi; Wen, Zai-Qing; Fujimori, Kiyoshi; Jing, Wendy; Sethuraman, Ananth; Swift, Rob; Ricci, Margaret Speed; Piedmonte, Deirdre Murphy

    2014-04-01

    Visible particles were unexpectedly observed in a neutral-pH placebo formulation stored in glass vials but were not observed in the same formulation composition that contained protein. The particles were identified as silica gel (SiO2 ) and polysorbate 20, suggesting dissolution of the glass vial. Time course studies were performed to assess the effect of variables such as pH, excipients, storage temperature, and duration on particle formation. Data suggest that glass dissolution occurred during the storage in the liquid state, as shown by increased Si levels in solution. Upon freezing, the samples underwent freeze concentration and likely became supersaturated, which resulted in the appearance of visible silica particles upon thawing. The glass degradation described here is unique and differs from the more commonly reported delamination, defined by the presence of reflective, shard-like glass flakes in solution that are often termed lamellae. This case study underscores the importance of an early assessment (during formulation development) of potential incompatibility of the formulation with the primary container.

  20. Crude protein, ash, phosphorus, neutral detergent fiber and starch concentrations in particle size distributions of corn steam flaked to varying bulk densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The particle size distribution that results from steam flaking cereal grains could be related to differences in the chemical composition of steam-flaked (SF) vs. unprocessed grain. Particle size distribution and associated crude protein (CP), phosphorus (P), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and starch...

  1. Introduction: advances and opportunities in cluster research. [Neutral (metal) and ionic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Examples of neutral and ionic clusters include these in the upper and lower atmosphere, interstellar grain formation, combustion, radiation physics and chemistry, surface bombardment, fission product transport in reactors, corrosion, etc. This paper is a brief overview of some recent developments in cluster research. (DLC)

  2. Comparisons Between Model Predictions and Spectral Measurements of Charged and Neutral Particles on the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald M.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Boettcher, Stephan; Boehm, Eckart; Guo, Jingnan; Koehler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Posner, Arik

    2014-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars have been made by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Curiosity rover since August 2012. RAD is a particle detector that measures the energy spectrum of charged particles (10 to approx. 200 MeV/u) and high energy neutrons (approx 8 to 200 MeV). The data obtained on the surface of Mars for 300 sols are compared to the simulation results using the Badhwar-O'Neill galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment model and the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code. For the nuclear interactions of primary GCR through Mars atmosphere and Curiosity rover, the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used. For describing the daily column depth of atmosphere, daily atmospheric pressure measurements at Gale Crater by the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) are implemented into transport calculations. Particle flux at RAD after traversing varying depths of atmosphere depends on the slant angles, and the model accounts for shielding of the RAD "E" dosimetry detector by the rest of the instrument. Detailed comparisons between model predictions and spectral data of various particle types provide the validation of radiation transport models, and suggest that future radiation environments on Mars can be predicted accurately. These contributions lend support to the understanding of radiation health risks to astronauts for the planning of various mission scenarios

  3. Removal of particles from lithographic masks through plasma-assisted cleaning by metastable atomic neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, W. M.; Szybilski, D. S.; Das, C. E.; Raju, R.; Surla, V.; Neumann, M. J.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2008-11-01

    For extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) to become a high volume manufacturing technology for integrated circuit manufacturing, the cleanliness of the system, especially the photomask, is of high importance. For EUV photomasks, which cannot be protected from contamination by the use of a pellicle, an effective and quick cleaning technology needs to be ready in order to maintain wafer throughput. There are challenges to extend current wet cleaning technologies to meet the future needs for damage-free and high efficiency mask cleaning. Accordingly, a unique process for cleaning particulates from surfaces, specifically photomasks as well as wafers, has been evaluated at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. The removal technique utilizes a high density plasma source as well as pulsed substrate biases to provide for removal. Helium is used as the primary gas in the plasma, which under ionization, provides for a large density of helium metastable atoms present in the plasma. These metastable helium atoms have on the order of 20 eV of energy which can transfer to particles on the substrate to be cleaned. When the substrate is under a small flux of ion bombardment, these bonds then remain broken and it is theorized that this allows the particles to be volatilized for their subsequent removal. 100 % particle removal efficiency has been obtained for 30 nm, 80 nm, and 200 nm polystyrene latex particles. In addition, removal rate has been correlated with helium metastable population density determined by optical emission spectroscopy.

  4. Recent advances in the characterization of HIV-1 neutralization assays for standardized evaluation of the antibody response to infection and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Polonis, Victoria R; Brown, Bruce K; Rosa Borges, Andrew; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Zhang, Mei-Yun; Barnett, Susan W; Ruprecht, Ruth M; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Fenyö, Eva-Maria; Montefiori, David C; McCutchan, Francine E; Michael, Nelson L

    2008-06-05

    In AIDS vaccine development the pendulum has swung towards a renewed emphasis on the potential role for neutralizing antibodies in a successful global vaccine. It is recognized that vaccine-induced antibody performance, as assessed in the available neutralization assays, may well serve as a "gatekeeper" for HIV-1 subunit vaccine prioritization and advancement. As a result, development of a standardized platform for reproducible measurement of neutralizing antibodies has received considerable attention. Here we review current advancements in our knowledge of the performance of different types of antibodies in a traditional primary cell neutralization assay and the newer, more standardized TZM-bl reporter cell line assay. In light of recently revealed differences (see accompanying article) in the results obtained in these two neutralization formats, parallel evaluation with both platforms should be contemplated as an interim solution until a better understanding of immune correlates of protection is achieved.

  5. Neutralizing Antibodies Induced by Recombinant Virus-Like Particles of Enterovirus 71 Genotype C4 Inhibit Infection at Pre- and Post-attachment Steps

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Zhiqiang; Ye, Xiaohua; Huang, Xulin; Cai, Yicun; Liu, Qingwei; Li, Yan; Su, Zhiguo; Huang, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease, which has been prevalent in Asia–Pacific regions, causing significant morbidity and mortality in young children. Antibodies elicited by experimental EV71 vaccines could neutralize infection in vitro and passively protect animal models from lethal challenge, indicating that neutralizing antibodies play an essential role in protection. However, how neutralizing antibodies inhibit infection in vitro remains unclear. Methods/Findings In the present study, we explored the mechanisms of neutralization by antibodies against EV71 virus-like particles (VLPs). Recombinant VLPs of EV71 genotype C4 were produced in insect cells using baculovirus vectors. Immunization with the VLPs elicited a high-titer, EV71-specific antibody response in mice. Anti-VLP mouse sera potently neutralized EV71 infection in vitro. The neutralizing antibodies in the anti-VLP mouse sera were found to target mainly an extremely conserved epitope (FGEHKQEKDLEYGAC) located at the GH loop of the VP1 protein. The neutralizing anti-VLP antisera were able to inhibit virus binding to target cells efficiently. In addition, post-attachment treatment of virus-bound cells with the anti-VLP antisera also neutralized virus infection, although the antibody concentration required was higher than that of the pre-attachment treatment. Conclusions Collectively, our findings represent a valuable addition to the understanding of mechanisms of EV71 neutralization and have strong implications for EV71 vaccine development. PMID:23451250

  6. Exponential Characteristic Spatial Quadrature for Discrete Ordinates Neutral Particle Transport in Slab Geometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    neutron energy distribution function Va1 = fission neutrons produced = scalar neutron flux Functional dependence of each variable is...an albedo ac times the outbound flux of neutrons passing across the surface of the boundary return back into the boundary in an isotropic distribution ...8217)O(7, E’, t) where 4 v = neutron speed xV = angular neutron flux = unit vector in direction of particle motion ; = coordinate location in space

  7. Linear Characteristic Spatial Quadrature for Discrete Ordinates Neutral Particle Transport on Arbitrary Triangles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    density of particles from sources that are independent of the flux distribution emitted at position F with energies in dE about E and directions in dfl...current j can be produced. Scalar fluxes are needed to determine reaction rates such as fission and neutron activation rates. Vector currents are...scalar flux distribution on the spatial mesh. This guess might be zero throughout or some informed initial guess. The guess would be used to construct

  8. Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Santosh P; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D; Govindarajan, J

    2013-02-01

    Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a = 25 cm and major radius, R = 75 cm) using a 45° parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and ΔE∕E of high-energy channel has been found to be ∼10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature Ti(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically Te(0) ∼ 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here.

  9. Enterovirus type 71 neutralizing antibodies in the serum of macaque monkeys immunized with EV71 virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Li; Yu, Chun-I; Hu, Yu-Chen; Tsai, Tze-Jiun; Kuo, Yin-Chieh; Chi, Wei-Kuang; Lin, Ae-Ning; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2012-02-08

    Enterovirus type 71 (EV71) is a virulent form of enteroviruses causing hospitalizations for children less than three years of age. Currently there are no anti-viral therapies or vaccines available for EV71. Due to the high risk of poliomyelitis-like paralysis and fatal encephalitis, an effective vaccine to EV71 could potentially prevent virus-induced morbidity and mortality. In this study, we first tested a potential EV71 vaccine candidate based on virus-like particles (VLP). We vaccinated macaque monkeys to validate the immunogenicity of the VLP vaccine to EV71. We detected the VLP or EV71-specific antibodies, neutralization titers, ELISPOT, and T cell response to find their immune responses to EV71. When the VLP vaccine adjuvanted with alum was given to macaque monkeys, these monkeys developed both specific humoral and cellular immune responses to EV71. Despite lower neutralizing antibodies to EV71 were found in sera of VLP-immunized monkeys than monkeys vaccinated with inactivated EV71, VLP-based vaccine generated a memory immune response to EV71. Hence, VLP-based EV71 vaccine is a potential vaccine against EV71 infection.

  10. A Massively Parallel Particle Code for Rarefied Ionized and Neutral Gas Flows in Earth and Planetary Atmospheres, Ionospheres and Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the global structure, dynamics, and physical and chemical processes occurring in the upper atmospheres, exospheres, and ionospheres of the Earth, the other planets, comets and planetary satellites and their interactions with their outer particles and fields environs, it is often necessary to address the fundamentally non-equilibrium aspects of the physical environment. These are regions where complex chemistry, energetics, and electromagnetic field influences are important. Traditional approaches are based largely on hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic MHD) formulations and are very important and highly useful. However, these methods often have limitations in rarefied physical regimes where the molecular collision rates and ion gyrofrequencies are small and where interactions with ionospheres and upper neutral atmospheres are important.

  11. Interpretation of time-of-flight distributions for neutral particles under pulsed laser evaporation using direct Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Alexey A.

    2013-12-21

    A theoretical study of the time-of-flight (TOF) distributions under pulsed laser evaporation in vacuum has been performed. A database of TOF distributions has been calculated by the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. It is shown that describing experimental TOF signals through the use of the calculated TOF database combined with a simple analysis of evaporation allows determining the irradiated surface temperature and the rate of evaporation. Analysis of experimental TOF distributions under laser ablation of niobium, copper, and graphite has been performed, with the evaluated surface temperature being well agreed with results of the thermal model calculations. General empirical dependences are proposed, which allow indentifying the regime of the laser induced thermal ablation from the TOF distributions for neutral particles without invoking the DSMC-calculated database.

  12. Search for a heavy neutral particle decaying into an electron and a muon using 1 fb-1 of ATLAS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dubbs, T.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckert, S.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Fellmann, D.; Felzmann, C. U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. 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I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Rumiantsev, V.; Rumyantsev, L.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rust, D. R.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sanchez, A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Savva, P.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scallon, O.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, M.; Schöning, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schuh, S.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shichi, H.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloan, T. J.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Sondericker, J.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockmanns, T.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, Hs.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Traynor, D.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo. K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2011-12-01

    A search is presented for a high mass neutral particle that decays directly to the e ± μ ∓ final state. The data sample was recorded by the ATLAS detector in sqrt{s}=7 TeV pp collisions at the LHC from March to June 2011 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 1.07 fb-1. The data are found to be consistent with the Standard Model background. The high e ± μ ∓ mass region is used to set 95% confidence level upper limits on the production of two possible new physics processes: tau sneutrinos in an R-parity violating supersymmetric model and Z'-like vector bosons in a lepton flavor violating model.

  13. System maps for retention of small neutral compounds on a superficially porous particle column in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Atapattu, Sanka N; Poole, Colin F; Praseuth, Mike B

    2016-10-14

    The system constants of the solvation parameter model are used to prepare system maps for the retention of small neutral molecules on the ocadecylsiloxane-bonded silica superficially porous particle stationary phase (Kinetex C18) for aqueous-organic solvent mobile phases containing 10-70% (v/v) methanol or acetonitrile. A comparison of the system constants with eight commercially available octadecylsiloxane-bonded silica columns for the same separation conditions confirms that the general retention properties of Kinetex C-18 are similar to totally porous octadecylsiloxane-bonded silica stationary phases and that method transfer should be no more difficult than that usually observed when substituting one octadecylsiloxane-bonded silica column for another.

  14. On the Effects of Curvature on the Confinement of a Neutral Particle to a Quantum Dot Induced by Non-inertial Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, K.

    2012-03-01

    We discuss the influence of a linear topological defect on the bound states of a non-relativistic neutral particle with permanent magnetic dipole moment in two distinct cases: In the first case, we consider a Fermi-Walker reference frame for the observers and show how non-inertial effects yield bound states analogous to having a neutral particle subject to the Tan-Inkson model for a quantum dot (W.-C. Tan, J.C. Inkson, Semicond. Sci. Technol. 11:1635, 1996); in the second case, we consider the action of a constant force and obtain the energy levels of the bound states.

  15. On the Lorentz symmetry breaking effects on a Dirac neutral particle inside a two-dimensional quantum ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, K.; Belich, H.

    2014-07-01

    We study the effects of the Lorentz symmetry violation in the nonrelativistic quantum dynamics of a spin-1/2 neutral particle interacting with external fields confined to a two-dimensional quantum ring (W.-C. Tan, J.C. Inkson, Semicond. Sci. Technol. 11, 1635 (1996)). We show a possible scenario for the Lorentz symmetry breaking that permits us to make an analogy with the Landau-Aharonov-Casher system (M. Ericsson, E. Sjöqvist, Phys. Rev. A 65, 013607 (2001)), where a change in the angular frequency characteristic of the confinement of a quantum particle to a two-dimensional ring is obtained. Then, we show that an upper bound for the Lorentz symmetry breaking parameters may be set up. Besides, we analyse another possible scenario of the Lorentz symmetry violation by showing the presence of an analogue of the Coulomb potential. We obtain the bound states solutions to the Schrödinger-Pauli equation and discuss a quantum effect characterized by the dependence of the angular frequency on the quantum numbers of the system.

  16. Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells exhibit dendritic cell stimulating activity and induce neutralizing antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling; Lin Jianguo; Sun Yuliang; Bennouna, Soumaya; Lo, Michael; Wu Qingyang; Bu Zhigao; Pulendran, Bali; Compans, Richard W. . E-mail: compans@microbio.emory.edu; Yang Chinglai . E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses (rBV) expressing Ebola virus VP40 (rBV-VP40) or GP (rBV-GP) proteins were generated. Infection of Sf9 insect cells by rBV-VP40 led to assembly and budding of filamentous particles from the cell surface as shown by electron microscopy. Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by coinfection of Sf9 cells with rBV-VP40 and rBV-GP, and incorporation of Ebola GP into VLPs was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Recombinant baculovirus infection of insect cells yielded high levels of VLPs, which were shown to stimulate cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells similar to VLPs produced in mammalian cells. The immunogenicity of Ebola VLPs produced in insect cells was evaluated by immunization of mice. Analysis of antibody responses showed that most of the GP-specific antibodies were of the IgG2a subtype, while no significant level of IgG1 subtype antibodies specific for GP was induced, indicating the induction of a Th1-biased immune response. Furthermore, sera from Ebola VLP immunized mice were able to block infection by Ebola GP pseudotyped HIV virus in a single round infection assay, indicating that a neutralizing antibody against the Ebola GP protein was induced. These results show that production of Ebola VLPs in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses represents a promising approach for vaccine development against Ebola virus infection.

  17. User's manual for ONEDANT: a code package for one-dimensional, diffusion-accelerated, neutral-particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, R.D.; Brinkley, F.W. Jr.; Marr, D.R.

    1982-02-01

    ONEDANT is designed for the CDC-7600, but the program has been implemented and run on the IBM-370/190 and CRAY-I computers. ONEDANT solves the one-dimensional multigroup transport equation in plane, cylindrical, spherical, and two-angle plane geometries. Both regular and adjoint, inhomogeneous and homogeneous (k/sub eff/ and eigenvalue search) problems subject to vacuum, reflective, periodic, white, albedo, or inhomogeneous boundary flux conditions are solved. General anisotropic scattering is allowed and anisotropic inhomogeneous sources are permitted. ONEDANT numerically solves the one-dimensional, multigroup form of the neutral-particle, steady-state form of the Boltzmann transport equation. The discrete-ordinates approximation is used for treating the angular variation of the particle distribution and the diamond-difference scheme is used for phase space discretization. Negative fluxes are eliminated by a local set-to-zero-and-correct algorithm. A standard inner (within-group) iteration, outer (energy-group-dependent source) iteration technique is used. Both inner and outer iterations are accelerated using the diffusion synthetic acceleration method. (WHK)

  18. Interactions of neutral and singly charged keV atomic particles with gas-phase adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Fresia; Bari, Sadia; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Schlathoelter, Thomas

    2007-07-21

    KeV atomic particles traversing biological matter are subject to charge exchange and screening effects which dynamically change this particle's effective charge. The understanding of the collision cascade along the track thus requires a detailed knowledge of the interaction dynamics of radiobiologically relevant molecules, such as DNA building blocks or water, not only with ionic but also with neutral species. We have studied collisions of keV H{sup +}, He{sup +}, and C{sup +} ions and H{sup 0}, He{sup 0}, and C{sup 0} atoms with the DNA base adenine by means of high resolution time-of-flight spectrometry. For H{sup 0} and H{sup +} we find qualitatively very similar fragmentation patterns, while for carbon, strong differences are observed when comparing C{sup 0} and C{sup +} impact. For collisions with He{sup 0} and He{sup +} projectiles, a pronounced delayed fragmentation channel is observed, which has not been reported before.

  19. A solution of the monoenergetic neutral particle transport equation for adjacent half-spaces with anisotropic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, B.D.; Mostacci, D.; Previti, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present highly accurate solutions to the neutral particle transport equation in a half-space. While our initial motivation was in response to a recently published solution based on Chandrasekhar's H-function, the presentation to follow has taken on a more comprehensive tone. The solution by H-functions certainly did achieved high accuracy but was limited to isotropic scattering and emission from spatially uniform and linear sources. Moreover, the overly complicated nature of the H-function approach strongly suggests that its extension to anisotropic scattering and general sources is not at all practical. For this reason, an all encompassing theory for the determination of highly precise benchmarks, including anisotropic scattering for a variety of spatial source distributions, is presented for particle transport in a half-space. We illustrate the approach via a collection of cases including tables of 7-place flux benchmarks to guide transport methods developers. The solution presented can be applied to a considerable number of one and two half-space transport problems with variable sources and represents a state-of-the-art benchmark solution.

  20. A massively parallel method of characteristic neutral particle transport code for GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, W. R.; Smith, K.; Forget, B.

    2013-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, parallel computing has enabled computers to grow ever larger and more powerful while scientific applications have advanced in sophistication and resolution. This trend is being challenged, however, as the power consumption for conventional parallel computing architectures has risen to unsustainable levels and memory limitations have come to dominate compute performance. Heterogeneous computing platforms, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), are an increasingly popular paradigm for solving these issues. This paper explores the applicability of GPUs for deterministic neutron transport. A 2D method of characteristics (MOC) code - OpenMOC - has been developed with solvers for both shared memory multi-core platforms as well as GPUs. The multi-threading and memory locality methodologies for the GPU solver are presented. Performance results for the 2D C5G7 benchmark demonstrate 25-35 x speedup for MOC on the GPU. The lessons learned from this case study will provide the basis for further exploration of MOC on GPUs as well as design decisions for hardware vendors exploring technologies for the next generation of machines for scientific computing. (authors)

  1. Control of neutral particle fueling and exhaust by plasma edge topology optimization in Wendelstein 7-X and HSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephey, Laurie

    2016-10-01

    Comparative experiments at the HSX and Wendelstein 7-X stellarators are being performed. At W7-X it was shown that fine control of the edge magnetic structure in W7-X is a feasible actuator to control global particle confinement. During the startup campaign of W7-X, the edge magnetic structure is defined by five poloidal limiters. Inside of the last closed flux surface in the standard magnetic configuration, the 5/6 resonance and corresponding magnetic island are located directly inside of the plasma source region. Inward movement of the island in a predominantly electron-root transport regime has been found to increase the effective helium confinement time τp* He, a critical metric for plasma purity control in future burning plasmas, by a factor of two. The experimental analysis is supported by fully 3-D fluid plasma and kinetic neutral modeling using the EMC3-EIRENE code and will be compared to these experimental results from both devices. A single reservoir, single species particle balance will be extracted from experimental measurements aided by the fully 3-D modeling analysis from EMC3-EIRENE to quantify the causal link established above based on measured parameters. At HSX, similar investigations to those performed at W7-X are ongoing. HSX has substantial flexibility in both its edge magnetic configuration and also in edge connection lengths via limiter insertion. Both are being examined to study any resulting changes global particle confinement and provide insight into the physics of the underlying mechanism. Together with the results from W7-X, both experiments will provide information on the link between the plasma edge topology and the global particle confinement. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grants DE-SC0014210, DE-FG02-93ER54222, DE-AC05-00OR22725, DOE LANS Contract DE-AC52- 06NA25396, and within the EUROfusion Consortium under Euratom Grant No 633053.

  2. Advances in Bayesian Model Based Clustering Using Particle Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Merl, D M

    2009-11-19

    Recent work by Carvalho, Johannes, Lopes and Polson and Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy introduced a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) alternative to traditional iterative Monte Carlo strategies (e.g. MCMC and EM) for Bayesian inference for a large class of dynamic models. The basis of SMC techniques involves representing the underlying inference problem as one of state space estimation, thus giving way to inference via particle filtering. The key insight of Carvalho et al was to construct the sequence of filtering distributions so as to make use of the posterior predictive distribution of the observable, a distribution usually only accessible in certain Bayesian settings. Access to this distribution allows a reversal of the usual propagate and resample steps characteristic of many SMC methods, thereby alleviating to a large extent many problems associated with particle degeneration. Furthermore, Carvalho et al point out that for many conjugate models the posterior distribution of the static variables can be parametrized in terms of [recursively defined] sufficient statistics of the previously observed data. For models where such sufficient statistics exist, particle learning as it is being called, is especially well suited for the analysis of streaming data do to the relative invariance of its algorithmic complexity with the number of data observations. Through a particle learning approach, a statistical model can be fit to data as the data is arriving, allowing at any instant during the observation process direct quantification of uncertainty surrounding underlying model parameters. Here we describe the use of a particle learning approach for fitting a standard Bayesian semiparametric mixture model as described in Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy. In Section 2 we briefly review the previously presented particle learning algorithm for the case of a Dirichlet process mixture of multivariate normals. In Section 3 we describe several novel extensions to the original

  3. Goal-based angular adaptivity applied to a wavelet-based discretisation of the neutral particle transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Goffin, Mark A.; Buchan, Andrew G.; Dargaville, Steven; Pain, Christopher C.; Smith, Paul N.; Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.

    2015-01-15

    A method for applying goal-based adaptive methods to the angular resolution of the neutral particle transport equation is presented. The methods are applied to an octahedral wavelet discretisation of the spherical angular domain which allows for anisotropic resolution. The angular resolution is adapted across both the spatial and energy dimensions. The spatial domain is discretised using an inner-element sub-grid scale finite element method. The goal-based adaptive methods optimise the angular discretisation to minimise the error in a specific functional of the solution. The goal-based error estimators require the solution of an adjoint system to determine the importance to the specified functional. The error estimators and the novel methods to calculate them are described. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the methods. It is shown that the methods can significantly reduce the number of unknowns and computational time required to obtain a given error. The novelty of the work is the use of goal-based adaptive methods to obtain anisotropic resolution in the angular domain for solving the transport equation. -- Highlights: •Wavelet angular discretisation used to solve transport equation. •Adaptive method developed for the wavelet discretisation. •Anisotropic angular resolution demonstrated through the adaptive method. •Adaptive method provides improvements in computational efficiency.

  4. Kinetics of electrons and neutral particles in radio-frequency transformer coupled plasma H- ion source at Seoul National University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, K. J.; Dang, J. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Cho, W. H.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-10-01

    In volume production H- ion sources, control of electron temperature is essential due to its close correlation with the generation of vibrationally-excited hydrogen molecules in the driver region as well as the generation of H- ions by dissociative attachment in the extraction region. In the ion source group at Seoul National University (SNU) in Korea, a lot of research effort has been made to the development of a volume production H- ion source based on radio-frequency (RF) transformer-coupled plasma (TCP) for long lifetime continuous wave (CW) operation. It has a spiral RF antenna located outside the discharge chamber to generate a plasma with high electron temperature in the driver region and employs a magnetic filter field to prevent high energy electrons from being transported to the extraction region. In this paper, we present the recent progress on understanding of the underlying physics of the RF TCP H- ion source at SNU. Special attention is paid to the characterization of electron kinetics regime for controlling electron energy distribution and the influence of relaxation of neutral particles during the transport across the magnetic filter region. Effect of the degree of dissociation on the production of H- ions is also discussed.

  5. Advanced Scavenge Systems for an Integrated Engine Inlet Particle Separator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    INSTRUMENTAT10N............ .oooo.....& 117 TEST RIG FACILITY INSTALLAT ION ..................... 124 TEST PLA.N OUJTLINE. . ... . .. .. .. .. . ... IZ...CDD 40 - 00 COD 0 cc 0a co 0 im 0 00 0-4 < -i 4L B LA SECT ION I (HUB) I1- SECTION 2 2- SECTION 3 3- SECTION 4 4 SECTION 5 5 STACKING POINT L.o in...based on previous particle seoarator experienc*, the difference in separation ef~iciency from 20-percent scavenge to 25 percent scavenge is mall, and

  6. Advanced Handling and Sorting Techniques for Ultrasmall Particles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-15

    Nitrogen Mixtures III-ll Ashing of Inorganic Materials with Oxygen, Hydrogen and Tetrafluoromethane 111-19 Spread in a Particle Beam Diameter IV-14...MATERIALS WITH OXYGEN, HYDROGEN AND TETRAFLUOROMETHANE Sample Material Initial Wt gm Final Wt. gm % Residue A. Ashed with Oxygen 1. Clay... Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) 1. Silica Dust 2. Uranium Dioxide 0.5173 1.4142 1.1845 93.2 4.0943 73.4 0.5601 99.9 4.1506 100.0 0.3409 60.8 2.9834 100.0 0.6301

  7. Arcing and rf signal generation during target irradiation by a high-energy, pulsed neutral particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Robiscoe, R.T.

    1988-02-01

    We present a theory describing the dynamics of arc discharges in bulk dielectric materials on board space-based vehicles. Such ''punch-through'' arcs can occur in target satellites irradiated by high-energy (250 MeV), pulsed (100 mA x 10 ms) neutral particle beams. We treat the arc as a capacitively limited avalanche current in the target dielectric material, and we find expressions for the arc duration, charge transport, currents, and discharge energy. These quantities are adjusted to be consistent with known scaling laws for the area of charge depleted by the arc. After a brief account of the statistical distribution of voltages at which the arc starts and stops, we calculate the signal strength and frequency spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation broadcast by the arc. We find that arcs from thick ()similarreverse arrowto)1 cm) targets can generate rf signals detectable up to 1000 km from the target, bu a radio receiver operating at frequency 80 MHz, bandwidth 100 kHz, and detection threshold -105 dBm. These thick-target arc signals are 10 to 20 dB above ambient noise at the receiver, and they provide target hit assessment if the signal spectrum can be sampled at several frequencies in the nominal range 30-200 MHz. Thin-target ()similarreverse arrowto)1 mm) arc signals are much weaker, but when they are detecable in conjunction with thick-target signals, target discrimination is possible by comparing the signal frequency spectra. 24 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Individual Particle Analysis of Ambient PM 2.5 Using Advanced Electron Microscopy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald J. Keeler; Masako Morishita

    2006-12-31

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate a combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques that can be effectively used to identify and characterize individual particles and their sources. Specific techniques to be used include high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), STEM energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), and energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM). A series of ambient PM{sub 2.5} samples were collected in communities in southwestern Detroit, MI (close to multiple combustion sources) and Steubenville, OH (close to several coal fired utility boilers). High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) -imaging showed a series of nano-metal particles including transition metals and elemental composition of individual particles in detail. Submicron and nano-particles with Al, Fe, Ti, Ca, U, V, Cr, Si, Ba, Mn, Ni, K and S were observed and characterized from the samples. Among the identified nano-particles, combinations of Al, Fe, Si, Ca and Ti nano-particles embedded in carbonaceous particles were observed most frequently. These particles showed very similar characteristics of ultrafine coal fly ash particles that were previously reported. By utilizing HAADF-STEM, STEM-EDX, and EF-TEM, this investigation was able to gain information on the size, morphology, structure, and elemental composition of individual nano-particles collected in Detroit and Steubenville. The results showed that the contributions of local combustion sources - including coal fired utilities - to ultrafine particle levels were significant. Although this combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques by itself can not identify source categories, these techniques can be utilized as complementary analytical tools that are capable of providing detailed information on individual particles.

  9. A new EV71 VP3 epitope in norovirus P particle vector displays neutralizing activity and protection in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liping; Fan, Rongjun; Sun, Shiyang; Fan, Peihu; Su, Weiheng; Zhou, Yan; Gao, Feng; Xu, Fei; Kong, Wei; Jiang, Chunlai

    2015-11-27

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16), as the main agents causing hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), have become a serious public health concern in the Asia-Pacific region. Recently, various neutralizing B cell epitopes of EV71 were identified as targets for promising vaccine candidates. Structural studies of Picornaviridae indicated that potent immunodominant epitopes typically lie in the hypervariable loop of capsid surfaces. However, cross-neutralizing antibodies and cross-protection between EV71 and CVA16 have not been observed. Therefore, we speculated that divergent sequences of the two viruses are key epitopes for inducing protective neutralizing responses. In this study, we selected 10 divergent epitope candidates based on alignment of the EV71 and CVA16 P1 amino acid sequences using the Multalin interface page, and these epitopes are conserved among all subgenotypes of EV71. Simultaneously, by utilizing the norovirus P particle as a novel vaccine delivery carrier, we identified the 71-6 epitope (amino acid 176-190 of VP3) as a conformational neutralizing epitope against EV71 in an in vitro micro-neutralization assay as well as an in vivo protection assay in mice. Altogether, these results indicated that the incorporation of the 71-6 epitope into the norovirus P domain can provide a promising candidate for an effective synthetic peptide-based vaccine against EV71.

  10. Transient Enhancement ('Spike-on-Tail') Observed on Neutral-Beam-Injected Energetic Ion Spectra Using the E||B Neutral Particle Analyzer in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    S. S. Medley; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Bell, R. E.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.; Roquemore, A. L.

    2010-06-01

    An increase of up to four-fold in the E||B Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) charge exchange neutral flux localized at the Neutral Beam (NB) injection full energy is observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Termed the High-Energy Feature (HEF), it appears on the NB-injected energetic ion spectrum only in discharges where tearing or kink-type modes (f < 10 kHz) are absent, TAE activity (f ~ 10-150 kHz) is weak (δBrms < 75 mGauss) and CAE/GAE activity (f ~ 400 – 1200 kHz) is robust. The feature exhibits a growth time of ~ 20 - 80 ms and occasionally develops a slowing down distribution that continues to evolve over periods of 100's of milliseconds, a time scale long compared with the typical ~ 10's ms equilibration time of the NB injected particles. The HEF is observed only in H-mode (not L-mode) discharges with injected NB power of 4 MW or greater and in the field pitch range v||/v ~ 0.7 – 0.9; i.e. only for passing (never trapped) energetic ions. The HEF is suppressed by vessel conditioning using lithium deposition at rates ~ 100 mg/shot, a level sufficient to suppress ELM activity. Increases of ~ 10 - 30 % in the measured neutron yield and total stored energy are observed to coincide with the feature along with broadening of measured Te(r), Ti(r) and ne(r) profiles. However, TRANSP analysis shows that such increases are driven by plasma profile changes and not the HEF phenomenon itself. Though a definitive mechanism has yet to be developed, the HEF appears to be caused by a form of TAE/CAE wave-particle interaction that distorts of the NB fast ion distribution in phase space.

  11. Innovative experimental particle physics through technological advances: Past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Harry W.K.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    This mini-course gives an introduction to the techniques used in experimental particle physics with an emphasis on the impact of technological advances. The basic detector types and particle accelerator facilities will be briefly covered with examples of their use and with comparisons. The mini-course ends with what can be expected in the near future from current technology advances. The mini-course is intended for graduate students and post-docs and as an introduction to experimental techniques for theorists.

  12. Design and physicochemical characterization of advanced spray-dried tacrolimus multifunctional particles for inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao; Hayes, Don; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Kuhn, Robert J; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design, develop, and optimize respirable tacrolimus microparticles and nanoparticles and multifunctional tacrolimus lung surfactant mimic particles for targeted dry powder inhalation delivery as a pulmonary nanomedicine. Particles were rationally designed and produced at different pump rates by advanced spray-drying particle engineering design from organic solution in closed mode. In addition, multifunctional tacrolimus lung surfactant mimic dry powder particles were prepared by co-dissolving tacrolimus and lung surfactant mimic phospholipids in methanol, followed by advanced co-spray-drying particle engineering design technology in closed mode. The lung surfactant mimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phosphor-rac-1-glycerol]. Laser diffraction particle sizing indicated that the particle size distributions were suitable for pulmonary delivery, whereas scanning electron microscopy imaging indicated that these particles had both optimal particle morphology and surface morphology. Increasing the pump rate percent of tacrolimus solution resulted in a larger particle size. X-ray powder diffraction patterns and differential scanning calorimetry thermograms indicated that spray drying produced particles with higher amounts of amorphous phase. X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry also confirmed the preservation of the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state for all engineered respirable particles. Furthermore, it was observed in hot-stage micrographs that raw tacrolimus displayed a liquid crystal transition following the main phase transition, which is consistent with its interfacial properties. Water vapor uptake and lyotropic phase transitions in the solid state at varying levels of relative humidity were determined by gravimetric vapor sorption technique. Water content in the various powders was very low and well within the levels necessary

  13. The Los Alamos Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop and beginning of the advanced accelerator concepts field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.

    2012-12-01

    The first Advanced Acceleration of Particles-AAC-Workshop (actually named Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop) was held at Los Alamos in January 1982. The workshop lasted a week and divided all the acceleration techniques into four categories: near field, far field, media, and vacuum. Basic theorems of particle acceleration were postulated (later proven) and specific experiments based on the four categories were formulated. This landmark workshop led to the formation of the advanced accelerator R&D program in the HEP office of the DOE that supports advanced accelerator research to this day. Two major new user facilities at Argonne and Brookhaven and several more directed experimental efforts were built to explore the advanced particle acceleration schemes. It is not an exaggeration to say that the intellectual breadth and excitement provided by the many groups who entered this new field provided the needed vitality to then recently formed APS Division of Beams and the new online journal Physical Review Special Topics-Accelerators and Beams. On this 30th anniversary of the AAC Workshops, it is worthwhile to look back at the legacy of the first Workshop at Los Alamos and the fine groundwork it laid for the field of advanced accelerator concepts that continues to flourish to this day.

  14. Numerical studies of the effects of neutrally buoyant large particles on turbulent channel flow at the friction Reynolds number up to 395

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaosheng; Wang, Yu; Shao, Xueming

    2012-11-01

    A direct-forcing fictitious domain method was employed to perform fully-resolved numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow laden with large neutrally buoyant particles at constant pressure gradients. The effects of the particles on the turbulence (including the fluid-phase average velocity, the root-mean-square (rms) of the velocity fluctuation, the probability density function of the velocity and the vortex structures) at the friction Reynolds number of 180 and 395 were investigated. The results show that the drag-reduction effect caused by the spherical particle at low particle volumes is very small. The presence of particles decreases the maximum rms of streamwise velocity fluctuation near wall via weakening the large-scale streamwise vortices, and on the other hand increases the rms of transverse and spanwise fluctuating velocities in vicinity of the wall via inducing smaller-scale vortices. The effects of the particles on the fluid velocity PDF (probability density function) normalized with the rms velocity are small, irrespective of the particle size, particle volume fraction and Reynolds number. The work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11072217 and 11132008), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University.

  15. Pluto, Near and Far: PEPSSI Measurements of Energetic Particles During the New Horizons Flyby and Investigating a Pluto Torus of Circumsolar Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Matthew Eric; Kollmann, Peter; McNutt, Ralph L.; Smith, H. Todd; Bagenal, Fran; Brown, Lawrence E.; Elliott, Heather A.; Haggerty, Dennis K.; Horanyi, Mihaly; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Kusterer, Martha; Lisse, Carey M.; McComas, David J.; Piquette, Marcus; Strobel, Darrell; Szalay, Jamey; Vandegriff, Jon; Zirnstein, Eric; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Cathy B.; Weaver, Harold A.; Young, Leslie A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    The energetic particle environment at Pluto has been unknown, and little modeled, until this year’s historic encounter by the New Horizon (NH) spacecraft on 14 July 2015. The first energetic particle observations, made with the Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument, were downlinked in August 2015. There are variations in the intensities of suprathermal (~3-30 keV/nucleon) ions that are associated with a combination of the position of the spacecraft relative to Pluto, the look direction of PEPSSI, and (potentially) temporal evolution in the system. We present the results of the near encounter with Pluto, to as close as ~11.6 Rp (1 Rp = 1187 km), which, early analysis shows, include large intensity variations associated with Pluto. We also present the concept of a neutral gas torus surrounding the Sun, aligned with Pluto’s orbit, and place observational constraints on it based primarily on comparison of NH measurements with a 3-D Monte Carlo model adapted from analogous satellite tori surrounding Saturn and Jupiter. Such a torus, or perhaps partial torus, could result from neutral N2 escaping from Pluto’s exosphere. Unlike other more massive planets, gaseous neutrals escape Pluto readily via Jeans escape (i.e., owing to the high thermal speed relative to the escape velocity). These neutrals are not directly observable by NH but, once ionized to N2+ or N+ via photolysis or charge exchange, are picked up by the solar wind, ultimately reaching ~50 keV or more, making these pickup ions detectable by PEPSSI. This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  16. Utility of Japanese encephalitis virus subgenomic replicon-based single-round infectious particles as antigens in neutralization tests for Zika virus and three other flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kurane, Ichiro; Matsuda, Mami; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Konishi, Eiji

    2017-05-01

    The introduction of a foreign virus into an area may cause an outbreak, as with the Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in the Americas. Preparedness for handling a viral outbreak involves the development of tests for the serodiagnosis of foreign virus infections. We previously established a gene-based technology to generate some flaviviral antigens useful for functional antibody assays. The technology utilizes a Japanese encephalitis virus subgenomic replicon to generate single-round infectious particles (SRIPs) that possess designed surface antigens. In the present study, we successfully expanded the capacity of SRIPs to four human-pathogenic mosquito-borne flaviviruses that could potentially be introduced from endemic to non-endemic countries: ZIKV, Sepik virus, Wesselsbron virus, and Usutu virus. Flavivirus-crossreactive monoclonal antibodies dose-dependently neutralized these SRIPs. ZIKV-SRIPs also produced antibody-dose-dependent neutralization curves equivalent to those shown by authentic ZIKV particles using sera from a Zika fever patient. The faithful expression of designed surface antigens on SRIPs will allow their use in neutralization tests to diagnose foreign flaviviral infections.

  17. Single Particle ICP-MS: Advances toward routine analysis of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Manuel D; Olesik, John W; Barber, Angela G; Challis, Katie; Ranville, James F

    2016-07-01

    From its early beginnings in characterizing aerosol particles to its recent applications for investigating natural waters and waste streams, single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) has proven to be a powerful technique for the detection and characterization of aqueous dispersions of metal-containing nanomaterials. Combining the high-throughput of an ensemble technique with the specificity of a single particle counting technique and the elemental specificity of ICP-MS, spICP-MS is capable of rapidly providing researchers with information pertaining to size, size distribution, particle number concentration, and major elemental composition with minimal sample perturbation. Recently, advances in data acquisition, signal processing, and the implementation of alternative mass analyzers (e.g., time-of-flight) has resulted in a wider breadth of particle analyses and made significant progress toward overcoming many of the challenges in the quantitative analysis of nanoparticles. This review provides an overview of spICP-MS development from a niche technique to application for routine analysis, a discussion of the key issues for quantitative analysis, and examples of its further advancement for analysis of increasingly complex environmental and biological samples. Graphical Abstract Single particle ICP-MS workflow for the analysis of suspended nanoparticles.

  18. Current Advances in Virus-Like Particles as a Vaccination Approach against HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chongbo; Ao, Zhujun; Yao, Xiaojian

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates against HIV-1 infection. They are capable of preserving the native conformation of HIV-1 antigens and priming CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses efficiently via cross presentation by both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. Progress has been achieved in the preclinical research of HIV-1 VLPs as prophylactic vaccines that induce broadly neutralizing antibodies and potent T cell responses. Moreover, the progress in HIV-1 dendritic cells (DC)-based immunotherapy provides us with a new vision for HIV-1 vaccine development. In this review, we describe updates from the past 5 years on the development of HIV-1 VLPs as a vaccine candidate and on the combined use of HIV particles with HIV-1 DC-based immunotherapy as efficient prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination strategies. PMID:26805898

  19. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J.; Weiland, J.; Zang, Q.

    2013-10-15

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport.

  20. Partial Protection against Porcine Influenza A Virus by a Hemagglutinin-Expressing Virus Replicon Particle Vaccine in the Absence of Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Meret E.; Vielle, Nathalie J.; Python, Sylvie; Brechbühl, Daniel; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Posthaus, Horst; Zimmer, Gert; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-01-01

    This work was initiated by previous reports demonstrating that mismatched influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines can induce enhanced disease, probably mediated by antibodies. Our aim was, therefore, to investigate if a vaccine inducing opsonizing but not neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (HA) of a selected heterologous challenge virus would enhance disease or induce protective immune responses in the pig model. To this end, we immunized pigs with either whole inactivated virus (WIV)-vaccine or HA-expressing virus replicon particles (VRP) vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Both types of vaccines induced virus neutralizing and opsonizing antibodies against homologous virus as shown by a highly sensitive plasmacytoid dendritic cell-based opsonization assay. Opsonizing antibodies showed a broader reactivity against heterologous IAV compared with neutralizing antibodies. Pigs immunized with HA-recombinant VRP vaccine were partially protected from infection with a mismatched IAV, which was not neutralized but opsonized by the immune sera. The VRP vaccine reduced lung lesions, lung inflammatory cytokine responses, serum IFN-α responses, and viral loads in the airways. Only the VRP vaccine was able to prime IAV-specific IFNγ/TNFα dual secreting CD4+ T cells detectable in the peripheral blood. In summary, this work demonstrates that with the virus pair selected, a WIV vaccine inducing opsonizing antibodies against HA which lack neutralizing activity, is neither protective nor does it induce enhanced disease in pigs. In contrast, VRP-expressing HA is efficacious vaccines in swine as they induced both potent antibodies and T-cell immunity resulting in a broader protective value. PMID:27446083

  1. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between ions and neutrals in a partially ionized plasma are important throughout heliophysics, including near the solar surface in prominences. Understanding how ion-neutral coupling affects formation, support, structure, and dynamics of prominences will advance our physical understanding of magnetized systems involving a transition from a weakly ionized dense gas to a fully ionized tenuous plasma. We address the fundamental physics of prominence support, which is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force, and the implications for observations. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized, it is necessary to consider the support of the both the ionized and neutral components. Support of the neutrals is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material.

  2. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  3. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  4. Search for resonant pair production of neutral long-lived particles decaying to bb in pp collisions at square root(S)=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Backusmayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Devaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; da Silva, W L Prado; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-08-14

    We report on a first search for resonant pair production of neutral long-lived particles (NLLP) which each decay to a bb pair, using 3.6 fb(-1) of data recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We search for pairs of displaced vertices in the tracking detector at radii in the range 1.6-20 cm from the beam axis. No significant excess is observed above background, and upper limits are set on the production rate in a hidden-valley benchmark model for a range of Higgs boson masses and NLLP masses and lifetimes.

  5. Advanced particle filter. Technical progress report No. 19, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Tidd advanced particle filtration (APF) test runs 25 through 34 were completed during the first quarter of 1995. All Tidd testing was completed with the conclusion of APF test run 34 on 3/30/95. The Westinghouse activities supporting the APF operation during this quarter included processing of test data and participating in one APF borescope inspection. Data is included on the filter operation.

  6. Search for neutral, long-lived particles decaying into two muons in pp[over] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; Cruz-Burelo, E De La; Martins, C De Oliveira; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Bihan, A-C Le; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; McCarthy, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Kooten, R Van; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Toerne, E Von; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-10-20

    We present a search for a neutral particle, pair produced in pp[over] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV, which decays into two muons and lives long enough to travel at least 5 cm before decaying. The analysis uses approximately 380 pb(-1) of data recorded with the D0 detector. The background is estimated to be about one event. No candidates are observed, and limits are set on the pair-production cross section times branching fraction into dimuons + X for such particles. For a mass of 10 GeV and lifetime of 4x10(-11) s, we exclude values greater than 0.14 pb (95% C.L.). These results are used to limit the interpretation of NuTeV's excess of dimuon events.

  7. DNA prime and virus-like particle boost from a single H5N1 strain elicits broadly neutralizing antibody responses against head region of H5 hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiqin; Zhou, Fan; Buchy, Philippe; Zuo, Teng; Hu, Hongxing; Liu, Jingjing; Song, Yufeng; Ding, Heng; Tsai, Cheguo; Chen, Ze; Zhang, Linqi; Deubel, Vincent; Zhou, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Since 1996, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has presented a persistent threat to public health. Its high degree of genetic diversity also poses enormous challenges in developing effective vaccines. To search for vaccine regimens that could elicit broadly neutralizing antibody responses against diverse HPAI H5N1 strains, in the present study we tested H5 hemagglutinin (HA) from an A/Thailand/1(KAN)-1/2004 strain in a heterologous prime-boost vaccination. We demonstrated that priming mice with DNA and boosting with virus-like particle induced antibody responses that cross-neutralize all reported clades and subclades of HPAI H5N1 viruses and protect mice from high lethal dose HPAI H5N1 challenge in both active and passive immunizations. Unexpectedly, cross-divergent H5 neutralizing antibodies are directed to the HA head and block both attachment and postattachment of virus entry. Thus, we conclude that as a promising pan-H5 vaccine candidate this prime-boost regimen could be further developed in ferrets and in humans.

  8. Advanced In-Situ Detection and Chemical Analysis of Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Gemer, A.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Maute, K.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Williams, E.; O'brien, L.; Rocha, J. R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ulysses dust detector discovered that interstellar dust particles pass through the solar system. The Hyperdsut instrument is developed for the in-situ detection and analysis of these particles to determine the elemental, chemical and isotopic compositions. Hyperdust builds on the heritage of previous successful instruments, e.g. the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on Cassini. Hyperdust combines a highly sensitive Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) and the high mass resolution Chemical Analyzer (CA). The DTS will detect dust particles as small as 0.3 μm in radius, and the velocity vector information is used to confirm the interstellar origin and/or reveal the dynamics from the interactions within the solar system. The effective target area of the CA is > 600 cm2 achieves mass resolution in excess of 200, which is considerably higher than that of CDA, and is acheved by advanced ion optics design. The Hyperdust instrument is in the final phases of development to TRL 6.

  9. A cell-local finite difference discretization of the low-order quasidiffusion equations for neutral particle transport on unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Wieselquist, William A.; Anistratov, Dmitriy Y.; Morel, Jim E.

    2014-09-15

    We present a quasidiffusion (QD) method for solving neutral particle transport problems in Cartesian XY geometry on unstructured quadrilateral meshes, including local refinement capability. Neutral particle transport problems are central to many applications including nuclear reactor design, radiation safety, astrophysics, medical imaging, radiotherapy, nuclear fuel transport/storage, shielding design, and oil well-logging. The primary development is a new discretization of the low-order QD (LOQD) equations based on cell-local finite differences. The accuracy of the LOQD equations depends on proper calculation of special non-linear QD (Eddington) factors from a transport solution. In order to completely define the new QD method, a proper discretization of the transport problem is also presented. The transport equation is discretized by a conservative method of short characteristics with a novel linear approximation of the scattering source term and monotonic, parabolic representation of the angular flux on incoming faces. Analytic and numerical tests are used to test the accuracy and spatial convergence of the non-linear method. All tests exhibit O(h{sup 2}) convergence of the scalar flux on orthogonal, random, and multi-level meshes.

  10. Deposition rate and etching rate due to neutral radicals and dust particles measured using QCMs together with a dust eliminating filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ryu; Koga, Kazunori; Yamashita, Daisuke; Kamataki, Kunihiro; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Shiratani, Masaharu; Ashikawa, Naoko; Tokitani, Masayuki; Masuzaki, Suguru; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Sagara, Akio; the LHD experimental Group Team

    2015-09-01

    We have developed an in-situ method for measuring deposition rate of radicals and dust particles using quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) together with a dust eliminating filter. The QCMs have three channels of quartz crystals. Channel 1 was used to measure total deposition rate due to radicals and dust particles. Channel 2 was covered with a dust eliminating filter. Channel 3 was covered with a stainless-steel plate. Moreover, all QCMs are covered with a grounded stainless steel mesh for suppressing influx of charged particles. The measurements were conducted in the Large Helical Device in the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. Although the deposition measurements during the discharges were difficult, we obtained deposition rate and etching rate by comparing the data before and after each discharge. The frequency difference for channel 1 changes from 0.1 Hz (etching) to -0.5 Hz (deposition), while those for channels 2 and 3 are within a range of +/-0.1 Hz and +/-0.05 Hz, respectively. The QCM method gives information on deposition rate and etching rate due to neutral radicals and dust particles.

  11. The effect of neutrally buoyant finite-size particles on channel flows in the laminar-turbulent transition regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, Vincent; Abbas, Micheline; Masbernat, Olivier; Climent, Eric

    2013-12-01

    The presence of finite-size particles in a channel flow close to the laminar-turbulent transition is simulated with the Force Coupling Method which allows two-way coupling with the flow dynamics. Spherical particles with channel height-to-particle diameter ratio of 16 are initially randomly seeded in a fluctuating flow above the critical Reynolds number corresponding to single phase flow relaminarization. When steady-state is reached, the particle volume fraction is homogeneously distributed in the channel cross-section (ϕ ≅ 5%) except in the near-wall region where it is larger due to inertia-driven migration. Turbulence statistics (intensity of velocity fluctuations, small-scale vortical structures, wall shear stress) calculated in the fully coupled two-phase flow simulations are compared to single-phase flow data in the transition regime. It is observed that particles increase the transverse r.m.s. flow velocity fluctuations and they break down the flow coherent structures into smaller, more numerous and sustained eddies, preventing the flow to relaminarize at the single-phase critical Reynolds number. When the Reynolds number is further decreased and the suspension flow becomes laminar, the wall friction coefficient recovers the evolution of the laminar single-phase law provided that the suspension viscosity is used in the Reynolds number definition. The residual velocity fluctuations in the suspension correspond to a regime of particulate shear-induced agitation.

  12. Charge neutralization as the major factor for the assembly of nucleocapsid-like particles from C-terminal truncated hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Vanessa L. de Azevedo; Peabody, David S.; Ferreira, Davis Fernandes; Bianconi, M. Lucia; Gomes, Andre Marco de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein, in addition to its structural role to form the nucleocapsid assembly, plays a critical role in HCV pathogenesis by interfering in several cellular processes, including microRNA and mRNA homeostasis. The C-terminal truncated HCV core protein (C124) is intrinsically unstructured in solution and is able to interact with unspecific nucleic acids, in the micromolar range, and to assemble into nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) in vitro. The specificity and propensity of C124 to the assembly and its implications on HCV pathogenesis are not well understood. Methods Spectroscopic techniques, transmission electron microscopy and calorimetry were used to better understand the propensity of C124 to fold or to multimerize into NLPs when subjected to different conditions or in the presence of unspecific nucleic acids of equivalent size to cellular microRNAs. Results The structural analysis indicated that C124 has low propensity to self-folding. On the other hand, for the first time, we show that C124, in the absence of nucleic acids, multimerizes into empty NLPs when subjected to a pH close to its isoelectric point (pH ≈ 12), indicating that assembly is mainly driven by charge neutralization. Isothermal calorimetry data showed that the assembly of NLPs promoted by nucleic acids is enthalpy driven. Additionally, data obtained from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy show that C124, in nanomolar range, was able to interact and to sequester a large number of short unspecific nucleic acids into NLPs. Discussion Together, our data showed that the charge neutralization is the major factor for the nucleocapsid-like particles assembly from C-terminal truncated HCV core protein. This finding suggests that HCV core protein may physically interact with unspecific cellular polyanions, which may correspond to microRNAs and mRNAs in a host cell infected by HCV, triggering their confinement into infectious particles. PMID:27867765

  13. Constraining the Europa Neutral Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard T.; Mitchell, Donald; mauk, Barry; Johnson, Robert E.; clark, george

    2016-10-01

    "Neutral tori" consist of neutral particles that usually co-orbit along with their source forming a toroidal (or partial toroidal) feature around the planet. The distribution and composition of these features can often provide important, if not unique, insight into magnetospheric particles sources, mechanisms and dynamics. However, these features can often be difficult to directly detect. One innovative method for detecting neutral tori is by observing Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) that are generally considered produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between charged and neutral particles.Mauk et al. (2003) reported the detection of a Europa neutral particle torus using ENA observations. The presence of a Europa torus has extremely large implications for upcoming missions to Jupiter as well as understanding possible activity at this moon and providing critical insight into what lies beneath the surface of this icy ocean world. However, ENAs can also be produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between two ionized particles and in that case cannot be used to infer the presence of neutral particle population. Thus, a detailed examination of all possible source interactions must be considered before one can confirm that likely original source population of these ENA images is actually a Europa neutral particle torus. For this talk, we examine the viability that the Mauk et al. (2003) observations were actually generated from a neutral torus emanating from Europa as opposed to charge particle interactions with plasma originating from Io. These results help constrain such a torus as well as Europa source processes.

  14. The Response of the Ionospheric Cusp to the Solar Through Two Perspectives: Low Energy Changed Particle In-Situ Measurements and Low- Energy Neutral Atom Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, V. N.; Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Craven, P. D.

    2000-01-01

    The IMAGE mission provides a new perspective on the study of the response of the magnetosphere/ionosphere system to changing solar wind conditions, particularly the variability of ion outflow. Learning to interpret this new type of data becomes an essential step in the process of melding these results with the wealth of in-situ charged particle observations obtained over the past 25 years. In order to understand how the in-situ data correspond to and contrast with IMAGE results we will perform a conjunctive study of event data from two instruments to shed light on the coupling of the solar wind and ionosphere from these different perspectives. We will use the Low Energy Neutral Atom instrument (LENA) which images energetic neutral atom emissions from upward flowing ionospheric ions and the Thermal Ion Dynamics Instrument (TIDE) on the Polar satellite which measures in-situ ion outflow from 0.3-300 eV. Our primary goal will be to understand how comparing the imaging and in-situ perspectives can aid in the analysis of both data sets.

  15. The Response of the Ionospheric Cusp to the Solar Wind Through Two Perspectives: Low Energy Charged Particle In-Situ Measurements and Low-Energy Neutral Atom Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, V. N.; Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Giles, B. L.; Craven, P. D.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission provides a new perspective on the study of the response of the magnetosphere/ionosphere system to changing solar wind conditions, particularly the variability of ion outflow. Learning to interpret this new type of data becomes an essential step in the process of melding these results with the wealth of in-situ charged particle observations obtained over the past 25 years. In order to understand how the in-situ data correspond to and contrast with IMAGE results we will perform a conjunctive study of event data from two instruments to shed light on the coupling of the solar wind and ionosphere from these different perspectives. We will use the Low Energy Neutral Atom instrument (LENA) which images energetic neutral atom emissions from upward flowing ionospheric ions and the Thermal Ion Dynamics Instrument (TIDE) on the Polar satellite which measures in-situ ion outflow from 0.3-300 eV. Our primary goal will be to understand how comparing the imaging and in-situ perspectives can aid in the analysis of both data sets.

  16. Transfer of a weakly bound electron in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles. I. Long-range interaction effects in the ionic-covalent coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V. S. Narits, A. A.

    2013-10-15

    Ion-pair formation processes are studied in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles possessing small electron affinities. Nonadiabatic transitions from a Rydberg covalent term to an ionic term of a quasi-molecule are considered using the modified Landau-Zener theory supplemented with calculation of survival factors of an anion decaying in the Coulomb field of a positive ion core. Using the technique of irreducible tensor operators and the momentum representation of the wavefunction of a highly excited atom, exact expressions are obtained for transition matrix elements and the ionic-covalent coupling parameter. The approach developed in the paper provides the description beyond the scope of a conventional assumption about a small variation of the wavefunction of the Rydberg atom on the range of electron coordinates determined by the characteristic radius of the wavefunction of the anion. This allows one to correctly consider long-range effects of the interaction between a weakly bound electron and the neutral core of a negative ion in processes under study. It is shown by the example of thermal collisions of Xe(nf) atoms with CH{sub 3}CN molecules that this is very important for a reliable quantitative description of anion formation with a low binding energy. The results are compared with experiments and calculations performed within the framework of a number of approximate methods.

  17. Effects on a Landau-type system for a neutral particle with no permanent electric dipole moment subject to the Kratzer potential in a rotating frame.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Abinael B; Bakke, Knut

    2016-06-01

    The behaviour of a neutral particle (atom, molecule) with an induced electric dipole moment in a region with a uniform effective magnetic field under the influence of the Kratzer potential (Kratzer 1920 Z. Phys.3, 289-307. (doi:10.1007/BF01327754)), and rotating effects is analysed. It is shown that the degeneracy of the Landau-type levels is broken and the angular frequency of the system acquires a new contribution that stems from the rotation effects. Moreover, in the search for bound state solutions, it is shown that the possible values of this angular frequency of the system are determined by the quantum numbers associated with the radial modes and the angular momentum, the angular velocity of the rotating frame and by the parameters associated with the Kratzer potential.

  18. Neutral Particle Analyzer Vertically Scanning Measurements of MHD-induced Energetic Ion Redistribution or Loss in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. Medley, R. Andre, R.E. Bell, D.S. Darrow, C.W. Domier, E.D. Fredrickson, N.N. Gorelenkov, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, K.C. Lee, F.M. Levinton, D. Liu, N.C. Luhmann, Jr., J.E. Menard, H. Park, D. Stutman, A.L. Roquemore, K. Tritz, H. Yuh and the NSTX Team

    2007-11-15

    Observations of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) induced redistribution or loss of energetic ions measured using the vertically scanning capability of the Neutral Particle Analyzer diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are presented along with TRANSP and ORBIT code analysis of the results. Although redistribution or loss of energetic ions due to bursting fishbone-like and low-frequency (f ~ 10 kHz) kinktype MHD activity has been reported previously, the primary goal of this work is to study redistribution or loss due to continuous Alfvénic (f ~ 20 – 150 kHz) modes, a topic that heretofore has not been investigated in detail for NSTX plasmas. Initial indications are that the former drive energetic ion loss whereas the continuous Alfvénic modes only cause redistribution and the energetic ions remain confined.

  19. Effects on a Landau-type system for a neutral particle with no permanent electric dipole moment subject to the Kratzer potential in a rotating frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Abinael B.; Bakke, Knut

    2016-06-01

    The behaviour of a neutral particle (atom, molecule) with an induced electric dipole moment in a region with a uniform effective magnetic field under the influence of the Kratzer potential (Kratzer 1920 Z. Phys. 3, 289-307. (doi:10.1007/BF01327754)), and rotating effects is analysed. It is shown that the degeneracy of the Landau-type levels is broken and the angular frequency of the system acquires a new contribution that stems from the rotation effects. Moreover, in the search for bound state solutions, it is shown that the possible values of this angular frequency of the system are determined by the quantum numbers associated with the radial modes and the angular momentum, the angular velocity of the rotating frame and by the parameters associated with the Kratzer potential.

  20. Arc discharge regulation of a megawatt hot cathode bucket ion source for the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Yahong; Hu Chundong; Liu Sheng; Jiang Caichao; Li Jun; Liang Lizhen; Collaboration: NBI Team

    2012-01-15

    Arc discharge of a hot cathode bucket ion source tends to be unstable what attributes to the filament self-heating and energetic electrons backstreaming from the accelerator. A regulation method, which based on the ion density measurement by a Langmuir probe, is employed for stable arc discharge operation and long pulse ion beam generation. Long pulse arc discharge of 100 s is obtained based on this regulation method of arc power. It establishes a foundation for the long pulse arc discharge of a megawatt ion source, which will be utilized a high power neutral beam injection device.

  1. News and Views: Messenger: Volcanic Mercury; Mapping the heliopause with neutral particles Student Moonshot; Iron on the case; Lunar testdrives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    Mercury, while resembling the Moon, has much more volcanism apparent at the surface, and a rich collection of species in the plasma of its magnetosphere, according to first results from NASA's Messenger mission. And there's a mystery, too: there appears to be much less iron in these rocks than expected. A solar observatory has detected particles from the edge of the solar system, which help to resolve a long-standing puzzle about the heliopause and open the door to a new mapping method.

  2. Space-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy free of high-energy neutral particle noise in wavelength range of 10-130 Å on the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xianli; Morita, Shigeru; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Goto, Motoshi; Dong, Chunfeng

    2014-04-01

    A flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer system working in wavelength range of 10-130 Å has been constructed in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for profile measurements of bremsstrahlung continuum and line emissions of heavy impurities in the central column of plasmas, which are aimed at studies on Zeff and impurity transport, respectively. Until now, a large amount of spike noise caused by neutral particles with high energies (≤180 keV) originating in neutral beam injection has been observed in EUV spectroscopy on LHD. The new system has been developed with an aim to delete such a spike noise from the signal by installing a thin filter which can block the high-energy neutral particles entering the EUV spectrometer. Three filters of 11 μm thick beryllium (Be), 3.3 μm thick polypropylene (PP), and 0.5 μm thick polyethylene terephthalate (PET: polyester) have been examined to eliminate the spike noise. Although the 11 μm Be and 3.3 μm PP filters can fully delete the spike noise in wavelength range of λ ≤ 20 Å, the signal intensity is also reduced. The 0.5 μm PET filter, on the other hand, can maintain sufficient signal intensity for the measurement and the spike noise remained in the signal is acceptable. As a result, the bremsstrahlung profile is successfully measured without noise at 20 Å even in low-density discharges, e.g., 2.9 × 1013 cm-3, when the 0.5 μm PET filter is used. The iron n = 3-2 Lα transition array consisting of FeXVII to FeXXIV is also excellently observed with their radial profiles in wavelength range of 10-18 Å. Each transition in the Lα array can be accurately identified with its radial profile. As a typical example of the method a spectral line at 17.62 Å is identified as FeXVIII transition. Results on absolute intensity calibration of the spectrometer system, pulse height and noise count analyses of the spike noise between holographic and ruled gratings and wavelength response of the used filters

  3. Inorganic ions in ambient fine particles over a National Park in central India: Seasonality, dependencies between SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+, and neutralization of aerosol acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Samresh; Sunder Raman, Ramya

    2016-10-01

    Twelve hour integrated ambient fine particles (PM2.5) were collected over an Van Vihar National Park (VVNP), in Bhopal, Central India. Samples were collected on filter substrates every-other-day for two years (2012 and 2013). In addition to PM2.5 mass concentration, water soluble inorganic ions (WSIIs) were also measured. Further, on-site meteorological parameters including temperature, wind speed, wind direction, relative humidity, rainfall and atmospheric pressure were recorded. During 2012, the average PM2.5 concentration was 40 ± 31 μgm-3 while during 2013 it was 48 ± 50 μgm-3. Further, in about 20% of the samples the 12 h integrated fine PM mass exceeded the daily (24 h) average standards (60 μgm-3). This observation suggests that the PM2.5 mass concentration at the study site is likely to be in violation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS), India. During the study period the sum of three major ions (SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+) accounted for 19.4% of PM2.5 mass on average. Air parcel back trajectory ensembles revealed that emissions from thermal power plants were likely to be the main regional source of particulate SO42- and NO3- measured over VVNP. Further, local traffic activities appeared to have no significant impact on the concentrations of PM2.5 and its WSIIs constituents, as revealed by a day-of-the-week analysis. PM2.5 mass, SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+ showed a pronounced seasonal trend with winter (Jan, Feb) and post-monsoon (Oct, Nov, Dec) highs and pre-monsoon (Mar, Apr, May) and monsoon (Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep) lows, during both 2012 and 2013. Further, when the sum of SO42- and NO3- constituted greater than 90% of water soluble inorganic anions by mass, they were linearly dependent on one another and moderately anti-correlated (r2 = 0.60). The molar ratios of NH4+ and non-sea salt SO42- were examined to understand the aerosol neutralization mechanisms and particulate NO3- formation. An assessment of these ratios and subsequent analyses

  4. Advancements in the Coupling of State-of-the-Art Energetic Particle and Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advancements in coupling the Earth Moon Mars Radiation Environment Module (EMMREM) and two MHD models, Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS) and ENLIL, have yielded promising results for predicting differential energy flux and radiation doses at 1AU. The EMMREM+MAS coupling focuses on the details of particle acceleration due to CMEs initiated low in the corona (1Rs - 20Rs). The EMMREM+ENLIL coupling gives results for CMEs initiated at ~20Rs and is part of a predictive capability being developed in conjunction with the CCMC. The challenge in forming large solar energetic particle events in both the prompt scenario lower down or for a gradual CME further out is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration regions while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream. We present here details of the MHD parameters and topology of a CME around the acceleration regions in the early evolution (below 2Rs), dose and flux predictions at 1AU, and how compression regions vs. shocks affect the evolution and spectrum of an SEP event.

  5. Advances in Quantifying the Radiative Effects of Aerosol Particles on Climate from Airborne Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, K. S.; Coddington, O.; Bergstrom, R.; Redemann, J.

    2007-12-01

    In the fourth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, large uncertainties persist in estimates of climate forcing by aerosol particles. One contributor to this uncertainty is the poorly quantified vertical distribution of solar radiation absorbed by aerosol particles, from the regional to global scale. Another is the spectral and spatial variability of surface albedo, an effect that can dominate the top-of-atmosphere perturbations due to aerosol scattering and absorption, particularly over land. Over the past three years a number of intensive airborne field experiments (ICARTT, MILAGRO, GoMACCS) have contributed significantly to our understanding of the impact of pollution outflow from urban-industrial centers on radiative forcing, using spectrally resolved radiometric measurements and novel observationally-based methods to derive forcing efficiency and flux divergence. We present an overview of some of the most significant advances in direct radiative forcing realized by these studies, and recommendations on where the greatest challenges remain. In addition we present findings from these experiments on the influence of aerosol particles on cloud radiative properties, a potentially greater effect but even more uncertain than direct radiative forcing.

  6. Advances in Single-Particle Electron Cryomicroscopy Structure Determination applied to Sub-tomogram Averaging

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Tanmay A.M.; Russo, Christopher J.; Löwe, Jan; Passmore, Lori A.; Scheres, Sjors H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent innovations in specimen preparation, data collection, and image processing have led to improved structure determination using single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Here we explore some of these advances to improve structures determined using electron cryotomography (cryo-ET) and sub-tomogram averaging. We implement a new three-dimensional model for the contrast transfer function, and use this in a regularized likelihood optimization algorithm as implemented in the RELION program. Using direct electron detector data, we apply both single-particle analysis and sub-tomogram averaging to analyze radiation-induced movements of the specimen. As in single-particle cryo-EM, we find that significant sample movements occur during tomographic data acquisition, and that these movements are substantially reduced through the use of ultrastable gold substrates. We obtain a sub-nanometer resolution structure of the hepatitis B capsid, and show that reducing radiation-induced specimen movement may be central to attempts at further improving tomogram quality and resolution. PMID:26256537

  7. The movement of particles in liquid metals under gravity forces and the interaction of particles with advancing solid-liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, F.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of shrinkage and gas porosity are discussed. Gravity forces enhance the removal of gas bubbles from a metal melt and contribute to the feeding of shrinkage porosity in castings. Experiments are reviewed which determine how large a density difference is required for metal particles to float or sink in a metal melt and to what extent do factors not considered in Stokes Law influence particle movement in a real system. As to the interaction of particles with an advancing solid-liquid interface, the results indicate that the metal particles are not rejected in a metal melt, and that concentrations of particles in a metal following solidification are due to other factors.

  8. Search for neutral color-octet weak-triplet scalar particles in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-29

    A search for pair production of neutral color-octet weak-triplet scalar particles (Θ0) is performed in processes where one Θ0 decays to a pair of b quark jets and the other to a Z boson plus a jet, with the Z boson decaying to a pair of electrons or muons. The search is performed with data collected by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1 of proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The number of observed events is found to be in agreement with the standard model predictions. The 95% confidence levelmore » upper limit on the product of the cross section and branching fraction is obtained as a function of the Θ0 mass. The 95% confidence level lower bounds on the Θ0 mass are found to be 623 and 426 GeV, for two different octo-triplet theoretical scenarios. These are the first direct experimental bounds on particles predicted by the octo-triplet model.« less

  9. Search for neutral color-octet weak-triplet scalar particles in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-29

    A search for pair production of neutral color-octet weak-triplet scalar particles0) is performed in processes where one Θ0 decays to a pair of b quark jets and the other to a Z boson plus a jet, with the Z boson decaying to a pair of electrons or muons. The search is performed with data collected by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1 of proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The number of observed events is found to be in agreement with the standard model predictions. The 95% confidence level upper limit on the product of the cross section and branching fraction is obtained as a function of the Θ0 mass. The 95% confidence level lower bounds on the Θ0 mass are found to be 623 and 426 GeV, for two different octo-triplet theoretical scenarios. These are the first direct experimental bounds on particles predicted by the octo-triplet model.

  10. New multigroup Monte Carlo scattering algorithm suitable for neutral- and charged-particle Boltzmann and Fokker-Planck calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, D.P.

    1983-05-01

    Morel (1981) has developed multigroup Legendre cross sections suitable for input to standard discrete ordinates transport codes for performing charged-particle Fokker-Planck calculations in one-dimensional slab and spherical geometries. Since the Monte Carlo neutron transport code, MORSE, uses the same multigroup cross section data that discrete ordinates codes use, it was natural to consider whether Fokker-Planck calculations could be performed with MORSE. In order to extend the unique three-dimensional forward or adjoint capability of MORSE to Fokker-Planck calculations, the MORSE code was modified to correctly treat the delta-function scattering of the energy operator, and a new set of physically acceptable cross sections was derived to model the angular operator. Morel (1979) has also developed multigroup Legendre cross sections suitable for input to standard discrete ordinates codes for performing electron Boltzmann calculations. These electron cross sections may be treated in MORSE with the same methods developed to treat the Fokker-Planck cross sections. The large magnitude of the elastic scattering cross section, however, severely increases the computation or run time. It is well-known that approximate elastic cross sections are easily obtained by applying the extended transport (or delta function) correction to the Legendre coefficients of the exact cross section. An exact method for performing the extended transport cross section correction produces cross sections which are physically acceptable. Sample calculations using electron cross sections have demonstrated this new technique to be very effective in decreasing the large magnitude of the cross sections.

  11. Ions and neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncet, A.

    After a short presentation of intensity limitations examples due to trapped ions, the processes of ionization and neutralization build up in particle accelerators and storage rings are briefly reviewed. The tolerable limits in neutralization are then assessed at the light of current theories of incoherent and coherent effects driven by ions. Finally the usual antidotes such as clearing electrodes, missing bunch schemes and beam shaking are presented.

  12. Prevalence of AAV1 neutralizing antibodies and consequences for a clinical trial of gene transfer for advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, B; Butler, J; Felker, G M; Ponikowski, P; Voors, A A; Pogoda, J M; Provost, R; Guerrero, J; Hajjar, R J; Zsebo, K M

    2016-03-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) has many advantages as a gene therapy vector, but the presence of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is an important limitation. This study was designed to determine: (1) characteristics of AAV NAbs in human subjects, (2) prevalence of AAV1 NAbs in heart failure patients and (3) utility of aggressive immunosuppressive therapy in reducing NAb seroconversion in an animal model. NAb titers were assessed in a cohort of heart failure patients and in patients screened for a clinical trial of gene therapy with AAV1 carrying the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase gene (AAV1/SERCA2a). AAV1 NAbs were found in 59.5% of 1552 heart failure patients. NAb prevalence increased with age (P=0.001) and varied geographically. The pattern of NAb titers suggested that exposure is against AAV2, with AAV1 NAb seropositivity due to crossreactivity. The effects of immunosuppression on NAb formation were tested in mini-pigs treated with immunosuppressant therapy before, during and after a single AAV1/SERCA2a infusion. Aggressive immunosuppression did not prevent formation of AAV1 NAbs. We conclude that immunosuppression is unlikely to be a viable solution for repeat AAV1 dosing. Strategies to reduce NAbs in heart failure patients are needed to increase eligibility for gene transfer using AAV vectors.

  13. Observation of Energetic Particle Driven Modes Relevant to Advanced Tokamak Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    R. Nazikian; B. Alper; H.L. Berk; D. Borba; C. Boswell; R.V. Budny; K.H. Burrell; C.Z. Cheng; E.J. Doyle; E. Edlund; R.J. Fonck; A. Fukuyama; N.N. Gorelenkov; C.M. Greenfield; D.J. Gupta; M. Ishikawa; R.J. Jayakumar; G.J. Kramer; Y. Kusama; R.J. La Haye; G.R. McKee; W.A. Peebles; S.D. Pinches; M. Porkolab; J. Rapp; T.L. Rhodes; S.E. Sharapov; K. Shinohara; J.A. Snipes; W.M. Solomon; E.J. Strait; M. Takechi; M.A. Van Zeeland; W.P. West; K.L. Wong; S. Wukitch; L. Zeng

    2004-10-21

    Measurements of high-frequency oscillations in JET [Joint European Torus], JT-60U, Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, and TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] plasmas are contributing to a new understanding of fast ion-driven instabilities relevant to Advanced Tokamak (AT) regimes. A model based on the transition from a cylindrical-like frequency-chirping mode to the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) has successfully encompassed many of the characteristics seen in experiments. In a surprising development, the use of internal density fluctuation diagnostics has revealed many more modes than has been detected on edge magnetic probes. A corollary discovery is the observation of modes excited by fast particles traveling well below the Alfven velocity. These observations open up new opportunities for investigating a ''sea of Alfven Eigenmodes'' in present-scale experiments, and highlight the need for core fluctuation and fast ion measurements in a future burning-plasma experiment.

  14. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forward-forward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  15. Advances in 4D Treatment Planning for Scanned Particle Beam Therapy — Report of Dedicated Workshops

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Christoph; Graeff, Christian; Riboldi, Marco; Nill, Simeon; Baroni, Guido; Knopf, Antje-Christin

    2014-01-01

    We report on recent progress in the field of mobile tumor treatment with scanned particle beams, as discussed in the latest editions of the 4D treatment planning workshop. The workshop series started in 2009, with about 20 people from 4 research institutes involved, all actively working on particle therapy delivery and development. The first workshop resulted in a summary of recommendations for the treatment of mobile targets, along with a list of requirements to apply these guidelines clinically. The increased interest in the treatment of mobile tumors led to a continuously growing number of attendees: the 2012 edition counted more than 60 participants from 20 institutions and commercial vendors. The focus of research discussions among workshop participants progressively moved from 4D treatment planning to complete 4D treatments, aiming at effective and safe treatment delivery. Current research perspectives on 4D treatments include all critical aspects of time resolved delivery, such as in-room imaging, motion detection, beam application, and quality assurance techniques. This was motivated by the start of first clinical treatments of hepato cellular tumors with a scanned particle beam, relying on gating or abdominal compression for motion mitigation. Up to date research activities emphasize significant efforts in investigating advanced motion mitigation techniques, with a specific interest in the development of dedicated tools for experimental validation. Potential improvements will be made possible in the near future through 4D optimized treatment plans that require upgrades of the currently established therapy control systems for time resolved delivery. But since also these novel optimization techniques rely on the validity of the 4DCT, research focusing on alternative 4D imaging technique, such as MRI based 4DCT generation will continue. PMID:24354749

  16. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forwardforward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  17. The “Puck” energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low‐resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low‐resource but highly capable, mass‐species‐discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the “Puck” EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high‐voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions. PMID:27867799

  18. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, Kyle

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  19. A new effective process for production of curdlan oligosaccharides based on alkali-neutralization treatment and acid hydrolysis of curdlan particles in water suspension.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhu, Li; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung; Zong, Yu; Li, Wei-Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Biologically active β-1,3-oligosaccharides with rapidly growing biomedical applications are produced from hydrolysis of curdlan polysaccharide. The water-insoluble curdlan impedes its hydrolysis efficiency which is enhanced by our newly developed alkali-neutralization treatment process to increase the stability of curdlan suspension to more than 20 days, while the untreated control settled within 5 min. A putative double-layer structure model comprising of a compact core and a hydrated outer layer was proposed to describe the treated curdlan particles based on sedimentation and scanning electron microscopy observation. This model was verified by single- and two-step acid hydrolysis, indicative of the reduced susceptibility to hydrolysis when close to the compact core. Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, thin-layer chromatography analyses, and effective HPLC procedure led to the development of improved process to produce purified individual β-1,3-oligosaccharides with degrees of polymerization from 2 to 10 and potential for biomedical applications from curdlan hydrolyzate. Our new curdlan oligosaccharide production process offers an even better alternative to the previously published processes.

  20. Analysis of plasma and neutral gas flow inside of a PET bottle under PIII condition by particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagawa, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Ikeyama, M.; Nakao, S.; Choi, J.; Miyagawa, S.

    2006-01-01

    The plasma behavior inside of a PET bottle has been simulated under the condition of plasma immersed ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) using the simulation software "PEGASUS". The software uses the "PIC-MCCM" module for the plasma analysis and the "DSMCM" module for the gas flow field analysis. DSMCM gives densities, velocities, fluxes, temperatures and pressures of each neutral species such as the fed gas species and radicals. By coupling PIC-MCCM with DSMCM simulation, the plasma behavior in the flowing Ar gas and N2 gas has been simulated. The gas was injected from the tip of the gas inlet which was inserted into the center of the bottle. The base gas pressure was 1-50 Pa and a positive pulse voltage (maximum voltage = 0.1-1 kV) was applied to the center rod. A two-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system was used. Time evolution of the spacial distribution was obtained for densities of electrons, N2+ ions, N2∗ radicals and N atoms in N2 gas, and Ar+ ions, Ar∗ and Ar∗(4s) radicals in Ar gas. Time evolution of the particle flux and the energy flux of electrons and ions on the target surface was also obtained.

  1. Development and validation of a critical gradient energetic particle driven Alfven eigenmode transport model for DIII-D tilted neutral beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Bass, E. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; VanZeeland, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with the DIII-D tilted neutral beam injection (NBI) varying the beam energetic particle (EP) source profiles have provided strong evidence that unstable Alfven eigenmodes (AE) drive stiff EP transport at a critical EP density gradient [Heidbrink et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 093006]. Here the critical gradient is identified by the local AE growth rate being equal to the local ITG/TEM growth rate at the same low toroidal mode number. The growth rates are taken from the gyrokinetic code GYRO. Simulation show that the slowing down beam-like EP distribution has a slightly lower critical gradient than the Maxwellian. The ALPHA EP density transport code [Waltz and Bass 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104006], used to validate the model, combines the low-n stiff EP critical density gradient AE mid-core transport with the Angioni et al (2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 055013) energy independent high-n ITG/TEM density transport model controling the central core EP density profile. For the on-axis NBI heated DIII-D shot 146102, while the net loss to the edge is small, about half the birth fast ions are transported from the central core r/a  <  0.5 and the central density is about half the slowing down density. These results are in good agreement with experimental fast ion pressure profiles inferred from MSE constrained EFIT equilibria.

  2. Human papillomavirus type 16 virus-like particles expressed in attenuated Salmonella typhimurium elicit mucosal and systemic neutralizing antibodies in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nardelli-Haefliger, D; Roden, R B; Benyacoub, J; Sahli, R; Kraehenbuhl, J P; Schiller, J T; Lachat, P; Potts, A; De Grandi, P

    1997-01-01

    Attenuated strains of Salmonella are attractive live vaccine candidates for eliciting mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. The ability to induce immune responses in the reproductive tract may be critical for the effectiveness of a prophylactic vaccine against genital human papillomaviruses (HPV), which are important etiologic agents in the development of cervical cancer. To examine the potential of a live Salmonella-based vaccine to prevent genital HPV infection, the L1 major capsid protein from HPV type 16 (HPV16) was constitutively expressed in the PhoPc strain of Salmonella typhimurium. As demonstrated by electron microscopy, the L1 protein expressed in these bacteria assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) that resemble authentic papillomavirus virions. This is the first demonstration that papillomavirus VLPs can self-assemble in prokaryotes. BALB/c mice were immunized with the HPV16 L1 recombinant PhoPc strain by the oral and nasal routes. Despite a low stability of the L1-expressing plasmid in vivo, a double nasal immunization was effective in inducing L1-specific serum antibodies that recognized mainly native, but not disassembled, VLPs. These antibodies effectively neutralized HPV16 pseudotyped virions in an in vitro infectivity assay. Conformationally dependent anti-VLP immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG were also detected in oral and vaginal secretions, indicating that potentially protective antibody responses were elicited at mucosal sites. Recombinant attenuated Salmonella expressing HPV capsids may represent a promising vaccine candidate against genital HPV infection. PMID:9234794

  3. The Application of the BrilLanCe Series Scintillation Detector in the Spectrometer of Neutral Particles for the Satellite Experiment Zina-Nt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, Irene V.; Arkhangelsky, Andrey I.; Batischev, Alexey. G.; Galper, Arkady M.; Kondratyeva, Natalya V.; Naumov, Petr Yu.

    Spectrometric detector complex ZINA-NT is intended to study a radiation conditions onboard satellite and characteristics of hard X-ray and gamma-ray fluxes from GRB, solar flares and to detect other non-stationary fluxes of cosmic gamma-rays. The advantages for using of this new detector for modification of present neutral particles detector on the base of CsI(Tl) are discussed. Scintillation detectors based on BrilLanCe series crystal have got very small lighting time, an excellent energy resolution and light output, more intensive than devices based on CsI(Tl). Using of BrilLanCe series crystal instead of CsI(Tl) ones allows to detect terrestrial gamma flashes (TGF), gamma ray bursts (GRB) and solar flares with smaller time durations and intensities. Moreover, the counts rate linearity region of BrilLanCe detectors is extended up to 106 s-1 and it allows to observe a very intensive events. So, the using of such type of detector permits us the possibility to separate gamma-quanta and neutrons on the timescales less than 50 microseconds.

  4. On the influence of a Rashba-type coupling induced by Lorentz-violating effects on a Landau system for a neutral particle

    SciTech Connect

    Bakke, K.; Belich, H.

    2015-03-15

    We study a possible scenario of the Lorentz symmetry violation background that allows us to build an analogue of the Landau system for a nonrelativistic Dirac neutral particle interacting with a field configuration of crossed electric and magnetic fields. We also discuss the arising of analogues of the Rashba coupling, the Zeeman term and the Darwin term from the Lorentz symmetry breaking effects, and the influence of these terms on the analogue of the Landau system confined to a two-dimensional quantum ring. Finally, we show that this analogy with the Landau system confined to a two-dimensional quantum ring allows us to establish an upper bound for the Lorentz symmetry breaking parameters. - Highlights: • Landau system from crossed electric and magnetic fields and fixed time-like vector. • Analogues of the Rashba coupling, the Zeeman term and the Darwin term. • Lorentz symmetry breaking effects on a two-dimensional quantum ring. • Upper bound for the Lorentz symmetry breaking parameters.

  5. A Dynamic Model for the Interaction Between an Insoluble Particle and an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, A. V.; Mukherjee, S.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    2000-01-01

    Most models that describe the interaction of an insoluble particle with an advancing solid-liquid interface are based on the assumption of steady state. However, as demonstrated by experimental work, the process does not reach steady state until the particle is pushed for a while by the interface. In this work, a dynamic mathematical model was developed. The dynamic model demonstrates that this interaction is essentially non-steady state and that steady state eventually occurs only when solidification is conducted at sub-critical velocities. The model was tested for three systems: aluminum-zirconia particles, succinonitrilepolystyrene particles, and biphenyl-glass particles. The calculated values for critical velocity of the pushing/engulfment transition were in same range with the experimental ones.

  6. A Method for Consensus Reaching in Product Kansei Evaluation Using Advanced Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Consumers' opinions toward product design alternatives are often subjective and perceptual, which reflect their perception about a product and can be described using Kansei adjectives. Therefore, Kansei evaluation is often employed to determine consumers' preference. However, how to identify and improve the reliability of consumers' Kansei evaluation opinions toward design alternatives has an important role in adding additional insurance and reducing uncertainty to successful product design. To solve this problem, this study employs a consensus model to measure consistence among consumers' opinions, and an advanced particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm combined with Linearly Decreasing Inertia Weight (LDW) method is proposed for consensus reaching by minimizing adjustment of consumers' opinions. Furthermore, the process of the proposed method is presented and the details are illustrated using an example of electronic scooter design evaluation. The case study reveals that the proposed method is promising for reaching a consensus through searching optimal solutions by PSO and improving the reliability of consumers' evaluation opinions toward design alternatives according to Kansei indexes. PMID:28316619

  7. Recent advances in the modeling of plasmas with the Particle-In-Cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Lehe, Remi; Vincenti, Henri; Godfrey, Brendan; Lee, Patrick; Haber, Irv

    2015-11-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach is the method of choice for self-consistent simulations of plasmas from first principles. The fundamentals of the PIC method were established decades ago but improvements or variations are continuously being proposed. We report on several recent advances in PIC related algorithms, including: (a) detailed analysis of the numerical Cherenkov instability and its remediation, (b) analytic pseudo-spectral electromagnetic solvers in Cartesian and cylindrical (with azimuthal modes decomposition) geometries, (c) arbitrary-order finite-difference and generalized pseudo-spectral Maxwell solvers, (d) novel analysis of Maxwell's solvers' stencil variation and truncation, in application to domain decomposition strategies and implementation of Perfectly Matched Layers in high-order and pseudo-spectral solvers. Work supported by US-DOE Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231 and the US-DOE SciDAC program ComPASS. Used resources of NERSC, supported by US-DOE Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. A Method for Consensus Reaching in Product Kansei Evaluation Using Advanced Particle Swarm Optimization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan-Pu

    2017-01-01

    Consumers' opinions toward product design alternatives are often subjective and perceptual, which reflect their perception about a product and can be described using Kansei adjectives. Therefore, Kansei evaluation is often employed to determine consumers' preference. However, how to identify and improve the reliability of consumers' Kansei evaluation opinions toward design alternatives has an important role in adding additional insurance and reducing uncertainty to successful product design. To solve this problem, this study employs a consensus model to measure consistence among consumers' opinions, and an advanced particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm combined with Linearly Decreasing Inertia Weight (LDW) method is proposed for consensus reaching by minimizing adjustment of consumers' opinions. Furthermore, the process of the proposed method is presented and the details are illustrated using an example of electronic scooter design evaluation. The case study reveals that the proposed method is promising for reaching a consensus through searching optimal solutions by PSO and improving the reliability of consumers' evaluation opinions toward design alternatives according to Kansei indexes.

  9. A virus-like particle vaccination strategy expands its tolerance to H3N2 antigenic drift by enhancing neutralizing antibodies against hemagglutinin stalk.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Cheng, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Chih-Yuan; Lin, Chao-Hua; Kuo, Chuan-Yi; Huang, Hsiang-Yi; Wu, Fu-Ting; Yang, Yu-Chih; Wu, Chia-Ying; Liu, Ming-Tsan; Hsiao, Pei-Wen

    2017-04-01

    Seasonal influenza viruses impact public health annually due to their continual evolution. However, the current inactivated seasonal vaccines provide poor protection against antigenically drifted viruses and require periodical reformulation through hit-and-miss predictions about which strains will circulate during the next season. To reduce the impact caused by vaccine mismatch, we investigated the drift-tolerance of virus-like particles (VLP) as an improved vaccine candidate. The cross-protective humoral immunity elicited by the H3N2-VLP vaccine constructed for the 2011-2012 season was examined against viruses isolated from 2010 to 2015 in Taiwan evolving chronologically through clades 1, 4, 5, 3B and 3C, as well as viruses that were circulating globally in 2005, 2007 and 2009. Mouse immunization results demonstrated that H3N2-VLP vaccine elicited superior immunological breadth in comparison with the cognate conventional whole-inactivated virus (WIV) vaccine. Titers of neutralizing antibodies against heterologous strains representing each epidemic period in the VLP group were significantly higher than in the WIV group, indicating the antibody repertoire induced by the H3N2-VLPs was insensitive to viral antigenic drift over a span of at least 10 years. Noticeably, H3N2-VLP elicited higher levels of anti-stalk antibodies than H3N2-WIV, which offset the ineffectiveness caused by antigenic drift. This advantageous effect was attributed to the uncleaved precursor of their HA proteins. These results suggest a mechanism through which VLP-induced humoral immunity may better tolerate the evolutionary dynamics of influenza viruses and point to the possible use of a VLP vaccine as a method by which the requirement for annual updates of seasonal influenza vaccines may be diminished.

  10. Recombinant retrovirus-derived virus-like particle-based vaccines induce hepatitis C virus-specific cellular and neutralizing immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Huret, Christophe; Desjardins, Delphine; Miyalou, Mathilde; Levacher, Béatrice; Amadoudji Zin, Martin; Bonduelle, Olivia; Combadière, Béhazine; Dalba, Charlotte; Klatzmann, David; Bellier, Bertrand

    2013-03-01

    While the immunological correlates of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific immunity are not well understood, it is now admitted that an effective vaccine against HCV will need to induce both cellular and humoral immune responses and address viral heterogeneity to prevent immune escape. We developed a vaccine platform specifically aimed at inducing such responses against HCV antigens displayed by recombinant retrovirus-based virus-like particles (VLPs) made of Gag of murine leukemia virus. Both ex vivo produced VLPs and plasmid DNA encoding VLPs can be used as vaccines. Here, we report that immunizations with plasmid DNA forming VLPs pseudotyped with HCV E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins (HCV-specific plasmo-retroVLPs) induce strong T-cell-mediated immune responses that can be optimized by using proper DNA delivery methods and/or genetic adjuvants. Additionally, multigenotype or multi-specific T-cell responses were observed after immunization with plasmids that encode VLPs pseudotyped with E1E2 derived from numerous viral genotypes and/or displaying NS3 antigen in capsid proteins. While homologous prime-boost immunizations with HCV-specific plasmo-retroVLPs or ex vivo produced VLPs induce a low level of specific antibody responses, optimal combination of plasmo-retroVLPs and VLPs was identified for inducing HCV-specific T-cell and B-cell responses as well as neutralizing antibodies. Altogether, these results have important meanings for the development of anti-HCV preventive vaccines and exemplify the flexibility and potential of our retrovirus-based platform in inducing broad cellular and humoral immune responses.

  11. Search for the production of a long lived neutral particle which decays hadronically in association with a Z boson in pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Michael; Atlas Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Despite the increasing luminosity of the LHC, no new particles beyond the standard model have yet been found by conventional searches. This has led to interest in more exotic signatures of potential new particles. One such exotic signature is a jet without tracks and almost all of its energy deposited in the hadronic calorimeter vs the electromagnetic calorimeter (which lies closer to the beam). A long lived neutral particle that traverses the detector into the HCal before decaying hadronically would produce such a signature. In this talk, I will present a search for such a particle recoiling against a standard model Z boson in pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

  12. Advanced multi-frequency radar: Design, preliminary measurements and particle size distribution retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majurec, Ninoslav

    In the spring of 2001 the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory (MIRSL) at the University of Massachusetts began the development of an advanced Multi-Frequency Radar (AMFR) system for studying clouds and precipitation. This mobile radar was designed to consist of three polarimetric Doppler subsystems operating at Ku-band (13.4 GHz), Ka-band (35.6 GHz) and W-band (94.92 GHz). This combination of frequency bands allows a measurement of a wide range of atmospheric targets ranging from weakly reflecting clouds to strong precipitation. The antenna beamwidths at each frequency were intentionally matched, ensuring consistent sampling volume. Multi-frequency radar remote sensing techniques are not widely used because few multi-frequency radars are available to the science community. One exception is the 33 GHz/95 GHz UMass Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS), which AMFR is intended to replace. AMFR's multi-parameter capabilities are designed for characterizing the complex microphysics of layer clouds and precipitation processes in winter storms. AMFR will also play an important role in developing algorithms and validating measurements for an upcoming generation of space-borne radars. The frequency bands selected for AMFR match those of several sensors that have been deployed or are under development. These include the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agencies (JAXA's) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite Ku-band (13 GHz) radar, the CloudSat W-band (95 GHz) radar, and the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) satellite radars at Ku-band and Ka-band. This dissertation describes the AMFR hardware design and development. Compared to CPRS, the addition of one extra frequency band (Ku) will extend AMFR's measurement capabilities towards the larger particle sizes (precipitation). AMFR's design is based around high-power klystron amplifiers. This ensures complete coherency (CPRS uses magnetrons and coherent-on-receive technique). The partial loss in sensitivity due to

  13. Pichia pastoris-expressed dengue 2 envelope forms virus-like particles without pre-membrane protein and induces high titer neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mani, Shailendra; Tripathi, Lav; Raut, Rajendra; Tyagi, Poornima; Arora, Upasana; Barman, Tarani; Sood, Ruchi; Galav, Alka; Wahala, Wahala; de Silva, Aravinda; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Khanna, Navin

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease with a global prevalence. It is caused by four closely-related dengue viruses (DENVs 1-4). A dengue vaccine that can protect against all four viruses is an unmet public health need. Live attenuated vaccine development efforts have encountered unexpected interactions between the vaccine viruses, raising safety concerns. This has emphasized the need to explore non-replicating dengue vaccine options. Virus-like particles (VLPs) which can elicit robust immunity in the absence of infection offer potential promise for the development of non-replicating dengue vaccine alternatives. We have used the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris to develop DENV envelope (E) protein-based VLPs. We designed a synthetic codon-optimized gene, encoding the N-terminal 395 amino acid residues of the DENV-2 E protein. It also included 5' pre-membrane-derived signal peptide-encoding sequences to ensure proper translational processing, and 3' 6× His tag-encoding sequences to facilitate purification of the expressed protein. This gene was integrated into the genome of P. pastoris host and expressed under the alcohol oxidase 1 promoter by methanol induction. Recombinant DENV-2 protein, which was present in the insoluble membrane fraction, was extracted and purified using Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. Amino terminal sequencing and detection of glycosylation indicated that DENV-2 E had undergone proper post-translational processing. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of discrete VLPs in the purified protein preparation after dialysis. The E protein present in these VLPs was recognized by two different conformation-sensitive monoclonal antibodies. Low doses of DENV-2 E VLPs formulated in alum were immunogenic in inbred and outbred mice eliciting virus neutralizing titers >1,1200 in flow cytometry based assays and protected AG129 mice against lethal challenge (p<0.05). The formation of immunogenic DENV-2 E VLPs in the

  14. Evaluation of Particle Counter Technology for Detection of Fuel Contamination Detection Utilizing Advanced Aviation Forward Area Refueling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-24

    replacement of water bottom removal.  Recirculation – Air was purged from the filter separator vessel and fuel was again pumped from the tank , through...8, Automatic Particle Counter, cleanliness, free water , Diesel 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT none 18. NUMBER OF...Advanced Aviation Forward Area Refueling System Joel Schmitigal U S Army Tank Automotive Research DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release

  15. A new coincidence model for single particle counters, Part II: Advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Knapp, J Z; Lieberman, A; Abramson, L R

    1994-01-01

    Accuracy, acceptance limits and methods for U.S.P. (788) contaminating particle assays published in the XXII Revision are refined in U.S.P. XXIII. In both Revisions, although different numerical values and methods are employed, particle contamination limits remain constants for all S.V.I. container volumes. The effect of this quality standard is high particle concentration acceptance limits in the smallest S.V.I. container sizes. The effect of these high concentrations is to introduce both undercount errors and false counts into U.S.P. (788) SVI contaminating particle assays. There is general agreement that the count of high concentrations of particles by a single particle light extinction counter result in an increase of the average size of the distribution of particles reported and a decrease in their total number. The error mechanism is termed "signal coincidence." Understanding and control of both these problems is unified with the introduction of the count efficiency parameter. Part I of this paper makes available two core concepts with which evaluation and control of coincidence error in single particle counters can be accurately quantified. These two core concepts are the "Particle Triggered Poisson Model," a new more accurate statistical model of the particle counting process and a concentration measure that includes the effect of particle size on the counting capability of a detector. Use of these concepts make it possible to evaluate particle detector count efficiency capability from experimental data of the coincidence effect. This is an application paper. It combines the theory in the Part I paper with the replicability of particle counters into a simple test protocol. The test results can be used to calculate a contour of particle size and count within which both undercount errors and the introduction of false counts into U.S.P. (788) particle assays are controlled. From the data analyzed it can be seen that any single particle size test cannot

  16. Use of advanced particle methods in modeling space propulsion and its supersonic expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borner, Arnaud

    This research discusses the use of advanced kinetic particle methods such as Molecular Dynamics (MD) and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model space propulsion systems such as electrospray thrusters and their supersonic expansions. MD simulations are performed to model an electrospray thruster for the ionic liquid (IL) EMIM--BF4 using coarse-grained (CG) potentials. The model is initially featuring a constant electric field applied in the longitudinal direction. Two coarse-grained potentials are compared, and the effective-force CG (EFCG) potential is found to predict the formation of the Taylor cone, the cone-jet, and other extrusion modes for similar electric fields and mass flow rates observed in experiments of a IL fed capillary-tip-extractor system better than the simple CG potential. Later, one-dimensional and fully transient three-dimensional electric fields, the latter solving Poisson's equation to take into account the electric field due to space charge at each timestep, are computed by coupling the MD model to a Poisson solver. It is found that the inhomogeneous electric field as well as that of the IL space-charge improve agreement between modeling and experiment. The boundary conditions (BCs) are found to have a substantial impact on the potential and electric field, and the tip BC is introduced and compared to the two previous BCs, named plate and needle, showing good improvement by reducing unrealistically high radial electric fields generated in the vicinity of the capillary tip. The influence of the different boundary condition models on charged species currents as a function of the mass flow rate is studied, and it is found that a constant electric field model gives similar agreement to the more rigorous and computationally expensive tip boundary condition at lower flow rates. However, at higher mass flow rates the MD simulations with the constant electric field produces extruded particles with higher Coulomb energy per ion, consistent with

  17. Heavy Charged Particle Radiobiology: Using Enhanced Biological Effectiveness and Improved Beam Focusing to Advance Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B.; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  18. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-03

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation.

  19. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Dahl, David A.; Delmore, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  20. The Interaction Between an Insoluble Particle and an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: Micro-Gravity Experiments and Theoretical Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Ssen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of an insoluble particle with an advancing solid/liquid interface (SLI) has been a subject of investigation for the past four decades. While the original interest stemmed from geology applications (e.g., frost heaving in soil), researchers soon realized that the complex science associated with such an interaction is relevant to many other scientific fields encompassing metal matrix composites (MMCs), high temperature superconductors, inclusion management in steel, growth of monotectics, and preservation of biological cells. During solidification of a liquid containing an insoluble particle, three distinct interaction phenomena have been experimentally observed: instantaneous engulfment of the particle, continuous pushing, and particle pushing followed by engulfment. It was also observed that for given experimental conditions and particle size there is a critical solidification velocity, V(sub cr), above which a particle is engulfed. During solidification of MMCs pushing leads to particle agglomeration at the grain boundaries and this has detrimental effects on mechanical properties of the casting. Consequently, the process must be designed for instantaneous engulfment to occur. This implies the development of accurate theoretical models to predict V(sub cr), and perform benchmark experiments to test the validity of such models. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the pushing/engulfment phenomenon (PEP), its quantification in terms of the material and processing parameters remains a focus of research. Since natural convection currents occurring during terrestrial solidification experiments complicate the study of PEP, execution of experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) has been approved and funded by NASA. Extensive terrestrial (1g) experiments and preliminary micro-gravity (mu g) experiments on two space shuttle missions have been conducted in preparation for future experiments on the ISS. The investigated

  1. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  2. Regression modeling of particle size distributions in urban storm water: advancements through improved sample collection methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, Michael N.; Selbig, William R.

    2012-01-01

    A new sample collection system was developed to improve the representation of sediment entrained in urban storm water by integrating water quality samples from the entire water column. The depth-integrated sampler arm (DISA) was able to mitigate sediment stratification bias in storm water, thereby improving the characterization of suspended-sediment concentration and particle size distribution at three independent study locations. Use of the DISA decreased variability, which improved statistical regression to predict particle size distribution using surrogate environmental parameters, such as precipitation depth and intensity. The performance of this statistical modeling technique was compared to results using traditional fixed-point sampling methods and was found to perform better. When environmental parameters can be used to predict particle size distributions, environmental managers have more options when characterizing concentrations, loads, and particle size distributions in urban runoff.

  3. Advances in Automated QA/QC for TRISO Fuel Particle Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hockey, Ronald L.; Bond, Leonard J.; Batishko, Charles R.; Gray, Joseph N.; Saurwein, John J.; Lowden, Richard A.

    2004-06-30

    Fuel in most Generation IV reactor designs typically encompasses billions of the TRISO particles. Present day QA/QC methods, done manually and in many cases destructively, cannot economically test a statistically significant fraction of the large number of the individual fuel particles required. Fully automated inspection technologies are essential to economical TRISO fuel particle production. A combination of in-line nondestructive (NDE) measurements employing electromagnetic induction and digital optical imaging analysis is currently under investigation and preliminary data indicate the potential for meeting the demands of this application. To calibrate high-speed NDE methods, surrogate fuel particle samples are being coated with layers containing a wide array of defect types found to degrade fuel performance and these are being characterized via high-resolution CT and digital radiographic images.

  4. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  5. NATO Advanced Research Workshop: Optics of Biological Particles. Held in Novosibirsk, Russia on 3-6 Oct 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    A 3. DATES COVERED - 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE NATO Advanced Research Workshop Optics of Biological Particles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Characterization of Biologi- cal Species” 4 17:20 – 19:00 visit IChK&C 19:00 dinner 2nd day: Tuesday October 4 , 2005 09:00 – 09:30 Virginia Foot...surfaces; (3) erythrocyte lysis in isotonic solution of ammonium chloride; ( 4 ) endocytosis. OPTICS OF RED BLOOD CELLS AND CELL AGGREGATES Alexander V

  6. ADVANCED METHODS FOR THE COMPUTATION OF PARTICLE BEAM TRANSPORT AND THE COMPUTATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND MULTIPARTICLE PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Alex J. Dragt

    2012-08-31

    Since 1980, under the grant DEFG02-96ER40949, the Department of Energy has supported the educational and research work of the University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory (DSAT) Group. The primary focus of this educational/research group has been on the computation and analysis of charged-particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods, and on advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and multiparticle phenomena. This Final Report summarizes the accomplishments of the DSAT Group from its inception in 1980 through its end in 2011.

  7. Measurement of neutral strange particle production in the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-09-01

    Measurements are presented of the production of primary K(S)0 and Lambda particles in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV in the region transverse to the leading charged-particle jet in each event. The average multiplicity and average scalar transverse momentum sum of K(S)0 and Lambda particles measured at pseudorapidities abs(eta) < 2 rise with increasing charged-particle jet pt in the range 1-10 GeV and saturate in the region 10-50 GeV. The rise and saturation of the strange particle yields and transverse momentum sums in the underlying event are similar to those observed for inclusive charged particles, which confirms the impact-parameter picture of multiple parton interactions. The results are compared to recent tunes of the PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generator. The PYTHIA simulations underestimate the data by 15-30% for K(S)0 mesons and by about 50% for Lambda baryons, a deficit similar to that observed for the inclusive strange particle production in non-single-diffractive proton-proton collisions. The constant strange- to charged-particle activity ratios and the similar trends for mesons and baryons indicate that the multiparton-interaction dynamics is decoupled from parton hadronization, which occurs at a later stage.

  8. Modeling Combined Chemotherapy and Particle Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Marco; Tommasino, Francesco; Yamada, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the only cancer for which deaths are predicted to increase in 2014 and beyond. Combined radiochemotherapy protocols using gemcitabine and hypofractionated X-rays are ongoing in several clinical trials. Recent results indicate that charged particle therapy substantially increases local control of resectable and unresectable pancreas cancer, as predicted from previous radiobiology studies considering the high tumor hypoxia. Combination with chemotherapy improves the overall survival (OS). We compared published data on X-ray and charged particle clinical results with or without adjuvant chemotherapy calculating the biological effective dose. We show that chemoradiotherapy with protons or carbon ions results in 1 year OS significantly higher than those obtained with other treatment schedules. Further hypofractionation using charged particles may result in improved local control and survival. A comparative clinical trial using the standard X-ray scheme vs. the best current standard with carbon ions is crucial and may open new opportunities for this deadly disease. PMID:26217585

  9. Characterizing the distribution of particles in urban stormwater: advancements through improved sampling technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, William R.

    2014-01-01

    A new sample collection system was developed to improve the representation of sediment in stormwater by integrating the entire water column. The depth-integrated sampler arm (DISA) was able to mitigate sediment stratification bias in storm water, thereby improving the characterization of particle size distribution from urban source areas. Collector streets had the lowest median particle diameter of 8 μm, followed by parking lots, arterial streets, feeder streets, and residential and mixed land use (32, 43, 50, 80 and 95 μm, respectively). Results from this study suggest there is no single distribution of particles that can be applied uniformly to runoff in urban environments; however, integrating more of the entire water column during the sample collection can address some of the shortcomings of a fixed-point sampler by reducing variability and bias caused by the stratification of solids in a water column.

  10. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  11. Particle-vibration coupling: Recent advances in microscopic calculations with the Skyrme Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colò, G.; Baldo, M.; Bortignon, P. F.; Rizzo, D.; Bocchi, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this contribution, we report some recent progress in our understanding of particle-vibration coupling (PVC) in nuclei. In particular, we first review the formal development that has allowed some of us to deduce the PVC equations within the Green's functionmethod. Applications are then discussed, both in the case of single-particle states and giant resonances in magic nuclei. We also present a new model that extends the PVC ansatz and is meant to account for the complete low-lying spectra of odd nuclei.

  12. Beyond Viral Neutralization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena; Evans, David; Ferrari, Guido; Bournazos, Stylianos; Parsons, Matthew S; Bernard, Nicole F; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-01-13

    It has been known for more than 30 years that Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) infection drives a very potent B cell response resulting in the production of anti-HIV-1 antibodies targeting several viral proteins, particularly its envelope glycoproteins (Env). Env epitopes are exposed on the surfaces of viral particles and infected cells where they are targets of potentially protective antibodies. These antibodies can interdict infection by neutralization and there is strong evidence suggesting that Fc-mediated effector function can also contribute to protection. Current evidence suggests that Fc-mediated effector function plays a role in protection against infection by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) and it might be important for protection by non-neutralizing antibodies. Fc-mediated effector function includes diverse mechanisms that include antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-mediated complement activation (ADC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), antibody-mediated trancytosis inhibition, and antibody-mediated virus opsonization. All these functions could be beneficial in fighting viral infections including HIV-1. In this perspective, we discuss the latest developments for ADCC responses discussed at the HIVR4P satellite session on non-neutralizing antibodies, with emphasis on the mechanisms of ADCC resistance employed by HIV-1, the structural basis of epitopes recognized by antibodies that mediate ADCC, NK-cell education and ADCC, and murine models to study ADCC against HIV-1.

  13. Eddy Current, Magnetic Particle and Hardness Testing, Aviation Quality Control (Advanced): 9227.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This unit of instruction includes the principles of eddy current, magnetic particle and hardness testing; standards used for analyzing test results; techniques of operating equipment; interpretation of indications; advantages and limitations of these methods of testing; care and calibration of equipment; and safety and work precautions. Motion…

  14. Advanced 3D electromagnetic and particle-in-cell modeling on structured/unstructured hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, D.B.; Pasik, M.F.; Kiefer, M.L.; Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1998-01-01

    New techniques have been recently developed that allow unstructured, free meshes to be embedded into standard 3-dimensional, rectilinear, finite-difference time-domain grids. The resulting hybrid-grid modeling capability allows the higher resolution and fidelity of modeling afforded by free meshes to be combined with the simplicity and efficiency of rectilinear techniques. Integration of these new methods into the full-featured, general-purpose QUICKSILVER electromagnetic, Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code provides new modeling capability for a wide variety of electromagnetic and plasma physics problems. To completely exploit the integration of this technology into QUICKSILVER for applications requiring the self-consistent treatment of charged particles, this project has extended existing PIC methods for operation on these hybrid unstructured/rectilinear meshes. Several technical issues had to be addressed in order to accomplish this goal, including the location of particles on the unstructured mesh, adequate conservation of charge, and the proper handling of particles in the transition region between structured and unstructured portions of the hybrid grid.

  15. ADVANCING THE ION BEAM THIN FILM PLANARIZATION PROCESS FOR THE SMOOTHING OF SUBSTRATE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkarimi, P B; Spiller, E; Baker, S L; Robinson, J C; Stearns, D G; Liddle, J A; Salmassi, F; Liang, T; Stivers, A R

    2004-10-19

    For a number of technologies small substrate contaminants are undesirable, and for one technology in particular, extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), they can be a very serious issue. We have demonstrated that the Ion Beam Thin Film Planarization Process, a coating process designed to planarize substrate asperities, can be extended to smooth {approx}70 nm and {approx}80 nm diameter particles on EUVL reticle substrates to a height of {approx}0.5 nm, which will render them noncritical in an EUVL printing process. We demonstrate this smoothing process using controlled nanoscale substrate particles and lines fabricated with an e-beam lithography process. The above smoothing process was also modified to yield an excellent reflectance/wavelength uniformity and a good EUV reflectivity for the multilayer, which is required for EUVL reticles. Cross-sectional TEM on a smoothed substrate line defect shows excellent agreement with results obtained from our multilayer growth model.

  16. Advanced methods in global gyrokinetic full f particle simulation of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ogando, F.; Heikkinen, J. A.; Henriksson, S.; Janhunen, S. J.; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Leerink, S.

    2006-11-30

    A new full f nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation code, named ELMFIRE, has been developed for simulating transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas. The code is based on a gyrokinetic particle-in-cell algorithm, which can consider electrons and ions jointly or separately, as well as arbitrary impurities. The implicit treatment of the ion polarization drift and the use of full f methods allow for simulations of strongly perturbed plasmas including wide orbit effects, steep gradients and rapid dynamic changes. This article presents in more detail the algorithms incorporated into ELMFIRE, as well as benchmarking comparisons to both neoclassical theory and other codes.Code ELMFIRE calculates plasma dynamics by following the evolution of a number of sample particles. Because of using an stochastic algorithm its results are influenced by statistical noise. The effect of noise on relevant magnitudes is analyzed.Turbulence spectra of FT-2 plasma has been calculated with ELMFIRE, obtaining results consistent with experimental data.

  17. The Frontier of Modern Calorimetry: Hardware Advances and Application in Particle Physics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Tatiana

    While the last missing components of the SM puzzle seem to be successfully found, particle physicists remain hungry for what might be there, beyond the cosy boundaries of the well studies elementary particle world. However, the sophisticated technique of data analysis and acute Monte Carlo simulations remain fruitless. It appears that the successful intrusion into the realm, in which we were not welcome so far, may require a very different implication of effort. All those results might suggest, though banal, that we need an improvement on the hardware side. Indeed, the hadronic calorimeter of CMS is no competitor to its other state-of-art components. This obstacle in many cases significantly complicates the flow of the physics analysis. Besides, the era of high luminosity LHC operation in the offing is calling for the same. After exploration of the analysis debri with 8TeV collision data, we investigate various approaches for better calorimetry for the CMS detector.

  18. Fast imaging measurements and modeling of neutral and impurity density on C-2U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstedt, Erik; Deng, B.; Dettrick, S.; Gupta, D. K.; Osin, D.; Roche, T.; Zhai, K.; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    The C-2U device employed neutral beam injection and end-biasing to sustain an advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration plasma for 5+ ms, beyond characteristic transport time-scales. Three high-speed, filtered cameras observed visible light emission from neutral hydrogen and impurities, as well as deuterium pellet ablation and compact-toroid injection which were used for auxiliary particle fueling. Careful vacuum practices and titanium gettering successfully reduced neutral recycling from the confinement vessel wall. As a result, a large fraction of the remaining neutrals originate from charge-exchange between the neutral beams and plasma ions. Measured H/D- α emission is used with DEGAS2 neutral particle modeling to reconstruct the strongly non-axissymmetric neutral distribution. This is then used in fast-ion modeling to more accurately estimate their charge-exchange loss rate. Oxygen emission due to electron-impact excitation and charge-exchange recombination has also been measured using fast imaging. Reconstructed emissivity of O4+ is localized on the outboard side of the core plasma near the estimated location of the separatrix inferred by external magnetic measurements. Tri Alpha Energy.

  19. Advances and patents about grinding equipments with nano-particle jet minimum quantity lubrication.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongzhou; Li, Changhe; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Qiang; Hou, Yali

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a large number of patents have been devoted to developing minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) grinding techniques that can significantly improve both environmentally conscious and energy saving and costeffective sustainable grinding fluid alternatives. Among them, one patent is about a controllable nano-fluids jet MQL grinding system based on electrostatic atomization. Using the principle of electrostatics, it can achieve the control of droplet transfer by charging the sprayed droplets. This system can improve the uniformity of the droplet spectrum, liquid deposition efficiency and effective utilization of liquid. It can also effectively control the movement patterns of the droplets, thereby reducing the pollution of the environment and providing better health protection for workers. Although researchers accomplished profound and systematic studies on MQL, especially on nano-particles jet MQL. It can solve the shortage of MQL in cooling performance, greatly improve the working environment, save energy and reduce costs to achieve a low-carbon manufacturing. The unique lubricating performance and tribological property of solid nano-particles form nano-particle shearing films at the grinding wheel/workpiece interface, which can enhance the lubricating performance of MQL grinding. Existing studies on MQL grinding equipments, however, cannot meet the needs of the technological development. Therefore, our research provided a general introduction of the latest patients and research progress of nanoparticles jet MQL grinding equipments presented by the research team from Qingdao Technological University.

  20. Remediating radium contaminated legacy sites: Advances made through machine learning in routine monitoring of "hot" particles.

    PubMed

    Varley, Adam; Tyler, Andrew; Smith, Leslie; Dale, Paul; Davies, Mike

    2015-07-15

    The extensive use of radium during the 20th century for industrial, military and pharmaceutical purposes has led to a large number of contaminated legacy sites across Europe and North America. Sites that pose a high risk to the general public can present expensive and long-term remediation projects. Often the most pragmatic remediation approach is through routine monitoring operating gamma-ray detectors to identify, in real-time, the signal from the most hazardous heterogeneous contamination (hot particles); thus facilitating their removal and safe disposal. However, current detection systems do not fully utilise all spectral information resulting in low detection rates and ultimately an increased risk to the human health. The aim of this study was to establish an optimised detector-algorithm combination. To achieve this, field data was collected using two handheld detectors (sodium iodide and lanthanum bromide) and a number of Monte Carlo simulated hot particles were randomly injected into the field data. This allowed for the detection rate of conventional deterministic (gross counts) and machine learning (neural networks and support vector machines) algorithms to be assessed. The results demonstrated that a Neural Network operated on a sodium iodide detector provided the best detection capability. Compared to deterministic approaches, this optimised detection system could detect a hot particle on average 10cm deeper into the soil column or with half of the activity at the same depth. It was also found that noise presented by internal contamination restricted lanthanum bromide for this application.

  1. Advances in Thermal Spray Deposition of Billets for Particle Reinforced Light Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzelburger, Martin; Zimmermann, Christian; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-01

    Forming of light-metals in semi-solid state offers some advantages like low process temperatures, improved mould durability, good flow behavior and fine, globular microstructure of the final material. By the introduction of ceramic particles, increased elastic modulus and yield strength as well as wear resistance and creep behavior can be obtained. By semi-solid forging or semi-solid casting, particle reinforced metals (PRM) can be produced with improved matrix microstructure and beneficial forming process parameters compared to conventional MMC manufacturing techniques. The production of this kind of light metal matrix composites requires the supply of dense semi-finished parts with well defined volume fractions of homogeneously distributed particulate reinforcement. A manufacturing method for cylindrical light metal billets is described that applies thermal spraying as a build-up process for simultaneous deposition of matrix and reinforcement phase with cored wires as spraying material. Thermal spraying leads to small grain sizes and prevents dendrite formation. However, long process cycle times lead to billet heating and recrystallization of the matrix microstructure. In order to preserve small grain sizes that enable semi-solid forming, the thermal spraying process was analyzed by in-flight particle analysis and thermography. As a consequence, the deposition process was optimized by adaptation of the thermal spraying parameters and by application of additional cooling, leading to lower billet temperatures and finer PRM billet microstructure.

  2. Advances in Thermal Spray Deposition of Billets for Particle Reinforced Light Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzelburger, Martin; Zimmermann, Christian; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-07

    Forming of light-metals in semi-solid state offers some advantages like low process temperatures, improved mould durability, good flow behavior and fine, globular microstructure of the final material. By the introduction of ceramic particles, increased elastic modulus and yield strength as well as wear resistance and creep behavior can be obtained. By semi-solid forging or semi-solid casting, particle reinforced metals (PRM) can be produced with improved matrix microstructure and beneficial forming process parameters compared to conventional MMC manufacturing techniques. The production of this kind of light metal matrix composites requires the supply of dense semi-finished parts with well defined volume fractions of homogeneously distributed particulate reinforcement. A manufacturing method for cylindrical light metal billets is described that applies thermal spraying as a build-up process for simultaneous deposition of matrix and reinforcement phase with cored wires as spraying material. Thermal spraying leads to small grain sizes and prevents dendrite formation. However, long process cycle times lead to billet heating and recrystallization of the matrix microstructure. In order to preserve small grain sizes that enable semi-solid forming, the thermal spraying process was analyzed by in-flight particle analysis and thermography. As a consequence, the deposition process was optimized by adaptation of the thermal spraying parameters and by application of additional cooling, leading to lower billet temperatures and finer PRM billet microstructure.

  3. Characterization of exposures to nanoscale particles and fibers during solid core drilling of hybrid carbon nanotube advanced composites.

    PubMed

    Bello, Dhimiter; Wardle, Brian L; Zhang, Jie; Yamamoto, Namiko; Santeufemio, Christopher; Hallock, Marilyn; Virji, M Abbas

    2010-01-01

    This work investigated exposures to nanoparticles and nanofibers during solid core drilling of two types of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT)-hybrid composites: (1) reinforced plastic hybrid laminates (alumina fibers and CNT); and (2) graphite-epoxy composites (carbon fibers and CNT). Multiple real-time instruments were used to characterize the size distribution (5.6 nm to 20 microm), number and mass concentration, particle-bound polyaromatic hydrocarbons (b-PAHs), and surface area of airborne particles at the source and breathing zone. Time-integrated samples included grids for electron microscopy characterization of particle morphology and size resolved (2 nm to 20 microm) samples for the quantification of metals. Several new important findings herein include generation of airborne clusters of CNTs not seen during saw-cutting of similar composites, fewer nanofibers and respirable fibers released, similarly high exposures to nanoparticles with less dependence on the composite thickness, and ultrafine (< 5 nm) aerosol originating from thermal degradation of the composite material.

  4. Comparison between an unipolar corona charger and a polonium-based bipolar neutralizer for the analysis of nanosized particles and biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Laschober, Christian; Kaufman, Stanley L; Reischl, Georg; Allmaier, Günter; SzymanskiWladyslaw, W

    2006-05-01

    In this work we present results on the charging efficiency of nanoparticles by means of a corona based unipolar charging unit. This device was designed to replace a Po210 bipolar charger unit in a commercial electrospray aerosol generator (TSI Mod 3480). The charging efficiency has been investigated for negative and positive charged particles of various chemical composition in the size range between 5 and 18 nm. The corona current has been found to be the most influential operation parameter on the charging efficiency. With a positive electrospray droplet charge and a negatively-biased corona needle, a rapidly decreasing yield of singly positively charged aerosol particles with increasing corona current was found. An increasing yield of negatively charged particles was observed with increasing current of the corona process. Providing appropriate corona settings nanoparticles with charge levels similar to these obtained with a Po210 charger were found. At optimal corona settings the yield of singly charged particles was found to be two to four times higher for negative and positive particles compared to bipolar charging. This gain in the charging efficiency increases directly the sensitivity of analysis and enhances all measurement and manipulation processes of airborne nanoparticles for which electrical charging is required.

  5. Advances in the field of single-particle cryo-electron microscopy over the last decade.

    PubMed

    Frank, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    In single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), molecules suspended in a thin aqueous layer are rapidly frozen and imaged at cryogenic temperature in the transmission electron microscope. From the random projection views, a three-dimensional image is reconstructed, enabling the structure of the molecule to be obtained. In this article I discuss technological progress over the past decade, which has, in my own field of study, culminated in the determination of ribosome structure at 2.5-Å resolution. I also discuss likely future improvements in methodology.

  6. Advanced oxidation of natural organic matter using hydrogen peroxide and iron-coated pumice particles.

    PubMed

    Kitis, M; Kaplan, S S

    2007-08-01

    The oxidative removal of natural organic matter (NOM) from waters using hydrogen peroxide and iron-coated pumice particles as heterogeneous catalysts was investigated. Two NOM sources were tested: humic acid solution and a natural source water. Iron coated pumice removed about half of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration at a dose of 3000 mg l(-1) in 24 h by adsorption only. Original pumice and peroxide dosed together provided UV absorbance reductions as high as 49%, mainly due to the presence of metal oxides including Al(2)O(3), Fe(2)O(3) and TiO(2) in the natural pumice, which are known to catalyze the decomposition of peroxide forming strong oxidants. Coating the original pumice particles with iron oxides significantly enhanced the removal of NOM with peroxide. A strong linear correlation was found between iron contents of coated pumices and UV absorbance reductions. Peroxide consumption also correlated with UV absorbance reduction. Control experiments proved the effective coating and the stability of iron oxide species bound on pumice surfaces. Results overall indicated that in addition to adsorptive removal of NOM by metal oxides on pumice surfaces, surface reactions between iron oxides and peroxide result in the formation of strong oxidants, probably like hydroxyl radicals, which further oxidize both adsorbed NOM and remaining NOM in solution, similar to those in Fenton-like reactions.

  7. Advances in nuclear data and all-particle transport for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Chadwick, M.B.; Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1994-05-01

    Fast neutrons have been used to treat over 15,000 cancer patients worldwide and proton therapy is rapidly emerging as a treatment of choice for tumors around critical anatomical structures. Neutron therapy requires evaluated data to {approximately}70 MeV while proton therapy requires data to {approximately}250 MeV. Collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the medical physics community has revealed limitations in nuclear cross section evaluations and radiation transport capabilities that have prevented neutron and proton radiation therapy centers from using Monte Carlo calculations to accurately predict dose in patients. These evaluations require energy- and angle-dependent cross sections for secondary neutrons, charged-particles and recoil nuclei. We are expanding the LLNL nuclear databases to higher energies for biologically important elements and have developed a three-dimensional, all-particle Monte Carlo radiation transport code that uses computer-assisted-tomography (CT) images as the input mesh. This code, called PEREGRINE calculates dose distributions in the human body and can be used as a tool to determine the dependence of dose on details of the evaluated nuclear data. In this paper, we will review the status of the nuclear data required for neutron and proton therapy, describe the capabilities of the PEREGRINE package, and show the effects of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution.

  8. Confinement and dynamics of neutral beam injected fast ions in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Almagri, F.; Anderson, J. K.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J.; Fiksel, G.; Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Stupishin, N.; Andre, R.; McCune, D.

    2010-11-01

    The new 1MW neutral beam injector (97% H, 3% D) on MST provides a good test-bed for study of fast ions in the RFP. Analysis of the D-D fusion neutron flux decay at beam turn-off reveals that the confinement time of the fast ions is at least 10 ms, ten-fold larger than the thermal conferment times for particles and energy in standard stochastic plasmas. Also, the fast ion confinement increases with magnetic field strength. Dependence of fast ion confinement on plasma parameters, beam energy, and injection direction will be characterized and compared with TRANSP simulations. In addition, an advanced neutral particle analyzer and a prototype of fast ion charge exchange spectroscopy are under construction to measure neutralized fast ions and induced Doppler-shifted Hα light, respectively, thereby resolving fast ion density and energy distribution. Initial measurements of fast-ion dynamics during magnetic reconnection events will be presented.

  9. The Search for Fractional Charge Particles in an Advanced, Automated Variation of the Millikan Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I. T.; Halyo, V.; Lee, E. R.; Loomba, D.; Perl, M. L.

    2001-04-01

    We will present a variation on the Millikan apparatus designed to look for fractionally charged particles in bulk materials, and results from the current run. Oil drops are produced from a drop-on-demand ejector, and imaged by a digital CCD camera and framegrabber combination. A networked Linux cluster is used to simultaneously collect and analyze data, and to monitor and control the apparatus. The experiment is fully automated, and utilizes laminar air flow to make possible the accurate measurements of charge on large (20 micron) fluid drops. The experiment has the capability to process a total of 10^7 to 10^8 drops (20-200 mg), and the ability to use large drops enables the search to be carried out in mineral suspensions.

  10. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  11. Advanced laser particle accelerator development at LANL: from fast ignition to radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine A; Offermann, D T; Cobble, J A; Schmitt, M J; Gautier, D C; Kwan, T J T; Montgomery, D S; Kluge, Thomas; Bussmann, Micheal; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Gall, B; Geissel, M; Korgan, G; Kovaleski, S; Lockard, T; Malekos, S; Schollmeier, M; Sentoku, Y; Cowan, T E

    2010-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, SN M detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high current and high energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology in conjunction with our partners at the ForschungsZentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD). Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent etliciencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  12. Incorporating advanced language models into the P300 speller using particle filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speier, W.; Arnold, C. W.; Deshpande, A.; Knall, J.; Pouratian, N.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The P300 speller is a common brain-computer interface (BCI) application designed to communicate language by detecting event related potentials in a subject’s electroencephalogram signal. Information about the structure of natural language can be valuable for BCI communication, but attempts to use this information have thus far been limited to rudimentary n-gram models. While more sophisticated language models are prevalent in natural language processing literature, current BCI analysis methods based on dynamic programming cannot handle their complexity. Approach. Sampling methods can overcome this complexity by estimating the posterior distribution without searching the entire state space of the model. In this study, we implement sequential importance resampling, a commonly used particle filtering (PF) algorithm, to integrate a probabilistic automaton language model. Main result. This method was first evaluated offline on a dataset of 15 healthy subjects, which showed significant increases in speed and accuracy when compared to standard classification methods as well as a recently published approach using a hidden Markov model (HMM). An online pilot study verified these results as the average speed and accuracy achieved using the PF method was significantly higher than that using the HMM method. Significance. These findings strongly support the integration of domain-specific knowledge into BCI classification to improve system performance.

  13. Incorporating advanced language models into the P300 speller using particle filtering

    PubMed Central

    Speier, W; Arnold, CW; Deshpande, A; Knall, J

    2015-01-01

    Objective The P300 speller is a common brain–computer interface (BCI) application designed to communicate language by detecting event related potentials in a subject’s electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. Information about the structure of natural language can be valuable for BCI communication, but attempts to use this information have thus far been limited to rudimentary n-gram models. While more sophisticated language models are prevalent in natural language processing literature, current BCI analysis methods based on dynamic programming cannot handle their complexity. Approach Sampling methods can overcome this complexity by estimating the posterior distribution without searching the entire state space of the model. In this study, we implement sequential importance resampling, a commonly used particle filtering (PF) algorithm, to integrate a probabilistic automaton language model. Main Result This method was first evaluated offline on a dataset of 15 healthy subjects, which showed significant increases in speed and accuracy when compared to standard classification methods as well as a recently published approach using a hidden Markov model (HMM). An online pilot study verified these results as the average speed and accuracy achieved using the PF method was significantly higher than that using the HMM method. Significance These findings strongly support the integration of domain-specific knowledge into BCI classification to improve system performance. PMID:26061188

  14. Advanced Laser Particle Accelerator Development at LANL: From Fast Ignition to Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, K. A.; Offermann, D. T.; Cobble, J. A.; Schmitt, M. J.; Gautier, D. C.; Kwan, T. J.; Montgomery, D. S.; Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Gall, B.; Kovaleski, S.; Geissel, M.; Schollmeier, M.; Korgan, G.; Malekos, S.; Lockard, T.

    2010-11-04

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, Special Nuclear Material (SNM) detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high-current and high-energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology. Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent efficiencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt laser. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world [3]. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  15. Search for a Heavy Neutral Particle Decaying to eμ, eτ, or μτ in pp Collisions at sqrt[s]=8  TeV with the ATLAS Detector.

    PubMed

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Sandhoff, M; Sandoval, C; Sandstroem, R; Sankey, D P C; Sannino, M; Sansoni, A; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, H; Santoyo Castillo, I; Sapp, K; Sapronov, A; Saraiva, J G; Sarrazin, B; Sasaki, O; Sasaki, Y; Sato, K; Sauvage, G; Sauvan, E; Savage, G; Savard, P; Sawyer, C; Sawyer, L; Saxon, J; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scanlon, T; Scannicchio, D A; Scarcella, M; Scarfone, V; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schaefer, D; Schaefer, R; Schaeffer, J; Schaepe, S; Schaetzel, S; Schäfer, U; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Schiavi, C; Schillo, C; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmidt, E; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, S; Schmitt, S; Schneider, B; Schnellbach, Y J; Schnoor, U; Schoeffel, L; Schoening, A; Schoenrock, B D; Schopf, E; Schorlemmer, A L S; Schott, M; Schouten, D; Schovancova, J; Schramm, S; Schreyer, M; Schroeder, C; Schuh, N; Schultens, M J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwarz, T A; Schwegler, Ph; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwindling, J; Schwindt, T; Schwoerer, M; Sciacca, F G; Scifo, E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Scutti, F; Searcy, J; Sedov, G; Sedykh, E; Seema, P; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Sekula, S J; Selbach, K E; Seliverstov, D M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Serkin, L; Serre, T; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sfiligoj, T; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shan, L Y; Shang, R; Shank, J T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Shcherbakova, A; Shehu, C Y; Sherwood, P; Shi, L; Shimizu, S; Shimmin, C O; Shimojima, M; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Shoaleh Saadi, D; Shochet, M J; Shojaii, S; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Shushkevich, S; Sicho, P; Sidiropoulou, O; Sidorov, D; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simard, O; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simon, D; Simoniello, R; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Siragusa, G; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skinner, M B; Skottowe, H P; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Slawinska, M; Sliwa, K; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smestad, L; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, M N K; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snidero, G; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Socher, F; Soffer, A; Soh, D A; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solc, J; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solodkov, A A; Soloshenko, A; Solovyanov, O V; Solovyev, V; Sommer, P; Song, H Y; Soni, N; Sood, A; Sopczak, A; Sopko, B; Sopko, V; Sorin, V; Sosa, D; Sosebee, M; Sotiropoulou, C L; Soualah, R; Soueid, P; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Spagnolo, S; Spalla, M; Spanò, F; Spearman, W R; Spettel, F; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spiller, L A; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; St Denis, R D; Staerz, S; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stamm, S; Stanecka, E; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stanitzki, M M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Staszewski, R; Stavina, P; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stern, S; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Stramaglia, M E; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Strubig, A; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Subramaniam, R; Succurro, A; Sugaya, Y; Suhr, C; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, S; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, Y; Svatos, M; Swedish, S; Swiatlowski, M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Taccini, C; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tam, J Y C; Tan, K G; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tannenwald, B B; Tannoury, N; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Teoh, J J; Tepel, F; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Therhaag, J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, R J; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thun, R P; Tibbetts, M J; Ticse Torres, R E; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tiouchichine, E; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tolley, E; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; True, P; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turecek, D; Turra, R; Turvey, A J; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ughetto, M; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Unverdorben, C; Urban, J; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Usanova, A; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valderanis, C; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Den Wollenberg, W; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; Van Der Leeuw, R; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vannucci, F; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veloso, F; Velz, T; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigne, R; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, X; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, A; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yakabe, R; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yao, L; Yao, W-M; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    2015-07-17

    This Letter presents a search for a heavy neutral particle decaying into an opposite-sign different-flavor dilepton pair, e^{±}μ^{∓}, e^{±}τ^{∓}, or μ^{±}τ^{∓} using 20.3  fb^{-1} of pp collision data at sqrt[s]=8  TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The numbers of observed candidate events are compatible with the standard model expectations. Limits are set on the cross section of new phenomena in two scenarios: the production of ν[over ˜]_{τ} in R-parity-violating supersymmetric models and the production of a lepton-flavor-violating Z^{'} vector boson.

  16. Monte Carlo particle-trajectory models for neutral cometary gases. I - Models and equations. II - The spatial morphology of the Lyman-alpha coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.; Smyth, William H.

    1988-01-01

    The mathematical derivations of various methods employed in the Monte Carlo particle-trajectory model (MCPTM) are presented, and the application of the MCPTM to the calculation of the photochemical heating of the inner coma through the partial thermalization of cometary hydrogen atoms produced by the photodissociation of water is discussed. This model is then used to explain the observed morphology of the spatially extended Ly-alpha comas of comets. The rocket and Skylab images of the Ly-alpha coma of Comet Kohoutek are examined.

  17. Application of the Scintillation Detector on base of BrilLanCe Series Crystal in Neutral Particles Spectrometer for the Satellite Experiment ZINA-NT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, Irene; Arkhangelsky, Andrey; Batischev, Alexey; Naumov, Pietr; Kondratyeva, Natalia

    In a condition of normal gravity, field-induced translational and rotational motions of solids are publically recognized for materials that contain spontaneous magnetic moments. It is believed that a high field above B = 10 T is necessary to induce such movements for ordinary diamagnetic material. Rotation and translation induced by low field of B = 0.5 T were recently reported on diamagnetic single-crystals of corundum [1], calcite, diamond, graphite and silver [2]. Here the crystals were released in microgravity produced by drop capsule(duration 4.5 s), and the motions took place in diffused gas medium (50Pa). In homogeneous field, crystal showed rotational oscillation with respect to field because of diamagnetic anisotropy energy. In a given field intensity, its period was determined by anisotropy of diamagnetic susceptibility. The crystal was ejected from field center by field-gradient force with significant terminal velocity. In a given field distribution, the velocity uniquely depended on intrinsic susceptibility of material. It is expected that the above two motions were independent to mass of sample. Necessity of clarifying magnetic properties of a single particle is increasing with the growing interest on nano-sized materials; data of susceptibility as well as its anisotropy are necessary for characterizing its property. However the values are difficult to obtain by conventional methods because of 2 factors; existence of a sample holder, and necessity of mass measurement. Susceptibility and its anisotropy of a single particle can be determined with high precision from above two motions in microgravity, because the methods are free of sample holder and mass measurement. Moreover, they are based on simple motional equations that consist of an inertia term and a magnetic term. In principle, magnetization is measured for limitlessly small sample, provided that the motions are observed. Attempt to obtain magnetization curve from the above-mentioned translation

  18. Neutralization efficiency estimation in a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the optimal conditions of neutral beam generation to maintain a high degree of neutralization and focusing during beam energy variation for a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma with a three-grid ion beam acceleration system. The neutral beam energy distribution was estimated by measuring the energy profiles of ions that 'survived' the neutralization after reflection. The energy measurements of the primary and reflected ions showed narrow distribution functions, each with only one peak. At higher beam energies, both the ratio of the ion energy loss to the primary energy and the degree of energy divergence decreased, confirming the precise alignment of the neutral beam. The neutralization efficiency of the neutral beam source with a three-grid acceleration system was found to be affected mainly by the beam angle divergence rather than by the particle translation energy.

  19. Using advanced dispersion models and mobile monitoring to characterize spatial patterns of ultrafine particles in an urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwack, Leonard M.; Hanna, Steven R.; Spengler, John D.; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2011-09-01

    In urban settings with elevated bridges, buildings, and other complex terrain, the relationship between traffic and air pollution can be highly variable and difficult to accurately characterize. Atmospheric dispersion models are often used in this context, but incorporating background concentrations and characterizing emissions at high spatiotemporal resolution is challenging, especially for ultrafine particles (UFPs). Ambient pollutant monitoring can characterize this relationship, especially when using continuous real-time monitoring. However, it is challenging to quantify local source contributions over background or to characterize spatial patterns across a neighborhood. The goal of this study is to evaluate contributions of traffic to neighborhood-scale air pollution using a combination of regression models derived from mobile UFP monitoring observations collected in Brooklyn, NY and outputs from the Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) model. QUIC is a dispersion model that can explicitly take into account the three-dimensional shapes of buildings. The monitoring-based regression model characterized concentration gradients from a major elevated roadway, controlling for real-time traffic volume, meteorological variables, and other local sources. QUIC was applied to simulate dispersion from this same major roadway. The relative concentration decreases with distance from the roadway estimated by the monitoring-based regression model after removal of background and by QUIC were similar. Horizontal contour plots with both models demonstrated non-uniform patterns related to building configuration and source heights. We used the best-fit relationship between the monitoring-based regression model after removal of background and the QUIC outputs ( R2 = 0.80) to estimate a UFP emissions factor of 5.7 × 10 14 particles/vehicle-km, which was relatively consistent across key model assumptions. Our joint applications of novel techniques for analyzing mobile monitoring

  20. Fast ion behavior during neutral beam injection in ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, M.R.; Thomas, C.E.; Colchin, R.J.; Rome, J.A.; England, A.C.; Fowler, R.H.; Aceto, S.C.

    1993-09-01

    In stellarators, single-particle confinement properties can be more complex than in their tokamak counterparts. Fast-ion behavior in tokamaks has been well characterized through an abundance of measurements on various devices and in general has been shown to be consistent with classical slowing-down theory, although anomalous ion behavior has been observed during intense beam injection in ISX-B, during fishbone instabilities in PDX, and in experiments on TFR. In contrast, fast ion behavior in stellarators is not as wel established experimentally with the primary experiments to date focusing o near-perpendicular or perpendicular neutral beam injection (NBI) on the Wendelstein 7-A stellarator (91 and Heliotron-E. This paper addresses fast-ion confinement properties in a large-aspect-ratio, moderate-shear stellarator, the Advanced Toroidal Facility, during tangential NBI. The primary data used in this study are the experimentally measured energy spectra of charge-exchange neutrals escaping from the plasma, using a two-dimensional scanning neutral particle analyzer. This diagnostic method is well established, having been used on several devices since the early 1970`s. Various aspects of fast-ion behavior are investigated by comparing these data with computed theoretical spectra based on energeticion distributions derived from the fastion Fokker-Planck equation. Ion orbits are studied by computer orbit following, by the computation of J* surfaces, and by Monte Carlo calculations.

  1. Ultracold neutral plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, M.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-01-01

    By photoionizing samples of laser-cooled atoms with laser light tuned just above the ionization limit, plasmas can be created with electron and ion temperatures below 10 K. These ultracold neutral plasmas have extended the temperature bounds of plasma physics by two orders of magnitude. Table-top experiments, using many of the tools from atomic physics, allow for the study of plasma phenomena in this new regime with independent control over the density and temperature of the plasma through the excitation process. Characteristic of these systems is an inhomogeneous density profile, inherited from the density distribution of the laser-cooled neutral atom sample. Most work has dealt with unconfined plasmas in vacuum, which expand outward at velocities of order 100 m/s, governed by electron pressure, and with lifetimes of order 100 μs, limited by stray electric fields. Using detection of charged particles and optical detection techniques, a wide variety of properties and phenomena have been observed, including expansion dynamics, collective excitations in both the electrons and ions, and collisional properties. Through three-body recombination collisions, the plasmas rapidly form Rydberg atoms, and clouds of cold Rydberg atoms have been observed to spontaneously avalanche ionize to form plasmas. Of particular interest is the possibility of the formation of strongly coupled plasmas, where Coulomb forces dominate thermal motion and correlations become important. The strongest impediment to strong coupling is disorder-induced heating, a process in which Coulomb energy from an initially disordered sample is converted into thermal energy. This restricts electrons to a weakly coupled regime and leaves the ions barely within the strongly coupled regime. This review will give an overview of the field of ultracold neutral plasmas, from its inception in 1999 to current work, including efforts to increase strong coupling and effects on plasma properties due to strong coupling.

  2. Magnetic particle imaging: advancements and perspectives for real-time in vivo monitoring and image-guided therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablico-Lansigan, Michele H.; Situ, Shu F.; Samia, Anna Cristina S.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging biomedical imaging technology that allows the direct quantitative mapping of the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. MPI's increased sensitivity and short image acquisition times foster the creation of tomographic images with high temporal and spatial resolution. The contrast and sensitivity of MPI is envisioned to transcend those of other medical imaging modalities presently used, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray scans, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this review, we present an overview of the recent advances in the rapidly developing field of MPI. We begin with a basic introduction of the fundamentals of MPI, followed by some highlights over the past decade of the evolution of strategies and approaches used to improve this new imaging technique. We also examine the optimization of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers used for imaging, underscoring the importance of size homogeneity and surface engineering. Finally, we present some future research directions for MPI, emphasizing the novel and exciting opportunities that it offers as an important tool for real-time in vivo monitoring. All these opportunities and capabilities that MPI presents are now seen as potential breakthrough innovations in timely disease diagnosis, implant monitoring, and image-guided therapeutics.

  3. Whole-Chain Tick Saliva Proteins Presented on Hepatitis B Virus Capsid-Like Particles Induce High-Titered Antibodies with Neutralizing Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Philipp; Wallich, Reinhard; Nassal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ticks are vectors for various, including pathogenic, microbes. Tick saliva contains multiple anti-host defense factors that enable ticks their bloodmeals yet also facilitate microbe transmission. Lyme disease-causing borreliae profit specifically from the broadly conserved tick histamine release factor (tHRF), and from cysteine-rich glycoproteins represented by Salp15 from Ixodes scapularis and Iric-1 from Ixodes ricinus ticks which they recruit to their outer surface protein C (OspC). Hence these tick proteins are attractive targets for anti-tick vaccines that simultaneously impair borrelia transmission. Main obstacles are the tick proteins´ immunosuppressive activities, and for Salp15 orthologs, the lack of efficient recombinant expression systems. Here, we exploited the immune-enhancing properties of hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) derived capsid-like particles (CLPs) to generate, in E. coli, nanoparticulate vaccines presenting tHRF and, as surrogates for the barely soluble wild-type proteins, cysteine-free Salp15 and Iric-1 variants. The latter CLPs were exclusively accessible in the less sterically constrained SplitCore system. Mice immunized with tHRF CLPs mounted a strong anti-tHRF antibody response. CLPs presenting cysteine-free Salp15 and Iric-1 induced antibodies to wild-type, including glycosylated, Salp15 and Iric-1. The broadly distributed epitopes included the OspC interaction sites. In vitro, the anti-Salp15 antibodies interfered with OspC binding and enhanced human complement-mediated killing of Salp15 decorated borreliae. A mixture of all three CLPs induced high titered antibodies against all three targets, suggesting the feasibility of combination vaccines. These data warrant in vivo validation of the new candidate vaccines´ protective potential against tick infestation and Borrelia transmission. PMID:26352137

  4. Simulations of neutralized final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to drive an inertial fusion target or study high energy density physics with heavy ion beams, the beam radius must be focused to < 3 mm and the pulse length must be compressed to < 10 ns. The conventional scheme for temporal pulse compression makes use of an increasing ion velocity to compress the beam as it drifts and beam space charge to stagnate the compression before final focus. Beam compression in a neutralizing plasma does not require stagnation of the compression, enabling a more robust method. The final pulse shape at the target can be programmed by an applied velocity tilt. In this paper, neutralized drift compression is investigated. The sensitivity of the compression and focusing to beam momentum spread, plasma, and magnetic field conditions is studied with realistic driver examples. Using the 3D particle-in-cell code, we examine issues associated with self-field generation, stability, and vacuum-neutralized transport transition and focusing.

  5. Modeling of neutral entrainment in an FRC thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, Jeremiah; Gimelshein, Natalia; Gimelshein, Sergey; Cambier, Jean-Luc; Ketsdever, Andrew

    2012-11-27

    Neutral entrainment in a field reversed configuration thruster is modeled numerically with an implicit PIC code extended to include thermal and chemical interactions between plasma and neutral particles. The contribution of charge exchange and electron impact ionization reactions is analyzed, and the sensitivity of the entrainment efficiency to the plasmoid translation velocity and neutral density is evaluated.

  6. Gas cell neutralizers (Fundamental principles)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehrer, B.

    1985-06-01

    Neutralizing an ion-beam of the size and energy levels involved in the neutral-particle-beam program represents a considerable extension of the state-of-the-art of neutralizer technology. Many different mediums (e.g., solid, liquid, gas, plasma, photons) can be used to strip the hydrogen ion of its extra electron. A large, multidisciplinary R and D effort will no doubt be required to sort out all of the ''pros and cons'' of these various techniques. The purpose of this particular presentation is to discuss some basic configurations and fundamental principles of the gas type of neutralizer cell. Particular emphasis is placed on the ''Gasdynamic Free-Jet'' neutralizer since this configuration has the potential of being much shorter than other type of gas cells (in the beam direction) and it could operate in nearly a continuous mode (CW) if necessary. These were important considerations in the ATSU design which is discussed in some detail in the second presentation entitled ''ATSU Point Design''.

  7. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  8. Recent advances in particle and droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices based on surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuochen; Zhe, Jiang

    2011-04-07

    Manipulation of microscale particles and fluid liquid droplets is an important task for lab-on-a-chip devices for numerous biological researches and applications, such as cell detection and tissue engineering. Particle manipulation techniques based on surface acoustic waves (SAWs) appear effective for lab-on-a-chip devices because they are non-invasive, compatible with soft lithography micromachining, have high energy density, and work for nearly any type of microscale particles. Here we review the most recent research and development of the past two years in SAW based particle and liquid droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices including particle focusing and separation, particle alignment and patterning, particle directing, and liquid droplet delivery.

  9. In-vacuum sensors for the beamline components of the ITER neutral beam test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Sartori, E.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Veltri, P.

    2016-11-01

    Embedded sensors have been designed for installation on the components of the MITICA beamline, the prototype ITER neutral beam injector (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), to derive characteristics of the particle beam and to monitor the component conditions during operation for protection and thermal control. Along the beamline, the components interacting with the particle beam are the neutralizer, the residual ion dump, and the calorimeter. The design and the positioning of sensors on each component have been developed considering the expected beam-surface interaction including non-ideal and off-normal conditions. The arrangement of the following instrumentation is presented: thermal sensors, strain gages, electrostatic probes including secondary emission detectors, grounding shunt for electrical currents, and accelerometers.

  10. In vitro assay for neutralizing antibody to hepatitis C virus: evidence for broadly conserved neutralization epitopes.

    PubMed

    Bartosch, Birke; Bukh, Jens; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Granier, Christelle; Engle, Ronald E; Blackwelder, William C; Emerson, Suzanne U; Cosset, François-Loïc; Purcell, Robert H

    2003-11-25

    Our understanding of the humoral immune response to hepatitis C virus (HCV) is limited because the virus can be studied only in humans and chimpanzees and because previously described neutralization assays have not been robust or simple to perform. Nevertheless, epidemiologic and laboratory studies suggested that neutralizing Ab to HCV might be important in preventing infection. We have recently described a neutralization assay based on the neutralization of pseudotyped murine retrovirus constructs bearing HCV envelope glycoproteins on their surface. We have applied the assay to well characterized clinical samples from HCV-infected patients and chimpanzees, confirmed the existence of neutralizing Ab to HCV, and validated most previously reported neutralizations of the virus. We did not find neutralizing anti-HCV in resolving infections but did find relatively high titers (>1:320) of such Ab in chronic infections. Neutralizing Ab was directed not only to epitope(s) in the hypervariable region of the E2 envelope protein but also to one or more epitopes elsewhere in the envelope of the virus. Neutralizing Ab was broadly reactive and could neutralize pseudotype particles bearing the envelope glycoproteins of two different subgenotypes (1a and 1b). The ability to assay neutralizing anti-HCV should permit an assessment of the prospects for successful Ab-mediated passive and active immunoprophylaxis against hepatitis C.

  11. In vitro assay for neutralizing antibody to hepatitis C virus: Evidence for broadly conserved neutralization epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Bartosch, Birke; Bukh, Jens; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Granier, Christelle; Engle, Ronald E.; Blackwelder, William C.; Emerson, Suzanne U.; Cosset, François-Loïc; Purcell, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    Our understanding of the humoral immune response to hepatitis C virus (HCV) is limited because the virus can be studied only in humans and chimpanzees and because previously described neutralization assays have not been robust or simple to perform. Nevertheless, epidemiologic and laboratory studies suggested that neutralizing Ab to HCV might be important in preventing infection. We have recently described a neutralization assay based on the neutralization of pseudotyped murine retrovirus constructs bearing HCV envelope glycoproteins on their surface. We have applied the assay to well characterized clinical samples from HCV-infected patients and chimpanzees, confirmed the existence of neutralizing Ab to HCV, and validated most previously reported neutralizations of the virus. We did not find neutralizing anti-HCV in resolving infections but did find relatively high titers (>1:320) of such Ab in chronic infections. Neutralizing Ab was directed not only to epitope(s) in the hypervariable region of the E2 envelope protein but also to one or more epitopes elsewhere in the envelope of the virus. Neutralizing Ab was broadly reactive and could neutralize pseudotype particles bearing the envelope glycoproteins of two different subgenotypes (1a and 1b). The ability to assay neutralizing anti-HCV should permit an assessment of the prospects for successful Ab-mediated passive and active immunoprophylaxis against hepatitis C. PMID:14617769

  12. Neutral strange particle production at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Saulys, A.C.; For the E810 Collaboration

    1993-02-11

    We present the results of {Lambda} and K{sub s{sup o}} production from Si and Pb targets with 14.6{times}{Lambda} Gev/c Si beams. The measured rapidity distributions and the transverse mass exponential slopes are presented and compared with models.

  13. Discrete Elements Method of Neutral Particle Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    distribution of flux which is strongly peaked along the axis of the duct. If the duct is not aligned along one of the quadrature set directions, the...rule requires knowledge of the flux in three fixed directions distributed in azimuth and three fixed directions distributed polarly, within each element...so that none of the flux would reach cells 3 and 9. However, because the SC method assumes a constant flux distribution along each cell interface

  14. Satellite observations and instrumentation for measuring energetic neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, H.D.; Mobilia, J.; Collin, H.L.; Imhof, W.L. . Space Sciences Lab.)

    1993-12-01

    Direct measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) and ions have been obtained with the cooled solid state detectors on the low-altitude (220 km) three-axis stabilized S81-1/ stimulated emissions of energetic particles (SEEP) satellite and on the spinning 400 km [times] 5.5 R[sub e] (where R[sub e] is Earth radii) Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). During magnetic storms ENA and ion precipitation (E > 10 keV) are evident over the low-altitude equatorial region based on data from the SEEP (ONR 804) spectrometers and CRRES ion mass spectrometer (IMS-HI) (ONR 307-8-3) ion composition and ENA instrument. The IMS-HI neutral atom spectrometer covers the energy range from 20 to 1,500 keV with a geometrical factor of 10[sub [minus]3] cm[sup 2] sr and uses a 7-kG magnetic field to screen out protons less than about 50 MeV. During the strong magnetic storm of 24 March 1991 the first ENA and ion mass composition measurements were obtained of ring current particles below the inner belt and these fluxes are compared to the IMS-HI flux measurements in the ring current. Recently, an advanced spectrometer, the Source/Loss-cone Energetic Particle Spectrometer (SEPS), has been developed to image electrons, ions, and neutrals on the despun platform of the POLAR satellite ([approximately]1.8 [times] 9 R[sub e]) for launch in the mid 1990s as part of NASA's International Solar Terrestrial Physics/Global Geospace Science (ISTP/GGS) program.

  15. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in

  16. MONTE CARLO ADVANCES FOR THE EOLUS ASCI PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    J. S. HENDRICK; G. W. MCKINNEY; L. J. COX

    2000-01-01

    The Eolus ASCI project includes parallel, 3-D transport simulation for various nuclear applications. The codes developed within this project provide neutral and charged particle transport, detailed interaction physics, numerous source and tally capabilities, and general geometry packages. One such code is MCNPW which is a general purpose, 3-dimensional, time-dependent, continuous-energy Monte Carlo fully-coupled N-Particle transport code. Significant advances are also being made in the areas of modern software engineering and parallel computing. These advances are described in detail.

  17. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  18. The neutral upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. N.

    2002-07-01

    After World War II, Professor S.K. Mitra wrote a comprehensive book called The Upper Atmosphere, which dealt with information available from ground-based and balloon-borne experiments. As a result, topics such as day airglow were investigated and further ground-based experiments using incoherent back-scattering were carried out. These activities resulted in important new information on the ozonosphere. The dramatic discovery of ozone holes forms a new and exciting chapter in the discovery of atmospheric processes. While dealing with the limits of the atmosphere, reference may be made to interstellar molecules whose discovery has raised considerable scientific curiosity. Knowledge on the solar-terrestrial relationship advanced a great deal when more information on solar radiation became available by measuring higher energy photons in the UV, EUV, and even X-ray regime. All this information is incorporated in this volume and presented under the title The Neutral Upper Atmosphere. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/0-7923-6434-1

  19. Proposed research on advanced accelerator concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.C.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1991-09-01

    This report summarizes technical progress and accomplishments during the proposed three-year research on advanced accelerator concepts supported by the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-88ER40465. A vigorous theoretical program has been pursued in critical problem areas related to advanced accelerator concepts and the basic equilibrium, stability, and radiation properties of intense charged particle beams. Broadly speaking, our research has made significant contributions in the following three major areas: Investigations of physics issues related to particle acceleration including two-beam accelerators and cyclotron resonance laser (CRL) accelerators; Investigations of RF sources including the free- electron lasers, cyclotron resonance masers, and relativistic magnetrons; Studies of coherent structures in electron plasmas and beams ranging from a low-density, nonrelativistic, pure electron plasma column to high-density, relativistic, non-neutral electron flow in a high-voltage diode. The remainder of this report presents theoretical and computational advances in these areas.

  20. Characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of advanced spray-dried chemotherapeutic PEGylated phospholipid particles for dry powder inhalation delivery in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Meenach, Samantha A; Anderson, Kimberly W; Zach Hilt, J; McGarry, Ronald C; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-07-16

    Pulmonary inhalation chemotherapeutic drug delivery offers many advantages for lung cancer patients in comparison to conventional systemic chemotherapy. Inhalable particles are advantageous in their ability to deliver drug deep in the lung by utilizing optimally sized particles and higher local drug dose delivery. In this work, spray-dried and co-spray dried inhalable lung surfactant-mimic PEGylated lipopolymers as microparticulate/nanoparticulate dry powders containing paclitaxel were rationally designed via organic solution advanced spray drying (no water) in closed-mode from dilute concentration feed solution. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine poly(ethylene glycol) (DPPE-PEG) with varying PEG chain length were mixed with varying amounts of paclitaxel in methanol to produce co-spray dried microparticles and nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy showed the spherical particle morphology of the inhalable particles. Thermal analysis and X-ray powder diffraction confirmed the retention of the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid-state following spray drying, the degree of solid-state molecular order, and solid-state phase transition behavior. The residual water content of the particles was very low as quantified analytically Karl Fisher titration. The amount of paclitaxel loaded into the particles was quantified which indicated high encapsulation efficiencies (43-99%). Dry powder aerosol dispersion performance was measured in vitro using the Next Generation Impactor (NGI) coupled with the Handihaler dry powder inhaler device and showed mass median aerodynamic diameters in the range of 3.4-7 μm. These results demonstrate that this novel microparticulate/nanoparticulate chemotherapeutic PEGylated phospholipid dry powder inhalation aerosol platform has great potential in lung cancer drug delivery.

  1. Effect of advanced aftertreatment for PM and NOx reduction on heavy-duty diesel engine ultrafine particle emissions.

    PubMed

    Herner, Jorn Dinh; Hu, Shaohua; Robertson, William H; Huai, Tao; Chang, M-C Oliver; Rieger, Paul; Ayala, Alberto

    2011-03-15

    Four heavy-duty and medium-duty diesel vehicles were tested in six different aftertreament configurations using a chassis dynamometer to characterize the occurrence of nucleation (the conversion of exhaust gases to particles upon dilution). The aftertreatment included four different diesel particulate filters and two selective catalytic reduction (SCR) devices. All DPFs reduced the emissions of solid particles by several orders of magnitude, but in certain cases the occurrence of a volatile nucleation mode could increase total particle number emissions. The occurrence of a nucleation mode could be predicted based on the level of catalyst in the aftertreatment, the prevailing temperature in the aftertreatment, and the age of the aftertreatment. The particles measured during nucleation had a high fraction of sulfate, up to 62% of reconstructed mass. Additionally the catalyst reduced the toxicity measured in chemical and cellular assays suggesting a pathway for an inverse correlation between particle number and toxicity. The results have implications for exposure to and toxicity of diesel PM.

  2. Advances in the simulation and automated measurement of well-sorted granular material: 2. Direct measures of particle properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Rubin, David M.

    2012-01-01

    1. In this, the second of a pair of papers on the structure of well-sorted natural granular material (sediment), new methods are described for automated measurements from images of sediment, of: 1) particle-size standard deviation (arithmetic sorting) with and without apparent void fraction; and 2) mean particle size in material with void fraction. A variety of simulations of granular material are used for testing purposes, in addition to images of natural sediment. Simulations are also used to establish that the effects on automated particle sizing of grains visible through the interstices of the grains at the very surface of a granular material continue to a depth of approximately 4 grain diameters and that this is independent of mean particle size. Ensemble root-mean squared error between observed and estimated arithmetic sorting coefficients for 262 images of natural silts, sands and gravels (drawn from 8 populations) is 31%, which reduces to 27% if adjusted for bias (slope correction between observed and estimated values). These methods allow non-intrusive and fully automated measurements of surfaces of unconsolidated granular material. With no tunable parameters or empirically derived coefficients, they should be broadly universal in appropriate applications. However, empirical corrections may need to be applied for the most accurate results. Finally, analytical formulas are derived for the one-step pore-particle transition probability matrix, estimated from the image's autocorrelogram, from which void fraction of a section of granular material can be estimated directly. This model gives excellent predictions of bulk void fraction yet imperfect predictions of pore-particle transitions.

  3. Advances in understanding the genesis and evolution solar energetic particle events over the last two solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Rami

    2016-04-01

    I will review the observational and modeling efforts related to solar energetic particle (SEP) events over the 23rd and 24th solar cycles. I will concentrate on large SEP events related to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), but discuss observations related to the possible role of flares in the acceleration of particles in those events, as well. The possible roles of various acceleration and transport processes in understanding the characteristics of the events will be discussed. This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA).

  4. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emissions Project (APBF-DEC): 2,000-Hour Performance of a NOx Adsorber Catalyst and Diesel Particle Filter System for a Medium-Duty, Pick-Up Diesel Engine Platform; Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-03-01

    Presents the results of a 2,000-hour test of an emissions control system consisting of a nitrogen oxides adsorber catalyst in combination with a diesel particle filter, advanced fuels, and advanced engine controls in an SUV/pick-up truck vehicle platform.

  5. An autoneutralizing neutral molecular beam gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmore, J. E.; Appelhans, A. D.; Dahl, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    A high-energy (up to 28 keV) neutral molecular beam gun has been developed and put into routine use that takes advantage of the autoneutralization properties of the sulfur hexafluoride anion for the production of high-energy sulfur hexafluoride neutral molecules. The anions are produced in an electron-capture source, accelerated, and focused in a lens assembly designed to minimize residence time, allowed to drift at their terminal velocity for a suitable distance during which up to 30% auto-eject an electron, and all remaining charged particles are electrostatically skimmed, resulting in a focused neutral beam. Rasterable neutral beams focused to a 5-mm spot size up to 3 m from the source have been produced with beam currents up to 40 pA equivalent. Spot sizes of 1 mm can be produced with intensity levels of a few picoamperes equivalent.

  6. Interstellar neutrals in interplanetary space

    SciTech Connect

    Hovestadt, D.; Moebius, E. )

    1989-03-01

    The solar system is moving through the interstellar medium with a velocity of about 20 km/s. The neutral interstellar gas, which thereby penetrates the heliosphere, is subject to ionization by solar UV radiation, charge exchange with the solar wind, and electron collisions. The newly created ions are then picked by the solar wind through interaction of interstellar neutrals with the interplanetary magnetic field. The pick-up ions with their peculiar elemental composition probably also constitute the source particles of the Anomalous Cosmic Ray Component (ACR). In this report descriptions of the interaction with the solar wind are reviewed. While most of the constituents are already ionized far beyond the orbit of the Earth, neutral helium (because of its high ionization potential) approaches the Sun to {lt}1 AU. The pick-up of interstellar He{sup +} ions has recently been directly observed for the first time. The observed velocity distribution of He{sup +} extending up to twice the solar wind velocity can be explained in terms of pitch angle scattering of the ions probably by interplanetary Alven waves and subsequent adiabatic cooling in the expanding solar wind. Thermal coupling of the He{sup +} to the solar wind is negligible in the inner heliosphere. Detailed studies of the pick-up distribution provide a method to investigate the interplanetary propagation parameters and the state of the local interstellar medium.

  7. Kinetic Simulation and Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced simulation tools and measurement techniques have been developed to study the dynamic magnetosphere and its response to drivers in the solar wind. The Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) is a kinetic code that solves the 3D distribution in space, energy and pitch-angle information of energetic ions and electrons. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imagers have been carried in past and current satellite missions. Global morphology of energetic ions were revealed by the observed ENA images. We have combined simulation and ENA analysis techniques to study the development of ring current ions during magnetic storms and substorms. We identify the timing and location of particle injection and loss. We examine the evolution of ion energy and pitch-angle distribution during different phases of a storm. In this talk we will discuss the findings from our ring current studies and how our simulation and ENA analysis tools can be applied to the upcoming TRIO-CINAMA mission.

  8. Removal of contaminants by plasma assisted cleaning by metastable atom neutralization (PACMAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, W. M.; Szybilski, D. S.; Das, C. E.; Raju, R.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2009-03-01

    For the continued advancement of lithography, specifically extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), particle contamination on the photomask and the subsequent removal of these particles is of critical importance. Particle contamination on the photomasks can result in defects printed on devices and their subsequent failure and/or process throughput reduction. A new idea for the removal of these particles is to utilize the energy in metastable species in a plasma. In a laboratory or processing plasma where ionization fraction is relatively low, there exists metastable species with long lifetimes that have significant energy, in some cases on the order of ~20 eV. Through a combined process of ion bombardment as well as the energy transferred from the neutralization of the metastable species, particles on a surface can be reduced to volatile compounds which can be pumped off of the surface thus reducing the particle contamination on the surface. Preliminary results for the removal of polystyrene latex (PSL) nano particles on low resistivity silicon wafers have shown approximately 20 nm/min removal rates. The removal rate obtained through the use of the PACMAN technique is much faster compared to just metastable cleaning alone. The current results of the removal of particles via the PACMAN technique will be presented as well as a damage assessment if any caused by this process.

  9. Neutral theory and the species abundance distribution: recent developments and prospects for unifying niche and neutral perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Thomas J; Whittaker, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Published in 2001, The Unified Neutral Theory of Biodiversity and Biogeography (UNTB) emphasizes the importance of stochastic processes in ecological community structure, and has challenged the traditional niche-based view of ecology. While neutral models have since been applied to a broad range of ecological and macroecological phenomena, the majority of research relating to neutral theory has focused exclusively on the species abundance distribution (SAD). Here, we synthesize the large body of work on neutral theory in the context of the species abundance distribution, with a particular focus on integrating ideas from neutral theory with traditional niche theory. First, we summarize the basic tenets of neutral theory; both in general and in the context of SADs. Second, we explore the issues associated with neutral theory and the SAD, such as complications with fitting and model comparison, the underlying assumptions of neutral models, and the difficultly of linking pattern to process. Third, we highlight the advances in understanding of SADs that have resulted from neutral theory and models. Finally, we focus consideration on recent developments aimed at unifying neutral- and niche-based approaches to ecology, with a particular emphasis on what this means for SAD theory, embracing, for instance, ideas of emergent neutrality and stochastic niche theory. We put forward the argument that the prospect of the unification of niche and neutral perspectives represents one of the most promising future avenues of neutral theory research. PMID:25360266

  10. Simulation And Design Of A Reflection Magnet For The EAST Neutral Beam System

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen Liangli; Dong Huchun

    2011-09-26

    The simulation and design of a reflection magnet to be installed in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) neutral beam injection system are reported. A parametric design and simulation for the reflection magnet was carried out. For a deuterium beam with 42 cm as the bending radius, the intensity of reflection magnet field is about 1376 Gs at the energy of 80 keV. In order to determine position of the ion dump and the surface power load, a particle simulation with Monte Carlo was developed to study ion trajectories. In addition, the louver design is introduced.

  11. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies to Fight HIV-1: On the Threshold of Success

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Juan Pablo; Vendrell, Alejandrina; Chiavenna, Sebastián Matias

    2017-01-01

    Anti-human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (anti-HIV-1) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies are broadening the spectrum of pre- and post-exposure treatment against HIV-1. A better understanding of how these antibodies develop and interact with particular regions of the viral envelope protein is guiding a more rational structure-based immunogen design. The aim of this article is to review the most recent advances in the field, from the development of these particular antibodies during natural HIV-1 infection, to their role preventing infection, boosting endogenous immune responses and clearing both free viral particles and persistently infected cells. PMID:28123384

  12. Airborne Particles: What We Have Learned About Their Role in Climate from Remote Sensing, and Prospects for Future Advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Desert dust, wildfire smoke, volcanic ash, biogenic and urban pollution particles, all affect the regional-scale climate of Earth in places and at times; some have global-scale impacts on the column radiation balance, cloud properties, atmospheric stability structure, and circulation patterns. Remote sensing has played a central role in identifying the sources and transports of airborne particles, mapping their three-dimensional distribution and variability, quantifying their amount, and constraining aerosol air mass type. The measurements obtained from remote sensing have strengths and limitations, and their value for characterizing Earths environment is enhanced immensely when they are combined with direct, in situ observations, and used to constrain aerosol transport and climate models. A similar approach has been taken to study the role particles play in determining the climate of Mars, though based on far fewer observations. This presentation will focus what we have learned from remote sensing about the impacts aerosol have on Earths climate; a few points about how aerosols affect the climate of Mars will also be introduced, in the context of how we might assess aerosol-climate impacts more generally on other worlds.

  13. Advanced zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron particles for acidic magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited ZnS and other IR materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzman, S.; Giannechini, L. J.; Romanofsky, H. J.; Golini, N.; Taylor, B.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a modified version of zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron (CI) particles that were invented at the University of Rochester in 2008. The amount of zirconia on the coating is increased to further protect the iron particles from corrosion when introduced to an acidic environment. Five low-pH, magnetorheological (MR) fluids were made with five acids: acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric, and hydrofluoric. All fluids were based on the modified zirconia-coated CI particles. Off-line viscosity and pH stability were measured for all acidic MR fluids to determine the ideal fluid composition for acidic MR finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (ZnS) and other infrared (IR) optical materials, such as hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) ZnS, CVD zinc selenide (ZnSe), and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). Results show significant reduction in surface artifacts (millimeter-size, pebble-like structures on the finished surface) for several standard-grade CVD ZnS substrates and good surface roughness for the non-CVD MgF2 substrate when MR finished with our advanced acidic MR fluid.

  14. Intense ion beam neutralization using underdense background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Berdanier, William; Roy, Prabir K.; Kaganovich, Igor

    2015-01-15

    Producing an overdense background plasma for neutralization purposes with a density that is high compared to the beam density is not always experimentally possible. We show that even an underdense background plasma with a small relative density can achieve high neutralization of intense ion beam pulses. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we show that if the total plasma electron charge is not sufficient to neutralize the beam charge, electron emitters are necessary for effective neutralization but are not needed if the plasma volume is so large that the total available charge in the electrons exceeds that of the ion beam. Several regimes of possible underdense/tenuous neutralization plasma densities are investigated with and without electron emitters or dense plasma at periphery regions, including the case of electron emitters without plasma, which does not effectively neutralize the beam. Over 95% neutralization is achieved for even very underdense background plasma with plasma density 1/15th the beam density. We compare results of particle-in-cell simulations with an analytic model of neutralization and find close agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations. Further, we show experimental data from the National Drift Compression experiment-II group that verifies the result that underdense plasma can neutralize intense heavy ion beams effectively.

  15. THE ROLE OF NEUTRALS IN H-MODE PEDESTAL FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. GROEBNER; M.A. MAHDAVI; A.W. LEONARD; T.H. OSBORNE; G.D. PORTER; R.J. COLCHIN; L.W.OWEN

    2001-11-01

    An analytic model, derived from coupled continuity equations for the electron and neutral deuterium densities, is consistent with many features of edge electron density profiles in the DIII-D tokamak. For an assumed constant particle diffusion coefficient, the model shows that particle transport and neutral fueling produce electron and neutral density profiles that have the same characteristic scale lengths at the plasma edge. For systematic variations of density in H-mode discharges, the model predicts that the width of the electron density transport barrier decreases and the maximum gradient increases, as observed in the experiments. The widths computed from the model agree quantitatively with the experimental widths for conditions in which the model is valid. These results support models of transport barrier formation in which the H-mode particle barrier is driven by the edge particle flux and the width of the barrier is approximately the neutral penetration length.

  16. Equivalent Neutral Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Wenqing

    1996-01-01

    The definition of equivalent neutral wind and the rationale for using it as the geophysical product of a spaceborne scatterometer are reviewed. The differences between equivalent neutral wind and actual wind, which are caused by atmospheric density stratification, are demonstrated with measurements at selected locations. A method of computing this parameter from ship and buoy measurements is described and some common fallacies in accounting for the effects of atmospheric stratification on wind shear are discussed. The computer code for the model to derive equivalent neutral wind is provided.

  17. Neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 induced by immunization

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Most neutralizing antibodies act at the earliest steps of viral infection and block interaction of the virus with cellular receptors to prevent entry into host cells. The inability to induce neutralizing antibodies to HIV has been a major obstacle to HIV vaccine research since the early days of the epidemic. However, in the past three years, the definition of a neutralizing antibody against HIV has been revolutionized by the isolation of extremely broad and potent neutralizing antibodies from HIV-infected individuals. Considerable hurdles remain for inducing neutralizing antibodies to a protective level after immunization. Meanwhile, novel technologies to bypass the induction of antibodies are being explored to provide prophylactic antibody-based interventions. This review addresses the challenge of inducing HIV neutralizing antibodies upon immunization and considers notable recent advances in the field. A greater understanding of the successes and failures for inducing a neutralizing response upon immunization is required to accelerate the development of an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:23401570

  18. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  19. Advances in colloid and biocolloid transport in porous media: particle size-dependent dispersivity and gravity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate prediction of colloid and biocolloid transport in porous media relies heavily on usage of suitable dispersion coefficients. The widespread procedure for dispersion coefficient determination consists of conducting conservative tracer experiments and subsequently fitting the collected breakthrough data with a selected advection-dispersion transport model. The fitted dispersion coefficient is assumed to characterize the porous medium and is often used thereafter to analyze experimental results obtained from the same porous medium with other solutes, colloids, and biocolloids. The classical advection-dispersion equation implies that Fick's first law of diffusion adequately describes the dispersion process, or that the dispersive flux is proportional to the concentration gradient. Therefore, the above-described procedure inherently assumes that the dispersive flux of all solutes, colloids and biocolloids under the same flow field conditions is exactly the same. Furthermore, the available mathematical models for colloid and biocoloid transport in porous media do not adequately account for gravity effects. Here an extensive laboratory study was undertaken in order to assess whether the dispersivity, which traditionally has been considered to be a property of the porous medium, is dependent on colloid particle size, interstitial velocity and length scale. The breakthrough curves were successfully simulated with a mathematical model describing colloid and biocolloid transport in homogeneous, water saturated porous media. The results demonstrated that the dispersivity increases very slowly with increasing interstitial velocity, and increases with column length. Furthermore, contrary to earlier results, which were based either on just a few experimental observations or experimental conditions leading to low mass recoveries, dispersivity was positively correlated with colloid particle size. Also, transport experiments were performed with biocolloids (bacteriophages:

  20. Neutralization Assay for Chikungunya Virus Infection: Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test.

    PubMed

    Azami, Nor Azila Muhammad; Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2016-01-01

    Neutralization assay is a technique that detects and quantifies neutralizing antibody in serum samples by calculating the percentage of reduction of virus activity, as the concentration of virus used is usually constant. Neutralizing antibody titer is conventionally determined by calculating the percentage reduction in total virus infectivity by counting and comparing number of plaques (localized area of infection due to cytopathic effect) with a standard amount of virus. Conventional neutralizing test uses plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT) to determine neutralizing antibody titers against Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Here we describe the plaque reduction neutralization assay (PRNT) using Vero cell lines to obtain neutralizing antibody titers.

  1. The Phobos neutral and ionized torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Curry, S. M.; Fatemi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Charged particle sputtering, micrometeoroid impact vaporization, and photon-stimulated desorption are fundamental processes operating at airless surfaces throughout the solar system. At larger bodies, such as Earth's Moon and several of the outer planet moons, these processes generate tenuous surface-bound exospheres that have been observed by a variety of methods. Phobos and Deimos, in contrast, are too gravitationally weak to keep ejected neutrals bound and, thus, are suspected to generate neutral tori in orbit around Mars. While these tori have not yet been detected, the distribution and density of both the neutral and ionized components are of fundamental interest. We combine a neutral Monte Carlo model and a hybrid plasma model to investigate both the neutral and ionized components of the Phobos torus. We show that the spatial distribution of the neutral torus is highly dependent on each individual species (due to ionization rates that span nearly 4 orders of magnitude) and on the location of Phobos with respect to Mars. Additionally, we present the flux distribution of torus pickup ions throughout the Martian system and estimate typical pickup ion fluxes. We find that the predicted pickup ion fluxes are too low to perturb the ambient plasma, consistent with previous null detections by spacecraft around Mars.

  2. Entangling two transportable neutral atoms via local spin exchange.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A M; Lester, B J; Foss-Feig, M; Wall, M L; Rey, A M; Regal, C A

    2015-11-12

    To advance quantum information science, physical systems are sought that meet the stringent requirements for creating and preserving quantum entanglement. In atomic physics, robust two-qubit entanglement is typically achieved by strong, long-range interactions in the form of either Coulomb interactions between ions or dipolar interactions between Rydberg atoms. Although such interactions allow fast quantum gates, the interacting atoms must overcome the associated coupling to the environment and cross-talk among qubits. Local interactions, such as those requiring substantial wavefunction overlap, can alleviate these detrimental effects; however, such interactions present a new challenge: to distribute entanglement, qubits must be transported, merged for interaction, and then isolated for storage and subsequent operations. Here we show how, using a mobile optical tweezer, it is possible to prepare and locally entangle two ultracold neutral atoms, and then separate them while preserving their entanglement. Ground-state neutral atom experiments have measured dynamics consistent with spin entanglement, and have detected entanglement with macroscopic observables; we are now able to demonstrate position-resolved two-particle coherence via application of a local gradient and parity measurements. This new entanglement-verification protocol could be applied to arbitrary spin-entangled states of spatially separated atoms. The local entangling operation is achieved via spin-exchange interactions, and quantum tunnelling is used to combine and separate atoms. These techniques provide a framework for dynamically entangling remote qubits via local operations within a large-scale quantum register.

  3. Entangling two transportable neutral atoms via local spin exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, A. M.; Lester, B. J.; Foss-Feig, M.; Wall, M. L.; Rey, A. M.; Regal, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    To advance quantum information science, physical systems are sought that meet the stringent requirements for creating and preserving quantum entanglement. In atomic physics, robust two-qubit entanglement is typically achieved by strong, long-range interactions in the form of either Coulomb interactions between ions or dipolar interactions between Rydberg atoms. Although such interactions allow fast quantum gates, the interacting atoms must overcome the associated coupling to the environment and cross-talk among qubits. Local interactions, such as those requiring substantial wavefunction overlap, can alleviate these detrimental effects; however, such interactions present a new challenge: to distribute entanglement, qubits must be transported, merged for interaction, and then isolated for storage and subsequent operations. Here we show how, using a mobile optical tweezer, it is possible to prepare and locally entangle two ultracold neutral atoms, and then separate them while preserving their entanglement. Ground-state neutral atom experiments have measured dynamics consistent with spin entanglement, and have detected entanglement with macroscopic observables; we are now able to demonstrate position-resolved two-particle coherence via application of a local gradient and parity measurements. This new entanglement-verification protocol could be applied to arbitrary spin-entangled states of spatially separated atoms. The local entangling operation is achieved via spin-exchange interactions, and quantum tunnelling is used to combine and separate atoms. These techniques provide a framework for dynamically entangling remote qubits via local operations within a large-scale quantum register.

  4. Reversal of particle flux in collisional-finite beta tokamak discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Weiland, J.; Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.

    2015-01-15

    The mixed gradient method [Zhong et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 265001 (2013)] is adopted and effects of collisions and finite beta are included in the Weiland 9-equation fluid model. The particle flux and particle pinch, obtained using the Weiland anomalous transport fluid model, are compared with Tore Supra experimental results. Particle transport is also studied using predictive simulation data for an experimental advanced superconducting tokamak discharge in which neutral beam heating is utilized. The effects of collisions on particle transport are studied by turning collisions on and off in the Weiland model. It is found that the particle pinch region is related to the mode structure. The particle pinch region coincides with the region where the strong ballooning modes are present due to large gradients. The general properties of the fluid model are examined by finding regions where collisions can enhance the particle pinch.

  5. Use of particle beams for lunar prospecting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toepfer, A. J.; Eppler, D.; Friedlander, A.; Weitz, R.

    1993-01-01

    A key issue in choosing the appropriate site for a manned lunar base is the availability of resources, particularly oxygen and hydrogen for the production of water, and ores for the production of fuels and building materials. NASA has proposed two Lunar Scout missions that would orbit the Moon and use, among other instruments, a hard X-ray spectrometer, a neutron spectrometer, and a Ge gamma ray spectrometer to map the lunar surface. This passive instrumentation will have low resolution (tens of kilometers) due to the low signal levels produced by natural radioactivity and the interaction of cosmic rays and the solar wind with the lunar surface. This paper presents the results of a concept definition effort for a neutral particle beam lunar mapper probe. The idea of using particle beam probes to survey asteroids was first proposed by Sagdeev et al., and an ion beam device was fielded on the 1988 Soviet probe to the Mars moon Phobos. During the past five years, significant advances in the technology of neutral particle beams (NPB) have led to a suborbital flight of a neutral hydrogen beam device in the SDIO-sponsored BEAR experiment. An orbital experiment, the Neutral Particle Beam Far Field Optics Experiment (NPB-FOX) is presently in the preliminary design phase. The development of NPB accelerators that are space-operable leads one to consider the utility of these devices for probing the surface of the Moon using gamma ray, X-ray, and optical/UV spectroscopy to locate various elements and compounds. We consider the utility of the NPB-FOX satellite containing a 5-MeV particle beam accelerator as a probe in lunar orbit. Irradiation of the lunar surface by the particle beam will induce secondary and back scattered radiation from the lunar surface to be detected by a sensor that may be co-orbital with or on the particle beam satellite platform, or may be in a separate orbit. The secondary radiation is characteristic of the make-up of the lunar surface. The size of the

  6. Production of Cytomegalovirus Dense Bodies by Scalable Bioprocess Methods Maintains Immunogenicity and Improves Neutralizing Antibody Titers.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Ohrum, Kirsten; Cayatte, Corinne; Liu, Yi; Wang, Zhaoti; Irrinki, Alivelu; Cataniag, Floro; Nguyen, Nga; Lambert, Stacie; Liu, Hui; Aslam, Shahin; Duke, Greg; McCarthy, Michael P; McCormick, Louise

    2016-11-15

    With the goal of developing a virus-like particle-based vaccine based on dense bodies (DB) produced by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we evaluated scalable culture, isolation, and inactivation methods and applied technically advanced assays to determine the relative purity, composition, and immunogenicity of DB particles. Our results increase our understanding of the benefits and disadvantages of methods to recover immunogenic DB and inactivate contaminating viral particles. Our results indicate that (i) HCMV strain Towne replicates in MRC-5 fibroblasts grown on microcarriers, (ii) DB particles recovered from 2-bromo-5,6-dichloro-1-beta-d-ribofuranosyl benzimidazole riboside (BDCRB)-treated cultures and purified by tangential flow filtration (TFF-DB) or glycerol tartrate gradient sedimentation (GT-DB) constitute 92% or 98%, respectively, of all particles in the final product, (iii) epithelial cell-tropic DB particles are recovered from a single round of coinfection by AD169 and Towne strain viruses, consistent with complementation between the UL130 and UL131A expressed by these strains and restoration of gH/gL/UL128-UL131A (gH pentamer), (iv) equivalent neutralizing antibody titers are induced in mice following immunization with epithelial cell-tropic DB or gH pentamer-deficient DB preparations, (v) UV-inactivated residual virus in GT-DB or TFF-DB preparations retained immunogenicity and induced neutralizing antibody, preventing viral entry into epithelial cells, and (vi) GT-DB and TFF-DB induced cellular immune responses to multiple HCMV peptides. Collectively, this work provides a foundation for future development of DB as an HCMV-based particle vaccine.

  7. Physicochemical characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of organic solution advanced spray-dried cyclosporine A multifunctional particles for dry powder inhalation aerosol delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Zhang, Weifen; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    In this systematic and comprehensive study, inhalation powders of the polypeptide immunosuppressant drug - cyclosporine A - for lung delivery as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were successfully designed, developed, and optimized. Several spray drying pump rates were rationally chosen. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, Karl Fischer titration, laser size diffraction, and gravimetric vapor sorption. Aerosol dispersion performance was conducted using a next generation impactor with a Food and Drug Administration-approved DPI device. These DPIs displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance with high values in emitted dose, respirable fraction, and fine particle fraction. In addition, novel multifunctional inhalation aerosol powder formulations of cyclosporine A with lung surfactant-mimic phospholipids were also successfully designed and developed by advanced organic solution cospray drying in closed mode. The lung surfactantmimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-snglycero- 3-(phosphor-rac-1-glycerol). These cyclosporine A lung surfactant-mimic aerosol powder formulations were comprehensively characterized. Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state was preserved following advanced organic solution spray drying in closed mode. These novel multifunctional inhalation powders were optimized for DPI delivery with excellent aerosol dispersion performance and high aerosol performance parameters.

  8. Physicochemical characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of organic solution advanced spray-dried cyclosporine A multifunctional particles for dry powder inhalation aerosol delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao; Zhang, Weifen; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    In this systematic and comprehensive study, inhalation powders of the polypeptide immunosuppressant drug – cyclosporine A – for lung delivery as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were successfully designed, developed, and optimized. Several spray drying pump rates were rationally chosen. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, Karl Fischer titration, laser size diffraction, and gravimetric vapor sorption. Aerosol dispersion performance was conducted using a next generation impactor with a Food and Drug Administration-approved DPI device. These DPIs displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance with high values in emitted dose, respirable fraction, and fine particle fraction. In addition, novel multifunctional inhalation aerosol powder formulations of cyclosporine A with lung surfactant-mimic phospholipids were also successfully designed and developed by advanced organic solution cospray drying in closed mode. The lung surfactantmimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-snglycero- 3-(phosphor-rac-1-glycerol). These cyclosporine A lung surfactant-mimic aerosol powder formulations were comprehensively characterized. Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state was preserved following advanced organic solution spray drying in closed mode. These novel multifunctional inhalation powders were optimized for DPI delivery with excellent aerosol dispersion performance and high aerosol performance parameters. PMID:23569375

  9. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, O.; Wang, J.

    2011-05-20

    Full particle PIC simulations are performed to study the neutralization of an ion beam in the cohesionless, mesothermal regime. Simulations further confirmed that neutralization is achieved through interactions between the trapped electrons and the potential well established by the propagation of the beam front along the beam direction and is not through plasma instabilities as previous studies suggested. In the transverse direction, the process is similar to that of the expansion of mesothermal plasma into vacuum. Parametric simulations are also performed to investigate the effects of beam radius and domain boundary condition on the neutralization process. The results suggests that, while the qualitative behavior may be similar in ground tests, quantitative parameters such as the beam potential will be affected significantly by the vacuum chamber because of the limits imposed on the expansion process by the finite chamber space.

  10. Neutral Beam Injection in the Electric Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Carter, T. A.; Gauvreau, J.-L.; Grossman, A.; Lafonteese, D. J.; Pace, D. C.; Schmitz, L. W.; Taylor, R. J.; White, A. E.; Yates, T. F.

    2004-11-01

    The Electric Tokamak (ET) at UCLA (Bt=0.25T, R=5m, a=1m, Te(0)=300eV, tau(0)=1s) is now running long shots (5s). A new development program was started last year to include a neutral beam in the daily operations of the machine. As a result, a 10kV neutral beam injector was built to deal with plasma and measurement issues. The design and parameters of the beam are discussed. The source is based on an RF generated plasma, with a single extraction grid providing an accel-decel configuration. Plasma neutralization efficiency is also presented. Co- or counter injection is now possible using a single beam. The construction of a second beam is planned for simultaneous co- and counter injections for toroidal momentum input control. Plasma toroidal and poloidal rotation, particle diffusion and current drive effects will be presented.

  11. Advanced spray-dried design, physicochemical characterization, and aerosol dispersion performance of vancomycin and clarithromycin multifunctional controlled release particles for targeted respiratory delivery as dry powder inhalation aerosols.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Woong; Li, Xiaojian; Vogt, Frederick G; Hayes, Don; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Park, Eun-Seok; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-10-15

    Respirable microparticles/nanoparticles of the antibiotics vancomycin (VCM) and clarithromycin (CLM) were successfully designed and developed by novel organic solution advanced spray drying from methanol solution. Formulation optimization was achieved through statistical experimental design of pump feeding rates of 25% (Low P), 50% (Medium P) and 75% (High P). Systematic and comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hot-stage microscopy (HSM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Karl Fischer titration (KFT), laser size diffraction (LSD), gravimetric vapor sorption (GVS), confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and spectroscopy for chemical imaging mapping. These novel spray-dried (SD) microparticulate/nanoparticulate dry powders displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) with high values in emitted dose (ED), respirable fraction (RF), and fine particle fraction (FPF). VCM DPIs displayed better aerosol dispersion performance compared to CLM DPIs which was related to differences in the physicochemical and particle properties of VCM and CLM. In addition, organic solution advanced co-spray drying particle engineering design was employed to successfully produce co-spray-dried (co-SD) multifunctional microparticulate/nanoparticulate aerosol powder formulations of VCM and CLM with the essential lung surfactant phospholipid, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), for controlled release pulmonary nanomedicine delivery as inhalable dry powder aerosols. Formulation optimization was achieved through statistical experimental design of molar ratios of co-SD VCM:DPPC and co-SD CLM:DPPC. XRPD and DSC confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid-state was preserved following spray drying. Co-SD VCM:DPPC and co-SD CLM:DPPC dry powder aerosols demonstrated controlled release of antibiotic drug that was fitted to various

  12. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies for HIV Eradication.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-02-01

    Passive transfer of antibodies has long been considered a potential treatment modality for infectious diseases, including HIV. Early efforts to use antibodies to suppress HIV replication, however, were largely unsuccessful, as the antibodies that were studied neutralized only a relatively narrow spectrum of viral strains and were not very potent. Recent advances have led to the discovery of a large portfolio of human monoclonal antibodies that are broadly neutralizing across many HIV-1 subtypes and are also substantially more potent. These antibodies target multiple different epitopes on the HIV envelope, thus allowing for the development of antibody combinations. In this review, we discuss the application of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for HIV treatment and HIV eradication strategies. We highlight bNAbs that target key epitopes, such as the CD4 binding site and the V2/V3-glycan-dependent sites, and we discuss several bNAbs that are currently in the clinical development pipeline.

  13. Tautomerism in neutral histidine.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Celina; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2014-10-06

    Histidine is an important natural amino acid, involved in many relevant biological processes, which, because of its physical properties, proved difficult to characterize experimentally in its neutral form. In this work, neutral histidine has been generated in the gas phase by laser ablation of solid samples and its N(ε)H tautomeric form unraveled through its rotational spectrum. The quadrupole hyperfine structure, arising from the existing three (14)N nuclei, constituted a site-specifically probe for revealing the tautomeric form as well as the side chain configuration of this proteogenic amino acid.

  14. Low-energy neutral-atom spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, D.E.; Cohen, S.A.

    1982-04-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of a low energy neutral atom spectrometer are described. Time-of-flight analysis is used to measure the energy spectrum of charge-exchange deuterium atoms emitted from the PLT tokamak plasma in the energy range from 20 to 1000 eV. The neutral outflux is gated on a 1 ..mu..sec time scale by a slotted rotating chopper disc, supported against gravity in vacuum by magnetic levitation, and is detected by secondary electron emission from a Cu-Be plate. The energy dependent detection efficiency has been measured in particle beam experiments and on the tokamak so that the diagnostic is absolutely calibrated, allowing quantitative particle fluxes to be determined with 200 ..mu..sec time resolution. In addition to its present application as a plasma diagnostic, the instrument is capable of making a wide variety of measurements relevant to atomic and surface physics.

  15. Analysis of particle size and interface effects on the strength and ductility of advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettehad, Mahmood

    This thesis is devoted to the numerical investigation of mechanical behavior of Dual phase (DP) steels. Such grade of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) is favorable to the automotive industry due the unique properties such as high strength and ductility with low finished cost. Many experimental and numerical studies have been done to achieve the optimized behavior of DP steels by controlling their microstructure. Experiments are costly and time consuming so in recent years numerical tools are utilized to help the metallurgist before doing experiments. Most of the numerical studies are based on classical (local) constitutive models where no material length scale parameters are incorporated in the model. Although these models are proved to be very effective in modeling the material behavior in the large scales but they fail to address some critical phenomena which are important for our goals. First, they fail to address the size effect phenomena which materials show at microstructural scale. This means that materials show stronger behavior at small scales compared to large scales. Another issue with classical models is the mesh size dependency in modeling the softening behavior of materials. This means that in the finite element context (FEM) the results will be mesh size dependent and no converged solution exist upon mesh refinement. Thereby by applying the classical (local) models one my loose the accuracy on measuring the strength and ductility of DP steels. Among the non-classical (nonlocal) models, gradient-enhanced plasticity models which consider the effect of neighboring point on the behavior of one specific point are proved to be numerically effective and versatile tools to accomplish the two concerns mentioned above. So in this thesis a gradient-enhanced plasticity model which incorporates both the energetic and dissipative material length scales is derived based on the laws of thermodynamics. This model also has a consistent yield-like function for the

  16. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  17. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  18. Anisotropic Particles in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg A.; Soldati, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropic particles are common in many industrial and natural turbulent flows. When these particles are small and neutrally buoyant, they follow Lagrangian trajectories while exhibiting rich orientational dynamics from the coupling of their rotation to the velocity gradients of the turbulence field. This system has proven to be a fascinating application of the fundamental properties of velocity gradients in turbulence. When particles are not neutrally buoyant, they experience preferential concentration and very different preferential alignment than neutrally buoyant tracer particles. A vast proportion of the parameter range of anisotropic particles in turbulence is still unexplored, with most existing research focusing on the simple foundational cases of axisymmetric ellipsoids at low concentrations in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and in turbulent channel flow. Numerical simulations and experiments have recently developed a fairly comprehensive picture of alignment and rotation in these cases, and they provide an essential foundation for addressing more complex problems of practical importance. Macroscopic effects of nonspherical particle dynamics include preferential concentration in coherent structures and drag reduction by fiber suspensions. We review the models used to describe nonspherical particle motion, along with numerical and experimental methods for measuring particle dynamics.

  19. BEAM TRANSPORT AND STORAGE WITH COLD NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, Peter L.

    2012-05-15

    A large class of cold neutral atoms and molecules is subject to magnetic field-gradient forces. In the presence of a field, hyperfine atomic states are split into several Zeeman levels. The slopes of these curves vs. field are the effective magnetic moments. By means of optical pumping in a field, Zeeman states of neutral lithium atoms and CaH molecules with effective magnetic moments of nearly {+-} one Bohr magneton can be selected. Particles in Zeeman states for which the energy increases with field are repelled by increasing fields; particles in states for which the energy decreases with field are attracted to increasing fields. For stable magnetic confinement, field-repelled states are required. Neutral-particle velocities in the present study are on the order of tens to hundreds of m/s and the magnetic fields needed for transport and injection are on the order of in the range of 0.01-1T. Many of the general concepts of charged-particle beam transport carry over into neutral particle spin-force optics, but with important differences. In general, the role of bending dipoles in charged particle optics is played by quadrupoles in neutral particle optics; the role of quadrupoles is played by sextupoles. The neutralparticle analog of charge-exchange injection into storage rings is the use of lasers to flip the state of particles from field-seeking to field-repelled. Preliminary tracking results for two neutral atom/molecule storage ring configurations are presented. It was found that orbit instabilities limit the confinment time in a racetrack-shaped ring with discrete magnetic elements with drift spaces between them; stable behavior was observed in a toroidal ring with a continuous sextupole field. An alternative concept using a linear sextupole or octupole channel with solenoids on the ends is presently being considered.

  20. A General Nonlinear Fluid Model for Reacting Plasma-Neutral Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, E T; Shumlak, U

    2012-04-06

    A generalized, computationally tractable fluid model for capturing the effects of neutral particles in plasmas is derived. The model derivation begins with Boltzmann equations for singly charged ions, electrons, and a single neutral species. Electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge exchange reactions are included. Moments of the reaction collision terms are detailed. Moments of the Boltzmann equations for electron, ion, and neutral species are combined to yield a two-component plasma-neutral fluid model. Separate density, momentum, and energy equations, each including reaction transfer terms, are produced for the plasma and neutral equations. The required closures for the plasma-neutral model are discussed.

  1. Carbon neutral hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Frank S; Keith, David W

    2008-11-13

    Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector may be the most difficult aspect of climate change mitigation. We suggest that carbon neutral hydrocarbons (CNHCs) offer an alternative pathway for deep emission cuts that complement the use of decarbonized energy carriers. Such fuels are synthesized from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon neutral hydrogen. The result is a liquid fuel compatible with the existing transportation infrastructure and therefore capable of a gradual deployment with minimum supply disruption. Capturing the atmospheric CO2 can be accomplished using biomass or industrial methods referred to as air capture. The viability of biomass fuels is strongly dependent on the environmental impacts of biomass production. Strong constraints on land use may favour the use of air capture. We conclude that CNHCs may be a viable alternative to hydrogen or conventional biofuels and warrant a comparable level of research effort and support.

  2. Particles in the Heliosphere: Scientific and Technical Challenges in the Next Decade (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    A distinguishing feature of research in solar and space physics is our ability to directly observe the velocity distributions functions and abundances of particles at points in space without disrupting the overall system. This allows us to obtain unique insights into fundamental physical processes including shocks, acceleration, magnetic reconnection, wave-particle interactions, and ion-neutral coupling that are relevant both for heliophysics and for broader plasma applications, including laboratory plasmas and more exotic astrophysical environments. This talk will highlight some of the most exciting scientific challenges in heliophysics related to particles in space, from thermal to relativistic energies, and from neutral gas to highly ionized plasma. Technological advances in instrumentation and spacecraft needed to answer these questions within the next decade will also be examined.

  3. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  4. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Fred L.; Blank, Merle L.

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated ether-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood pressure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  5. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  6. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, F.L.; Blank, M.L.

    1984-10-26

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated either-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood presure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  7. Ultracold neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, Thomas C.; Rolston, Steven L.

    2010-03-15

    Plasmas are collections of charged particles that can exhibit an impressively diverse set of collective phenomena. They exist in an extraordinary variety of environments and span a great range of densities and temperatures, from 15 million kelvin in the core of the Sun to 200 K in the ionosphere and from 10{sup 30} particles per cubic centimeter in a white dwarf to 1 particle per cm{sup 3} in interstellar space. They can find application in lighting sources, manufacturing of computer chips, and fusion energy research. Plasmas created in the laboratory are used to replicate and study those that occur naturally and to probe the fundamental and complex behavior of plasmas.

  8. Neutral Atom Diffusion in a Partially Ionized Prominence Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The support of solar prominences is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. it is necessary to consider in addition the support of the neutral component of the prominence plasma. This support is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material,

  9. Mechanism of human antibody-mediated neutralization of Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Flyak, Andrew I; Ilinykh, Philipp A; Murin, Charles D; Garron, Tania; Shen, Xiaoli; Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Slaughter, James C; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Ward, Andrew B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-26

    The mechanisms by which neutralizing antibodies inhibit Marburg virus (MARV) are not known. We isolated a panel of neutralizing antibodies from a human MARV survivor that bind to MARV glycoprotein (GP) and compete for binding to a single major antigenic site. Remarkably, several of the antibodies also bind to Ebola virus (EBOV) GP. Single-particle EM structures of antibody-GP complexes reveal that all of the neutralizing antibodies bind to MARV GP at or near the predicted region of the receptor-binding site. The presence of the glycan cap or mucin-like domain blocks binding of neutralizing antibodies to EBOV GP, but not to MARV GP. The data suggest that MARV-neutralizing antibodies inhibit virus by binding to infectious virions at the exposed MARV receptor-binding site, revealing a mechanism of filovirus inhibition.

  10. Mechanism of Human Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of Marburg Virus

    PubMed Central

    Flyak, Andrew I.; Ilinykh, Philipp A.; Murin, Charles D.; Garron, Tania; Shen, Xiaoli; Fusco, Marnie L.; Hashiguchi, Takao; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Slaughter, James C.; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Ward, Andrew B.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms by which neutralizing antibodies inhibit Marburg virus (MARV) are not known. We isolated a panel of neutralizing antibodies from a human MARV survivor that bind to MARV glycoprotein (GP) and compete for binding to a single major antigenic site. Remarkably, several of the antibodies also bind to Ebola virus (EBOV) GP. Single-particle EM structures of Antibody-GP complexes reveals that all of the neutralizing antibodies bind to MARV GP at or near the predicted region of the receptor-binding site. The presence of the glycan cap or mucin-like domain blocks binding of neutralizing antibodies to EBOV GP but not to MARV GP. The data suggest that MARV neutralizing antibodies inhibit virus by binding to infectious virions at the exposed MARV receptor-binding site, revealing a mechanism of filovirus inhibition. PMID:25723164

  11. Fluorescent Cell-Counting Neutralization Test for Psittacosis

    PubMed Central

    Hahon, Nicholas; Cooke, Kenneth O.

    1965-01-01

    Hahon, Nicholas (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.), and Kenneth O. Cooke. Fluorescent cell-counting neutralization test for psittacosis. J. Bacteriol. 89:1465–1471. 1965.—A sensitive, precise, and specific serological procedure, the fluorescent cell-counting neutralization test, was developed to detect and to measure quantitatively psittacosis serum-neutralizing antibodies within 24 hr. The test is based on the reduction of fluorescent cells in McCoy cell monolayers resulting from the neutralization of infective agent particles by specific antiserum. Small but significant rises in neutralizing titers were measured in serum specimens from monkeys previously exposed to the psittacosis agent and from humans with diagnoses of subclinical or established psittacosis infections. PMID:14291581

  12. Neutrality between Government and Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1996-01-01

    The overall guiding principle of neutrality between government and religion masks a tension that exists between free exercise of religion and establishment of religion. Reviews the development and current status of "Lemon" as a test for neutrality; proposes a new test for neutrality, evenhandedness, that is common to both the Free…

  13. Exploring potential Pluto-generated neutral tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard T.; Hill, Matthew; KollMann, Peter; McHutt, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    The NASA New Horizons mission to Pluto is providing unprecedented insight into this mysterious outer solar system body. Escaping molecular nitrogen is of particular interest and possibly analogous to similar features observed at moons of Saturn and Jupiter. Such escaping N2 has the potential of creating molecular nitrogen and N (as a result of molecular dissociation) tori or partial toroidal extended particle distributions. The presence of these features would present the first confirmation of an extended toroidal neutral feature on a planetary scale in our solar system. While escape velocities are anticipated to be lower than those at Enceladus, Io or even Europa, particle lifetimes are much longer in Pluto’s orbit because as a result of much weaker solar interaction processes along Pluto’s orbit (on the order of tens of years). Thus, with a ~248 year orbit, Pluto may in fact be generating an extended toroidal feature along it orbit.For this work, we modify and apply our 3-D Monte Carlo neutral torus model (previously used at Saturn, Jupiter and Mercury) to study/analyze the theoretical possibility and scope of potential Pluto-generated neutral tori. Our model injects weighted particles and tracks their trajectories under the influence of all gravitational fields with interactions with other particles, solar photons and Pluto collisions. We present anticipated N2 and N tori based on current estimates of source characterization and environmental conditions. We also present an analysis of sensitivity to assumed initial conditions. Such results can provide insight into the Pluto system as well as valuable interpretation of New Horizon’s observational data.

  14. The San Marco 3 neutral atmosphere composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelz, D. T.; Newton, G. P.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Clem, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    The experimental instrumentation of the San Marco 3 satellite is described along with the calibration and operation. The instrumentation for the following experiments was included: an air density experiment for measuring the instantaneous drag force, and thus the neutral particle total mass density; a neutral atmosphere composition experiment for measuring the densities of helium, atomic and molecular oxygen, molecular nitrogen and argon; and a neutral atmosphere temperature experiment to determine the gas kinetic temperature by measuring molecular nitrogen density variations in an orificed spherical chamber as a function of angle of attack.

  15. Neutral beam injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Duesing, G.; Altmann, H.; Falter, H.; Goede, A.; Haange, R.; Hemsworth, R.S.; Kupschus, P.; Stork, D.; Thompson, E.

    1987-01-01

    The development of the neutral injection (NI) system for the Joint European Torus and its status in 1985 are reported. First the system parameters are discussed and the layout is described, followed by a summary of the physics design calculations, the development, production, and testing of the components and the subsystem assembly. The system commissioning is presented, including a description of the function and the realization of the NI test bed. A summary of performance predictions for 80-keV beam heating experiments, and of the experimental evidence on balanced versus coinjection, is presented. The operational experience with the first injector and the plasma physics results obtained so far are summarized.

  16. Three-dimensional modeling of the neutral gas depletion effect in a helicon discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollasch, Jeffrey; Schmitz, Oliver; Norval, Ryan; Reiter, Detlev; Sovinec, Carl

    2016-10-01

    Helicon discharges provide an attractive radio-frequency driven regime for plasma, but neutral-particle dynamics present a challenge to extending performance. A neutral gas depletion effect occurs when neutrals in the plasma core are not replenished at a sufficient rate to sustain a higher plasma density. The Monte Carlo neutral particle tracking code EIRENE was setup for the MARIA helicon experiment at UW Madison to study its neutral particle dynamics. Prescribed plasma temperature and density profiles similar to those in the MARIA device are used in EIRENE to investigate the main causes of the neutral gas depletion effect. The most dominant plasma-neutral interactions are included so far, namely electron impact ionization of neutrals, charge exchange interactions of neutrals with plasma ions, and recycling at the wall. Parameter scans show how the neutral depletion effect depends on parameters such as Knudsen number, plasma density and temperature, and gas-surface interaction accommodation coefficients. Results are compared to similar analytic studies in the low Knudsen number limit. Plans to incorporate a similar Monte Carlo neutral model into a larger helicon modeling framework are discussed. This work is funded by the NSF CAREER Award PHY-1455210.

  17. Time reversal violation for entangled neutral mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, J.

    2013-07-01

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of "in" and "out" states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

  18. Improved numerical calculation of the generation of a neutral beam by charge transfer between chlorine ions/neutrals and a graphite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Ohtsuka, Shingo; Iwasaki, Takuya; Ono, Kohei; Iriye, Yasuroh; Samukawa, Seiji

    2014-11-01

    The charge transfer process between chlorine particles (ions or neutrals) and a graphite surface on collision was investigated by using a highly stable numerical simulator based on time-dependent density functional theory to understand the generation mechanism of a high-efficiency neutral beam developed by Samukawa et al (2001 Japan. J. Appl. Phys. 40 L779). A straightforward calculation was achieved by adopting a large enough unit cell. The dependence of the neutralization efficiency on the incident energy of the particle was investigated, and the trend of the experimental result was reproduced. It was also found that doping the electrons and holes into graphite could change the charge transfer process and neutralization probability. This result suggests that it is possible to develop a neutral beam source that has high neutralization efficiency for both positive and negative ions.

  19. A Pre-ionization System to Limit Neutral Gas in a Compact Toroid Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allfrey, Ian; Roche, Thomas; Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Garate, Eusebio; Gota, Hiroshi; Asai, Tomohiko; the TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Fusion plasmas require long lifetimes and high temperatures, both of which are limited by particle loss, among other factors. Therefore, refueling a long-lived advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma in C-2U is necessary, and injecting a supersonic compact toroid (CT) is an effective means of introducing particles into the FRC core. However, neutral gas that trails the CT into the target chamber cools the FRC. Pre-ionization (PI) system assists the break down between electrodes of the CT injector (CTI), so the amount of introduced gas can be lowered by up to a factor of two, effectively increasing the ionization fraction; thus, reducing the amount of neutral gas in the system. Additionally, the PI decreases the delay in CTI breakdown so a highly reproducible operation is achievable. The PI system consists of a fast, high voltage, pulse discharge circuit coupled to a Teflon insulated semi-rigid coaxial cable inserted into the CTI. System details and experimental data will be presented, in addition to issues such as the introduction of impurities and pre-ionizer lifetime.

  20. Implementation of a plasma-neutral model in NIMROD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, S.; Shumlak, U.; King, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    Interaction between plasma fluid and neutral species is of great importance in the edge region of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The presence of neutrals can have beneficial effects such as fueling burning plasmas and quenching the disruptions in tokamaks, as well as deleterious effects like depositing high energy particles on the vessel wall. The behavior of edge plasmas in magnetically confined systems has been investigated using computational approaches that utilize the fluid description for the plasma and Monte Carlo transport for neutrals. In this research a reacting plasma-neutral model is implemented in NIMROD to study the interaction between plasma and neutral fluids. This model, developed by E. T. Meier and U. Shumlak, combines a single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma model with a gas dynamic neutral fluid model which accounts for electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge exchange. Incorporating this model into NIMROD allows the study of the interaction between neutrals and plasma in a variety of plasma science problems. An accelerated plasma moving through a neutral gas background in a coaxial electrode configuration is modeled, and the results are compared with previous calculations from the HiFi code.

  1. Neutralization Serotyping of BK Polyomavirus Infection in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Pastrana, Diana V.; Brennan, Daniel C.; Çuburu, Nicolas; Storch, Gregory A.; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Randhawa, Parmjeet S.; Buck, Christopher B.

    2012-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV or BKPyV) associated nephropathy affects up to 10% of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). BKV isolates are categorized into four genotypes. It is currently unclear whether the four genotypes are also serotypes. To address this issue, we developed high-throughput serological assays based on antibody-mediated neutralization of BKV genotype I and IV reporter vectors (pseudoviruses). Neutralization-based testing of sera from mice immunized with BKV-I or BKV-IV virus-like particles (VLPs) or sera from naturally infected human subjects revealed that BKV-I specific serum antibodies are poorly neutralizing against BKV-IV and vice versa. The fact that BKV-I and BKV-IV are distinct serotypes was less evident in traditional VLP-based ELISAs. BKV-I and BKV-IV neutralization assays were used to examine BKV type-specific neutralizing antibody responses in KTRs at various time points after transplantation. At study entry, sera from 5% and 49% of KTRs showed no detectable neutralizing activity for BKV-I or BKV-IV neutralization, respectively. By one year after transplantation, all KTRs were neutralization seropositive for BKV-I, and 43% of the initially BKV-IV seronegative subjects showed evidence of acute seroconversion for BKV-IV neutralization. The results suggest a model in which BKV-IV-specific seroconversion reflects a de novo BKV-IV infection in KTRs who initially lack protective antibody responses capable of neutralizing genotype IV BKVs. If this model is correct, it suggests that pre-vaccinating prospective KTRs with a multivalent VLP-based vaccine against all BKV serotypes, or administration of BKV-neutralizing antibodies, might offer protection against graft loss or dysfunction due to BKV associated nephropathy. PMID:22511874

  2. 200-mm-diameter neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma etcher and silicon etching

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Tomohiro; Nukaga, Osamu; Ueki, Shinji; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Inamoto, Yoshimasa; Ohtake, Hiroto; Samukawa, Seiji

    2010-09-15

    The authors developed a neutral beam source consisting of a 200-mm-diameter inductively coupled plasma etcher and a graphite neutralization aperture plate based on the design of a neutral beam source that Samukawa et al. [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 2 40, L779 (2001)] developed. They measured flux and energy of neutral particles, ions, and photons using a silicon wafer with a thermocouple and a Faraday cup and calculated the neutralization efficiency. An Ar neutral beam flux of more than 1 mA/cm{sup 2} in equivalent current density and a neutralization efficiency of more than 99% were obtained. The spatial uniformity of the neutral beam flux was within {+-}6% within a 100 mm diameter. Silicon etching using a F{sub 2}-based neutral beam was done at an etch rate of about 47 nm/min, while Cl{sub 2}-based neutral beam realized completely no undercut. The uniformity of etch rate was less than {+-}5% within the area. The etch rate increased by applying bias power to the neutralization aperture plate, which shows that accelerated neutral beam was successfully obtained. These results indicate that the neutral beam source is scalable, making it possible to obtain a large-diameter and uniform neutral beam, which is inevitable for application to mass production.

  3. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  4. Neutralizer Characterization of a NEXT Multi-Thruster Array With Electrostatic Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael; Pencil, Eric; McEwen, Heather; Diaz, Esther

    2006-01-01

    Neutralizers in a multi-thruster array configuration were characterized using conventional diagnostics such as peak-to-peak keeper oscillation amplitude as well as unconventional methods which featured the application of electrostatic probes. The response of the array local plasma environment to neutralizer flow rate changes were documented using Langmuir probes and retarding potential analyzers. Such characterization is necessary for system efficiency and stability optimization. Because the local plasma environment was measured in conjunction with the neutralizer characterization, particle fluxes at the array and thus array lifetime impacts associated with neutralizer operating mode could also be investigated. Neutralizer operating condition was documented for a number of multithruster array configurations ranging from three-engines, three-neutralizers to a single engine, one-neutralizer all as a function of neutralizer flow rate.

  5. Neutral polypropylene laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolfino, Chiara; Lertora, Enrico; Gambaro, Carla

    2016-10-01

    The joining of polymeric materials is a technology used in many industrial applications, from transport to telecommunications and the medical sector. A new technology for the joining of polymers is the laser welding process. In particular, fibre laser welding is a flexible technology which allows high process speed and the realization of good quality joints. Despite its application becoming more widespread in the production of assemblies of high precision, the application of laser technology for the welding of polymers has not been the subject of many studies up to now. This study focused on the welding of neutral polypropylene. The window process parameter was identified, without the use of additives to increase radiation absorption, and a mechanical characterization was conducted in order to evaluate the quality of the joints realized.

  6. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  7. Targets for a Neutral Kaon Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    A secondary beam of neutral Kaons is under consideration for Hall D at Jefferson Lab to perform spectroscopic studies of hyperons produced by K 0 L particles scattering from proton and deuteron targets. The proposed physics program would utilize the GlueX detector package currently installed in Hall D. This contribution looks at potential targets for use in the new facility, paying close attention to the existing infrastructure of GlueX and Hall D. Unpolarized cryotargets of liquid hydrogen and deuerium, as well as polarized solid targets of protons and deuterons are examined.

  8. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sandri, S.; Poggi, C.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.

    2011-12-13

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  9. Transient Photochemistry of Neutral Red.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    ascorbic acid system to 50 successive flashes, indicating that no ground state neutral red is permanently converted to leuco dye . Since leuco neutral...complete regeneration of ground state neutral red in this pH range in the present study suggests that formation of leuco dye is not significant. The second...radical disproportionation step is followed by a slower step which converts leuco dye to semireduced radical. Because coupling the two steps

  10. Transient ion neutralization by electrons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The nonlinear initial-boundary-value problems describing the lateral neutralization of ion beams for the cases that (1) an auxiliary electric field accelerates the electrons into the ion space, and (2) the electrons are injected into the ion space at a prescribed current density are treated. Analytical solutions are derived which give the position and speed of the neutralization front as a function of time, and the temporal development of the electron density, velocity, and electric fields during the neutralization process.

  11. The Aharonov-Bohm effect in neutral liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonin, E. B.

    2010-09-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect was discovered as a quantum-mechanical effect for charged particles, but it has its counterpart in classical wave mechanics. The Aharonov-Bohm interference arises at the scattering of a sound wave by a vortex in classical and quantum hydrodynamics. This interference leads to a transverse force between quasiparticles and vortices in superfluids and superconductors. The Aharonov-Bohm effect was also generalized to neutral particles with magnetic or electric dipole momenta. The Aharonov-Bohm effect for charge particles and its modification for magnetic momenta (the Aharonov-Casher effect) have already been experimentally observed, and the efforts to detect the Aharonov-Bohm effect for electrically polarized neutral particles are on the way. A possible system for this detection is a Bose-condensate of excitons in a double quantum well. Observation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in this system would provide direct evidence of Bose-Einstein condensation.

  12. Facility for intense diagnostic neutral beam (IDNB) development

    SciTech Connect

    Kasik, R.J.; Hinckley, W.B.; Bartsch, R.R.; Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Greenly, J.B.

    1993-08-01

    An intense, pulsed neutral beam source is under development for use as a probe beam on hot, burning plasmas such as in the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) which is presently in the planning stage. A pulsed, neutral hydrogen beam of 10s of kilo amperes of current can have an alpha particle, charge-exchange-recombination-spectroscopy (alpha-CHERS) signal-to-noise ratio of {approximately} 10. This beam would allow the measurement, on a single pulse of a few hundred nanoseconds duration, of the local alpha particle distribution function as well as other features of the tokamak plasma such as current density profile, impurity density, and microturbulence spectrum. The cross-sections for the CHERS diagnostic dictate operation with proton energies greater than {approximately}50keV. A pulsed neutral hydrogen source of this voltage and intensity can be achieved by neutralizing the ion flux from a magnetized ion-diode. The cross-sections for attachment and stripping, when coupled with scaling from Child-Langmiur, space-charge-limited, ion-current flow imply operation below - 100keV for maximum neutral fluence. The development of a flashover-anode, ion source for forthcoming evaluation of a neutralizing section is described below. This source operates in the accelerator voltage range 70 to 100keV. Eventually, the flashover-anode, magnetized ion-diode will be replaced with a plasma-anode, magnetized ion-diode.

  13. Molecular clips and tweezers hosting neutral guests.

    PubMed

    Hardouin-Lerouge, Marie; Hudhomme, Piétrick; Sallé, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Intense current interest in supramolecular chemistry is devoted to the construction of molecular assemblies displaying controlled molecular motion associated to recognition. On this ground, molecular clips and tweezers have focused an increasing attention. This tutorial review points out the recent advances in the construction of always more sophisticated molecular clips and tweezers, illustrating their remarkably broad structural variety and focusing on their binding ability towards neutral guests. A particular attention is brought to recent findings in dynamic molecular tweezers whose recognition ability can be regulated by external stimuli. Porphyrin-based systems will not be covered here as this very active field has been recently reviewed.

  14. Transfer of a weakly bound electron in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles. II. Ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of the Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) States by Ca, Sr, and Ba atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Narits, A. A.; Mironchuk, E. S.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2013-10-15

    Electron-transfer processes are studied in thermal collisions of Rydberg atoms with alkaline-earth Ca(4s{sup 2}), Sr(5s{sup 2}), and Ba(6s{sup 2}) atoms capable of forming negative ions with a weakly bound outermost p-electron. We consider the ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of highly excited atomic states caused by transitions between Rydberg covalent and ionic terms of a quasi-molecule produced in collisions of particles. The contributions of these reaction channels to the total depopulation cross section of Rydberg states of Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) atoms as functions of the principal quantum number n are compared for selectively excited nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n and for states with large orbital quantum numbers l = n - 1, n - 2. It is shown that the contribution from resonant quenching dominates at small values of n, and the ion-pair formation process begins to dominate with increasing n. The values and positions of the maxima of cross sections for both processes strongly depend on the electron affinity of an alkaline-earth atom and on the orbital angular momentum l of a highly excited atom. It is shown that in the case of Rydberg atoms in states with large l {approx} n - 1, the rate constants of ion-pair formation and collisional quenching are considerably lower than those for nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n.

  15. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  16. Surface conversion techniques for low energy neutral atom imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation has focused on development of key technology elements for low energy neutral atom imaging. More specifically, we have investigated the conversion of low energy neutral atoms to negatively charged ions upon reflection from specially prepared surfaces. This 'surface conversion' technique appears to offer a unique capability of detecting, and thus imaging, neutral atoms at energies of 0.01 - 1 keV with high enough efficiencies to make practical its application to low energy neutral atom imaging in space. Such imaging offers the opportunity to obtain the first instantaneous global maps of macroscopic plasma features and their temporal variation. Through previous in situ plasma measurements, we have a statistical picture of large scale morphology and local measurements of dynamic processes. However, with in situ techniques it is impossible to characterize or understand many of the global plasma transport and energization processes. A series of global plasma images would greatly advance our understanding of these processes and would provide the context for interpreting previous and future in situ measurements. Fast neutral atoms, created from ions that are neutralized in collisions with exospheric neutrals, offer the means for remotely imaging plasma populations. Energy and mass analysis of these neutrals provides critical information about the source plasma distribution. The flux of neutral atoms available for imaging depends upon a convolution of the ambient plasma distribution with the charge exchange cross section for the background neutral population. Some of the highest signals are at relatively low energies (well below 1 keV). This energy range also includes some of the most important plasma populations to be imaged, for example the base of the cleft ion fountain.

  17. Energy distributions of sputtered copper neutrals and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Direct quantitative analysis of surfaces by secondary ion mass spectrometry will depend on an understanding of the yield ratio of ions to neutrals. This ratio as a function of the energy of the sputtered particles has been obtained for a clean polycrystalline copper surface sputtered by 1000-3000 eV Ar(+). The energy distributions of both neutral and ionized copper were measured with a retarding potential analyzer using potential modulation differentiation and signal averaging. The maximum for both distributions is identical and occurs near 2.5 eV. The energy distributions of neutrals is more sharply peaked than that of the ions, presumably as a consequence of more efficient nutralization of slow escaping ions by the mobile electrons of copper. The ion-neutral ratio is compared with results from various ionization models.

  18. MODELING DRIFT ALONG THE HELIOSPHERIC WAVY NEUTRAL SHEET

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, R. A.

    2012-11-20

    Drift along the wavy heliospheric neutral sheet is believed to play an important role in cosmic-ray modulation and can explain the peaked versus flat intensity profiles during consecutive solar magnetic epochs. Modulation models are becoming more and more realistic and in order to determine the role of the wavy neutral sheet more accurately, we revisit a previous calculation for drift along it. While mathematically correct, we argue that the previous expression for neutral sheet drift, which follows naturally from the standard expression for gradient and curvature drift, must be adapted in order for the drift speed to be less than particle speed. We compare the effect of both the previous and the current more accurate version of neutral sheet drift on cosmic-ray modulation with results obtained by other methods.

  19. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1992-05-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  20. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I. ); Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics)

    1992-01-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  1. Plasma-neutral interaction processes in the magnetosphere of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, Aharon

    1992-01-01

    Models of Saturnian magnetospheric processes are reviewed emphasizing the interaction of charged and neutral particles in the gaseous phase and mentioning the role of solid matter. It is found that interpretations of different Voyager datasets regarding the Saturnian magnetosphere can vary. Specific interactions examined to resolve these discrepancies include charge exchange, ion-atom interchange, isotropizing and thermalizing collisions, and interactions between magnetospheric charged particles and surface layers of the icy satellites. The latter interactions result in sputtering of the surface or atmosphere as well as neutral injections into the magnetosphere. Constraints based on known reaction rates are shown to be useful in analyzing the abundances of the water-group molecules. The composition of the magnetospheric plasma is shown to be related to the differences between the interactions of atomic and molecular plasmas with neutral matter.

  2. JC polyomavirus mutants escape antibody-mediated neutralization.

    PubMed

    Ray, Upasana; Cinque, Paola; Gerevini, Simonetta; Longo, Valeria; Lazzarin, Adriano; Schippling, Sven; Martin, Roland; Buck, Christopher B; Pastrana, Diana V

    2015-09-23

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) persistently infects the urinary tract of most adults. Under conditions of immune impairment, JCV causes an opportunistic brain disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). JCV strains found in the cerebrospinal fluid of PML patients contain distinctive mutations in surface loops of the major capsid protein, VP1. We hypothesized that VP1 mutations might allow the virus to evade antibody-mediated neutralization. Consistent with this hypothesis, neutralization serology revealed that plasma samples from PML patients neutralized wild-type JCV strains but failed to neutralize patient-cognate PML-mutant JCV strains. This contrasted with serological results for healthy individuals, most of whom robustly cross-neutralized all tested JCV variants. Mice administered a JCV virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine initially showed neutralizing "blind spots" (akin to those observed in PML patients) that closed after booster immunization. A PML patient administered an experimental JCV VLP vaccine likewise showed markedly increased neutralizing titer against her cognate PML-mutant JCV. The results indicate that deficient humoral immunity is a common aspect of PML pathogenesis and that vaccination may overcome this humoral deficiency. Thus, vaccination with JCV VLPs might prevent the development of PML.

  3. Higher Throughput Quantification of Neutralizing Antibody to Herpes Simplex Viruses.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Tamara P; Mitchell, Michelle C; Korom, Maria; Wang, Hong; Yu, Yinyi; Morrison, Lynda A; Belshe, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    We report a rapid, higher throughput method for measuring neutralizing antibody to herpes simplex virus (HSV) in human sera. Clinical isolates and sera from the Herpevac Trial for Women were used in a colorimetric assay in which infection of tissue culture (lack of neutralization) was indicated by substrate metabolism by beta-galactosidase induced in the ELVIS cell line. The neutralization assay was optimized by addition of guinea pig complement, which particularly enhanced neutralizing antibody titers to HSV-2. Higher neutralizing antibody titers were also achieved using virus particles isolated from the supernatant of infected cells rather than lysate of infected cells as the source of virus. The effect of assay incubation time and incubation time with substrate were also optimized. We found that incubating with substrate until a standard optical density of 1.0 was reached permitted a better comparison among virus isolates, and achieved reliable measurement of neutralizing antibody activity. Interestingly, in contrast to results in the absence of complement, addition of complement allowed sera from HSV-2 gD-vaccinated subjects to neutralize HSV-1 and HSV-2 clinical and laboratory isolates with equal potency.

  4. Is science metaphysically neutral?

    PubMed

    Fry, Iris

    2012-09-01

    This paper challenges the claim that science is metaphysically neutral upheld by contenders of the separation of peacefully co-existent science and religion and by evolutionary theists. True, naturalistic metaphysical claims can neither be refuted nor proved and are thus distinct from empirical hypotheses. However, metaphysical assumptions not only regulate the theoretical and empirical study of nature, but are increasingly supported by the growing empirical body of science. This historically evolving interaction has contributed to the development of a naturalistic worldview that renounces the necessity of a transcendent god and of purposeful design. The thesis presented here differs not only from the claims of the "separatists" and of evolutionary theists. In pointing to the metaphysical aspects of science, I also criticize the failure of some evolutionary naturalists to distinguish between empirical and metaphysical contentions. Most important, based on the examination of science suggested here, creationists' false accusation that science is only a naturalistic dogma is refuted. Finally, the difficulties involved in the position endorsed here for the public support of evolution are acknowledged, taking into account the high religious profile of the American society and the social and political context in the US and in other countries.

  5. Weak neutral current chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R.

    1996-07-01

    Metal cluster organic complexes, neither atomic nor solid but in analogy to atomic nuclei and to mesoscopic systems, have unusual dynamics and catalytic properties. Organo-metal clusters as quintessence prebiotic enzymes could have originated the homochirality of the molecules from achiral precursors, controlled from the atomic-nucleus, with the initial product itself serving subsequently as chiral auxiliary transferring and amplifying the chirality in the autocatalytic process now. High resolution spectroscopic studies of diatomic molecules beginning now may lead to upper estimates of the interaction strength of weak neutral currents (WNG) with valence electrons of metal clusters and suggest kinetic pathways to dynamic symmetry breaking in the asymmetric synthesis of chiral molecules. An estimate of 10{sup {minus}5} kT (thousand times larger than for radiolysis) for the parity violating energy (PVE) could be sufficient to run an entropy driven spin-catalyzed asymmetric synthesis. Expect then, wherever there are metal clusters in interstellar dust or under the sea chiral molecular production. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Weak neutral current chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, R.

    1996-07-01

    Metal cluster organic complexes, neither atomic nor solid but in analogy to atomic nuclei and to mesoscopic systems, have unusual dynamics and catalytic properties. Organo-metal clusters as quintessence prebiotic enzymes could have originated the homochirality of the molecules from achiral precursors, controlled from the atomic-nucleus, with the initial product itself serving subsequently as chiral auxiliary transferring and amplifying the chirality in the autocatalytic process now. High resolution spectroscopic studies of diatomic molecules beginning now may lead to upper estimates of the interaction strength of weak neutral currents (WNG) with valence electrons of metal clusters and suggest kinetic pathways to dynamic symmetry breaking in the asymmetric synthesis of chiral molecules. An estimate of 10-5 kT (thousand times larger than for radiolysis) for the parity violating energy (PVE) could be sufficient to run an entropy driven spin-catalyzed asymmetric synthesis. Expect then, wherever there are metal clusters in interstellar dust or under the sea chiral molecular production.

  7. The many guises of a neutral fermion singlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ernest

    2017-03-01

    The addition of a neutral fermion singlet to the Standard Model (SM) of particle interactions leads to many diverse possibilities. It is not necessarily a right-handed neutrino. I discuss many of the simplest and most interesting scenarios of possible new physics with this approach. In particular, I propose the possible spontaneous breaking of baryon number, resulting in the massless “sakharon”.

  8. Particle Accelerators in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  9. Imager of low energy neutral atoms (ILENA) - Imaging neutrals from the magnetosphere at energies below 20 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A.; Smith, Mark F.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a new imager suitable for measurements of magnetospheric neutrals with energies from about 100 eV to about 10 keV; an energy range adequate for imaging the plasmasheet neutral atoms out to about 10 R(E). The instrument, an outgrowth of a study of atom-surface collisions in support of satellite drag calculations, separates incident photons from neutral atoms by surface scattering and conversion of the neutrals to ions. Subsequently, the ions formed on the first surface are accelerated through a light rejection section which also disperses the ions according to energy. The dispersed ion beam is then allowed to impact a second surface where a start pulse is generated to obtain ion velocity and energy/charge. The second surface is chosen to give large secondary electron emission without regard to charge state of the particles reflected from it. The data supporting the proposed ILENA design is presented in the first part of the paper.

  10. Neutralization tests on the SERT 2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.; Domitz, S.

    1979-01-01

    Neutralization test data obtained on the SERT 2 spacecraft are presented. Tests included ion beam neutralization of a thruster by a close (normal design) neutralizer as well as by a distant (1 meter) neutralizer. Parameters affecting neutralization, such as neutralizer bias voltage, neutralizer anode voltage, local spacecraft plasma density, and solar array voltage configuration were varied and changes in plasma potentials were measured. A plasma model is presented as an approximation of observed results.

  11. The Effects of Plasma-Neutral Interactions on Neutral Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, V.; Thayer, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Plasma-neutral interactions are fundamental to the structure and behavior of the neutral thermosphere. This interaction, primarily through ion-neutral collisions, ties electrodynamics with hydrodynamics requiring a fully coupled ionosphere - thermosphere model to simulate and dissect the sequence of responses that occur in the neutral gas when a change occurs in the ionosphere. In particular, changes in the ion drag force prompt a hydrodynamic response that will alter several properties of the thermosphere, including neutral winds. Here, the fully coupled National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (NCAR TIEGCM) is used to evaluate how changes in mechanical coupling, through the ion drag force, alter thermosphere properties, with a focus on thermospheric neutral winds. The equatorial thermosphere anomaly (ETA) produces a transient wind system, and a dissection of the hydrodynamic processes responsible for its formation will be used to demonstrate the causal structure in neutral gas response to a change in field-aligned ion drag force. This well-behaved response elucidates processes that must be occurring in other regions of the thermosphere where more significant changes in the ion drag force occur.

  12. A Neutral Beam Injector Upgrade for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    T. Stevenson; B McCormack; G.D. Loesser; M. Kalish; S. Ramakrishnan; L. Grisham; J. Edwards; M. Cropper; G. Rossi; A. von Halle; M. Williams

    2002-01-18

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) capability with a Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) capable of 80 kiloelectronvolt (keV), 5 Megawatt (MW), 5 second operation. This 5.95 million dollar upgrade reused a previous generation injector and equipment for technical, cost, and schedule reasons to obtain these specifications while retaining a legacy capability of 120 keV neutral particle beam delivery for shorter pulse lengths for possible future NSTX experiments. Concerns with NBI injection included power deposition in the plasma, aiming angles from the fixed NBI fan array, density profiles and beam shine through, orbit losses of beam particles, and protection of the vacuum vessel wall against beam impingement. The upgrade made use of the beamline and cryo panels from the Neutral Beam Test Stand facility, existing power supplies and controls, beamline components and equipment not contaminated by tritium during DT [deuterium-tritium] experiments, and a liquid Helium refrigerator plant to power and cryogenically pump a beamline and three ion sources. All of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) ion sources had been contaminated with tritium, so a refurbishment effort was undertaken on selected TFTR sources to rid the three sources destined for the NSTX NBI of as much tritium as possible. An interconnecting duct was fabricated using some spare and some new components to attach the beamline to the NSTX vacuum vessel. Internal vacuum vessel armor using carbon tiles was added to protect the stainless steel vacuum vessel from beam impingement in the absence of plasma and interlock failure. To date, the NBI has operated to 80 keV and 5 MW and has injected requested power levels into NSTX plasmas with good initial results, including high beta and strong heating characteristics at full rated plasma current.

  13. Irreproducibility of neutralization of herpes simplex virus under conditions where antibody is not in excess.

    PubMed

    Shariff, D; Hallworth, J A; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1987-01-01

    Neutralizing activity against herpes simplex virus was significantly reduced if initial virus titers were greater than 10(6) PFU/ml; there was no significant neutralization when initial virus titers approached 10(8) PFU/ml. This was a result of utilization of all available antibody by virus particles and 'free' virus antigen and emphasizes the importance of conducting virus neutralization tests under conditions of antibody excess.

  14. Dynamics of neutral lipid storage and mobilization in yeast.

    PubMed

    Daum, G; Wagner, A; Czabany, T; Athenstaedt, K

    2007-02-01

    We make use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a flexible experimental system to investigate coordinate pathways of neutral lipid synthesis, storage and mobilization with special emphasis on the role of different organelles in these processes. Recently, a number of new gene products involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) and steryl ester (STE) metabolism were identified in our laboratory and by other groups. STE are synthesized by the two STE synthases Are1p and Are2p, whereas TAG are formed mainly through the action of the two TAG synthases Dga1p and Lro1p with minor contributions of Are1p and Are2p. Once formed, TAG and STE are stored in so-called lipid particles. A dga1Deltalro1Deltaare1Deltaare2Delta quadruple mutant which lacks neutral lipid synthesis and is consequently devoid of lipid particles turned out to be a valuable tool for studying the physiological role of storage lipids and lipid particles. Mobilization of neutral lipid depots occurs through catalysis of TAG lipases and STE hydrolases. Three TAG lipases named Tgl3p, Tgl4p and Tgl5p, and three STE hydrolases named Tgl1p, Yeh1p and Yeh2p were recently identified at the molecular level. Although these hydrolases exhibit overlapping function within the enzyme families, they are specific for TAG and STE, respectively. With the exception of Dga1p, whose activity is partially localized to lipid particles, TAG and STE forming enzymes are restricted to the endoplasmic reticulum. TAG lipases and STE hydrolases are components of lipid particles with the exception of Yeh2p, which is plasma membrane located. Thus, neutral lipid metabolism is not only regulated at the enzyme level but also by the distribution of the components to organelles. The fact that neutral lipid homeostasis is linked to a number of cell biological processes confirms the important role of this class of lipids as cellular modulators or effectors.

  15. Environmental neutralization of polonium-218

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.D.; Hopke, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that two mechanisms of neutralization of the singly charged polonium ion exist. Charged Polonium-218 can be neutralized by reacting with oxygen to form a polonium oxide ion with a higher ionization potential than that of the polonium metal and then accepting an electron transferred from a lower ionization potential gas. In this present work, this mechanism has been verified by determining that the polonium oxide has an ionization potential in the range 10.35-10.53 eV. It was also previously reported that /sup 218/Po can be neutralized, in the absence of oxygen, by the scavenging of electrons by a trace gas such as water or nitrogen dioxide and their diffusion to the polonium ion. To verify this second neutralization mechanism, concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in nitrogen in the range of 50 ppb-1 ppm were examined for their ability to neutralize the polonium ion. Complete neutralization of /sup 218/Po was observed at nitrogen dioxide concentrations greater than 700 ppb. For concentrations below 700 ppb, the degree of neutralization was found to increase smoothly with the nitrogen dioxide concentration.

  16. Biomimetic Particles as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in the development of novel nanoparticle and microparticle-based therapeutics. An emerging paradigm is the incorporation of biomimetic features into these synthetic therapeutic constructs to enable them to better interface with biological systems. Through the control of size, shape, and material consistency, particle cores have been generated that better mimic natural cells and viruses. In addition, there have been significant advances in biomimetic surface functionalization of particles through the integration of bio-inspired artificial cell membranes and naturally derived cell membranes. Biomimetic technologies enable therapeutic particles to have increased potency to benefit human health. PMID:26277289

  17. Biomimetic particles as therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Randall A; Sunshine, Joel C; Green, Jordan J

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in the development of novel nanoparticle- and microparticle-based therapeutics. An emerging paradigm is the incorporation of biomimetic features into these synthetic therapeutic constructs to enable them to better interface with biological systems. Through the control of size, shape, and material consistency, particle cores have been generated that better mimic natural cells and viruses. In addition, there have been significant advances in biomimetic surface functionalization of particles through the integration of bio-inspired artificial cell membranes and naturally derived cell membranes. Biomimetic technologies enable therapeutic particles to have increased potency to benefit human health.

  18. Neutralization of reovirus: the gene responsible for the neutralization antigen

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    The S1 genome segment of reovirus is linked to type specificity as determined by neutralization antibody. This gene segment codes for a minor outer capsid polypeptide (sigma1). Therefore, sigma1 is the peptide responsible for induction of neutralization antibody and confers type specificity. This biologic property of reovirus was defined using hybrid recombinants clones between reovirus types 1 and 3 and 2 and 3. PMID:925604

  19. Neutral Helium Profile Measurements in the WVU Helicon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, Amy; Hardin, Robert; Scime, Earl; Connor, Spencer

    2006-10-01

    We report spatially resolved measurements of excited state neutral helium density, temperature, and flow velocities in the WVU helicon plasma source (HELIX). While ion dynamics are studied extensively, neutral particle characteristics such as density and temperature are frequently neglected in low temperature plasmas and assumed to be spatially uniform. Measurement of the neutral flow is also important, specifically for researchers who use line integrated spectroscopy, since flows along the line of sight can artificially broaden the line width of emission lines. Recent work by Holland et al. on spontaneous flow shear illustrates the need for spatially resolved measurement profiles of the neutral particle parameters. Inclusion of a spatially varying ion-neutral momentum dampening parameter in theoretical models would not only give a more comprehensive understanding of the physics, but could lead to increased shear. Profile measurements were made using the 2D stage described in Hardin et al. C. Holland, J. H. Yu, A. James et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195002 (2006). R. Hardin, X. Sun, E. Scime, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 4091 (2004).

  20. Display of neutralizing epitopes of Canine parvovirus and a T-cell epitope of the fusion protein of Canine distemper virus on chimeric tymovirus-like particles and its use as a vaccine candidate both against Canine parvo and Canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Dev; Shahana, Pallichera Vijayan; Rani, Gudavelli Sudha; Sugumar, Parthasarthy; Shankar, Chinchkar Ramchandra; Srinivasan, Villuppanoor Alwar

    2009-12-10

    Expression of Physalis mottle tymovirus coat protein in Escherichia coli was earlier shown to self-assemble into empty capsids that were nearly identical to the capsids formed in vivo. Amino acid substitutions were made at the N-terminus of wild-type Physalis mottle virus coat protein with neutralizing epitopes of Canine parvovirus containing the antigenic sites 1-2, 4 and 6-7 and T-cell epitope of the fusion protein of Canine distemper virus in various combinations to yield PhMV1, PhMV2, PhMV3, PhMV4 and PhMV5. These constructs were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The chimeric proteins self-assembled into chimeric tymovirus-like particles (TVLPs) as determined by electron microscopy. The TVLPs were purified by ultracentrifugation and injected into guinea pigs and dogs to determine their immunogenicity. Initial immunogenicity studies in guinea pigs indicated that PhMV3 gave a higher response in comparison to the other TVLPs for both CPV and CDV and hence all further experiments in dogs were done with PhMV3. HI was done against different isolates obtained from various parts of the country. Protective titres indicated the broad spectrum of the vaccine. In conclusion the study indicated that the above chimeric VLP based vaccine could be used in dogs to generate a protective immune response against diseases caused by both Canine parvo and Canine distemper virus.

  1. Simulation study of radial dose due to the irradiation of a swift heavy ion aiming to advance the treatment planning system for heavy particle cancer therapy: The effect of emission angles of secondary electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moribayashi, Kengo

    2015-12-01

    A radial dose simulation model has been proposed in order to advance the treatment planning system for heavy particle cancer therapy. Here, the radial dose is the dose due to the irradiation of a heavy ion as a function of distances from this ion path. The model proposed here may overcome weak points of paradigms that are employed to produce the conventional radial dose distributions. To provide the radial dose with higher accuracy, this paper has discussed the relationship between the emission angles of secondary electrons and the radial dose. It is found that the effect of emission angles becomes stronger on the radial dose with increasing energies of the secondary electrons.

  2. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Laura E; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katie J; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J; Euler, Zelda; Burger, Judith A; Seaman, Michael S; Sanders, Rogier W; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Burton, Dennis R

    2015-08-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4) assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs) Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design.

  3. Artificial electromagnetism for neutral atoms: Escher staircase and Laughlin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Erich J.

    2004-10-01

    We present a method for creating fields that couple to neutral atoms in the same way that electromagnetic fields couple to charged particles. We show that this technique opens the door for a range of neutral atom experiments, including probing the interplay between periodic potentials and quantum Hall effects. Furthermore, we propose, and analyze, seemingly paradoxical geometries which can be engineered through these techniques. For example, we show how to create a ring of sites where an atom continuously reduces its potential energy by moving in a clockwise direction.

  4. Vendor neutral archive in PACS.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Tapesh Kumar; Sanjeev

    2012-10-01

    An archive is a location containing a collection of records, documents, or other materials of historical importance. An integral part of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) is archiving. When a hospital needs to migrate a PACS vendor, the complete earlier data need to be migrated in the format of the newly procured PACS. It is both time and money consuming. To address this issue, the new concept of vendor neutral archive (VNA) has emerged. A VNA simply decouples the PACS and workstations at the archival layer. This is achieved by developing an application engine that receives, integrates, and transmits the data using the different syntax of a Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) format. Transferring the data belonging to the old PACS to a new one is performed by a process called migration of data. In VNA, a number of different data migration techniques are available to facilitate transfer from the old PACS to the new one, the choice depending on the speed of migration and the importance of data. The techniques include simple DICOM migration, prefetch-based DICOM migration, medium migration, and the expensive non-DICOM migration. "Vendor neutral" may not be a suitable term, and "architecture neutral," "PACS neutral," "content neutral," or "third-party neutral" are probably better and preferred terms. Notwithstanding this, the VNA acronym has come to stay in both the medical IT user terminology and in vendor nomenclature, and radiologists need to be aware of its impact in PACS across the globe.

  5. Experimental and numerical studies of neutral gas depletion in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi

    the neutral pressure is reduced due the balance of total pressure with plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure). Neutral gas heating is due to the elastic scattering and charge exchange collisions with ions, which are accelerated by the bulk plasma ambi-polar electrostatic field. The excellent agreement between experiment and simulation, and parametric study reveal that gas heating and pressure balance are the main mechanisms of gas depletion in an inductively coupled plasma. Coupling between plasma and neutral gas was observed by both experiment and simulation. The resulting gas depletion enhances the plasma transport to the surrounding wall, increases the particle loss, and decreases the plasma density.

  6. Test particles in a magnetized conformastatic spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Piñeres, Antonio C.; Capistrano, Abraão J. S.; Quevedo, Hernando

    2016-06-01

    A class of exact conformastatic solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations is presented in which the gravitational and electromagnetic potentials are completely determined by a harmonic function. We derive the equations of motion for neutral and charged particles in a spacetime background characterized by this class of solutions. As an example, we focus on the analysis of a particular harmonic function, which generates a singularity-free and asymptotically flat spacetime that describes the gravitational field of a punctual mass endowed with a magnetic field. In this particular case, we investigate the main physical properties of equatorial circular orbits. We show that due to the electromagnetic interaction, it is possible to have charged test particles which stay at rest with respect to a static observer located at infinity. Additionally, we obtain an analytic expression for the perihelion advance of test particles and the corresponding explicit value in the case of a punctual magnetic mass. We show that the analytical expressions obtained from our analysis are sufficient for being confronted with observations in order to establish whether such objects can exist in nature.

  7. Inclusive Focus Particles in English and Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Sang-gu

    2011-01-01

    When discussing focus particles, it has been common practice to rely on the dichotomy of inclusive vs. exclusive particles, "a la" Konig (1991). Inclusive focus particles are often further divided into scalar particles, such as "also", "too", and "either", and non-scalar particles, such as "even". In this thesis, I advance a comparative analysis…

  8. TFTR alpha extraction and measurement: Development and testing of advanced alpha detectors: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.

    1988-02-15

    Advanced alpha-particle detectors made of heavy elements were investigated as alternatives to silicon surface-barrier detectors for the ''foil-neutralization technique'' of alpha-particle diagnostics in fusion reactors with high neutron backgrounds. From an extensive literature review, it was decided that HgI/sub 2/ would make a more suitable detector for alpha-particle diagnostics than other heavy element detectors such as CdTe. Thus, HgI/sub 2/ detectors were designed and fabricated. Experimental tests were performed to determine detector characteristics and detector responses to alpha particles. Radiation noise measurements were also performed using the North Carolina State University PULSTAR nuclear reactor for both the HgI/sub 2/ detectors and commercial Si(Au) surface barrier detectors. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Chemistry of atmospheric nucleation: on the recent advances on precursor characterization and atmospheric cluster composition in connection with atmospheric new particle formation.

    PubMed

    Kulmala, M; Petäjä, T; Ehn, M; Thornton, J; Sipilä, M; Worsnop, D R; Kerminen, V-M

    2014-01-01

    The recent development in measurement techniques and theoretical understanding has enabled us to study atmospheric vapor, cluster and nanoparticle concentrations, dynamics, and their connection to atmospheric nucleation. Here we present a summary of the chemistry of atmospheric clustering, growing nanoparticles, and their precursors. In this work, we focus particularly on atmospheric gas-to-particle conversion and recent progress in its understanding.

  10. The effect of asphaltene particle size and distribution on the temporal advancement of the asphaltene deposition profile in the well column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinali Hasanvand, Mahdi; Mosayebi Behbahani, Reza; Feyzi, Farzaneh; Ali Mousavi Dehghani, Seyed

    2016-05-01

    Asphaltene deposition in oil wells is an inconvenient production problem. Generating a precise deposition model for the well column is essential for optimal well design and prevention/reduction of deposition-associated difficulties. The goal of this study is to determine the effects of various parameters on the deposition process. These parameters include oil viscosity, temperature, flow velocity, well diameter and asphaltene particle size and particle size distribution. The first five parameters are analyzed using Escobedo and Mansoori (2010), Cleaver and Yates (1975) and Friedlander and Johnstone (1957) asphaltene deposition models. The last parameter (asphaltene particle size distribution) is not directly included in the asphaltene deposition models. Therefore, a dynamic well column model is generated by combining transport phenomena (mass, heat and momentum transfer) equations with thermodynamic models. The model is fine-tuned and verified based on field data from an Iranian producing oil well with frequent asphaltene deposition problem and subsequently used for predicting the time-dependent development of the asphaltene deposition profile in the well column for a series of asphaltene particle size distributions. The results show the effect of the said parameters depends on how the buffer layer and Brownian motion are defined. The Escobedo and Mansoori (2010) model is found to make better predictions of deposited asphaltene in the studied well.

  11. The impact of exospheric neutral dynamics on ring current decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Gruntman, M.; Bailey, J. J.; Toth, G.

    2015-12-01

    The geocorona plays an important role in the energy budget of the Earth's inner magnetosphere since charge exchange of energetic ions with exospheric neutrals makes the exosphere act as an energy sink for ring current particles. Long-term ring current decay following a magnetic storm is mainly due to these electron transfer reactions, leading to the formation energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) that leave the ring current system on ballistic trajectories. The number of ENAs emitted from a given region of space depends on several factors, such as the energy and species of the energetic ion population in that region and the density of the neutral gas with which the ions undergo charge exchange. However, the density and structure of the exosphere are strongly dependent on changes in atmospheric temperature and density as well as charge exchange with the ions of plasmaspheric origin, which depletes the geocorona (by having a neutral removed from the system). Moreover, the radiation pressure exerted by solar far-ultraviolet photons pushes the geocoronal hydrogen away from the Earth in an anti-sunward direction to form a tail of neutral hydrogen. TWINS ENA images provide a direct measurement of these ENA losses and therefore insight into the dynamics of the ring current decay through interactions with the geocorona. We assess the influence of geocoronal neutrals on ring current formation and decay by analysis of the predicted ENA emissions using 6 different geocoronal models and simulations from the HEIDI ring current model during storm time. Comparison with TWINS ENA images shows that the location of the peak ENA enhancements is highly dependent on the distribution of geocoronal hydrogen density. We show that the neutral dynamics has a strong influence on the time evolution of the ring current populations as well as on the formation of energetic neutral atoms.

  12. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  13. Monoenergetic Neutral Particle Transport in Semi-Infinite Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    angular distributions , the condition at infinity will be 5 lim 4(x,j P) < 00, 0 < c < 1 where O(x, 1) is the directed or angular flux , c is the number of...29b) which are to be inverted. 1.c Entering Angularly Distributed Flux For a general angularly distributed entering flux , the boundary condition is V...half-space problem which is to be solved based on the solution for the general angularly distributed entering flux found in § II.1.c. 2.a. Exiting

  14. DANTSYS: A diffusion accelerated neutral particle transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Alcouffe, R.E.; Baker, R.S.; Brinkley, F.W.; Marr, D.R.; O`Dell, R.D.; Walters, W.F.

    1995-06-01

    The DANTSYS code package includes the following transport codes: ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWODANT/GQ, TWOHEX, and THREEDANT. The DANTSYS code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent, multigroup discrete ordinates form of the boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, one or more Solver Modules, and the Edit Module, respectively. The Input and Edit Modules are very general in nature and are common to all the Solver Modules. The ONEDANT Solver Module contains a one-dimensional (slab, cylinder, and sphere), time-independent transport equation solver using the standard diamond-differencing method for space/angle discretization. Also included in the package are solver Modules named TWODANT, TWODANT/GQ, THREEDANT, and TWOHEX. The TWODANT Solver Module solves the time-independent two-dimensional transport equation using the diamond-differencing method for space/angle discretization. The authors have also introduced an adaptive weighted diamond differencing (AWDD) method for the spatial and angular discretization into TWODANT as an option. The TWOHEX Solver Module solves the time-independent two-dimensional transport equation on an equilateral triangle spatial mesh. The THREEDANT Solver Module solves the time independent, three-dimensional transport equation for XYZ and RZ{Theta} symmetries using both diamond differencing with set-to-zero fixup and the AWDD method. The TWODANT/GQ Solver Module solves the 2-D transport equation in XY and RZ symmetries using a spatial mesh of arbitrary quadrilaterals. The spatial differencing method is based upon the diamond differencing method with set-to-zero fixup with changes to accommodate the generalized spatial meshing.

  15. Time-Dependent, Parallel Neutral Particle Transport Code System.

    SciTech Connect

    BAKER, RANDAL S.

    2009-09-10

    Version 00 PARTISN (PARallel, TIme-Dependent SN) is the evolutionary successor to CCC-547/DANTSYS. The PARTISN code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent or dependent multigroup discrete ordinates form of the Boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, the Solver Module, and the Edit Module, respectively. PARTISN is the evolutionary successor to the DANTSYSTM code system package. The Input and Edit Modules in PARTISN are very similar to those in DANTSYS. However, unlike DANTSYS, the Solver Module in PARTISN contains one, two, and three-dimensional solvers in a single module. In addition to the diamond-differencing method, the Solver Module also has Adaptive Weighted Diamond-Differencing (AWDD), Linear Discontinuous (LD), and Exponential Discontinuous (ED) spatial differencing methods. The spatial mesh may consist of either a standard orthogonal mesh or a block adaptive orthogonal mesh. The Solver Module may be run in parallel for two and three dimensional problems. One can now run 1-D problems in parallel using Energy Domain Decomposition (triggered by Block 5 input keyword npeg>0). EDD can also be used in 2-D/3-D with or without our standard Spatial Domain Decomposition. Both the static (fixed source or eigenvalue) and time-dependent forms of the transport equation are solved in forward or adjoint mode. In addition, PARTISN now has a probabilistic mode for Probability of Initiation (static) and Probability of Survival (dynamic) calculations. Vacuum, reflective, periodic, white, or inhomogeneous boundary conditions are solved. General anisotropic scattering and inhomogeneous sources are permitted. PARTISN solves the transport equation on orthogonal (single level or block-structured AMR) grids in 1-D (slab, two-angle slab, cylindrical, or spherical), 2-D (X-Y, R-Z, or R-T) and 3-D (X-Y-Z or R-Z-T) geometries.

  16. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-04-28

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  17. Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-05-15

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100 G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  18. Effect of Thermospheric Neutral Density upon Inner Trapped-belt Proton Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Lodhi, M. A. K.; Diaz, Abel B.

    2007-01-01

    We wish to point out that a secular change in the Earth's atmospheric neutral density alters charged-particle lifetime in the inner trapped radiation belts, in addition to the changes recently reported as produced by greenhouse gases. Heretofore, changes in neutral density have been of interest primarily because of their effect on the orbital drag of satellites. We extend this to include the orbital lifetime of charged particles in the lower radiation belts. It is known that the charged-belt population is coupled to the neutral density of the atmosphere through changes induced by solar activity, an effect produced by multiple scattering off neutral and ionized atoms along with ionization loss in the thermosphere where charged and neutral populations interact. It will be shown here that trapped-belt flux J is bivariant in energy E and thermospheric neutral density , as J(E,rho). One can conclude that proton lifetimes in these belts are also directly affected by secular changes in the neutral species populating the Earth s thermosphere. This result is a consequence of an intrinsic property of charged-particle flux, that flux is not merely a function of E but is dependent upon density rho when a background of neutrals is present.

  19. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-10-21

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus.

  20. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H.; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus. PMID:25288761

  1. Low-Energy Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of Io Plasma and Neutral Tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Wieser, Martin; Wieser, Gabriella S.; Wurz, Peter; Krupp, Norbert; Brandt, Pontus C.

    2014-05-01

    Io's plasma neutral tori play significant roles in the Jovian magnetosphere. We present a feasibility study of measuring low-energy energetic neutral atoms (LENAs) generated from the tori. We calculate the LENA flux between 10 eV and 3 keV, which covers the energy range of the corotational plasma flow. The differential flux is typically 103-105cm-2sr-1s-1eV -1 near the energy of the corotation measured from the Ganymede orbit. It is above the detection level of the planned LENA sensor that is to be flown to the Jupiter system with a time integral of 0.01-1 seconds. The flux is typically observed from the dawn side of Jupiter. The observed flux will exhibit periodicities though the assumed ENA generation is time independent, which can be attributed to the Jovian magnetosphere rotation and the rotation of Io around Jupiter. The energy spectra will exhibit dispersion signatures, because of the non-negligible flight time of the LENAs from Io to the satellite. In 2030, the Jupiter exploration mission JUICE will conduct a LENA measurement with a LENA instrument, the Jovian Neutrals Analyzer (JNA). From the LENA observations collected by JNA, we will be able to derive characteristic quantities, such as the density, velocity, velocity distribution function, and composition of plasma-torus particles. We also discuss the possible physics to be explored by JNA in addition to the constraints for operating the sensor and analyzing the obtained dataset.

  2. Low-energy energetic neutral atom imaging of Io plasma and neutral tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Wieser, Martin; Wieser, Gabriella S.; Wurz, Peter; Krupp, Norbert; Brandt, Pontus C.:son

    2015-04-01

    Io's plasma and neutral tori play significant roles in the Jovian magnetosphere. We present feasibility studies of measuring low-energy energetic neutral atoms (LENAs) generated from the Io tori. We calculate the LENA flux between 10 eV and 3 keV. The energy range includes the corotational plasma flow energy. The expected differential flux at Ganymede distance is typically 103-105 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 eV-1 near the energy of the corotation. It is above the detection level of the planned LENA sensor that is to be flown to the Jupiter system with integration times of 0.01-1 s. The flux has strong asymmetry with respective to the Io phase. The observations will exhibit periodicities, which can be attributed to the Jovian magnetosphere rotation and the rotation of Io around Jupiter. The energy spectra will exhibit dispersion signatures, because of the non-negligible flight time of the LENAs from Io to the satellite. In 2030, the Jupiter exploration mission JUICE will conduct a LENA measurement with a LENA instrument, the Jovian Neutrals Analyzer (JNA). From the LENA observations collected by JNA, we will be able to derive characteristic quantities, such as the density, velocity, velocity distribution function, and composition of plasma-torus particles. We also discuss the possible physics to be explored by JNA in addition to the constraints for operating the sensor and analyzing the obtained dataset.

  3. Time reversal violation for entangled neutral mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabeu, J.

    2014-07-01

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique solution for the test of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and φ, Factories. The two quantum effects of the decays as filtering measurements of the meson states and the transfer of information of the first decay to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of "in" and "out" states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system. The perspectives for future additional studies of TRV are discussed.

  4. Time reversal violation for entangled neutral mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabeu, J.

    2014-07-23

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique solution for the test of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and φ, Factories. The two quantum effects of the decays as filtering measurements of the meson states and the transfer of information of the first decay to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of “in” and “out” states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system. The perspectives for future additional studies of TRV are discussed.

  5. Colloquium: Artificial gauge potentials for neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dalibard, Jean; Gerbier, Fabrice; Juzeliunas, Gediminas; Oehberg, Patrik

    2011-10-01

    When a neutral atom moves in a properly designed laser field, its center-of-mass motion may mimic the dynamics of a charged particle in a magnetic field, with the emergence of a Lorentz-like force. In this Colloquium the physical principles at the basis of this artificial (synthetic) magnetism are presented. The corresponding Aharonov-Bohm phase is related to the Berry's phase that emerges when the atom adiabatically follows one of the dressed states of the atom-laser interaction. Some manifestations of artificial magnetism for a cold quantum gas, in particular, in terms of vortex nucleation are discussed. The analysis is then generalized to the simulation of non-Abelian gauge potentials and some striking consequences are presented, such as the emergence of an effective spin-orbit coupling. Both the cases of bulk gases and discrete systems, where atoms are trapped in an optical lattice, are addressed.

  6. Reduced neutral XLPE cable design

    SciTech Connect

    Valli, G.F.; Zawadzki, J.A.; Orton, H.E. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes the theoretical, laboratory and economic analyses undertaken to determine the optimum metallic concentric neutral design for its single conductor 750 and 500 kcmil aluminum XLPE 15 kV insulated concentric-neutral type feeder cables. The results suggest that reducing the cross-sectional area of this concentric neutral from the currently-recognized industry standard of 20 percent of the central conductor to 7% results in overall present-worth system cost saving of approximately $3 per conductor meter or approximately 22% of the cable first cost. The neutral configuration ultimately chosen to replace the previous standard 37 - number 14 AWG wires was 2 - 1 inch {times} 5 mil tinned copper tapes overlapped by 25%. Line voltage fault test were run in the high-power laboratory on samples with various neutral configurations to confirm they would successfully pass our worst-case fault duty of 10 kA for 20 cycles (i.e., .33 sec) with no reclosing.

  7. Selective neutrality and enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1997-10-01

    This article appeals to a recent theory of enzyme evolution to show that the properties, neutral or adaptive, which characterize the observed allelic variation in natural populations can be inferred from the functional parameters, substrate specificity, and reaction rate. This study delineates the following relations between activity variables, and the forces--adaptive or neutral--determining allelic variation: (1) Enzymes with broad substrate specificity: The observed polymorphism is adaptive; mutations in this class of enzymes can result in increased fitness of the organism and hence be relevant for positive selection. (2) Enzymes with absolute substrate specificity and diffusion-controlled rates: Observed allelic variation will be absolutely neutral; mutations in this class of enzymes will be either deleterious or have no effect on fitness. (3) Enzymes with absolute or group specificity and nondiffusion-controlled rates: Observed variation will be partially neutral; mutants which are selectively neutral may become advantageous under an appropriate environmental condition or different genetic background. We illustrate each of the relations between kinetic properties and evolutionary states with examples drawn from enzymes whose evolutionary dynamics have been intensively studied.

  8. Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation experiment is scheduled to be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission. The objective of this experiment is to measure very faint emissions at nighttime arising from fluxes of energetic neutral atoms in the thermosphere. These energetic atoms have energies ranging up to about 50 keV, and arise from ions of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen trapped in the inner magnetosphere. Some of these ions become neutralized in charge exchange reactions with neutral hydrogen in the hydrogen geocorona that extends through the region. The ions are trapped on magnetic field lines which cross the equatorial plane at 2 to 6 earth radii distance, and they mirror at a range of heights on these field lines, extending down to the thermosphere at 500 km altitude. The ATLAS 1 measurements will not be of the neutral atoms themselves but of the optical emission produced by those on trajectories that intersect the thermosphere. The ENAP measurements are to be made using the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) which is being flown on the ATLAS mission primarily for daytime spectral observations, and the ENAP measurements will all be nighttime measurements because of the faintness of the emissions and the relatively low level of magnetic activity expected.

  9. Energy Gap of Neutral Excitations Implies Vanishing Charge Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruki

    2017-03-01

    In quantum many-body systems with a U(1) symmetry, such as particle number conservation and axial spin conservation, there are two distinct types of excitations: charge-neutral excitations and charged excitations. The energy gaps of these excitations may be independent from each other in strongly correlated systems. The static susceptibility of the U(1) charge vanishes when the charged excitations are all gapped, but its relation to the neutral excitations is not obvious. Here we show that a finite excitation gap of the neutral excitations is, in fact, sufficient to prove that the charge susceptibility vanishes (i.e., the system is incompressible). This result gives a partial explanation for why the celebrated quantization condition n (S -mz)∈Z at magnetization plateaus works even in spatial dimensions greater than one.

  10. Energetic neutral atoms: Imaging the magnetospheric ring current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, Edmond C.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetospheric imaging is a new discipline whose goal is to make pictures of the energetic particle populations trapped in the magnetic field of Earth (or any other planet). This project demonstrated the technical feasibility and scientific validity of magnetospheric imaging using energetic neutral atoms (ENA) with the publication and quantitative analysis of the first ENA images ever obtained from space. ENA's are produced when singly-charged energetic (approximately 100 keV) trapped ions make an atomic collision with the neutral hydrogen atoms which boil of the top of the Earth's atmosphere. These hydrogen atoms suffuse the entire trapping volume of the magnetosphere. The energetic ion steals the electron from the atmospheric hydrogen, so the energetic ion is transformed into an energetic neutral atom with a velocity of several thousands of kilometers/second. Moreover, the new-born ENA preserves the velocity that the trapped ion had at the time of the collision. Consequently, any population of energetic ions emits ENA's.

  11. Pressure anisotropy and radial stress balance in the Jovian neutral sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paranicas, C. P.; Mauk, B. H.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    By examining particle and magnetic field data from the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft, signatures were found indicating that the (greater than about 28 keV) particle pressure parallel to the magnetic field is greater than the pressure perpendicular to the field within the nightside neutral sheet (three nightside neutral sheet crossings, with favorable experimental conditions, were used). By incorporating the pressure anisotropy into the calculation of radial forces within the hightside neutral sheet, it is found that (1) force balance is approximately achieved and (2) the anisotropy force term provides the largest contribution of the other particle forces considered (pressure gradients and the corotation centrifugal force). With regard to the problem of understanding the balance of radial forces within the dayside neutral sheet (McNutt, 1984; Mauk and Krimigis, 1987), the nightside pressure anisotropy force is larger than the dayside pressure gradient forces at equivalent radial distances; however, a full accounting of the dayside regions remains to be achieved.

  12. Advanced Fusion Power Plant Studies. Annual Report for 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; Greenfield, C.M.; Kinsey, J.E.; et al.

    2000-01-01

    Significant progress in physics understanding of the reversed shear advanced tokamak regime has been made since the last ARIES-RS study was completed in 1996. The 1999 study aimed at updating the physics design of ARIES-RS, which has been renamed ARIES-AT, using the improved understanding achieved in the last few years. The new study focused on: Improvement of beta-limit stability calculations to include important non-ideal effects such as resistive wall modes and neo-classical tearing modes; Use of physics based transport model for internal transport barrier (ITB) formation and sustainment; Comparison of current drive and rotational flow drive using fast wave, electron cyclotron wave and neutral particle beam; Improvement in heat and particle control; Integrated modeling of the optimized scenario with self-consistent current and transport profiles to study the robustness of the bootstrap alignment, ITB sustainment, and stable path to high beta and high bootstrap fraction operation.

  13. A Re-Examiniation of Phonological Neutralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinnsen, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews research studies that raise serious questions about phonological neutralization, that is, the merger of a contrast in certain contexts. Some findings cast doubt on the very existence of neutralization and the correctness of the theoretical principles that make assumptions based on neutralization. Reanalyzes neutralization in light of these…

  14. Current disruptions in the near-earth neutral sheet region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Lopez, R. E.; Anderson, B. J.; Takahashi, K.; Zanetti, L. J.; Mcentire, R. W.; Potemra, T. A.; Klumpar, D. M.; Greene, E. M.; Strangeway, R.

    1992-01-01

    Current disruption events observed by the Charge Composition Explorer during 1985 and 1986 are examined. Occurrence of current disruption was accompanied by large magnetic field turbulence and frequently with reversal in the sign of the field component normal to the neutral sheet. Current disruptions in the near-earth region are found to be typically shortlived (about 1-5 min), and their onsets coincide well with the ground onsets of substorm expansion or intensification in the local time sector of the footpoint of the spacecraft. These events are found almost exclusively close to the field reversal plane of the neutral sheet (within about 0.5 RE). Prior to current disruption the field strength can be reduced to as low as one seventh of the dipole field value and can recover to nearly the dipole value after disruption. The temporal evolution of particle pressure in the near-earth neutral sheet during the onset of current disruption indicates that the current buildup during the substorm growth phase is associated with enhancement in the particle pressure at the neutral sheet.

  15. New calculations of neutral atoms release in the Mercury exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borin, Patrizia; Bruno, Marco; Cremonese, Gabriele; Marzari, Francesco

    Meteoroid impacts are an important source of neutral atoms in the exosphere of Mercury. Recent papers attribute to impacting particles smaller than 1 cm most of the contribution to exospheric gases. In this work we calculate the vapour and neutral atoms production rates on Mercury, as due to the impacts of micrometeoroids in the size range between 5-100 µm, that contribute for about 50% of the neutral atoms released by impacts, according to flux obtained by the new dynamical model of Borin et al. (2009). The calculations have been performed taking into account two different calibration sources for the meteoroid flux provided by Love and Brownlee (1993) (as for Borin et al., 2009) and by Grun et al. (1985). Moreover, we give different values of the vapour production rates assuming both asteroidal and cometary sources of the dust particles (Wiegert, 2009; Dermott et al., 2002). Considering three different surface composition and mass fraction of atoms in the regolith of the planet (Cremonese et al. 2005, Goettel 1988, Smith and Marconi 1995) we provide the estimate of neutral atoms production rates, as sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium.

  16. Seeking to Improve Low Energy Neutral Atom Detection in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Herrero, F.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2007-01-01

    The detection of energetic neutral atoms allows for the remote examination of the interactions between plasmas and neutral populations in space. Before these neutral atoms can be measured, they must first be converted to ions. For the low energy end of this spectrum, interaction with a conversion surface is often the most efficient method to convert neutrals into ions. It is generally thought that the most efficient surfaces are low work functions materials. However, by their very nature, these surfaces are highly reactive and unstable, and therefore are not suitable for space missions where conditions cannot be controlled as they are in a laboratory. We therefore are looking to optimize a stable surface for conversion efficiency. Conversion efficiency can be increased either by changing the incident angle of the neutral particles to be grazing incidence and using stable surfaces with high conversion efficiencies. We have examined how to increase the angle of incidence from -80 degrees to -89 degrees, while maintaining or improving the total active conversion surface area without increasing the overall volume of the instrument. We are developing a method to micro-machine silicon, which will reduce the volume to surface area ratio by a factor of 60. We have also examined the material properties that affect the conversion efficiency of the surface for stable surfaces. Some of the parameters we have examined are work function, smoothness, and bond structure. We find that for stable surfaces, the most important property is the smoothness of the surface.

  17. Ion-neutral Coupling During the August 2011 Magnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Su, Y.; Sutton, E. K.; Weimer, D. R.; Earle, G. D.; Gerrard, A. J.; Ober, D. M.; Wilson, G. R.; Davidson, R.

    2012-12-01

    During the August 2011 magnetic storm, electromagnetic and particle energy input to the ionosphere and thermosphere were directly monitored by DMSP satellites F15, F16, and F17. Simultaneous with these observations were measurements of neutral winds from the Neutral Wind Meter on C/NOFS, and SOFDI, a ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer located in Huancayo. In addition, the accelerometers on the GRACE spacecraft measured fluctuations in neutral densities. The total energy input into the ionosphere was estimated using the Weimer (2005) model, scaled by the DMSP measurements. This was compared with the energy increase in the thermosphere, calculated by direct measurements from GRACE. Model predictions of thermospheric response show good comparisons with measurement. Results of our analysis show that from the initiation of the storm main phase, traveling atmospheric disturbances and neutral winds move from high to low latitudes for many hours. The response of the thermosphere to energy input is surprisingly fast, indicating that ion-neutral coupling mechanisms are highly effective during the storm. Weimer, D. R., Predicting Surface Geomagnetic Variations Using Ionospheric Electrodynamic Models, J. Geophys. Res., 110, A12307, doi:10.1029/ 2005JA011270, 2005.

  18. Human-like antibodies neutralizing Western equine encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Hülseweh, Birgit; Rülker, Torsten; Pelat, Thibaut; Langermann, Claudia; Frenzel, Andrè; Schirrmann, Thomas; Dübel, Stefan; Thullier, Philippe; Hust, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the development of the first neutralizing antibodies against Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), a member of the genus Alphavirus. WEEV is transmitted by mosquitoes and can spread to the human central nervous system, causing symptoms ranging from mild febrile reactions to life-threatening encephalitis. WEEV has been classified as a biological warfare agent by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No anti-WEEV drugs are currently commercially available. Neutralizing antibodies are useful for the pre- and post-exposure treatment of WEEV infections. In this study, two immune antibody gene libraries were constructed from two macaques immunized with inactivated WEEV. Four antibodies were selected from these libraries and recloned as scFv-Fc, with a human Fc part. These antibodies bound WEEV specifically in ELISA with little or no cross-reaction with other alphaviruses. They were further analyzed by immunohistochemistry. All binders were suitable for the intracellular detection of WEEV particles. Neutralizing activity was determined in vitro. Three of the four antibodies were found to be neutralizing; about 1 ng/mL of the best antibody (ToR69–3A2) neutralized 50% of 5x104 TCID50/mL. Due to its human-like nature with a germinality index of 89% (VH) and 91% (VL), the ToR69–3A2 antibody is a promising candidate for future passive vaccine development. PMID:24518197

  19. A Study of Energetic Neutral Oxygen Emissions and its Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Lui, A. T.; Fok, M.

    2008-05-01

    Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) emission detection serves as an innovative diagnostic tool for detailed investigations of energetic particles and has contributed greatly in addressing key issues of storm and substorm dynamics. ENAs, which are products of charge exchange between singly charged energetic ions and neutrals of the geocorona, carry not only spectral information but also composition of source plasma and therefore enable global imaging of ring current ions. An inter-spacecraft comparison of energetic neutral oxygen (ENO) intensity from two different vantage points, provided by IMAGE and Geotail, showed that viewing perspective plays a very important role in the observed ENO intensity level during a magnetic storm period [Lui et al., 2005]. Motivated by the findings, we investigate how viewing perspective influences energetic neutral atom emissions from a modeling perspective. Our simulation results, based upon O+ ion fluxes from the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) and the subsequent ENO calculation, reproduce the total differential ENO intensity obtained from two spacecraft to a reasonable degree. Further analysis of our results indicates that pitch angle anisotropy in ring current ion flux, a crucial physical quantity in ring current and radiation belt dynamics, is one major contributor to the difference in energetic neutral atom intensity from different viewing perspectives. Using the CRCM, we will also examine the role of O+ in the storm-time ring current dynamics. Lui, A. T. Y. et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L13104, doi:10.1029/2005GL022851 (2005).

  20. Advanced biostack experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors; (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars; (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness); and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  1. Search for New Physics in Neutral Kaon Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Comfort, Joseph R.

    2016-04-30

    This report will summarize contributions made by the ASU group during the grant period. Focus will be given to three areas: (1) Monte Carlo simulations; (2) signal processing in the electronics; and (3) data analysis software. For reference, a drawing of the KOTO detector is shown in Fig. 1. The production target for the neutral beam particles was about 20 meters upstream of the detector.

  2. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H. [Livermore, CA; Frank, Alan M. [Livermore, CA

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process.

  3. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, J.H.; Frank, A.M.

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment is disclosed. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process. 2 figs.

  4. Low energy neutral atom imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Funsten, H.O.; Gosling, J.T.; Moore, K.R.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    Energetic neutral atom (ENA) and low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging of space plasmas are emerging new technology which promises to revolutionize the way we view and understand large scale space plasma phenomena and dynamics. ENAs and LENAs are produced in the magnetosphere by charge exchange between energetic and plasma ions and cold geocoronal neutrals. While imaging techniques have been previously developed for observing ENAs, with energies above several tens of keV, most of the ions found in the terrestrial magnetosphere have lower energies. We recently suggested that LENAs could be imaged by first converting the neutrals to ions and then electrostatically analyzing them to reject the UV background. In this paper we extend this work to examine in detail the sensor elements needed to make an LENA imager. These elements are (1) a biased collimator to remove the ambient plasma ions and electrons and set the azimuthal field-of-view; (2) a charge modifier to convert a portion of the incident LENAs to ions; (3) an electrostatic analyzer to reject UV light and set the energy passband; and (4) a coincidence detector to measure converted LENAs while rejecting noise and penetrating radiation. We also examine the issue of LENA imager sensitivity and describe ways of optimizing sensitivity in the various sensor components. Finally, we demonstrate in detail how these general considerations are implemented by describing one relatively straightforward design based on a hemispherical electrostatic analyzer.

  5. MSFC Skylab neutral buoyancy simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of a neutral buoyancy simulator for developing extravehicular activity systems and for training astronauts in weightless activities is discussed. The construction of the facility and the operations are described. The types of tests and the training activities conducted in the simulator are reported. Photographs of the components of the simulator and actual training exercises are included.

  6. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqing; Li, Shaowei; Gu, Ying; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-11-18

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART) but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment.

  7. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiqing; Li, Shaowei; Gu, Ying; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART) but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment. PMID:27869733

  8. Electron Extraction Mechanisms of a Micro ECR Neutralizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takao, Yoshinori; Hiramoto, Kenta; Nakagawa, Yuichi; Kasagi, Yusuke; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2015-09-01

    A neutralizer is one of the indispensable components for ion propulsion systems. To design a better performance neutralizer the mechanisms of electron extraction from its plasma source through orifices should be elucidated. In the present study, three-dimensional particle simulations have been carried out for a 4.2-GHz microwave discharge neutralizer, where the size of the discharge chamber is 20 × 20 × 4 mm3 and a xenon electron cyclotron resonance plasma is employed. The numerical model is composed of a particle-in-cell simulation with a Monte Carlo collision algorithm for the kinetics of charged particles, a finite-difference time-domain method for the electromagnetic fields of microwaves, and a finite element analysis for the magnetostatic fields of permanent magnets. The calculations were conducted at the gas pressure of 1 mTorr and the absorbed power of 0.3 W. The simulation results have indicated that the electrostatic field of the plasma has a dominant influence on the electron extraction, where electrons are not extracted unless the effect of the electrostatic field is taken into account in the calculations. This work was supported in part by JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 25289304. Part of the simulations was performed on the KDK computer system at RISH, Kyoto University.

  9. Lateral Migration and Rotational Motion of Elliptic Particles in Planar Poiseuille Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qi, Dewei; Luo, Li-Shi; Aravamuthan, Raja; Strieder, William; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Simulations of elliptic particulate suspensions in the planar Poiseuille flow are performed by using the lattice Boltzmann equation. Effects of the multi-particle on the lateral migration and rotational motion of both neutrally and non-neutrally buoyant elliptic particles are investigated. Low and intermediate total particle volume fraction f(sub a) = 13%, 15%, and 40% are considered in this work.

  10. Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This section of the publication includes papers entitled: (1) Coupled growth in hypermonotectics; (2) Directional solidification of refined Al-4 wt.% Cu alloys; (3) Effects of convection on interface curvature during growth of concentrated ternary compounds; (4) Directional solidification of Al-1.5 wt.% Ni alloys; (5) Interactive response of advancing phase boundaries to particles; (6) INTeractive Response of Advancing Phase boundaries to Particles-INTRAPP; and (7) Particle engulfment and pushing by solidifying interfaces.

  11. Correlation of Density Pedestal Width and Neutral Penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.; Nevins, W. M.; Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.; Umansky, M. V.

    2003-10-01

    Pedestal studies in DIII-D and C-Mod find a good correlation between the width of the H-mode density barrier and the neutral penetration length.[1][2] These results suggest that the width may be set by the combined effects of neutral and plasma transport. This paper is a report on fluid simulations of boundary plasma using BOUT code [3] with neutral source added. Thus both neutral and plasma physics are treated. The plasma transport is self-consistently driven by boundary turbulence due to the resistive X-point mode, while neutral is described by a simple fluid diffusive model. The plasma profiles are evolved on the same time scale as the turbulence for the given heat source from the core plasma and particle source from the neutrals. For prescribed neutral profiles, we find the formation of a density pedestal inside the separatrix in the L-mode even though the calculated plasma diffusion coefficients are almost radially constant and without the formation of a temperature pedestal. These results support the hypothesis that particle fueling can provide the dominant control for the size of the H-mode density barrier. The width of the density barrier, and its relationship to pedestal height and neutral penetration length at the midplane, will be given by using hyperbolic-tangent fit to the simulation data. [1] R.J.Groebner, M.A.Mahdavi, A.W.Leonard, 19th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference(Lyon, France, 14 to 19 October 2002), IAEA-CN-94/EX/C2-3. [2] D.Mossessian, J.W.Hughes, M.Greenwald, et al., ``Local dimensionless identity method as a tool for studying H-mode pedestal'', The 9th Joint US-European TTF workshop (Madison, Wisconsin, April 2nd - 5th, 2003). [3] X.Q.Xu, R.H.Cohen, T.D.Rognlien and J.R.Myra, Physics of Plasma, Vol. 7, 1951-1958 (2000).

  12. Small Particle Response to Fluid Motion Using Tethered Particles to Simulate Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James; L'Esperance, Drew; Rangel, Roger; Coimbra, Carlos; Witherow, William K.; Rogers, Jan; Lal, Ravindra

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on ground based work conducted to support the Spaceflight Definition project SHIVA (Spaceflight Holography Investigation in a Virtual Apparatus). SHIVA will advance our understanding of the movement of a particle in a fluid. Gravity usually dominates the equations of motion, but in microgravity as well as on earth other terms can become important. Through an innovative application of fractional differential equations, two members of our team produced the first analytical solution of a fundamental equation of motion, which had only been solved numerically or by approximation before. The general solution predicts that the usually neglected history term becomes important in particle response to a sinusoidal fluid movement when the characteristic viscous time is in the same order as the fluid oscillation period and peaks when the two times are equal. In this case three force terms, the Stokes drag, the added mass, and the history drag must all be included in predicting particle movement. We have developed diagnostic recording methods using holography to save all of the particle field data, allowing the experiment to essentially be transferred from space back to earth in what we call the virtual apparatus for on-earth microgravity experimentation. We can quantify precisely the three-dimensional motion of sets of particles, allowing us to test and apply the new analytical solutions. We are examining the response of particles up to 2 mm radius to fluid oscillation at frequencies up to 80 Hz with amplitudes up to 200 microns. Ground studies to support the flight development program have employed various schemes to simulate microgravity. One of the most reliable and meaningful methods uses spheres tethered to a fine hair suspended in the fluid. We have also investigated particles with nearly neutral buoyancy. Recordings are made at the peak amplitudes of vibration of the cell providing a measure of the ratio of fluid to particle amplitude. The experiment

  13. Magnetotail particle dynamics and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speiser, Theodore W.

    1995-01-01

    The main thrust of our research is to study