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Sample records for advanced numerical schemes

  1. Using Steffe's Advanced Fraction Schemes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Andrea V.; Norton, Anderson H.

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing schemes, which are different from strategies, can help teachers understand their students' thinking about fractions. Using Steffe's advanced fraction schemes, the authors describe a progression of development that upper elementary and middle school students might follow in understanding fractions. Each scheme can be viewed as a…

  2. Development of a numerical scheme to predict geomagnetic storms after intense solar events and geomagnetic activity 27 days in advance. Final report, 6 Aug 86-16 Nov 90

    SciTech Connect

    Akasofu, S.I.; Lee, L.H.

    1991-02-01

    The modern geomagnetic storm prediction scheme should be based on a numerical simulation method, rather than on a statistical result. Furthermore, the scheme should be able to predict the geomagnetic storm indices, such as the Dst and AE indices, as a function of time. By recognizing that geomagnetic storms are powered by the solar wind-magnetosphere generator and that its power is given in terms of the solar wind speed, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) magnitude and polar angle, the authors have made a major advance in predicting both flare-induced storms and recurrent storms. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the prediction scheme can be calibrated using the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observation, when the solar disturbance advances about half-way to the earth. It is shown, however, that we are still far from a reliable prediction scheme. The prediction of the IMF polar angle requires future advance in understanding characteristics of magnetic clouds.

  3. A numerical scheme for ionizing shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Aslan, Necdet . E-mail: naslan@yeditepe.edu.tr; Mond, Michael

    2005-12-10

    A two-dimensional (2D) visual computer code to solve the steady state (SS) or transient shock problems including partially ionizing plasma is presented. Since the flows considered are hypersonic and the resulting temperatures are high, the plasma is partially ionized. Hence the plasma constituents are electrons, ions and neutral atoms. It is assumed that all the above species are in thermal equilibrium, namely, that they all have the same temperature. The ionization degree is calculated from Saha equation as a function of electron density and pressure by means of a nonlinear Newton type root finding algorithms. The code utilizes a wave model and numerical fluctuation distribution (FD) scheme that runs on structured or unstructured triangular meshes. This scheme is based on evaluating the mesh averaged fluctuations arising from a number of waves and distributing them to the nodes of these meshes in an upwind manner. The physical properties (directions, strengths, etc.) of these wave patterns are obtained by a new wave model: ION-A developed from the eigen-system of the flux Jacobian matrices. Since the equation of state (EOS) which is used to close up the conservation laws includes electronic effects, it is a nonlinear function and it must be inverted by iterations to determine the ionization degree as a function of density and temperature. For the time advancement, the scheme utilizes a multi-stage Runge-Kutta (RK) algorithm with time steps carefully evaluated from the maximum possible propagation speed in the solution domain. The code runs interactively with the user and allows to create different meshes to use different initial and boundary conditions and to see changes of desired physical quantities in the form of color and vector graphics. The details of the visual properties of the code has been published before (see [N. Aslan, A visual fluctuation splitting scheme for magneto-hydrodynamics with a new sonic fix and Euler limit, J. Comput. Phys. 197 (2004) 1

  4. Multidimensional numerical scheme for resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2007-12-01

    The paper describes a new upwind conservative numerical scheme for special relativistic resistive magnetohydrodynamics with scalar resistivity. The magnetic field is kept approximately divergence free and the divergence of the electric field is kept consistent with the electric charge distribution via the method of Generalized Lagrange Multiplier. The hyperbolic fluxes are computed using the Harten-Lax-van Leer (HLL) prescription and the source terms are accounted via the time-splitting technique. The results of test simulations show that the scheme can handle equally well both resistive current sheets and shock waves, and thus can be a useful tool for studying phenomena of relativistic astrophysics that involve both colliding supersonic flows and magnetic reconnection.

  5. Numerical Schemes for Rough Parabolic Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Deya, Aurelien

    2012-04-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of numerical approximation schemes for a class of parabolic equations on (0,1) perturbed by a non-linear rough signal. It is the continuation of Deya (Electron. J. Probab. 16:1489-1518, 2011) and Deya et al. (Probab. Theory Relat. Fields, to appear), where the existence and uniqueness of a solution has been established. The approach combines rough paths methods with standard considerations on discretizing stochastic PDEs. The results apply to a geometric 2-rough path, which covers the case of the multidimensional fractional Brownian motion with Hurst index H>1/3.

  6. Numerical viscosity and the entropy condition for conservative difference schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, E.

    1983-01-01

    Consider a scalar, nonlinear conservative difference scheme satisfying the entropy condition. It is shown that difference schemes containing more numerical viscosity will necessarily converge to the unique, physically relevant weak solution of the approximated conservation equation. In particular, entropy satisfying convergence follows for E schemes - those containing more numerical viscosity than Godunov's scheme.

  7. Simple Numerical Schemes for the Korteweg-deVries Equation

    SciTech Connect

    C. J. McKinstrie; M. V. Kozlov

    2000-12-01

    Two numerical schemes, which simulate the propagation of dispersive non-linear waves, are described. The first is a split-step Fourier scheme for the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. The second is a finite-difference scheme for the modified KdV equation. The stability and accuracy of both schemes are discussed. These simple schemes can be used to study a wide variety of physical processes that involve dispersive nonlinear waves.

  8. Study on the numerical schemes for hypersonic flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagdewe, S. P.; Shevare, G. R.; Kim, Heuy-Dong

    2009-10-01

    Hypersonic flow is full of complex physical and chemical processes, hence its investigation needs careful analysis of existing schemes and choosing a suitable scheme or designing a brand new scheme. The present study deals with two numerical schemes Harten, Lax, and van Leer with Contact (HLLC) and advection upstream splitting method (AUSM) to effectively simulate hypersonic flow fields, and accurately predict shock waves with minimal diffusion. In present computations, hypersonic flows have been modeled as a system of hyperbolic equations with one additional equation for non-equilibrium energy and relaxing source terms. Real gas effects, which appear typically in hypersonic flows, have been simulated through energy relaxation method. HLLC and AUSM methods are modified to incorporate the conservation laws for non-equilibrium energy. Numerical implementation have shown that non-equilibrium energy convect with mass, and hence has no bearing on the basic numerical scheme. The numerical simulation carried out shows good comparison with experimental data available in literature. Both numerical schemes have shown identical results at equilibrium. Present study has demonstrated that real gas effects in hypersonic flows can be modeled through energy relaxation method along with either AUSM or HLLC numerical scheme.

  9. High order parallel numerical schemes for solving incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Avi; Milner, Edward J.; Liou, May-Fun; Belch, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of parallel computers for numerically solving flow fields has gained much importance in recent years. This paper introduces a new high order numerical scheme for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) specifically designed for parallel computational environments. A distributed MIMD system gives the flexibility of treating different elements of the governing equations with totally different numerical schemes in different regions of the flow field. The parallel decomposition of the governing operator to be solved is the primary parallel split. The primary parallel split was studied using a hypercube like architecture having clusters of shared memory processors at each node. The approach is demonstrated using examples of simple steady state incompressible flows. Future studies should investigate the secondary split because, depending on the numerical scheme that each of the processors applies and the nature of the flow in the specific subdomain, it may be possible for a processor to seek better, or higher order, schemes for its particular subcase.

  10. Numerical simulation of shock wave diffraction by TVD schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Victor Y. C.; Yee, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    An upwind total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme and a predictor-corrector symmetric TVD scheme were used to numerically simulate the blast wave diffraction on a stationary object. The objective is to help design an optimum configuration so that lateral motion is minimized and at the same time vortex shedding and flow separation are reduced during a blast wave encounter. Results are presented for a generic configuration for both a coarse grid and a fine grid to illustrate the global and local diffraction flow fields. Numerical experiments for the shock wave reflection on a wedge are also included to validate the current approach. Numerical study indicated that these TVD schemes are more stable and produced higher shock resolution than classical shock capturing methods such as the explicit MacCormack scheme.

  11. A hybrid numerical scheme for the numerical solution of the Burgers' equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiwari, Ram

    2015-03-01

    In this article, a hybrid numerical scheme based on Euler implicit method, quasilinearization and uniform Haar wavelets has been developed for the numerical solutions of Burgers' equation. Most of the numerical methods available in the literature fail to capture the physical behavior of the equations when viscosity ν → 0. In Jiwari (2012), the author presented the numerical results up to ν = 0.003 and the scheme failed for values smaller than ν = 0.003. The main aim in the development of the present scheme is to overcome the drawback of the scheme developed in Jiwari (2012). Lastly, three test problems are chosen to check the accuracy of the proposed scheme. The approximated results are compared with existing numerical and exact solutions found in literature. The use of uniform Haar wavelet is found to be accurate, simple, fast, flexible, convenient and at small computation costs.

  12. Suppressing the numerical Cherenkov radiation in the Yee numerical scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuter, Rachel; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of laser facilities will routinely produce relativistic particle beams from the interaction of intense laser pulses with solids and/or gases. Their modeling with Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes needs dispersion-free Maxwell solvers in order to properly describe the interaction of electromagnetic waves with relativistic particles. A particular attention is devoted to the suppression of the numerical Cherenkov instability, responsible for the noise generation. It occurs when the electromagnetic wave is artificially slowed down because of the finite mesh size, thus allowing for the high energy particles to propagate with super-luminous velocities. In the present paper, we show how a slight increase of the light velocity in the Maxwell's equations enables to suppress this instability while keeping a good overall precision of calculations.

  13. Fundamental Limitations in Advanced LC Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailichenko, A. A.

    2010-11-04

    Fundamental limitations in acceleration gradient, emittance, alignment and polarization in acceleration schemes are considered in application for novel schemes of acceleration, including laser-plasma and structure-based schemes. Problems for each method are underlined whenever it is possible. Main attention is paid to the scheme with a tilted laser bunch.

  14. A factored implicit scheme for numerical weather prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augenbaum, J. M.; Cohn, S. E.; Isaacson, E.; Dee, D. P.; Marchesin, D.

    1985-01-01

    An implicit method is proposed to factor the nonlinear partial differential equations governing fast and slow modes of dynamic motion in numerical weather prediction schemes. The method permits separate factorization of the slow and fast modes of the implicit operator. A simple two-dimensional version of the system of three-dimensional equations governing atmospheric dynamics over shallow water was analyzed to assess the accuracy of the proposed method. It is shown that the method has a small error which is comparable to other discretization errors in the overall scheme.

  15. A multidimensional numerical scheme for two-fluid relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkov, Maxim; Komissarov, Serguei S.; Korolev, Vitaly; Zankovich, Andrey

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes an explicit multidimensional numerical scheme for special relativistic two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics of electron-positron plasma and a suit of test problems. The scheme utilizes Cartesian grid and the third-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory interpolation. Time integration is carried out using the third-order total variation diminishing method of Runge-Kutta type, thus ensuring overall third-order accuracy on smooth solutions. The magnetic field is kept near divergence-free by means of the method of generalized Lagrange multiplier. The test simulations, which include linear and non-linear continuous plasma waves, shock waves, strong explosions and the tearing instability, show that the scheme is sufficiently robust and confirm its accuracy.

  16. Numerical analysis of boosting scheme for scalable NMR quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    SaiToh, Akira; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2005-02-01

    Among initialization schemes for ensemble quantum computation beginning at thermal equilibrium, the scheme proposed by Schulman and Vazirani [in Proceedings of the 31st ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing (STOC'99) (ACM Press, New York, 1999), pp. 322-329] is known for the simple quantum circuit to redistribute the biases (polarizations) of qubits and small time complexity. However, our numerical simulation shows that the number of qubits initialized by the scheme is rather smaller than expected from the von Neumann entropy because of an increase in the sum of the binary entropies of individual qubits, which indicates a growth in the total classical correlation. This result--namely, that there is such a significant growth in the total binary entropy--disagrees with that of their analysis.

  17. Unsteady boundary layers with an intelligent numerical scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebeci, T.

    1986-02-01

    A numerical method has been developed to represent unsteady boundary layers with large flow reversal. It makes use of the characteristic box scheme which examines the finite-difference grid in relation to the magnitude and direction of local velocity and reaches and implements a decision to ensure that the Courant, Friedricks and Lewey stability criterion is not violated. The method has been applied to the problem of an impulsively started circular cylinder and the results, though generally consistent with those of van Dommelen and Shen obtained with a Lagrangian method, show some differences. The time step is identified as very important and, with the present intelligent numerical scheme, the results were readily extended to times far beyond those previously achieved with Eulerian methods. Extrapolation of the results suggests that the much-discussed singularity for this unsteady flow is the same as that of the corresponding steady flow.

  18. Advances in numerical and applied mathematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    South, J. C., Jr. (Editor); Hussaini, M. Y. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    This collection of papers covers some recent developments in numerical analysis and computational fluid dynamics. Some of these studies are of a fundamental nature. They address basic issues such as intermediate boundary conditions for approximate factorization schemes, existence and uniqueness of steady states for time dependent problems, and pitfalls of implicit time stepping. The other studies deal with modern numerical methods such as total variation diminishing schemes, higher order variants of vortex and particle methods, spectral multidomain techniques, and front tracking techniques. There is also a paper on adaptive grids. The fluid dynamics papers treat the classical problems of imcompressible flows in helically coiled pipes, vortex breakdown, and transonic flows.

  19. Numerical Methods in Quantum Mechanics: Analysis of Numerical Schemes on One-Dimensional Schrodinger Wave Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Marvin Quenten, Jr.

    The motion and behavior of quantum processes can be described by the Schrodinger equation using the wave function, Psi(x,t). The use of the Schrodinger equation to study quantum phenomena is known as Quantum Mechanics, akin to classical mechanics being the tool to study classical physics. This research focuses on the emphasis of numerical techniques: Finite-Difference, Fast Fourier Transform (spectral method), finite difference schemes such as the Leapfrog method and the Crank-Nicolson scheme and second quantization to solve and analyze the Schrodinger equation for the infinite square well problem, the free particle with periodic boundary conditions, the barrier problem, tight-binding hamiltonians and a potential wall problem. We discuss these techniques and the problems created to test how these different techniques draw both physical and numerical conclusions in a tabular summary. We observed both numerical stability and quantum stability (conservation of energy, probability, momentum, etc.). We found in our results that the Crank-Nicolson scheme is an unconditionally stable scheme and conserves probability (unitary), and momentum, though dissipative with energy. The time-independent problems conserved energy, momentum and were unitary, which is of interest, but we found when time-dependence was introduced, quantum stability (i.e. conservation of mass, momentum, etc.) was not implied by numerical stability. Hence, we observed schemes that were numerically stable, but not quantum stable as well as schemes that were quantum stable, but not numerically stable for all of time, t. We also observed that second quantization removed the issues with stability as the problem was transformed into a discrete problem. Moreover, all quantum information is conserved in second quantization. This method, however, does not work universally for all problems.

  20. Numerical solution of a semilinear elliptic equation via difference scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigmohammadi, Elif Ozturk; Demirel, Esra

    2016-08-01

    We consider the Bitsadze-Samarskii type nonlocal boundary value problem { -d/2v (t ) d t2 +B v (t ) =h (t ,v (t ) ) ,0 scheme. The numerical results are computed by MATLAB.

  1. COMPARISON OF NUMERICAL SCHEMES FOR SOLVING A SPHERICAL PARTICLE DIFFUSION EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new robust iterative numerical scheme was developed for a nonlinear diffusive model that described sorption dynamics in spherical particle suspensions. he numerical scheme had been applied to finite difference and finite element models that showed rapid convergence and stabilit...

  2. Energy balanced numerical schemes with very high order. The Augmented Roe Flux ADER scheme. Application to the shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas-Montilla, A.; Murillo, J.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, an ADER type finite volume numerical scheme is proposed as an extension of a first order solver based on weak solutions of RPs with source terms. The type of source terms considered here are a special but relevant type of source terms: their spatial integral is discontinuous. The relevant difference with other previously defined ADER schemes is that it considers the presence of the source term in the solutions of the DRP. Unlike the original ADER schemes, the proposed numerical scheme computes the RPs of the high order terms of the DRP departing from time derivatives of the fluxes as initial conditions for these RPs. Weak solutions of the RPs defined for the DRP are computed using an augmented version of the Roe solver that includes an extra wave that accounts for the contribution of the source term. The discretization done over the source term leads to an energy balanced numerical scheme that allows to obtain the exact solution for steady cases with independence of the grid refinement. In unsteady problems, the numerical scheme ensures the convergence to the exact solution. The numerical scheme is constructed with an arbitrary order of accuracy, and has no theoretical barrier. Numerical results for the Burger's equation and the shallow water equations are presented in this work and indicate that the proposed numerical scheme is able to converge with the expected order of accuracy.

  3. A numerical scheme for coastal morphodynamic modelling on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerin, Thomas; Bertin, Xavier; Dodet, Guillaume

    2016-08-01

    Over the last decade, modelling systems based on unstructured grids have been appearing increasingly attractive to investigate the dynamics of coastal zones. However, the resolution of the sediment continuity equation to simulate bed evolution is a complex problem which often leads to the development of numerical oscillations. To overcome this problem, addition of artificial diffusion or bathymetric filters are commonly employed methods, although these techniques can potentially over-smooth the bathymetry. This study aims to present a numerical scheme based on the Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) formalism to solve the bed continuity equation on unstructured grids in a finite volume formulation. The new solution is compared against a classical method, which combines a basic node-centered finite volume method with artificial diffusion, for three idealized test cases. This comparison reveals that a higher accuracy is obtained with our new method while the addition of diffusion appears inappropriate mainly due to the arbitrary choice of the diffusion coefficient. Moreover, the increased computation time associated with the WENO-based method to solve the bed continuity equation is negligible when considering a fully-coupled simulation with tides and waves. Finally, the application of the new method to the pluri-monthly evolution of an idealized inlet subjected to tides and waves shows the development of realistic bed features (e.g. secondary flood channels, ebb-delta sandbars, or oblique sandbars at the adjacent beaches), that are smoothed or nonexistent when using additional diffusion.

  4. Variationally consistent discretization schemes and numerical algorithms for contact problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuth, Barbara

    We consider variationally consistent discretization schemes for mechanical contact problems. Most of the results can also be applied to other variational inequalities, such as those for phase transition problems in porous media, for plasticity or for option pricing applications from finance. The starting point is to weakly incorporate the constraint into the setting and to reformulate the inequality in the displacement in terms of a saddle-point problem. Here, the Lagrange multiplier represents the surface forces, and the constraints are restricted to the boundary of the simulation domain. Having a uniform inf-sup bound, one can then establish optimal low-order a priori convergence rates for the discretization error in the primal and dual variables. In addition to the abstract framework of linear saddle-point theory, complementarity terms have to be taken into account. The resulting inequality system is solved by rewriting it equivalently by means of the non-linear complementarity function as a system of equations. Although it is not differentiable in the classical sense, semi-smooth Newton methods, yielding super-linear convergence rates, can be applied and easily implemented in terms of a primal-dual active set strategy. Quite often the solution of contact problems has a low regularity, and the efficiency of the approach can be improved by using adaptive refinement techniques. Different standard types, such as residual- and equilibrated-based a posteriori error estimators, can be designed based on the interpretation of the dual variable as Neumann boundary condition. For the fully dynamic setting it is of interest to apply energy-preserving time-integration schemes. However, the differential algebraic character of the system can result in high oscillations if standard methods are applied. A possible remedy is to modify the fully discretized system by a local redistribution of the mass. Numerical results in two and three dimensions illustrate the wide range of

  5. Comparative study of numerical schemes of TVD3, UNO3-ACM and optimized compact scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Duck-Joo; Hwang, Chang-Jeon; Ko, Duck-Kon; Kim, Jae-Wook

    1995-01-01

    Three different schemes are employed to solve the benchmark problem. The first one is a conventional TVD-MUSCL (Monotone Upwind Schemes for Conservation Laws) scheme. The second scheme is a UNO3-ACM (Uniformly Non-Oscillatory Artificial Compression Method) scheme. The third scheme is an optimized compact finite difference scheme modified by us: the 4th order Runge Kutta time stepping, the 4th order pentadiagonal compact spatial discretization with the maximum resolution characteristics. The problems of category 1 are solved by using the second (UNO3-ACM) and third (Optimized Compact) schemes. The problems of category 2 are solved by using the first (TVD3) and second (UNO3-ACM) schemes. The problem of category 5 is solved by using the first (TVD3) scheme. It can be concluded from the present calculations that the Optimized Compact scheme and the UN03-ACM show good resolutions for category 1 and category 2 respectively.

  6. The hybrid Eulerian Lagrangian numerical scheme tested with Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. B.; Sørensen, B.; Tarning-Andersen, P.; Christensen, J. H.; Brandt, J.; Kaas, E.

    2012-11-01

    A newly developed advection scheme, the Hybrid Eulerian Lagrangian (HEL) scheme, has been tested, including a module for atmospheric chemistry, including 58 chemical species, and compared to two other traditional advection schemes; a classical pseudospectral Eulerian method the Accurate Space Derivative (ASD) scheme and the bi-cubic semi-Lagrangian (SL) scheme using classical rotation tests. The rotation tests have been designed to test and compare the advection schemes for different spatial and temporal resolutions in different chemical conditions (rural and urban) and for different shapes (cone and slotted cylinder) giving the advection schemes different challenges with respect to relatively slow or fast chemistry and smooth or sharp gradients, respectively. In every test, error measures have been calculated and used for ranking of the advection schemes with respect to performance, i.e. lowest overall errors for all chemical species. Furthermore, the HEL and SL schemes have been compared in a shallow water model, demonstrating the performance in a more realistic non-linear deformation flow. The results in this paper show that the new advection scheme, HEL, by far outperforms both the Eulerian and semi-Lagrangian schemes with very low error estimates compared to the two other schemes. Although no analytic solution can be obtained for the performance in the non-linear shallow water model flow, the tracer distribution appears realistic as compared to LMCSL when a mixing between local parcel concentrations is introduced in HEL.

  7. Numerical study of chemically reacting flows using an LU scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, Jian Shun; Yoon, Seokkwan

    1988-01-01

    A new computational fluid dynamic code has been developed for the study of mixing and chemical reactions in the flow fields of ramjets and scramjets. The code employs an implicit finite volume, lower-upper symmetric successive overrelaxation scheme for solving the complete two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations and species transport equations in a fully-coupled and very efficient manner. The combustion processes are modeled by an 8-species, 14-step finite rate chemistry model whereas turbulence is simulated by a Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model. The validity of the code is demonstrated by comparing the numerical calculations with both experimental data and previous calculations of a cold flow helium injection into a straight channel and premixed hydrogen-air reacting flows in a ramped duct. The code is then used to calculate the mixing and chemical reactions of a hydrogen jet transversely injected into a supersonic airstream. Results are presented describing the flow field, the recirculation regions in front and behind the injector, and the chemical reactions.

  8. The hybrid Eulerian Lagrangian numerical scheme tested with Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. B.; Sørensen, B.; Tarning-Andersen, P.; Christensen, J. H.; Brandt, J.; Kaas, E.

    2012-12-01

    A newly developed transport scheme, the Hybrid Eulerian Lagrangian (HEL) scheme, has been tested using a module for atmospheric chemistry, including 58 chemical species, and compared to two other traditional advection schemes; a classical pseudospectral Eulerian method the Accurate Space Derivative (ASD) scheme and the bi-cubic semi-Lagrangian (SL) scheme using classical rotation tests. The rotation tests have been designed to test and compare the advection schemes for different spatial and temporal resolutions in different chemical conditions (rural and urban) and for different shapes (cone and slotted cylinder). This gives the advection schemes different challenges with respect to relatively slow or fast chemistry and smooth or sharp gradients. In every test, error measures have been calculated and used for ranking of the advection schemes with respect to performance, i.e. lowest overall errors for all chemical species. The results presented show that the new transport scheme, HEL, by far outperforms both the Eulerian and semi-Lagrangian schemes with very low error estimates compared to the two other schemes.

  9. Advanced numerics for multi-dimensional fluid flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanka, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the development and use of mathematical models for the simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer and combustion processes in engineering equipment. The equations representing the multi-dimensional transport of mass, momenta and species are numerically solved by finite-difference or finite-element techniques. However despite the multiude of differencing schemes and solution algorithms, and the advancement of computing power, the calculation of multi-dimensional flows, especially three-dimensional flows, remains a mammoth task. The following discussion is concerned with the author's recent work on the construction of accurate discretization schemes for the partial derivatives, and the efficient solution of the set of nonlinear algebraic equations resulting after discretization. The present work has been jointly supported by the Ramjet Engine Division of the Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  10. A faster numerical scheme for a coupled system modeling soil erosion and sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, M.-H.; Cordier, S.; Lucas, C.; Cerdan, O.

    2015-02-01

    Overland flow and soil erosion play an essential role in water quality and soil degradation. Such processes, involving the interactions between water flow and the bed sediment, are classically described by a well-established system coupling the shallow water equations and the Hairsine-Rose model. Numerical approximation of this coupled system requires advanced methods to preserve some important physical and mathematical properties; in particular, the steady states and the positivity of both water depth and sediment concentration. Recently, finite volume schemes based on Roe's solver have been proposed by Heng et al. (2009) and Kim et al. (2013) for one and two-dimensional problems. In their approach, an additional and artificial restriction on the time step is required to guarantee the positivity of sediment concentration. This artificial condition can lead the computation to be costly when dealing with very shallow flow and wet/dry fronts. The main result of this paper is to propose a new and faster scheme for which only the CFL condition of the shallow water equations is sufficient to preserve the positivity of sediment concentration. In addition, the numerical procedure of the erosion part can be used with any well-balanced and positivity preserving scheme of the shallow water equations. The proposed method is tested on classical benchmarks and also on a realistic configuration.

  11. Numerical Schemes for the Hamilton-Jacobi and Level Set Equations on Triangulated Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Sethian, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Borrowing from techniques developed for conservation law equations, numerical schemes which discretize the Hamilton-Jacobi (H-J), level set, and Eikonal equations on triangulated domains are presented. The first scheme is a provably monotone discretization for certain forms of the H-J equations. Unfortunately, the basic scheme lacks proper Lipschitz continuity of the numerical Hamiltonian. By employing a virtual edge flipping technique, Lipschitz continuity of the numerical flux is restored on acute triangulations. Next, schemes are introduced and developed based on the weaker concept of positive coefficient approximations for homogeneous Hamiltonians. These schemes possess a discrete maximum principle on arbitrary triangulations and naturally exhibit proper Lipschitz continuity of the numerical Hamiltonian. Finally, a class of Petrov-Galerkin approximations are considered. These schemes are stabilized via a least-squares bilinear form. The Petrov-Galerkin schemes do not possess a discrete maximum principle but generalize to high order accuracy.

  12. Verification and comparison of four numerical schemes for a 1D viscoelastic blood flow model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Fullana, Jose-Maria; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    A reliable and fast numerical scheme is crucial for the 1D simulation of blood flow in compliant vessels. In this paper, a 1D blood flow model is incorporated with a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic arterial wall. This leads to a nonlinear hyperbolic-parabolic system, which is then solved with four numerical schemes, namely: MacCormack, Taylor-Galerkin, monotonic upwind scheme for conservation law and local discontinuous Galerkin. The numerical schemes are tested on a single vessel, a simple bifurcation and a network with 55 arteries. The numerical solutions are checked favorably against analytical, semi-analytical solutions or clinical observations. Among the numerical schemes, comparisons are made in four important aspects: accuracy, ability to capture shock-like phenomena, computational speed and implementation complexity. The suitable conditions for the application of each scheme are discussed. PMID:25145651

  13. An Advanced Leakage Scheme for Neutrino Treatment in Astrophysical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, A.; Cabezón, R. M.; Käppeli, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present an Advanced Spectral Leakage (ASL) scheme to model neutrinos in the context of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and compact binary mergers. Based on previous gray leakage schemes, the ASL scheme computes the neutrino cooling rates by interpolating local production and diffusion rates (relevant in optically thin and thick regimes, respectively) separately for discretized values of the neutrino energy. Neutrino trapped components are also modeled, based on equilibrium and timescale arguments. The better accuracy achieved by the spectral treatment allows a more reliable computation of neutrino heating rates in optically thin conditions. The scheme has been calibrated and tested against Boltzmann transport in the context of Newtonian spherically symmetric models of CCSNe. ASL shows a very good qualitative and a partial quantitative agreement for key quantities from collapse to a few hundreds of milliseconds after core bounce. We have proved the adaptability and flexibility of our ASL scheme, coupling it to an axisymmetric Eulerian and to a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code to simulate core collapse. Therefore, the neutrino treatment presented here is ideal for large parameter-space explorations, parametric studies, high-resolution tests, code developments, and long-term modeling of asymmetric configurations, where more detailed neutrino treatments are not available or are currently computationally too expensive.

  14. LES of turbulent heat transfer: proper convection numerical schemes for temperature transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Châtelain, A.; Ducros, F.; Métais, O.

    2004-03-01

    Large eddy simulations of two basic configurations (decay of isotropic turbulence, and the academic plane channel flow) with heat transfer have been performed comparing several convection numerical schemes, in order to discuss their ability to evaluate temperature fluctuations properly. Results are compared with the available incompressible heat transfer direct numerical simulation data. It is shown that the use of regularizing schemes (such as high order upwind type schemes) for the temperature transport equation in combination with centered schemes for momentum transport equation gives better results than the use of centred schemes for both equations.

  15. Analyzing numerics of bulk microphysics schemes in community models: warm rain processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sednev, I.; Menon, S.

    2012-08-01

    Implementation of bulk cloud microphysics (BLK) parameterizations in atmospheric models of different scales has gained momentum in the last two decades. Utilization of these parameterizations in cloud-resolving models when timesteps used for the host model integration are a few seconds or less is justified from the point of view of cloud physics. However, mechanistic extrapolation of the applicability of BLK schemes to the regional or global scales and the utilization of timesteps of hundreds up to thousands of seconds affect both physics and numerics. We focus on the mathematical aspects of BLK schemes, such as stability and positive-definiteness. We provide a strict mathematical definition for the problem of warm rain formation. We also derive a general analytical condition (SM-criterion) that remains valid regardless of parameterizations for warm rain processes in an explicit Eulerian time integration framework used to advanced finite-difference equations, which govern warm rain formation processes in microphysics packages in the Community Atmosphere Model and the Weather Research and Forecasting model. The SM-criterion allows for the existence of a unique positive-definite stable mass-conserving numerical solution, imposes an additional constraint on the timestep permitted due to the microphysics (like the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition for the advection equation), and prohibits use of any additional assumptions not included in the strict mathematical definition of the problem under consideration. By analyzing the numerics of warm rain processes in source codes of BLK schemes implemented in community models we provide general guidelines regarding the appropriate choice of time steps in these models.

  16. Improvements to the RELAP5-3D Nearly-Implicit Numerical Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Riemke; Walter L. Weaver; RIchard R. Schultz

    2005-05-01

    The RELAP5-3D computer program has been improved with regard to its nearly-implicit numerical scheme for twophase flow and single-phase flow. Changes were made to the nearly-implicit numerical scheme finite difference momentum equations as follows: (1) added the velocity flip-flop mass/energy error mitigation logic, (2) added the modified Henry-Fauske choking model, (3) used the new time void fraction in the horizontal stratification force terms and gravity head, and (4) used an implicit form of the artificial viscosity. The code modifications allow the nearly-implicit numerical scheme to be more implicit and lead to enhanced numerical stability.

  17. Evaluating two numerical advection schemes in HYCOM for eddy-resolving modelling of the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, B. C.; Bertino, L.; Johannessen, J. A.

    2009-06-01

    A 4th order advection scheme is applied in a nested eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) of the greater Agulhas Current system for the purpose of testing advanced numerics as a means for improving the model simulation for eventual operational implementation. Model validation techniques comparing sea surface height variations, sea level skewness and variogram analyses to satellite altimetry measurements quantify that generally the 4th order advection scheme improves the realism of the model simulation. The most striking improvement over the standard 2nd order momentum advection scheme, is that the southern Agulhas Current is simulated as a well-defined meandering current, rather than a train of successive eddies. A better vertical structure and stronger poleward transports in the Agulhas Current core contribute toward a better southwestward penetration of the current, and its temperature field, implying a stronger Indo-Atlantic inter-ocean exchange. It is found that the transport, and hence this exchange, is sensitive to the occurrences of mesoscale features originating upstream in the Mozambique Channel and southern East Madagascar Current, and that the improved HYCOM simulation is well suited for further studies of these inter-actions.

  18. Evaluating two numerical advection schemes in HYCOM for eddy-resolving modelling of the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, B. C.; Bertino, L.; Johannessen, J. A.

    2009-02-01

    A 4th order advection scheme is applied in a nested eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) of the greater Agulhas Current system for the purpose of testing advanced numerics as a means for improving the model simulation for eventual operational implementation. Model validation techniques comparing sea surface height variations, sea level skewness and variogram analyses to satellite altimetry measurements quantify that generally the 4th order advection scheme improves the realism of the model simulation. The most striking improvement over the standard 2nd order momentum advection scheme, is that the Southern Agulhas Current is simulated as a well-defined meandering current, rather than a train of successive eddies. A better vertical structure and stronger poleward transports in the Agulhas Current core contribute toward a better southwestward penetration of the current, and its temperature field, implying a stronger Indo-Atlantic inter-ocean exchange. It is found that the transport, and hence this exchange, is sensitive to the occurrences of mesoscale features originating upstream in the Mozambique Channel and Southern East Madagascar Current, and that the improved HYCOM simulation is well suited for further studies of these inter-actions.

  19. A benchmark study of numerical schemes for one-dimensional arterial blood flow modelling.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Etienne; Nithiarasu, Perumal; Blanco, Pablo J; Müller, Lucas O; Fossan, Fredrik Eikeland; Hellevik, Leif Rune; Donders, Wouter P; Huberts, Wouter; Willemet, Marie; Alastruey, Jordi

    2015-10-01

    Haemodynamical simulations using one-dimensional (1D) computational models exhibit many of the features of the systemic circulation under normal and diseased conditions. Recent interest in verifying 1D numerical schemes has led to the development of alternative experimental setups and the use of three-dimensional numerical models to acquire data not easily measured in vivo. In most studies to date, only one particular 1D scheme is tested. In this paper, we present a systematic comparison of six commonly used numerical schemes for 1D blood flow modelling: discontinuous Galerkin, locally conservative Galerkin, Galerkin least-squares finite element method, finite volume method, finite difference MacCormack method and a simplified trapezium rule method. Comparisons are made in a series of six benchmark test cases with an increasing degree of complexity. The accuracy of the numerical schemes is assessed by comparison with theoretical results, three-dimensional numerical data in compatible domains with distensible walls or experimental data in a network of silicone tubes. Results show a good agreement among all numerical schemes and their ability to capture the main features of pressure, flow and area waveforms in large arteries. All the information used in this study, including the input data for all benchmark cases, experimental data where available and numerical solutions for each scheme, is made publicly available online, providing a comprehensive reference data set to support the development of 1D models and numerical schemes. PMID:26100764

  20. Multi-dimensional high-order numerical schemes for Lagrangian hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, William W; Woodward, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    An approximate solver for multi-dimensional Riemann problems at grid points of unstructured meshes, and a numerical scheme for multi-dimensional hydrodynamics have been developed in this paper. The solver is simple, and is developed only for the use in numerical schemes for hydrodynamics. The scheme is truely multi-dimensional, is second order accurate in both space and time, and satisfies conservation laws exactly for mass, momentum, and total energy. The scheme has been tested through numerical examples involving strong shocks. It has been shown that the scheme offers the principle advantages of high-order Codunov schemes; robust operation in the presence of very strong shocks and thin shock fronts.

  1. Eulerian-Lagrangian numerical scheme for simulating advection, dispersion, and transient storage in streams and a comparison of numerical methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, T.J.; Runkel, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Past applications of one-dimensional advection, dispersion, and transient storage zone models have almost exclusively relied on a central differencing, Eulerian numerical approximation to the nonconservative form of the fundamental equation. However, there are scenarios where this approach generates unacceptable error. A new numerical scheme for this type of modeling is presented here that is based on tracking Lagrangian control volumes across a fixed (Eulerian) grid. Numerical tests are used to provide a direct comparison of the new scheme versus nonconservative Eulerian numerical methods, in terms of both accuracy and mass conservation. Key characteristics of systems for which the Lagrangian scheme performs better than the Eulerian scheme include: nonuniform flow fields, steep gradient plume fronts, and pulse and steady point source loadings in advection-dominated systems. A new analytical derivation is presented that provides insight into the loss of mass conservation in the nonconservative Eulerian scheme. This derivation shows that loss of mass conservation in the vicinity of spatial flow changes is directly proportional to the lateral inflow rate and the change in stream concentration due to the inflow. While the nonconservative Eulerian scheme has clearly worked well for past published applications, it is important for users to be aware of the scheme's limitations. ?? 2008 ASCE.

  2. Brush seal numerical simulation: Concepts and advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the brush seal is considered to be most promising among the advanced type seals that are presently in use in the high speed turbomachinery. The brush is usually mounted on the stationary portions of the engine and has direct contact with the rotating element, in the process of limiting the 'unwanted' leakage flows between stages, or various engine cavities. This type of sealing technology is providing high (in comparison with conventional seals) pressure drops due mainly to the high packing density (around 100 bristles/sq mm), and brush compliance with the rotor motions. In the design of modern aerospace turbomachinery leakage flows between the stages must be minimal, thus contributing to the higher efficiency of the engine. Use of the brush seal instead of the labyrinth seal reduces the leakage flow by one order of magnitude. Brush seals also have been found to enhance dynamic performance, cost less, and are lighter than labyrinth seals. Even though industrial brush seals have been successfully developed through extensive experimentation, there is no comprehensive numerical methodology for the design or prediction of their performance. The existing analytical/numerical approaches are based on bulk flow models and do not allow the investigation of the effects of brush morphology (bristle arrangement), or brushes arrangement (number of brushes, spacing between them), on the pressure drops and flow leakage. An increase in the brush seal efficiency is clearly a complex problem that is closely related to the brush geometry and arrangement, and can be solved most likely only by means of a numerically distributed model.

  3. Brush seal numerical simulation: Concepts and advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. J.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.

    1994-07-01

    The development of the brush seal is considered to be most promising among the advanced type seals that are presently in use in the high speed turbomachinery. The brush is usually mounted on the stationary portions of the engine and has direct contact with the rotating element, in the process of limiting the 'unwanted' leakage flows between stages, or various engine cavities. This type of sealing technology is providing high (in comparison with conventional seals) pressure drops due mainly to the high packing density (around 100 bristles/sq mm), and brush compliance with the rotor motions. In the design of modern aerospace turbomachinery leakage flows between the stages must be minimal, thus contributing to the higher efficiency of the engine. Use of the brush seal instead of the labyrinth seal reduces the leakage flow by one order of magnitude. Brush seals also have been found to enhance dynamic performance, cost less, and are lighter than labyrinth seals. Even though industrial brush seals have been successfully developed through extensive experimentation, there is no comprehensive numerical methodology for the design or prediction of their performance. The existing analytical/numerical approaches are based on bulk flow models and do not allow the investigation of the effects of brush morphology (bristle arrangement), or brushes arrangement (number of brushes, spacing between them), on the pressure drops and flow leakage. An increase in the brush seal efficiency is clearly a complex problem that is closely related to the brush geometry and arrangement, and can be solved most likely only by means of a numerically distributed model.

  4. Positivity-preserving numerical schemes for multidimensional advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.; Macvean, M. K.; Lock, A. P.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the construction of an explicit, single time-step, conservative, finite-volume method for multidimensional advective flow, based on a uniformly third-order polynomial interpolation algorithm (UTOPIA). Particular attention is paid to the problem of flow-to-grid angle-dependent, anisotropic distortion typical of one-dimensional schemes used component-wise. The third-order multidimensional scheme automatically includes certain cross-difference terms that guarantee good isotropy (and stability). However, above first-order, polynomial-based advection schemes do not preserve positivity (the multidimensional analogue of monotonicity). For this reason, a multidimensional generalization of the first author's universal flux-limiter is sought. This is a very challenging problem. A simple flux-limiter can be found; but this introduces strong anisotropic distortion. A more sophisticated technique, limiting part of the flux and then restoring the isotropy-maintaining cross-terms afterwards, gives more satisfactory results. Test cases are confined to two dimensions; three-dimensional extensions are briefly discussed.

  5. Steady-state Analysis Model for Advanced Fuelcycle Schemes

    2006-05-12

    The model was developed as a part of the study, "Advanced Fuel Cycles and Waste Management", which was performed during 2003—2005 by an ad-hoc expert group under the Nuclear Development Committee in the OECD/NEA. The model was designed for an efficient conduct of nuclear fuel cycle scheme cost analyses. It is simple, transparent and offers users the capability to track down the cost analysis results. All the fuel cycle schemes considered in the model aremore » represented in a graphic format and all values related to a fuel cycle step are shown in the graphic interface, i.e., there are no hidden values embedded in the calculations. All data on the fuel cycle schemes considered in the study including mass flows, waste generation, cost data, and other data such as activities, decay heat and neutron sources of spent fuel and high—level waste along time are included in the model and can be displayed. The user can modify easily the values of mass flows and/or cost parameters and see the corresponding changes in the results. The model calculates: front—end fuel cycle mass flows such as requirements of enrichment and conversion services and natural uranium; mass of waste based on the waste generation parameters and the mass flow; and all costs. It performs Monte Carlo simulations with changing the values of all unit costs within their respective ranges (from lower to upper bounds).« less

  6. Steady-State Analysis Model for Advanced Fuel Cycle Schemes.

    2008-03-17

    Version 00 SMAFS was developed as a part of the study, "Advanced Fuel Cycles and Waste Management", which was performed during 2003-2005 by an ad-hoc expert group under the Nuclear Development Committee in the OECD/NEA. The model was designed for an efficient conduct of nuclear fuel cycle scheme cost analyses. It is simple, transparent and offers users the capability to track down cost analysis results. All the fuel cycle schemes considered in the model aremore » represented in a graphic format and all values related to a fuel cycle step are shown in the graphic interface, i.e., there are no hidden values embedded in the calculations. All data on the fuel cycle schemes considered in the study including mass flows, waste generation, cost data, and other data such as activities, decay heat and neutron sources of spent fuel and high-level waste along time are included in the model and can be displayed. The user can easily modify values of mass flows and/or cost parameters and see corresponding changes in the results. The model calculates: front-end fuel cycle mass flows such as requirements of enrichment and conversion services and natural uranium; mass of waste based on the waste generation parameters and the mass flow; and all costs.« less

  7. Analysis and design of numerical schemes for gas dynamics. 2: Artificial diffusion and discrete shock structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1994-01-01

    The effect of artificial diffusion on discrete shock structures is examined for a family of schemes which includes scalar diffusion, convective upwind and split pressure (CUSP) schemes, and upwind schemes with characteristics splitting. The analysis leads to conditions on the diffusive flux such that stationary discrete shocks can contain a single interior point. The simplest formulation which meets these conditions is a CUSP scheme in which the coefficients of the pressure differences is fully determined by the coefficient of convective diffusion. It is also shown how both the characteristic and CUSP schemes can be modified to preserve constant stagnation enthalpy in steady flow, leading to four variants, the E and H-characteristic schemes, and the E and H-CUSP schemes. Numerical results are presented which confirm the properties of these schemes.

  8. On some numerical scheme of solving diffraction problem on open and closed screens

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhakov, Gleb V.

    2015-03-10

    In the paper, the problem of diffraction on thin ideally conductive screens is reduced to vector hypersingular integral equation with integral treated in the sense of finite Hadamard value. An numerical scheme to solve the equation is introduced. The scheme is based on piecewise approximation of unknown function. The advantage of the scheme is that integral of singular part is reduced to contour integral which can be analytically calculated so numerical calculation are significantly accelerated. Several examples of resulting numerical experiments are given in comparison with known theoretical and experimental data.

  9. The numerical viscosity of entropy stable schemes for systems of conservation laws. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1987-01-01

    Discrete approximations to hyperbolic systems of conservation laws are studied. The amount of numerical viscosity present in such schemes is quantified and related to their entropy stability by means of comparison.To this end, conservative schemes which are also entropy-conservative are constructed. These entropy-conservative schemes enjoy second-order accuracy; moreover, they can be interpreted as piecewise-linear finite-element methods, and hence can be formulated on various mesh configurations. It is then shown that conservative schemes are entropy stable, if and (for three-point schemes) only they contain more viscosity than that present in the above-mentioned entropy-conservative ones.

  10. SEAWAT 2000: modelling unstable flow and sensitivity to discretization levels and numerical schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Maktoumi, A.; Lockington, D. A.; Volker, R. E.

    2007-09-01

    A systematic analysis shows how results from the finite difference code SEAWAT are sensitive to choice of grid dimension, time step, and numerical scheme for unstable flow problems. Guidelines to assist in selecting appropriate combinations of these factors are suggested. While the SEAWAT code has been tested for a wide range of problems, the sensitivity of results to spatial and temporal discretization levels and numerical schemes has not been studied in detail for unstable flow problems. Here, the Elder-Voss-Souza benchmark problem has been used to systematically explore the sensitivity of SEAWAT output to spatio-temporal resolution and numerical solver choice. A grid size of 0.38 and 0.60% of the total domain length and depth respectively is found to be fine enough to deliver results with acceptable accuracy for most of the numerical schemes when Courant number (Cr) is 0.1. All numerical solvers produced similar results for extremely fine meshes; however, some schemes converged faster than others. For instance, the 3rd-order total variation-diminishing method (TVD3) scheme converged at a much coarser mesh than the standard finite difference methods (SFDM) upstream weighting (UW) scheme. The sensitivity of the results to Cr number depends on the numerical scheme as expected.

  11. Fourth-order compact schemes for the numerical simulation of coupled Burgers' equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, H. P.; Khaliq, A. Q. M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces two new modified fourth-order exponential time differencing Runge-Kutta (ETDRK) schemes in combination with a global fourth-order compact finite difference scheme (in space) for direct integration of nonlinear coupled viscous Burgers' equations in their original form without using any transformations or linearization techniques. One scheme is a modification of the Cox and Matthews ETDRK4 scheme based on (1 , 3) -Padé approximation and other is a modification of Krogstad's ETDRK4-B scheme based on (2 , 2) -Padé approximation. Efficient versions of the proposed schemes are obtained by using a partial fraction splitting technique of rational functions. The stability properties of the proposed schemes are studied by plotting the stability regions, which provide an explanation of their behavior for dispersive and dissipative problems. The order of convergence of the schemes is examined empirically and found that the modification of ETDRK4 converges with the expected rate even if the initial data are nonsmooth. On the other hand, modification of ETDRK4-B suffers with order reduction if the initial data are nonsmooth. Several numerical experiments are carried out in order to demonstrate the performance and adaptability of the proposed schemes. The numerical results indicate that the proposed schemes provide better accuracy than other schemes available in the literature. Moreover, the results show that the modification of ETDRK4 is reliable and yields more accurate results than modification of ETDRK4-B, while solving problems with nonsmooth data or with high Reynolds number.

  12. Adaptive Numerical Dissipative Control in High Order Schemes for Multi-D Non-Ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, B.

    2004-01-01

    The goal is to extend our adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order filter schemes and our new divergence-free methods for ideal MHD to non-ideal MHD that include viscosity and resistivity. The key idea consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and leave the rest of the region free of numerical dissipation contamination. These scheme-independent detectors are capable of distinguishing shocks/shears, flame sheets, turbulent fluctuations and spurious high-frequency oscillations. The detection algorithm is based on an artificial compression method (ACM) (for shocks/shears), and redundant multi-resolution wavelets (WAV) (for the above types of flow feature). These filter approaches also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error. The filter scheme consists of spatially sixth order or higher non-dissipative spatial difference operators as the base scheme for the inviscid flux derivatives. If necessary, a small amount of high order linear dissipation is used to remove spurious high frequency oscillations. For example, an eighth-order centered linear dissipation (AD8) might be included in conjunction with a spatially sixth-order base scheme. The inviscid difference operator is applied twice for the viscous flux derivatives. After the completion of a full time step of the base scheme step, the solution is adaptively filtered by the product of a 'flow detector' and the 'nonlinear dissipative portion' of a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme. In addition, the scheme independent wavelet flow detector can be used in conjunction with spatially compact, spectral or spectral element type of base schemes. The ACM and wavelet filter schemes using the dissipative portion of a second-order shock-capturing scheme with sixth-order spatial central base scheme for both the inviscid and viscous MHD flux

  13. Finite-difference scheme for the numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.; Ramadhani, Issa

    1992-01-01

    A finite-difference scheme for numerical integration of the Schroedinger equation is constructed. Asymptotically (r goes to infinity), the method gives the exact solution correct to terms of order r exp -2.

  14. A Continuing Search for a Near-Perfect Numerical Flux Scheme. Part 1; [AUSM+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    1994-01-01

    While enjoying demonstrated improvement in accuracy, efficiency, and robustness over existing schemes, the Advection Upstream Splitting Scheme (AUSM) was found to have some deficiencies in extreme cases. This recent progress towards improving the AUSM while retaining its advantageous features is described. The new scheme, termed AUSM+, features: unification of velocity and Mach number splitting; exact capture of a single stationary shock; and improvement in accuracy. A general construction of the AUSM+ scheme is layed out and then focus is on the analysis of the a scheme and its mathematical properties, heretofore unreported. Monotonicity and positivity are proved, and a CFL-like condition is given for first and second order schemes and for generalized curvilinear co-ordinates. Finally, results of numerical tests on many problems are given to confirm the capability and improvements on a variety of problems including those failed by prominent schemes.

  15. The numerical viscosity of entropy stable schemes for systems of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, E.

    1985-01-01

    Discrete approximations to hyperbolic systems of conservation laws are studied. The amount of numerical viscosity present in such schemes, is quantified and related to their entropy stability by means of comparison. To this end, conservative schemes which are also entropy conservative are constructed. These entropy conservative schemes enjoy second-order accuracy; moreover, they admit a particular interpretation within the finite-element frameworks, and hence can be formulated on various mesh configurations. It is then shown that conservative schemes are entropy stable if and only if they contain more viscosity than the mentioned above entropy conservative ones.

  16. Determination of Solution Accuracy of Numerical Schemes as Part of Code and Calculation Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Blottner, F.G.; Lopez, A.R.

    1998-10-01

    This investigation is concerned with the accuracy of numerical schemes for solving partial differential equations used in science and engineering simulation codes. Richardson extrapolation methods for steady and unsteady problems with structured meshes are presented as part of the verification procedure to determine code and calculation accuracy. The local truncation error de- termination of a numerical difference scheme is shown to be a significant component of the veri- fication procedure as it determines the consistency of the numerical scheme, the order of the numerical scheme, and the restrictions on the mesh variation with a non-uniform mesh. Genera- tion of a series of co-located, refined meshes with the appropriate variation of mesh cell size is in- vestigated and is another important component of the verification procedure. The importance of mesh refinement studies is shown to be more significant than just a procedure to determine solu- tion accuracy. It is suggested that mesh refinement techniques can be developed to determine con- sistency of numerical schemes and to determine if governing equations are well posed. The present investigation provides further insight into the conditions and procedures required to effec- tively use Richardson extrapolation with mesh refinement studies to achieve confidence that sim- ulation codes are producing accurate numerical solutions.

  17. Numerical Compression Schemes for Proteomics Mass Spectrometry Data*

    PubMed Central

    Teleman, Johan; Dowsey, Andrew W.; Gonzalez-Galarza, Faviel F.; Perkins, Simon; Pratt, Brian; Röst, Hannes L.; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan; Jones, Andrew R.; Deutsch, Eric W.; Levander, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    The open XML format mzML, used for representation of MS data, is pivotal for the development of platform-independent MS analysis software. Although conversion from vendor formats to mzML must take place on a platform on which the vendor libraries are available (i.e. Windows), once mzML files have been generated, they can be used on any platform. However, the mzML format has turned out to be less efficient than vendor formats. In many cases, the naïve mzML representation is fourfold or even up to 18-fold larger compared with the original vendor file. In disk I/O limited setups, a larger data file also leads to longer processing times, which is a problem given the data production rates of modern mass spectrometers. In an attempt to reduce this problem, we here present a family of numerical compression algorithms called MS-Numpress, intended for efficient compression of MS data. To facilitate ease of adoption, the algorithms target the binary data in the mzML standard, and support in main proteomics tools is already available. Using a test set of 10 representative MS data files we demonstrate typical file size decreases of 90% when combined with traditional compression, as well as read time decreases of up to 50%. It is envisaged that these improvements will be beneficial for data handling within the MS community. PMID:24677029

  18. Numerical study of read scheme in one-selector one-resistor crossbar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungho; Kim, Hee-Dong; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive numerical circuit analysis of read schemes of a one selector-one resistance change memory (1S1R) crossbar array is carried out. Three schemes-the ground, V/2, and V/3 schemes-are compared with each other in terms of sensing margin and power consumption. Without the aid of a complex analytical approach or SPICE-based simulation, a simple numerical iteration method is developed to simulate entire current flows and node voltages within a crossbar array. Understanding such phenomena is essential in successfully evaluating the electrical specifications of selectors for suppressing intrinsic drawbacks of crossbar arrays, such as sneaky current paths and series line resistance problems. This method provides a quantitative tool for the accurate analysis of crossbar arrays and provides guidelines for developing an optimal read scheme, array configuration, and selector device specifications.

  19. Advanced unrepeatered systems using novel Raman amplification schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Do-il; Pelouch, Wayne; Burtsev, Sergey; Perrier, Philippe; Fevrier, Herve

    2015-01-01

    Unrepeatered transmission systems provide a cost-effective solution to transmit high capacity channels in submarine networks to communicate between coastal population centers or in terrestrial networks to connect remote areas where service access is difficult. The main goal of unrepeatered systems has traditionally been to achieve the longest reach, however, increasing traffic demands now require unrepeatered systems to support both longer reach and higher transport capacity. As a result, transmission rate of unrepeatered systems has quickly moved from 10 Gb/s to 40 Gb/s or 100 Gb/s. This paper reviews the key basic technologies, with a specific focus on Raman amplification, required for long-reach, high-capacity unrepeatered optical transmission systems. We will discuss novel Raman amplification schemes, enhanced remote optically pumped amplifiers (ROPA), ultra-low loss / large effective area fibers, and coherent transmission with advanced modulation format and high FEC coding gain. We will also report recent experimental demonstrations that show how these technologies have been combined to achieve industry's leading capacity and reach transmission.

  20. A practical numerical scheme for the ternary Cahn-Hilliard system with a logarithmic free energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Darae; Kim, Junseok

    2016-01-01

    We consider a practically stable finite difference method for the ternary Cahn-Hilliard system with a logarithmic free energy modeling the phase separation of a three-component mixture. The numerical scheme is based on a linear unconditionally gradient stable scheme by Eyre and is solved by an efficient and accurate multigrid method. The logarithmic function has a singularity at zero. To remove the singularity, we regularize the function near zero by using a quadratic polynomial approximation. We perform a convergence test, a linear stability analysis, and a robustness test of the ternary Cahn-Hilliard equation. We observe that our numerical solutions are convergent, consistent with the exact solutions of linear stability analysis, and stable with practically large enough time steps. Using the proposed numerical scheme, we also study the temporal evolution of morphology patterns during phase separation in one-, two-, and three-dimensional spaces.

  1. Ancient numerical daemons of conceptual hydrological modeling: 1. Fidelity and efficiency of time stepping schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Martyn P.; Kavetski, Dmitri

    2010-10-01

    A major neglected weakness of many current hydrological models is the numerical method used to solve the governing model equations. This paper thoroughly evaluates several classes of time stepping schemes in terms of numerical reliability and computational efficiency in the context of conceptual hydrological modeling. Numerical experiments are carried out using 8 distinct time stepping algorithms and 6 different conceptual rainfall-runoff models, applied in a densely gauged experimental catchment, as well as in 12 basins with diverse physical and hydroclimatic characteristics. Results show that, over vast regions of the parameter space, the numerical errors of fixed-step explicit schemes commonly used in hydrology routinely dwarf the structural errors of the model conceptualization. This substantially degrades model predictions, but also, disturbingly, generates fortuitously adequate performance for parameter sets where numerical errors compensate for model structural errors. Simply running fixed-step explicit schemes with shorter time steps provides a poor balance between accuracy and efficiency: in some cases daily-step adaptive explicit schemes with moderate error tolerances achieved comparable or higher accuracy than 15 min fixed-step explicit approximations but were nearly 10 times more efficient. From the range of simple time stepping schemes investigated in this work, the fixed-step implicit Euler method and the adaptive explicit Heun method emerge as good practical choices for the majority of simulation scenarios. In combination with the companion paper, where impacts on model analysis, interpretation, and prediction are assessed, this two-part study vividly highlights the impact of numerical errors on critical performance aspects of conceptual hydrological models and provides practical guidelines for robust numerical implementation.

  2. Numerical Forming Simulations and Optimisation in Advanced Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huétink, J.; van den Boogaard, A. H.; Geijselears, H. J. M.; Meinders, T.

    2007-05-01

    With the introduction of new materials as high strength steels, metastable steels and fibre reinforced composites, the need for advanced physically valid constitutive models arises. In finite deformation problems constitutive relations are commonly formulated in terms the Cauchy stress as a function of the elastic Finger tensor and an objective rate of the Cauchy stress as a function of the rate of deformation tensor. For isotropic materials models this is rather straightforward, but for anisotropic material models, including elastic anisotropy as well as plastic anisotropy, this may lead to confusing formulations. It will be shown that it is more convenient to define the constitutive relations in terms of invariant tensors referred to the deformed metric. Experimental results are presented that show new combinations of strain rate and strain path sensitivity. An adaptive through- thickness integration scheme for plate elements is developed, which improves the accuracy of spring back prediction at minimal costs. A procedure is described to automatically compensate the CAD tool shape numerically to obtain the desired product shape. Forming processes need to be optimized for cost saving and product improvement. Until recently, a trial-and-error process in the factory primarily did this optimization. An optimisation strategy is proposed that assists an engineer to model an optimization problem that suits his needs, including an efficient algorithm for solving the problem.

  3. A numerical study of ENO and TVD schemes for shock capturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Shih-Hung; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1988-01-01

    The numerical performance of a second-order upwind-based total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme and that of a uniform second-order essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) scheme for shock capturing are compared. The TVD scheme used is a modified version of Liou, using the flux-difference splitting (FDS) of Roe and his superbee function as the limiter. The construction of the basic ENO scheme is based on Harten, Engquist, Osher, and Chakravarthy, and the 2-D extensions are obtained by using a Strang-type of fractional-step time-splitting method. Numerical results presented include both steady and unsteady, 1-D and 2-D calculations. All the chosen test problems have exact solutions so that numerical performance can be measured by comparing the computer results to them. For 1-D calculations, the standard shock-tube problems of Sod and Lax are chosen. A very strong shock-tube problem, with the initial density ratio of 400 to 1 and pressure ratio of 500 to 1, is also used to study the behavior of the two schemes. For 2-D calculations, the shock wave reflection problems are adopted for testing. The cases presented in this report include flows with Mach numbers of 2.9, 5.0, and 10.0.

  4. Quantitative evaluation of numerical integration schemes for Lagrangian particle dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Huda Mohd.; Esler, J. Gavin

    2016-07-01

    A rigorous methodology for the evaluation of integration schemes for Lagrangian particle dispersion models (LPDMs) is presented. A series of one-dimensional test problems are introduced, for which the Fokker-Planck equation is solved numerically using a finite-difference discretisation in physical space and a Hermite function expansion in velocity space. Numerical convergence errors in the Fokker-Planck equation solutions are shown to be much less than the statistical error associated with a practical-sized ensemble (N = 106) of LPDM solutions; hence, the former can be used to validate the latter. The test problems are then used to evaluate commonly used LPDM integration schemes. The results allow for optimal time-step selection for each scheme, given a required level of accuracy. The following recommendations are made for use in operational models. First, if computational constraints require the use of moderate to long time steps, it is more accurate to solve the random displacement model approximation to the LPDM rather than use existing schemes designed for long time steps. Second, useful gains in numerical accuracy can be obtained, at moderate additional computational cost, by using the relatively simple "small-noise" scheme of Honeycutt.

  5. A block interface flux reconstruction method for numerical simulation with high order finite difference scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Junhui

    2013-05-01

    Overlap grid is usually used in numerical simulation of flow with complex geometry by high order finite difference scheme. It is difficult to generate overlap grid and the connectivity information between adjacent blocks, especially when interpolation is required for non-coincident overlap grids. In this study, an interface flux reconstruction (IFR) method is proposed for numerical simulation using high order finite difference scheme with multi-block structured grids. In this method the neighboring blocks share a common face, and the fluxes on each block are matched to set the boundary conditions for each interior block. Therefore this method has the promise of allowing discontinuous grids on either side of an interior block interface. The proposed method is proven to be stable for 7-point central DRP scheme coupled with 4-point and 5-point boundary closure schemes, as well as the 4th order compact scheme coupled with 3rd order boundary closure scheme. Four problems are numerically solved with the developed code to validate the interface flux reconstruction method in this study. The IFR method coupled with the 4th order DRP scheme or compact scheme is validated to be 4th order accuracy with one and two dimensional waves propagation problems. Two dimensional pulse propagation in mean flow is computed with wavy mesh to demonstrate the ability of the proposed method for non-uniform grid. To demonstrate the ability of the proposed method for complex geometry, sound scattering by two cylinders is simulated and the numerical results are compared with the analytical data. It is shown that the numerical results agree well with the analytical data. Finally the IFR method is applied to simulate viscous flow pass a cylinder at Reynolds number 150 to show its capability for viscous problem. The computed pressure coefficient on the cylinder surface, the frequency of vortex shedding, the lift and drag coefficients are presented. The numerical results are compared with the data

  6. RELAP5 two-phase fluid model and numerical scheme for economic LWR system simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, V.H.; Wagner, R.J.; Trapp, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The RELAP5 two-phase fluid model and the associated numerical scheme are summarized. The experience accrued in development of a fast running light water reactor system transient analysis code is reviewed and example of the code application are given.

  7. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  8. Advanced in turbulence physics and modeling by direct numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    The advent of direct numerical simulations of turbulence has opened avenues for research on turbulence physics and turbulence modeling. Direct numerical simulation provides values for anything that the scientist or modeler would like to know about the flow. An overview of some recent advances in the physical understanding of turbulence and in turbulence modeling obtained through such simulations is presented.

  9. Numerical calculation of tidal current with UTOPIA scheme for advection and application to Osaka Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komoda, Jun; Matsuyama, Masaji

    UTOPIA scheme was applied to advection term for the numerical calculation of tide and tidal current to reproduce the strong tidal current realistically. Numerical model is constructed by boundary-fitted coordinate method vertically using Arakawa A grid in space. The new method is designed to suppress a numerical oscillation usually induced by Arakawa A grid. UTOPIA scheme was confirmed to be suitable to express a strong current around complicated topography. This model was applied to the tidal calculation for M2 constituent in Osaka Bay with two narrow straits, i.e., Akashi and Tomogashima straits. The tidal currents obtained in this model agree with them observed at monitoring stations, and the four eddies in the bay were also reproduced as the residual currents, i.e., tide induced transient eddy (TITE). The generation, growth and lifetime of the eddies also were investigated.

  10. Numerical pricing of options using high-order compact finite difference schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangman, D. Y.; Gopaul, A.; Bhuruth, M.

    2008-09-01

    We consider high-order compact (HOC) schemes for quasilinear parabolic partial differential equations to discretise the Black-Scholes PDE for the numerical pricing of European and American options. We show that for the heat equation with smooth initial conditions, the HOC schemes attain clear fourth-order convergence but fail if non-smooth payoff conditions are used. To restore the fourth-order convergence, we use a grid stretching that concentrates grid nodes at the strike price for European options. For an American option, an efficient procedure is also described to compute the option price, Greeks and the optimal exercise curve. Comparisons with a fourth-order non-compact scheme are also done. However, fourth-order convergence is not experienced with this strategy. To improve the convergence rate for American options, we discuss the use of a front-fixing transformation with the HOC scheme. We also show that the HOC scheme with grid stretching along the asset price dimension gives accurate numerical solutions for European options under stochastic volatility.

  11. 3 Lectures: "Lagrangian Models", "Numerical Transport Schemes", and "Chemical and Transport Models"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A.

    2005-01-01

    The topics for the three lectures for the Canadian Summer School are Lagrangian Models, numerical transport schemes, and chemical and transport models. In the first lecture I will explain the basic components of the Lagrangian model (a trajectory code and a photochemical code), the difficulties in using such a model (initialization) and show some applications in interpretation of aircraft and satellite data. If time permits I will show some results concerning inverse modeling which is being used to evaluate sources of tropospheric pollutants. In the second lecture I will discuss one of the core components of any grid point model, the numerical transport scheme. I will explain the basics of shock capturing schemes, and performance criteria. I will include an example of the importance of horizontal resolution to polar processes. We have learned from NASA's global modeling initiative that horizontal resolution matters for predictions of the future evolution of the ozone hole. The numerical scheme will be evaluated using performance metrics based on satellite observations of long-lived tracers. The final lecture will discuss the evolution of chemical transport models over the last decade. Some of the problems with assimilated winds will be demonstrated, using satellite data to evaluate the simulations.

  12. Numerical schemes for dynamically orthogonal equations of stochastic fluid and ocean flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ueckermann, M.P.; Lermusiaux, P.F.J.; Sapsis, T.P.

    2013-01-15

    The quantification of uncertainties is critical when systems are nonlinear and have uncertain terms in their governing equations or are constrained by limited knowledge of initial and boundary conditions. Such situations are common in multiscale, intermittent and non-homogeneous fluid and ocean flows. The dynamically orthogonal (DO) field equations provide an adaptive methodology to predict the probability density functions of such flows. The present work derives efficient computational schemes for the DO methodology applied to unsteady stochastic Navier-Stokes and Boussinesq equations, and illustrates and studies the numerical aspects of these schemes. Semi-implicit projection methods are developed for the mean and for the DO modes, and time-marching schemes of first to fourth order are used for the stochastic coefficients. Conservative second-order finite-volumes are employed in physical space with new advection schemes based on total variation diminishing methods. Other results include: (i) the definition of pseudo-stochastic pressures to obtain a number of pressure equations that is linear in the subspace size instead of quadratic; (ii) symmetric advection schemes for the stochastic velocities; (iii) the use of generalized inversion to deal with singular subspace covariances or deterministic modes; and (iv) schemes to maintain orthonormal modes at the numerical level. To verify our implementation and study the properties of our schemes and their variations, a set of stochastic flow benchmarks are defined including asymmetric Dirac and symmetric lock-exchange flows, lid-driven cavity flows, and flows past objects in a confined channel. Different Reynolds number and Grashof number regimes are employed to illustrate robustness. Optimal convergence under both time and space refinements is shown as well as the convergence of the probability density functions with the number of stochastic realizations.

  13. A New Framework to Compare Mass-Flux Schemes Within the AROME Numerical Weather Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riette, Sébastien; Lac, Christine

    2016-08-01

    In the Application of Research to Operations at Mesoscale (AROME) numerical weather forecast model used in operations at Météo-France, five mass-flux schemes are available to parametrize shallow convection at kilometre resolution. All but one are based on the eddy-diffusivity-mass-flux approach, and differ in entrainment/detrainment, the updraft vertical velocity equation and the closure assumption. The fifth is based on a more classical mass-flux approach. Screen-level scores obtained with these schemes show few discrepancies and are not sufficient to highlight behaviour differences. Here, we describe and use a new experimental framework, able to compare and discriminate among different schemes. For a year, daily forecast experiments were conducted over small domains centred on the five French metropolitan radio-sounding locations. Cloud base, planetary boundary-layer height and normalized vertical profiles of specific humidity, potential temperature, wind speed and cloud condensate were compared with observations, and with each other. The framework allowed the behaviour of the different schemes in and above the boundary layer to be characterized. In particular, the impact of the entrainment/detrainment formulation, closure assumption and cloud scheme were clearly visible. Differences mainly concerned the transport intensity thus allowing schemes to be separated into two groups, with stronger or weaker updrafts. In the AROME model (with all interactions and the possible existence of compensating errors), evaluation diagnostics gave the advantage to the first group.

  14. A New Framework to Compare Mass-Flux Schemes Within the AROME Numerical Weather Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riette, Sébastien; Lac, Christine

    2016-03-01

    In the Application of Research to Operations at Mesoscale (AROME) numerical weather forecast model used in operations at Météo-France, five mass-flux schemes are available to parametrize shallow convection at kilometre resolution. All but one are based on the eddy-diffusivity-mass-flux approach, and differ in entrainment/detrainment, the updraft vertical velocity equation and the closure assumption. The fifth is based on a more classical mass-flux approach. Screen-level scores obtained with these schemes show few discrepancies and are not sufficient to highlight behaviour differences. Here, we describe and use a new experimental framework, able to compare and discriminate among different schemes. For a year, daily forecast experiments were conducted over small domains centred on the five French metropolitan radio-sounding locations. Cloud base, planetary boundary-layer height and normalized vertical profiles of specific humidity, potential temperature, wind speed and cloud condensate were compared with observations, and with each other. The framework allowed the behaviour of the different schemes in and above the boundary layer to be characterized. In particular, the impact of the entrainment/detrainment formulation, closure assumption and cloud scheme were clearly visible. Differences mainly concerned the transport intensity thus allowing schemes to be separated into two groups, with stronger or weaker updrafts. In the AROME model (with all interactions and the possible existence of compensating errors), evaluation diagnostics gave the advantage to the first group.

  15. Numerical study of fourth-order linearized compact schemes for generalized NLS equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hong-lin; Shi, Han-sheng; Zhao, Ying

    2014-08-01

    The fourth-order compact approximation for the spatial second-derivative and several linearized approaches, including the time-lagging method of Zhang et al. (1995), the local-extrapolation technique of Chang et al. (1999) and the recent scheme of Dahlby et al. (2009), are considered in constructing fourth-order linearized compact difference (FLCD) schemes for generalized NLS equations. By applying a new time-lagging linearized approach, we propose a symmetric fourth-order linearized compact difference (SFLCD) scheme, which is shown to be more robust in long-time simulations of plane wave, breather, periodic traveling-wave and solitary wave solutions. Numerical experiments suggest that the SFLCD scheme is a little more accurate than some other FLCD schemes and the split-step compact difference scheme of Dehghan and Taleei (2010). Compared with the time-splitting pseudospectral method of Bao et al. (2003), our SFLCD method is more suitable for oscillating solutions or the problems with a rapidly varying potential.

  16. Efficient Schemes for Reducing Numerical Dispersion in ModelingMultiphase Transport through Porous and Fractured Media

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2006-04-13

    Numerical issues with modeling transport of chemicals or solute in realistic large-scale subsurface systems have been a serious concern, even with the continual progress made in both simulation algorithms and computer hardware in the past few decades. The problem remains and becomes even more difficult when dealing with chemical transport in a multiphase flow system using coarse, multidimensional regular or irregular grids, because of the known effects of numerical dispersion associated with moving plume fronts. We have investigated several total-variation-diminishing (TVD) or flux-limiter schemes by implementing and testing them in the T2R3D code, one of the TOUGH2 family of codes. The objectives of this paper are (1) to investigate the possibility of applying these TVD schemes, using multi-dimensional irregular unstructured grids, and (2) to help select more accurate spatial averaging methods for simulating chemical transport given a numerical grid or spatial discretization. We present an application example to show that such TVD schemes are able to effectively reduce numerical dispersion.

  17. Numerical scheme for riser motion calculation during 3-D VIV simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kevin; Chen, Hamn-Ching; Chen, Chia-Rong

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical scheme for riser motion calculation and its application to riser VIV simulations. The discretisation of the governing differential equation is studied first. The top tensioned risers are simplified as tensioned beams. A centered space and forward time finite difference scheme is derived from the governing equations of motion. Then an implicit method is adopted for better numerical stability. The method meets von Neumann criteria and is shown to be unconditionally stable. The discretized linear algebraic equations are solved using a LU decomposition method. This approach is then applied to a series of benchmark cases with known solutions. The comparisons show good agreement. Finally the method is applied to practical riser VIV simulations. The studied cases cover a wide range of riser VIV problems, i.e. different riser outer diameter, length, tensioning conditions, and current profiles. Reasonable agreement is obtained between the numerical simulations and experimental data on riser motions and cross-flow VIV a/D . These validations and comparisons confirm that the present numerical scheme for riser motion calculation is valid and effective for long riser VIV simulation.

  18. Numerical dissipation control in high order shock-capturing schemes for LES of low speed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, D. V.; Yee, H. C.; Wray, A. A.; Sjögreen, B.; Kritsuk, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    The Yee & Sjögreen adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order scheme (High Order Filter Methods for Wide Range of Compressible Flow Speeds, ICOSAHOM 09, 2009) is further improved for DNS and LES of shock-free turbulence and low speed turbulence with shocklets. There are vastly different requirements in the minimization of numerical dissipation for accurate turbulence simulations of different compressible flow types and flow speeds. Traditionally, the method of choice for shock-free turbulence and low speed turbulence are by spectral, high order central or high order compact schemes with high order linear filters. With a proper control of a local flow sensor, appropriate amount of numerical dissipation in high order shock-capturing schemes can have spectral-like accuracy for compressible low speed turbulent flows. The development of the method includes an adaptive flow sensor with automatic selection on the amount of numerical dissipation needed at each flow location for more accurate DNS and LES simulations with less tuning of parameters for flows with a wide range of flow speed regime during the time-accurate evolution, e.g., time varying random forcing. An automatic selection of the different flow sensors catered to the different flow types is constructed. A Mach curve and high-frequency oscillation indicators are used to reduce the tuning of parameters in controlling the amount of shock-capturing numerical dissipation to be employed for shock-free turbulence, low speed turbulence and turbulence with strong shocks. In Kotov et al. (High Order Numerical Methods for LES of Turbulent Flows with Shocks, ICCFD8, Chengdu, Sichuan, China, July 14-18, 2014) the LES of a turbulent flow with a strong shock by the Yee & Sjögreen scheme indicated a good agreement with the filtered DNS data. A work in progress for the application of the adaptive flow sensor for compressible turbulence with time-varying random forcing is forthcoming. The present study examines the

  19. Adaptive Numerical Dissipation Control in High Order Schemes for Multi-D Non-Ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, B.

    2005-01-01

    The required type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter to accurately resolve all relevant multiscales of complex MHD unsteady high-speed shock/shear/turbulence/combustion problems are not only physical problem dependent, but also vary from one flow region to another. In addition, proper and efficient control of the divergence of the magnetic field (Div(B)) numerical error for high order shock-capturing methods poses extra requirements for the considered type of CPU intensive computations. The goal is to extend our adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order filter schemes and our new divergence-free methods for ideal MHD to non-ideal MHD that include viscosity and resistivity. The key idea consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and leave the rest of the region free from numerical dissipation contamination. These scheme-independent detectors are capable of distinguishing shocks/shears, flame sheets, turbulent fluctuations and spurious high-frequency oscillations. The detection algorithm is based on an artificial compression method (ACM) (for shocks/shears), and redundant multiresolution wavelets (WAV) (for the above types of flow feature). These filters also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error.

  20. Higher-Order Compact Schemes for Numerical Simulation of Incompressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert V.; Demuren, Ayodeji O.; Carpenter, Mark

    1998-01-01

    A higher order accurate numerical procedure has been developed for solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for 2D or 3D fluid flow problems. It is based on low-storage Runge-Kutta schemes for temporal discretization and fourth and sixth order compact finite-difference schemes for spatial discretization. The particular difficulty of satisfying the divergence-free velocity field required in incompressible fluid flow is resolved by solving a Poisson equation for pressure. It is demonstrated that for consistent global accuracy, it is necessary to employ the same order of accuracy in the discretization of the Poisson equation. Special care is also required to achieve the formal temporal accuracy of the Runge-Kutta schemes. The accuracy of the present procedure is demonstrated by application to several pertinent benchmark problems.

  1. Advanced Entry Adult Apprenticeship Training Scheme: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Alan; Ingram, Hadyn; Phillips, Sunny

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate an innovative way to train adult apprentices for the construction industry. Design/methodology/approach: The paper emphasizes that, in order to address skills shortages for international construction, training methods must be improved. It looks at the example of an adult apprenticeship scheme in…

  2. A numerical scheme for optimal transition paths of stochastic chemical kinetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Di

    2008-10-01

    We present a new framework for finding the optimal transition paths of metastable stochastic chemical kinetic systems with large system size. The optimal transition paths are identified to be the most probable paths according to the Large Deviation Theory of stochastic processes. Dynamical equations for the optimal transition paths are derived using the variational principle. A modified Minimum Action Method (MAM) is proposed as a numerical scheme to solve the optimal transition paths. Applications to Gene Regulatory Networks such as the toggle switch model and the Lactose Operon Model in Escherichia coli are presented as numerical examples.

  3. Numerical integration of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in generic time-discretization schemes.

    PubMed

    Romá, Federico; Cugliandolo, Leticia F; Lozano, Gustavo S

    2014-08-01

    We introduce a numerical method to integrate the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in spherical coordinates for generic discretization schemes. This method conserves the magnetization modulus and ensures the approach to equilibrium under the expected conditions. We test the algorithm on a benchmark problem: the dynamics of a uniformly magnetized ellipsoid. We investigate the influence of various parameters, and in particular, we analyze the efficiency of the numerical integration, in terms of the number of steps needed to reach a chosen long time with a given accuracy. PMID:25215839

  4. Numerical Simulations and Optimisation in Forming of Advanced Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huétink, J.

    2007-04-01

    With the introduction of new materials as high strength steels, metastable steels and fiber reinforce composites, the need for advanced physically valid constitutive models arises. A biaxial test equipment is developed and applied for the determination of material data as well as for validation of material models. An adaptive through- thickness integration scheme for plate elements is developed, which improves the accuracy of spring back prediction at minimal costs. An optimization strategy is proposed that assists an engineer to model an optimization problem.

  5. Numerical investigation of a modified family of centered schemes applied to multiphase equations with nonconservative sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crochet, M. W.; Gonthier, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    Systems of hyperbolic partial differential equations are frequently used to model the flow of multiphase mixtures. These equations often contain sources, referred to as nozzling terms, that cannot be posed in divergence form, and have proven to be particularly challenging in the development of finite-volume methods. Upwind schemes have recently shown promise in properly resolving the steady wave solution of the associated multiphase Riemann problem. However, these methods require a full characteristic decomposition of the system eigenstructure, which may be either unavailable or computationally expensive. Central schemes, such as the Kurganov-Tadmor (KT) family of methods, require minimal characteristic information, which makes them easily applicable to systems with an arbitrary number of phases. However, the proper implementation of nozzling terms in these schemes has been mathematically ambiguous. The primary objectives of this work are twofold: first, an extension of the KT family of schemes is proposed that formally accounts for the nonconservative nozzling sources. This modification results in a semidiscrete form that retains the simplicity of its predecessor and introduces little additional computational expense. Second, this modified method is applied to multiple, but equivalent, forms of the multiphase equations to perform a numerical study by solving several one-dimensional test problems. Both ideal and Mie-Grüneisen equations of state are used, with the results compared to an analytical solution. This study demonstrates that the magnitudes of the resulting numerical errors are sensitive to the form of the equations considered, and suggests an optimal form to minimize these errors. Finally, a separate modification of the wave propagation speeds used in the KT family is also suggested that can reduce the extent of numerical diffusion in multiphase flows.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Deep Mantle Convection: Advection and Diffusion Schemes for Marker Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Dabrowski, Marcin; Steinberger, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Thermal and chemical evolution of Earth's deep mantle can be studied by modeling vigorous convection in a chemically heterogeneous fluid. Numerical modeling of such a system poses several computational challenges. Dominance of heat advection over the diffusive heat transport, and a negligible amount of chemical diffusion results in sharp gradients of thermal and chemical fields. The exponential dependence of the viscosity of mantle materials on temperature also leads to high gradients of the velocity field. The accuracy of many numerical advection schemes degrades quickly with increasing gradient of the solution, while the computational effort, in terms of the scheme complexity and required resolution, grows. Additional numerical challenges arise due to a large range of length-scales characteristic of a thermochemical convection system with highly variable viscosity. To examplify, the thickness of the stem of a rising thermal plume may be a few percent of the mantle thickness. An even thinner filament of an anomalous material that is entrained by that plume may consitute less than a tenth of a percent of the mantle thickness. We have developed a two-dimensional FEM code to model thermochemical convection in a hollow cylinder domain, with a depth- and temperature-dependent viscosity representative of the mantle (Steinberger and Calderwood, 2006). We use marker-in-cell method for advection of chemical and thermal fields. The main advantage of perfoming advection using markers is absence of numerical diffusion during the advection step, as opposed to the more diffusive field-methods. However, in the common implementation of the marker-methods, the solution of the momentum and energy equations takes place on a computational grid, and nodes do not generally coincide with the positions of the markers. Transferring velocity-, temperature-, and chemistry- information between nodes and markers introduces errors inherent to inter- and extrapolation. In the numerical scheme

  7. Advances in Numerical Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) depend critically on the availability of accurate, nondispersive, least dissipative computation algorithm as well as high quality numerical boundary treatments. This paper focuses on the recent developments of numerical boundary conditions. In a typical CAA problem, one often encounters two types of boundaries. Because a finite computation domain is used, there are external boundaries. On the external boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the solution outside the computation domain are to be imposed. Inside the computation domain, there may be internal boundaries. On these internal boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the presence of an object or surface with specific acoustic characteristics are to be applied. Numerical boundary conditions, both external or internal, developed for simple model problems are reviewed and examined. Numerical boundary conditions for real aeroacoustic problems are also discussed through specific examples. The paper concludes with a description of some much needed research in numerical boundary conditions for CAA.

  8. Automatic optimization of metrology sampling scheme for advanced process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chue, Chuei-Fu; Huang, Chun-Yen; Shih, Chiang-Lin

    2011-03-01

    In order to ensure long-term profitability, driving the operational costs down and improving the yield of a DRAM manufacturing process are continuous efforts. This includes optimal utilization of the capital equipment. The costs of metrology needed to ensure yield are contributing to the overall costs. As the shrinking of device dimensions continues, the costs of metrology are increasing because of the associated tightening of the on-product specifications requiring more metrology effort. The cost-of-ownership reduction is tackled by increasing the throughput and availability of metrology systems. However, this is not the only way to reduce metrology effort. In this paper, we discuss how the costs of metrology can be improved by optimizing the recipes in terms of the sampling layout, thereby eliminating metrology that does not contribute to yield. We discuss results of sampling scheme optimization for on-product overlay control of two DRAM manufacturing processes at Nanya Technology Corporation. For a 6x DRAM production process, we show that the reduction of metrology waste can be as high as 27% and overlay can be improved by 36%, comparing with a baseline sampling scheme. For a 4x DRAM process, having tighter overlay specs, a gain of ca. 0.5nm on-product overlay could be achieved, without increasing the metrology effort relative to the original sampling plan.

  9. Building fast well-balanced two-stage numerical schemes for a model of two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh, Mai Duc

    2014-06-01

    We present a set of well-balanced two-stage schemes for an isentropic model of two-phase flows arisen from the modeling of deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular materials. The first stage is to absorb the source term in nonconservative form into equilibria. Then in the second stage, these equilibria will be composed into a numerical flux formed by using a convex combination of the numerical flux of a stable Lax-Friedrichs-type scheme and the one of a higher-order Richtmyer-type scheme. Numerical schemes constructed in such a way are expected to get the interesting property: they are fast and stable. Tests show that the method works out until the parameter takes on the value CFL, and so any value of the parameter between zero and this value is expected to work as well. All the schemes in this family are shown to capture stationary waves and preserves the positivity of the volume fractions. The special values of the parameter 0,1/2,1/(1+CFL), and CFL in this family define the Lax-Friedrichs-type, FAST1, FAST2, and FAST3 schemes, respectively. These schemes are shown to give a desirable accuracy. The errors and the CPU time of these schemes and the Roe-type scheme are calculated and compared. The constructed schemes are shown to be well-balanced and faster than the Roe-type scheme.

  10. Efficient numerical schemes for viscoplastic avalanches. Part 1: The 1D case

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Nieto, Enrique D.

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with the numerical resolution of a shallow water viscoplastic flow model. Viscoplastic materials are characterized by the existence of a yield stress: below a certain critical threshold in the imposed stress, there is no deformation and the material behaves like a rigid solid, but when that yield value is exceeded, the material flows like a fluid. In the context of avalanches, it means that after going down a slope, the material can stop and its free surface has a non-trivial shape, as opposed to the case of water (Newtonian fluid). The model involves variational inequalities associated with the yield threshold: finite-volume schemes are used together with duality methods (namely Augmented Lagrangian and Bermúdez–Moreno) to discretize the problem. To be able to accurately simulate the stopping behavior of the avalanche, new schemes need to be designed, involving the classical notion of well-balancing. In the present context, it needs to be extended to take into account the viscoplastic nature of the material as well as general bottoms with wet/dry fronts which are encountered in geophysical geometries. We derived such schemes and numerical experiments are presented to show their performances.

  11. Toward a consistent framework for high order mesh refinement schemes in numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongwane, Bishop

    2015-05-01

    It has now become customary in the field of numerical relativity to couple high order finite difference schemes to mesh refinement algorithms. To this end, different modifications to the standard Berger-Oliger adaptive mesh refinement algorithm have been proposed. In this work we present a fourth order stable mesh refinement scheme with sub-cycling in time for numerical relativity. We do not use buffer zones to deal with refinement boundaries but explicitly specify boundary data for refined grids. We argue that the incompatibility of the standard mesh refinement algorithm with higher order Runge Kutta methods is a manifestation of order reduction phenomena, caused by inconsistent application of boundary data in the refined grids. Our scheme also addresses the problem of spurious reflections that are generated when propagating waves cross mesh refinement boundaries. We introduce a transition zone on refined levels within which the phase velocity of propagating modes is allowed to decelerate in order to smoothly match the phase velocity of coarser grids. We apply the method to test problems involving propagating waves and show a significant reduction in spurious reflections.

  12. von Neumann Stability Analysis of Numerical Solution Schemes for 1D and 2D Euler Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konangi, Santosh; Palakurthi, Nikhil Kumar; Ghia, Urmila

    2014-11-01

    A von Neumann stability analysis is conducted for numerical schemes for the full system of coupled, density-based 1D and 2D Euler equations, closed by an isentropic equation of state. The governing equations are discretized on a staggered grid, which permits equivalence to finite-volume discretization. Presently, first-order accurate spatial and temporal finite-difference techniques are analyzed. The momentum convection term is treated as explicit, semi-implicit or implicit. Density upwind bias is included in the spatial operator of the continuity equation. By combining the discretization techniques, ten solution schemes are formulated. For each scheme, unstable and stable regimes are identified through the stability analysis, and the maximum allowable CFL number is predicted. The predictions are verified for selected schemes, using the Riemann problem at incompressible and compressible Mach numbers. Very good agreement is obtained between the analytically predicted and ``experimentally'' observed CFL values for all cases, thereby validating the analysis. The demonstrated analysis provides an accurate indication of stability conditions for the Euler equations, in contrast to the simplistic conditions arising from model equations, such as the wave equation.

  13. On the validation of cloud parametrization schemes in numerical atmospheric models with satellite data from ISCCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, I.

    2003-04-01

    A new method is presented to validate cloud parametrization schemes in numerical atmospheric models with satellite data of scanning radiometers. This method is applied to the regional atmospheric model HRM (High Resolution Regional Model) using satellite data from ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project). Due to the limited reliability of former validations there has been a need for developing a new validation method: Up to now differences between simulated and measured cloud properties are mostly declared as deficiencies of the cloud parametrization scheme without further investigation. Other uncertainties connected with the model or with the measurements have not been taken into account. Therefore changes in the cloud parametrization scheme based on such kind of validations might not be realistic. The new method estimates uncertainties of the model and the measurements. Criteria for comparisons of simulated and measured data are derived to localize deficiencies in the model. For a better specification of these deficiencies simulated clouds are classified regarding their parametrization. With this classification the localized model deficiencies are allocated to a certain parametrization scheme. Applying this method to the regional model HRM the quality of forecasting cloud properties is estimated in detail. The overestimation of simulated clouds in low emissivity heights especially during the night is localized as model deficiency. This is caused by subscale cloudiness. As the simulation of subscale clouds in the regional model HRM is described by a relative humidity parametrization these deficiencies are connected with this parameterization.

  14. Advanced numerical methods and software approaches for semiconductor device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    CAREY,GRAHAM F.; PARDHANANI,A.L.; BOVA,STEVEN W.

    2000-03-23

    In this article the authors concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to drift-dominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the drift-diffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of upwind and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter-Gummel approach, Petrov-Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), entropy variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of the methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. They have included numerical examples from the recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and they emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, they briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.

  15. Advanced Numerical Methods and Software Approaches for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carey, Graham F.; Pardhanani, A. L.; Bova, S. W.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to driftdominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the driftdiffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of “upwind” and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter – Gummel approach, Petrov – Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), “entropy” variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of themore » methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. We have included numerical examples from our recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and we emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, we briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.« less

  16. Multiecho scheme advances surface NMR for aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunewald, Elliot; Walsh, David

    2013-12-01

    nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is increasingly used as a method to noninvasively characterize aquifers. This technology follows a successful history of NMR logging, applied over decades to estimate hydrocarbon reservoir properties. In contrast to logging, however, surface methods have utilized relatively simple acquisition sequences, from which pore-scale properties may not be reliably and efficiently estimated. We demonstrate for the first time the capability of sophisticated multiecho measurements to rapidly record a surface NMR response that more directly reflects aquifer characteristics. Specifically, we develop an adaptation of the multipulse Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence, widely used in logging, to measure the T2 relaxation response in a single scan. We validate this approach in a field surface NMR data set and by direct comparison with an NMR log. Adoption of the CPMG marked a landmark advancement in the history of logging NMR; we have now realized this same advancement in the surface NMR method.

  17. Application of an efficient hybrid scheme for aeroelastic analysis of advanced propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Sankar, N. L.; Reddy, T. S. R.; Huff, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    An efficient 3-D hybrid scheme is applied for solving Euler equations to analyze advanced propellers. The scheme treats the spanwise direction semi-explicitly and the other two directions implicitly, without affecting the accuracy, as compared to a fully implicit scheme. This leads to a reduction in computer time and memory requirement. The calculated power coefficients for two advanced propellers, SR3 and SR7L, and various advanced ratios showed good correlation with experiment. Spanwise distribution of elemental power coefficient and steady pressure coefficient differences also showed good agreement with experiment. A study of the effect of structural flexibility on the performance of the advanced propellers showed that structural deformation due to centrifugal and aero loading should be included for better correlation.

  18. A numerical study of a class of TVD schemes for compressible mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandham, N. D.; Yee, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    At high Mach numbers the two-dimensional time-developing mixing layer develops shock waves, positioned around large-scale vortical structures. A suitable numerical method has to be able to capture the inherent instability of the flow, leading to the roll-up of vortices, and also must be able to capture shock waves when they develop. Standard schemes for low speed turbulent flows, for example spectral methods, rely on resolution of all flow-features and cannot handle shock waves, which become too thin at any realistic Reynolds number. The performance of a class of second-order explicit total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes on a compressible mixing layer problem was studied. The basic idea is to capture the physics of the flow correctly, by resolving down to the smallest turbulent length scales, without resorting to turbulence or sub-grid scale modeling, and at the same time capture shock waves without spurious oscillations. The present study indicates that TVD schemes can capture the shocks accurately when they form, but (without resorting to a finer grid) have poor accuracy in computing the vortex growth. The solution accuracy depends on the choice of limiter. However a larger number of grid points are in general required to resolve the correct vortex growth. The low accuracy in computing time-dependent problems containing shock waves as well as vortical structures is partly due to the inherent shock-capturing property of all TVD schemes. In order to capture shock waves without spurious oscillations these schemes reduce to first-order near extrema and indirectly produce clipping phenomena, leading to inaccuracy in the computation of vortex growth. Accurate simulation of unsteady turbulent fluid flows with shock waves will require further development of efficient, uniformly higher than second-order accurate, shock-capturing methods.

  19. Numerical Schemes for the Hamilton-Jacobi and Level Set Equations on Triangulated Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Sethian, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Borrowing from techniques developed for conservation law equations, we have developed both monotone and higher order accurate numerical schemes which discretize the Hamilton-Jacobi and level set equations on triangulated domains. The use of unstructured meshes containing triangles (2D) and tetrahedra (3D) easily accommodates mesh adaptation to resolve disparate level set feature scales with a minimal number of solution unknowns. The minisymposium talk will discuss these algorithmic developments and present sample calculations using our adaptive triangulation algorithm applied to various moving interface problems such as etching, deposition, and curvature flow.

  20. Thermoplastic polymer patterning without residual layer by advanced nanoimprinting schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunsoo; Cheng, Xing

    2009-06-01

    Nanoimprinting is a fast-growing technique for nanoscale patterning. One of the remaining issues in nanoimprinting is the removal of the residual layer after nanoimprinting. Traditionally the residual layer is removed by an oxygen reactive-ion etching (RIE) step. The need for a vacuum environment and dedicated equipment in this step lowers the throughput and increases the cost of the nanoimprinting process. It also prevents the possibility of patterning isolated functional polymers because oxygen RIE destroys the functional materials. In this work, novel nanoimprinting schemes are developed to nondestructively remove the residual layer in thermal nanoimprinting by solvent developing and dewetting. Combined with a transfer-bonding technique, three-dimensional polymer scaffolds are achieved. The techniques developed here eliminate the RIE step in thermal nanoimprinting and are compatible with roller nanoimprinting for large-scale patterning of polymer micro- or nanostructures. The technique also opens up new applications for nanoimprinting in patterning isolated conjugated polymers for organic electronic devices and circuits.

  1. Thermoplastic polymer patterning without residual layer by advanced nanoimprinting schemes.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunsoo; Cheng, Xing

    2009-06-17

    Nanoimprinting is a fast-growing technique for nanoscale patterning. One of the remaining issues in nanoimprinting is the removal of the residual layer after nanoimprinting. Traditionally the residual layer is removed by an oxygen reactive-ion etching (RIE) step. The need for a vacuum environment and dedicated equipment in this step lowers the throughput and increases the cost of the nanoimprinting process. It also prevents the possibility of patterning isolated functional polymers because oxygen RIE destroys the functional materials. In this work, novel nanoimprinting schemes are developed to nondestructively remove the residual layer in thermal nanoimprinting by solvent developing and dewetting. Combined with a transfer-bonding technique, three-dimensional polymer scaffolds are achieved. The techniques developed here eliminate the RIE step in thermal nanoimprinting and are compatible with roller nanoimprinting for large-scale patterning of polymer micro- or nanostructures. The technique also opens up new applications for nanoimprinting in patterning isolated conjugated polymers for organic electronic devices and circuits. PMID:19468173

  2. A hybrid numerical prediction scheme for solar radiation estimation in un-gauged catchments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamim, M. A.; Bray, M.; Ishak, A. M.; Remesan, R.; Han, D.

    2009-09-01

    The importance of solar radiation on earth's surface is depicted in its wide range of applications in the fields of meteorology, agricultural sciences, engineering, hydrology, crop water requirements, climatic changes and energy assessment. It is quite random in nature as it has to go through different processes of assimilation and dispersion while on its way to earth. Compared to other meteorological parameters, solar radiation is quite infrequently measured, for example, the worldwide ratio of stations collecting solar radiation to those collecting temperature is 1:500 (Badescu, 2008). Researchers, therefore, have to rely on indirect techniques of estimation that include nonlinear models, artificial intelligence (e.g. neural networks), remote sensing and numerical weather predictions (NWP). This study proposes a hybrid numerical prediction scheme for solar radiation estimation in un-gauged catchments. It uses the PSU/NCAR's Mesoscale Modelling system (MM5) (Grell et al., 1995) to parameterise the cloud effect on extraterrestrial radiation by dividing the atmosphere into four layers of very high (6-12 km), high (3-6 km), medium (1.5-3) and low (0-1.5) altitudes from earth. It is believed that various cloud forms exist within each of these layers. An hourly time series of upper air pressure and relative humidity data sets corresponding to all of these layers is determined for the Brue catchment, southwest UK, using MM5. Cloud Index (CI) was then determined using (Yang and Koike, 2002): 1 p?bi [ (Rh - Rh )] ci =------- max 0.0,---------cri dp pbi - ptipti (1- Rhcri) where, pbi and pti represent the air pressure at the top and bottom of each layer and Rhcri is the critical value of relative humidity at which a certain cloud type is formed. Output from a global clear sky solar radiation model (MRM v-5) (Kambezidis and Psiloglu, 2008) is used along with meteorological datasets of temperature and precipitation and astronomical information. The analysis is aided by the

  3. Finite volume numerical scheme for high-resolution gravity field modelling and its parallel implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fašková, Z.; Macák, M.; Čunderlík, R.; Mikula, K.

    2012-04-01

    The paper discusses a numerical solution of the geodetic boundary value problem (GBVP) by the finite volume method (FVM). The FVM is a numerical method where numerical flux is conserved from one discretization cell to its neighbour, so it's very appropriate for solving GBVP with the Neumann and the Dirichlet BCs. Our numerical scheme is developed for 3D computational domain above an ellipsoid. It is shown that a refinement of the discretization in height's direction leads to more precise numerical results. In order to achieve high-resolution numerical results, parallel implementations of algorithms using the MPI procedures were developed and computations on parallel computers were successfully performed. This basis includes the splitting of all arrays in meridian's direction, usage of an implementation of the Bi-CGSTAB non-stationary iterative solver instead of the standard SOR and an optimization of communications on parallel computers with the NUMA architecture. This gives us higher speed up in comparison to standard approaches and enables us to develop an efficient tool for high-resolution global or regional gravity field modelling in huge areas. Numerical experiments present global modelling with the resolution comparable with EGM2008 and detailed regional modelling in the Pacific Ocean with the resolution 2x2 arc min. Input gravity disturbances are generated from the DTU10-GRAV gravity field model and the disturbing potential is computed from the GOCE_DIR2 satellite geopotential model up to degree 240. Finally, the obtained disturbing potential is used to evaluate the geopotential on the DTU10 mean sea surface and the achieved mean dynamic topography is compared with the ECCO oceanographic model.

  4. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with a relatively low intensity (3  ×  1016 W cm-2) allowed the enhancing of the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the ‘ultraclean’ proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as a target. A combination of the specific target composition and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed the enhancing of the yield of alpha particles up to 109 per steradian. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long-laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  5. Advanced receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (ARAIM) schemes with GNSS time offsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yun; Wang, Jinling; Jiang, Yiping

    2013-07-01

    Within the current Advanced Receiver Integrity Monitoring (ARAIM) scheme, the time offsets between different Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) constellations are estimated along with a position solution and the GNSS receiver clock error. This scheme is called the Time-offsets Estimated ARAIM, or the TOE ARAIM. In order to enhance the interoperability and compatibility between different constellations, the time offsets are expected to be broadcast to users in future multi-GNSS positioning and navigation applications. This paper describes two new ARAIM schemes to make use of the Broadcast Time Offsets (BTOs): Time Offset Observed ARAIM (TOO ARAIM) and Time Offset Synchronized ARAIM (TOS ARAIM). It has been shown that the VPL performances of these two new ARAIM schemes rely strongly on the accuracy of BTOs. By varying the error model of the BTOs, the simulation results also demonstrate that the proposed new TOO ARAIM scheme can outperform the existing TOE ARAIM scheme-even if the accuracy of BTOs for integrity is degraded to 4.5 m and the probability of a BTO fault is relaxed to 10-2 h-1. In addition, the new Time Offset Synchronized ARAIM scheme (TOS ARAIM) can also perform better than the existing TOE ARAIM scheme if the accuracy of BTOs for integrity can reach 0.75 m. As the TOO ARAIM also has a very relaxed requirement on BTOs and better VPL performance, the TOO ARAIM is regarded as a superior ARAIM scheme for multi-GNSS with BTOs available.

  6. Numerical simulation of transonic limit cycle oscillations using high-order low-diffusion schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoyuan; Zha, Ge-Cheng

    2010-05-01

    This paper simulates the NLR7301 airfoil limit cycle oscillation (LCO) caused by fluid-structure interaction (FSI) using Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) coupled with Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) one-equation turbulence model. A low diffusion E-CUSP (LDE) scheme with 5th order weighted essentially nonoscillatory scheme (WENO) is employed to calculate the inviscid fluxes. A fully conservative 4th order central differencing is used for the viscous terms. A fully coupled fluid-structural interaction model is employed. For the case computed in this paper, the predicted LCO frequency, amplitudes, averaged lift and moment, all agree excellently with the experiment performed by Schewe et al. The solutions appear to have bifurcation and are dependent on the initial fields or initial perturbation. The developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD)/computational structure dynamics (CSD) simulation is able to capture the LCO with very small amplitudes measured in the experiment. This is attributed to the high order low diffusion schemes, fully coupled FSI model, and the turbulence model used. This research appears to be the first time that a numerical simulation of LCO matches the experiment. The simulation confirms several observations of the experiment.

  7. Orbital Advection by Interpolation: A Fast and Accurate Numerical Scheme for Super-Fast MHD Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B M; Guan, X; Gammie, F

    2008-04-11

    In numerical models of thin astrophysical disks that use an Eulerian scheme, gas orbits supersonically through a fixed grid. As a result the timestep is sharply limited by the Courant condition. Also, because the mean flow speed with respect to the grid varies with position, the truncation error varies systematically with position. For hydrodynamic (unmagnetized) disks an algorithm called FARGO has been developed that advects the gas along its mean orbit using a separate interpolation substep. This relaxes the constraint imposed by the Courant condition, which now depends only on the peculiar velocity of the gas, and results in a truncation error that is more nearly independent of position. This paper describes a FARGO-like algorithm suitable for evolving magnetized disks. Our method is second order accurate on a smooth flow and preserves {del} {center_dot} B = 0 to machine precision. The main restriction is that B must be discretized on a staggered mesh. We give a detailed description of an implementation of the code and demonstrate that it produces the expected results on linear and nonlinear problems. We also point out how the scheme might be generalized to make the integration of other supersonic/super-fast flows more efficient. Although our scheme reduces the variation of truncation error with position, it does not eliminate it. We show that the residual position dependence leads to characteristic radial variations in the density over long integrations.

  8. Multiscale/fractional step schemes for the numerical simulation of the rotating shallow water flows with complex periodic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauberteau, F.; Temam, R. M.; Tribbia, J.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we study several multiscale/fractional step schemes for the numerical solution of the rotating shallow water equations with complex topography. We consider the case of periodic boundary conditions (f-plane model). Spatial discretization is obtained using a Fourier spectral Galerkin method. For the schemes presented in this paper we consider two approaches. The first approach (multiscale schemes) is based on topography scale separation and the numerical time integration is function of the scales. The second approach is based on a splitting of the operators, and the time integration method is function of the operator considered (fractional step schemes). The numerical results obtained are compared with the explicit reference scheme (Leap-Frog scheme). With these multiscale/fractional step schemes the objective is to propose new schemes giving numerical results similar to those obtained using only one uniform fine grid N×N and a time step Δt, but with a CPU time near the CPU time needed when using only one coarse grid N1×N1, N1Δt.

  9. Resource Allocation and Power Management Schemes in an LTE-Advanced Femtocell Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byung-Bog; Yu, Jae-Hak; Lee, In-Hwan; Pyo, Cheol-Sig; Kim, Se-Jin

    In this letter, we introduce two different resource allocation and Tx power management schemes, called resource control and fixed power (RCFP) and fixed resource and power control (FRPC), in an LTE-Advanced femtocell network. We analyze and compare the two schemes in terms of the system throughput for downlink and energy consumption of home evolved NodeB (HeNB) Tx power according to the number of HeNBs and home user equipment (HUE)'s user traffic density (C). The simulation results show that the FRPC scheme has better performance in terms of system throughput for macro user equipments (MUEs) and energy consumption in low C.

  10. A new hybrid-Lagrangian numerical scheme for gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak edge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, S.; Hager, R.; Chang, C. S.; Kwon, J. M.; Parker, S. E.

    2016-06-01

    In order to enable kinetic simulation of non-thermal edge plasmas at a reduced computational cost, a new hybrid-Lagrangian δf scheme has been developed that utilizes the phase space grid in addition to the usual marker particles, taking advantage of the computational strengths from both sides. The new scheme splits the particle distribution function of a kinetic equation into two parts. Marker particles contain the fast space-time varying, δf, part of the distribution function and the coarse-grained phase-space grid contains the slow space-time varying part. The coarse-grained phase-space grid reduces the memory-requirement and the computing cost, while the marker particles provide scalable computing ability for the fine-grained physics. Weights of the marker particles are determined by a direct weight evolution equation instead of the differential form weight evolution equations that the conventional delta-f schemes use. The particle weight can be slowly transferred to the phase space grid, thereby reducing the growth of the particle weights. The non-Lagrangian part of the kinetic equation - e.g., collision operation, ionization, charge exchange, heat-source, radiative cooling, and others - can be operated directly on the phase space grid. Deviation of the particle distribution function on the velocity grid from a Maxwellian distribution function - driven by ionization, charge exchange and wall loss - is allowed to be arbitrarily large. The numerical scheme is implemented in the gyrokinetic particle code XGC1, which specializes in simulating the tokamak edge plasma that crosses the magnetic separatrix and is in contact with the material wall.

  11. Some recent advances in the numerical solution of differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambrosio, Raffaele

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the talk is the presentation of some recent advances in the numerical solution of differential equations, with special emphasis to reaction-diffusion problems, Hamiltonian problems and ordinary differential equations with discontinuous right-hand side. As a special case, in this short paper we focus on the solution of reaction-diffusion problems by means of special purpose numerical methods particularly adapted to the problem: indeed, following a problem oriented approach, we propose a modified method of lines based on the employ of finite differences shaped on the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Constructive issues and a brief analysis are presented, together with some numerical experiments showing the effectiveness of the approach and a comparison with existing solvers.

  12. Modeling of Convective-Stratiform Precipitation Processes: Sensitivity to Partitioning Methods and Numerical Advection Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Steve; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.; Ferrier, B.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Six different convective-stratiform separation techniques, including a new technique that utilizes the ratio of vertical and terminal velocities, are compared and evaluated using two-dimensional numerical simulations of a tropical [Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE)] and midlatitude continental [Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central (PRESTORM)] squall line. The simulations are made using two different numerical advection schemes: 4th order and positive definite advection. Comparisons are made in terms of rainfall, cloud coverage, mass fluxes, apparent heating and moistening, mean hydrometeor profiles, CFADs (Contoured Frequency with Altitude Diagrams), microphysics, and latent heating retrieval. Overall, it was found that the different separation techniques produced results that qualitatively agreed. However, the quantitative differences were significant. Observational comparisons were unable to conclusively evaluate the performance of the techniques. Latent heating retrieval was shown to be sensitive to the use of separation technique mainly due to the stratiform region for methods that found very little stratiform rain. The midlatitude PRESTORM simulation was found to be nearly invariant with respect to advection type for most quantities while for TOGA COARE fourth order advection produced numerous shallow convective cores and positive definite advection fewer cells that were both broader and deeper penetrating above the freezing level.

  13. A benchmark for numerical scheme validation of airborne particle exposure in street canyons.

    PubMed

    Marini, S; Buonanno, G; Stabile, L; Avino, P

    2015-02-01

    Measurements of particle concentrations and distributions in terms of number, surface area, and mass were performed simultaneously at eight sampling points within a symmetric street canyon of an Italian city. The aim was to obtain a useful benchmark for validation of wind tunnel experiments and numerical schemes: to this purpose, the influence of wind directions and speeds was considered. Particle number concentrations (PNCs) were higher on the leeward side than the windward side of the street canyon due to the wind vortex effect. Different vertical PNC profiles were observed between the two canyon sides depending on the wind direction and speed at roof level. A decrease in particle concentrations was observed with increasing rooftop wind speed, except for the coarse fraction indicating a possible particle resuspension due to the traffic and wind motion. This study confirms that particle concentration fields in urban street canyons are strongly influenced by traffic emissions and meteorological parameters, especially wind direction and speed. PMID:25167823

  14. Numerical characterization of DNA sequences in a 2-D graphical representation scheme of low degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Nandy, Ashesh

    2003-02-01

    Some 2-D and 3-D graphical representations of DNA sequences have been given by Gate, Nandy, Leong, Randic, and Guo et al. Based on 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequences, Raychaudhury and Nandy introduced the first-order moments of the x and y coordinates and the radius of the plot of a DNA sequence for indexing scheme and similarity measures of DNA sequences. In this Letter, based on Guo's novel 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequences of low degeneracy, we introduce the improved first-order moments of the x and y coordinates and the radius of DNA sequences, and the distance of two DNA sequences. The new descriptors of DNA sequences give a good numerical characterization of DNA sequences, which have lower degeneracy.

  15. Parallel solution of high-order numerical schemes for solving incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, Edward J.; Lin, Avi; Liou, May-Fun; Blech, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    A new parallel numerical scheme for solving incompressible steady-state flows is presented. The algorithm uses a finite-difference approach to solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The algorithms are scalable and expandable. They may be used with only two processors or with as many processors as are available. The code is general and expandable. Any size grid may be used. Four processors of the NASA LeRC Hypercluster were used to solve for steady-state flow in a driven square cavity. The Hypercluster was configured in a distributed-memory, hypercube-like architecture. By using a 50-by-50 finite-difference solution grid, an efficiency of 74 percent (a speedup of 2.96) was obtained.

  16. A numerical scheme and some theoretical aspects for the cylindrically and spherically symmetric sine-Gordon equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lu Trong Khiem

    2016-07-01

    A finite difference formula based on the predictor-corrector technique is presented to integrate the cylindrically and spherically symmetric sine-Gordon equations numerically. Based on various numerical observations, one property of the waves of kink type is conjectured and used to explain their returning effect. Several numerical experiments are carried out and they are in excellent agreement with the existing results. In addition, the corresponding modulation solution for the two-dimensional ring-shaped kink is extended to that in three-dimension. Both numerical and theoretical aspects are utilized to verify the reliability of the proposed numerical scheme and thus the analytical modulation solutions.

  17. An implicit numerical scheme for the simulation of internal viscous flows on unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Pletcher, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically for two-dimensional steady viscous laminar flows. The grids are generated based on the method of Delaunay triangulation. A finite-volume approach is used to discretize the conservation law form of the compressible flow equations written in terms of primitive variables. A preconditioning matrix is added to the equations so that low Mach number flows can be solved economically. The equations are time marched using either an implicit Gauss-Seidel iterative procedure or a solver based on a conjugate gradient like method. A four color scheme is employed to vectorize the block Gauss-Seidel relaxation procedure. This increases the memory requirements minimally and decreases the computer time spent solving the resulting system of equations substantially. A factor of 7.6 speed up in the matrix solver is typical for the viscous equations. Numerical results are obtained for inviscid flow over a bump in a channel at subsonic and transonic conditions for validation with structured solvers. Viscous results are computed for developing flow in a channel, a symmetric sudden expansion, periodic tandem cylinders in a cross-flow, and a four-port valve. Comparisons are made with available results obtained by other investigators.

  18. Numerical investigation of complex flooding schemes for surfactant polymer based enhanced oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Sourav; Daripa, Prabir

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant-polymer flooding is a widely used method of chemical enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in which an array of complex fluids containing suitable and varying amounts of surfactant or polymer or both mixed with water is injected into the reservoir. This is an example of multiphase, multicomponent and multiphysics porous media flow which is characterized by the spontaneous formation of complex viscous fingering patterns and is modeled by a system of strongly coupled nonlinear partial differential equations with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Here we propose and discuss a modern, hybrid method based on a combination of a discontinuous, multiscale finite element formulation and the method of characteristics to accurately solve the system. Several types of flooding schemes and rheological properties of the injected fluids are used to numerically study the effectiveness of various injection policies in minimizing the viscous fingering and maximizing oil recovery. Numerical simulations are also performed to investigate the effect of various other physical and model parameters such as heterogeneity, relative permeability and residual saturation on the quantities of interest like cumulative oil recovery, sweep efficiency, fingering intensity to name a few. Supported by the grant NPRP 08-777-1-141 from the Qatar National Research Fund (a member of The Qatar Foundation).

  19. First order comparison of numerical calculation and two different turtle input schemes to represent a SLC defocusing magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, J.

    1983-07-14

    Correcting the dispersion function in the SLC north arc it turned out that backleg-windings (BLW) acting horizontally as well as BLW acting vertically have to be used. In the latter case the question arose what is the best representation of a defocusing magnet with excited BLW acting in the vertical plane for the computer code TURTLE. Two different schemes, the 14.-scheme and the 20.-scheme were studied and the TURTLE output for one ray through such a magnet compared with the numerical solution of the equation of motion; only terms of first order have been taken into account.

  20. Sensitivity analysis of numerical weather prediction radiative schemes to forecast direct solar radiation over Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukkavilli, S. K.; Kay, M. J.; Taylor, R.; Prasad, A. A.; Troccoli, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Australian Solar Energy Forecasting System (ASEFS) project requires forecasting timeframes which range from nowcasting to long-term forecasts (minutes to two years). As concentrating solar power (CSP) plant operators are one of the key stakeholders in the national energy market, research and development enhancements for direct normal irradiance (DNI) forecasts is a major subtask. This project involves comparing different radiative scheme codes to improve day ahead DNI forecasts on the national supercomputing infrastructure running mesoscale simulations on NOAA's Weather Research & Forecast (WRF) model. ASEFS also requires aerosol data fusion for improving accurate representation of spatio-temporally variable atmospheric aerosols to reduce DNI bias error in clear sky conditions over southern Queensland & New South Wales where solar power is vulnerable to uncertainities from frequent aerosol radiative events such as bush fires and desert dust. Initial results from thirteen years of Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) deseasonalised DNI and MODIS NASA-Terra aerosol optical depth (AOD) anomalies demonstrated strong negative correlations in north and southeast Australia along with strong variability in AOD (~0.03-0.05). Radiative transfer schemes, DNI and AOD anomaly correlations will be discussed for the population and transmission grid centric regions where current and planned CSP plants dispatch electricity to capture peak prices in the market. Aerosol and solar irradiance datasets include satellite and ground based assimilations from the national BOM, regional aerosol researchers and agencies. The presentation will provide an overview of this ASEFS project task on WRF and results to date. The overall goal of this ASEFS subtask is to develop a hybrid numerical weather prediction (NWP) and statistical/machine learning multi-model ensemble strategy that meets future operational requirements of CSP plant operators.

  1. Advanced numerical methods in mesh generation and mesh adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, Konstantine; Danilov, A; Vassilevski, Y; Agonzal, A

    2010-01-01

    Numerical solution of partial differential equations requires appropriate meshes, efficient solvers and robust and reliable error estimates. Generation of high-quality meshes for complex engineering models is a non-trivial task. This task is made more difficult when the mesh has to be adapted to a problem solution. This article is focused on a synergistic approach to the mesh generation and mesh adaptation, where best properties of various mesh generation methods are combined to build efficiently simplicial meshes. First, the advancing front technique (AFT) is combined with the incremental Delaunay triangulation (DT) to build an initial mesh. Second, the metric-based mesh adaptation (MBA) method is employed to improve quality of the generated mesh and/or to adapt it to a problem solution. We demonstrate with numerical experiments that combination of all three methods is required for robust meshing of complex engineering models. The key to successful mesh generation is the high-quality of the triangles in the initial front. We use a black-box technique to improve surface meshes exported from an unattainable CAD system. The initial surface mesh is refined into a shape-regular triangulation which approximates the boundary with the same accuracy as the CAD mesh. The DT method adds robustness to the AFT. The resulting mesh is topologically correct but may contain a few slivers. The MBA uses seven local operations to modify the mesh topology. It improves significantly the mesh quality. The MBA method is also used to adapt the mesh to a problem solution to minimize computational resources required for solving the problem. The MBA has a solid theoretical background. In the first two experiments, we consider the convection-diffusion and elasticity problems. We demonstrate the optimal reduction rate of the discretization error on a sequence of adaptive strongly anisotropic meshes. The key element of the MBA method is construction of a tensor metric from hierarchical edge

  2. Comparison of ice-phase microphysical parameterization schemes using numerical simulations of tropical convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccumber, Michael; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Penc, Richard; Soong, Su-Tzai

    1991-01-01

    The performance of several ice parameterizations has been evaluated through a numerical cloud model. Ice effects using different schemes are contrasted with each other and with an ice-free control by incorporating them into the cloud model and by applying them to simulations of tropical squall systems. The latter are simulated in 2D so that a large domain can be used to incorporate a complete anvil. Nonsquall-type convective lines are simulated in 3D owing to their smaller horizontal scale. It is concluded that inclusion of ice microphysics in the cloud model enhanced the agreement of the simulated convection with some features of observed convection, including the proportion of surface rainfall in the anvil region and the intensity and structure of the radar brightband near the melting level in the anvil. In the experiments with bulk microphysics, three ice categories produced much better results than two ice categories, which in turn was better than no ice. For the tropical squall-type and nonsquall-type systems the optimal mix was ice, snow, and graupel.

  3. Analysis and Dynamically Consistent Numerical Schemes for the SIS Model and Related Reaction Diffusion Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubuma, J. M.-S.; Mureithi, E.; Terefe, Y. A.

    2011-11-01

    The classical SIS epidemiological model is extended in two directions: (a) The number of adequate contacts per infective in unit time is assumed to be a function of the total population in such a way that this number grows less rapidly as the total population increases; (b) A diffusion term is added to the SIS model and this leads to a reaction diffusion equation, which governs the spatial spread of the disease. With the parameter R0 representing the basic reproduction number, it is shown that R0 = 1 is a forward bifurcation for the model (a), with the disease-free equilibrium being globally asymptotic stable when R0 is less than 1. In the case when R0 is greater than 1, traveling wave solutions are found for the model (b). Nonstandard finite difference (NSFD) schemes that replicate the dynamics of the continuous models are presented. In particular, for the model (a), a nonstandard version of the Runge-Kutta method having high order of convergence is investigated. Numerical experiments that support the theory are provided.

  4. Gas Evolution Dynamics in Godunov-Type Schemes and Analysis of Numerical Shock Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kun

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we are going to study the gas evolution dynamics of the exact and approximate Riemann solvers, e.g., the Flux Vector Splitting (FVS) and the Flux Difference Splitting (FDS) schemes. Since the FVS scheme and the Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting (KFVS) scheme have the same physical mechanism and similar flux function, based on the analysis of the discretized KFVS scheme the weakness and advantage of the FVS scheme are closely observed. The subtle dissipative mechanism of the Godunov method in the 2D case is also analyzed, and the physical reason for shock instability, i.e., carbuncle phenomena and odd-even decoupling, is presented.

  5. Numerical simulation of the debris flow dynamics with an upwind scheme and specific friction treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Burillo, Guillermo; Beguería, Santiago; Latorre, Borja; Burguete, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Debris flows, snow and rock avalanches, mud and earth flows are often modeled by means of a particular realization of the so called shallow water equations (SWE). Indeed, a number of simulation models have been already developed [1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7]. Debris flow equations differ from shallow water equations in two main aspects. These are (a) strong bed gradient and (b) rheology friction terms that differ from the traditional SWE. A systematic analysis of the numerical solution of the hyperbolic system of equations rising from the shallow water equations with different rheological laws has not been done. Despite great efforts have been done to deal with friction expressions common in hydraulics (such as Manning friction), landslide rheologies are characterized by more complicated expressions that may deal to unphysical solutions if not treated carefully. In this work, a software that solves the time evolution of sliding masses over complex bed configurations is presented. The set of non- linear equations is treated by means of a first order upwind explicit scheme, and the friction contribution to the dynamics is treated with a suited numerical scheme [8]. In addition, the software incorporates various rheological models to accommodate for different flow types, such as the Voellmy frictional model [9] for rock and debris avalanches, or the Herschley-Bulkley model for debris and mud flows. The aim of this contribution is to release this code as a free, open source tool for the simulation of mass movements, and to encourage the scientific community to make use of it. The code uses as input data the friction coefficients and two input files: the topography of the bed and the initial (pre-failure) position of the sliding mass. In addition, another file with the final (post-event) position of the sliding mass, if desired, can be introduced to be compared with the simulation obtained result. If the deposited mass is given, an error estimation is computed by

  6. Numerical simulation of the debris flow dynamics with an upwind scheme and specific friction treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Burillo, Guillermo; Beguería, Santiago; Latorre, Borja; Burguete, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Debris flows, snow and rock avalanches, mud and earth flows are often modeled by means of a particular realization of the so called shallow water equations (SWE). Indeed, a number of simulation models have been already developed [1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7]. Debris flow equations differ from shallow water equations in two main aspects. These are (a) strong bed gradient and (b) rheology friction terms that differ from the traditional SWE. A systematic analysis of the numerical solution of the hyperbolic system of equations rising from the shallow water equations with different rheological laws has not been done. Despite great efforts have been done to deal with friction expressions common in hydraulics (such as Manning friction), landslide rheologies are characterized by more complicated expressions that may deal to unphysical solutions if not treated carefully. In this work, a software that solves the time evolution of sliding masses over complex bed configurations is presented. The set of non- linear equations is treated by means of a first order upwind explicit scheme, and the friction contribution to the dynamics is treated with a suited numerical scheme [8]. In addition, the software incorporates various rheological models to accommodate for different flow types, such as the Voellmy frictional model [9] for rock and debris avalanches, or the Herschley-Bulkley model for debris and mud flows. The aim of this contribution is to release this code as a free, open source tool for the simulation of mass movements, and to encourage the scientific community to make use of it. The code uses as input data the friction coefficients and two input files: the topography of the bed and the initial (pre-failure) position of the sliding mass. In addition, another file with the final (post-event) position of the sliding mass, if desired, can be introduced to be compared with the simulation obtained result. If the deposited mass is given, an error estimation is computed by

  7. An Improved Transformation and Optimized Sampling Scheme for the Numerical Evaluation of Singular and Near-Singular Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khayat, Michael A.; Wilton, Donald R.; Fink, Patrick W.

    2007-01-01

    Simple and efficient numerical procedures using singularity cancellation methods are presented for evaluating singular and near-singular potential integrals. Four different transformations are compared and the advantages of the Radial-angular transform are demonstrated. A method is then described for optimizing this integration scheme.

  8. On the numerical simulation of particle dynamics in the radiation belt: 1. Implicit and semi-implicit schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporeale, E.; Delzanno, G. L.; Zaharia, S.; Koller, J.

    2013-06-01

    The particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belt is generally modeled by means of a two-dimensional diffusion equation for the particle distribution function in energy and pitch angle. The goal of this paper is to survey and compare different numerical schemes for the solution of the diffusion equation, and to outline the optimal strategy from a numerical point of view. We focus on the general (and more computationally challenging) case where the mixed terms in the diffusion tensor are retained. In Part 1, we compare fully implicit and semi-implicit schemes. For the former, we have analyzed a direct solver based on a LU decomposition routine for sparse matrices, and an iterative incomplete LU preconditioned Generalized Minimal REsidual solver. For the semi-implicit scheme, we have studied an alternating direction implicit scheme. We present a convergence study for a realistic case that shows that the time step and grid size are strongly constrained by the desired accuracy of the solution. We show that the fully implicit scheme is to be preferred in most cases as the more computationally efficient.

  9. A numerical scheme for modelling reacting flow with detailed chemistry and transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Knio, Omar M.; Najm, Habib N.; Paul, Phillip H.

    2003-09-01

    An efficient projection scheme is developed for the simulation of reacting flow with detailed kinetics and transport. The scheme is based on a zero-Mach-number formulation of the compressible conservation equations for an ideal gas mixture. It is a modified version of the stiff operator-split scheme developed by Knio, Najm & Wyckoff (1999, J. Comput. Phys. 154, 428). Similar to its predecessor, the new scheme relies on Strang splitting of the discrete evolution equations, where diffusion is integrated in two half steps that are symmetrically distributed around a single stiff step for the reaction source terms. The diffusive half-step is integrated using an explicit single-step, multistage, Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev (RKC) method, which replaces the explicit, multi-step, fractional sub-step approach used in the previous formulation. This modification maintains the overall second-order convergence properties of the scheme and enhances the efficiency of the computations by taking advantage of the extended real-stability region of the RKC scheme. Two additional efficiency-enhancements are also explored, based on an extrapolation procedure for the transport coefficients and on the use of approximate Jacobian data evaluated on a coarse mesh. By including these enhancement schemes, performance tests using 2D computations with a detailed C{sub 1}C{sub 2} methane-air mechanism and a detailed mixture-averaged transport model indicate that speedup factors of about 15 are achieved over the previous split-stiff scheme.

  10. Nonstandard Finite Difference Schemes: Relations Between Time and Space Step-Sizes in Numerical Schemes for PDE's That Follow from Positivity Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    1996-01-01

    A large class of physical phenomena can be modeled by evolution and wave type Partial Differential Equations (PDE). Few of these equations have known explicit exact solutions. Finite-difference techniques are a popular method for constructing discrete representations of these equations for the purpose of numerical integration. However, the solutions to the difference equations often contain so called numerical instabilities; these are solutions to the difference equations that do not correspond to any solution of the PDE's. For explicit schemes, the elimination of this behavior requires functional relations to exist between the time and space steps-sizes. We show that such functional relations can be obtained for certain PDE's by use of a positivity condition. The PDE's studied are the Burgers, Fisher, and linearized Euler equations.

  11. An Advanced Manipulator For Poisson Series With Numerical Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscani, Francesco; Casotto, S.

    2006-06-01

    The availability of an efficient and featureful manipulator for Poisson deries with numerical coefficients is a standard need for celestial mechanicians and has arisen during our work on the analytical development of the Tide-Generating-Potential (TGP). In the harmonic expansion of the TGP the Poisson series appearing in the theories of motion of the celestial bodies are subjected to a wide set of mathematical operations, ranging from simple additions and multiplications to more sophisticated operations on Legendre polynomials and spherical harmonics with Poisson series as arguments. To perform these operations we have developed an algebraic manipulator, called Piranha, structured as an object-oriented multi-platform C++ library. Piranha handles series with real and complex coefficients, and operates with an arbitrary degree of precision. It supports advanced features such as trigonometric operations and the generation of special functions from Poisson series. Piranha is provided with a proof-of-concept, multi-platform GUI, which serves as a testbed and benchmark for the library. We describe Piranha's architecture and characteristics, what it accomplishes currently and how it will be extended in the future (e.g., to handle series with symbolic coefficients in a consistent fashion with its current design).

  12. Dynamic design, numerical solution and effective verification of acceleration-level obstacle-avoidance scheme for robot manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lin; Zhang, Yunong

    2016-03-01

    For avoiding obstacles and joint physical constraints of robot manipulators, this paper proposes and investigates a novel obstacle avoidance scheme (termed the acceleration-level obstacle-avoidance scheme). The scheme is based on a new obstacle-avoidance criterion that is designed by using the gradient neural network approach for the first time. In addition, joint physical constraints such as joint-angle limits, joint-velocity limits and joint-acceleration limits are incorporated into such a scheme, which is further reformulated as a quadratic programming (QP). Two important 'bridge' theorems are established so that such a QP can be converted equivalently to a linear variational inequality and then equivalently to a piecewise-linear projection equation (PLPE). A numerical algorithm based on a PLPE is thus developed and applied for an online solution of the resultant QP. Four path-tracking tasks based on the PA10 robot in the presence of point and window-shaped obstacles demonstrate and verify the effectiveness and accuracy of the acceleration-level obstacle-avoidance scheme. Besides, the comparisons between the non-obstacle-avoidance and obstacle-avoidance results further validate the superiority of the proposed scheme.

  13. A hybrid numerical technique for predicting the aerodynamic and acoustic fields of advanced turboprops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homicz, G. F.; Moselle, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid numerical procedure is presented for the prediction of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of advanced turboprops. A hybrid scheme is proposed which in principle leads to a consistent simultaneous prediction of both fields. In the inner flow a finite difference method, the Approximate-Factorization Alternating-Direction-Implicit (ADI) scheme, is used to solve the nonlinear Euler equations. In the outer flow the linearized acoustic equations are solved via a Boundary-Integral Equation (BIE) method. The two solutions are iteratively matched across a fictitious interface in the flow so as to maintain continuity. At convergence the resulting aerodynamic load prediction will automatically satisfy the appropriate free-field boundary conditions at the edge of the finite difference grid, while the acoustic predictions will reflect the back-reaction of the radiated field on the magnitude of the loading source terms, as well as refractive effects in the inner flow. The equations and logic needed to match the two solutions are developed and the computer program implementing the procedure is described. Unfortunately, no converged solutions were obtained, due to unexpectedly large running times. The reasons for this are discussed and several means to alleviate the situation are suggested.

  14. Numerical solution of 3D Navier-Stokes equations with upwind implicit schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marx, Yves P.

    1990-01-01

    An upwind MUSCL type implicit scheme for the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations is presented. Comparison between different approximate Riemann solvers (Roe and Osher) are performed and the influence of the reconstructions schemes on the accuracy of the solution as well as on the convergence of the method is studied. A new limiter is introduced in order to remove the problems usually associated with non-linear upwind schemes. The implementation of a diagonal upwind implicit operator for the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations is also discussed. Finally the turbulence modeling is assessed. Good prediction of separated flows are demonstrated if a non-equilibrium turbulence model is used.

  15. An implicit factored scheme for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. II - The numerical ODE connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, R. M.; Warming, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to establish a connection between linear multistep methods for applications to ordinary differential equations and their extension (by approximate factorization) to alternating direction implicit methods for partial differential equations. An earlier implicit factored scheme for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is generalized by innovations that (1) increase the class of temporal difference schemes to include all linear multistep methods, (2) optimize the class of unconditionally stable factored schemes by a new choice of unknown variable, and (3) improve the computational efficiency by the introduction of quasi-one-leg methods.

  16. Recent advances in the development of implicit schemes for the equations of fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warming, R. F.; Beam, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Innovations and extensions of implicit schemes for equations of fluid dynamics are presented. The notation and theory for linear multistep methods are reviewed, and extensions of work by Beam and Warming (1979) include the implementation of one-leg methods, ADI methods for equations with mixed derivatives, flux vector splitting, the P-dimensional wave equation, and boundary conditions. Numerical experiments indicate that implicit treatment of the boundary conditions is necessary for unconditional stability, and the improvement and implementation of the boundary condition theory should improve the implicit algorithms for gas dynamic equations.

  17. Enhanced numerical inviscid and viscous fluxes for cell centered finite volume schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Albrecht

    1991-07-01

    The most attractive features of cell centered finite volume schemes seem to be the easy introduction of the solid body boundary condition and the implementation of characteristic based methods for evaluating the convective fluxes at the cell faces of the finite volumes. For the viscous parts of the fluxes, however, cell centered finite volume schemes are not as well suited as cell vertex based discretizations since in a general grid, cell centered schemes usually are not linear flow preserving concerning the viscous terms. That means that the viscous stress tensor and the heat flux vector may spuriously vary in a flow field with linear velocity and/or temperature distribution. Several enhancements of the flux formulations for cell centered finite volume schemes are described.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Chennai Heavy Rainfall Using MM5 Mesoscale Model with Different Cumulus Parameterization Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litta, A. J.; Chakrapani, B.; Mohankumar, K.

    2007-07-01

    Heavy rainfall events become significant in human affairs when they are combined with hydrological elements. The problem of forecasting heavy precipitation is especially difficult since it involves making a quantitative precipitation forecast, a problem well recognized as challenging. Chennai (13.04°N and 80.17°E) faced incessant and heavy rain about 27 cm in 24 hours up to 8.30 a.m on 27th October 2005 completely threw life out of gear. This torrential rain caused by deep depression which lay 150km east of Chennai city in Bay of Bengal intensified and moved west north-west direction and crossed north Tamil Nadu and south Andhra Pradesh coast on 28th morning. In the present study, we investigate the predictability of the MM5 mesoscale model using different cumulus parameterization schemes for the heavy rainfall event over Chennai. MM5 Version 3.7 (PSU/NCAR) is run with two-way triply nested grids using Lambert Conformal Coordinates (LCC) with a nest ratio of 3:1 and 23 vertical layers. Grid sizes of 45, 15 and 5 km are used for domains 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The cumulus parameterization schemes used in this study are Anthes-Kuo scheme (AK), the Betts-Miller scheme (BM), the Grell scheme (GR) and the Kain-Fritsch scheme (KF). The present study shows that the prediction of heavy rainfall is sensitive to cumulus parameterization schemes. In the time series of rainfall, Grell scheme is in good agreement with observation. The ideal combination of the nesting domains, horizontal resolution and cloud parameterization is able to simulate the heavy rainfall event both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  19. The numerical prediction of planar viscoelastic contraction flows using the pom pom model and higher-order finite volume schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguayo, J. P.; Phillips, P. M.; Phillips, T. N.; Tamaddon-Jahromi, H. R.; Snigerev, B. A.; Webster, M. F.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the numerical solution of viscoelastic flows using two contrasting high-order finite volume schemes. We extend our earlier work for Poiseuille flow in a planar channel and the single equation form of the extended pom-pom (SXPP) model [M. Aboubacar, J.P. Aguayo, P.M. Phillips, T.N. Phillips, H.R. Tamaddon-Jahromi, B.A. Snigerev, M.F. Webster, Modelling pom-pom type models with high-order finite volume schemes, J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 126 (2005) 207-220], to determine steady-state solutions for planar 4:1 sharp contraction flows. The numerical techniques employed are time-stepping algorithms: one of hybrid finite element/volume type, the other of pure finite volume form. The pure finite volume scheme is a staggered-grid cell-centred scheme based on area-weighting and a semi-Lagrangian formulation. This may be implemented on structured or unstructured rectangular grids, utilising backtracking along the solution characteristics in time. For the hybrid scheme, we solve the momentum-continuity equations by a fractional-staged Taylor-Galerkin pressure-correction procedure and invoke a cell-vertex finite volume scheme for the constitutive law. A comparison of the two finite volume approaches is presented, concentrating upon the new features posed by the pom-pom class of models in this context of non-smooth flows. Here, the dominant feature of larger shear and extension in the entry zone influences both stress and stretch, so that larger stretch develops around the re-entrant corner zone as Weissenberg number increases, whilst correspondingly stress levels decline.

  20. Accelerating development of advanced inverters : evaluation of anti-islanding schemes with grid support functions and preliminary laboratory demonstration.

    SciTech Connect

    Neely, Jason C.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Ropp, Michael; Schutz, Dustin

    2013-11-01

    The high penetration of utility interconnected photovoltaic (PV) systems is causing heightened concern over the effect that variable renewable generation will have on the electrical power system (EPS). These concerns have initiated the need to amend the utility interconnection standard to allow advanced inverter control functionalities that provide: (1) reactive power control for voltage support, (2) real power control for frequency support and (3) better tolerance of grid disturbances. These capabilities are aimed at minimizing the negative impact distributed PV systems may have on EPS voltage and frequency. Unfortunately, these advanced control functions may interfere with island detection schemes, and further development of advanced inverter functions requires a study of the effect of advanced functions on the efficacy of antiislanding schemes employed in industry. This report summarizes the analytical, simulation and experimental work to study interactions between advanced inverter functions and anti-islanding schemes being employed in distributed PV systems.

  1. Numerical simulation by TVD schemes of complex shock reflections from airfoils at high angle of attack. [Total Variation Diminishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Young J.; Yee, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    The shock-capturing capability of total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes is demonstrated for a more realistic complex shock-diffraction problem for which the experimental data are available. Second-order explicit upwind and symmetric TVD schemes are used to solve the time-dependent Euler equations of gas dynamics for the interaction of a blast wave with an airfoil at high angle-of-attack. The test cases considered are a time-dependent moving curved-shock wave and a contant moving planar-shock wave impinging at an angle-of-attack 30 deg on a NACA 0018 airfoil. Good agreement is obtained between isopycnic contours computed by the TVD schemes and those from experimental interferograms. No drastic difference in flow-field structure is found between the curved- and planar-shock wave cases, except for a difference in density level near the lower surface of the airfoil. Computation for cases with higher shock Mach numbers is also possible. Numerical experiments show that the symmetric TVD scheme is less sensitive to the boundary conditions treatment than the upwind scheme.

  2. Conservative numerical schemes for unsteady one-dimensional two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cascales, Jose Ramon

    The thesis is devoted to the modelization of non steady two phase mixtures of liquid and vapour. It has been motivated by the great amount of industrial applications in which we find these phenomena. Transient two phase flow is a very important issue in nuclear, chemical and industrial applications. In the case of the nuclear industry due to the importance of preventing loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and guaranteeing a good performance of the coolant system in power plants. We justify the present development by means of the introduction of the most important codes developed during the last two decades and their associated mesh techniques. It is basically focused on the extension of some conservative and explicit schemes to obtain approximate solutions of the system of equations in one dimensional one pressure two phase flow. They have been centred and upwind schemes to solve multiphase flow problems, most of them based on the exact or approximate solution of Riemann problems using Godunov's like methods such as Approximate Riemann solvers or Flux Splitting methods. We have studied mainly TVD schemes, Adapted TVD schemes (ATVD) and the AUSM family of schemes. Firstly we introduce the 1D two phase flow system of equations with which we will work. We consider the systems of equations more used depending on the model. Thus we introduce the homogeneous model, the isentropic model and the separated model will be treated in some detail. The evaluation of the eigenstructure of the homogeneous and the separated two phase flow is studied. Different methods to determine the eigenvalues are presented. A general method to determine the eigenvectors is studied as well. We extend different conservative schemes to two phase flow whose good behaviour in single phase has been well proved. They are basically TVD schemes, the Adapted TVD schemes developed by Gascon and Corberan and the AUSM family of schemes, firstly introduced by Steffen and Liou. Most of the extensions developed

  3. A numerical resolution study of high order essentially non-oscillatory schemes applied to incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinan, E.; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1992-01-01

    High order essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) schemes, originally designed for compressible flow and in general for hyperbolic conservation laws, are applied to incompressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with periodic boundary conditions. The projection to divergence-free velocity fields is achieved by fourth order central differences through Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) and a mild high-order filtering. The objective of this work is to assess the resolution of ENO schemes for large scale features of the flow when a coarse grid is used and small scale features of the flow, such as shears and roll-ups, are not fully resolved. It is found that high-order ENO schemes remain stable under such situations and quantities related to large-scale features, such as the total circulation around the roll-up region, are adequately resolved.

  4. Numerical Speed of Sound and its Application to Schemes for all Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Edwards, Jack R.

    1999-01-01

    The concept of "numerical speed of sound" is proposed in the construction of numerical flux. It is shown that this variable is responsible for the accurate resolution of' discontinuities, such as contacts and shocks. Moreover, this concept can he readily extended to deal with low speed and multiphase flows. As a results, the numerical dissipation for low speed flows is scaled with the local fluid speed, rather than the sound speed. Hence, the accuracy is enhanced the correct solution recovered, and the convergence rate improved. We also emphasize the role of mass flux and analyze the behavior of this flux. Study of mass flux is important because the numerical diffusivity introduced in it can be identified. In addition, it is the term common to all conservation equations. We show calculated results for a wide variety of flows to validate the effectiveness of using the numerical speed of sound concept in constructing the numerical flux. We especially aim at achieving these two goals: (1) improving accuracy and (2) gaining convergence rates for all speed ranges. We find that while the performance at high speed range is maintained, the flux now has the capability of performing well even with the low: speed flows. Thanks to the new numerical speed of sound, the convergence is even enhanced for the flows outside of the low speed range. To realize the usefulness of the proposed method in engineering problems, we have also performed calculations for complex 3D turbulent flows and the results are in excellent agreement with data.

  5. A novel type II relay-assisted retransmission scheme for uplink of LTE-advanced system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Anxin; Nagata, Satoshi; Harada, Atsushi; Suda, Hirohito

    2013-12-01

    Relay, which enables coverage extension and throughput enhancement, is a very promising technique for future wireless communication systems. Among different types of relay, type II relay is one kind of inband relays and is hotly discussed in LTE-Advanced system for throughput enhancement. In order to support type II relay, many challenges must be overcome. In this article, we focus on relay-assisted uplink data retransmission and propose a novel joint design of reference signal and data precoding for type II relay. The proposed method not only solves the problem of channel estimation mismatch for control information, but also achieves cooperative diversity gain for data transmission. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method over existing schemes.

  6. Recent advances in two-phase flow numerics

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaffy, J.H.; Macian, R.

    1997-07-01

    The authors review three topics in the broad field of numerical methods that may be of interest to individuals modeling two-phase flow in nuclear power plants. The first topic is iterative solution of linear equations created during the solution of finite volume equations. The second is numerical tracking of macroscopic liquid interfaces. The final area surveyed is the use of higher spatial difference techniques.

  7. Development of a solution adaptive unstructured scheme for quasi-3D inviscid flows through advanced turbomachinery cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usab, William J., Jr.; Jiang, Yi-Tsann

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to develop a general solution adaptive scheme for the accurate prediction of inviscid quasi-three-dimensional flow in advanced compressor and turbine designs. The adaptive solution scheme combines an explicit finite-volume time-marching scheme for unstructured triangular meshes and an advancing front triangular mesh scheme with a remeshing procedure for adapting the mesh as the solution evolves. The unstructured flow solver has been tested on a series of two-dimensional airfoil configurations including a three-element analytic test case presented here. Mesh adapted quasi-three-dimensional Euler solutions are presented for three spanwise stations of the NASA rotor 67 transonic fan. Computed solutions are compared with available experimental data.

  8. On one numerical scheme of the solution of a three-dimensional problem of diffraction of an electromagnetic wave on thin ideally conductive screens

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhakov, G. V.

    2014-11-12

    In the paper, the problem of diffraction on thin ideally conductive screens is reduced to vector hypersingular integral equation with integral treated in the sense of finite Hadamard value. An numerical scheme to solve the equation is introduced. The scheme is based on piecewise approximation of unknown function. The advantage of the scheme is that integral of singular part is reduced to contour integral which can be analytically calculated so numerical calculation are significantly accelerated. Several examples of resulting numerical experiments are given in comparison with known theoretical and experimental data.

  9. Comparison of Numerical Schemes for a Realistic Computational Aeroacoustics Benchmark Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Wu, J.; Nallasamy, M.; Sawyer, S.; Dyson, R.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, a nonlinear structured-multiblock CAA solver, the NASA GRC BASS code, will be tested on a realistic CAA benchmark problem. The purpose of this test is to ascertain what effect the high-accuracy solution methods used in CAA have on a realistic test problem, where both the mean flow and the unsteady waves are simultaneously computed on a fully curvilinear grid from a commercial grid generator. The proposed test will compare the solutions obtained using several finite-difference methods on identical grids to determine whether high-accuracy schemes have advantages for this benchmark problem.

  10. Numerical solution of the Euler equations by finite volume methods using Runge Kutta time stepping schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A.; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Turkel, Eli

    1981-01-01

    A new combination of a finite volume discretization in conjunction with carefully designed dissipative terms of third order, and a Runge Kutta time stepping scheme, is shown to yield an effective method for solving the Euler equations in arbitrary geometric domains. The method has been used to determine the steady transonic flow past an airfoil using an O mesh. Convergence to a steady state is accelerated by the use of a variable time step determined by the local Courant member, and the introduction of a forcing term proportional to the difference between the local total enthalpy and its free stream value.

  11. Application of vortex identification schemes to direct numerical simulation data of a transitional boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Brian; Moin, Parviz; Sayadi, Taraneh

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated how various vortex identification and visualization criteria perform using direct numerical simulation data from a transitional and turbulent boundary layer by Sayadi, Hamman, and Moin ["Direct numerical simulation of complete transition to turbulence via h-type and k-type secondary instabilities," Technical Report, Stanford University, CTR Annual Research Briefs, 2011]. The presence of well-known Λ vortices in the transitional region provides a well defined and yet realistic benchmark for evaluation of various criteria. We investigate the impact of changing the threshold used for iso-surface plotting.

  12. System-level performance of LTE-Advanced with joint transmission and dynamic point selection schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Määttänen, Helka-Liina; Hämäläinen, Kari; Venäläinen, Juha; Schober, Karol; Enescu, Mihai; Valkama, Mikko

    2012-12-01

    In this article, we present a practical coordinated multipoint (CoMP) system for LTE-Advanced. In this CoMP system, cooperation is enabled for cell-edge users via dynamic switching between the normal single-cell operation and CoMP. We first formulate a general CoMP system model of several CoMP schemes. We then investigate a practical finite-rate feedback design that simultaneously supports interference coordination, joint transmission (JT), and dynamic point selection (DPS) with a varying number of cooperating transmission points while operating a single-cell transmission as a fallback mode. We provide both link-level and system-level results for the evaluation of different feedback options for general CoMP operation. The results show that there are substantial performance gains in cell-edge throughputs for both JT and DPS CoMP over the baseline Release 10 LTE-Advanced with practical feedback options. We also show that CoMP can enable improved mobility management in real networks.

  13. Generation of a composite grid for turbine flows and consideration of a numerical scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Y.; Yoon, S.; Reno, C.

    1986-01-01

    A composite grid was generated for flows in turbines. It consisted of the C-grid (or O-grid) in the immediate vicinity of the blade and the H-grid in the middle of the blade passage between the C-grids and in the upstream region. This new composite grid provides better smoothness, resolution, and orthogonality than any single grid for a typical turbine blade with a large camber and rounded leading and trailing edges. The C-H (or O-H) composite grid has an unusual grid point that is connected to more than four neighboring nodes in two dimensions (more than six neighboring nodes in three dimensions). A finite-volume lower-upper (LU) implicit scheme to be used on this grid poses no problem and requires no special treatment because each interior cell of this composite grid has only four neighboring cells in two dimensions (six cells in three dimensions). The LU implicit scheme was demonstrated to be efficient and robust for external flows in a broad flow regime and can be easily applied to internal flows and extended from two to three dimensions.

  14. EVALUATION OF NUMERICAL SCHEMES FOR SOLVING A CONSERVATION OF SPECIES EQUATION WITH CHEMICAL TERMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical methods are investigated for solving a system of continuity equations that contain linear and nonlinear chemistry as source and sink terms. It is shown that implicit, finite-difference approximations, when applied to the chemical kinetic terms, yield accurate results wh...

  15. Numerical study of unsteady shockwave reflections using an upwind TVD scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Andrew T.; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1990-01-01

    An unsteady TVD Navier-Stokes solver was developed and applied to the problem of shock reflection on a circular cylinder. The obtained numerical results were compared with the Schlieren photos from an experimental study. These results show that the present computer code has the ability of capturing moving shocks.

  16. Numerical simulation of Stokes flow around particles via a hybrid Finite Difference-Boundary Integral scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh

    2013-11-01

    An efficient algorithm for simulating Stokes flow around particles is presented here, in which a second order Finite Difference method (FDM) is coupled to a Boundary Integral method (BIM). This method utilizes the strong points of FDM (i.e. localized stencil) and BIM (i.e. accurate representation of particle surface). Specifically, in each iteration, the flow field away from the particles is solved on a Cartesian FDM grid, while the traction on the particle surface (given the the velocity of the particle) is solved using BIM. The two schemes are coupled by matching the solution in an intermediate region between the particle and surrounding fluid. We validate this method by solving for flow around an array of cylinders, and find good agreement with Hasimoto's (J. Fluid Mech. 1959) analytical results.

  17. The Role of Numerical Simulation in Advancing Plasma Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchi, P. J.; Mikellides, P. G.; Mikellides, I. G.

    1999-11-01

    Plasma thrusters often involve a complex set of interactions among several distinct physical processes. While each process can yield to separate mathematical representation, their combination generally requires numerical simulation. We have extended and used the MACH2 code successfully to simulate both self-field and applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters and, more recently, ablation-fed pulsed plasma microthrusters. MACH2 provides a framework in which to compute 2-1/2 dimensional, unsteady, MHD flows in two-temperature LTE. It couples to several options for electrical circuitry and allows access to both analytic formulas and tabular values for material properties and transport coefficients, including phenomenological models for anomalous transport. Even with all these capabilities, however, successful modeling demands comparison with experiment and with analytic solutions in idealized limits, and careful combination of MACH2 results with separate physical reasoning. Although well understood elsewhere in plasma physics, the strengths and limitations of numerical simulation for plasma propulsion needs further discussion.

  18. Numerical and experimental investigation into passive hydrogen recovery scheme using vacuum ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jenn-Jiang; Cho, Ching-Chang; Wu, Wei; Chiu, Ching-Huang; Chiu, Kuo-Ching; Lin, Chih-Hong

    2015-02-01

    The current work presents a numerical and experimental investigation into a passive ejector for recovering the anode off-gas in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system. The proposed ejector is consisted of a convergent-divergent channel and a suction channel, and it is connected with the anode outlet of PEMFC system for recovery the anode off-gas into the main gas supply. Numerical simulations based on a three-dimensional compressible steady-state k-ɛ turbulent model are performed to examine the effects of the inlet mass flow rate and nozzle throat diameter on the pressure, Mach number, temperature, suction channel mass flow rate, outlet channel mass flow rate, and suction channel entrainment ratio, respectively. The numerical results are confirmed by means of an experimental investigation. It is shown that supersonic flow conditions are induced in the ejector; resulting in the induction of a vacuum pressure in the suction channel and the subsequent recovery of the anode off-gas at the outlet of the main channel. In addition, it is shown that the mass flow rate in the suction channel increases with an increasing mass flow rate at the primary channel inlet. Finally, the results show that a higher entrainment ratio is obtained as the throat diameter of the nozzle in the ejector is reduced. Overall, the results presented in this study provide a useful source of reference for developing the ejector devices applied to fuel cell systems while simultaneously avoiding extra energy consumption.

  19. A nonlocal finite difference scheme for simulation of wave propagation in 2D models with reduced numerical dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martowicz, A.; Ruzzene, M.; Staszewski, W. J.; Rimoli, J. J.; Uhl, T.

    2014-03-01

    The work deals with the reduction of numerical dispersion in simulations of wave propagation in solids. The phenomenon of numerical dispersion naturally results from time and spatial discretization present in a numerical model of mechanical continuum. Although discretization itself makes possible to model wave propagation in structures with complicated geometries and made of different materials, it inevitably causes simulation errors when improper time and length scales are chosen for the simulations domains. Therefore, by definition, any characteristic parameter for spatial and time resolution must create limitations on maximal wavenumber and frequency for a numerical model. It should be however noted that expected increase of the model quality and its functionality in terms of affordable wavenumbers, frequencies and speeds should not be achieved merely by denser mesh and reduced time integration step. The computational cost would be simply unacceptable. The authors present a nonlocal finite difference scheme with the coefficients calculated applying a Fourier series, which allows for considerable reduction of numerical dispersion. There are presented the results of analyses for 2D models, with isotropic and anisotropic materials, fulfilling the planar stress state. Reduced numerical dispersion is shown in the dispersion surfaces for longitudinal and shear waves propagating for different directions with respect to the mesh orientation and without dramatic increase of required number of nonlocal interactions. A case with the propagation of longitudinal wave in composite material is studied with given referential solution of the initial value problem for verification of the time-domain outcomes. The work gives a perspective of modeling of any type of real material dispersion according to measurements and with assumed accuracy.

  20. Numerical scheme for a spatially inhomogeneous matrix-valued quantum Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Mendl, Christian B.

    2015-06-01

    We develop an efficient algorithm for a spatially inhomogeneous matrix-valued quantum Boltzmann equation derived from the Hubbard model. The distribution functions are 2 × 2 matrix-valued to accommodate the spin degree of freedom, and the scalar quantum Boltzmann equation is recovered as a special case when all matrices are proportional to the identity. We use Fourier discretization and fast Fourier transform to efficiently evaluate the collision kernel with spectral accuracy, and numerically investigate periodic, Dirichlet and Maxwell boundary conditions. Model simulations quantify the convergence to local and global thermal equilibrium.

  1. Static structure of general relativistic partially degenerate, self-gravitational, lepton configurations I. Numerical scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, W.Y.; Lake, K.; Stone, J.

    1984-06-15

    The Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations for isothermal, partially degenerate neutral lepton configurations have been solved numerically for arbitrary temperature and degree of degeneracy. For the specific case where the leptons are massive neutrions (approx.30 eV) with properties quite tightly constrained by cosmological considerations, we find that it possible to have a neutrino halo surrounding a normal galaxy with the right values of mass and radius required of the ''invisible halo'' in the missing mass problem. The density distribution, however, yields a rotational curve which, with the present chosen values of parameters, does not fit the observations for spiral galaxies.

  2. Improved computational schemes for the numerical modeling of hydrothermal resources in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.; George, J.H.; Allen, M.B.

    1990-05-01

    A new method, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) solution technique, is shown to be extremely effective when applied to the finite-difference solution of conductive and convective heat transfer in geologic systems. The CGS method is compared to the Successive Over/Under Relaxation schemes, a version of the Gaussian elimination method, and the Generalized Minimum Residual (GMRES) approach. The CGS procedure converges at least ten times faster than the nearest competitor. The model is applied to the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, located in northwestern Wyoming. Modeled results are compared with measured temperature-depth profiles and results from other studies. The temperature decrease from 72{degree}C to 54{degrees}C along the crest of the Thermopolis anticline is shown to result from cooling of the geothermal fluid as it moves to the southeast. Modeled results show correct general trends, however, a time-varying three-dimensional model will be needed to fully explain the effects of mixing within the aquifers along the crest of the anticline and thermal affects of surface surface topography. 29 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. A discontinuous wave-in-cell numerical scheme for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Richard J.; Moeller, Trevor

    2015-10-01

    A new Riemann solver scheme for hyperbolic systems is introduced. The method consists of a discretization of the initial data into an approximate representation by discrete, discontinuous waves. Instead of calculating an intercell flux based on these waves, the discontinuous waves are propagated directly. Since the sum total of all discontinuous waves represents an extension of the linear Riemann problem, the solution is determined straightforwardly. For nonlinear systems, each timestep is considered a separate linear Riemann problem, and the projected waves are weighted to a background grid. This method is strikingly similar to the particle-in-cell approach, except that discontinuous waves are pushed around instead of macroparticles. The method is applied to Maxwell's equations and the equations of inviscid gasdynamics. For linear systems, exact solutions can be achieved without dissipation, and exact transmissive boundary condition treatments are trivial to implement. For inviscid gasdynamics, the nonlinear method tended to resolve discontinuities more sharply than the Roe, HLL or HLLC methods while requiring only between 30% and 50% of the execution time under identical conditions. The approach is also extremely robust, as it works for any Courant number. In the limit that the Courant number becomes infinite, the nonlinear solution approaches the linearized solution.

  4. Basic and Advanced Numerical Performances Relate to Mathematical Expertise but Are Fully Mediated by Visuospatial Skills

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the potential role of basic numerical processing in the acquisition of numerical and mathematical competences. However, it is debated whether high-level numerical skills and mathematics depends specifically on basic numerical representations. In this study mathematicians and nonmathematicians performed a basic number line task, which required mapping positive and negative numbers on a physical horizontal line, and has been shown to correlate with more advanced numerical abilities and mathematical achievement. We found that mathematicians were more accurate compared with nonmathematicians when mapping positive, but not negative numbers, which are considered numerical primitives and cultural artifacts, respectively. Moreover, performance on positive number mapping could predict whether one is a mathematician or not, and was mediated by more advanced mathematical skills. This finding might suggest a link between basic and advanced mathematical skills. However, when we included visuospatial skills, as measured by block design subtest, the mediation analysis revealed that the relation between the performance in the number line task and the group membership was explained by non-numerical visuospatial skills. These results demonstrate that relation between basic, even specific, numerical skills and advanced mathematical achievement can be artifactual and explained by visuospatial processing. PMID:26913930

  5. High security chaotic multiple access scheme for visible light communication systems with advanced encryption standard interleaving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Junchao; Zhang, Lin; Li, Diyang; Liu, Xingcheng

    2016-06-01

    Chaotic sequences can be applied to realize multiple user access and improve the system security for a visible light communication (VLC) system. However, since the map patterns of chaotic sequences are usually well known, eavesdroppers can possibly derive the key parameters of chaotic sequences and subsequently retrieve the information. We design an advanced encryption standard (AES) interleaving aided multiple user access scheme to enhance the security of a chaotic code division multiple access-based visible light communication (C-CDMA-VLC) system. We propose to spread the information with chaotic sequences, and then the spread information is interleaved by an AES algorithm and transmitted over VLC channels. Since the computation complexity of performing inverse operations to deinterleave the information is high, the eavesdroppers in a high speed VLC system cannot retrieve the information in real time; thus, the system security will be enhanced. Moreover, we build a mathematical model for the AES-aided VLC system and derive the theoretical information leakage to analyze the system security. The simulations are performed over VLC channels, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness and high security of our presented AES interleaving aided chaotic CDMA-VLC system.

  6. Langevin spin dynamics based on ab initio calculations: numerical schemes and applications.

    PubMed

    Rózsa, L; Udvardi, L; Szunyogh, L

    2014-05-28

    A method is proposed to study the finite-temperature behaviour of small magnetic clusters based on solving the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations, where the effective magnetic field is calculated directly during the solution of the dynamical equations from first principles instead of relying on an effective spin Hamiltonian. Different numerical solvers are discussed in the case of a one-dimensional Heisenberg chain with nearest-neighbour interactions. We performed detailed investigations for a monatomic chain of ten Co atoms on top of a Au(0 0 1) surface. We found a spiral-like ground state of the spins due to Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interactions, while the finite-temperature magnetic behaviour of the system was well described by a nearest-neighbour Heisenberg model including easy-axis anisotropy. PMID:24806308

  7. Numerical simulation of the effect of dissipation and phase fluctuation in a direct communication scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fu; Zhang, Jun-Xiang; Zhu, Shi-Yao

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the direct counterfactual communication protocol, proposed by Salih et al (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 170502) using a single photon source under ideal conditions (no dissipation, no phase fluctuation and an infinite number of beam splitters), has attracted much interest from a broad range of scientists. In order to put the direct communication protocol into a realistic framework, we numerically simulate the effect of the dissipation and the phase fluctuation with a finite number of beam splitters. Our calculation shows that the dissipation and phase fluctuation will dramatically decrease the reliability and the efficiency of communication, and even corrupt the communication. To counteract the negative effect of dissipation, we propose the balanced dissipation method, which substantially improves the reliability of the protocol at the expense of decreasing communication efficiency. Meanwhile, our theoretical derivation shows that the reliability and efficiency of communication are independent of the input state: a single photon state or a coherent state.

  8. Numerical modeling of spray combustion with an advanced VOF method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min; Shih, Ming-Hsin; Liaw, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the technical development and validation of a multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical method using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) model and a Lagrangian tracking model which can be employed to analyze general multiphase flow problems with free surface mechanism. The gas-liquid interface mass, momentum and energy conservation relationships are modeled by continuum surface mechanisms. A new solution method is developed such that the present VOF model can be applied for all-speed flow regimes. The objectives of the present study are to develop and verify the fractional volume-of-fluid cell partitioning approach into a predictor-corrector algorithm and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the present approach by simulating benchmark problems including laminar impinging jets, shear coaxial jet atomization and shear coaxial spray combustion flows.

  9. Effect of spatial configuration of an extended nonlinear Kierstead-Slobodkin reaction-transport model with adaptive numerical scheme.

    PubMed

    Owolabi, Kolade M; Patidar, Kailash C

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the numerical simulations of an extended nonlinear form of Kierstead-Slobodkin reaction-transport system in one and two dimensions. We employ the popular fourth-order exponential time differencing Runge-Kutta (ETDRK4) schemes proposed by Cox and Matthew (J Comput Phys 176:430-455, 2002), that was modified by Kassam and Trefethen (SIAM J Sci Comput 26:1214-1233, 2005), for the time integration of spatially discretized partial differential equations. We demonstrate the supremacy of ETDRK4 over the existing exponential time differencing integrators that are of standard approaches and provide timings and error comparison. Numerical results obtained in this paper have granted further insight to the question 'What is the minimal size of the spatial domain so that the population persists?' posed by Kierstead and Slobodkin (J Mar Res 12:141-147, 1953), with a conclusive remark that the population size increases with the size of the domain. In attempt to examine the biological wave phenomena of the solutions, we present the numerical results in both one- and two-dimensional space, which have interesting ecological implications. Initial data and parameter values were chosen to mimic some existing patterns. PMID:27064984

  10. A Numerical Scheme for Special Relativistic Radiation Magnetohydrodynamics Based on Solving the Time-dependent Radiative Transfer Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsuga, Ken; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.

    2016-02-01

    We develop a numerical scheme for solving the equations of fully special relativistic, radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHDs), in which the frequency-integrated, time-dependent radiation transfer equation is solved to calculate the specific intensity. The radiation energy density, the radiation flux, and the radiation stress tensor are obtained by the angular quadrature of the intensity. In the present method, conservation of total mass, momentum, and energy of the radiation magnetofluids is guaranteed. We treat not only the isotropic scattering but also the Thomson scattering. The numerical method of MHDs is the same as that of our previous work. The advection terms are explicitly solved, and the source terms, which describe the gas-radiation interaction, are implicitly integrated. Our code is suitable for massive parallel computing. We present that our code shows reasonable results in some numerical tests for propagating radiation and radiation hydrodynamics. Particularly, the correct solution is given even in the optically very thin or moderately thin regimes, and the special relativistic effects are nicely reproduced.

  11. Advances in numerical solutions to integral equations in liquid state theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Jesse J.

    Solvent effects play a vital role in the accurate description of the free energy profile for solution phase chemical and structural processes. The inclusion of solvent effects in any meaningful theoretical model however, has proven to be a formidable task. Generally, methods involving Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations are used, but they either fail to accurately describe the solvent effects or require an exhaustive computation effort to overcome sampling problems. An alternative to these methods are the integral equations (IEs) of liquid state theory which have become more widely applicable due to recent advancements in the theory of interaction site fluids and the numerical methods to solve the equations. In this work a new numerical method is developed based on a Newton-type scheme coupled with Picard/MDIIS routines. To extend the range of these numerical methods to large-scale data systems, the size of the Jacobian is reduced using basis functions, and the Newton steps are calculated using a GMRes solver. The method is then applied to calculate solutions to the 3D reference interaction site model (RISM) IEs of statistical mechanics, which are derived from first principles, for a solute model of a pair of parallel graphene plates at various separations in pure water. The 3D IEs are then extended to electrostatic models using an exact treatment of the long-range Coulomb interactions for negatively charged walls and DNA duplexes in aqueous electrolyte solutions to calculate the density profiles and solution thermodynamics. It is found that the 3D-IEs provide a qualitative description of the density distributions of the solvent species when compared to MD results, but at a much reduced computational effort in comparison to MD simulations. The thermodynamics of the solvated systems are also qualitatively reproduced by the IE results. The findings of this work show the IEs to be a valuable tool for the study and prediction of

  12. Advanced numerical methods for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Toumi, I.; Caruge, D.

    1997-07-01

    This paper is devoted to new numerical methods developed for both one and three dimensional two-phase flow calculations. These methods are finite volume numerical methods and are based on the use of Approximate Riemann Solvers concepts to define convective fluxes versus mean cell quantities. The first part of the paper presents the numerical method for a one dimensional hyperbolic two-fluid model including differential terms as added mass and interface pressure. This numerical solution scheme makes use of the Riemann problem solution to define backward and forward differencing to approximate spatial derivatives. The construction of this approximate Riemann solver uses an extension of Roe`s method that has been successfully used to solve gas dynamic equations. As far as the two-fluid model is hyperbolic, this numerical method seems very efficient for the numerical solution of two-phase flow problems. The scheme was applied both to shock tube problems and to standard tests for two-fluid computer codes. The second part describes the numerical method in the three dimensional case. The authors discuss also some improvements performed to obtain a fully implicit solution method that provides fast running steady state calculations. Such a scheme is not implemented in a thermal-hydraulic computer code devoted to 3-D steady-state and transient computations. Some results obtained for Pressurised Water Reactors concerning upper plenum calculations and a steady state flow in the core with rod bow effect evaluation are presented. In practice these new numerical methods have proved to be stable on non staggered grids and capable of generating accurate non oscillating solutions for two-phase flow calculations.

  13. Propagation of gravity waves through an SPH scheme with numerical diffusive terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antuono, M.; Colagrossi, A.; Marrone, S.; Lugni, C.

    2011-04-01

    Basing on the work by Antuono et al. (2010) [1], an SPH model with numerical diffusive terms (here denoted δ-SPH) is combined with an enhanced treatment of solid boundaries to simulate 2D gravity waves generated by a wave maker and propagating into a basin. Both regular and transient wave systems are considered. In the former, a large number of simulations is performed for different wave steepness and height-to-depth ratio and the results are compared with a BEM Mixed-Eulerian-Lagrangian solver (here denoted BEM-MEL solver). In the latter, the δ-SPH model has been compared with both the experimental measurements available in the literature and with the BEM-MEL solver, at least until the breaking event occurs. The results show a satisfactory agreement between the δ-SPH model, the BEM-MEL solver and the experiments. Finally, the influence of the weakly-compressibility assumption on the SPH results is inspected and a convergence analysis is provided in order to identify the minimal spatial resolution needed to get an accurate representation of gravity waves.

  14. PROBABILISTIC SIMULATION OF SUBSURFACE FLUID FLOW: A STUDY USING A NUMERICAL SCHEME

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, Timothy Eric

    1980-03-01

    There has been an increasing interest in probabilistic modeling of hydrogeologic systems. The classical approach to groundwater modeling has been deterministic in nature, where individual layers and formations are assumed to be uniformly homogeneous. Even in the case of complex heterogeneous systems, the heterogeneities describe the differences in parameter values between various layers, but not within any individual layer. In a deterministic model a single-number is assigned to each hydrogeologic parameter, given a particular scale of interest. However, physically there is no such entity as a truly uniform and homogeneous unit. Single-number representations or deterministic predictions are subject to uncertainties. The approach used in this work models such uncertainties with probabilistic parameters. The resulting statistical distributions of output variables are analyzed. A numerical algorithm, based on axiomatic principles of probability theory, performs arithmetic operations between probability distributions. Two subroutines are developed from the algorithm and incorporated into the computer program TERZAGI, which solves groundwater flow problems in saturated, multi-dimensional systems. The probabilistic computer program is given the name, PROGRES. The algorithm has been applied to study the following problems: one-dimensional flow through homogeneous media, steady-state and transient flow conditions, one-dimensional flow through heterogeneous media, steady-state and transient flow conditions, and two-dimensional steady-stte flow through heterogeneous media. The results are compared with those available in the literature.

  15. Eulerian methods for the description of soot: mathematical modeling and numerical scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Wick, A.; Laurent, F.; Fox, R.; Pitsch, H.

    2014-11-01

    A development and comparison between numerical methods for soot modeling derived from the population balance equations (PBE) is presented. The soot mechanism includes nucleation, surface growth, oxidation, aggregation and breakage (Mueller et al., Proceed. Combust. Inst., 2009, 2011). For comparison, data from the ethylene premixed flame of Xu et al. (Combust. Flame 108, 1997) over a range of equivalence ratios are used. Two types of methods are introduced. The first is a moment method in which the closure is obtained through a reconstruction of the number density function (NDF). In particular, the NDF can be approximated by a sum of Gamma distribution functions (Yuan et al., J. Aero. Sci. 51, 2012). The second is Eulerian multi-fluid (MF), which is a size discretization method (Laurent et al., Combust. Theory Modelling 5, 2001) considering one or two moments per section. The case of one moment per section is also known as a sectional method. The accuracy of MF methods depends on the number of sections. Eventually, an extension of these two methods considering the surface area as a function of volume is taken into account to describe more precisely the geometry of soot particles. The solutions from these methods are compared with solutions from Monte Carlo method.

  16. Efficient Conservative Numerical Schemes for 1D Nonlinear Spherical Diffusion Equations with Applications in Battery Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Y; Albertus, P; Klein, R; Chaturvedi, N; Kojic, A; Bazant, MZ; Christensen, J

    2013-06-07

    Mathematical models of batteries which make use of the intercalation of a species into a solid phase need to solve the corresponding mass transfer problem. Because solving this equation can significantly add to the computational cost of a model, various methods have been devised to reduce the computational time. In this paper we focus on a comparison of the formulation, accuracy, and order of the accuracy for two numerical methods of solving the spherical diffusion problem with a constant or non-constant diffusion coefficient: the finite volume method and the control volume method. Both methods provide perfect mass conservation and second order accuracy in mesh spacing, but the control volume method provides the surface concentration directly, has a higher accuracy for a given numbers of mesh points and can also be easily extended to variable mesh spacing. Variable mesh spacing can significantly reduce the number of points that are required to achieve a given degree of accuracy in the surface concentration (which is typically coupled to the other battery equations) by locating more points where the concentration gradients are highest. (C) 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Numerical optimization design of advanced transonic wing configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosentino, G. B.; Holst, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    A computationally efficient and versatile technique for use in the design of advanced transonic wing configurations has been developed. A reliable and fast transonic wing flow-field analysis program, TWING, has been coupled with a modified quasi-Newton method, unconstrained optimization algorithm, QNMDIF, to create a new design tool. Fully three-dimensional wing designs utilizing both specified wing pressure distributions and drag-to-lift ration minimization as design objectives are demonstrated. Because of the high computational efficiency of each of the components of the design code, in particular the vectorization of TWING and the high speed of the Cray X-MP vector computer, the computer time required for a typical wing design is reduced by approximately an order of magnitude over previous methods. In the results presented here, this computed wave drag has been used as the quantity to be optimized (minimized) with great success, yielding wing designs with nearly shock-free (zero wave drag) pressure distributions and very reasonable wing section shapes.

  18. Immersed boundary Eulerian-Lagrangian 3D simulation of pyroclastic density currents: numerical scheme and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronzo, Domenico Maria; de Tullio, Marco; Pascazio, Giuseppe; Dellino, Pierfrancesco

    2010-05-01

    Pyroclastic density currents are ground hugging, hot, gas-particle flows representing the most hazardous events of explosive volcanism. Their impact on structures is a function of dynamic pressure, which expresses the lateral load that such currents exert over buildings. In this paper we show how analog experiments can be matched with numerical simulations for capturing the essential physics of the multiphase flow. We used an immersed boundary scheme for the mesh generation, which helped in reconstructing the steep velocity and particle concentration gradients near the ground surface. Results show that the calculated values of dynamic pressure agree reasonably with the experimental measurements. These outcomes encourage future application of our method for the assessment of the impact of pyroclastic density currents at the natural scale.

  19. Development of comprehensive numerical schemes for predicting evaporating gas-droplets flow processes of a liquid-fueled combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    An existing Computational Fluid Dynamics code for simulating complex turbulent flows inside a liquid rocket combustion chamber was validated and further developed. The Advanced Rocket Injector/Combustor Code (ARICC) is simplified and validated against benchmark flow situations for laminar and turbulent flows. The numerical method used in ARICC Code is re-examined for incompressible flow calculations. For turbulent flows, both the subgrid and the two equation k-epsilon turbulence models are studied. Cases tested include idealized Burger's equation in complex geometries and boundaries, a laminar pipe flow, a high Reynolds number turbulent flow, and a confined coaxial jet with recirculations. The accuracy of the algorithm is examined by comparing the numerical results with the analytical solutions as well as experimented data with different grid sizes.

  20. Technical note: Improving the AWAT filter with interpolation schemes for advanced processing of high resolution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Andre; Nehls, Thomas; Wessolek, Gerd

    2016-06-01

    Weighing lysimeters with appropriate data filtering yield the most precise and unbiased information for precipitation (P) and evapotranspiration (ET). A recently introduced filter scheme for such data is the AWAT (Adaptive Window and Adaptive Threshold) filter (Peters et al., 2014). The filter applies an adaptive threshold to separate significant from insignificant mass changes, guaranteeing that P and ET are not overestimated, and uses a step interpolation between the significant mass changes. In this contribution we show that the step interpolation scheme, which reflects the resolution of the measuring system, can lead to unrealistic prediction of P and ET, especially if they are required in high temporal resolution. We introduce linear and spline interpolation schemes to overcome these problems. To guarantee that medium to strong precipitation events abruptly following low or zero fluxes are not smoothed in an unfavourable way, a simple heuristic selection criterion is used, which attributes such precipitations to the step interpolation. The three interpolation schemes (step, linear and spline) are tested and compared using a data set from a grass-reference lysimeter with 1 min resolution, ranging from 1 January to 5 August 2014. The selected output resolutions for P and ET prediction are 1 day, 1 h and 10 min. As expected, the step scheme yielded reasonable flux rates only for a resolution of 1 day, whereas the other two schemes are well able to yield reasonable results for any resolution. The spline scheme returned slightly better results than the linear scheme concerning the differences between filtered values and raw data. Moreover, this scheme allows continuous differentiability of filtered data so that any output resolution for the fluxes is sound. Since computational burden is not problematic for any of the interpolation schemes, we suggest always using the spline scheme.

  1. Analytical and numerical schemes for a derivative with filtering property and no singular kernel with applications to diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doungmo Goufo, Emile Franc; Atangana, Abdon

    2016-08-01

    There have been numbers of conflicting and confusing situations, but also uniformity, in the application of the two most popular fractional derivatives, namely the classic Riemann-Liouville and Caputo fractional derivatives. The range of these issues is wide, including the initialization with the Caputo derivative and its observed difficulties compared to the Riemann-Liouville initialization conditions. In this paper, being aware of these issues and reacting to the newly introduced Caputo-Fabrizio fractional derivative (CFFD) without singular kernel, we introduce a new definition of fractional derivative called the new Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative (NRLFD) without singular kernel. The filtering property of the NRLFD is pointed out by showing it as the derivative of a convolution and contrary to the CFFD, it matches with the function when the order is zero. We also explore various scientific situations that may be conflicting and confusing in the applicability of both new derivatives. In particular, we show that both definitions still have some basic similarities, like not obeying the traditional chain rule. Furthermore, we provide the explicit formula for the Laplace transform of the NRLFD and we prove that, contrary to the CFFD, the NRLFD requires non-constant initial conditions and does not require the function f to be continuous or differentiable. Some simulations for the NRLFD are presented for different values of the derivative order. In the second part of this work, numerical approximations for the first- and second-order NRLFD are developped followed by a concrete application to diffusion. The stability of the numerical scheme is proved and numerical simulations are performed for different values of the derivative order α. They exhibit similar behavior for closed values of α.

  2. Self-consistent field theory and numerical scheme for calculating the phase diagram of wormlike diblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Chen, Jeff Z Y

    2013-10-01

    This paper concerns establishing a theoretical basis and numerical scheme for studying the phase behavior of AB diblock copolymers made of wormlike chains. The general idea of a self-consistent field theory is the combination of the mean-field approach together with a statistical weight that describes the configurational properties of a polymer chain. In recent years, this approach has been extensively used for structural prediction of block copolymers, based on the Gaussian-model description of a polymer chain. The wormlike-chain model has played an important role in the description of polymer systems, covering the semiflexible-to-rod crossover of the polymer properties and the highly stretching regime, which the Gaussian-chain model has difficulties to describe. Although the idea of developing a self-consistent field theory for wormlike chains could be traced back to early development in polymer physics, the solution of such a theory has been limited due to technical difficulties. In particular, a challenge has been to develop a numerical algorithm enabling the calculation of the phase diagram containing three-dimensional structures for wormlike AB diblock copolymers. This paper describes a computational algorithm that combines a number of numerical tricks, which can be used for such a calculation. A phase diagram covering major parameter areas was constructed for the wormlike-chain system and reported by us, where the ratio between the total length and the persistence length of a constituent polymer is suggested as another tuning parameter for the microphase-separated structures; all detailed technical issues are carefully addressed in the current paper. PMID:24229202

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Topics in Computational Partial Differential Equations: Numerical Methods and Diffpack Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsaounis, T. D.

    2005-02-01

    The scope of this book is to present well known simple and advanced numerical methods for solving partial differential equations (PDEs) and how to implement these methods using the programming environment of the software package Diffpack. A basic background in PDEs and numerical methods is required by the potential reader. Further, a basic knowledge of the finite element method and its implementation in one and two space dimensions is required. The authors claim that no prior knowledge of the package Diffpack is required, which is true, but the reader should be at least familiar with an object oriented programming language like C++ in order to better comprehend the programming environment of Diffpack. Certainly, a prior knowledge or usage of Diffpack would be a great advantage to the reader. The book consists of 15 chapters, each one written by one or more authors. Each chapter is basically divided into two parts: the first part is about mathematical models described by PDEs and numerical methods to solve these models and the second part describes how to implement the numerical methods using the programming environment of Diffpack. Each chapter closes with a list of references on its subject. The first nine chapters cover well known numerical methods for solving the basic types of PDEs. Further, programming techniques on the serial as well as on the parallel implementation of numerical methods are also included in these chapters. The last five chapters are dedicated to applications, modelled by PDEs, in a variety of fields. The first chapter is an introduction to parallel processing. It covers fundamentals of parallel processing in a simple and concrete way and no prior knowledge of the subject is required. Examples of parallel implementation of basic linear algebra operations are presented using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) programming environment. Here, some knowledge of MPI routines is required by the reader. Examples solving in parallel simple PDEs using

  4. A New Cell-Centered Implicit Numerical Scheme for Ions in the 2-D Axisymmetric Code Hall2de

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez Ortega, Alejandro; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new algorithm in the Hall2De code to simulate the ion hydrodynamics in the acceleration channel and near plume regions of Hall-effect thrusters. This implementation constitutes an upgrade of the capabilities built in the Hall2De code. The equations of mass conservation and momentum for unmagnetized ions are solved using a conservative, finite-volume, cell-centered scheme on a magnetic-field-aligned grid. Major computational savings are achieved by making use of an implicit predictor/multi-corrector algorithm for time evolution. Inaccuracies in the prediction of the motion of low-energy ions in the near plume in hydrodynamics approaches are addressed by implementing a multi-fluid algorithm that tracks ions of different energies separately. A wide range of comparisons with measurements are performed to validate the new ion algorithms. Several numerical experiments with the location and value of the anomalous collision frequency are also presented. Differences in the plasma properties in the near-plume between the single fluid and multi-fluid approaches are discussed. We complete our validation by comparing predicted erosion rates at the channel walls of the thruster with measurements. Erosion rates predicted by the plasma properties obtained from simulations replicate accurately measured rates of erosion within the uncertainty range of the sputtering models employed.

  5. Recent advances in numerical simulation and control of asymmetric flows around slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Wong, Tin-Chee; Sharaf, Hazem H.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    The problems of asymmetric flow around slender bodies and its control are formulated using the unsteady, compressible, thin-layer or full Navier-Stokes equations which are solved using an implicit, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. The problem is numerically simulated for both locally-conical and three-dimensional flows. The numerical applications include studies of the effects of relative incidence, Mach number and Reynolds number on the flow asymmetry. For the control of flow asymmetry, the numerical simulation cover passive and active control methods. For the passive control, the effectiveness of vertical fins placed in the leeward plane of geometric symmetry and side strakes with different orientations is studied. For the active control, the effectiveness of normal and tangential flow injection and surface heating and a combination of these methods is studied.

  6. A Straightforward Method for Advance Estimation of User Charges for Information in Numeric Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvelin, Kalervo

    1986-01-01

    Describes a method for advance estimation of user charges for queries in relational data model-based numeric databases when charges are based on data retrieved. Use of this approach is demonstrated by sample queries to an imaginary marketing database. The principles and methods of this approach and its relevance are discussed. (MBR)

  7. New energy-preserving schemes using Hamiltonian Boundary Value and Fourier pseudospectral methods for the numerical solution of the "good" Boussinesq equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jinliang; Zhang, Zhiyue

    2016-04-01

    Two energy-preserving schemes are proposed for the "good" Boussinesq (GBq) equation using the Hamiltonian Boundary Value and Fourier pseudospectral methods. The equation is discretized in space by Fourier pseudospectral method and in time by Hamiltonian Boundary Value methods (HBVMs). The outstanding advantages of the proposed schemes are that they can precisely conserve the global mass and energy, and provide highly accurate results. The single solitary wave, the interaction of two solitary waves and the birth of solitary waves are presented to validate the accuracy and conservation properties of the proposed schemes. In addition, we also compare our numerical results with other known studied methods in terms of numerical accuracy and conservation properties.

  8. Numerical framework and performance of the new multiple-phase cloud microphysics scheme in RegCM4.5: precipitation, cloud microphysics, and cloud radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogherotto, Rita; Tompkins, Adrian Mark; Giuliani, Graziano; Coppola, Erika; Giorgi, Filippo

    2016-07-01

    We implement and evaluate a new parameterization scheme for stratiform cloud microphysics and precipitation within regional climate model RegCM4. This new parameterization is based on a multiple-phase one-moment cloud microphysics scheme built upon the implicit numerical framework recently developed and implemented in the ECMWF operational forecasting model. The parameterization solves five prognostic equations for water vapour, cloud liquid water, rain, cloud ice, and snow mixing ratios. Compared to the pre-existing scheme, it allows a proper treatment of mixed-phase clouds and a more physically realistic representation of cloud microphysics and precipitation. Various fields from a 10-year long integration of RegCM4 run in tropical band mode with the new scheme are compared with their counterparts using the previous cloud scheme and are evaluated against satellite observations. In addition, an assessment using the Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) Observational Simulator Package (COSP) for a 1-year sub-period provides additional information for evaluating the cloud optical properties against satellite data. The new microphysics parameterization yields an improved simulation of cloud fields, and in particular it removes the overestimation of upper level cloud characteristics of the previous scheme, increasing the agreement with observations and leading to an amelioration of a long-standing problem in the RegCM system. The vertical cloud profile produced by the new scheme leads to a considerably improvement of the representation of the longwave and shortwave components of the cloud radiative forcing.

  9. Developing a TPCK-SRL Assessment Scheme for Conceptually Advancing Technology in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohen, Zehavit; Kramarski, Bracha

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to: (a) develop a conceptual TPCK-SRL scheme for assessing teachers' integration of self-regulated learning (SRL) considerations while infusing technology into a TPCK classroom context (blending K = knowledge about T = technology, P = pedagogy, and C = content), which reflects all three knowledge components' dynamic…

  10. Physical control oriented model of large scale refrigerators to synthesize advanced control schemes. Design, validation, and first control results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonne, François; Alamir, Mazen; Bonnay, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a physical method to obtain control-oriented dynamical models of large scale cryogenic refrigerators is proposed, in order to synthesize model-based advanced control schemes. These schemes aim to replace classical user experience designed approaches usually based on many independent PI controllers. This is particularly useful in the case where cryoplants are submitted to large pulsed thermal loads, expected to take place in the cryogenic cooling systems of future fusion reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced Fusion Experiment (JT-60SA). Advanced control schemes lead to a better perturbation immunity and rejection, to offer a safer utilization of cryoplants. The paper gives details on how basic components used in the field of large scale helium refrigeration (especially those present on the 400W @1.8K helium test facility at CEA-Grenoble) are modeled and assembled to obtain the complete dynamic description of controllable subsystems of the refrigerator (controllable subsystems are namely the Joule-Thompson Cycle, the Brayton Cycle, the Liquid Nitrogen Precooling Unit and the Warm Compression Station). The complete 400W @1.8K (in the 400W @4.4K configuration) helium test facility model is then validated against experimental data and the optimal control of both the Joule-Thompson valve and the turbine valve is proposed, to stabilize the plant under highly variable thermals loads. This work is partially supported through the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) Goal Oriented Training Program, task agreement WP10-GOT-GIRO.

  11. Physical control oriented model of large scale refrigerators to synthesize advanced control schemes. Design, validation, and first control results

    SciTech Connect

    Bonne, François; Bonnay, Patrick

    2014-01-29

    In this paper, a physical method to obtain control-oriented dynamical models of large scale cryogenic refrigerators is proposed, in order to synthesize model-based advanced control schemes. These schemes aim to replace classical user experience designed approaches usually based on many independent PI controllers. This is particularly useful in the case where cryoplants are submitted to large pulsed thermal loads, expected to take place in the cryogenic cooling systems of future fusion reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced Fusion Experiment (JT-60SA). Advanced control schemes lead to a better perturbation immunity and rejection, to offer a safer utilization of cryoplants. The paper gives details on how basic components used in the field of large scale helium refrigeration (especially those present on the 400W @1.8K helium test facility at CEA-Grenoble) are modeled and assembled to obtain the complete dynamic description of controllable subsystems of the refrigerator (controllable subsystems are namely the Joule-Thompson Cycle, the Brayton Cycle, the Liquid Nitrogen Precooling Unit and the Warm Compression Station). The complete 400W @1.8K (in the 400W @4.4K configuration) helium test facility model is then validated against experimental data and the optimal control of both the Joule-Thompson valve and the turbine valve is proposed, to stabilize the plant under highly variable thermals loads. This work is partially supported through the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) Goal Oriented Training Program, task agreement WP10-GOT-GIRO.

  12. The effect of a sub-grid statistical cloud-cover scheme applied to the COSMO local numerical weather prediction model over the wider geographical domain of Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgoustoglou, Euripides; Tzeferi, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    The COSMO model uses operationally two sub-grid schemes for the evaluation of stratus clouds. A semi-empirical scheme based on relative humidity is used in the radiation module while a statistical scheme is used in the turbulence module. The objective is to investigate the possibility of the implementation of the statistical scheme also in the radiation module. The relative impact is presented in reference to a spring test case with synoptic conditions that favor stratiform clouds. The domain considered is the wider Balkan region around the Hellenic geographical area and is characterized by comparable sea and land partitions. This particular domain choice gives rise to a strong coexistence of continental as well as marine clouds which is one of the most challenging features regarding the operational use of numerical weather prediction models by the Hellenic Meteorological Service. The results are evaluated through direct comparisons with satellite data as well as the observed 2-m temperatures for an approximate total of fifty Greek synoptic meteorological stations. The implementation of the statistical scheme led to an underestimation of low cloud-cover by the model in contrast to the implementation of the default relative-humidity scheme, while regarding medium cloud-cover the situation was reversed. Also, the daily 2-meter minimum and maximum temperatures were slightly better simulated, but not conclusively, when the statistical scheme was implemented in the radiation module. Although the statistical scheme cannot in its present form replace operationally the relative-humidity scheme in the radiation module, it is an important asset to COSMO model invoking valuable insight to the physics of the model and can be used as a basis to support the ongoing research in this crucial area of atmospheric sciences.

  13. Particle exhaust schemes in the DIII-D advanced divertor configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    For density control in long-pulse operation, the open divertor on the DIII-D tokamak will be equipped with a baffled chamber and a pumping system. The throat of the baffle chamber is sized to provide optimal pumping for the typical plasma equilibrium configuration. Severe limitations on the toroidal conductance of this baffle chamber require the use of in-vessel pumping to achieve the desired particle exhaust of about 25 Torr{center dot}l/s. Two separate pumping schemes are considered: an array of titanium getter modules based on the design developed by the Tore Supra team and a cryocondensation pump. The merits and demerits of each scheme are analyzed, and the design considerations introduced by the tokamak environment are brought out. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Left Ventricular Flow Analysis: Recent Advances in Numerical Methods and Applications in Cardiac Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Westerdale, John; McMahon, Eileen M.; Rajaraman, Prathish K.; Heys, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    The left ventricle (LV) pumps oxygenated blood from the lungs to the rest of the body through systemic circulation. The efficiency of such a pumping function is dependent on blood flow within the LV chamber. It is therefore crucial to accurately characterize LV hemodynamics. Improved understanding of LV hemodynamics is expected to provide important clinical diagnostic and prognostic information. We review the recent advances in numerical and experimental methods for characterizing LV flows and focus on analysis of intraventricular flow fields by echocardiographic particle image velocimetry (echo-PIV), due to its potential for broad and practical utility. Future research directions to advance patient-specific LV simulations include development of methods capable of resolving heart valves, higher temporal resolution, automated generation of three-dimensional (3D) geometry, and incorporating actual flow measurements into the numerical solution of the 3D cardiovascular fluid dynamics. PMID:23690874

  15. Recent advances in Runge-Kutta schemes for solving 3-D Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Wedan, Bruce W.; Abid, Ridha

    1989-01-01

    A thin-layer Navier-Stokes has been developed for solving high Reynolds number, turbulent flows past aircraft components under transonic flow conditions. The computer code has been validated through data comparisons for flow past isolated wings, wing-body configurations, prolate spheroids and wings mounted inside wind-tunnels. The basic code employs an explicit Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme to obtain steady state solution to the unsteady governing equations. Significant gain in the efficiency of the code has been obtained by implementing a multigrid acceleration technique to achieve steady-state solutions. The improved efficiency of the code has made it feasible to conduct grid-refinement and turbulence model studies in a reasonable amount of computer time. The non-equilibrium turbulence model of Johnson and King has been extended to three-dimensional flows and excellent agreement with pressure data has been obtained for transonic separated flow over a transport type of wing.

  16. Advanced control schemes and kinematic analysis for a kinematically redundant 7 DOF manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Zhou, Zhen-Lei

    1990-01-01

    The kinematic analysis and control of a kinematically redundant manipulator is addressed. The manipulator is the slave arm of a telerobot system recently built at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to serve as a testbed for investigating research issues in telerobotics. A forward kinematic transformation is developed in its most simplified form, suitable for real-time control applications, and the manipulator Jacobian is derived using the vector cross product method. Using the developed forward kinematic transformation and quaternion representation of orientation matrices, we perform computer simulation to evaluate the efficiency of the Jacobian in converting joint velocities into Cartesian velocities and to investigate the accuracy of Jacobian pseudo-inverse for various sampling times. The equivalence between Cartesian velocities and quaternion is also verified using computer simulation. Three control schemes are proposed and discussed for controlling the motion of the slave arm end-effector.

  17. Theoretical analysis of advanced schemes for free electron laser with a large {mu}{sub c}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhulin, V.I.; Zanadvorov, N.P.

    1995-12-31

    The possibility to operate with a short pulse FEL (electron pulse length a {sigma} {approx_equal} 1mm) in far infrared region (with the radiation wavelength 10{mu}m {le}{lambda}{le}300{mu}m) gives rise to many new applications. The parameter {mu}{sub c} = N{lambda}/{sigma}, which characterises the interaction time between the electron and radiation pulses in the undulator with N periods, becomes rather large ({mu}{sub c}{approximately}10) even for {lambda}{approximately}100{mu}m. An increase in {lambda} leads to the reduction in output power owing to an increase in both the diffraction losses and {mu}{sub c}. We consider two options capable to improve the situation in the FEL with planar undulator geometry: I. Reduction of the diffraction losses by use of circular or rectangular hollow waveguides in the cavity. II. Effective reduction of {mu}{sub c} factor by increasing the FEL-interaction time by means of the optical klystron undulator scheme. We demonstrate that; I. Introduction of a waveguide into the cavity causes additional difficulties. In both circular and rectangular cases the waveguide dispersion leads to the undesirable variation of radiation pulse shape. For the circular case the effect of depolarization becomes important and leads to the additional losses (up to 30%) due to the violation of the axial symmetry and linear polarization. II. The optical klystron scheme consisting of several separated undulators, can indeed increase the FEL-interaction time. The right choice of electron bunch delay between these undulators gives the possibility to couple several successive electron pulses with one radiation pulse during one passage through the cavity. This results in considerable increase in FEL-interaction time and corresponding increase in gain.

  18. Numerical simulation of the reactive flow in advanced (HSR) combustors using KIVA-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winowich, Nicholas S.

    1991-01-01

    Recent work has been done with the goal of establishing ultralow emission aircraft gas turbine combustors. A significant portion of the effort is the development of three dimensional computational combustor models. The KIVA-II computer code which is based on the Implicit Continuous Eulerian Difference mesh Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ICED-ALE) numerical scheme is one of the codes selected by NASA to achieve these goals. This report involves a simulation of jet injection through slanted slots within the Rich burn/Quick quench/Lean burn (RQL) baseline experimental rig. The RQL combustor distinguishes three regions of combustion. This work specifically focuses on modeling the quick quench mixer region in which secondary injection air is introduced radially through 12 equally spaced slots around the mixer circumference. Steady state solutions are achieved with modifications to the KIVA-II program. Work currently underway will evaluate thermal mixing as a function of injection air velocity and angle of inclination of the slots.

  19. An efficient liner cooling scheme for advanced small gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paskin, Marc D.; Mongia, Hukam C.; Acosta, Waldo A.

    1993-01-01

    A joint Army/NASA program was conducted to design, fabricate, and test an advanced, small gas turbine, reverse-flow combustor utilizing a compliant metal/ceramic (CMC) wall cooling concept. The objectives of this effort were to develop a design method (basic design data base and analysis) for the CMC cooling technique and then demonstrate its application to an advanced cycle, small, reverse-flow combustor with 3000 F burner outlet temperature. The CMC concept offers significant improvements in wall cooling effectiveness resulting in a large reduction in cooling air requirements. Therefore, more air is available for control of burner outlet temperature pattern in addition to the benefits of improved efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower smoke levels. The program was divided into four tasks. Task 1 defined component materials and localized design of the composite wall structure in conjunction with development of basic design models for the analysis of flow and heat transfer through the wall. Task 2 included implementation of the selected materials and validated design models during combustor preliminary design. Detail design of the selected combustor concept and its refinement with 3D aerothermal analysis were completed in Task 3. Task 4 covered detail drawings, process development and fabrication, and a series of burner rig tests. The purpose of this paper is to provide details of the investigation into the fundamental flow and heat transfer characteristics of the CMC wall structure as well as implementation of the fundamental analysis method for full-scale combustor design.

  20. Numerical simulation of flood inundation using a well-balanced kinetic scheme for the shallow water equations with bulk recharge and discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersoy, Mehmet; Lakkis, Omar; Townsend, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The flow of water in rivers and oceans can, under general assumptions, be efficiently modelled using Saint-Venant's shallow water system of equations (SWE). SWE is a hyperbolic system of conservation laws (HSCL) which can be derived from a starting point of incompressible Navier-Stokes. A common difficulty in the numerical simulation of HSCLs is the conservation of physical entropy. Work by Audusse, Bristeau, Perthame (2000) and Perthame, Simeoni (2001), proposed numerical SWE solvers known as kinetic schemes (KSs), which can be shown to have desirable entropy-consistent properties, and are thus called well-balanced schemes. A KS is derived from kinetic equations that can be integrated into the SWE. In flood risk assessment models the SWE must be coupled with other equations describing interacting meteorological and hydrogeological phenomena such as rain and groundwater flows. The SWE must therefore be appropriately modified to accommodate source and sink terms, so kinetic schemes are no longer valid. While modifications of SWE in this direction have been recently proposed, e.g., Delestre (2010), we depart from the extant literature by proposing a novel model that is "entropy-consistent" and naturally extends the SWE by respecting its kinetic formulation connections. This allows us to derive a system of partial differential equations modelling flow of a one-dimensional river with both a precipitation term and a groundwater flow model to account for potential infiltration and recharge. We exhibit numerical simulations of the corresponding kinetic schemes. These simulations can be applied to both real world flood prediction and the tackling of wider issues on how climate and societal change are affecting flood risk.

  1. The HiPER project for inertial confinement fusion and some experimental results on advanced ignition schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Koenig, M.; Baton, S.; Perez, F.; Gizzi, L. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Honrubia, J.; Antonelli, L.; Morace, A.; Volpe, L.; Santos, J.; Schurtz, G.; Hulin, S.; Ribeyre, X.; Fourment, C.; Nicolai, P.; Vauzour, B.; Gremillet, L.; Nazarov, W.; Pasley, J.; Richetta, M.; Lancaster, K.; Spindloe, Ch; Tolley, M.; Neely, D.; Kozlová, M.; Nejdl, J.; Rus, B.; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Dorchies, F.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the goals and some of the results of experiments conducted within the Working Package 10 (Fusion Experimental Programme) of the HiPER Project. These experiments concern the study of the physics connected to 'advanced ignition schemes', i.e. the fast ignition and the shock ignition approaches to inertial fusion. Such schemes are aimed at achieving a higher gain, as compared with the classical approach which is used in NIF, as required for future reactors, and make fusion possible with smaller facilities. In particular, a series of experiments related to fast ignition were performed at the RAL (UK) and LULI (France) Laboratories and studied the propagation of fast electrons (created by a short-pulse ultra-high-intensity beam) in compressed matter, created either by cylindrical implosions or by compression of planar targets by (planar) laser-driven shock waves. A more recent experiment was performed at PALS and investigated the laser-plasma coupling in the 1016 W cm-2 intensity regime of interest for shock ignition.

  2. Numerical simulation of a dust event in northeastern Germany with a new dust emission scheme in COSMO-ART

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dust emission scheme of Shao (2004) has been implemented into the regional atmospheric model COSMO-ART and has been applied to a severe dust event in northeastern Germany on 8th April 2011. The model sensitivity to soil moisture and vegetation cover has been studied. Soil moisture has been found...

  3. Recent numerical and algorithmic advances within the volume tracking framework for modeling interfacial flows

    SciTech Connect

    François, Marianne M.

    2015-05-28

    A review of recent advances made in numerical methods and algorithms within the volume tracking framework is presented. The volume tracking method, also known as the volume-of-fluid method has become an established numerical approach to model and simulate interfacial flows. Its advantage is its strict mass conservation. However, because the interface is not explicitly tracked but captured via the material volume fraction on a fixed mesh, accurate estimation of the interface position, its geometric properties and modeling of interfacial physics in the volume tracking framework remain difficult. Several improvements have been made over the last decade to address these challenges. In this study, the multimaterial interface reconstruction method via power diagram, curvature estimation via heights and mean values and the balanced-force algorithm for surface tension are highlighted.

  4. Recent numerical and algorithmic advances within the volume tracking framework for modeling interfacial flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    François, Marianne M.

    2015-05-28

    A review of recent advances made in numerical methods and algorithms within the volume tracking framework is presented. The volume tracking method, also known as the volume-of-fluid method has become an established numerical approach to model and simulate interfacial flows. Its advantage is its strict mass conservation. However, because the interface is not explicitly tracked but captured via the material volume fraction on a fixed mesh, accurate estimation of the interface position, its geometric properties and modeling of interfacial physics in the volume tracking framework remain difficult. Several improvements have been made over the last decade to address these challenges.more » In this study, the multimaterial interface reconstruction method via power diagram, curvature estimation via heights and mean values and the balanced-force algorithm for surface tension are highlighted.« less

  5. An energy and potential enstrophy conserving numerical scheme for the multi-layer shallow water equations with complete Coriolis force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Andrew L.; Dellar, Paul J.

    2016-05-01

    We present an energy- and potential enstrophy-conserving scheme for the non-traditional shallow water equations that include the complete Coriolis force and topography. These integral conservation properties follow from material conservation of potential vorticity in the continuous shallow water equations. The latter property cannot be preserved by a discretisation on a fixed Eulerian grid, but exact conservation of a discrete energy and a discrete potential enstrophy seems to be an effective substitute that prevents any distortion of the forward and inverse cascades in quasi-two dimensional turbulence through spurious sources and sinks of energy and potential enstrophy, and also increases the robustness of the scheme against nonlinear instabilities. We exploit the existing Arakawa-Lamb scheme for the traditional shallow water equations, reformulated by Salmon as a discretisation of the Hamiltonian and Poisson bracket for this system. The non-rotating, traditional, and our non-traditional shallow water equations all share the same continuous Hamiltonian structure and Poisson bracket, provided one distinguishes between the particle velocity and the canonical momentum per unit mass. We have determined a suitable discretisation of the non-traditional canonical momentum, which includes additional coupling between the layer thickness and velocity fields, and modified the discrete kinetic energy to suppress an internal symmetric computational instability that otherwise arises for multiple layers. The resulting scheme exhibits the expected second-order convergence under spatial grid refinement. We also show that the drifts in the discrete total energy and potential enstrophy due to temporal truncation error may be reduced to machine precision under suitable refinement of the timestep using the third-order Adams-Bashforth or fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration schemes.

  6. Numerical study of Alfvén eigenmodes in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Youjun; Li, Guoqiang; Yang, Wenjun; Zhou, Deng; Ren, Qilong; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Cai, Huishan

    2014-05-15

    Alfvén eigenmodes in up-down asymmetric tokamak equilibria are studied by a new magnetohydrodynamic eigenvalue code. The code is verified with the NOVA code for the Solovév equilibrium and then is used to study Alfvén eigenmodes in a up-down asymmetric equilibrium of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. The frequency and mode structure of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes are calculated. It is demonstrated numerically that up-down asymmetry induces phase variation in the eigenfunction across the major radius on the midplane.

  7. Simulation studies of the impact of advanced observing systems on numerical weather prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Kalnay, E.; Susskind, J.; Reuter, D.; Baker, W. E.; Halem, M.

    1984-01-01

    To study the potential impact of advanced passive sounders and lidar temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind observing systems on large-scale numerical weather prediction, a series of realistic simulation studies between the European Center for medium-range weather forecasts, the National Meteorological Center, and the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences is conducted. The project attempts to avoid the unrealistic character of earlier simulation studies. The previous simulation studies and real-data impact tests are reviewed and the design of the current simulation system is described. Consideration is given to the simulation of observations of space-based sounding systems.

  8. Advanced integration schemes for high-functionality/high-performance photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raring, James W.; Sysak, Matthew N.; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Dummer, Matthew; Skogen, Erik J.; Barton, Jonathon S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Coldren, Larry A.

    2006-02-01

    The evolution of optical communication systems has facilitated the required bandwidth to meet the increasing data rate demands. However, as the peripheral technologies have progressed to meet the requirements of advanced systems, an abundance of viable solutions and products have emerged. The finite market for these products will inevitably force a paradigm shift upon the communications industry. Monolithic integration is a key technology that will facilitate this shift as it will provide solutions at low cost with reduced power dissipation and foot-print in the form of highly functional optical components based on photonic integrated circuits (PICs). In this manuscript, we discuss the advantages, potential applications, and challenges of photonic integration. After a brief overview of various integration techniques, we present our novel approaches to increase the performance of the individual components comprising highly functional PICs.

  9. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven proton-boron fusion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Morrissey, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-02-01

    A low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with relatively low intensity (3 × 1016 W cm-2) was used to enhance the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the "ultraclean" proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha-particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as target. The combination of the specific target geometry and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed enhancing the yield of alpha-particles up to 109 per steradian, i.e 100 times higher than previous experimental achievements. Moreover the alpha particle stream presented a clearly peaked angular and energy distribution, which make this secondary source attractive for potential applications. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  10. A membrane-integrated advanced scheme for treatment of industrial wastewater: dynamic modeling towards scale up.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramesh; Pal, Parimal

    2013-08-01

    Modeling and simulation was carried out for an advanced membrane-integrated hybrid treatment process that ensures reuse of water with conversion and recovery of ammoniacal nitrogen as value-added struvite fertilizer from coke wastewater. While toxic cyanide was largely removed in a pre-chemical treatment unit using Fenton's reagents under optimized conditions, more than 95% of NH4(+)-N could be recovered as a valuable by-product called struvite through addition of appropriate doses of magnesium and phosphate salts. Water could be turned reusable through a polishing treatment by nanofiltration membranes in a largely fouling free membrane module following a biodegradation step. Mathematical modeling of such an integrated process was done with Haldane-Andrew approach for the associated microbial degradation of phenol by Pseudomonas putida. Residual NH4(+) was degraded by nitrification and denitrification following the modified Monod kinetics. The model could successfully predict the plant performance as reflected in reasonably low relative error (0.03-0.18) and high Willmott d-index (>0.98). PMID:23735488

  11. A review on recent advances in the numerical simulation for coalbed-methane-recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, X.R.; Wang, G.X.; Massarotto, P.; Golding, S.D.; Rudolph, V.

    2007-12-15

    The recent advances in numerical simulation for primary coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and enhanced coalbed-methane recovery (ECBMR) processes are reviewed, primarily focusing on the progress that has occurred since the late 1980s. Two major issues regarding the numerical modeling will be discussed in this review: first, multicomponent gas transport in in-situ bulk coal and, second, changes of coal properties during methane (CH{sub 4}) production. For the former issues, a detailed review of more recent advances in modeling gas and water transport within a coal matrix is presented. Further, various factors influencing gas diffusion through the coal matrix will be highlighted as well, such as pore structure, concentration and pressure, and water effects. An ongoing bottleneck for evaluating total mass transport rate is developing a reasonable representation of multiscale pore space that considers coal type and rank. Moreover, few efforts have been concerned with modeling water-flow behavior in the coal matrix and its effects on CH{sub 4} production and on the exchange of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and CH{sub 4}. As for the second issue, theoretical coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical models have been proposed to describe the evolution of pore structure during CH{sub 4} production, instead of traditional empirical equations. However, there is currently no effective coupled model for engineering applications. Finally, perspectives on developing suitable simulation models for CBM production and for predicting CO{sub 2}-sequestration ECBMR are suggested.

  12. Using the PPML approach for constructing a low-dissipation, operator-splitting scheme for numerical simulations of hydrodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, Igor; Vorobyov, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    An approach for constructing a low-dissipation numerical method is described. The method is based on a combination of the operator-splitting method, Godunov method, and piecewise-parabolic method on the local stencil. Numerical method was tested on a standard suite of hydrodynamic test problems. In addition, the performance of the method is demonstrated on a global test problem showing the development of a spiral structure in a gravitationally unstable gaseous galactic disk.

  13. An advanced numerical model for phase change problems in complicated geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khashan, Saud Abdel-Aziz

    1998-11-01

    An advanced fixed-grid enthalpy formulation based finite volume numerical method is developed to solve the phase change problems in complicated geometries. The numerical method is based on a general non-orthogonal grid structure and a colocated arrangement of variables. Second order discretizations and interpolations are used. The convergence rate is considerably accelerated by switching-off the velocity in the solidified region in an implicit way. This switching-off technique has a strong compatibility with SIMPLE-like methods. For all test cases conducted in this study, the rate of convergence using the new treatment exceeds that of the other enthalpy formulation-based methods and with less numerical stability constraints, when used in convection-diffusion phase change problems. For better run in vector computers, The Incomplete LU decomposition (ILU) matrix solver is partially vectorized. The Mflops (million floating point operation per second) number is raised from 60 to over 300. Water freezing in orthogonal and non-orthogonal geometry are studied under the effect of density inversion. All thermo-physical properties of the water are dealt with as temperature-dependent (no Boussinsq approximation). The results show a profound effect of density inversion on the flow/energy field and on the local as well as on the universal freezing rate.

  14. Improved scheme for parametrization of convection in the Met Office's Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneguz, Elena; Thomson, David; Witham, Claire; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta

    2015-04-01

    NAME is a Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model used by the Met Office to predict the dispersion of both natural and man-made contaminants in the atmosphere, e.g. volcanic ash, radioactive particles and chemical species. Atmospheric convection is responsible for transport and mixing of air resulting in a large exchange of heat and energy above the boundary layer. Although convection can transport material through the whole troposphere, convective clouds have a small horizontal length scale (of the order of few kilometres). Therefore, for large-scale transport the horizontal scale on which the convection exists is below the global NWP resolution used as input to NAME and convection must be parametrized. Prior to the work presented here, the enhanced vertical mixing generated by non-resolved convection was reproduced by randomly redistributing Lagrangian particles between the cloud base and cloud top with probability equal to 1/25th of the NWP predicted convective cloud fraction. Such a scheme is essentially diffusive and it does not make optimal use of all the information provided by the driving meteorological model. To make up for these shortcomings and make the parametrization more physically based, the convection scheme has been recently revised. The resulting version, presented in this paper, is now based on the balance equation between upward, entrainment and detrainment fluxes. In particular, upward mass fluxes are calculated with empirical formulas derived from Cloud Resolving Models and using the NWP convective precipitation diagnostic as closure. The fluxes are used to estimate how many particles entrain, move upward and detrain. Lastly, the scheme is completed by applying a compensating subsidence flux. The performance of the updated convection scheme is benchmarked against available observational data of passive tracers. In particular, radioxenon is a noble gas that can undergo significant long range transport: this study makes use of observations of

  15. Explicit robust schemes for implementation of a class of principal value-based constitutive models: Symbolic and numeric implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Saleeb, A. F.; Tan, H. Q.; Zhang, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The issue of developing effective and robust schemes to implement a class of the Ogden-type hyperelastic constitutive models is addressed. To this end, special purpose functions (running under MACSYMA) are developed for the symbolic derivation, evaluation, and automatic FORTRAN code generation of explicit expressions for the corresponding stress function and material tangent stiffness tensors. These explicit forms are valid over the entire deformation range, since the singularities resulting from repeated principal-stretch values have been theoretically removed. The required computational algorithms are outlined, and the resulting FORTRAN computer code is presented.

  16. Numerical approach for the voloxidation process of an advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Byung Heung; Jeong, Sang Mun; Seo, Chung-Seok

    2007-07-01

    A voloxidation process is adopted as the first step of an advanced spent fuel conditioning process in order to prepare the SF oxide to be reduced in the following electrolytic reduction process. A semi-batch type voloxidizer was devised to transform a SF pellet into powder. In this work, a simple reactor model was developed for the purpose of correlating a gas phase flow rate with an operation time as a numerical approach. With an assumption that a solid phase and a gas phase are homogeneous in a reactor, a reaction rate for an oxidation was introduced into a mass balance equation. The developed equation can describe a change of an outlet's oxygen concentration including such a case that a gas flow is not sufficient enough to continue a reaction at its maximum reaction rate. (authors)

  17. Direct numerical simulation of transitional and turbulent flow over a heated flat plate using finite-difference schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    1995-01-01

    This report deals with the direct numerical simulation of transitional and turbulent flow at low Mach numbers using high-order-accurate finite-difference techniques. A computation of transition to turbulence of the spatially-evolving boundary layer on a heated flat plate in the presence of relatively high freestream turbulence was performed. The geometry and flow conditions were chosen to match earlier experiments. The development of the momentum and thermal boundary layers was documented. Velocity and temperature profiles, as well as distributions of skin friction, surface heat transfer rate, Reynolds shear stress, and turbulent heat flux, were shown to compare well with experiment. The results indicate that the essential features of the transition process have been captured. The numerical method used here can be applied to complex geometries in a straightforward manner.

  18. Direct Numerical Simulation of Transitional and Turbulent Flow Over a Heated Flat Plate Using Finite-Difference Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    1995-01-01

    The work in this report was conducted at NASA Ames Research Center during the period from August 1993 to January 1995 deals with the direct numerical simulation of transitional and turbulent flow at low Mach numbers using high-order-accurate finite-difference techniques. A computation of transition to turbulence of the spatially-evolving boundary layer on a heated flat plate in the presence of relatively high freestream turbulence was performed. The geometry and flow conditions were chosen to match earlier experiments. The development of the momentum and thermal boundary layers was documented. Velocity and temperature profiles, as well as distributions of skin friction, surface heat transfer rate, Reynolds shear stress, and turbulent heat flux were shown to compare well with experiment. The numerical method used here can be applied to complex geometries in a straightforward manner.

  19. A Low-order Coupled Chemistry Meteorology Model for Testing Online and Offline Advanced Data Assimilation Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, M.; Haussaire, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Bocquet and Sakov have recently introduced a low-order model based on the coupling of thechaotic Lorenz-95 model which simulates winds along a mid-latitude circle, with thetransport of a tracer species advected by this wind field. It has been used to testadvanced data assimilation methods with an online model that couples meteorology andtracer transport. In the present study, the tracer subsystem of the model is replacedwith a reduced photochemistry module meant to emulate reactive air pollution. Thiscoupled chemistry meteorology model, the L95-GRS model, mimics continental andtranscontinental transport and photochemistry of ozone, volatile organic compounds andnitrogen dioxides.The L95-GRS is specially useful in testing advanced data assimilation schemes, such as theiterative ensemble Kalman smoother (IEnKS) that combines the best of ensemble andvariational methods. The model provides useful insights prior to any implementation ofthe data assimilation method on larger models. For instance, online and offline dataassimilation strategies based on the ensemble Kalman filter or the IEnKS can easily beevaluated with it. It allows to document the impact of species concentration observationson the wind estimation. The model also illustrates a long standing issue in atmosphericchemistry forecasting: the impact of the wind chaotic dynamics and of the chemical speciesnon-chaotic but highly nonlinear dynamics on the selected data assimilation approach.

  20. The role of numerical simulation for the development of an advanced HIFU system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Kohei; Narumi, Ryuta; Azuma, Takashi; Takagi, Shu; Matumoto, Yoichiro

    2014-10-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used clinically and is under clinical trials to treat various diseases. An advanced HIFU system employs ultrasound techniques for guidance during HIFU treatment instead of magnetic resonance imaging in current HIFU systems. A HIFU beam imaging for monitoring the HIFU beam and a localized motion imaging for treatment validation of tissue are introduced briefly as the real-time ultrasound monitoring techniques. Numerical simulations have a great impact on the development of real-time ultrasound monitoring as well as the improvement of the safety and efficacy of treatment in advanced HIFU systems. A HIFU simulator was developed to reproduce ultrasound propagation through the body in consideration of the elasticity of tissue, and was validated by comparison with in vitro experiments in which the ultrasound emitted from the phased-array transducer propagates through the acrylic plate acting as a bone phantom. As the result, the defocus and distortion of the ultrasound propagating through the acrylic plate in the simulation quantitatively agree with that in the experimental results. Therefore, the HIFU simulator accurately reproduces the ultrasound propagation through the medium whose shape and physical properties are well known. In addition, it is experimentally confirmed that simulation-assisted focus control of the phased-array transducer enables efficient assignment of the focus to the target. Simulation-assisted focus control can contribute to design of transducers and treatment planning.

  1. A new design of the LAPS land surface scheme for use over and through heterogeneous and non-heterogeneous surfaces: Numerical simulations and tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailovic, Dragutin T.; Lazic, Jelena; Leśny, Jacek; Olejnik, Janusz; Lalic, Branislava; Kapor, Darko; Cirisan, Ana

    2010-05-01

    Numerical simulations and tests with the recently redesigned land-air parameterization scheme (LAPS) are presented. In all experiments, supported either by one-point micrometeorological, 1D or 3D simulations, the attention has been directed to: (1) comparison of simulation outputs, expressing the energy transfer over and through heterogeneous and non-heterogeneous surfaces, versus observations and (2) analysis of uncertainties occurring in the solution of the energy balance equation at the land-air interface. To check the proposed method for aggregation of albedo, "propagating hole" sensitivity tests with LAPS over a sandstone rock grid cell have been performed with the forcing meteorological data for July 17, 1999 in Baxter site, Philadelphia (USA). Micrometeorological and biophysical measurements from the surface experiments conducted over crops and apple orchard in Serbia, Poland, Austria and France were used to test the operation of LAPS in calculating surface fluxes and canopy environment temperatures within and above plant covers of different densities. In addition, sensitivity tests with single canopy covers over the Central Europe region and comparison against the observations taken from SYNOP data using 3D simulations were made. Validation of LAPS performances over a solid surface has been done by comparison of 2 m air temperature observations against 5-day simulations over the Sahara Desert rocky ground using 3D model. To examine how realistically the LAPS simulates surface processes over a heterogeneous surface, we compared the air temperature measured at 2 m and that predicted by the 1D model with the LAPS as the surface scheme. Finally, the scheme behaviour over urban surface was tested by runs over different parts of a hypothetical urban area. The corresponding 1D simulations were carried out with an imposed meteorological dataset collected during HAPEX-MOBILHY experiment at Caumont (France). The quantities predicted by the LAPS compare well with the

  2. Numerical simulation of a dust event in northeastern Germany with a new dust emission scheme in COSMO-ART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deetz, K.; Klose, M.; Kirchner, I.; Cubasch, U.

    2016-02-01

    The dust emission scheme of Shao (2004) has been implemented into the regional atmospheric model COSMO-ART and has been applied to a severe dust event in northeastern Germany on 8th April 2011. The model sensitivity to soil moisture and vegetation cover has been studied. Soil moisture has been found to be relatively high in the model during the investigation period and has been reduced by different degree to investigate the resulting changes in dust emissions. Two different vegetation datasets have been tested as model input: the climatological vegetation cover data of COSMO-ART (ECOCLIMAP) and the SPOT5 remote sensing vegetation cover data for the time of the event. By varying soil moisture, vegetation cover and by restricting the potential emission area, a set of eleven simulations was generated. Vegetation cover during the event was about 24% lower on average compared to the climatological mean. Thus, dust emissions modeled with SPOT5 vegetation exceeded that modeled with climatological data by a factor of about 5. The modeled dust concentrations were compared with in-situ measurements of aerosol concentration. The temporal evolutions of simulations and observations have significant correlations (0.42-0.85) especially in rural backgrounds. The lower correlations at urban sites are attributed to anthropogenic PM10 sources, which are not included in the model. However, a verification of the magnitude of modeled dust concentrations is not possible due to the uncertainty in soil moisture and emission area.

  3. Numerical Analysis on a Flow Field of Liquid Metals Under a Magnetic Field, Using a Spectral Finite Difference Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Kichang; Mochimaru, Yoshihiro

    A steady-state axisymmetric flow field of a liquid metal in a coreless induction furnace under an axisymmetric magnetic field is analyzed numerically, using a spectral finite difference method. Vorticity-stream function formulation is used in conjunction with Maxwell's equations, in a boundary-fitted coordinate system. For boundary conditions, both no-slip on the wall and no shear stress tensor on the free surface are used as dynamic conditions, and a field equivalent to the magnetic field induced by external coils is adopted as an electromagnetic field condition. Presented are streamlines, magnetic streamlines, and radial profiles of the axial velocity component at two Reynolds numbers for various parameters. It is found that the flow field varies remarkably according to the Reynolds number, the dimensionless height of the liquid metal, and the dimensionless height of external coils.

  4. A numerical scheme for the identification of hybrid systems describing the vibration of flexible beams with tip bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, I. G.

    1984-01-01

    A cubic spline based Galerkin-like method is developed for the identification of a class of hybrid systems which describe the transverse vibration to flexible beams with attached tip bodies. The identification problem is formulated as a least squares fit to data subject to the system dynamics given by a coupled system of ordnary and partial differential equations recast as an abstract evolution equation (AEE) in an appropriate infinite dimensional Hilbert space. Projecting the AEE into spline-based subspaces leads naturally to a sequence of approximating finite dimensional identification problems. The solutions to these problems are shown to exist, are relatively easily computed, and are shown to, in some sense, converge to solutions to the original identification problem. Numerical results for a variety of examples are discussed.

  5. Impact of a variational objective analysis scheme on a regional area numerical model: The Italian Air Force Weather Service experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonavita, M.; Torrisi, L.

    2005-03-01

    A new data assimilation system has been designed and implemented at the National Center for Aeronautic Meteorology and Climatology of the Italian Air Force (CNMCA) in order to improve its operational numerical weather prediction capabilities and provide more accurate guidance to operational forecasters. The system, which is undergoing testing before operational use, is based on an “observation space” version of the 3D-VAR method for the objective analysis component, and on the High Resolution Regional Model (HRM) of the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD) for the prognostic component. Notable features of the system include a completely parallel (MPI+OMP) implementation of the solution of analysis equations by a preconditioned conjugate gradient descent method; correlation functions in spherical geometry with thermal wind constraint between mass and wind field; derivation of the objective analysis parameters from a statistical analysis of the innovation increments.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Optical Turbulence Using an Advanced Atmospheric Prediction Model: Implications for Adaptive Optics Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.

    2014-09-01

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from astronomical telescopes and reducing the data quality of optical imaging and communication links. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, so numerical simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using a multi-node linux cluster using the Intel chip architecture. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution and centered on the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) of the Big Island. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. The Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) TKE scheme has been modified to diagnose the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of the Richardson number, following observations by Kondo and others. This modification

  7. Development and validation of burnup dependent computational schemes for the analysis of assemblies with advanced lattice codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Karthikeyan

    The main aim of this research is the development and validation of computational schemes for advanced lattice codes. The advanced lattice code which forms the primary part of this research is "DRAGON Version4". The code has unique features like self shielding calculation with capabilities to represent distributed and mutual resonance shielding effects, leakage models with space-dependent isotropic or anisotropic streaming effect, availability of the method of characteristics (MOC), burnup calculation with reaction-detailed energy production etc. Qualified reactor physics codes are essential for the study of all existing and envisaged designs of nuclear reactors. Any new design would require a thorough analysis of all the safety parameters and burnup dependent behaviour. Any reactor physics calculation requires the estimation of neutron fluxes in various regions of the problem domain. The calculation goes through several levels before the desired solution is obtained. Each level of the lattice calculation has its own significance and any compromise at any step will lead to poor final result. The various levels include choice of nuclear data library and energy group boundaries into which the multigroup library is cast; self shielding of nuclear data depending on the heterogeneous geometry and composition; tracking of geometry, keeping error in volume and surface to an acceptable minimum; generation of regionwise and groupwise collision probabilities or MOC-related information and their subsequent normalization thereof, solution of transport equation using the previously generated groupwise information and obtaining the fluxes and reaction rates in various regions of the lattice; depletion of fuel and of other materials based on normalization with constant power or constant flux. Of the above mentioned levels, the present research will mainly focus on two aspects, namely self shielding and depletion. The behaviour of the system is determined by composition of resonant

  8. Implementation of Black Sea numerical model based on NEMO and 3DVAR data assimilation scheme for operational forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciliberti, Stefania Angela; Peneva, Elisaveta; Storto, Andrea; Rostislav, Kandilarov; Lecci, Rita; Yang, Chunxue; Coppini, Giovanni; Masina, Simona; Pinardi, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    This study describes a new model implementation for the Black Sea, which uses data assimilation, towards operational forecasting, based on NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean, Madec et al., 2012). The Black Sea domain is resolved with 1/27°×1/36° horizontal resolution (~3 km) and 31 z-levels with partial steps based on the GEBCO bathymetry data (Grayek et al., 2010). The model is forced by momentum, water and heat fluxes interactively computed by bulk formulae using high resolution atmospheric forcing provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Forecast (ECMWF). The initial condition is calculated from long-term climatological temperature and salinity 3D fields. Precipitation field over the basin has been computed from the climatological GPCP rainfall monthly data (Adler et al., 2003; Huffman et al., 2009), while the evaporation is derived from the latent heat flux. The climatological monthly mean runoff of the major rivers in the Black Sea is computed using the hydrological dataset provided by SESAME project (Ludvig et al., 2009). The exchange with Mediterranean Sea through the Bosporus Straits is represented by a surface boundary condition taking into account the barotropic transport calculated to balance the fresh water fluxes on monthly bases (Stanev and Beckers, 1999, Peneva et al., 2001). A multi-annual run 2011-2015 has been completed in order to describe the main characteristics of the Black Sea circulation dynamics and thermohaline structure and the numerical results have been validated using in-situ (ARGO) and satellite (SST, SLA) data. The Black Sea model represents also the core of the new Black Sea Forecasting System, implemented at CMCC operationally since January 2016, which produces at daily frequency 10-day forecasts, 3-days analyses and 1-day simulation. Once a week, the system is run 15-day in the past in analysis mode to compute the new optimal initial condition for the forecast cycle. The assimilation is performed by a

  9. Numerical Evaluation of Fluid Mixing Phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor Using Advanced Interface Tracking Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki

    Thermal-hydraulic design of the current boiling water reactor (BWR) is performed with the subchannel analysis codes which incorporated the correlations based on empirical results including actual-size tests. Then, for the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) core, an actual size test of an embodiment of its design is required to confirm or modify such correlations. In this situation, development of a method that enables the thermal-hydraulic design of nuclear reactors without these actual size tests is desired, because these tests take a long time and entail great cost. For this reason, we developed an advanced thermal-hydraulic design method for FLWRs using innovative two-phase flow simulation technology. In this study, a detailed Two-Phase Flow simulation code using advanced Interface Tracking method: TPFIT is developed to calculate the detailed information of the two-phase flow. In this paper, firstly, we tried to verify the TPFIT code by comparing it with the existing 2-channel air-water mixing experimental results. Secondary, the TPFIT code was applied to simulation of steam-water two-phase flow in a model of two subchannels of a current BWRs and FLWRs rod bundle. The fluid mixing was observed at a gap between the subchannels. The existing two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing is evaluated using detailed numerical simulation data. This data indicates that pressure difference between fluid channels is responsible for the fluid mixing, and thus the effects of the time average pressure difference and fluctuations must be incorporated in the two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing. When inlet quality ratio of subchannels is relatively large, it is understood that evaluation precision of the existing two-phase flow correlations for fluid mixing are relatively low.

  10. Investigation of upwind, multigrid, multiblock numerical schemes for three dimensional flows. Volume 1: Runge-Kutta methods for a thin layer Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannizzaro, Frank E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    A state-of-the-art computer code has been developed that incorporates a modified Runge-Kutta time integration scheme, upwind numerical techniques, multigrid acceleration, and multi-block capabilities (RUMM). A three-dimensional thin-layer formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations is employed. For turbulent flow cases, the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model is used. Two different upwind techniques are available: van Leer's flux-vector splitting and Roe's flux-difference splitting. Full approximation multi-grid plus implicit residual and corrector smoothing were implemented to enhance the rate of convergence. Multi-block capabilities were developed to provide geometric flexibility. This feature allows the developed computer code to accommodate any grid topology or grid configuration with multiple topologies. The results shown in this dissertation were chosen to validate the computer code and display its geometric flexibility, which is provided by the multi-block structure.

  11. Pollutant transport by shallow water equations on unstructured meshes: Hyperbolization of the model and numerical solution via a novel flux splitting scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzo, Davide; Siviglia, Annunziato; Toro, Eleuterio F.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, using the Cattaneo's relaxation approach, we reformulate the system of governing equations for the pollutant transport by shallow water flows over non-flat topography and anisotropic diffusion as hyperbolic balance laws with stiff source terms. The proposed relaxation system circumvents the infinite wave speed paradox which is inherent in standard advection-diffusion models. This turns out to give a larger stability range for the choice of the time step. Second, following a flux splitting approach, we derive a novel numerical method to discretise the resulting problem. In particular, we propose a new flux splitting and study the associated two systems of differential equations, called the "hydrodynamic" and the "relaxed diffusive" system, respectively. For the presented splitting we analyse the resulting two systems of differential equations and propose two discretisation schemes of the Godunov-type. These schemes are simple to implement, robust, accurate and fast when compared with existing methods. The resulting method is implemented on unstructured meshes and is systematically assessed for accuracy, robustness and efficiency on a carefully selected suite of test problems including non-flat topography and wetting and drying problems. Formal second order accuracy is assessed through convergence rates studies.

  12. Advanced Numerical Imaging Procedure Accounting for Non-Ideal Effects in GPR Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comite, Davide; Galli, Alessandro; Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    advanced implementation have also been tested by introducing 'errors' on the knowledge of the background medium permittivity, by simulating the presence of one or more layers, and by choosing different models of the surface roughness. The impact of these issues on the performance of both the conventional procedure and the advanced one will be extensively highlighted and discussed at the conference. [1] G. Valerio et al., "GPR detectability of rocks in a Martian-like shallow subsoil: A numerical approach," Plan. Sp. Sci., vol. 62, pp. 31-40, 2012. [2] A. Galli et al., "3D imaging of buried dielectric targets with a tomographic microwave approach applied to GPR synthetic data," Int. J. Antennas Propag., art. ID 610389, 10 pp., 2013 [3] F. Soldovieri et al., "A linear inverse scattering algorithm for realistic GPR applications," Near Surface Geophysics, 5 (1), pp. 29-42, 2007.

  13. Recent advances in theoretical and numerical studies of wire array Z-pinch in the IAPCM

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Ning Zhang, Yang Xiao, Delong Wu, Jiming Huang, Jun Yin, Li Sun, Shunkai Xue, Chuang Dai, Zihuan Ning, Cheng Shu, Xiaojian Wang, Jianguo Li, Hua

    2014-12-15

    Fast Z-pinch has produced the most powerful X-ray radiation source in laboratory and also shows the possibility to drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Recent advances in wire-array Z-pinch researches at the Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics are presented in this paper. A typical wire array Z-pinch process has three phases: wire plasma formation and ablation, implosion and the MRT instability development, stagnation and radiation. A mass injection model with azimuthal modulation coefficient is used to describe the wire initiation, and the dynamics of ablated plasmas of wire-array Z-pinches in (r, θ) geometry is numerically studied. In the implosion phase, a two-dimensional(r, z) three temperature radiation MHD code MARED has been developed to investigate the development of the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor(MRT) instability. We also analyze the implosion modes of nested wire-array and find that the inner wire-array is hardly affected before the impaction of the outer wire-array. While the plasma accelerated to high speed in the implosion stage stagnates on the axis, abundant x-ray radiation is produced. The energy spectrum of the radiation and the production mechanism are investigated. The computational x-ray pulse shows a reasonable agreement with the experimental result. We also suggest that using alloyed wire-arrays can increase multi-keV K-shell yield by decreasing the opacity of K-shell lines. In addition, we use a detailed circuit model to study the energy coupling between the generator and the Z-pinch implosion. Recently, we are concentrating on the problems of Z-pinch driven ICF, such as dynamic hohlraum and capsule implosions. Our numerical investigations on the interaction of wire-array Z-pinches on foam convertors show qualitative agreements with experimental results on the “Qiangguang I” facility. An integrated two-dimensional simulation of dynamic hohlraum driven capsule implosion provides us the physical insights of wire

  14. Recent advances in theoretical and numerical studies of wire array Z-pinch in the IAPCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ning; Zhang, Yang; Xiao, Delong; Wu, Jiming; Huang, Jun; Yin, Li; Sun, Shunkai; Xue, Chuang; Dai, Zihuan; Ning, Cheng; Shu, Xiaojian; Wang, Jianguo; Li, Hua

    2014-12-01

    Fast Z-pinch has produced the most powerful X-ray radiation source in laboratory and also shows the possibility to drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Recent advances in wire-array Z-pinch researches at the Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics are presented in this paper. A typical wire array Z-pinch process has three phases: wire plasma formation and ablation, implosion and the MRT instability development, stagnation and radiation. A mass injection model with azimuthal modulation coefficient is used to describe the wire initiation, and the dynamics of ablated plasmas of wire-array Z-pinches in (r, θ) geometry is numerically studied. In the implosion phase, a two-dimensional(r, z) three temperature radiation MHD code MARED has been developed to investigate the development of the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor(MRT) instability. We also analyze the implosion modes of nested wire-array and find that the inner wire-array is hardly affected before the impaction of the outer wire-array. While the plasma accelerated to high speed in the implosion stage stagnates on the axis, abundant x-ray radiation is produced. The energy spectrum of the radiation and the production mechanism are investigated. The computational x-ray pulse shows a reasonable agreement with the experimental result. We also suggest that using alloyed wire-arrays can increase multi-keV K-shell yield by decreasing the opacity of K-shell lines. In addition, we use a detailed circuit model to study the energy coupling between the generator and the Z-pinch implosion. Recently, we are concentrating on the problems of Z-pinch driven ICF, such as dynamic hohlraum and capsule implosions. Our numerical investigations on the interaction of wire-array Z-pinches on foam convertors show qualitative agreements with experimental results on the "Qiangguang I" facility. An integrated two-dimensional simulation of dynamic hohlraum driven capsule implosion provides us the physical insights of wire

  15. An Advanced Temporal Credential-Based Security Scheme with Mutual Authentication and Key Agreement for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Ta; Weng, Chi-Yao; Lee, Cheng-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) can be quickly and randomly deployed in any harsh and unattended environment and only authorized users are allowed to access reliable sensor nodes in WSNs with the aid of gateways (GWNs). Secure authentication models among the users, the sensor nodes and GWN are important research issues for ensuring communication security and data privacy in WSNs. In 2013, Xue et al. proposed a temporal-credential-based mutual authentication and key agreement scheme for WSNs. However, in this paper, we point out that Xue et al.'s scheme cannot resist stolen-verifier, insider, off-line password guessing, smart card lost problem and many logged-in users' attacks and these security weaknesses make the scheme inapplicable to practical WSN applications. To tackle these problems, we suggest a simple countermeasure to prevent proposed attacks while the other merits of Xue et al.'s authentication scheme are left unchanged. PMID:23887085

  16. An advanced temporal credential-based security scheme with mutual authentication and key agreement for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Ta; Weng, Chi-Yao; Lee, Cheng-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) can be quickly and randomly deployed in any harsh and unattended environment and only authorized users are allowed to access reliable sensor nodes in WSNs with the aid of gateways (GWNs). Secure authentication models among the users, the sensor nodes and GWN are important research issues for ensuring communication security and data privacy in WSNs. In 2013, Xue et al. proposed a temporal-credential-based mutual authentication and key agreement scheme for WSNs. However, in this paper, we point out that Xue et al.'s scheme cannot resist stolen-verifier, insider, off-line password guessing, smart card lost problem and many logged-in users' attacks and these security weaknesses make the scheme inapplicable to practical WSN applications. To tackle these problems, we suggest a simple countermeasure to prevent proposed attacks while the other merits of Xue et al.'s authentication scheme are left unchanged. PMID:23887085

  17. Development and validation of burnup dependent computational schemes for the analysis of assemblies with advanced lattice codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Karthikeyan

    The main aim of this research is the development and validation of computational schemes for advanced lattice codes. The advanced lattice code which forms the primary part of this research is "DRAGON Version4". The code has unique features like self shielding calculation with capabilities to represent distributed and mutual resonance shielding effects, leakage models with space-dependent isotropic or anisotropic streaming effect, availability of the method of characteristics (MOC), burnup calculation with reaction-detailed energy production etc. Qualified reactor physics codes are essential for the study of all existing and envisaged designs of nuclear reactors. Any new design would require a thorough analysis of all the safety parameters and burnup dependent behaviour. Any reactor physics calculation requires the estimation of neutron fluxes in various regions of the problem domain. The calculation goes through several levels before the desired solution is obtained. Each level of the lattice calculation has its own significance and any compromise at any step will lead to poor final result. The various levels include choice of nuclear data library and energy group boundaries into which the multigroup library is cast; self shielding of nuclear data depending on the heterogeneous geometry and composition; tracking of geometry, keeping error in volume and surface to an acceptable minimum; generation of regionwise and groupwise collision probabilities or MOC-related information and their subsequent normalization thereof, solution of transport equation using the previously generated groupwise information and obtaining the fluxes and reaction rates in various regions of the lattice; depletion of fuel and of other materials based on normalization with constant power or constant flux. Of the above mentioned levels, the present research will mainly focus on two aspects, namely self shielding and depletion. The behaviour of the system is determined by composition of resonant

  18. Advances in Analytical and Numerical Dispersion Modeling of Pollutants Releasing from an Area-source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmatoori, Praneeth

    The air quality near agricultural activities such as tilling, plowing, harvesting, and manure application is of main concern because they release fine particulate matter into the atmosphere. These releases are modeled as area-sources in the air quality modeling research. None of the currently available dispersion models relate and incorporate physical characteristics and meteorological conditions for modeling the dispersion and deposition of particulates emitting from such area-sources. This knowledge gap was addressed by developing the advanced analytical and numerical methods for modeling the dispersion of particulate matter. The development, application, and evaluation of new dispersion modeling methods are discussed in detail in this dissertation. In the analytical modeling, a ground-level area source analytical dispersion model known as particulate matter deposition -- PMD was developed for predicting the concentrations of different particle sizes. Both the particle dynamics (particle physical characteristics) and meteorological conditions which have significant effect on the dispersion of particulates were related and incorporated in the PMD model using the formulations of particle gravitational settling and dry deposition velocities. The modeled particle size concentrations of the PMD model were evaluated statistically after applying it to particulates released from a biosolid applied agricultural field. The evaluation of the PMD model using the statistical criteria concluded effective and successful inclusion of dry deposition theory for modeling particulate matter concentrations. A comprehensive review of analytical area-source dispersion models, which do not account for dry deposition and treat pollutants as gases, was conducted and determined three models -- the Shear, the Parker, and the Smith. A statistical evaluation of these dispersion models was conducted after applying them to two different field data sets and the statistical results concluded that

  19. Advanced material modelling in numerical simulation of primary acetabular press-fit cup stability.

    PubMed

    Souffrant, R; Zietz, C; Fritsche, A; Kluess, D; Mittelmeier, W; Bader, R

    2012-01-01

    Primary stability of artificial acetabular cups, used for total hip arthroplasty, is required for the subsequent osteointegration and good long-term clinical results of the implant. Although closed-cell polymer foams represent an adequate bone substitute in experimental studies investigating primary stability, correct numerical modelling of this material depends on the parameter selection. Material parameters necessary for crushable foam plasticity behaviour were originated from numerical simulations matched with experimental tests of the polymethacrylimide raw material. Experimental primary stability tests of acetabular press-fit cups consisting of static shell assembly with consecutively pull-out and lever-out testing were subsequently simulated using finite element analysis. Identified and optimised parameters allowed the accurate numerical reproduction of the raw material tests. Correlation between experimental tests and the numerical simulation of primary implant stability depended on the value of interference fit. However, the validated material model provides the opportunity for subsequent parametric numerical studies. PMID:22817471

  20. Free Radical Addition Polymerization Kinetics without Steady-State Approximations: A Numerical Analysis for the Polymer, Physical, or Advanced Organic Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Brown, Amber; Landis, Amanda; Schimke, Greg; Peters, George

    2014-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the free radical addition polymerization system is described that provides those teaching polymer, physical, or advanced organic chemistry courses the opportunity to introduce students to numerical methods in the context of a simple but mathematically stiff chemical kinetic system. Numerical analysis can lead students to an…

  1. Springback Simulation: Impact of Some Advanced Constitutive Models and Numerical Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddag, Badis; Balan, Tudor; Abed-Meraim, Farid

    2005-08-01

    The impact of material models on the numerical simulation of springback is investigated. The study is focused on the strain-path sensitivity of two hardening models. While both models predict the Bauschinger effect, their response in the transient zone after a strain-path change is fairly different. Their respective predictions are compared in terms of sequential test response and of strip-drawing springback. For this purpose, an accurate and general time integration algorithm has been developed and implemented in the Abaqus code. The impact of several numerical parameters is also studied in order to assess the overall accuracy of the finite element prediction. For some test geometries, both material and numerical parameters are shown to clearly influence the springback behavior at a large extent. Moreover, a general trend cannot always be extracted, thus justifying the need for the finite element simulation of the stamping process.

  2. A review of recent advances in numerical simulations of microscale fuel processor for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holladay, J. D.; Wang, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Microscale (<5 W) reformers for hydrogen production have been investigated for over a decade. These devices are intended to provide hydrogen for small fuel cells. Due to the reformer's small size, numerical simulations are critical to understand heat and mass transfer phenomena occurring in the systems and help guide the further improvements. This paper reviews the development of the numerical codes and details the reaction equations used. The majority of the devices utilized methanol as the fuel due to methanol's low reforming temperature and high conversion, although, there are several methane fueled systems. The increased computational power and more complex codes have led to improved accuracy of numerical simulations. Initial models focused on the reformer, while more recently, the simulations began including other unit operations such as vaporizers, inlet manifolds, and combustors. These codes are critical for developing the next generation systems. The systems reviewed included plate reactors, microchannel reactors, and annulus reactors for both wash-coated and packed bed systems.

  3. CNC Turning Center Advanced Operations. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-332.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronski, Steven D.; Tatum, Kenneth

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to introduce the student to the operations and functions of a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 presents course expectations and syllabus, covers safety precautions, and describes the CNC turning center components, CNC…

  4. A numerical technique for calculation of the noise of high-speed propellers with advanced blade geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nystrom, P. A.; Farassat, F.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical technique and computer program were developed for the prediction of the noise of propellers with advanced geometry. The blade upper and lower surfaces are described by a curvilinear coordinate system, which was also used to divide the blade surfaces into panels. Two different acoustic formulations in the time domain were used to improve the speed and efficiency of the noise calculations: an acoustic formualtion with the Doppler factor singularity for panels moving at subsonic speeds and the collapsing sphere formulation for panels moving at transonic or supersonic speeds. This second formulation involves a sphere which is centered at the observer position and whose radius decreases at the speed of sound. The acoustic equation consisted of integrals over the curve of intersection for both the sphere and the panels on the blade. Algorithms used in some parts of the computer program are discussed. Comparisons with measured acoustic data for two model high speed propellers with advanced geometry are also presented.

  5. Numerical assessment of radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers: advanced calculations and radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztejnberg Gonçalves-Carralves, Manuel L.; Jevremovic, Tatjana

    2007-07-01

    In our previous publication (Mundy et al 2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1377) we have described the theoretical assessment of our novel approach in radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers and summarized the future directions in this area of research. In this paper we advanced the numerical analysis to show the detailed radiation dose distribution for various neutron sources in combination with the required boron concentration and allowed radiation skin doses. We once again proved the feasibility of the concept and will use these data and conclusions to start with the experimental verifications.

  6. A review of recent advances of numerical simulations of microscale fuel processors for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    Microscale (<5W) reformers for hydrogen production have been investigated for over a decade. These devices are intended to provide hydrogen for small fuel cells. Due to the reformer’s small size, numerical simulations are critical to understand heat and mass transfer phenomena occurring in the systems. This paper reviews the development of the numerical codes and details the reaction equations used. The majority of the devices utilized methanol as the fuel due to methanol’s low reforming temperature and high conversion, although, there are several methane fueled systems. As computational power has decreased in cost and increased in availability, the codes increased in complexity and accuracy. Initial models focused on the reformer, while more recently, the simulations began including other unit operations such as vaporizers, inlet manifolds, and combustors. These codes are critical for developing the next generation systems. The systems reviewed included, plate reactors, microchannel reactors, annulus reactors, wash-coated, packed bed systems.

  7. Advanced Techniques for Seismic Protection of Historical Buildings: Experimental and Numerical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzolani, Federico M.

    2008-07-08

    The seismic protection of historical and monumental buildings, namely dating back from the ancient age up to the 20th Century, is being looked at with greater and greater interest, above all in the Euro-Mediterranean area, its cultural heritage being strongly susceptible to undergo severe damage or even collapse due to earthquake. The cultural importance of historical and monumental constructions limits, in many cases, the possibility to upgrade them from the seismic point of view, due to the fear of using intervention techniques which could have detrimental effects on their cultural value. Consequently, a great interest is growing in the development of sustainable methodologies for the use of Reversible Mixed Technologies (RMTs) in the seismic protection of the existing constructions. RMTs, in fact, are conceived for exploiting the peculiarities of innovative materials and special devices, and they allow ease of removal when necessary. This paper deals with the experimental and numerical studies, framed within the EC PROHITECH research project, on the application of RMTs to the historical and monumental constructions mainly belonging to the cultural heritage of the Euro-Mediterranean area. The experimental tests and the numerical analyses are carried out at five different levels, namely full scale models, large scale models, sub-systems, devices, materials and elements.

  8. Numerical Study on Crossflow Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Su-Jong; Sabharwall, Piyush; Kim, Eung-Soo

    2014-03-01

    Various fluids such as water, gases (helium), molten salts (FLiNaK, FLiBe) and liquid metal (sodium) are used as a coolant of advanced small modular reactors (SMRs). The printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) has been adopted as the intermediate and/or secondary heat exchanger of SMR systems because this heat exchanger is compact and effective. The size and cost of PCHE can be changed by the coolant type of each SMR. In this study, the crossflow PCHE analysis code for advanced small modular reactor has been developed for the thermal design and cost estimation of the heat exchanger. The analytical solution of single pass, both unmixed fluids crossflow heat exchanger model was employed to calculate a two dimensional temperature profile of a crossflow PCHE. The analytical solution of crossflow heat exchanger was simply implemented by using built in function of the MATLAB program. The effect of fluid property uncertainty on the calculation results was evaluated. In addition, the effect of heat transfer correlations on the calculated temperature profile was analyzed by taking into account possible combinations of primary and secondary coolants in the SMR systems. Size and cost of heat exchanger were evaluated for the given temperature requirement of each SMR.

  9. Numerical simulation and intercomparison of boundary layer structure with different PBL schemes in WRF using experimental observations at a tropical site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariprasad, K. B. R. R.; Srinivas, C. V.; Singh, A. Bagavath; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2014-08-01

    In this study the performance of seven PBL parameterizations in the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF-ARW) mesoscale model was tested at the tropical site Kalpakkam. Meteorological observations collected during an intense observation campaign for wind field modeling called Round Robin Exercise (RRE) were used for comparison. High resolution simulations were conducted for a warm summer condition on 22-24 September 2010. The observations included GPS Sonde vertical profiles, surface level data from meteorological towers and turbulent fluxes from sonic anemometers. Sensitivity experiments with seven PBL schemes [Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ), Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN), Quasi Normal Scale Elimination (QNSE), Yonsei University (YSU), Asymmetric Convective Model (ACM2), Bougeault-Lacarrére (BL), Bretherton-Park (UW)] indicated that while all the schemes similarly produced the stable boundary layer characteristics there were large differences in the convective daytime PBL. It has been found that while ACM2 and QNSE produced highly unstable and deep convective layers, the UW produced relatively shallow mixed layer and all other schemes (YSU, MYNN, MYJ, BL) produced intermediately deep convective layers. All the schemes well produced the vertical wind directional shear within the PBL. A wide variation in the eddy diffusivities was simulated by different PBL schemes in convective daytime condition. ACM2 and UW produced excessive diffusivities which led to relatively weaker winds, warmer and dryer mixed layers with these schemes. Overall the schemes MYNN and YSU simulated the various PBL quantities in better agreement with observations. The differences in the simulated PBL structures could be partly due to various surface layer formulations that produced variation in friction velocity and heat fluxes in each case.

  10. Numerical modelling of the groundwater inflow to an advancing open pit mine: Kolahdarvazeh pit, Central Iran.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Saeed; Doulati Ardejani, Faramarz; Aslani, Soheyla; Baafi, Ernest

    2014-12-01

    The groundwater inflow into a mine during its life and after ceasing operations is one of the most important concerns of the mining industry. This paper presents a hydrogeological assessment of the Irankuh Zn-Pb mine at 20 km south of Esfahan and 1 km northeast of Abnil in west-Central Iran. During mine excavation, the upper impervious bed of a confined aquifer was broken and water at high-pressure flowed into an open pit mine associated with the Kolahdarvazeh deposit. The inflow rates were 6.7 and 1.4 m(3)/s at the maximum and minimum quantities, respectively. Permeability, storage coefficient, thickness and initial head of the fully saturated confined aquifer were 3.5 × 10(-4) m/s, 0.2, 30 m and 60 m, respectively. The hydraulic heads as a function of time were monitored at four observation wells in the vicinity of the pit over 19 weeks and at an observation well near a test well over 21 h. In addition, by measuring the rate of pumping out from the pit sump, at a constant head (usually equal to height of the pit floor), the real inflow rates to the pit were monitored. The main innovations of this work were to make comparison between numerical modelling using a finite element software called SEEP/W and actual data related to inflow and extend the applicability of the numerical model. This model was further used to estimate the hydraulic heads at the observation wells around the pit over 19 weeks during mining operations. Data from a pump-out test and observation wells were used for model calibration and verification. In order to evaluate the model efficiency, the modelling results of inflow quantity and hydraulic heads were compared to those from analytical solutions, as well as the field data. The mean percent error in relation to field data for the inflow quantity was 0.108. It varied between 1.16 and 1.46 for hydraulic head predictions, which are much lower values than the mean percent errors resulted from the analytical solutions (from 1.8 to 5

  11. Advanced numerical modeling and hybridization techniques for third-generation infrared detector pixel arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Jonathan

    Infrared (IR) detectors are well established as a vital sensor technology for military, defense and commercial applications. Due to the expense and effort required to fabricate pixel arrays, it is imperative to develop numerical simulation models to perform predictive device simulations which assess device characteristics and design considerations. Towards this end, we have developed a robust three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation model for IR detector pixel arrays. We used the finite-difference time-domain technique to compute the optical characteristics including the reflectance and the carrier generation rate in the device. Subsequently, we employ the finite element method to solve the drift-diffusion equations to compute the electrical characteristics including the I(V) characteristics, quantum efficiency, crosstalk and modulation transfer function. We use our 3D numerical model to study a new class of detector based on the nBn-architecture. This detector is a unipolar unity-gain barrier device consisting of a narrow-gap absorber layer, a wide-gap barrier layer, and a narrow-gap collector layer. We use our model to study the underlying physics of these devices and to explain the anomalously long lateral collection lengths for photocarriers measured experimentally. Next, we investigate the crosstalk in HgCdTe photovoltaic pixel arrays employing a photon-trapping (PT) structure realized with a periodic array of pillars intended to provide broadband operation. The PT region drastically reduces the crosstalk; making the use of the PT structures not only useful to obtain broadband operation, but also desirable for reducing crosstalk, especially in small pitch detector arrays. Then, the power and flexibility of the nBn architecture is coupled with a PT structure to engineer spectrally filtering detectors. Last, we developed a technique to reduce the cost of large-format, high performance HgCdTe detectors by nondestructively screen-testing detector arrays prior

  12. Evaluation of Temperature Gradient in Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) by Numerical Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical model of heat transfer using combined conduction, radiation and convection in AADSF was used to evaluate temperature gradients in the vicinity of the crystal/melt interface for variety of hot and cold zone set point temperatures specifically for the growth of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT). Reverse usage of hot and cold zones was simulated to aid the choice of proper orientation of crystal/melt interface regarding residual acceleration vector without actual change of furnace location on board the orbiter. It appears that an additional booster heater will be extremely helpful to ensure desired temperature gradient when hot and cold zones are reversed. Further efforts are required to investigate advantages/disadvantages of symmetrical furnace design (i.e. with similar length of hot and cold zones).

  13. Numerical simulation of fine blanking process using fully coupled advanced constitutive equations with ductile damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labergere, C.; Saanouni, K.; Benafia, S.; Galmiche, J.; Sulaiman, H.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the modelling and adaptive numerical simulation of the fine blanking process. Thermodynamically-consistent constitutive equations, strongly coupled with ductile damage, together with specific boundary conditions (particular command of forces on blank holder and counterpunch) are presented. This model is implemented into ABAQUS/EXPLICIT using the Vumat user subroutine and connected with an adaptive 2D remeshing procedure. The different material parameters are identified for the steel S600MC using experimental tensile tests conducted until the final fracture. A parametric study aiming to examine the sensitivity of the process parameters (die radius, clearance die/punch) to the punch force and fracture surfaces topology (convex zone, sheared zone, fracture zone and the burr).

  14. Recent advances in methods for numerical solution of O.D.E. initial value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, T. D.; Oppenheim, A. K.; Pratt, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    In the mathematical modeling of physical systems, it is often necessary to solve an initial value problem (IVP), consisting of a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE). A typical program produces approximate solutions at certain mesh points. Almost all existing codes try to control the local truncation error, while the user is really interested in controlling the true or global error. The present investigation provides a review of recent advances regarding the solution of the IVP, giving particular attention to stiff systems. Stiff phenomena are customarily defined in terms of the eigenvalues of the Jacobian. There are, however, some difficulties connected with this approach. It is pointed out that an estimate of the Lipschitz constant proves to be a very practical way to determine the stiffness of a problem.

  15. Relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yimin; Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    Two relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods are presented for elliptic equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The first scheme is a pointwise-preconditioned Richardson relaxation scheme and the second is a line relaxation scheme. The line relaxation scheme provides an efficient and relatively simple approach for solving two-dimensional spectral equations. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods are given.

  16. A Correction Scheme for Thermal Conductivity Measurement Using the Comparative Cut-bar Technique Based on a 3D Numerical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas W. Marshall; Changhu Xing; Charles Folsom; Colby Jensen; Heng Ban

    2014-05-01

    As an important factor affecting the accuracy of the thermal conductivity measurement, systematic (bias) error in the guarded comparative axial heat flow (cut-bar) method was mostly neglected by previous researches. This bias is due primarily to the thermal conductivity mismatch between sample and meter bars (reference), which is common for a sample of unknown thermal conductivity. A correction scheme, based on a finite element simulation of the measurement system, was proposed to reduce the magnitude of the overall measurement uncertainty. This scheme was experimentally validated by applying corrections on four types of sample measurements in which the specimen thermal conductivity is much smaller, slightly smaller, equal and much larger than that of the meter bar. As an alternative to the optimum guarding technique proposed before, the correction scheme can be used to minimize uncertainty contribution from the measurement system with non-optimal guarding conditions. It is especially necessary for large thermal conductivity mismatches between sample and meter bars.

  17. Science-Based Approach for Advancing Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy: Integrating Numerical Simulations with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, F.; Kang, S.; Chamorro, L. P.; Hill, C.

    2011-12-01

    The field of MHK energy is still in its infancy lagging approximately a decade or more behind the technology and development progress made in wind energy engineering. Marine environments are characterized by complex topography and three-dimensional (3D) turbulent flows, which can greatly affect the performance and structural integrity of MHK devices and impact the Levelized Cost of Energy (LCoE). Since the deployment of multi-turbine arrays is envisioned for field applications, turbine-to-turbine interactions and turbine-bathymetry interactions need to be understood and properly modeled so that MHK arrays can be optimized on a site specific basis. Furthermore, turbulence induced by MHK turbines alters and interacts with the nearby ecosystem and could potentially impact aquatic habitats. Increased turbulence in the wake of MHK devices can also change the shear stress imposed on the bed ultimately affecting the sediment transport and suspension processes in the wake of these structures. Such effects, however, remain today largely unexplored. In this work a science-based approach integrating state-of-the-art experimentation with high-resolution computational fluid dynamics is proposed as a powerful strategy for optimizing the performance of MHK devices and assessing environmental impacts. A novel numerical framework is developed for carrying out Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) in arbitrarily complex domains with embedded MHK devices. The model is able to resolve the geometrical complexity of real-life MHK devices using the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method along with a wall model for handling the flow near solid surfaces. Calculations are carried out for an axial flow hydrokinetic turbine mounted on the bed of rectangular open channel on a grid with nearly 200 million grid nodes. The approach flow corresponds to fully developed turbulent open channel flow and is obtained from a separate LES calculation. The specific case corresponds to that studied

  18. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations

    PubMed Central

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. PMID:25024412

  19. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz

    2014-08-13

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. PMID:25024412

  20. Recent Advancements In The Numerical Simulation Of Non-Equilibrium Flows With Application To Monatomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapper, M. G.; Cambier, J.-L.; Bultel, A.; Magin, T. E.

    2011-05-01

    This paper summarizes our current efforts in developing numerical methods for the study of non- equilibrium, high-enthalpy plasma. We describe the general approach used in the model development, some of the problems to be solved and benchmarks showing current capabilities. In particular, we review the recent development of a collisional-radiative model coupled with a single-fluid, two-temperature convection model for the transport of shock-heated argon along with extensions to krypton and xenon. The model is used in a systematic approach to examine the effects of the collision cross sections on the shock structure, including the relaxation layer and subsequent radiative-cooling regime. We review recent results obtained and comparisons with previous experimental results obtained at the University of Toronto’s Institute of Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) and the Australian National University (ANU), which serve as benchmarks to the model. We also show results when unsteady and multi-dimensional effects are included, highlighting the importance of coupling between convective transport and kinetic processes in nonequilibrium flows. We then look at extending the model to both nozzle and external flows to study expansion regimes.

  1. Advancing Satellite-Based Flood Prediction in Complex Terrain Using High-Resolution Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Nikolopoulos, E. I.; Bartsotas, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    Floods constitute one of the most significant and frequent natural hazard in mountainous regions. Satellite-based precipitation products offer in many cases the only available source of QPE. However, satellite-based QPE over complex terrain suffer from significant bias that limits their applicability for hydrologic modeling. In this work we investigate the potential of a new correction procedure, which involves the use of high-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) model simulations to adjust satellite QPE. Adjustment is based on the pdf matching of satellite and NWP (used as reference) precipitation distribution. The impact of correction procedure on simulating the hydrologic response is examined for 15 storm events that generated floods over the mountainous Upper Adige region of Northern Italy. Atmospheric simulations were performed at 1-km resolution from a state-of-the-art atmospheric model (RAMS/ICLAMS). The proposed error correction procedure was then applied on the widely used TRMM 3B42 satellite precipitation product and the evaluation of the correction was based on independent in situ precipitation measurements from a dense rain gauge network (1 gauge / 70 km2) available in the study area. Satellite QPE, before and after correction, are used to simulate flood response using ARFFS (Adige River Flood Forecasting System), a semi-distributed hydrologic model, which is used for operational flood forecasting in the region. Results showed that bias in satellite QPE before correction was significant and had a tremendous impact on the simulation of flood peak, however the correction procedure was able to reduce bias in QPE and therefore improve considerably the simulated flood hydrograph.

  2. Analysis and design of numerical schemes for gas dynamics 1: Artificial diffusion, upwind biasing, limiters and their effect on accuracy and multigrid convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1994-01-01

    The theory of non-oscillatory scalar schemes is developed in this paper in terms of the local extremum diminishing (LED) principle that maxima should not increase and minima should not decrease. This principle can be used for multi-dimensional problems on both structured and unstructured meshes, while it is equivalent to the total variation diminishing (TVD) principle for one-dimensional problems. A new formulation of symmetric limited positive (SLIP) schemes is presented, which can be generalized to produce schemes with arbitrary high order of accuracy in regions where the solution contains no extrema, and which can also be implemented on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes. Systems of equations lead to waves traveling with distinct speeds and possibly in opposite directions. Alternative treatments using characteristic splitting and scalar diffusive fluxes are examined, together with modification of the scalar diffusion through the addition of pressure differences to the momentum equations to produce full upwinding in supersonic flow. This convective upwind and split pressure (CUSP) scheme exhibits very rapid convergence in multigrid calculations of transonic flow, and provides excellent shock resolution at very high Mach numbers.

  3. Numerical Investigation of a Cascaded Longitudinal Space-Charge Amplifier at the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2015-06-01

    In a cascaded longitudinal space-charge amplifier (LSCA), initial density noise in a relativistic e-beam is amplified via the interplay of longitudinal space charge forces and properly located dispersive sections. This type of amplification process was shown to potentially result in large final density modulations [1] compatible with the production of broadband electromagnetic radiation. The technique was recently demonstrated in the optical domain [2]. In this paper we investigate, via numerical simulations, the performances of a cascaded LSCA beamline at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). We especially explore the properties of the produced broadband radiation. Our studies have been conducted with a grid-less three-dimensional space-charge algorithm.

  4. Advancing Efficient All-Electron Electronic Structure Methods Based on Numeric Atom-Centered Orbitals for Energy Related Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Volker

    This talk describes recent advances of a general, efficient, accurate all-electron electronic theory approach based on numeric atom-centered orbitals; emphasis is placed on developments related to materials for energy conversion and their discovery. For total energies and electron band structures, we show that the overall accuracy is on par with the best benchmark quality codes for materials, but scalable to large system sizes (1,000s of atoms) and amenable to both periodic and non-periodic simulations. A recent localized resolution-of-identity approach for the Coulomb operator enables O (N) hybrid functional based descriptions of the electronic structure of non-periodic and periodic systems, shown for supercell sizes up to 1,000 atoms; the same approach yields accurate results for many-body perturbation theory as well. For molecular systems, we also show how many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral quasiparticle excitation energies can be efficiently yet accurately applied using basis sets of computationally manageable size. Finally, the talk highlights applications to the electronic structure of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite materials, as well as to graphene-based substrates for possible future transition metal compound based electrocatalyst materials. All methods described here are part of the FHI-aims code. VB gratefully acknowledges contributions by numerous collaborators at Duke University, Fritz Haber Institute Berlin, TU Munich, USTC Hefei, Aalto University, and many others around the globe.

  5. On the relation between adiabatic time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and the ΔSCF-DFT method. Introducing a numerically stable ΔSCF-DFT scheme for local functionals based on constricted variational DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Choon; Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Ziegler, Tom

    2015-07-01

    In ΔSCF density functional theory studies of a i → a transition one performs separate fully self-consistent field calculations on the ground state configuration (i)n (n = 1,2) and the excited state configuration (i)n - 1a. The excitation energy for the transition i → a is subsequently determined as the Kohn-Sham energy difference ΔEi → a = E[in - 1a] - E[in] between the ground state (i)n and the excited state configuration (i)n - 1a. The ΔSCF scheme has been applied extensively and works well for lower energy excitations provided that they can be represented by a single orbital replacement or transition i → a. However, for excitations of higher energy ΔSCF tends to become numerically unstable with a variational collapse to transitions of lower energy. We demonstrate here a numerically stable ΔSCF scheme for local functionals that is guaranteed not to collapse on excited configurations of lower energy as well as the ground state. The new scheme is based on constricted variational density functional theory in which the canonical ground state orbitals are allowed to relax (R-CV(∞)-DFT). Since it is restricted to a single orbital replacement i → a it is termed SOR-R-CV(∞)-DFT.

  6. Numerical Viscous Flow Analysis of an Advanced Semispan Diamond-Wing Model at High-Life Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, F.; Biedron, R. T.; Luckring, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Turbulent Navier-Stokes computational results are presented for an advanced diamond wing semispan model at low speed, high-lift conditions. The numerical results are obtained in support of a wind-tunnel test that was conducted in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The model incorporated a generic fuselage and was mounted on the tunnel sidewall using a constant width standoff. The analyses include: (1) the numerical simulation of the NTF empty, tunnel flow characteristics; (2) semispan high-lift model with the standoff in the tunnel environment; (3) semispan high-lift model with the standoff and viscous sidewall in free air; and (4) semispan high-lift model without the standoff in free air. The computations were performed at conditions that correspond to a nominal approach and landing configuration. The wing surface pressure distributions computed for the model in both the tunnel and in free air agreed well with the corresponding experimental data and they both indicated small increments due to the wall interference effects. However, the wall interference effects were found to be more pronounced in the total measured and the computed lift, drag and pitching moment due to standard induced up-flow effects. Although the magnitudes of the computed forces and moment were slightly off compared to the measured data, the increments due the wall interference effects were predicted well. The numerical predictions are also presented on the combined effects of the tunnel sidewall boundary layer and the standoff geometry on the fuselage fore-body pressure distributions and the resulting impact on the overall configuration longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics.

  7. Numerical Treatment of a Skew-Derivative Problem for the Laplace Equation in the Exterior of Open Arcs: One-Point Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolybasova, V. V.; Krutitskii, P. A.

    2010-09-01

    We consider a skew derivative problem for a function which is harmonic in the exterior of open arcs in a plane. This problem models electric current in a semiconductor film from electrodes of arbitrary shapes in the presence of a magnetic field. A numerical method for solving the problem is proposed. The method is based on the boundary integral equation approach. The proposed numerical method is tested for different values of parameters and different shapes of the electrodes.

  8. Re-evaluation of an Optimized Second Order Backward Difference (BDF2OPT) Scheme for Unsteady Flow Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Lockard, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent experience in the application of an optimized, second-order, backward-difference (BDF2OPT) temporal scheme is reported. The primary focus of the work is on obtaining accurate solutions of the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations over long periods of time for aerodynamic problems of interest. The baseline flow solver under consideration uses a particular BDF2OPT temporal scheme with a dual-time-stepping algorithm for advancing the flow solutions in time. Numerical difficulties are encountered with this scheme when the flow code is run for a large number of time steps, a behavior not seen with the standard second-order, backward-difference, temporal scheme. Based on a stability analysis, slight modifications to the BDF2OPT scheme are suggested. The performance and accuracy of this modified scheme is assessed by comparing the computational results with other numerical schemes and experimental data.

  9. High resolution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1983-01-01

    A class of new explicit second order accurate finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. These highly nonlinear schemes are obtained by applying a nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme to an appropriately modified flux function. The so-derived second order accurate schemes achieve high resolution while preserving the robustness of the original nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme. Numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the performance of these new schemes.

  10. Upwind schemes and bifurcating solutions in real gas computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, Ambady; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1992-01-01

    The area of high speed flow is seeing a renewed interest due to advanced propulsion concepts such as the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), Space Shuttle, and future civil transport concepts. Upwind schemes to solve such flows have become increasingly popular in the last decade due to their excellent shock capturing properties. In the first part of this paper the authors present the extension of the Osher scheme to equilibrium and non-equilibrium gases. For simplicity, the source terms are treated explicitly. Computations based on the above scheme are presented to demonstrate the feasibility, accuracy and efficiency of the proposed scheme. One of the test problems is a Chapman-Jouguet detonation problem for which numerical solutions have been known to bifurcate into spurious weak detonation solutions on coarse grids. Results indicate that the numerical solution obtained depends both on the upwinding scheme used and the limiter employed to obtain second order accuracy. For example, the Osher scheme gives the correct CJ solution when the super-bee limiter is used, but gives the spurious solution when the Van Leer limiter is used. With the Roe scheme the spurious solution is obtained for all limiters.

  11. Erratum: ``Orbital Advection by Interpolation: A Fast and Accurate Numerical Scheme for Super-Fast MHD Flows'' (ApJ, 177, 373 [2008])

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B M; Guan, X; Gammie, C F

    2008-06-24

    The descriptions of some of the numerical tests in our original paper are incomplete, making reproduction of the results difficult. We provide the missing details here. The relevant tests are described in section 4 of the original paper (Figures 8-11).

  12. Application of low dissipation and dispersion Runge-Kutta schemes to benchmark problems in computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, F. Q.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Manthey, J.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate accurate and efficient time advancing methods for computational aeroacoustics, where non-dissipative and non-dispersive properties are of critical importance. Our analysis pertains to the application of Runge-Kutta methods to high-order finite difference discretization. In many CFD applications, multi-stage Runge-Kutta schemes have often been favored for their low storage requirements and relatively large stability limits. For computing acoustic waves, however, the stability consideration alone is not sufficient, since the Runge-Kutta schemes entail both dissipation and dispersion errors. The time step is now limited by the tolerable dissipation and dispersion errors in the computation. In the present paper, it is shown that if the traditional Runge-Kutta schemes are used for time advancing in acoustic problems, time steps greatly smaller than that allowed by the stability limit are necessary. Low Dissipation and Dispersion Runge-Kutta (LDDRK) schemes are proposed, based on an optimization that minimizes the dissipation and dispersion errors for wave propagation. Optimizations of both single-step and two-step alternating schemes are considered. The proposed LDDRK schemes are remarkably more efficient than the classical Runge-Kutta schemes for acoustic computations. Numerical results of each Category of the Benchmark Problems are presented. Moreover, low storage implementations of the optimized schemes are discussed. Special issues of implementing numerical boundary conditions in the LDDRK schemes are also addressed.

  13. Numerical Investigation of Cross Flow Phenomena in a Tight-Lattice Rod Bundle Using Advanced Interface Tracking Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weizhong; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ose, Yasuo; Ohnuki, Akira; Akimoto, Hajime; Hotta, Akitoshi; Fujimura, Ken

    In relation to the design of an innovative FLexible-fuel-cycle Water Reactor (FLWR), investigation of thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles of the FLWR is being carried out at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The FLWR core adopts a tight triangular lattice arrangement with about 1 mm gap clearance between adjacent fuel rods. In view of importance of accurate prediction of cross flow between subchannels in the evaluation of the boiling transition (BT) in the FLWR core, this study presents a statistical evaluation of numerical simulation results obtained by a detailed two-phase flow simulation code, TPFIT, which employs an advanced interface tracking method. In order to clarify mechanisms of cross flow in such tight lattice rod bundles, the TPFIT is applied to simulate water-steam two-phase flow in two modeled subchannels. Attention is focused on instantaneous fluctuation characteristics of cross flow. With the calculation of correlation coefficients between differential pressure and gas/liquid mixing coefficients, time scales of cross flow are evaluated, and effects of mixing section length, flow pattern and gap spacing on correlation coefficients are investigated. Differences in mechanism between gas and liquid cross flows are pointed out.

  14. Nonstandard finite difference schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    1995-01-01

    The major research activities of this proposal center on the construction and analysis of nonstandard finite-difference schemes for ordinary and partial differential equations. In particular, we investigate schemes that either have zero truncation errors (exact schemes) or possess other significant features of importance for numerical integration. Our eventual goal is to bring these methods to bear on problems that arise in the modeling of various physical, engineering, and technological systems. At present, these efforts are extended in the direction of understanding the exact nature of these nonstandard procedures and extending their use to more complicated model equations. Our presentation will give a listing (obtained to date) of the nonstandard rules, their application to a number of linear and nonlinear, ordinary and partial differential equations. In certain cases, numerical results will be presented.

  15. Saturation-free numerical scheme for computing the flow past a lattice of airfoils and the determination of separation points in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A. G.

    2011-07-01

    A numerical method for computing the potential flow past a lattice of airfoils is described. The problem is reduced to a linear integrodifferential equation on the lattice contour, which is then approximated by a linear system of equations with the help of specially derived quadrature formulas. The quadrature formulas exhibit exponential convergence in the number of points on an airfoil and have a simple analytical form. Due to its fast convergence and high accuracy, the method can be used to directly optimize the airfoils as based on any given integral characteristics. The shear stress distribution and the separation points are determined from the velocity distribution at the airfoil boundary calculated by solving the boundary layer equations. The method proposed is free of laborious grid generation procedures and does not involve difficulties associated with numerical viscosity at high Reynolds numbers.

  16. Trefftz difference schemes on irregular stencils

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukerman, Igor

    2010-04-20

    The recently developed Flexible Local Approximation MEthod (FLAME) produces accurate difference schemes by replacing the usual Taylor expansion with Trefftz functions - local solutions of the underlying differential equation. This paper advances and casts in a general form a significant modification of FLAME proposed recently by Pinheiro and Webb: a least-squares fit instead of the exact match of the approximate solution at the stencil nodes. As a consequence of that, FLAME schemes can now be generated on irregular stencils with the number of nodes substantially greater than the number of approximating functions. The accuracy of the method is preserved but its robustness is improved. For demonstration, the paper presents a number of numerical examples in 2D and 3D: electrostatic (magnetostatic) particle interactions, scattering of electromagnetic (acoustic) waves, and wave propagation in a photonic crystal. The examples explore the role of the grid and stencil size, of the number of approximating functions, and of the irregularity of the stencils.

  17. Multi-moment advection scheme in three dimension for Vlasov simulations of magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Takashi; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Amano, Takanobu

    2013-03-01

    We present an extension of the multi-moment advection scheme [T. Minoshima, Y. Matsumoto, T. Amano, Multi-moment advection scheme for Vlasov simulations, Journal of Computational Physics 230 (2011) 6800–6823] to the three-dimensional case, for full electromagnetic Vlasov simulations of magnetized plasma. The scheme treats not only point values of a profile but also its zeroth to second order piecewise moments as dependent variables, and advances them on the basis of their governing equations. Similar to the two-dimensional scheme, the three-dimensional scheme can accurately solve the solid body rotation problem of a gaussian profile with little numerical dispersion or diffusion. This is a very important property for Vlasov simulations of magnetized plasma. We apply the scheme to electromagnetic Vlasov simulations. Propagation of linear waves and nonlinear evolution of the electron temperature anisotropy instability are successfully simulated with a good accuracy of the energy conservation.

  18. Stability analysis of pressure correction schemes for the Navier–Stokes equations with traction boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghyun; Salgado, Abner J.

    2016-09-01

    We present a stability analysis for two different rotational pressure correction schemes with open and traction boundary conditions. First, we provide a stability analysis for a rotational version of the grad-div stabilized scheme of [A. Bonito, J.-L. Guermond, and S. Lee. Modified pressure-correction projection methods: Open boundary and variable time stepping. In Numerical Mathematics and Advanced Applications - ENUMATH 2013, volume 103 of Lecture Notes in Computational Science and Engineering, pages 623-631. Springer, 2015]. This scheme turns out to be unconditionally stable, provided the stabilization parameter is suitably chosen. We also establish a conditional stability result for the boundary correction scheme presented in [E. Bansch. A finite element pressure correction scheme for the Navier-Stokes equations with traction boundary condition. Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg., 279:198-211, 2014]. These results are shown by employing the equivalence between stabilized gauge Uzawa methods and rotational pressure correction schemes with traction boundary conditions.

  19. Low-dissipation and -dispersion Runge-Kutta schemes for computational acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, F. Q.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Manthey, J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate accurate and efficient time advancing methods for computational acoustics, where non-dissipative and non-dispersive properties are of critical importance. Our analysis pertains to the application of Runge-Kutta methods to high-order finite difference discretization. In many CFD applications multi-stage Runge-Kutta schemes have often been favored for their low storage requirements and relatively large stability limits. For computing acoustic waves, however, the stability consideration alone is not sufficient, since the Runge-Kutta schemes entail both dissipation and dispersion errors. The time step is now limited by the tolerable dissipation and dispersion errors in the computation. In the present paper, it is shown that if the traditional Runge-Kutta schemes are used for time advancing in acoustic problems, time steps greatly smaller than that allowed by the stability limit are necessary. Low-Dissipation and -Dispersion Runge-Kutta (LDDRE) schemes are proposed, based on an optimization that minimizes the dissipation and dispersion errors for wave propagation. Order optimizations of both single-step and two-step alternating schemes are considered. The proposed LDDRK schemes are remarkably more efficient than the classical Runge-Kutta schemes for acoustic computations. Moreover, low storage implementations of the optimized schemes are discussed. Special issues of implementing numerical boundary conditions in the LDDRK schemes are also addressed.

  20. Grid-independent upwind scheme for multidimensional flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parpia, Ijaz H.; Michalek, Donna J.

    1993-01-01

    Recent advances in the development of a grid-independent finite volume scheme for the Euler equations of gas dynamics are described. In the proposed method, flowfield gradient data are reconstructed locally (on a triangle) using five elementary planar waves, and an upwind numerical flux function for grid-oblique waves is developed to model the effect of the passage of these waves on the data in a cell. Numerical examples for several two-dimensional test problems are included. These results show high wave resolution and nearly monotone strong-wave transitions.

  1. New, Improved Bulk-microphysical Schemes for Studying Precipitation Processes in WRF. Part 1; Comparisons with Other Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Shi, J.; Chen, S. S> ; Lang, S.; Hong, S.-Y.; Thompson, G.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Hou, A.; Braun, S.; Simpson, J.

    2007-01-01

    Advances in computing power allow atmospheric prediction models to be mn at progressively finer scales of resolution, using increasingly more sophisticated physical parameterizations and numerical methods. The representation of cloud microphysical processes is a key component of these models, over the past decade both research and operational numerical weather prediction models have started using more complex microphysical schemes that were originally developed for high-resolution cloud-resolving models (CRMs). A recent report to the United States Weather Research Program (USWRP) Science Steering Committee specifically calls for the replacement of implicit cumulus parameterization schemes with explicit bulk schemes in numerical weather prediction (NWP) as part of a community effort to improve quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF). An improved Goddard bulk microphysical parameterization is implemented into a state-of the-art of next generation of Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. High-resolution model simulations are conducted to examine the impact of microphysical schemes on two different weather events (a midlatitude linear convective system and an Atllan"ic hurricane). The results suggest that microphysics has a major impact on the organization and precipitation processes associated with a summer midlatitude convective line system. The 31CE scheme with a cloud ice-snow-hail configuration led to a better agreement with observation in terms of simulated narrow convective line and rainfall intensity. This is because the 3ICE-hail scheme includes dense ice precipitating (hail) particle with very fast fall speed (over 10 m/s). For an Atlantic hurricane case, varying the microphysical schemes had no significant impact on the track forecast but did affect the intensity (important for air-sea interaction)

  2. Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  3. Numerical Modeling for Hole-Edge Cracking of Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) Components in the Static Bend Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Mohr, William; Yang, Yu-Ping; Zelenak, Paul; Kimchi, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    Numerical modeling of local formability, such as hole-edge cracking and shear fracture in bending of AHSS, is one of the challenging issues for simulation engineers for prediction and evaluation of stamping and crash performance of materials. This is because continuum-mechanics-based finite element method (FEM) modeling requires additional input data, "failure criteria" to predict the local formability limit of materials, in addition to the material flow stress data input for simulation. This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for predicting hole-edge failures during static bend tests of AHSS structures. A local-strain-based failure criterion and a stress-triaxiality-based failure criterion were developed and implemented in LS-DYNA simulation code to predict hole-edge failures in component bend tests. The holes were prepared using two different methods: mechanical punching and water-jet cutting. In the component bend tests, the water-jet trimmed hole showed delayed fracture at the hole-edges, while the mechanical punched hole showed early fracture as the bending angle increased. In comparing the numerical modeling and test results, the load-displacement curve, the displacement at the onset of cracking, and the final crack shape/length were used. Both failure criteria also enable the numerical model to differentiate between the local formability limit of mechanical-punched and water-jet-trimmed holes. The failure criteria and static bend test developed here are useful to evaluate the local formability limit at a structural component level for automotive crash tests.

  4. Simplification of the unified gas kinetic scheme.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songze; Guo, Zhaoli; Xu, Kun

    2016-08-01

    The unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) is an asymptotic preserving (AP) scheme for kinetic equations. It is superior for transition flow simulation and has been validated in the past years. However, compared to the well-known discrete ordinate method (DOM), which is a classical numerical method solving the kinetic equations, the UGKS needs more computational resources. In this study, we propose a simplification of the unified gas kinetic scheme. It allows almost identical numerical cost as the DOM, but predicts numerical results as accurate as the UGKS. In the simplified scheme, the numerical flux for the velocity distribution function and the numerical flux for the macroscopic conservative quantities are evaluated separately. The equilibrium part of the UGKS flux is calculated by analytical solution instead of the numerical quadrature in velocity space. The simplification is equivalent to a flux hybridization of the gas kinetic scheme for the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations and the conventional discrete ordinate method. Several simplification strategies are tested, through which we can identify the key ingredient of the Navier-Stokes asymptotic preserving property. Numerical tests show that, as long as the collision effect is built into the macroscopic numerical flux, the numerical scheme is Navier-Stokes asymptotic preserving, regardless the accuracy of the microscopic numerical flux for the velocity distribution function. PMID:27627418

  5. Multi-resolution analysis for ENO schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, Ami

    1993-01-01

    Given a function u(x) which is represented by its cell-averages in cells which are formed by some unstructured grid, we show how to decompose the function into various scales of variation. This is done by considering a set of nested grids in which the given grid is the finest, and identifying in each locality the coarsest grid in the set from which u(x) can be recovered to a prescribed accuracy. We apply this multi-resolution analysis to Essentially Non-oscillatory Schemes (ENO) schemes in order to reduce the number of numerical flux computations which is needed in order to advance the solution by one time-step. This is accomplished by decomposing the numerical solution at the beginning of each time-step into levels of resolution, and performing the computation in each locality at the appropriate coarser grid. We present an efficient algorithm for implementing this program in the one-dimensional case; this algorithm can be extended to the multi-dimensional case with cartesian grids.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Recent advances in jointed quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations of biological macromolecules: schemes and applications coupled to ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Yohsuke; Tateno, Masaru

    2010-10-01

    We review the recent research on the functional mechanisms of biological macromolecules using theoretical methodologies coupled to ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) treatments of reaction centers in proteins and nucleic acids. Since in most cases such biological molecules are large, the computational costs of performing ab initio calculations for the entire structures are prohibitive. Instead, simulations that are jointed with molecular mechanics (MM) calculations are crucial to evaluate the long-range electrostatic interactions, which significantly affect the electronic structures of biological macromolecules. Thus, we focus our attention on the methodologies/schemes and applications of jointed QM/MM calculations, and discuss the critical issues to be elucidated in biological macromolecular systems.

  7. Impact of precipitating ice on the simulation of a heavy rainfall event with advanced research WRF using two bulk microphysical schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, G. A.; Zoumakis, N. M.; Melas, D.; Kassomenos, P.

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model version 3.2 is used to examine the impact of precipitating ice and especially snow-graupel partitioning in the simulation of a heavy rainfall event over Chalkidiki peninsula in Northern Greece. This major precipitation event, associated with a case of cyclogenesis over the Aegean Sea, occurred on the 8th of October 2006 causing severe flooding and damage. Two widely used microphysical parameterizations, the Purdue Lin (PLIN) and WRF Single-Moment 6-class scheme (WSM6) are compared with available raingauge measurements over the complex topography of Chalkidiki. To further investigate the importance of snow and graupel relative mass content and the treatment of precipitating ice sedimentation velocity, two older versions of the WSM6 scheme were compiled and run with the current model. The verification results indicate that all simulations were found to match raingauge data more closely over the eastern mountainous Chalkidiki peninsula where maximum accumulations were observed. In other stations all schemes overestimate 24h accumulated rainfall except a station situated at the western part of the peninsula, where none of the simulations was able to reproduce observed rainfall. Graupel dominance in PLIN generates rapid precipitation fallout at the point of maximum predicted 24h accumulation. Similar behavior is shown in WSM6 from WRF version 2, but with significant less rainfall. Increasing snow amounts aloft, due to the unified treatment of precipitating ice in WSM6 from WRF version 3, modifies rain dynamics which decrease rainfall rates, but increases 24h accumulations. A sensitivity experiment where PLIN is used with snow accretion by graupel turned off, indicated that this process seems to be the most important factor controlling the differences in surface precipitation between PLIN and WSM6 from WRF version 3, determining the spatial and temporal distribution of this heavy precipitation event. The

  8. Multi-resolution analysis for ENO schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, Ami

    1991-01-01

    Given an function, u(x), which is represented by its cell-averages in cells which are formed by some unstructured grid, we show how to decompose the function into various scales of variation. This is done by considering a set of nested grids in which the given grid is the finest, and identifying in each locality the coarsest grid in the set from which u(x) can be recovered to a prescribed accuracy. This multi-resolution analysis was applied to essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) schemes in order to advance the solution by one time-step. This is accomplished by decomposing the numerical solution at the beginning of each time-step into levels of resolution, and performing the computation in each locality at the appropriate coarser grid. An efficient algorithm for implementing this program in the 1-D case is presented; this algorithm can be extended to the multi-dimensional case with Cartesian grids.

  9. Advanced numerical technique for analysis of surface and bulk acoustic waves in resonators using periodic metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, Natalya F.

    2014-09-01

    A numerical technique characterized by a unified approach for the analysis of different types of acoustic waves utilized in resonators in which a periodic metal grating is used for excitation and reflection of such waves is described. The combination of the Finite Element Method analysis of the electrode domain with the Spectral Domain Analysis (SDA) applied to the adjacent upper and lower semi-infinite regions, which may be multilayered and include air as a special case of a dielectric material, enables rigorous simulation of the admittance in resonators using surface acoustic waves, Love waves, plate modes including Lamb waves, Stonely waves, and other waves propagating along the interface between two media, and waves with transient structure between the mentioned types. The matrix formalism with improved convergence incorporated into SDA provides fast and robust simulation for multilayered structures with arbitrary thickness of each layer. The described technique is illustrated by a few examples of its application to various combinations of LiNbO3, isotropic silicon dioxide and silicon with a periodic array of Cu electrodes. The wave characteristics extracted from the admittance functions change continuously with the variation of the film and plate thicknesses over wide ranges, even when the wave nature changes. The transformation of the wave nature with the variation of the layer thicknesses is illustrated by diagrams and contour plots of the displacements calculated at resonant frequencies.

  10. Numerical Modeling for Springback Predictions by Considering the Variations of Elastic Modulus in Stamping Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Kimchi, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for predicting springback by considering the variations of elastic modulus on springback in stamping AHSS. Various stamping tests and finite-element method (FEM) simulation codes were used in this study. The cyclic loading-unloading tensile tests were conducted to determine the variations of elastic modulus for dual-phase (DP) 780 sheet steel. The biaxial bulge test was used to obtain plastic flow stress data. The non-linear reduction of elastic modulus for increasing the plastic strain was formulated by using the Yoshida model that was implemented in FEM simulations for springback. To understand the effects of material properties on springback, experiments were conducted with a simple geometry such as U-shape bending and the more complex geometry such as the curved flanging and S-rail stamping. Different measurement methods were used to confirm the final part geometry. Two different commercial FEM codes, LS-DYNA and DEFORM, were used to compare the experiments. The variable elastic modulus improved springback predictions in U-shape bending and curved flanging tests compared to FEM with the constant elastic modulus. However, in S-rail stamping tests, both FEM models with the isotropic hardening model showed limitations in predicting the sidewall curl of the S-rail part after springback. To consider the kinematic hardening and Bauschinger effects that result from material bending-unbending in S-rail stamping, the Yoshida model was used for FEM simulation of S-rail stamping and springback. The FEM predictions showed good improvement in correlating with experiments.

  11. Splitting scheme for poroelasticity and thermoelasticity problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vabishchevich, P. N.; Vasil'eva, M. V.; Kolesov, A. E.

    2014-08-01

    Boundary value problems in thermoelasticity and poroelasticity (filtration consolidation) are solved numerically. The underlying system of equations consists of the Lamé stationary equations for displacements and nonstationary equations for temperature or pressure in the porous medium. The numerical algorithm is based on a finite-element approximation in space. Standard stability conditions are formulated for two-level schemes with weights. Such schemes are numerically implemented by solving a system of coupled equations for displacements and temperature (pressure). Splitting schemes with respect to physical processes are constructed, in which the transition to a new time level is associated with solving separate elliptic problems for the desired displacements and temperature (pressure). Unconditionally stable additive schemes are constructed by choosing a weight of a three-level scheme.

  12. Structural stability of Lattice Boltzmann schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Claire; Sagaut, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this work is to determine classes of traveling solitary wave solutions for Lattice Boltzmann schemes by means of a hyperbolic ansatz. It is shown that spurious solitary waves can occur in finite-difference solutions of nonlinear wave equation. The occurrence of such a spurious solitary wave, which exhibits a very long life time, results in a non-vanishing numerical error for arbitrary time in unbounded numerical domain. Such a behavior is referred here to have a structural instability of the scheme, since the space of solutions spanned by the numerical scheme encompasses types of solutions (solitary waves in the present case) that are not solutions of the original continuous equations. This paper extends our previous work about classical schemes to Lattice Boltzmann schemes (David and Sagaut 2011; 2009a,b; David et al. 2007).

  13. The basic function scheme of polynomial type

    SciTech Connect

    WU, Wang-yi; Lin, Guang

    2009-12-01

    A new numerical method---Basic Function Method is proposed. This method can directly discrete differential operator on unstructured grids. By using the expansion of basic function to approach the exact function, the central and upwind schemes of derivative are constructed. By using the second-order polynomial as basic function and applying the technique of flux splitting method and the combination of central and upwind schemes to suppress the non-physical fluctuation near the shock wave, the second-order basic function scheme of polynomial type for solving inviscid compressible flow numerically is constructed in this paper. Several numerical results of many typical examples for two dimensional inviscid compressible transonic and supersonic steady flow illustrate that it is a new scheme with high accuracy and high resolution for shock wave. Especially, combining with the adaptive remeshing technique, the satisfactory results can be obtained by these schemes.

  14. Numerical evaluation of longitudinal motions of Wigley hulls advancing in waves by using Bessho form translating-pulsating source Green'S function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wenbin; Dong, Wencai

    2016-06-01

    In the framework of 3D potential flow theory, Bessho form translating-pulsating source Green's function in frequency domain is chosen as the integral kernel in this study and hybrid source-and-dipole distribution model of the boundary element method is applied to directly solve the velocity potential for advancing ship in regular waves. Numerical characteristics of the Green function show that the contribution of local-flow components to velocity potential is concentrated at the nearby source point area and the wave component dominates the magnitude of velocity potential in the far field. Two kinds of mathematical models, with or without local-flow components taken into account, are adopted to numerically calculate the longitudinal motions of Wigley hulls, which demonstrates the applicability of translating-pulsating source Green's function method for various ship forms. In addition, the mesh analysis of discrete surface is carried out from the perspective of ship-form characteristics. The study shows that the longitudinal motion results by the simplified model are somewhat greater than the experimental data in the resonant zone, and the model can be used as an effective tool to predict ship seakeeping properties. However, translating-pulsating source Green function method is only appropriate for the qualitative analysis of motion response in waves if the ship geometrical shape fails to satisfy the slender-body assumption.

  15. Towards Direct Numerical Simulation of mass and energy fluxes at the soil-atmospheric interface with advanced Lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Krafczyk, Manfred; Geier, Martin; Schönherr, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of soil evaporation and of soil water content dynamics near the soil surface are critical in the physics of land-surface processes on many scales and are dominated by multi-component and multi-phase mass and energy fluxes between the ground and the atmosphere. Although it is widely recognized that both liquid and gaseous water movement are fundamental factors in the quantification of soil heat flux and surface evaporation, their computation has only started to be taken into account using simplified macroscopic models. As the flow field over the soil can be safely considered as turbulent, it would be natural to study the detailed transient flow dynamics by means of Large Eddy Simulation (LES [1]) where the three-dimensional flow field is resolved down to the laminar sub-layer. Yet this requires very fine resolved meshes allowing a grid resolution of at least one order of magnitude below the typical grain diameter of the soil under consideration. In order to gain reliable turbulence statistics, up to several hundred eddy turnover times have to be simulated which adds up to several seconds of real time. Yet, the time scale of the receding saturated water front dynamics in the soil is on the order of hours. Thus we are faced with the task of solving a transient turbulent flow problem including the advection-diffusion of water vapour over the soil-atmospheric interface represented by a realistic tomographic reconstruction of a real porous medium taken from laboratory probes. Our flow solver is based on the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) [2] which has been extended by a Cumulant approach similar to the one described in [3,4] to minimize the spurious coupling between the degrees of freedom in previous LBM approaches and can be used as an implicit LES turbulence model due to its low numerical dissipation and increased stability at high Reynolds numbers. The kernel has been integrated into the research code Virtualfluids [5] and delivers up to 30% of the

  16. High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    A new third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially NonOscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme for scalar and vector linear hyperbolic equations with piecewise continuous initial conditions is developed. The new scheme is proven to be stable in the energy norm for both continuous and discontinuous solutions. In contrast to the existing high-resolution shock-capturing schemes, no assumption that the reconstruction should be total variation bounded (TVB) is explicitly required to prove stability of the new scheme. A rigorous truncation error analysis is presented showing that the accuracy of the 3rd-order ESWENO scheme is drastically improved if the tuning parameters of the weight functions satisfy certain criteria. Numerical results show that the new ESWENO scheme is stable and significantly outperforms the conventional third-order WENO finite difference scheme of Jiang and Shu in terms of accuracy, while providing essentially nonoscillatory solutions near strong discontinuities.

  17. Efficient implementation of weighted ENO schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Guang-Shan; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we further analyze, test, modify and improve the high order WENO (weighted essentially non-oscillatory) finite difference schemes of Liu, Osher and Chan. It was shown by Liu et al. that WENO schemes constructed from the r-th order (in L1 norm) ENO schemes are (r+1)-th order accurate. We propose a new way of measuring the smoothness of a numerical solution, emulating the idea of minimizing the total variation of the approximation, which results in a 5-th order WENO scheme for the case r = 3, instead of the 4-th order with the original smoothness measurement by Liu et al. This 5-th order WENO scheme is as fast as the 4-th order WENO scheme of Liu et al., and both schemes are about twice as fast as the 4-th order ENO schemes on vector supercomputers and as fast on serial and parallel computers. For Euler systems of gas dynamics, we suggest computing the weights from pressure and entropy instead of the characteristic values to simplify the costly characteristic procedure. The resulting WENO schemes are about twice as fast as the WENO schemes using the characteristic decompositions to compute weights, and work well for problems which do not contain strong shocks or strong reflected waves. We also prove that, for conservation laws with smooth solutions, all WENO schemes are convergent. Many numerical tests, including the 1D steady state nozzle flow problem and 2D shock entropy wave interaction problem, are presented to demonstrate the remarkable capability of the WENO schemes, especially the WENO scheme using the new smoothness measurement, in resolving complicated shock and flow structures. We have also applied Yang's artificial compression method to the WENO schemes to sharpen contact discontinuities.

  18. The Impact of Microphysical Schemes on Hurricane Intensity and Track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Shi, Jainn Jong; Chen, Shuyi S.; Lang, Stephen; Lin, Pay-Liam; Hong, Song-You; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Hou, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade, both research and operational numerical weather prediction models [e.g. the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF)] have started using more complex microphysical schemes originally developed for high-resolution cloud resolving models (CRMs) with 1-2 km or less horizontal resolutions. WRF is a next-generation meso-scale forecast model and assimilation system. It incorporates a modern software framework, advanced dynamics, numerics and data assimilation techniques, a multiple moveable nesting capability, and improved physical packages. WRF can be used for a wide range of applications, from idealized research to operational forecasting, with an emphasis on horizontal grid sizes in the range of 1-10 km. The current WRF includes several different microphysics options. At NASA Goddard, four different cloud microphysics options have been implemented into WRF. The performance of these schemes is compared to those of the other microphysics schemes available in WRF for an Atlantic hurricane case (Katrina). In addition, a brief review of previous modeling studies on the impact of microphysics schemes and processes on the intensity and track of hurricanes is presented and compared against the current Katrina study. In general, all of the studies show that microphysics schemes do not have a major impact on track forecasts but do have more of an effect on the simulated intensity. Also, nearly all of the previous studies found that simulated hurricanes had the strongest deepening or intensification when using only warm rain physics. This is because all of the simulated precipitating hydrometeors are large raindrops that quickly fall out near the eye-wall region, which would hydrostatically produce the lowest pressure. In addition, these studies suggested that intensities become unrealistically strong when evaporative cooling from cloud droplets and melting from ice particles are removed as this results in much weaker downdrafts in the simulated

  19. ULTRA-SHARP nonoscillatory convection schemes for high-speed steady multidimensional flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.; Mokhtari, Simin

    1990-01-01

    For convection-dominated flows, classical second-order methods are notoriously oscillatory and often unstable. For this reason, many computational fluid dynamicists have adopted various forms of (inherently stable) first-order upwinding over the past few decades. Although it is now well known that first-order convection schemes suffer from serious inaccuracies attributable to artificial viscosity or numerical diffusion under high convection conditions, these methods continue to enjoy widespread popularity for numerical heat transfer calculations, apparently due to a perceived lack of viable high accuracy alternatives. But alternatives are available. For example, nonoscillatory methods used in gasdynamics, including currently popular TVD schemes, can be easily adapted to multidimensional incompressible flow and convective transport. This, in itself, would be a major advance for numerical convective heat transfer, for example. But, as is shown, second-order TVD schemes form only a small, overly restrictive, subclass of a much more universal, and extremely simple, nonoscillatory flux-limiting strategy which can be applied to convection schemes of arbitrarily high order accuracy, while requiring only a simple tridiagonal ADI line-solver, as used in the majority of general purpose iterative codes for incompressible flow and numerical heat transfer. The new universal limiter and associated solution procedures form the so-called ULTRA-SHARP alternative for high resolution nonoscillatory multidimensional steady state high speed convective modelling.

  20. Moderate dose escalation for advanced stage Hodgkin's disease using the bleomycin, etoposide, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone scheme and adjuvant radiotherapy: a study of the German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group.

    PubMed

    Tesch, H; Diehl, V; Lathan, B; Hasenclever, D; Sieber, M; Rüffer, U; Engert, A; Franklin, J; Pfreundschuh, M; Schalk, K P; Schwieder, G; Wulf, G; Dölken, G; Worst, P; Koch, P; Schmitz, N; Bruntsch, U; Tirier, C; Müller, U; Loeffler, M

    1998-12-15

    The BEACOPP (bleomycin, etoposide, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) regimen, a rearranged and accelerated version of the standard COPP/adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy, has been shown to be effective and safe in a previous pilot study for advanced stage Hodgkin's disease (HD). The present study aimed to determine a maximum practicable dose of three drugs, ie, etoposide, adriamycin, and cyclophosphamide, for which acute toxicities were acceptable and to assess the feasibility of the escalated scheme. Sixty untreated patients with advanced stage HD were enrolled in this study. Radiotherapy was given in 44 patients (73%) after chemotherapy to initial bulk lesions and residual disease. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was given from day 8 to prevent prolonged neutrocytopenia and severe infections. The intended doses of adriamycin, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide in the BEACOPP schedule could be substantially escalated: adriamycin from 25 to 35, cyclophosphamide from 650 to 1,200, and etoposide from 100 to 200 mg/m2. The major toxicities were leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia with considerable heterogeneity between individual patients. Of 60 patients, 56 (93%) achieved a complete remission (CR). At a median observation of 32 months, the rates of survival and freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) were estimated to be 91% (95% confidence interval 83% to 99%) and 90% (82% to 98%). These results show that a moderate dose escalation of adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide of the baseline BEACOPP regimen is feasible. The escalated BEACOPP regimen shows very encouraging results in advanced stage HD and is now being compared in a randomized phase III study with BEACOPP at baseline dose level. PMID:9845521

  1. Advanced Nodal P3/SP3 Axial Transport Solvers for the MPACT 2D/1D Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Stimpson, Shane G; Collins, Benjamin S

    2015-01-01

    As part of its initiative to provide multiphysics simulations of nuclear reactor cores, the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is developing the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator (VERA-CS). The MPACT code, which is the primary neutron transport solver of VERA-CS, employs the two-dimensional/one-dimensional (2D/1D) method to solve 3-dimensional neutron transport problems and provide sub-pin-level resolution of the power distribution. While 2D method of characteristics is used to solve for the transport effects within each plane, 1D-nodal methods are used axially. There have been extensive studies of the 2D/1D method with a variety nodal methods, and the P3/SP3 solver has proved to be an effective method of providing higher-fidelity solutions while maintaining a low computational burden.The current implementation in MPACT wraps a one-node nodal expansion method (NEM) kernel for each moment, iterating between them and performing multiple sweeps to resolve flux distributions. However, it has been observed that this approach is more sensitive to convergence problems. This paper documents the theory and application two new nodal P3/SP3 approaches to be used within the 2D/1D method in MPACT. These two approaches aim to provide enhanced stability compared with the pre-existing one-node approach. Results from the HY-NEM-SP3 solver show that the accuracy is consistent with the one-node formulations and provides improved convergence for some problems; but the solver has issues with cases in thin planes. Although the 2N-SENM-SP3 solver is still under development, it is intended to resolve the issues with HY-NEM-SP3 but it will incur some additional computational burden by necessitating an additional 1D-CMFD-P3 solver to generate the second moment cell-averaged scalar flux.

  2. A classification scheme for chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemeth, Felix P.; Haugland, Sindre W.; Schmidt, Lennart; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Krischer, Katharina

    2016-09-01

    We present a universal characterization scheme for chimera states applicable to both numerical and experimental data sets. The scheme is based on two correlation measures that enable a meaningful definition of chimera states as well as their classification into three categories: stationary, turbulent, and breathing. In addition, these categories can be further subdivided according to the time-stationarity of these two measures. We demonstrate that this approach is both consistent with previously recognized chimera states and enables us to classify states as chimeras which have not been categorized as such before. Furthermore, the scheme allows for a qualitative and quantitative comparison of experimental chimeras with chimeras obtained through numerical simulations.

  3. Uncertainty of Microphysics Schemes in CRMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, W. K.; van den Heever, S. C.; Wu, D.; Saleeby, S. M.; Lang, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Microphysics is the framework through which to understand the links between interactive aerosol, cloud and precipitation processes. These processes play a critical role in the water and energy cycle. CRMs with advanced microphysics schemes have been used to study the interaction between aerosol, cloud and precipitation processes at high resolution. But, there are still many uncertainties associated with these microphysics schemes. This has arisen, in part, from the fact microphysical processes cannot be measured directly; instead, cloud properties, which can be measured, are and have been used to validate model results. The utilization of current and future global high-resolution models is rapidly increasing and are at what has been traditional CRM resolutions and are using microphysics schemes that were developed in traditional CRMs. A potential NASA satellite mission called the Cloud and Precipitation Processes Mission (CaPPM) is currently being planned for submission to the NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey. This mission could provide the necessary global estimates of cloud and precipitation properties with which to evaluate and improve dynamical and microphysical parameterizations and the feedbacks. In order to facilitate the development of this mission, CRM simulations have been conducted to identify microphysical processes responsible for the greatest uncertainties in CRMs. In this talk, we will present results from numerical simulations conducted using two CRMs (NU-WRF and RAMS) with different dynamics, radiation, land surface and microphysics schemes. Specifically, we will conduct sensitivity tests to examine the uncertainty of the some of the key ice processes (i.e. riming, melting, freezing and shedding) in these two-microphysics schemes. The idea is to quantify how these two different models' respond (surface rainfall and its intensity, strength of cloud drafts, LWP/IWP, convective-stratiform-anvil area distribution) to changes of these key ice

  4. Final Progress Report: Collaborative Research: Decadal-to-Centennial Climate & Climate Change Studies with Enhanced Variable and Uniform Resolution GCMs Using Advanced Numerical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fox-Rabinovitz, M; Cote, J

    2009-06-05

    The joint U.S-Canadian project has been devoted to: (a) decadal climate studies using developed state-of-the-art GCMs (General Circulation Models) with enhanced variable and uniform resolution; (b) development and implementation of advanced numerical techniques; (c) research in parallel computing and associated numerical methods; (d) atmospheric chemistry experiments related to climate issues; (e) validation of regional climate modeling strategies for nested- and stretched-grid models. The variable-resolution stretched-grid (SG) GCMs produce accurate and cost-efficient regional climate simulations with mesoscale resolution. The advantage of the stretched grid approach is that it allows us to preserve the high quality of both global and regional circulations while providing consistent interactions between global and regional scales and phenomena. The major accomplishment for the project has been the successful international SGMIP-1 and SGMIP-2 (Stretched-Grid Model Intercomparison Project, phase-1 and phase-2) based on this research developments and activities. The SGMIP provides unique high-resolution regional and global multi-model ensembles beneficial for regional climate modeling and broader modeling community. The U.S SGMIP simulations have been produced using SciDAC ORNL supercomputers. Collaborations with other international participants M. Deque (Meteo-France) and J. McGregor (CSIRO, Australia) and their centers and groups have been beneficial for the strong joint effort, especially for the SGMIP activities. The WMO/WCRP/WGNE endorsed the SGMIP activities in 2004-2008. This project reflects a trend in the modeling and broader communities to move towards regional and sub-regional assessments and applications important for the U.S. and Canadian public, business and policy decision makers, as well as for international collaborations on regional, and especially climate related issues.

  5. Implicit Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Himansu, Ananda; Wang, Xiao-Yen

    1999-01-01

    Artificial numerical dissipation is in important issue in large Reynolds number computations. In such computations, the artificial dissipation inherent in traditional numerical schemes can overwhelm the physical dissipation and yield inaccurate results on meshes of practical size. In the present work, the space-time conservation element and solution element method is used to construct new and accurate implicit numerical schemes such that artificial numerical dissipation will not overwhelm physical dissipation. Specifically, these schemes have the property that numerical dissipation vanishes when the physical viscosity goes to zero. These new schemes therefore accurately model the physical dissipation even when it is extremely small. The new schemes presented are two highly accurate implicit solvers for a convection-diffusion equation. The two schemes become identical in the pure convection case, and in the pure diffusion case. The implicit schemes are applicable over the whole Reynolds number range, from purely diffusive equations to convection-dominated equations with very small viscosity. The stability and consistency of the schemes are analysed, and some numerical results are presented. It is shown that, in the inviscid case, the new schemes become explicit and their amplification factors are identical to those of the Leapfrog scheme. On the other hand, in the pure diffusion case, their principal amplification factor becomes the amplification factor of the Crank-Nicolson scheme.

  6. Taxonomic scheme for the identification of marine bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, James D.

    1982-06-01

    A recently developed taxonomic scheme for the identification of marine bacteria is presented. The scheme is based on numerous reviews and monographs on marine bacteria, as well as Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology. While fairly extensive, the scheme is designed to identify marine bacteria using relatively few tests.

  7. Towards an "All Speed" Unstructured Upwind Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Jorgenson, Philip C.E.

    2009-01-01

    In the authors previous studies [1], a time-accurate, upwind finite volume method (ETAU scheme) for computing compressible flows on unstructured grids was proposed. The scheme is second order accurate in space and time and yields high resolution in the presence of discontinuities. The scheme features a multidimensional limiter and multidimensional numerical dissipation. These help to stabilize the numerical process and to overcome the annoying pathological behaviors of upwind schemes. In the present paper, it will be further shown that such multidimensional treatments also lead to a nearly all-speed or Mach number insensitive upwind scheme. For flows at very high Mach number, e.g., 10, local numerical instabilities or the pathological behaviors are suppressed, while for flows at very low Mach number, e.g., 0.02, computation can be directly carried out without invoking preconditioning. For flows in different Mach number regimes, i.e., low, medium, and high Mach numbers, one only needs to adjust one or two parameters in the scheme. Several examples with low and high Mach numbers are demonstrated in this paper. Thus, the ETAU scheme is applicable to a broad spectrum of flow regimes ranging from high supersonic to low subsonic, appropriate for both CFD (computational fluid dynamics) and CAA (computational aeroacoustics).

  8. State of the art of control schemes for smart systems featuring magneto-rheological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung-Bok; Li, Weihua; Yu, Miao; Du, Haiping; Fu, Jie; Do, Phu Xuan

    2016-04-01

    This review presents various control strategies for application systems utilizing smart magneto-rheological fluid (MRF) and magneto-rheological elastomers (MRE). It is well known that both MRF and MRE are actively studied and applied to many practical systems such as vehicle dampers. The mandatory requirements for successful applications of MRF and MRE include several factors: advanced material properties, optimal mechanisms, suitable modeling, and appropriate control schemes. Among these requirements, the use of an appropriate control scheme is a crucial factor since it is the final action stage of the application systems to achieve the desired output responses. There are numerous different control strategies which have been applied to many different application systems of MRF and MRE, summarized in this review. In the literature review, advantages and disadvantages of each control scheme are discussed so that potential researchers can develop more effective strategies to achieve higher control performance of many application systems utilizing magneto-rheological materials.

  9. Advanced coding and modulation schemes for TDRSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, Linda; Kaplan, Ted; Berman, Ted; Chang, Susan

    1993-11-01

    This paper describes the performance of the Ungerboeck and pragmatic 8-Phase Shift Key (PSK) Trellis Code Modulation (TCM) coding techniques with and without a (255,223) Reed-Solomon outer code as they are used for Tracking Data and Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) S-Band and Ku-Band return services. The performance of these codes at high data rates is compared to uncoded Quadrature PSK (QPSK) and rate 1/2 convolutionally coded QPSK in the presence of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), self-interference, and hardware distortions. This paper shows that the outer Reed-Solomon code is necessary to achieve a 10(exp -5) Bit Error Rate (BER) with an acceptable level of degradation in the presence of RFI. This paper also shows that the TCM codes with or without the Reed-Solomon outer code do not perform well in the presence of self-interference. In fact, the uncoded QPSK signal performs better than the TCM coded signal in the self-interference situation considered in this analysis. Finally, this paper shows that the E(sub b)/N(sub 0) degradation due to TDRSS hardware distortions is approximately 1.3 dB with a TCM coded signal or a rate 1/2 convolutionally coded QPSK signal and is 3.2 dB with an uncoded QPSK signal.

  10. Development of advanced global cloud classification schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konvalin, Chris; Logar, Antonette M.; Lloyd, David; Corwin, Edward; Penaloza, Manuel; Feind, Rand E.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1997-01-01

    The problem of producing polar cloud masks for satellite imagery is an important facet of the research on global warming. For the past three years, our research on this topic has produced a series of classifiers. The first classifier used traditional statistical techniques, and, although the performance was reasonably good, better accuracy and faster classification speeds were desired. Neural network classifiers provided an improvement in both classification speed and accuracy but a single monolithic network proved difficult to train and was computationally expensive. A decomposition of the neural network into a hierarchical structure provided significant reductions in training time and some increase in accuracy. While this technique produced excellent results, to optimize its performance a minimal feature set and a highly accurate and easily computed switching mechanism must be identified. This paper presents recent developments in these two areas. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data from the arctic and antarctic was used to test the network. A minimal feature set, which defines the elements of the network input vector, is desirable for both improving accuracy and reducing computation. A smaller input vector will reduce the number of weights which must be updated during training and concomitantly reduce training and testing times. Small input vectors are also desirable because of the oft-cited 'curse of dimensionality' which states the higher the dimension of the problem to be solved, the more difficult it will be for the network to find an acceptable solution. However, it is also known that if a network has insufficient information, it will not be possible to form an appropriate decision surface. In that case, additional features, and additional dimensions, are required. Finding the proper balance can be difficult. Previously, trial and error was used to find a 'good' selection of features for classification. Features were added individually and those which had no impact on the neural network classification were deleted. A new approach clusters the features and selects the members of the cluster with the highest information content. Features are still removed one at a time but clustering ensures that statistically different features are preserved and allows for parallelization of the feature selection process. In addition, a fuzzy expert system provides a much faster classification accuracy approximation. This technique was able to significantly reduce the size of the feature vectors without sacrificing classification accuracy. The switching mechanism used in this work employs a series of static and adaptive thresholds derived from statistical analysis of polar scenes. This technique is faster than the corresponding neural network switching mechanism and can be easily changed as additional data becomes available. The resulting system, then, uses the adaptive thresholds to select the appropriate neural network from a collection of multilayer perceptron networks each responsible for classifying a subset of the total number of classes. The inputs to these networks are selected by the fuzzy logic algorithm. The difficulty of finding these thresholds, a task performed by a human expert, motivated the use of a genetic algorithm to determine these values. This system was able to achieve 96.45% accuracy on the fundamental problem of distinguishing cloud from non-cloud classes. The time required to classify 468,750 pixels in a satellite image was 50 seconds.3220

  11. Numerical discretization for nonlinear diffusion filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustaffa, I.; Mizuar, I.; Aminuddin, M. M. M.; Dasril, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Nonlinear diffusion filters are famously used in machine vision for image denoising and restoration. This paper presents a study on the effects of different numerical discretization of nonlinear diffusion filter. Several numerical discretization schemes are presented; namely semi-implicit, AOS, and fully implicit schemes. The results of these schemes are compared by visual results, objective measurement e.g. PSNR and MSE. The results are also compared to a Daubechies wavelet denoising method. It is acknowledged that the two preceding scheme have already been discussed in literature, however comparison to the latter scheme has not been made. The semi-implicit scheme uses an additive operator splitting (AOS) developed to overcome the shortcoming of the explicit scheme i.e., stability for very small time steps. Although AOS has proven to be efficient, from the nonlinear diffusion filter results with different discretization schemes, examples shows that implicit schemes are worth pursuing.

  12. A Numerical Instability in an ADI Algorithm for Gyrokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. Belli; G.W. Hammett

    2004-12-17

    We explore the implementation of an Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) algorithm for a gyrokinetic plasma problem and its resulting numerical stability properties. This algorithm, which uses a standard ADI scheme to divide the field solve from the particle distribution function advance, has previously been found to work well for certain plasma kinetic problems involving one spatial and two velocity dimensions, including collisions and an electric field. However, for the gyrokinetic problem we find a severe stability restriction on the time step. Furthermore, we find that this numerical instability limitation also affects some other algorithms, such as a partially implicit Adams-Bashforth algorithm, where the parallel motion operator v{sub {parallel}} {partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}z is treated implicitly and the field terms are treated with an Adams-Bashforth explicit scheme. Fully explicit algorithms applied to all terms can be better at long wavelengths than these ADI or partially implicit algorithms.

  13. On the application of ENO scheme with subcell resolution to conservation laws with stiff source terms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Shih-Hung

    1991-01-01

    Two approaches are used to extend the essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) schemes to treat conservation laws with stiff source terms. One approach is the application of the Strang time-splitting method. Here the basic ENO scheme and the Harten modification using subcell resolution (SR), ENO/SR scheme, are extended this way. The other approach is a direct method and a modification of the ENO/SR. Here the technique of ENO reconstruction with subcell resolution is used to locate the discontinuity within a cell and the time evolution is then accomplished by solving the differential equation along characteristics locally and advancing in the characteristic direction. This scheme is denoted ENO/SRCD (subcell resolution - characteristic direction). All the schemes are tested on the equation of LeVeque and Yee (NASA-TM-100075, 1988) modeling reacting flow problems. Numerical results show that these schemes handle this intriguing model problem very well, especially with ENO/SRCD which produces perfect resolution at the discontinuity.

  14. Assessment of numerical methods for the solution of fluid dynamics equations for nonlinear resonance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Yang, H. Q.

    1989-01-01

    The capability of accurate nonlinear flow analysis of resonance systems is essential in many problems, including combustion instability. Classical numerical schemes are either too diffusive or too dispersive especially for transient problems. In the last few years, significant progress has been made in the numerical methods for flows with shocks. The objective was to assess advanced shock capturing schemes on transient flows. Several numerical schemes were tested including TVD, MUSCL, ENO, FCT, and Riemann Solver Godunov type schemes. A systematic assessment was performed on scalar transport, Burgers' and gas dynamic problems. Several shock capturing schemes are compared on fast transient resonant pipe flow problems. A system of 1-D nonlinear hyperbolic gas dynamics equations is solved to predict propagation of finite amplitude waves, the wave steepening, formation, propagation, and reflection of shocks for several hundred wave cycles. It is shown that high accuracy schemes can be used for direct, exact nonlinear analysis of combustion instability problems, preserving high harmonic energy content for long periods of time.

  15. Dynamic Restarting Schemes for Eigenvalue Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kesheng; Simon, Horst D.

    1999-03-10

    In studies of restarted Davidson method, a dynamic thick-restart scheme was found to be excellent in improving the overall effectiveness of the eigen value method. This paper extends the study of the dynamic thick-restart scheme to the Lanczos method for symmetric eigen value problems and systematically explore a range of heuristics and strategies. We conduct a series of numerical tests to determine their relative strength and weakness on a class of electronic structure calculation problems.

  16. Assessment of Planetary Boundary-Layer Schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Mesoscale Model Using MATERHORN Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Reneta; Silver, Zachariah; Zsedrovits, Tamas; Hocut, Christopher M.; Leo, Laura S.; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Fernando, Harindra J. S.

    2016-06-01

    The study was aimed at understanding the deficiencies of numerical mesoscale models by comparing predictions with a new high-resolution meteorological dataset collected during the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modelling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program. The simulations focussed on the stable boundary layer (SBL), the predictions of which continue to be challenging. High resolution numerical simulations (0.5-km horizontal grid size) were conducted to investigate the efficacy of six planetary boundary-layer (PBL) parametrizations available in the advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. One of the commonly used PBL schemes was modified to include eddy diffusivities that account for enhanced momentum transport compared to heat transport in the SBL, representing internal wave dynamics. All of the tested PBL schemes, including the modified scheme, showed a positive surface temperature bias. None of the PBL schemes was found to be superior in predicting the vertical wind and temperature profiles over the lowest 500 m, however two of the schemes appeared superior in capturing the lower PBL structure. The lowest model layers appear to have a significant impact on the predictions aloft. Regions of sporadic flow interactions delineated by the MATERHORN observations were poorly predicted, given such interactions are not represented in typical PBL schemes.

  17. Three-dimensional convection in horizontal cylinders - Numerical solutions and comparison with experimental and analytical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smutek, C.; Bontoux, P.; Roux, B.; Schiroky, G. H.; Hurford, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a three-dimensional numerical simulation of Boussinesq free convection in a horizontal differentially heated cylinder are presented. The computation was based on a Samarskii-Andreyev scheme (described by Leong, 1981) and a false-transient advancement in time, with vorticity, velocity, and temperature as dependent variables. Solutions for velocity and temperature distributions were obtained for Rayleigh numbers (based on the radius) Ra = 74-18,700, thus covering the core- and boundary-layer-driven regimes. Numerical solutions are compared with asymptotic analytical solutions and experimental data. The numerical results well represent the complex three-dimensional flows found experimentally.

  18. A diagonally inverted LU implicit multigrid scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Jeffrey W.; Caughey, David A.; Chima, Rodrick V.

    1988-01-01

    A new Diagonally Inverted LU Implicit scheme is developed within the framework of the multigrid method for the 3-D unsteady Euler equations. The matrix systems that are to be inverted in the LU scheme are treated by local diagonalizing transformations that decouple them into systems of scalar equations. Unlike the Diagonalized ADI method, the time accuracy of the LU scheme is not reduced since the diagonalization procedure does not destroy time conservation. Even more importantly, this diagonalization significantly reduces the computational effort required to solve the LU approximation and therefore transforms it into a more efficient method of numerically solving the 3-D Euler equations.

  19. Comprehensive numerical methodology for direct numerical simulations of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, Scott J.; Livescu, Daniel; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2016-05-01

    An investigation of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) requires efficient numerical methods, advanced boundary conditions, and consistent initialization in order to capture the wide range of scales and vortex dynamics present in the system, while reducing the computational impact associated with acoustic wave generation and the subsequent interaction with the flow. An advanced computational framework is presented that handles the challenges introduced by considering the compressive nature of RTI systems, which include sharp interfacial density gradients on strongly stratified background states, acoustic wave generation and removal at computational boundaries, and stratification dependent vorticity production. The foundation of the numerical methodology described here is the wavelet-based grid adaptivity of the Parallel Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method (PAWCM) that maintains symmetry in single-mode RTI systems to extreme late-times. PAWCM is combined with a consistent initialization, which reduces the generation of acoustic disturbances, and effective boundary treatments, which prevent acoustic reflections. A dynamic time integration scheme that can handle highly nonlinear and potentially stiff systems, such as compressible RTI, completes the computational framework. The numerical methodology is used to simulate two-dimensional single-mode RTI to extreme late-times for a wide range of flow compressibility and variable density effects. The results show that flow compressibility acts to reduce the growth of RTI for low Atwood numbers, as predicted from linear stability analysis.

  20. Numerical solution of the full potential equation using a chimera grid approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1995-01-01

    A numerical scheme utilizing a chimera zonal grid approach for solving the full potential equation in two spatial dimensions is described. Within each grid zone a fully-implicit approximate factorization scheme is used to advance the solution one interaction. This is followed by the explicit advance of all common zonal grid boundaries using a bilinear interpolation of the velocity potential. The presentation is highlighted with numerical results simulating the flow about a two-dimensional, nonlifting, circular cylinder. For this problem, the flow domain is divided into two parts: an inner portion covered by a polar grid and an outer portion covered by a Cartesian grid. Both incompressible and compressible (transonic) flow solutions are included. Comparisons made with an analytic solution as well as single grid results indicate that the chimera zonal grid approach is a viable technique for solving the full potential equation.

  1. On the relation between upwind-differencing schemes of Godunov, Engquist-Osher and Roe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanleer, B.

    1981-01-01

    The upwind differencing first order schemes of Godunov, Engquist-Osher and Roe are discussed on the basis of the inviscid Burgers equations. The differences between the schemes are interpreted as differences between the approximate Riemann solutions on which their numerical flux functions are based. Special attention is given to the proper formulation of these schemes when a source term is present. Second order two step schemes, based on the numerical flux functions of the first order schemes are also described. The schemes are compared in a numerical experiment, and recommendations on their use are included.

  2. A compatible Lagrangian hydrodynamic scheme for multicomponent flows with mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chong; Stagg, Alan K

    2012-01-01

    We present a Lagrangian time integration scheme and compatible discretization for total energy conservation in multicomponent mixing simulations. Mixing behavior results from relative motion between species. Species velocities are determined by solving species momentum equations in a Lagrangian manner. Included in the species momentum equations are species artificial viscosity (since each species can undergo compression) and inter-species momentum exchange. Thermal energy for each species is also solved, including compression work and thermal dissipation caused by momentum exchange. The present procedure is applicable to mixing of an arbitrary number of species that may not be in pressure or temperature equilibrium. A traditional staggered stencil has been adopted to describe motion of each species. The computational mesh for the mixture is constructed in a Lagrangian manner using the mass-averaged mixture velocity. Species momentum equations are solved at the vertices of the mesh, and temporary species meshes are constructed and advanced in time using the resulting species velocities. Following the Lagrangian step, species quantities are advected (mapped) from the species meshes to the mixture mesh. Momentum exchange between species introduces work that must be included in an energy-conserving discretization scheme. This work has to be transformed to dissipation in order to effect a net change in species thermal energy. The dissipation between interacting species pairs is obtained by combining the momentum exchange work. The dissipation is then distributed to the species involved using a distribution factor based on species specific heats. The resulting compatible discretization scheme provides total energy conservation of the whole mixture. In addition, the numerical scheme includes conservative local energy exchange between species in mixture. Due to the relatively large species interaction coefficients, both the species momenta and energies are calculated

  3. An authentication scheme for secure access to healthcare services.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Khurram; Kumari, Saru

    2013-08-01

    Last few decades have witnessed boom in the development of information and communication technologies. Health-sector has also been benefitted with this advancement. To ensure secure access to healthcare services some user authentication mechanisms have been proposed. In 2012, Wei et al. proposed a user authentication scheme for telecare medical information system (TMIS). Recently, Zhu pointed out offline password guessing attack on Wei et al.'s scheme and proposed an improved scheme. In this article, we analyze both of these schemes for their effectiveness in TMIS. We show that Wei et al.'s scheme and its improvement proposed by Zhu fail to achieve some important characteristics necessary for secure user authentication. We find that security problems of Wei et al.'s scheme stick with Zhu's scheme; like undetectable online password guessing attack, inefficacy of password change phase, traceability of user's stolen/lost smart card and denial-of-service threat. We also identify that Wei et al.'s scheme lacks forward secrecy and Zhu's scheme lacks session key between user and healthcare server. We therefore propose an authentication scheme for TMIS with forward secrecy which preserves the confidentiality of air messages even if master secret key of healthcare server is compromised. Our scheme retains advantages of Wei et al.'s scheme and Zhu's scheme, and offers additional security. The security analysis and comparison results show the enhanced suitability of our scheme for TMIS. PMID:23828650

  4. Nonlinear wave propagation using three different finite difference schemes (category 2 application)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, D. Stuart; Hardin, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Three common finite difference schemes are used to examine the computation of one-dimensional nonlinear wave propagation. The schemes are studied for their responses to numerical parameters such as time step selection, boundary condition implementation, and discretization of governing equations. The performance of the schemes is compared and various numerical phenomena peculiar to each is discussed.

  5. Parallelization of implicit finite difference schemes in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Naomi H.; Naik, Vijay K.; Nicoules, Michel

    1990-01-01

    Implicit finite difference schemes are often the preferred numerical schemes in computational fluid dynamics, requiring less stringent stability bounds than the explicit schemes. Each iteration in an implicit scheme involves global data dependencies in the form of second and higher order recurrences. Efficient parallel implementations of such iterative methods are considerably more difficult and non-intuitive. The parallelization of the implicit schemes that are used for solving the Euler and the thin layer Navier-Stokes equations and that require inversions of large linear systems in the form of block tri-diagonal and/or block penta-diagonal matrices is discussed. Three-dimensional cases are emphasized and schemes that minimize the total execution time are presented. Partitioning and scheduling schemes for alleviating the effects of the global data dependencies are described. An analysis of the communication and the computation aspects of these methods is presented. The effect of the boundary conditions on the parallel schemes is also discussed.

  6. A stable second-order scheme for fluid-structure interaction with strong added-mass effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Jaiman, Rajeev K.; Gurugubelli, Pardha S.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we present a stable second-order time accurate scheme for solving fluid-structure interaction problems. The scheme uses so-called Combined Field with Explicit Interface (CFEI) advancing formulation based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach with finite element procedure. Although loosely-coupled partitioned schemes are often popular choices for simulating FSI problems, these schemes may suffer from inherent instability at low structure to fluid density ratios. We show that our second-order scheme is stable for any mass density ratio and hence is able to handle strong added-mass effects. Energy-based stability proof relies heavily on the connections among extrapolation formula, trapezoidal scheme for second-order equation, and backward difference method for first-order equation. Numerical accuracy and stability of the scheme is assessed with the aid of two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction problems of increasing complexity. We confirm second-order temporal accuracy by numerical experiments on an elastic semi-circular cylinder problem. We verify the accuracy of coupled solutions with respect to the benchmark solutions of a cylinder-elastic bar and the Navier-Stokes flow system. To study the stability of the proposed scheme for strong added-mass effects, we present new results using the combined field formulation for flexible flapping motion of a thin-membrane structure with low mass ratio and strong added-mass effects in a uniform axial flow. Using a systematic series of fluid-structure simulations, a detailed analysis of the coupled response as a function of mass ratio for the case of very low bending rigidity has been presented.

  7. Upwind and symmetric shock-capturing schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of numerical methods for hyperbolic conservation laws has been a rapidly growing area for the last ten years. Many of the fundamental concepts and state-of-the-art developments can only be found in meeting proceedings or internal reports. This review paper attempts to give an overview and a unified formulation of a class of shock-capturing methods. Special emphasis is on the construction of the basic nonlinear scalar second-order schemes and the methods of extending these nonlinear scalar schemes to nonlinear systems via the extact Riemann solver, approximate Riemann solvers, and flux-vector splitting approaches. Generalization of these methods to efficiently include real gases and large systems of nonequilibrium flows is discussed. The performance of some of these schemes is illustrated by numerical examples for one-, two- and three-dimensional gas dynamics problems.

  8. Unstaggered Central Schemes for Hyperbolic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touma, R.

    2009-09-01

    We develop an unstaggered central scheme for approximating the solution of general two-dimensional hyperbolic systems. In particular, we are interested in solving applied problems arising in hydrodynamics and astrophysics. In contrast with standard central schemes that evolve the numerical solution on two staggered grids at consecutive time steps, the method we propose evolves the numerical solution on a single grid, and avoids the resolution of the Riemann problems arising at the cell interfaces, thanks to a layer of ghost cells implicitly used. The numerical base scheme is used to solve shallow water equation problems and ideal magnetohydrodynamic problems. To satisfy the divergence-free constraint of the magnetic field in the numerical solution of ideal magnetohydrodynamic problems, we adapt Evans and Hawley's the constrained transport method to our unstaggered base scheme, and apply it to correct the magnetic field components at the end of each time step. The obtained results are in good agreement with corresponding ones appearing in the recent literature, thus confirming the efficiency and the potential of the proposed method.

  9. Numerical computation of transonic flow governed by the full-potential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical solution techniques for solving transonic flow fields governed by the full potential equation are discussed. In a general sense relaxation schemes suitable for the numerical solution of elliptic partial differential equations are presented and discussed with emphasis on transonic flow applications. The presentation can be divided into two general categories: An introductory treatment of the basic concepts associated with the numerical solution of elliptic partial differential equations and a more advanced treatment of current procedures used to solve the full potential equation for transonic flow fields. The introductory material is presented for completeness and includes a brief introduction (Chapter 1), governing equations (Chapter 2), classical relaxation schemes (Chapter 3), and early concepts regarding transonic full potential equation algorithms (Chapter 4).

  10. A nonconservative scheme for isentropic gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gui-Qiang |; Liu, Jian-Guo

    1994-05-01

    In this paper, we construct a second-order nonconservative for the system of isentropic gas dynamics to capture the physical invariant regions for preventing negative density, to treat the vacuum singularity, and to control the local entropy from dramatically increasing near shock waves. The main difference in the construction of the scheme discussed here is that we use piecewise linear functions to approximate the Riemann invariants w and z instead of the physical variables {rho} and m. Our scheme is a natural extension of the schemes for scalar conservation laws and it can be numerical implemented easily because the system is diagonalized in this coordinate system. Another advantage of using Riemann invariants is that the Hessian matrix of any weak entropy has no singularity in the Riemann invariant plane w-z, whereas the Hessian matrices of the weak entropies have singularity at the vacuum points in the physical plane p-m. We prove that this scheme converges to an entropy solution for the Cauchy problem with L{sup {infinity}} initial data. By convergence here we mean that there is a subsequent convergence to a generalized solution satisfying the entrophy condition. As long as the entropy solution is unique, the whole sequence converges to a physical solution. This shows that this kind of scheme is quite reliable from theoretical view of point. In addition to being interested in the scheme itself, we wish to provide an approach to rigorously analyze nonconservative finite difference schemes.

  11. Hybrid undulator numerical optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hairetdinov, A.H.; Zukov, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    3D properties of the hybrid undulator scheme arc studied numerically using PANDIRA code. It is shown that there exist two well defined sets of undulator parameters which provide either maximum on-axis field amplitude or minimal higher harmonics amplitude of the basic undulator field. Thus the alternative between higher field amplitude or pure sinusoidal field exists. The behavior of the undulator field amplitude and harmonics structure for a large set of (undulator gap)/(undulator wavelength) values is demonstrated.

  12. Numerical simulations in combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews numerical simulations in reacting flows in general and combustion phenomena in particular. It is shown that use of implicit schemes and/or adaptive mesh strategies can improve convergence, stability, and accuracy of the solution. Difficulties increase as turbulence and multidimensions are considered, particularly when finite-rate chemistry governs the given combustion problem. Particular attention is given to the areas of solid-propellant combustion dynamics, turbulent diffusion flames, and spray droplet vaporization.

  13. An Improved Bulk Microphysical Scheme for Studying Precipitation Processes: Comparisons with Other Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W. K.; Shi, J. J.; Lang, S.; Chen, S.; Hong, S-Y.; Peters-Lidard, C.

    2007-01-01

    Cloud microphysical processes play an important role in non-hydrostatic high-resolution simulations. Over the past decade both research and operational numerical weather prediction models have started using more complex cloud microphysical schemes that were originally developed for high-resolution cloud-resolving models. An improved bulk microphysical parameterization (adopted from the Goddard microphysics schemes) has recently implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. This bulk microphysical scheme has three different options --- 2ICE (cloud ice & snow), 3ICE-graupel (cloud ice, snow & graupel) and 3ICE-hail (cloud ice, snow & hail). High-resolution model simulations are conducted to examine the impact of microphysical schemes on two different weather events (a midlatitude linear convective system and an Atlantic hurricane). In addition, this bulk microphysical parameterization is compared with WIRF's three other bulk microphysical schemes.

  14. A Spatial Discretization Scheme for Solving the Transport Equation on Unstructured Grids of Polyhedra

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.G.

    2000-11-01

    In this work, we develop a new spatial discretization scheme that may be used to numerically solve the neutron transport equation. This new discretization extends the family of corner balance spatial discretizations to include spatial grids of arbitrary polyhedra. This scheme enforces balance on subcell volumes called corners. It produces a lower triangular matrix for sweeping, is algebraically linear, is non-negative in a source-free absorber, and produces a robust and accurate solution in thick diffusive regions. Using an asymptotic analysis, we design the scheme so that in thick diffusive regions it will attain the same solution as an accurate polyhedral diffusion discretization. We then refine the approximations in the scheme to reduce numerical diffusion in vacuums, and we attempt to capture a second order truncation error. After we develop this Upstream Corner Balance Linear (UCBL) discretization we analyze its characteristics in several limits. We complete a full diffusion limit analysis showing that we capture the desired diffusion discretization in optically thick and highly scattering media. We review the upstream and linear properties of our discretization and then demonstrate that our scheme captures strictly non-negative solutions in source-free purely absorbing media. We then demonstrate the minimization of numerical diffusion of a beam and then demonstrate that the scheme is, in general, first order accurate. We also note that for slab-like problems our method actually behaves like a second-order method over a range of cell thicknesses that are of practical interest. We also discuss why our scheme is first order accurate for truly 3D problems and suggest changes in the algorithm that should make it a second-order accurate scheme. Finally, we demonstrate 3D UCBL's performance on several very different test problems. We show good performance in diffusive and streaming problems. We analyze truncation error in a 3D problem and demonstrate robustness in a

  15. Tabled Execution in Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Willcock, J J; Lumsdaine, A; Quinlan, D J

    2008-08-19

    Tabled execution is a generalization of memorization developed by the logic programming community. It not only saves results from tabled predicates, but also stores the set of currently active calls to them; tabled execution can thus provide meaningful semantics for programs that seemingly contain infinite recursions with the same arguments. In logic programming, tabled execution is used for many purposes, both for improving the efficiency of programs, and making tasks simpler and more direct to express than with normal logic programs. However, tabled execution is only infrequently applied in mainstream functional languages such as Scheme. We demonstrate an elegant implementation of tabled execution in Scheme, using a mix of continuation-passing style and mutable data. We also show the use of tabled execution in Scheme for a problem in formal language and automata theory, demonstrating that tabled execution can be a valuable tool for Scheme users.

  16. A New Low Dissipative High Order Schemes for MHD Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this talk is to extend our recently developed highly parallelizable nonlinear stable high order schemes for complex multiscale hydrodynamic applications to the viscous MHD equations. These schemes employed multiresolution wavelets as adaptive numerical dissipation controls to limit the amount and to aid the selection and/or blending of the appropriate types of dissipation to be used. The new scheme is formulated for both the conservative and non-conservative form of the MHD equations in curvilinear grids.

  17. Dispersion-relation-preserving finite difference schemes for computational acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Webb, Jay C.

    1993-01-01

    Time-marching dispersion-relation-preserving (DRP) schemes can be constructed by optimizing the finite difference approximations of the space and time derivatives in wave number and frequency space. A set of radiation and outflow boundary conditions compatible with the DRP schemes is constructed, and a sequence of numerical simulations is conducted to test the effectiveness of the DRP schemes and the radiation and outflow boundary conditions. Close agreement with the exact solutions is obtained.

  18. A high-order WENO-based staggered Godunov-type scheme with constrained transport for force-free electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Cong

    2011-03-01

    The force-free (or low inertia) limit of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) can be applied to many astrophysical objects, including black holes, neutron stars and accretion discs, where the electromagnetic field is so strong that the inertia and pressure of the plasma can be ignored. This is difficult to achieve with the standard MHD numerical methods because they still have to deal with plasma inertial terms even when these terms are much smaller than the electromagnetic terms. Under the force-free approximation, the plasma dynamics is entirely determined by the magnetic field. The plasma provides the currents and charge densities required by the dynamics of electromagnetic fields, but these currents carry no inertia. We present a high-order Godunov scheme to study such force-free electrodynamics. We have implemented weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) spatial interpolations in our scheme. An exact Riemann solver is implemented, which requires spectral decomposition into characteristic waves. We advance the magnetic field with the constrained transport (CT) scheme to preserve the divergence-free condition to machine round-off error. We apply the third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for the temporal integration. The mapping from face-centred variables to volume-centred variables is carefully considered. Extensive testing are performed to demonstrate the ability of our scheme to address force-free electrodynamics correctly. We finally apply the scheme to study relativistic magnetically dominated tearing instabilities and neutron star magnetospheres.

  19. Numerical simulation of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; To, Wai-Ming

    1992-01-01

    A new numerical framework for solving conservation laws is being developed. This new approach differs substantially from the well established methods, i.e., finite difference, finite volume, finite element and spectral methods, in both concept and methodology. The key features of the current scheme include: (1) direct discretization of the integral forms of conservation laws, (2) treating space and time on the same footing, (3) flux conservation in space and time, and (4) unified treatment of the convection and diffusion fluxes. The model equation considered in the initial study is the standard one dimensional unsteady constant-coefficient convection-diffusion equation. In a stability study, it is shown that the principal and spurious amplification factors of the current scheme, respectively, are structurally similar to those of the leapfrog/DuFort-Frankel scheme. As a result, the current scheme has no numerical diffusion in the special case of pure convection and is unconditionally stable in the special case of pure diffusion. Assuming smooth initial data, it will be shown theoretically and numerically that, by using an easily determined optimal time step, the accuracy of the current scheme may reach a level which is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the MacCormack scheme, with virtually identical operation count.

  20. Indirect visual cryptography scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiubo; Li, Tuo; Shi, Yishi

    2015-10-01

    Visual cryptography (VC), a new cryptographic scheme for image. Here in encryption, image with message is encoded to be N sub-images and any K sub-images can decode the message in a special rules (N>=2, 2<=K<=N). Then any K of the N sub-images are printed on transparency and stacked exactly, the message of original image will be decrypted by human visual system, but any K-1 of them get no information about it. This cryptographic scheme can decode concealed images without any cryptographic computations, and it has high security. But this scheme lacks of hidden because of obvious feature of sub-images. In this paper, we introduce indirect visual cryptography scheme (IVCS), which encodes sub-images to be pure phase images without visible strength based on encoding of visual cryptography. The pure phase image is final ciphertexts. Indirect visual cryptography scheme not only inherits the merits of visual cryptography, but also raises indirection, hidden and security. Meanwhile, the accuracy alignment is not required any more, which leads to the strong anti-interference capacity and robust in this scheme. System of decryption can be integrated highly and operated conveniently, and its process of decryption is dynamic and fast, which all lead to the good potentials in practices.

  1. Stable Difference Schemes for the Neutron Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Taskin, Abdulgafur

    2011-09-22

    The initial boundary value problem for the neutron transport equation is considered. The first and second orders of accuracy difference schemes for the approximate solution of this problem are presented. In applications, the stability estimates for solutions of difference schemes for the approximate solution of the neutron transport equation are obtained. Numerical techniques are developed and algorithms are tested on an example in MATLAB.

  2. Numerical modeling of late Glacial Laurentide advance of ice across Hudson Strait: Insights into terrestrial and marine geology, mass balance, and calving flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pfeffer, W.T.; Dyurgerov, M.; Kaplan, M.; Dwyer, J.; Sassolas, C.; Jennings, A.; Raup, B.; Manley, W.

    1997-01-01

    A time-dependent finite element model was used to reconstruct the advance of ice from a late Glacial dome on northern Quebec/Labrador across Hudson Strait to Meta Incognita Peninsula (Baffin Island) and subsequently to the 9.9-9.6 ka 14C Gold Cove position on Hall Peninsula. Terrestrial geological and geophysical information from Quebec and Labrador was used to constrain initial and boundary conditions, and the model results are compared with terrestrial geological information from Baffin Island and considered in the context of the marine event DC-0 and the Younger Dryas cooling. We conclude that advance across Hudson Strait from Ungava Bay to Baffin Island is possible using realistic glacier physics under a variety of reasonable boundary conditions. Production of ice flux from a dome centered on northeastern Quebec and Labrador sufficient to deliver geologically inferred ice thickness at Gold Cove (Hall Peninsula) appears to require extensive penetration of sliding south from Ungava Bay. The discharge of ice into the ocean associated with advance and retreat across Hudson Strait does not peak at a time coincident with the start of the Younger Dryas and is less than minimum values proposed to influence North Atlantic thermohaline circulation; nevertheless, a significant fraction of freshwater input to the North Atlantic may have been provided abruptly and at a critical time by this event.

  3. CONDIF - A modified central-difference scheme for convective flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runchal, Akshai K.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a method, called CONDIF, which modifies the CDS (central-difference scheme) by introducing a controlled amount of numerical diffusion based on the local gradients. The numerical diffusion can be adjusted to be negligibly low for most problems. CONDIF results are significantly more accurate than those obtained from the hybrid scheme when the Peclet number is very high and the flow is at large angles to the grid.

  4. Highly accurate adaptive finite element schemes for nonlinear hyperbolic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1992-08-01

    This document is a final report of research activities supported under General Contract DAAL03-89-K-0120 between the Army Research Office and the University of Texas at Austin from July 1, 1989 through June 30, 1992. The project supported several Ph.D. students over the contract period, two of which are scheduled to complete dissertations during the 1992-93 academic year. Research results produced during the course of this effort led to 6 journal articles, 5 research reports, 4 conference papers and presentations, 1 book chapter, and two dissertations (nearing completion). It is felt that several significant advances were made during the course of this project that should have an impact on the field of numerical analysis of wave phenomena. These include the development of high-order, adaptive, hp-finite element methods for elastodynamic calculations and high-order schemes for linear and nonlinear hyperbolic systems. Also, a theory of multi-stage Taylor-Galerkin schemes was developed and implemented in the analysis of several wave propagation problems, and was configured within a general hp-adaptive strategy for these types of problems. Further details on research results and on areas requiring additional study are given in the Appendix.

  5. Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) schemes of uniform accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwich, PETER-M.; Hsu, Chung-Hao; Liu, C. H.

    1988-01-01

    Explicit second-order accurate finite-difference schemes for the approximation of hyperbolic conservation laws are presented. These schemes are nonlinear even for the constant coefficient case. They are based on first-order upwind schemes. Their accuracy is enhanced by locally replacing the first-order one-sided differences with either second-order one-sided differences or central differences or a blend thereof. The appropriate local difference stencils are selected such that they give TVD schemes of uniform second-order accuracy in the scalar, or linear systems, case. Like conventional TVD schemes, the new schemes avoid a Gibbs phenomenon at discontinuities of the solution, but they do not switch back to first-order accuracy, in the sense of truncation error, at extrema of the solution. The performance of the new schemes is demonstrated in several numerical tests.

  6. An optimized finite-difference scheme for wave propagation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zingg, D. W.; Lomax, H.; Jurgens, H.

    1993-01-01

    Two fully-discrete finite-difference schemes for wave propagation problems are presented, a maximum-order scheme and an optimized (or spectral-like) scheme. Both combine a seven-point spatial operator and an explicit six-stage time-march method. The maximum-order operator is fifth-order in space and is sixth-order in time for a linear problem with periodic boundary conditions. The phase and amplitude errors of the schemes obtained using Fourier analysis are given and compared with a second-order and a fourth-order method. Numerical experiments are presented which demonstrate the usefulness of the schemes for a range of problems. For some problems, the optimized scheme leads to a reduction in global error compared to the maximum-order scheme with no additional computational expense.

  7. A gyrokinetic continuum code based on the numerical Lie transform (NLT) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lei; Xu, Yingfeng; Xiao, Xiaotao; Dai, Zongliang; Wang, Shaojie

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we report a novel gyrokinetic simulation method named numerical Lie transform (NLT), which depends on a new physical model derived from the I-transform theory. In this model, the perturbed motion of a particle is decoupled from the unperturbed motion. Due to this property, the unperturbed orbit can be computed in advance and saved as numerical tables for real-time computation. A 4D tensor B-spline interpolation module is developed and applied with the semi-Lagrangian scheme to avoid operator splitting. The NLT code is verified by the Rosenbluth-Hinton test and the linear ITG Cyclone test.

  8. Advanced Tsunami Numerical Simulations and Energy Considerations by use of 3D-2D Coupled Models: The October 11, 1918, Mona Passage Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Venegas, Alberto M.; Horrillo, Juan; Pampell-Manis, Alyssa; Huérfano, Victor; Mercado, Aurelio

    2015-06-01

    The most recent tsunami observed along the coast of the island of Puerto Rico occurred on October 11, 1918, after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake in the Mona Passage. The earthquake was responsible for initiating a tsunami that mostly affected the northwestern coast of the island. Runup values from a post-tsunami survey indicated the waves reached up to 6 m. A controversy regarding the source of the tsunami has resulted in several numerical simulations involving either fault rupture or a submarine landslide as the most probable cause of the tsunami. Here we follow up on previous simulations of the tsunami from a submarine landslide source off the western coast of Puerto Rico as initiated by the earthquake. Improvements on our previous study include: (1) higher-resolution bathymetry; (2) a 3D-2D coupled numerical model specifically developed for the tsunami; (3) use of the non-hydrostatic numerical model NEOWAVE (non-hydrostatic evolution of ocean WAVE) featuring two-way nesting capabilities; and (4) comprehensive energy analysis to determine the time of full tsunami wave development. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes model tsunami solution using the Navier-Stokes algorithm with multiple interfaces for two fluids (water and landslide) was used to determine the initial wave characteristic generated by the submarine landslide. Use of NEOWAVE enabled us to solve for coastal inundation, wave propagation, and detailed runup. Our results were in agreement with previous work in which a submarine landslide is favored as the most probable source of the tsunami, and improvement in the resolution of the bathymetry yielded inundation of the coastal areas that compare well with values from a post-tsunami survey. Our unique energy analysis indicates that most of the wave energy is isolated in the wave generation region, particularly at depths near the landslide, and once the initial wave propagates from the generation region its energy begins to stabilize.

  9. A high-order symmetrical weighted hybrid ENO-flux limiter scheme for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedian, Rooholah; Adibi, Hojatollah; Dehghan, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) procedure for solving hyperbolic conservation laws, on uniform meshes. The new scheme combines essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) reconstructions together with monotone upwind schemes for scalar conservation laws' interpolants. In a one-dimensional context, first, we obtain an optimum polynomial on a five-cells stencil. This optimum polynomial is fifth-order accurate in regions of smoothness. Next, we modify a third-order ENO polynomial by choosing an additional point inside the stencil in order to obtain the highest accuracy when combined with the Harten-Osher reconstruction-evolution method limiter. Then, we consider the optimum polynomial as a symmetric and convex combination of four polynomials with ideal weights. After that, following the methodology of the classic WENO procedure, we calculate non-oscillatory weights with the ideal weights. Also, the numerical solution is advanced in time by means of the linear multi-step total variation bounded (TV B) technique. Numerical examples on both scalar and gas dynamics problems confirm that the new scheme is non-oscillatory and yields sharp results when solving profiles with discontinuities. Comparing the new scheme with high-order WENO schemes shows that our method reduces smearing near shocks and corners, and in some cases it is more accurate near discontinuities. Finally, the new method is extended to multi-dimensional problems by a dimension-by-dimension approach. Several multi-dimensional examples are performed to show that our method remains non-oscillatory while giving good resolution of discontinuities.

  10. Scheme of thinking quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.

    2009-11-01

    A general approach describing quantum decision procedures is developed. The approach can be applied to quantum information processing, quantum computing, creation of artificial quantum intelligence, as well as to analyzing decision processes of human decision makers. Our basic point is to consider an active quantum system possessing its own strategic state. Processing information by such a system is analogous to the cognitive processes associated to decision making by humans. The algebra of probability operators, associated with the possible options available to the decision maker, plays the role of the algebra of observables in quantum theory of measurements. A scheme is advanced for a practical realization of decision procedures by thinking quantum systems. Such thinking quantum systems can be realized by using spin lattices, systems of magnetic molecules, cold atoms trapped in optical lattices, ensembles of quantum dots, or multilevel atomic systems interacting with electromagnetic field.

  11. A low-order coupled chemistry meteorology model for testing online and offline data assimilation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haussaire, J.-M.; Bocquet, M.

    2015-08-01

    Bocquet and Sakov (2013) have introduced a low-order model based on the coupling of the chaotic Lorenz-95 model which simulates winds along a mid-latitude circle, with the transport of a tracer species advected by this zonal wind field. This model, named L95-T, can serve as a playground for testing data assimilation schemes with an online model. Here, the tracer part of the model is extended to a reduced photochemistry module. This coupled chemistry meteorology model (CCMM), the L95-GRS model, mimics continental and transcontinental transport and the photochemistry of ozone, volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides. Its numerical implementation is described. The model is shown to reproduce the major physical and chemical processes being considered. L95-T and L95-GRS are specifically designed and useful for testing advanced data assimilation schemes, such as the iterative ensemble Kalman smoother (IEnKS) which combines the best of ensemble and variational methods. These models provide useful insights prior to the implementation of data assimilation methods on larger models. We illustrate their use with data assimilation schemes on preliminary, yet instructive numerical experiments. In particular, online and offline data assimilation strategies can be conveniently tested and discussed with this low-order CCMM. The impact of observed chemical species concentrations on the wind field can be quantitatively estimated. The impacts of the wind chaotic dynamics and of the chemical species non-chaotic but highly nonlinear dynamics on the data assimilation strategies are illustrated.

  12. Development of Design Technology on Thermal-Hydraulic Performance in Tight-Lattice Rod Bundles: III - Numerical Evaluation of Fluid Mixing Phenomena using Advanced Interface-Tracking Method -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Takase, Kazuyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    Thermal-hydraulic design of the current boiling water reactor (BWR) is performed by correlations with empirical results of actual-size tests. However, for the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) core, an actual size test of an embodiment of its design is required to confirm or modify such correlations. Development of a method that enables the thermal-hydraulic design of nuclear reactors without these actual size tests is desired, because these tests take a long time and entail great cost. For this reason we developed an advanced thermal-hydraulic design method for FLWRs using innovative two-phase flow simulation technology. In this study, detailed Two-Phase Flow simulation code using advanced Interface Tracking method: TPFIT is developed to calculate the detailed information of the two-phase flow. We tried to verify the TPFIT code by comparing it with the 2-channel air-water and steam-water mixing experimental results. The predicted result agrees well the observed results and bubble dynamics through the gap and cross flow behavior could be effectively predicted by the TPFIT code, and pressure difference between fluid channels is responsible for the fluid mixing.

  13. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  14. Triangle based TVD schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durlofsky, Louis J.; Osher, Stanley; Engquist, Bjorn

    1990-01-01

    A triangle based total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme for the numerical approximation of hyperbolic conservation laws in two space dimensions is constructed. The novelty of the scheme lies in the nature of the preprocessing of the cell averaged data, which is accomplished via a nearest neighbor linear interpolation followed by a slope limiting procedures. Two such limiting procedures are suggested. The resulting method is considerably more simple than other triangle based non-oscillatory approximations which, like this scheme, approximate the flux up to second order accuracy. Numerical results for linear advection and Burgers' equation are presented.

  15. Improved Boundary Conditions for Cell-centered Difference Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Klopfer, Goetz H.; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Cell-centered finite-volume (CCFV) schemes have certain attractive properties for the solution of the equations governing compressible fluid flow. Among others, they provide a natural vehicle for specifying flux conditions at the boundaries of the physical domain. Unfortunately, they lead to slow convergence for numerical programs utilizing them. In this report a method for investigating and improving the convergence of CCFV schemes is presented, which focuses on the effect of the numerical boundary conditions. The key to the method is the computation of the spectral radius of the iteration matrix of the entire demoralized system of equations, not just of the interior point scheme or the boundary conditions.

  16. An Energy Decaying Scheme for Nonlinear Dynamics of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottasso, Carlo L.; Bauchau, Olivier A.; Choi, Jou-Young; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A novel integration scheme for nonlinear dynamics of geometrically exact shells is developed based on the inextensible director assumption. The new algorithm is designed so as to imply the strict decay of the system total mechanical energy at each time step, and consequently unconditional stability is achieved in the nonlinear regime. Furthermore, the scheme features tunable high frequency numerical damping and it is therefore stiffly accurate. The method is tested for a finite element spatial formulation of shells based on mixed interpolations of strain tensorial components and on a two-parameter representation of director rotations. The robustness of the, scheme is illustrated with the help of numerical examples.

  17. A chaos secure communication scheme based on multiplication modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallahi, Kia; Leung, Henry

    2010-02-01

    A secure spread spectrum communication scheme using multiplication modulation is proposed. The proposed system multiplies the message by chaotic signal. The scheme does not need to know the initial condition of the chaotic signals and the receiver is based on an extended Kalman filter (EKF). This signal encryption scheme lends itself to cheap implementation and can therefore be used effectively for ensuring security and privacy in commercial consumer electronics products. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme, a numerical example based on Genesio-Tesi system and also Chen dynamical system is presented and the results are compared.

  18. On the dissipation mechanism of Godunov-type schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soo Hyung; Kwon, Jang Hyuk

    2003-07-01

    Dissipation mechanisms of Godunov-type schemes are presented in the framework of unified representation. The causes of inaccuracy at the contact discontinuity and the dissipation mechanism in the numerical mass flux of the HLLEM scheme are examined first. A "vacuum preserving property" is defined and the prominent role of the numerical signal speed involved with the rarefaction waves in the expanding region is analyzed. Through a linear perturbation analysis on the odd-even decoupling problem, necessary conditions for designing a shock stable scheme are discussed. As a result, an improved HLLE(HLLE+) scheme is proposed and its dissipation mechanism is analyzed. The diffusivity of the Godunov-type schemes is examined by two-dimensional hypersonic viscous flow.

  19. Check-Digit Schemes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the study of identification codes and check-digit schemes as a way to show students a practical application of mathematics and introduce them to coding theory. Examples include postal service money orders, parcel tracking numbers, ISBN codes, bank identification numbers, and UPC codes. (MKR)

  20. An improved WENO-Z scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acker, F.; B. de R. Borges, R.; Costa, B.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we show that for a WENO scheme to improve the numerical resolution of smooth waves, increasing to some extent the contribution of the substencils where the solution is less smooth is much more important than improving the accuracy at critical points. WENO-Z, for instance, achieved less dissipative results than classical WENO through the use of a high-order global smoothness measurement, τ, which increased the weights of less-smooth substencils. This time, we present a way of further increasing the relevance of less-smooth substencils by adding a new term to the WENO-Z weights that uses information which is already available in its formula. The improved scheme attains much better resolution at the smooth parts of the solution, while keeping the same numerical stability of the original WENO-Z at shocks and discontinuities.

  1. Embedded discontinuous Galerkin transport schemes with localised limiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotter, C. J.; Kuzmin, D.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by finite element spaces used for representation of temperature in the compatible finite element approach for numerical weather prediction, we introduce locally bounded transport schemes for (partially-)continuous finite element spaces. The underlying high-order transport scheme is constructed by injecting the partially-continuous field into an embedding discontinuous finite element space, applying a stable upwind discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme, and projecting back into the partially-continuous space; we call this an embedded DG transport scheme. We prove that this scheme is stable in L2 provided that the underlying upwind DG scheme is. We then provide a framework for applying limiters for embedded DG transport schemes. Standard DG limiters are applied during the underlying DG scheme. We introduce a new localised form of element-based flux-correction which we apply to limiting the projection back into the partially-continuous space, so that the whole transport scheme is bounded. We provide details in the specific case of tensor-product finite element spaces on wedge elements that are discontinuous P1/Q1 in the horizontal and continuous P2 in the vertical. The framework is illustrated with numerical tests.

  2. Forcing scheme in pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase flows.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Luo, K H; Li, X J

    2012-07-01

    The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is a widely used multiphase model in the LB community. In this model, an interaction force, which is usually implemented via a forcing scheme, is employed to mimic the molecular interactions that cause phase segregation. The forcing scheme is therefore expected to play an important role in the pseudoepotential LB model. In this paper, we aim to address some key issues about forcing schemes in the pseudopotential LB model. First, theoretical and numerical analyses will be made for Shan-Chen's forcing scheme [Shan and Chen, Phys. Rev. E 47, 1815 (1993)] and the exact-difference-method forcing scheme [Kupershtokh et al., Comput. Math. Appl. 58, 965 (2009)]. The nature of these two schemes and their recovered macroscopic equations will be shown. Second, through a theoretical analysis, we will reveal the physics behind the phenomenon that different forcing schemes exhibit different performances in the pseudopotential LB model. Moreover, based on the analysis, we will present an improved forcing scheme and numerically demonstrate that the improved scheme can be treated as an alternative approach to achieving thermodynamic consistency in the pseudopotential LB model. PMID:23005565

  3. High Order Semi-Lagrangian Advection Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2014-11-01

    In most fluid phenomena, advection plays an important roll. A numerical scheme capable of making quantitative predictions and simulations must compute correctly the advection terms appearing in the equations governing fluid flow. Here we present a high order forward semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme specifically tailored to compute material derivatives. The scheme relies on the geometrical interpretation of material derivatives to compute the time evolution of fields on grids that deform with the material fluid domain, an interpolating procedure of arbitrary order that preserves the moments of the interpolated distributions, and a nonlinear mapping strategy to perform interpolations between undeformed and deformed grids. Additionally, a discontinuity criterion was implemented to deal with discontinuous fields and shocks. Tests of pure advection, shock formation and nonlinear phenomena are presented to show performance and convergence of the scheme. The high computational cost is considerably reduced when implemented on massively parallel architectures found in graphic cards. The authors acknowledge funding from Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER Grant Number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  4. A New Class of Finite Difference Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahesh, K.

    1996-01-01

    Fluid flows in the transitional and turbulent regimes possess a wide range of length and time scales. The numerical computation of these flows therefore requires numerical methods that can accurately represent the entire, or at least a significant portion, of this range of scales. The inaccurate representation of small scales is inherent to non-spectral schemes. This can be detrimental to computations where the energy in the small scales is comparable to that in the larger scales, e.g. large-eddy simulations of high Reynolds number turbulence. The inaccurate numerical representation of the small scales in these large-eddy simulations can result in the numerical error overwhelming the contribution of the subgrid-scale model.

  5. Numerical simulation of small perturbation transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seebass, A. R.; Yu, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a systematic study of small perturbation transonic flows are presented. Both the flow over thin airfoils and the flow over wedges were investigated. Various numerical schemes were employed in the study. The prime goal of the research was to determine the efficiency of various numerical procedures by accurately evaluating the wave drag, both by computing the pressure integral around the body and by integrating the momentum loss across the shock. Numerical errors involved in the computations that affect the accuracy of drag evaluations were analyzed. The factors that effect numerical stability and the rate of convergence of the iterative schemes were also systematically studied.

  6. The Implicit and Explicit alpha-mu Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Himansu, Ananda

    1997-01-01

    Artificial numerical dissipation is an important issue in large Reynolds number computations. In such computations, the artificial dissipation inherent in traditional numerical schemes can overwhelm the physical dissipation and yield inaccurate results on meshes of practical size. In the present work, the space-time conservation element and solution element method is used to construct new and accurate numerical schemes such that artificial numerical dissipation will not overwhelm physical dissipation. Specifically, these schemes have the property that numerical dissipation vanishes when the physical viscosity goes to zero. These new schemes therefore accurately model the physical dissipation even when it is extremely small. The method of space-time conservation element and solution element, currently under development, is a nontraditional numerical method for solving conservation laws. The method is developed on the basis of local and global flux conservation in a space-time domain, in which space and time are treated in a unified manner. Explicit solvers for model and fluid dynamic conservation laws have previously been investigated. In this paper, we introduce a new concept in the design of implicit schemes, and use it to construct two highly accurate solvers for a convection-diffusion equation. The two schemes become identical in the pure convection case, and in the pure diffusion case. The implicit schemes are applicable over the whole Reynolds number range, from purely diffusive equations to purely inviscid (convective) equations. The stability and consistency of the schemes are analyzed, and some numerical results are presented. It is shown that, in the inviscid case, the new schemes become explicit and their amplification factors are identical to those of the Leapfrog scheme. On the other hand, in the pure diffusion case, their principal amplification factor becomes the amplification factor of the Crank-Nicolson scheme. We also construct an explicit solver

  7. Development of new flux splitting schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, MENG-S.; Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Maximizing both accuracy and efficiency has been the primary objective in designing a numerical algorithm for CFD. This is especially important for solution of complex three-dimensional systems of Navier-Stokes equations which often include turbulence modeling and chemistry effects. Recently, upwind schemes have been well received for both their capability of resolving discontinuities and their sound theoretical basis in characteristic theory for hyperbolic systems. With this in mind, two new flux splitting techniques are presented for upwind differencing.

  8. A Wavelet Based Dissipation Method for ALE Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, B; Eliason, D.; Jameson, L.

    2000-07-01

    Wavelet analysis is natural tool to detect the presence of numerical noise, shocks and other features which might drive a calculation to become unstable. Here we suggest ways where wavelets can be used effectively to define a dissipation flag to replace dissipation flags traditionally used in ALE numerical schemes.

  9. Splitting based finite volume schemes for ideal MHD equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, F. G.; Mishra, S.; Risebro, N. H.

    2009-02-01

    We design finite volume schemes for the equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and based on splitting these equations into a fluid part and a magnetic induction part. The fluid part leads to an extended Euler system with magnetic forces as source terms. This set of equations are approximated by suitable two- and three-wave HLL solvers. The magnetic part is modeled by the magnetic induction equations which are approximated using stable upwind schemes devised in a recent paper [F. Fuchs, K.H. Karlsen, S. Mishra, N.H. Risebro, Stable upwind schemes for the Magnetic Induction equation. Math. Model. Num. Anal., Available on conservation laws preprint server, submitted for publication, URL: ]. These two sets of schemes can be combined either component by component, or by using an operator splitting procedure to obtain a finite volume scheme for the MHD equations. The resulting schemes are simple to design and implement. These schemes are compared with existing HLL type and Roe type schemes for MHD equations in a series of numerical experiments. These tests reveal that the proposed schemes are robust and have a greater numerical resolution than HLL type solvers, particularly in several space dimensions. In fact, the numerical resolution is comparable to that of the Roe scheme on most test problems with the computational cost being at the level of a HLL type solver. Furthermore, the schemes are remarkably stable even at very fine mesh resolutions and handle the divergence constraint efficiently with low divergence errors.

  10. 2D SEDFLUX 1.0C:. an advanced process-response numerical model for the fill of marine sedimentary basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syvitski, James P. M.; Hutton, Eric W. H.

    2001-07-01

    Numerical simulators of the dynamics of strata formation of continental margins fuse information from the atmosphere, ocean and regional geology. Such models can provide information for areas and times for which actual measurements are not available, or for when purely statistical estimates are not adequate by themselves. SEDFLUX is such a basin-fill model, written in ANSI-standard C, able to simulate the delivery of sediment and their accumulation over time scales of tens of thousands of years. SEDFLUX includes the effects of sea-level fluctuations, river floods, ocean storms, and other relevant environmental factors (climate trends, random catastrophic events), at a time step (daily to yearly) that is sensitive to short-term variations of the seafloor. SEDFLUX combines individual process-response models into one fully interactive model, delivering a multi-sized sediment load onto and across a continental margin, including sediment redistribution by (1) river mouth dynamics, (2) buoyant surface plumes, (3) hyperpycnal flows, (4) ocean storms, (5) slope instabilities, (6) turbidity currents, and (7) debris flows. The model allows for the deposit to compact, to undergo tectonic processes (faults, uplift) and isostatic subsidence from the sediment load. The modeled architecture has a typical vertical resolution of 1-25 cm, and a typical horizontal resolution of between 1 and 100 m.

  11. Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  12. A flexible gridding scheme for reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a new control volume based finite difference scheme for petroleum reservoir simulation which can be used with unstructured grids. The numerical scheme to model fluid flow is shown to be easily used for Voronoi grids in 2D. It can also be used with certain geometrical limitations for 3D Voronoi grids. The scheme can be used without any significant limitations for triangle or tetrahedron based grids where control volumes are constructed around their vertices. It assumes uniform properties inside such control volumes. Full, anisotropic and asymmetric permeability tensor can be easily handled with the proposed method. The permeability tensor can vary from block to block. Thus it will be of great value in modeling fluid flow in reservoirs where principal directions of permeability varies between beds or within a bed. The paper also presents an analysis of some of the published flexible gridding schemes which use a control volume type algebraic approximation and demonstrate the advantages of the method presented here. The technique for grid construction is also discussed. Test results presented here demonstrate the need for proper representation of reservoir geometry to predict the correct flow behavior. The gridding scheme described in this paper achieves that purpose.

  13. Force-controlled absorption in a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank

    SciTech Connect

    Spinneken, Johannes Christou, Marios; Swan, Chris

    2014-09-01

    An active control methodology for the absorption of water waves in a numerical wave tank is introduced. This methodology is based upon a force-feedback technique which has previously been shown to be very effective in physical wave tanks. Unlike other methods, an a-priori knowledge of the wave conditions in the tank is not required; the absorption controller being designed to automatically respond to a wide range of wave conditions. In comparison to numerical sponge layers, effective wave absorption is achieved on the boundary, thereby minimising the spatial extent of the numerical wave tank. In contrast to the imposition of radiation conditions, the scheme is inherently capable of absorbing irregular waves. Most importantly, simultaneous generation and absorption can be achieved. This is an important advance when considering inclusion of reflective bodies within the numerical wave tank. In designing the absorption controller, an infinite impulse response filter is adopted, thereby eliminating the problem of non-causality in the controller optimisation. Two alternative controllers are considered, both implemented in a fully-nonlinear wave tank based on a multiple-flux boundary element scheme. To simplify the problem under consideration, the present analysis is limited to water waves propagating in a two-dimensional domain. The paper presents an extensive numerical validation which demonstrates the success of the method for a wide range of wave conditions including regular, focused and random waves. The numerical investigation also highlights some of the limitations of the method, particularly in simultaneously generating and absorbing large amplitude or highly-nonlinear waves. The findings of the present numerical study are directly applicable to related fields where optimum absorption is sought; these include physical wavemaking, wave power absorption and a wide range of numerical wave tank schemes.

  14. A 4OEC scheme for the biharmonic steady Navier-Stokes equations in non-rectangular domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Shuvam; Kalita, Jiten C.

    2015-11-01

    Recently the biharmonic form of the Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations have been solved in various domains by using second order compact discretization. In this paper, we present a fourth order essentially compact (4OEC) finite difference scheme for the steady N-S equations in geometries beyond rectangular. As a further advancement to the earlier formulations on the classical biharmonic equation that were developed for Cartesian coordinate system, this scheme is capable of numerically solving the two-dimensional N-S equations using body fitted coordinate system. Despite the presence of extra derivative terms in the quasi-linear form of the biharmonic equation, our extended formulation continues to maintain its fourth order accuracy on a nine-point compact stencil. A spectral analysis on the scheme reveals its superior resolution properties. The formulation has been tested on fluid flow problems of varied complexities on different geometries which includes flow past an impulsively started circular cylinder and elliptic aerofoil with angles of attack. We present our numerical results and validate them with established numerical and experimental observations available in the literature; excellent comparison is obtained in all the cases.

  15. Advanced midwifery practice or advancing midwifery practice?

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel; Leap, Nicky; Homer, Caroline

    2010-09-01

    Advanced midwifery practice is a controversial notion in midwifery, particularly at present in Australia. The proposed changes in legislation around access to the publicly funded Medical Benefits Scheme (MBS) and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) in 2009-2010 have meant that the issue of advanced midwifery practice has again taken prominence. Linking midwifery access to MBS and PBS to a safety and quality framework that includes an 'advanced midwifery credentialling framework' is particularly challenging. The Haxton and Fahy paper in the December 2009 edition of Women and Birth is timely as it enables a reflection upon these issues and encourages debate and discussion about exactly what is midwifery, what are we educating our students for and is working to the full scope of practice practising at advanced level? This paper seeks to address some of these questions and open up the topic for further debate. PMID:20018582

  16. Solution of the linear shallow water equations by the fourth-order leapfrog scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalik, Z.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical schemes of the first and second order of approximation introduce numerical distortion when the wave propagation over a long distance is investigated. To alleviate this problem, the fourth-order leapfrog scheme is constructed. The standard leapfrog method is based on the truncated Taylor series expansion which depicts an error proportional to the second-order terms. In the proposed method the numerical solution is corrected for these terms. The space and time corrections work well in diminishing numerical dispersion and dissipation.

  17. Semi-passive, Chemical Oxidation Schemes for the Long-term Treatment of Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Frank W. Schwartz

    2005-12-13

    This research involves a combined experimental and modeling study that builds on our previous DOE-sponsored work in investigating how KMnO{sub 4} can be better used with in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated by chlorinated ethylenes (e.g., PCE, TCE, DCE). This study aims to provide scientific basis for developing a new long-term, semi-passive ISCO scheme that uses controlled release KMnO{sub 4} as a reactive barrier component. Specific objectives of the study are (1) to construct controlled release KMnO{sub 4} as a new reactive barrier component that could deliver permanganate at a controlled rate over long time periods of years, (2) to quantitatively describe release mechanisms associated with the controlled release KMnO{sub 4}, (3) to demonstrate efficacy of the new remediation scheme using proof-of-concept experiments, and (4) to design advanced forms of controlled release systems through numerical optimization. The new scheme operates in a long-term, semi-passive manner to control spreading of a dissolved contaminant plume with periodic replacement of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} installed in the subsurface. As a first step in developing this remedial concept, we manufactured various prototype controlled release KMnO{sub 4} forms. Then we demonstrated using column experiments that the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} could deliver small amount of permanganate into flowing water at controlled rates over long time periods of years. An analytical model was also used to estimate the diffusivities and durations of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4}. Finally, proof-of-concept flow-tank experiments were performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} scheme in controlling dissolved TCE plume in a long-term, semi-passive manner. Another important thrust of our research effort involved numerical optimization of controlled release systems. This study used a numerical model that is capable of describing release patterns of active

  18. On a fourth order accurate implicit finite difference scheme for hyperbolic conservation laws. II - Five-point schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.; Tal-Ezer, H.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a family of two-level five-point implicit schemes for the solution of one-dimensional systems of hyperbolic conservation laws, which generalized the Crank-Nicholson scheme to fourth order accuracy (4-4) in both time and space. These 4-4 schemes are nondissipative and unconditionally stable. Special attention is given to the system of linear equations associated with these 4-4 implicit schemes. The regularity of this system is analyzed and efficiency of solution-algorithms is examined. A two-datum representation of these 4-4 implicit schemes brings about a compactification of the stencil to three mesh points at each time-level. This compact two-datum representation is particularly useful in deriving boundary treatments. Numerical results are presented to illustrate some properties of the proposed scheme.

  19. Hybridization schemes for clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, David J.

    The concept of an optimum hybridization scheme for cluster compounds is developed with particular reference to electron counting. The prediction of electron counts for clusters and the interpretation of the bonding is shown to depend critically upon the presumed hybridization pattern of the cluster vertex atoms. This fact has not been properly appreciated in previous work, particularly in applications of Stone's tensor surface harmonic (TSH) theory, but is found to be a useful tool when dealt with directly. A quantitative definition is suggested for the optimum cluster hybridization pattern based directly upon the ease of interpretation of the molecular orbitals, and results are given for a range of species. The relationship of this scheme to the detailed cluster geometry is described using Löwdin's partitioned perturbation theory, and the success and range of application of TSH theory are discussed.

  20. Application of TVD schemes for the Euler equations of gas dynamics. [method of Total Variation Diminishing for shock wave computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Warming, R. F.; Harten, A.

    1985-01-01

    Highly accurate and yet stable shock-capturing finite difference schemes have been designed for the computation of the Euler equations of gas dynamics. Four different principles for the construction of high resolution total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes are available, including hybrid schemes, a second-order extension of Godunov's scheme by van Leer (1979), the modified flux approach of Harten (1983, 1984), and the numerical fluctuation approach of Roe (1985). The present paper has the objective to review the class of second-order TVD schemes via the modified flux approach. Attention is given to first-order TVD schemes, a second-order accurate explicit TVD scheme, the global order of accuracy of the second-order TVD scheme, extensions to systems and two-dimensional conservation laws, numerical experiments with a second-order explicit TVD scheme, implicit TVD schemes, and second-order implicit TVD schemes.

  1. A numerical method for cardiac mechanoelectric simulations.

    PubMed

    Pathmanathan, Pras; Whiteley, Jonathan P

    2009-05-01

    Much effort has been devoted to developing numerical techniques for solving the equations that describe cardiac electrophysiology, namely the monodomain equations and bidomain equations. Only a limited selection of publications, however, address the development of numerical techniques for mechanoelectric simulations where cardiac electrophysiology is coupled with deformation of cardiac tissue. One problem commonly encountered in mechanoelectric simulations is instability of the coupled numerical scheme. In this study, we develop a stable numerical scheme for mechanoelectric simulations. A number of convergence tests are carried out using this stable technique for simulations where deformations are of the magnitude typically observed in a beating heart. These convergence tests demonstrate that accurate computation of tissue deformation requires a nodal spacing of around 1 mm in the mesh used to calculate tissue deformation. This is a much finer computational grid than has previously been acknowledged, and has implications for the computational efficiency of the resulting numerical scheme. PMID:19263223

  2. Beyond Scheme F

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, C.J.; Fisher, H.; Pepin, J.; Gillmann, R.

    1996-07-01

    Traffic classification techniques were evaluated using data from a 1993 investigation of the traffic flow patterns on I-20 in Georgia. First we improved the data by sifting through the data base, checking against the original video for questionable events and removing and/or repairing questionable events. We used this data base to critique the performance quantitatively of a classification method known as Scheme F. As a context for improving the approach, we show in this paper that scheme F can be represented as a McCullogh-Pitts neural network, oar as an equivalent decomposition of the plane. We found that Scheme F, among other things, severely misrepresents the number of vehicles in Class 3 by labeling them as Class 2. After discussing the basic classification problem in terms of what is measured, and what is the desired prediction goal, we set forth desirable characteristics of the classification scheme and describe a recurrent neural network system that partitions the high dimensional space up into bins for each axle separation. the collection of bin numbers, one for each of the axle separations, specifies a region in the axle space called a hyper-bin. All the vehicles counted that have the same set of in numbers are in the same hyper-bin. The probability of the occurrence of a particular class in that hyper- bin is the relative frequency with which that class occurs in that set of bin numbers. This type of algorithm produces classification results that are much more balanced and uniform with respect to Classes 2 and 3 and Class 10. In particular, the cancellation of errors of classification that occurs is for many applications the ideal classification scenario. The neural network results are presented in the form of a primary classification network and a reclassification network, the performance matrices for which are presented.

  3. Efficient Low Dissipative High Order Schemes for Multiscale MHD Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Yee, Helen C.

    2002-11-01

    Accurate numerical simulations of complex multiscale compressible viscous flows, especially high speed turbulence combustion and acoustics, demand high order schemes with adaptive numerical dissipation controls. Standard high resolution shock-capturing methods are too dissipative to capture the small scales and/or long-time wave propagations without extreme grid refinements and small time steps. An integrated approach for the control of numerical dissipation in high order schemes for the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations has been developed and verified by the authors and collaborators. These schemes are suitable for the problems in question. Basically, the scheme consists of sixth-order or higher non-dissipative spatial difference operators as the base scheme. To control the amount of numerical dissipation, multiresolution wavelets are used as sensors to adaptively limit the amount and to aid the selection and/or blending of the appropriate types of numerical dissipation to be used. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves play a key role in drag reduction in highly maneuverable high speed combat aircraft, in space weather forecasting, and in the understanding of the dynamics of the evolution of our solar system and the main sequence stars. Although there exist a few well-studied second and third-order high-resolution shock-capturing schemes for the MHD in the literature, these schemes are too diffusive and not practical for turbulence/combustion MHD flows. On the other hand, extension of higher than third-order high-resolution schemes to the MHD system of equations is not straightforward. Unlike the hydrodynamic equations, the inviscid MHD system is non-strictly hyperbolic with non-convex fluxes. The wave structures and shock types are different from their hydrodynamic counterparts. Many of the non-traditional hydrodynamic shocks are not fully understood. Consequently, reliable and highly accurate numerical schemes for multiscale MHD equations pose a great

  4. MIMO transmit scheme based on morphological perceptron with competitive learning.

    PubMed

    Valente, Raul Ambrozio; Abrão, Taufik

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a new multi-input multi-output (MIMO) transmit scheme aided by artificial neural network (ANN). The morphological perceptron with competitive learning (MP/CL) concept is deployed as a decision rule in the MIMO detection stage. The proposed MIMO transmission scheme is able to achieve double spectral efficiency; hence, in each time-slot the receiver decodes two symbols at a time instead one as Alamouti scheme. Other advantage of the proposed transmit scheme with MP/CL-aided detector is its polynomial complexity according to modulation order, while it becomes linear when the data stream length is greater than modulation order. The performance of the proposed scheme is compared to the traditional MIMO schemes, namely Alamouti scheme and maximum-likelihood MIMO (ML-MIMO) detector. Also, the proposed scheme is evaluated in a scenario with variable channel information along the frame. Numerical results have shown that the diversity gain under space-time coding Alamouti scheme is partially lost, which slightly reduces the bit-error rate (BER) performance of the proposed MP/CL-NN MIMO scheme. PMID:27135805

  5. A new multi-symplectic scheme for the generalized Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haochen; Sun, Jianqiang

    2012-09-01

    We propose a new scheme for the generalized Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation. The multi-symplectic conservation property of the new scheme is proved. Back error analysis shows that the new multi-symplectic scheme has second order accuracy in space and time. Numerical application on studying the KPI equation and the KPII equation are presented in detail.

  6. High-order compact MacCormack scheme for two-dimensional compressible and non-hydrostatic equations of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JavanNezhad, R.; Meshkatee, A. H.; Ghader, S.; Ahmadi-Givi, F.

    2016-09-01

    This study is devoted to application of the fourth-order compact MacCormack scheme to spatial differencing of the conservative form of two-dimensional and non-hydrostatic equation of a dry atmosphere. To advance the solution in time a four-stage Runge-Kutta method is used. To perform the simulations, two test cases including evolution of a warm bubble and a cold bubble in a neutral atmosphere with open and rigid boundaries are employed. In addition, the second-order MacCormack and the standard fourth-order compact MacCormack schemes are used to perform the simulations. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of the numerical results for different test cases exhibit the superiority of the fourth-order compact MacCormack scheme on the second-order method.

  7. Convergence Acceleration for Multistage Time-Stepping Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Turkel, Eli L.; Rossow, C-C; Vasta, V. N.

    2006-01-01

    The convergence of a Runge-Kutta (RK) scheme with multigrid is accelerated by preconditioning with a fully implicit operator. With the extended stability of the Runge-Kutta scheme, CFL numbers as high as 1000 could be used. The implicit preconditioner addresses the stiffness in the discrete equations associated with stretched meshes. Numerical dissipation operators (based on the Roe scheme, a matrix formulation, and the CUSP scheme) as well as the number of RK stages are considered in evaluating the RK/implicit scheme. Both the numerical and computational efficiency of the scheme with the different dissipation operators are discussed. The RK/implicit scheme is used to solve the two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) compressible, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. In two dimensions, turbulent flows over an airfoil at subsonic and transonic conditions are computed. The effects of mesh cell aspect ratio on convergence are investigated for Reynolds numbers between 5.7 x 10(exp 6) and 100.0 x 10(exp 6). Results are also obtained for a transonic wing flow. For both 2-D and 3-D problems, the computational time of a well-tuned standard RK scheme is reduced at least a factor of four.

  8. Central Weighted Non-Oscillatory (CWENO) and Operator Splitting Schemes in Computational Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovski, Stavro

    2011-05-01

    High-resolution shock-capturing schemes (HRSC) are known to be the most adequate and advanced technique used for numerical approximation to the solution of hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. Since most of the astrophysical phenomena can be described by means of system of (M)HD conservation equations, finding most ac- curate, computationally not expensive and robust numerical approaches for their solution is a task of great importance for numerical astrophysics. Based on the Central Weighted Non-Oscillatory (CWENO) reconstruction approach, which relies on the adaptive choice of the smoothest stencil for resolving strong shocks and discontinuities in central framework on staggered grid, we present a new algorithm for systems of conservation laws using the key idea of evolving the intermediate stages in the Runge Kutta time discretization in primitive variables . In this thesis, we introduce a new so-called conservative-primitive variables strategy (CPVS) by integrating the latter into the earlier proposed Central Runge Kutta schemes (Pareschi et al., 2005). The advantages of the new shock-capturing algorithm with respect to the state-of-the-art HRSC schemes used in astrophysics like upwind Godunov-type schemes can be summarized as follows: (i) Riemann-solver-free central approach; (ii) favoring dissipation (especially needed for multidimensional applications in astrophysics) owing to the diffusivity coming from the design of the scheme; (iii) high accuracy and speed of the method. The latter stems from the fact that the advancing in time in the predictor step does not need inversion between the primitive and conservative variables and is essential in applications where the conservative variables are neither trivial to compute nor to invert in the set of primitive ones as it is in relativistic hydrodynamics. The main objective of the research adopted in the thesis is to outline the promising application of the CWENO (with CPVS) in the problems of the

  9. MFIX documentation numerical technique

    SciTech Connect

    Syamlal, M.

    1998-01-01

    MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges) is a general-purpose hydrodynamic model for describing chemical reactions and heat transfer in dense or dilute fluid-solids flows, which typically occur in energy conversion and chemical processing reactors. The calculations give time-dependent information on pressure, temperature, composition, and velocity distributions in the reactors. The theoretical basis of the calculations is described in the MFIX Theory Guide. Installation of the code, setting up of a run, and post-processing of results are described in MFIX User`s manual. Work was started in April 1996 to increase the execution speed and accuracy of the code, which has resulted in MFIX 2.0. To improve the speed of the code the old algorithm was replaced by a more implicit algorithm. In different test cases conducted the new version runs 3 to 30 times faster than the old version. To increase the accuracy of the computations, second order accurate discretization schemes were included in MFIX 2.0. Bubbling fluidized bed simulations conducted with a second order scheme show that the predicted bubble shape is rounded, unlike the (unphysical) pointed shape predicted by the first order upwind scheme. This report describes the numerical technique used in MFIX 2.0.

  10. Explicit Von Neumann Stability Conditions for the c-tau Scheme: A Basic Scheme in the Development of the CE-SE Courant Number Insensitive Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung

    2005-01-01

    As part of the continuous development of the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE-SE) method, recently a set of so call ed "Courant number insensitive schemes" has been proposed. The key advantage of these new schemes is that the numerical dissipation associa ted with them generally does not increase as the Courant number decre ases. As such, they can be applied to problems with large Courant number disparities (such as what commonly occurs in Navier-Stokes problem s) without incurring excessive numerical dissipation.

  11. Classification Schemes: Developments and Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pocock, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the growth, survival and future of library classification schemes. Concludes that to survive, a scheme must constantly update its policies, and readily adapt itself to accommodate growing disciplines and changing terminology. (AEF)

  12. ESCAP mobile training scheme.

    PubMed

    Yasas, F M

    1977-01-01

    In response to a United Nations resolution, the Mobile Training Scheme (MTS) was set up to provide training to the trainers of national cadres engaged in frontline and supervisory tasks in social welfare and rural development. The training is innovative in its being based on an analysis of field realities. The MTS team consisted of a leader, an expert on teaching methods and materials, and an expert on action research and evaluation. The country's trainers from different departments were sent to villages to work for a short period and to report their problems in fulfilling their roles. From these grass roots experiences, they made an analysis of the job, determining what knowledge, attitude and skills it required. Analysis of daily incidents and problems were used to produce indigenous teaching materials drawn from actual field practice. How to consider the problems encountered through government structures for policy making and decisions was also learned. Tasks of the students were to identify the skills needed for role performance by job analysis, daily diaries and project histories; to analyze the particular community by village profiles; to produce indigenous teaching materials; and to practice the role skills by actual role performance. The MTS scheme was tried in Nepal in 1974-75; 3 training programs trained 25 trainers and 51 frontline workers; indigenous teaching materials were created; technical papers written; and consultations were provided. In Afghanistan the scheme was used in 1975-76; 45 participants completed the training; seminars were held; and an ongoing Council was created. It is hoped that the training program will be expanded to other countries. PMID:12265562

  13. The Super Tuesday Outbreak: Forecast Sensitivities to Single-Moment Microphysics Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Case, Jonathan L.; Dembek, Scott R.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Forecast precipitation and radar characteristics are used by operational centers to guide the issuance of advisory products. As operational numerical weather prediction is performed at increasingly finer spatial resolution, convective precipitation traditionally represented by sub-grid scale parameterization schemes is now being determined explicitly through single- or multi-moment bulk water microphysics routines. Gains in forecasting skill are expected through improved simulation of clouds and their microphysical processes. High resolution model grids and advanced parameterizations are now available through steady increases in computer resources. As with any parameterization, their reliability must be measured through performance metrics, with errors noted and targeted for improvement. Furthermore, the use of these schemes within an operational framework requires an understanding of limitations and an estimate of biases so that forecasters and model development teams can be aware of potential errors. The National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) Spring Experiments have produced daily, high resolution forecasts used to evaluate forecast skill among an ensemble with varied physical parameterizations and data assimilation techniques. In this research, high resolution forecasts of the 5-6 February 2008 Super Tuesday Outbreak are replicated using the NSSL configuration in order to evaluate two components of simulated convection on a large domain: sensitivities of quantitative precipitation forecasts to assumptions within a single-moment bulk water microphysics scheme, and to determine if these schemes accurately depict the reflectivity characteristics of well-simulated, organized, cold frontal convection. As radar returns are sensitive to the amount of hydrometeor mass and the distribution of mass among variably sized targets, radar comparisons may guide potential improvements to a single-moment scheme. In addition, object-based verification metrics are evaluated for

  14. NUMERICAL NOISE PM SIMULATION IN CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have found that numerical noise in the latest release of CMAQ using the yamo advection scheme when compiled on Linux cluster with pgf90 (5.0 or 6.0). We recommend to use -C option to eliminate the numerical noise.

  15. A flux splitting scheme with high-resolution and robustness for discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Yasuhiro; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1994-01-01

    A flux splitting scheme is proposed for the general nonequilibrium flow equations with an aim at removing numerical dissipation of Van-Leer-type flux-vector splittings on a contact discontinuity. The scheme obtained is also recognized as an improved Advection Upwind Splitting Method (AUSM) where a slight numerical overshoot immediately behind the shock is eliminated. The proposed scheme has favorable properties: high-resolution for contact discontinuities; conservation of enthalpy for steady flows; numerical efficiency; applicability to chemically reacting flows. In fact, for a single contact discontinuity, even if it is moving, this scheme gives the numerical flux of the exact solution of the Riemann problem. Various numerical experiments including that of a thermo-chemical nonequilibrium flow were performed, which indicate no oscillation and robustness of the scheme for shock/expansion waves. A cure for carbuncle phenomenon is discussed as well.

  16. Assessment of Total Variation Diminishing schemes in combustion instability problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Z. J.; Yang, H. Q.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulations of acoustic waves in a shear layer and in an idealized combustion chamber using high resolution Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) schemes has been carried out to study the effects of inherent scheme dissipation and dispersion errors of this class of problems. The numerical results are compared against available exact solutions to quantify these errors. Several popular TVD limiters widely used in the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) community have been assessed. Osher-Chakravarthy limiters are modified so that they can be used in explicit schemes. Among all the limiters investigated, Osher-Chakravarthy third-order limiter is identified as having performed the best. It is also found that all TVD schemes have exceptionally small dispersive errors.

  17. Quantum messages with signatures forgeable in arbitrated quantum signature schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewan; Choi, Jeong Woon; Jho, Nam-Su; Lee, Soojoon

    2015-02-01

    Even though a method to perfectly sign quantum messages has not been known, the arbitrated quantum signature scheme has been considered as one of the good candidates. However, its forgery problem has been an obstacle to the scheme becoming a successful method. In this paper, we consider one situation, which is slightly different from the forgery problem, that we use to check whether at least one quantum message with signature can be forged in a given scheme, although all the messages cannot be forged. If there are only a finite number of forgeable quantum messages in the scheme, then the scheme can be secured against the forgery attack by not sending forgeable quantum messages, and so our situation does not directly imply that we check whether the scheme is secure against the attack. However, if users run a given scheme without any consideration of forgeable quantum messages, then a sender might transmit such forgeable messages to a receiver and in such a case an attacker can forge the messages if the attacker knows them. Thus it is important and necessary to look into forgeable quantum messages. We show here that there always exists such a forgeable quantum message-signature pair for every known scheme with quantum encryption and rotation, and numerically show that there are no forgeable quantum message-signature pairs that exist in an arbitrated quantum signature scheme.

  18. Entropy stable schemes for initial-boundary-value conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svärd, Magnus; Mishra, Siddhartha

    2012-12-01

    We consider initial-boundary-value problems for systems of conservation laws and design entropy stable finite difference schemes to approximate them. The schemes are shown to be entropy stable for a large class of systems that are equipped with a symmetric splitting, derived from the entropy formulation. Numerical examples for the Euler equations of gas dynamics are presented to illustrate the robust performance of the proposed method.

  19. Comparison of Several Dissipation Algorithms for Central Difference Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Radespiel, R.; Turkel, E.

    1997-01-01

    Several algorithms for introducing artificial dissipation into a central difference approximation to the Euler and Navier Stokes equations are considered. The focus of the paper is on the convective upwind and split pressure (CUSP) scheme, which is designed to support single interior point discrete shock waves. This scheme is analyzed and compared in detail with scalar and matrix dissipation (MATD) schemes. Resolution capability is determined by solving subsonic, transonic, and hypersonic flow problems. A finite-volume discretization and a multistage time-stepping scheme with multigrid are used to compute solutions to the flow equations. Numerical results are also compared with either theoretical solutions or experimental data. For transonic airfoil flows the best accuracy on coarse meshes for aerodynamic coefficients is obtained with a simple MATD scheme.

  20. On Approximate Factorization Schemes for Solving the Full Potential Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1997-01-01

    An approximate factorization scheme based on the AF2 algorithm is presented for solving the three-dimensional full potential equation for the transonic flow about isolated wings. Two spatial discretization variations are presented, one using a hybrid first-order/second-order-accurate scheme and the second using a fully second-order-accurate scheme. The present algorithm utilizes a C-H grid topology to map the flow field about the wing. One version of the AF2 iteration scheme is used on the upper wing surface and another slightly modified version is used on the lower surface. These two algorithm variations are then connected at the wing leading edge using a local iteration technique. The resulting scheme has improved linear stability characteristics and improved time-like damping characteristics relative to previous implementations of the AF2 algorithm. The presentation is highlighted with a grid refinement study and a number of numerical results.

  1. The construction of high-accuracy schemes for acoustic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Lei; Baeder, James D.

    1995-01-01

    An accuracy analysis of various high order schemes is performed from an interpolation point of view. The analysis indicates that classical high order finite difference schemes, which use polynomial interpolation, hold high accuracy only at nodes and are therefore not suitable for time-dependent problems. Thus, some schemes improve their numerical accuracy within grid cells by the near-minimax approximation method, but their practical significance is degraded by maintaining the same stencil as classical schemes. One-step methods in space discretization, which use piecewise polynomial interpolation and involve data at only two points, can generate a uniform accuracy over the whole grid cell and avoid spurious roots. As a result, they are more accurate and efficient than multistep methods. In particular, the Cubic-Interpolated Psuedoparticle (CIP) scheme is recommended for computational acoustics.

  2. XFEM schemes for level set based structural optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Wang, Michael Yu; Wei, Peng

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, some elegant extended finite element method (XFEM) schemes for level set method structural optimization are proposed. Firstly, two-dimension (2D) and three-dimension (3D) XFEM schemes with partition integral method are developed and numerical examples are employed to evaluate their accuracy, which indicate that an accurate analysis result can be obtained on the structural boundary. Furthermore, the methods for improving the computational accuracy and efficiency of XFEM are studied, which include the XFEM integral scheme without quadrature sub-cells and higher order element XFEM scheme. Numerical examples show that the XFEM scheme without quadrature sub-cells can yield similar accuracy of structural analysis while prominently reducing the time cost and that higher order XFEM elements can improve the computational accuracy of structural analysis in the boundary elements, but the time cost is increasing. Therefore, the balance of time cost between FE system scale and the order of element needs to be discussed. Finally, the reliability and advantages of the proposed XFEM schemes are illustrated with several 2D and 3D mean compliance minimization examples that are widely used in the recent literature of structural topology optimization. All numerical results demonstrate that the proposed XFEM is a promising structural analysis approach for structural optimization with the level set method.

  3. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  4. AMR vs High Order Schemes Wavelets as a Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, L.

    2000-10-04

    The final goal behind any numerical method is give the smallest wall-clock time for a given final time error or, conversely, the smallest run-time error for a given wall clock time, etc. Here a comparison will be given between adaptive mesh refinement schemes and non-adaptive schemes of higher order. It will be shown that in three dimension calculations that in order for AMR schemes to be competitive that the finest scale must be restricted to an extremely, and unrealistic, small percentage of the computational domain.

  5. Multi-dimensional ENO schemes for general geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, Ami; Chakravarthy, Sukumar R.

    1991-01-01

    A class of ENO schemes is presented for the numerical solution of multidimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws in structured and unstructured grids. This is a class of shock-capturing schemes which are designed to compute cell-averages to high order accuracy. The ENO scheme is composed of a piecewise-polynomial reconstruction of the solution form its given cell-averages, approximate evolution of the resulting initial value problem, and averaging of this approximate solution over each cell. The reconstruction algorithm is based on an adaptive selection of stencil for each cell so as to avoid spurious oscillations near discontinuities while achieving high order of accuracy away from them.

  6. Recent progress on essentially non-oscillatory shock capturing schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osher, Stanley; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of the construction of efficient implementations of 'essentially nonoscillatory' (ENO) schemes that approximate systems of hyperbolic conservation laws. ENO schemes use a local adaptive stencil to automatically obtain information from regions of smoothness when the solution develops discontinuities. Approximations employing ENOs can thereby obtain uniformly high accuracy to the very onset of discontinuities, while retaining a sharp and essentially nonoscillatory shock transition. For ease of implementation, ENO schemes applying the adaptive stencil concept to the numerical fluxes and employing a TVD Runge-Kutta-type time discretization are constructed.

  7. Accurate Monotonicity - Preserving Schemes With Runge-Kutta Time Stepping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, A.; Huynh, H. T.

    1997-01-01

    A new class of high-order monotonicity-preserving schemes for the numerical solution of conservation laws is presented. The interface value in these schemes is obtained by limiting a higher-order polynominal reconstruction. The limiting is designed to preserve accuracy near extrema and to work well with Runge-Kutta time stepping. Computational efficiency is enhanced by a simple test that determines whether the limiting procedure is needed. For linear advection in one dimension, these schemes are shown as well as the Euler equations also confirm their high accuracy, good shock resolution, and computational efficiency.

  8. Iterated upwind schemes for gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K. Szmelter, Joanna

    2009-01-10

    A class of high-resolution schemes established in integration of anelastic equations is extended to fully compressible flows, and documented for unsteady (and steady) problems through a span of Mach numbers from zero to supersonic. The schemes stem from iterated upwind technology of the multidimensional positive definite advection transport algorithm (MPDATA). The derived algorithms employ standard and modified forms of the equations of gas dynamics for conservation of mass, momentum and either total or internal energy as well as potential temperature. Numerical examples from elementary wave propagation, through computational aerodynamics benchmarks, to atmospheric small- and large-amplitude acoustics with intricate wave-flow interactions verify the approach for both structured and unstructured meshes, and demonstrate its flexibility and robustness.

  9. The Impact of Microphysical Schemes on Intensity and Track of Hurricane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W. K.; Shi, J. J.; Chen, S. S.; Lang, S.; Lin, P.; Hong, S. Y.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Hou, A.

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, both research and operational numerical weather prediction models [e.g. Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF)] have started using more complex microphysical schemes originally developed for high-resolution cloud resolving models (CRMs) with a 1-2 km or less horizontal resolutions. The WRF is a next-generation meso-scale forecast model and assimilation system that has incorporated a modern software framework, advanced dynamics, numeric and data assimilation techniques, a multiple moveable nesting capability, and improved physical packages. The WRF model can be used for a wide range of applications, from idealized research to operational forecasting, with an emphasis on horizontal grid sizes in the range of 1-10 km. The current WRF includes several different microphysics options. At Goddard, four different cloud microphysics schemes (warm rain only, two-class of ice, two three-class of ice with either graupel or hail) are implemented into the WRF. The performances of these schemes have been compared to those from other WRF microphysics scheme options for an Atlantic hurricane case. In addition, a brief review and comparison on the previous modeling studies on the impact of microphysics schemes and microphysical processes on intensity and track of hurricane will be presented. Generally, almost all modeling studies found that the microphysics schemes did not have major impacts on track forecast, but did have more effect on the intensity. All modeling studies found that the simulated hurricane has rapid deepening and/or intensification for the warm rain-only case. It is because all hydrometeors were very large raindrops, and they fell out quickly at and near the eye-wall region. This would hydrostatically produce the lowest pressure. In addition, these modeling studies suggested that the simulated hurricane becomes unrealistically strong by removing the evaporative cooling of cloud droplets and melting of ice particles. This is due to the

  10. Accuracy of schemes with nonuniform meshes for compressible fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of the space discretization for time-dependent problems when a nonuniform mesh is used is considered. Many schemes reduce to first-order accuracy while a popular finite volume scheme is even inconsistent for general grids. This accuracy is based on physical variables. However, when accuracy is measured in computational variables then second-order accuracy can be obtained. This is meaningful only if the mesh accurately reflects the properties of the solution. In addition, the stability properties of some improved accurate schemes are analyzed and it can be shown that they also allow for larger time steps when Runge-Kutta type methods are used to advance in time.

  11. Finite-difference schemes for anisotropic diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Es, Bram van; Koren, Barry; Blank, Hugo J. de

    2014-09-01

    In fusion plasmas diffusion tensors are extremely anisotropic due to the high temperature and large magnetic field strength. This causes diffusion, heat conduction, and viscous momentum loss, to effectively be aligned with the magnetic field lines. This alignment leads to different values for the respective diffusive coefficients in the magnetic field direction and in the perpendicular direction, to the extent that heat diffusion coefficients can be up to 10{sup 12} times larger in the parallel direction than in the perpendicular direction. This anisotropy puts stringent requirements on the numerical methods used to approximate the MHD-equations since any misalignment of the grid may cause the perpendicular diffusion to be polluted by the numerical error in approximating the parallel diffusion. Currently the common approach is to apply magnetic field-aligned coordinates, an approach that automatically takes care of the directionality of the diffusive coefficients. This approach runs into problems at x-points and at points where there is magnetic re-connection, since this causes local non-alignment. It is therefore useful to consider numerical schemes that are tolerant to the misalignment of the grid with the magnetic field lines, both to improve existing methods and to help open the possibility of applying regular non-aligned grids. To investigate this, in this paper several discretization schemes are developed and applied to the anisotropic heat diffusion equation on a non-aligned grid.

  12. Advanced Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Atmospheric Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnlein, Christian; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Gerz, Thomas

    The present chapter introduces the method of computational simulation to predict and study turbulent atmospheric flows. This includes a description of the fundamental approach to computational simulation and the practical implementation using the technique of large-eddy simulation. In addition, selected contributions from IPA scientists to computational model development and various examples for applications are given. These examples include homogeneous turbulence, convective boundary layers, heated forest canopy, buoyant thermals, and large-scale flows with baroclinic wave instability.

  13. Advanced PID type fuzzy logic power system stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Hiyama, Takashi; Kugimiya, Masahiko; Satoh, Hironori . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1994-09-01

    An advanced fuzzy logic control scheme has been proposed for a micro-computer based power system stabilizer to enhance the overall stability of power systems. The proposed control scheme utilizes the PID information of the generator speed. The input signal to the stabilizer is the real power output of a study unit. Simulations show the effectiveness of the advanced fuzzy logic control scheme.

  14. The upwind control volume scheme for unstructured triangular grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Michael; Anderson, W. Kyle; Roberts, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    A new algorithm for the numerical solution of the Euler equations is presented. This algorithm is particularly suited to the use of unstructured triangular meshes, allowing geometric flexibility. Solutions are second-order accurate in the steady state. Implementation of the algorithm requires minimal grid connectivity information, resulting in modest storage requirements, and should enhance the implementation of the scheme on massively parallel computers. A novel form of upwind differencing is developed, and is shown to yield sharp resolution of shocks. Two new artificial viscosity models are introduced that enhance the performance of the new scheme. Numerical results for transonic airfoil flows are presented, which demonstrate the performance of the algorithm.

  15. An unstaggered central scheme on nonuniform grids for the simulation of a compressible two-phase flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touma, Rony; Zeidan, Dia

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we extend a central finite volume method on nonuniform grids to the case of drift-flux two-phase flow problems. The numerical base scheme is an unstaggered, non oscillatory, second-order accurate finite volume scheme that evolves a piecewise linear numerical solution on a single grid and uses dual cells intermediately while updating the numerical solution to avoid the resolution of the Riemann problems arising at the cell interfaces. We then apply the numerical scheme and solve a classical drift-flux problem. The obtained results are in good agreement with corresponding ones appearing in the recent literature, thus confirming the potential of the proposed scheme.

  16. Handling geophysical flows: Numerical modelling using Graphical Processing Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Navarro, Pilar; Lacasta, Asier; Juez, Carmelo; Morales-Hernandez, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Computational tools may help engineers in the assessment of sediment transport during the decision-making processes. The main requirements are that the numerical results have to be accurate and simulation models must be fast. The present work is based on the 2D shallow water equations in combination with the 2D Exner equation [1]. The resulting numerical model accuracy was already discussed in previous work. Regarding the speed of the computation, the Exner equation slows down the already costly 2D shallow water model as the number of variables to solve is increased and the numerical stability is more restrictive. On the other hand, the movement of poorly sorted material over steep areas constitutes a hazardous environmental problem. Computational tools help in the predictions of such landslides [2]. In order to overcome this problem, this work proposes the use of Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) for decreasing significantly the simulation time [3, 4]. The numerical scheme implemented in GPU is based on a finite volume scheme. The mathematical model and the numerical implementation are compared against experimental and field data. In addition, the computational times obtained with the Graphical Hardware technology are compared against Single-Core (sequential) and Multi-Core (parallel) CPU implementations. References [Juez et al.(2014)] Juez, C., Murillo, J., & Garca-Navarro, P. (2014) A 2D weakly-coupled and efficient numerical model for transient shallow flow and movable bed. Advances in Water Resources. 71 93-109. [Juez et al.(2013)] Juez, C., Murillo, J., & Garca-Navarro, P. (2013) . 2D simulation of granular flow over irregular steep slopes using global and local coordinates. Journal of Computational Physics. 225 166-204. [Lacasta et al.(2014)] Lacasta, A., Morales-Hernndez, M., Murillo, J., & Garca-Navarro, P. (2014) An optimized GPU implementation of a 2D free surface simulation model on unstructured meshes Advances in Engineering Software. 78 1-15. [Lacasta

  17. Implicit and semi-implicit schemes: Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, R.; Tóth, G.; Botchev, M. A.; van der Ploeg, A.

    1999-06-01

    This study formulates general guidelines to extend an explicit code with a great variety of implicit and semi-implicit time integration schemes. The discussion is based on their specific implementation in the Versatile Advection Code, which is a general purpose software package for solving systems of non-linear hyperbolic (and/or parabolic) partial differential equations, using standard high resolution shock capturing schemes. For all combinations of explicit high resolution schemes with implicit and semi-implicit treatments, it is shown how second-order spatial and temporal accuracy for the smooth part of the solutions can be maintained. Strategies to obtain steady state and time accurate solutions implicitly are discussed. The implicit and semi-implicit schemes require the solution of large linear systems containing the Jacobian matrix. The Jacobian matrix itself is calculated numerically to ensure the generality of this implementation. Three options are discussed in terms of applicability, storage requirements and computational efficiency. One option is the easily implemented matrix-free approach, but the Jacobian matrix can also be calculated by using a general grid masking algorithm, or by an efficient implementation for a specific Lax-Friedrich-type total variation diminishing (TVD) spatial discretization. The choice of the linear solver depends on the dimensionality of the problem. In one dimension, a direct block tridiagonal solver can be applied, while in more than one spatial dimension, a conjugate gradient (CG)-type iterative solver is used. For advection-dominated problems, preconditioning is needed to accelerate the convergence of the iterative schemes. The modified block incomplete LU-preconditioner is implemented, which performs very well. Examples from two-dimensional hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic computations are given. They model transonic stellar outflow and recover the complex magnetohydrodynamic bow shock flow in the switch-on regime

  18. Optimal rotated staggered-grid finite-difference schemes for elastic wave modeling in TTI media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Yan, Hongyong; Liu, Hong

    2015-11-01

    The rotated staggered-grid finite-difference (RSFD) is an effective approach for numerical modeling to study the wavefield characteristics in tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media. But it surfaces from serious numerical dispersion, which directly affects the modeling accuracy. In this paper, we propose two different optimal RSFD schemes based on the sampling approximation (SA) method and the least-squares (LS) method respectively to overcome this problem. We first briefly introduce the RSFD theory, based on which we respectively derive the SA-based RSFD scheme and the LS-based RSFD scheme. Then different forms of analysis are used to compare the SA-based RSFD scheme and the LS-based RSFD scheme with the conventional RSFD scheme, which is based on the Taylor-series expansion (TE) method. The contrast in numerical accuracy analysis verifies the greater accuracy of the two proposed optimal schemes, and indicates that these schemes can effectively widen the wavenumber range with great accuracy compared with the TE-based RSFD scheme. Further comparisons between these two optimal schemes show that at small wavenumbers, the SA-based RSFD scheme performs better, while at large wavenumbers, the LS-based RSFD scheme leads to a smaller error. Finally, the modeling results demonstrate that for the same operator length, the SA-based RSFD scheme and the LS-based RSFD scheme can achieve greater accuracy than the TE-based RSFD scheme, while for the same accuracy, the optimal schemes can adopt shorter difference operators to save computing time.

  19. Robust Neighboring Optimal Guidance for the Advanced Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, David G.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, optimization has become an engineering tool through the availability of numerous successful nonlinear programming codes. Optimal control problems are converted into parameter optimization (nonlinear programming) problems by assuming the control to be piecewise linear, making the unknowns the nodes or junction points of the linear control segments. Once the optimal piecewise linear control (suboptimal) control is known, a guidance law for operating near the suboptimal path is the neighboring optimal piecewise linear control (neighboring suboptimal control). Research conducted under this grant has been directed toward the investigation of neighboring suboptimal control as a guidance scheme for an advanced launch system.

  20. Sensitivity of Age-of-Air Calculations to the Choice of Advection Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hemler, Richard S.; Mahlman, Jerry D.; Bruhwiler, Lori; Takacs, Lawrence L.

    2000-01-01

    The age of air has recently emerged as a diagnostic of atmospheric transport unaffected by chemical parameterizations, and the features in the age distributions computed in models have been interpreted in terms of the models' large-scale circulation field. This study shows, however, that in addition to the simulated large-scale circulation, three-dimensional age calculations can also be affected by the choice of advection scheme employed in solving the tracer continuity equation, Specifically, using the 3.0deg latitude X 3.6deg longitude and 40 vertical level version of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory SKYHI GCM and six online transport schemes ranging from Eulerian through semi-Lagrangian to fully Lagrangian, it will be demonstrated that the oldest ages are obtained using the nondiffusive centered-difference schemes while the youngest ages are computed with a semi-Lagrangian transport (SLT) scheme. The centered- difference schemes are capable of producing ages older than 10 years in the mesosphere, thus eliminating the "young bias" found in previous age-of-air calculations. At this stage, only limited intuitive explanations can be advanced for this sensitivity of age-of-air calculations to the choice of advection scheme, In particular, age distributions computed online with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (MACCM3) using different varieties of the SLT scheme are substantially older than the SKYHI SLT distribution. The different varieties, including a noninterpolating-in-the-vertical version (which is essentially centered-difference in the vertical), also produce a narrower range of age distributions than the suite of advection schemes employed in the SKYHI model. While additional MACCM3 experiments with a wider range of schemes would be necessary to provide more definitive insights, the older and less variable MACCM3 age distributions can plausibly be interpreted as being due to the semi-implicit semi

  1. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, Cyrus K.; Steinberger, Craig J.

    1990-01-01

    This research is involved with the implementation of advanced computational schemes based on large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing and its coupling with chemical reactions in compressible turbulent flows. In the efforts related to LES, a research program to extend the present capabilities of this method was initiated for the treatment of chemically reacting flows. In the DNS efforts, the focus is on detailed investigations of the effects of compressibility, heat release, and non-equilibrium kinetics modelings in high speed reacting flows. Emphasis was on the simulations of simple flows, namely homogeneous compressible flows, and temporally developing high speed mixing layers.

  2. Hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory schemes with different indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2010-10-01

    A key idea in finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes is a combination of lower order fluxes to obtain a higher order approximation. The choice of the weight to each candidate stencil, which is a nonlinear function of the grid values, is crucial to the success of WENO schemes. For the system case, WENO schemes are based on local characteristic decompositions and flux splitting to avoid spurious oscillation. But the cost of computation of nonlinear weights and local characteristic decompositions is very high. In this paper, we investigate hybrid schemes of WENO schemes with high order up-wind linear schemes using different discontinuity indicators and explore the possibility in avoiding the local characteristic decompositions and the nonlinear weights for part of the procedure, hence reducing the cost but still maintaining non-oscillatory properties for problems with strong shocks. The idea is to identify discontinuity by an discontinuity indicator, then reconstruct numerical flux by WENO approximation in discontinuous regions and up-wind linear approximation in smooth regions. These indicators are mainly based on the troubled-cell indicators for discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method which are listed in the paper by Qiu and Shu (J. Qiu, C.-W. Shu, A comparison of troubled-cell indicators for Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin methods using weighted essentially non-oscillatory limiters, SIAM Journal of Scientific Computing 27 (2005) 995-1013). The emphasis of the paper is on comparison of the performance of hybrid scheme using different indicators, with an objective of obtaining efficient and reliable indicators to obtain better performance of hybrid scheme to save computational cost. Detail numerical studies in one- and two-dimensional cases are performed, addressing the issues of efficiency (less CPU time and more accurate numerical solution), non-oscillatory property.

  3. A triple-moment hail bulk microphysics scheme. Part II: Verification and comparison with two-moment bulk microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loftus, A. M.; Cotton, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    Microphysical parameterizations in numerical cloud models continue to grow in complexity as our capability to represent microphysical processes increases owing to greater knowledge of these processes as well as advances in computing power. In Part I of this study, a new triple-moment bulk hail microphysics scheme (3MHAIL) that predicts the spectral shape parameter of the hail size distribution was presented and evaluated against lower order-moment schemes. In this paper, the 3MHAIL scheme is verified in simulations of a well-observed supercell storm that occurred over northwest Kansas on 29 June 2000 during the Severe Thunderstorm and Electrification and Precipitation Study (STEPS). Comparisons of the simulation results with the observations for this case, as well as with results of simulations using two different two-moment (2M) configurations of the RAMS microphysics schemes, suggest a significant improvement of the simulated storm structure and evolution is achieved with the 3MHAIL scheme. The generation of large hail and subsequent fallout in the simulation using 3MHAIL microphysics show particularly good agreement with surface hail reports for this storm as well as with previous studies of hail-producing supercell storms. On the other hand, the simulation with 2M microphysics produces only small hail aloft and virtually no hail at the surface, whereas a 2M version of the 3MHAIL scheme (with a fixed spectral shape parameter) produces unrealistically high amounts of large hail at low levels as a result of artificial shifts in the hail size spectra towards larger diameter hail during the melting process.

  4. Resolution-optimised nonlinear scheme for secondary derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Yu, Changping; Chen, Zhe; Li, Xinliang

    2016-02-01

    A 5-point-stencil optimised nonlinear scheme with spectral-like resolution within the whole wave number range for secondary derivatives is devised. The proposed scheme can compensate for the dissipation deficiency of traditional linear schemes and suppress the spurious energy accumulation that occurs at high wave numbers, both of which are frequently encountered in large eddy simulation. The new scheme is composed of a linear fourth-order central scheme term and an artificial viscosity term. These two terms are connected by a nonlinear weight. The proposed nonlinear weight is designed based on Fourier analysis, rather than Taylor analysis, to guarantee a spectral-like resolution. Moreover, the accuracy is not affected by the optimisation, and the new scheme reaches fourth-order accuracy. The new scheme is tested numerically using the one-dimensional diffusion problem, one-dimensional steady viscous Burger's shock, two-dimensional vortex decaying, three-dimensional isotropic decaying turbulence and fully developed turbulent channel flow. All the tests confirm that the new scheme has spectral-like resolution and can improve the accuracy of the energy spectrum, dissipation rate and high-order statistics of turbulent flows.

  5. An optimized spectral difference scheme for CAA problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Junhui; Yang, Zhigang; Li, Xiaodong

    2012-05-01

    In the implementation of spectral difference (SD) method, the conserved variables at the flux points are calculated from the solution points using extrapolation or interpolation schemes. The errors incurred in using extrapolation and interpolation would result in instability. On the other hand, the difference between the left and right conserved variables at the edge interface will introduce dissipation to the SD method when applying a Riemann solver to compute the flux at the element interface. In this paper, an optimization of the extrapolation and interpolation schemes for the fourth order SD method on quadrilateral element is carried out in the wavenumber space through minimizing their dispersion error over a selected band of wavenumbers. The optimized coefficients of the extrapolation and interpolation are presented. And the dispersion error of the original and optimized schemes is plotted and compared. An improvement of the dispersion error over the resolvable wavenumber range of SD method is obtained. The stability of the optimized fourth order SD scheme is analyzed. It is found that the stability of the 4th order scheme with Chebyshev-Gauss-Lobatto flux points, which is originally weakly unstable, has been improved through the optimization. The weak instability is eliminated completely if an additional second order filter is applied on selected flux points. One and two dimensional linear wave propagation analyses are carried out for the optimized scheme. It is found that in the resolvable wavenumber range the new SD scheme is less dispersive and less dissipative than the original scheme, and the new scheme is less anisotropic for 2D wave propagation. The optimized SD solver is validated with four computational aeroacoustics (CAA) workshop benchmark problems. The numerical results with optimized schemes agree much better with the analytical data than those with the original schemes.

  6. A Comparison of Some Difference Schemes for a Parabolic Problem of Zero-Coupon Bond Pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, Tatiana; Vulkov, Lubin

    2009-11-01

    This paper describes a comparison of some numerical methods for solving a convection-diffusion equation subjected by dynamical boundary conditions which arises in the zero-coupon bond pricing. The one-dimensional convection-diffusion equation is solved by using difference schemes with weights including standard difference schemes as the monotone Samarskii's scheme, FTCS and Crank-Nicolson methods. The schemes are free of spurious oscillations and satisfy the positivity and maximum principle as demanded for the financial and diffusive solution. Numerical results are compared with analytical solutions.

  7. Generalized formulation of a class of explicit and implicit TVD schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    A one parameter family of second order explicit and implicit total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes is reformulated so that a simpler and wider group of limiters is included. The resulting scheme can be viewed as a symmetrical algorithm with a variety of numerical dissipation terms that are designed for weak solutions of hyperbolic problems. This is a generalization of Roe and Davis's recent works to a wider class of symmetric schemes other than Lax-Wendroff. The main properties of the present class of schemes are that they can be implicit, and when steady state calculations are sought, the numerical solution is independent of the time step.

  8. Finite element or Galerkin type semidiscrete schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgun, K.

    1983-01-01

    A finite element of Galerkin type semidiscrete method is proposed for numerical solution of a linear hyperbolic partial differential equation. The question of stability is reduced to the stability of a system of ordinary differential equations for which Dahlquist theory applied. Results of separating the part of numerical solution which causes the spurious oscillation near shock-like response of semidiscrete scheme to a step function initial condition are presented. In general all methods produce such oscillatory overshoots on either side of shocks. This overshoot pathology, which displays a behavior similar to Gibb's phenomena of Fourier series, is explained on the basis of dispersion of separated Fourier components which relies on linearized theory to be satisfactory. Expository results represented.

  9. Astrophysical hydrodynamics with a high-order discontinuous Galerkin scheme and adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Kevin; Bauer, Andreas; Chandrashekar, Praveen; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Klingenberg, Christian; Springel, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Solving the Euler equations of ideal hydrodynamics as accurately and efficiently as possible is a key requirement in many astrophysical simulations. It is therefore important to continuously advance the numerical methods implemented in current astrophysical codes, especially also in light of evolving computer technology, which favours certain computational approaches over others. Here we introduce the new adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code TENET, which employs a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme for hydrodynamics. The Euler equations in this method are solved in a weak formulation with a polynomial basis by means of explicit Runge-Kutta time integration and Gauss-Legendre quadrature. This approach offers significant advantages over commonly employed second-order finite-volume (FV) solvers. In particular, the higher order capability renders it computationally more efficient, in the sense that the same precision can be obtained at significantly less computational cost. Also, the DG scheme inherently conserves angular momentum in regions where no limiting takes place, and it typically produces much smaller numerical diffusion and advection errors than an FV approach. A further advantage lies in a more natural handling of AMR refinement boundaries, where a fall-back to first order can be avoided. Finally, DG requires no wide stencils at high order, and offers an improved data locality and a focus on local computations, which is favourable for current and upcoming highly parallel supercomputers. We describe the formulation and implementation details of our new code, and demonstrate its performance and accuracy with a set of two- and three-dimensional test problems. The results confirm that DG schemes have a high potential for astrophysical applications.

  10. A Spatiotemporal-Chaos-Based Cryptosystem Taking Advantage of Both Synchronous and Self-Synchronizing Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Hua-Ping; Wang, Shi-Hong; Li, Xiao-Wen; Tang, Guo-Ning; Kuang, Jin-Yu; Ye, Wei-Ping; Hu, Gang

    2004-06-01

    Two-dimensional one-way coupled map lattices are used for cryptography where multiple space units produce chaotic outputs in parallel. One of the outputs plays the role of driving for synchronization of the decryption system while the others perform the function of information encoding. With this separation of functions the receiver can establish a self-checking and self-correction mechanism, and enjoys the advantages of both synchronous and self-synchronizing schemes. A comparison between the present system with the system of advanced encryption standard (AES) is presented in the aspect of channel noise influence. Numerical investigations show that our system is much stronger than AES against channel noise perturbations, and thus can be better used for secure communications with large channel noise.

  11. Comparison of the AUSM(+) and H-CUSP Schemes for Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2003-01-01

    Many turbomachinery CFD codes use second-order central-difference (C-D) schemes with artificial viscosity to control point decoupling and to capture shocks. While C-D schemes generally give accurate results, they can also exhibit minor numerical problems including overshoots at shocks and at the edges of viscous layers, and smearing of shocks and other flow features. In an effort to improve predictive capability for turbomachinery problems, two C-D codes developed by Chima, RVCQ3D and Swift, were modified by the addition of two upwind schemes: the AUSM+ scheme developed by Liou, et al., and the H-CUSP scheme developed by Tatsumi, et al. Details of the C-D scheme and the two upwind schemes are described, and results of three test cases are shown. Results for a 2-D transonic turbine vane showed that the upwind schemes eliminated viscous layer overshoots. Results for a 3-D turbine vane showed that the upwind schemes gave improved predictions of exit flow angles and losses, although the HCUSP scheme predicted slightly higher losses than the other schemes. Results for a 3-D supersonic compressor (NASA rotor 37) showed that the AUSM+ scheme predicted exit distributions of total pressure and temperature that are not generally captured by C-D codes. All schemes showed similar convergence rates, but the upwind schemes required considerably more CPU time per iteration.

  12. Numerical simulation studies of unsteady low Reynolds number separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatineni, Mahidhar

    Numerical simulations were used to study unsteady low-Reynolds-number separated flows. The studies were focused on the instability of the separation bubbles, the associated vortex shedding, and the response to imposed disturbances. The simulations were performed for separation bubbles in both low Mach number compressible and incompressible flow regimes. The compressible study consisted of unsteady simulations of flows over the Eppler 387 airfoil and the APEX airfoil. For a sufficiently high Reynolds number the simulations showed that the flow over the airfoils is inherently unsteady, with associated vortex shedding. A Fourier analysis of the unsteady flowfield revealed the presence of a dominant frequency in the flow. The dominant frequency from the numerical solution was found to agree with the most unstable frequency calculated using linear stability theory. The vortex shedding was shown to be caused by the growth of the disturbance waves corresponding to the dominant mode calculated from the linear stability analysis. In order to study the separation bubble and the vortex shedding in detail, a simpler two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) incompressible flow over a flat plate was considered. The onset of self excited vortex shedding, and the response of the separation bubble to 2-D and 3-D disturbances was studied in detail through numerical simulations. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations were solved using a fifth order finite difference scheme for spatial discretization and a fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme for time advancement. A new high-order nonuniform grid finite difference scheme was also developed for the simulations. The incompressible simulation results showed that it was possible to induce vortex shedding by imposing disturbances upstream of the separation bubble. For a sufficiently large freestream velocity gradient the separation bubble was globally unstable, leading to a growth in the size of the separation bubble and the

  13. Plotting and Scheming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 Click for larger view

    These two graphics are planning tools used by Mars Exploration Rover engineers to plot and scheme the perfect location to place the rock abrasion tool on the rock collection dubbed 'El Capitan' near Opportunity's landing site. 'El Capitan' is located within a larger outcrop nicknamed 'Opportunity Ledge.'

    The rover visualization team from NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., initiated the graphics by putting two panoramic camera images of the 'El Capitan' area into their three-dimensional model. The rock abrasion tool team from Honeybee Robotics then used the visualization tool to help target and orient their instrument on the safest and most scientifically interesting locations. The blue circle represents one of two current targets of interest, chosen because of its size, lack of dust, and most of all its distinct and intriguing geologic features. To see the second target location, see the image titled 'Plotting and Scheming.'

    The rock abrasion tool is sensitive to the shape and texture of a rock, and must safely sit within the 'footprint' indicated by the blue circles. The rock area must be large enough to fit the contact sensor and grounding mechanism within the area of the outer blue circle, and the rock must be smooth enough to get an even grind within the abrasion area of the inner blue circle. If the rock abrasion tool were not grounded by its support mechanism or if the surface were uneven, it could 'run away' from its target. The rock abrasion tool is location on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm.

    Over the next few martian days, or sols, the rover team will use these and newer, similar graphics created with more recent, higher-resolution panoramic camera images and super-spectral data from the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. These data will be used to pick the best

  14. Numerical analysis of turbulent coaxial flow with internal heat generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, A.; Weinstein, H.

    1981-01-01

    A computational method with which to obtain a physical understanding of the turbulent field of two coaxial jets entering an axisymmetric chamber is developed. Even the laminar field of this flow is quite complicated. This is due to the many different domains which exist in the field especially in the entrance region. Physically, three regions may be identified: the wall region, the initial region near the axis of symmetry and the mixing region. Advancing downstream, these regions change relative size with the ratio of the two jets' mass fluxes as the main parameter. The turbulent field of these flows is much more complicated due to the difference in the effective transport coefficients and turbulence level from region to region. However, being aware beforehand of the complications and the different regions of this field, the appropriate turbulence model and numerical scheme can be adjusted to treat the problem.

  15. Enhanced efficiency of plasma acceleration in the laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, J.; Rosiński, M.; Jabłoński, S.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Parys, P.; Rączka, P.; Krousky, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Liska, R.; Kucharik, M.

    2015-01-01

    Among various methods for the acceleration of dense plasmas the mechanism called laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) is capable of achieving the highest energetic efficiency. In the LICPA scheme, a projectile placed in a cavity is accelerated along a guiding channel by the laser-induced thermal plasma pressure or by the radiation pressure of an intense laser radiation trapped in the cavity. This arrangement leads to a significant enhancement of the hydrodynamic or electromagnetic forces driving the projectile, relative to standard laser acceleration schemes. The aim of this paper is to review recent experimental and numerical works on LICPA with the emphasis on the acceleration of heavy plasma macroparticles and dense ion beams. The main experimental part concerns the research carried out at the kilojoule sub-nanosecond PALS laser facility in Prague. Our measurements performed at this facility, supported by advanced two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, have demonstrated that the LICPA accelerator working in the long-pulse hydrodynamic regime can be a highly efficient tool for the acceleration of heavy plasma macroparticles to hyper-velocities and the generation of ultra-high-pressure (>100 Mbar) shocks through the collision of the macroparticle with a solid target. The energetic efficiency of the macroparticle acceleration and the shock generation has been found to be significantly higher than that for other laser-based methods used so far. Using particle-in-cell simulations it is shown that the LICPA scheme is highly efficient also in the short-pulse high-intensity regime and, in particular, may be used for production of intense ion beams of multi-MeV to GeV ion energies with the energetic efficiency of tens of per cent, much higher than for conventional laser acceleration schemes.

  16. Kinetic schemes for the ultra-relativistic Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunik, Matthias; Qamar, Shamsul; Warnecke, Gerald

    2003-05-01

    We present a kinetic numerical scheme for the relativistic Euler equations, which describe the flow of a perfect fluid in terms of the particle density n, the spatial part of the four-velocity u and the pressure p. The kinetic approach is very simple in the ultra-relativistic limit, but may also be applied to more general cases. The basic ingredients of the kinetic scheme are the phase-density in equilibrium and the free flight. The phase-density generalizes the non-relativistic Maxwellian for a gas in local equilibrium. The free flight is given by solutions of a collision free kinetic transport equation. The scheme presented here is an explicit method and unconditionally stable. We establish that the conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy as well as the entropy inequality are everywhere exactly satisfied by the solution of the kinetic scheme. For that reason we obtain weak admissible Euler solutions including arbitrarily complicated shock interactions. In the numerical case studies the results obtained from the kinetic scheme are compared with the first order upwind and centered schemes.

  17. Final Progress Report submitted via the DOE Energy Link (E-Link) in June 2009 [Collaborative Research: Decadal-to-Centennial Climate & Climate Change Studies with Enhanced Variable and Uniform Resolution GCMs Using Advanced Numerical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fox-Rabinovitz, M; Cote, J

    2009-10-09

    The joint U.S-Canadian project has been devoted to: (a) decadal climate studies using developed state-of-the-art GCMs (General Circulation Models) with enhanced variable and uniform resolution; (b) development and implementation of advanced numerical techniques; (c) research in parallel computing and associated numerical methods; (d) atmospheric chemistry experiments related to climate issues; (e) validation of regional climate modeling strategies for nested- and stretched-grid models. The variable-resolution stretched-grid (SG) GCMs produce accurate and cost-efficient regional climate simulations with mesoscale resolution. The advantage of the stretched grid approach is that it allows us to preserve the high quality of both global and regional circulations while providing consistent interactions between global and regional scales and phenomena. The major accomplishment for the project has been the successful international SGMIP-1 and SGMIP-2 (Stretched-Grid Model Intercomparison Project, phase-1 and phase-2) based on this research developments and activities. The SGMIP provides unique high-resolution regional and global multi-model ensembles beneficial for regional climate modeling and broader modeling community. The U.S SGMIP simulations have been produced using SciDAC ORNL supercomputers. The results of the successful SGMIP multi-model ensemble simulations of the U.S. climate are available at the SGMIP web site (http://essic.umd.edu/~foxrab/sgmip.html) and through the link to the WMO/WCRP/WGNE web site: http://collaboration.cmc.ec.gc.ca/science/wgne. Collaborations with other international participants M. Deque (Meteo-France) and J. McGregor (CSIRO, Australia) and their centers and groups have been beneficial for the strong joint effort, especially for the SGMIP activities. The WMO/WCRP/WGNE endorsed the SGMIP activities in 2004-2008. This project reflects a trend in the modeling and broader communities to move towards regional and sub-regional assessments and

  18. Hampshire Probation Sports Counselling Scheme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, Keith

    A sports counseling scheme for young people on criminal probation in Hampshire (England) was developed in the 1980s as a partnership between the Sports Council and the Probation Service. The scheme aims to encourage offenders, aged 14 and up, to make constructive use of their leisure time; to allow participants the opportunity to have positive…

  19. Entropy Splitting and Numerical Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Vinokur, M.; Djomehri, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    A rigorous stability estimate for arbitrary order of accuracy of spatial central difference schemes for initial-boundary value problems of nonlinear symmetrizable systems of hyperbolic conservation laws was established recently by Olsson and Oliger (1994) and Olsson (1995) and was applied to the two-dimensional compressible Euler equations for a perfect gas by Gerritsen and Olsson (1996) and Gerritsen (1996). The basic building block in developing the stability estimate is a generalized energy approach based on a special splitting of the flux derivative via a convex entropy function and certain homogeneous properties. Due to some of the unique properties of the compressible Euler equations for a perfect gas, the splitting resulted in the sum of a conservative portion and a non-conservative portion of the flux derivative. hereafter referred to as the "Entropy Splitting." There are several potential desirable attributes and side benefits of the entropy splitting for the compressible Euler equations that were not fully explored in Gerritsen and Olsson. The paper has several objectives. The first is to investigate the choice of the arbitrary parameter that determines the amount of splitting and its dependence on the type of physics of current interest to computational fluid dynamics. The second is to investigate in what manner the splitting affects the nonlinear stability of the central schemes for long time integrations of unsteady flows such as in nonlinear aeroacoustics and turbulence dynamics. If numerical dissipation indeed is needed to stabilize the central scheme, can the splitting help minimize the numerical dissipation compared to its un-split cousin? Extensive numerical study on the vortex preservation capability of the splitting in conjunction with central schemes for long time integrations will be presented. The third is to study the effect of the non-conservative proportion of splitting in obtaining the correct shock location for high speed complex shock

  20. A new flux splitting scheme for Euler equations of gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xindong; Hu, Zongmin; Jiang, Zonglin

    2015-03-10

    A new flux splitting method named K-CUSP scheme is proposed in the paper. The major difference between K-CUSP and two traditional CUSP schemes (H-CUSP and E-CUSP) is that all kinematic quantities and all thermodynamic quantities in total enthalpy will be separately split into convective term and pressure term. The present scheme adopts the cell-face Mach number splitting method of AUSM+ scheme and the interface flux of pressure term is given a new way in the subsonic regime. Numerical solutions demonstrate that the new scheme inherits the simplicity and robustness of FVS schemes, which overcomes the shortcomings of pressure overshoot of shock wave in H-CUSP and E-CUSP schemes, but also retains the high-resolution of FDS schemes, which achieves the high accuracy of contact discontinuity and shock discontinuity.

  1. An implicit-explicit Eulerian Godunov scheme for compressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.P.; Colella, P.; Glaz, H.M.

    1995-02-01

    A hybrid implicit-explicit scheme is developed for Eulerian hydrodynamics. The hybridization is a continuous switch and operates on each characteristic field separately. The explicit scheme is a version of the second-order Geodunov scheme; the implicit method is only first-order accurate in time but leads to a block tridiagonal matrix inversion for efficiency and is unconditionally stable for the case of linear advection. The methodology is described for the cases of linear advection, for nonlinear scalar problems, and for gas dynamics. An important element of our work is the use of a modified Engquist-Osher flux function in place of the Godunov flux. Several numerical results are presented to demonstrate the properties of the method, especially stable numerical shocks at very high CFL numbers and second-order accurate steady states. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Dynamics of Numerics and CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This lecture attempts to illustrate the basic ideas of how the recent advances in nonlinear dynamical systems theory (dynamics) can provide new insights into the understanding of numerical algorithms used in solving nonlinear differential equations (DEs). Examples will be given of the use of dynamics to explain unusual phenomena that occur in numerics. The inadequacy of the use of linearized analysis for the understanding of long time behavior of nonlinear problems will be illustrated, and the role of dynamics in studying the nonlinear stability, accuracy, convergence property and efficiency of using time- dependent approaches to obtaining steady-state numerical solutions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will briefly be explained.

  3. Three discontinuous Galerkin schemes for the anisotropic heat conduction equation on non-aligned grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, M.; Wiesenberger, M.; Stegmeir, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present and discuss three discontinuous Galerkin (dG) discretizations for the anisotropic heat conduction equation on non-aligned cylindrical grids. Our non-aligned scheme relies on a self-adjoint local dG (LDG) discretization of the elliptic operator. It conserves the energy exactly and converges with arbitrary order. The pollution by numerical perpendicular heat fluxes decreases with superconvergence rates. We compare this scheme with aligned schemes that are based on the flux-coordinate independent approach for the discretization of parallel derivatives. Here, the dG method provides the necessary interpolation. The first aligned discretization can be used in an explicit time-integrator. However, the scheme violates conservation of energy and shows up stagnating convergence rates for very high resolutions. We overcome this partly by using the adjoint of the parallel derivative operator to construct a second self-adjoint aligned scheme. This scheme preserves energy, but reveals unphysical oscillations in the numerical tests, which result in a decreased order of convergence. Both aligned schemes exhibit low numerical heat fluxes into the perpendicular direction and are superior for flute-modes with finite parallel gradients. We build our argumentation on various numerical experiments on all three schemes for a general axisymmetric magnetic field, which is closed by a comparison to the aligned finite difference (FD) schemes of Stegmeir et al. (2014) and Stegmeir et al. (submitted for publication).

  4. The design and application of upwind schemes on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Jespersen, Dennis C.

    1989-01-01

    Solution and mesh generation algorithms for solving the Euler equations on unstructured meshes consisting of triangle and quadrilateral control volumes are presented. Cell-centered and mesh-vertex upwind finite-volume schemes are developed which utilize multi-dimensional monotone linear reconstruction procedures. These algorithms differ from existing algorithms (even on structured meshes). Numerical results in two dimensions are presented.

  5. Analysis of synchronous digital-modulation schemes for satellite communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takhar, G. S.; Gupta, S. C.

    1975-01-01

    The multipath communication channel for space communications is modeled as a multiplicative channel. This paper discusses the effects of multiplicative channel processes on the symbol error rate for quadrature modulation (QM) digital modulation schemes. An expression for the upper bound on the probability of error is derived and numerically evaluated. The results are compared with those obtained for additive channels.

  6. Numerical simulation of electrospray in the cone-jet mode.

    PubMed

    Herrada, M A; López-Herrera, J M; Gañán-Calvo, A M; Vega, E J; Montanero, J M; Popinet, S

    2012-08-01

    We present a robust and computationally efficient numerical scheme for simulating steady electrohydrodynamic atomization processes (electrospray). The main simplification assumed in this scheme is that all the free electrical charges are distributed over the interface. A comparison of the results with those calculated with a volume-of-fluid method showed that the numerical scheme presented here accurately describes the flow pattern within the entire liquid domain. Experiments were performed to partially validate the numerical predictions. The simulations reproduced accurately the experimental shape of the liquid cone jet, providing correct values of the emitted electric current even for configurations very close to the cone-jet stability limit. PMID:23005852

  7. Comparison of two schemes for derivation of atmospheric motion vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Holmlund, K.; Zhang, Q.; Schmetz, J.

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents the operational scheme of the National Satellite Meteorological Center (NSMC) of the China Meteorological Administration (CMA) to derive atmospheric motion vectors. The NSMC scheme is compared with a method developed at the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) in preparation for Meteosat Second Generation. Both schemes employ similar basic principles in terms of feature tracking and height assignment, however there are also some important differences. Furthermore, the EUMETSAT scheme assigns quality indicators to each wind vector at the end of the processing chain, whereas the NMSC scheme has inbuilt quality checking at different processing steps allowing for reinstatement of winds rejected by a first quality check. The evaluation of the performance is gained from two periods: a week in January and a week in July 1999. European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast analyses and radiosonde data are used as independent data for evaluation of the two schemes. It is shown that correlating infrared image data with water vapor data before height adjustment, as performed in the NSMC scheme, has a great potential to better distinguish high and low cloud and to provide high-density wind fields. The utilization of radiative transfer calculations for the estimation of the height of thin clouds in the EUMETSAT scheme is shown to be imperative for good quality wind fields. Finally, the feature of the EUMETSAT scheme to assign quality indicators improves the utility of the wind vectors for use in numerical weather prediction models. It is suggested that a combination of the different features of both schemes potentially provide highly increased spatial density in the wind field with improved quality.

  8. An Analysis of the Robustness of Composition Scoring Schemes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Kyle

    Various claims have been made about the efficiency of different composition scoring schemes. This paper reports the results of a systematic analysis of the robustness of holistic scoring, analytical scoring, and an obective diagnostic test, Davidson's "Test of the Ability to Subordinate." Compositions from an advanced English as a Second Language…

  9. Progress with multigrid schemes for hypersonic flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radespiel, R.; Swanson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    Several multigrid schemes are considered for the numerical computation of viscous hypersonic flows. For each scheme, the basic solution algorithm uses upwind spatial discretization with explicit multistage time stepping. Two level versions of the various multigrid algorithms are applied to the two dimensional advection equation, and Fourier analysis is used to determine their damping properties. The capabilities of the multigrid methods are assessed by solving three different hypersonic flow problems. Some new multigrid schemes based on semicoarsening strategies are shown to be quite effective in relieving the stiffness caused by the high aspect ratio cells required to resolve high Reynolds number flows. These schemes exhibit good convergence rates for Reynolds numbers up to 200 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers up to 25.

  10. Progress with multigrid schemes for hypersonic flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Radespiel, R.; Swanson, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    Several multigrid schemes are considered for the numerical computation of viscous hypersonic flows. For each scheme, the basic solution algorithm employs upwind spatial discretization with explicit multistage time stepping. Two-level versions of the various multigrid algorithms are applied to the two-dimensional advection equation, and Fourier analysis is used to determine their damping properties. The capabilities of the multigrid methods are assessed by solving three different hypersonic flow problems. Some new multigrid schemes based on semicoarsening strategies are shown to be quite effective in relieving the stiffness caused by the high-aspect-ratio cells required to resolve high Reynolds number flows. These schemes exhibit good convergence rates for Reynolds numbers up to 200 X 10{sup 6} and Mach numbers up to 25. 32 refs., 31 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Conservative properties of finite difference schemes for incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morinishi, Youhei

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to construct accurate finite difference schemes for incompressible unsteady flow simulations such as LES (large-eddy simulation) or DNS (direct numerical simulation). In this report, conservation properties of the continuity, momentum, and kinetic energy equations for incompressible flow are specified as analytical requirements for a proper set of discretized equations. Existing finite difference schemes in staggered grid systems are checked for satisfaction of the requirements. Proper higher order accurate finite difference schemes in a staggered grid system are then proposed. Plane channel flow is simulated using the proposed fourth order accurate finite difference scheme and the results compared with those of the second order accurate Harlow and Welch algorithm.

  12. Entropy-bounded discontinuous Galerkin scheme for Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yu; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    An entropy-bounded Discontinuous Galerkin (EBDG) scheme is proposed in which the solution is regularized by constraining the entropy. The resulting scheme is able to stabilize the solution in the vicinity of discontinuities and retains the optimal accuracy for smooth solutions. The properties of the limiting operator according to the entropy-minimum principle are proofed, and an optimal CFL-criterion is derived. We provide a rigorous description for locally imposing entropy constraints to capture multiple discontinuities. Significant advantages of the EBDG-scheme are the general applicability to arbitrary high-order elements and its simple implementation for multi-dimensional configurations. Numerical tests confirm the properties of the scheme, and particular focus is attributed to the robustness in treating discontinuities on arbitrary meshes.

  13. High order WENO scheme for computational cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Ishani

    2010-11-01

    This doctoral dissertation is concerned with the formulation and application of a high order accurate numerical algorithm suitable in solving complex multi dimensional equations and the application of this algorithm to a problem in Astrophysics. The algorithm is designed with the aim of resolving solutions of partial differential equations with sharp fronts propagating with time. This high order accurate class of numerical technique is called a Weighted Essentially Non Oscillatory (WENO) method and is well suited for shock capturing in solving conservation laws. The numerical approximation method, in the algorithm, is coupled with high order time marching as well as integration techniques designed to reduce computational cost. This numerical algorithm is used in several applications in computational cosmology to help understand questions about certain physical phenomena which occurred during the formation and evolution of first generation stars. The thesis is divided broadly in terms of the algorithm and its application to the different galactic processes. The first chapter deals with the astrophysical problem and offers an introduction to the numerical algorithm. In chapter 2 we outline the mathematical model and the various functions and parameters associated with the model. We also give a brief description of the relevant physical phenomena and the conservation laws associated with them. In chapter 3, we give a detailed description of the higher order algorithm and its formulation. We also highlight the special techniques incorporated in the algorithm in order to make it more suitable for handling cases which are computationally intensive. In the later chapters, 4-7, we explore in detail the physical processes and the different applications of our numerical scheme. We calculate different results such as the time scale of a temperature coupling mechanism, radiation and intensity changes etc. Different tests are also performed to illustrate the stability and

  14. On smoothing of the Crank-Nicolson scheme and higher order schemes for pricing barrier options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, B. A.; Khaliq, A. Q. M.; Yousuf, M.; Vigo-Aguiar, J.; Deininger, R.

    2007-07-01

    Most option pricing problems have nonsmooth payoffs or discontinuous derivatives at the exercise price. Discrete barrier options have not only nonsmooth payoffs but also time dependent discontinuities. In pricing barrier options, certain aspects are triggered if the asset price becomes too high or too low. Standard smoothing schemes used to solve problems with nonsmooth payoff do not work well for discrete barrier options because of discontinuities introduced in the time domain when each barrier is applied. Moreover, these unwanted oscillations become worse when estimating the hedging parameters, e.g., Delta and Gamma. We have an improved smoothing strategy for the Crank-Nicolson method which is unique in achieving optimal order convergence for barrier option problems. Numerical experiments are discussed for one asset and two asset problems. Time evolution graphs are obtained for one asset problems to show how option prices change with respect to time. This smoothing strategy is then extended to higher order methods using diagonal (m,m)--Pade main schemes under a smoothing strategy of using as damping schemes the (0,2m-1) subdiagonal Pade schemes.

  15. Advanced adaptive computational methods for Navier-Stokes simulations in rotorcraft aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowers, S. T.; Bass, J. M.; Oden, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    A phase 2 research and development effort was conducted in area transonic, compressible, inviscid flows with an ultimate goal of numerically modeling complex flows inherent in advanced helicopter blade designs. The algorithms and methodologies therefore are classified as adaptive methods, which are error estimation techniques for approximating the local numerical error, and automatically refine or unrefine the mesh so as to deliver a given level of accuracy. The result is a scheme which attempts to produce the best possible results with the least number of grid points, degrees of freedom, and operations. These types of schemes automatically locate and resolve shocks, shear layers, and other flow details to an accuracy level specified by the user of the code. The phase 1 work involved a feasibility study of h-adaptive methods for steady viscous flows, with emphasis on accurate simulation of vortex initiation, migration, and interaction. Phase 2 effort focused on extending these algorithms and methodologies to a three-dimensional topology.

  16. Numerical simulation of shock wave propagation in flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rénier, Mathieu; Marchiano, Régis; Gaudard, Eric; Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Coulouvrat, François

    2012-09-01

    Acoustical shock waves propagate through flows in many situations. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft influenced by winds, or the so-called Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades when rotating at supersonic speeds, are two examples of such a phenomenon. In this work, an original method called FLHOWARD, acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction, is presented. It relies on a scalar nonlinear wave equation, which takes into account propagation in a privileged direction (one-way approach), with diffraction, flow, heterogeneous and nonlinear effects. Theoretical comparison of the dispersion relations between that equation and parabolic equations (standard or wide angle) shows that this approach is more precise than the parabolic approach because there are no restrictions about the angle of propagation. A numerical procedure based on the standard split-step technique is used. It consists in splitting the nonlinear wave equation into simpler equations. Each of these equations is solved thanks to an analytical solution when it is possible, and a finite differences scheme in other cases. The advancement along the propagation direction is done with an implicit scheme. The validity of that numerical procedure is assessed by comparisons with analytical solutions of the Lilley's equation in waveguides for uniform or shear flows in linear regime. Attention is paid to the advantages and drawbacks of that method. Finally, the numerical code is used to simulate the propagation of sonic boom through a piece of atmosphere with flows and heterogeneities. The effects of the various parameters are analysed.

  17. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with the aerospace industry, other government agencies, and academia, is leading the effort to develop an advanced multidisciplinary analysis environment for aerospace propulsion systems called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. The initial development of NPSS focused on the analysis and design of airbreathing aircraft engines, but the resulting NPSS framework may be applied to any system, for example: aerospace, rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and even human system modeling. NPSS provides increased flexibility for the user, which reduces the total development time and cost. It is currently being extended to support the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Fundamental Aeronautics Program and the Advanced Virtual Engine Test Cell (AVETeC). NPSS focuses on the integration of multiple disciplines such as aerodynamics, structure, and heat transfer with numerical zooming on component codes. Zooming is the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail. NPSS development includes capabilities to facilitate collaborative engineering. The NPSS will provide improved tools to develop custom components and to use capability for zooming to higher fidelity codes, coupling to multidiscipline codes, transmitting secure data, and distributing simulations across different platforms. These powerful capabilities extend NPSS from a zero-dimensional simulation tool to a multi-fidelity, multidiscipline system-level simulation tool for the full development life cycle.

  18. Direct numerical simulations of a spatially developing plane wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maekawa, Hiroshi; Mansour, Nagi N.

    1992-01-01

    In the present paper, direct numerical methods by which to simulate the spatially developing free shear flows in the transitional region are described and the numerical results of a spatially developing plane wake are presented. The incompressible time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations were solved using Pade finite difference approximations in the streamwise direction, a mapped pseudospectral Fourier method in the cross-stream direction, and a third-order compact Runge-Kutta scheme for time advancement. The unstable modes of the Orr-Sommerfeld equations were used to perturb the inlet of the wake. Statistical analyses were performed and some numerical results were compared with experimental measurements. When only the fundamental mode is forced, the energy spectra show amplification of the fundamental and its higher harmonics. In this case, unperturbed alternate vortices develop in the saturation region of the wake. The phase jitter around the fundamental frequency plays a critical role in generating vortices of random shape and spacing. Large- and small-scale distortions of the fundamental structure are observed. Pairing of vortices of the same sign is observed, as well as vortex coupling of vortices of the opposite sign.

  19. Sensitivity of Gcm Inm Ras To The Change of Humidity Advection Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrykin, S. V.

    We study the influence of change the numerical scheme used for humidity advection in the GCM INM RAS on the model results. The previously used advection scheme of the second order ­ leap-frog was changed on the semi-lagrangian cip scheme of the third order. It has shown that the last scheme has excelent numerical properties among other common semi-lagrangian schemes dealing with precise advection of sharp gra- dients. The numerical expriments with GCM has shown that the main changes in the humidity and temperature fields has happend near tropopause. More closeness of the model fields obtained with new advection of humidity to the NCAR/NCEP reanalyses fields are shown.

  20. Periastron advance in black-hole binaries.

    PubMed

    Le Tiec, Alexandre; Mroué, Abdul H; Barack, Leor; Buonanno, Alessandra; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Sago, Norichika; Taracchini, Andrea

    2011-09-30

    The general relativistic (Mercury-type) periastron advance is calculated here for the first time with exquisite precision in full general relativity. We use accurate numerical relativity simulations of spinless black-hole binaries with mass ratios 1/8≤m(1)/m(2)≤1 and compare with the predictions of several analytic approximation schemes. We find the effective-one-body model to be remarkably accurate and, surprisingly, so also the predictions of self-force theory [replacing m(1)/m(2)→m(1)m(2)/(m(1)+m(2))(2)]. Our results can inform a universal analytic model of the two-body dynamics, crucial for ongoing and future gravitational-wave searches. PMID:22107182

  1. Extension of Efficient Low Dissipative High Order Schemes for 3-D Curvilinear Moving Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel; Yee H. C.; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The efficient low dissipative high order schemes proposed by Yee et al. is formulated for 3-D curvilinear moving grids. These schemes consists of a high order base schemes combined with nonlinear characteristic filters. The amount of numerical dissipation is minimized by applying the schemes to the entropy splitting form of the inviscid flux derivatives. The analysis is given for a thermally perfect gas. The main difficulty in the extension of higher order schemes that were formulated in Cartesian coordinates to curvilinear moving grids is the higher order transformed metric evaluations. The higher order numerical evaluation of the transformed metric terms to insure freestream preservation is done in a coordinate invariant manner. The formulation is an improvement over existing formulation of high order scheme in curvilinear moving grids.

  2. r-modified Crank-Nicholson difference schemes for one dimensional nonlinear viscous Burgers' equation for an incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Gambo, Yusuf Ya'u.

    2016-08-01

    The nonlocal boundary value problem for viscous Burgers' equation is considered. Solutions to the 1-D equation are presented numerically by Rothe, Crank-Nicholson and r-modified Crank-Nicholson difference schemes. Matlab codes for all the three schemes are designed based on the idea of fixed-point iteration procedure and modified Gauss elimination method. The numerical results are compared.

  3. Numerical noise in ocean and estuarine models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.; Carey, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate methods for solving the shallow water equations may lead to solutions exhibiting large fictitious, numerically-induced oscillations. The analysis of the discrete dispersion relation and modal solutions of small wavelengths provides a powerful technique for assessing the sensitivity of alternative numerical schemes to irregular data which may lead to such oscillatory numerical noise. For those schemes where phase speed vanishes at a finite wavenumber or there are multiple roots for wavenumber, oscillation modes can exist which are uncoupled from the dynamics of the problem. The discrete modal analysis approach is used here to identify two classes of spurious oscillation modes associated respectively with the two different asymptotic limits corresponding to estuarine and large scale ocean models. The analysis provides further insight into recent numerical results for models which include large spatial scales and Coriolis acceleration. ?? 1984.

  4. Novel driving scheme for FLCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiin-chuan; Wang, Chi-Chang

    1996-03-01

    A frame change data driving scheme (FCDDS) for ferroelectric LCD(FLCD) of matrix- addressing is developed which uses only positive voltages for the row and column waveforms to achieve bipolar driving waveforms on the FLCD pixels. Thus the required supply voltage for the driver chips is half that of the conventional driving scheme. Each scan line is addressed in only twice the switching time (tau) (minimum response time of FLC) so that this scheme is suitable for high duty ratio panels. In order to meet this bistable electro-optic effect of FLCD and zero net dc voltage across each pixel of the liquid crystal, turning on and turning off pixels are done at different time slots and frame slots. This driving scheme can be easily implemented using commercially available STN LCD drivers plus a small external circuit or by making an ASIC which is a slight modification of the STN driver. Both methods are discussed.

  5. Evaluating the performance of SURFEXv5 as a new land surface scheme for the ALADINcy36 and ALARO-0 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, R.; Degrauwe, D.; Duerinckx, A.; Cedilnik, J.; Costa, V.; Dalkilic, T.; Essaouini, K.; Jerczynki, M.; Kocaman, F.; Kullmann, L.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Meier, F.; Sassi, M.; Schneider, S.; Váňa, F.; Termonia, P.

    2014-01-01

    The newly developed land surface scheme SURFEX (SURFace EXternalisée) is implemented into a limited-area numerical weather prediction model running operationally in a number of countries of the ALADIN and HIRLAM consortia. The primary question addressed is the ability of SURFEX to be used as a new land surface scheme and thus assessing its potential use in an operational configuration instead of the original ISBA (Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere) scheme. The results show that the introduction of SURFEX either shows improvement for or has a neutral impact on the 2 m temperature, 2 m relative humidity and 10 m wind. However, it seems that SURFEX has a tendency to produce higher maximum temperatures at high-elevation stations during winter daytime, which degrades the 2 m temperature scores. In addition, surface radiative and energy fluxes improve compared to observations from the Cabauw tower. The results also show that promising improvements with a demonstrated positive impact on the forecast performance are achieved by introducing the town energy balance (TEB) scheme. It was found that the use of SURFEX has a neutral impact on the precipitation scores. However, the implementation of TEB within SURFEX for a high-resolution run tends to cause rainfall to be locally concentrated, and the total accumulated precipitation obviously decreases during the summer. One of the novel features developed in SURFEX is the availability of a more advanced surface data assimilation using the extended Kalman filter. The results over Belgium show that the forecast scores are similar between the extended Kalman filter and the classical optimal interpolation scheme. Finally, concerning the vertical scores, the introduction of SURFEX either shows improvement for or has a neutral impact in the free atmosphere.

  6. Evaluating the performance of SURFEXv5 as a new land surface scheme for the ALADINcy36 and ALARO-0 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, R.; Degrauwe, D.; Duerinckx, A.; Cedilnik, J.; Costa, V.; Dalkilic, T.; Essaouini, K.; Jerczynki, M.; Kocaman, F.; Kullmann, L.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Meier, F.; Sassi, M.; Schneider, S.; Váňa, F.; Termonia, P.

    2013-07-01

    The newly developed land surface scheme SURFEX (Surface Externalisée) is implemented into a limited area numerical weather prediction model running operationally in a number of countries of the ALADIN and HIRLAM consortia. The primary question addressed is the ability of SURFEX to be used as a new land surface scheme and thus assessing its potential use in an operational configuration instead of the original ISBA (Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere) scheme. The results show that the introduction of SURFEX either gives improvements or neutral impact on the 2 m temperature, 2 m relative humidity, and 10 m wind. However, it seems that SURFEX has a tendency to produce higher maximum temperatures at high elevation stations during winter daytime which degrades the scores. In addition, surface radiative and energy fluxes improve compared to observations from the Cabauw tower. The results also show that promising improvements with a demonstrated positive impact are achieved by introducing the Town Energy Balance (TEB) scheme. It was found that the use of SURFEX has a neutral impact on the precipitation scores. However, the implementation of TEB within SURFEX for a high resolution run tends to cause rainfall to be locally concentrated and the total accumulated precipitation decreases obviously during the summer. One of the novel features developed in SURFEX is the availability of a more advanced surface data assimilation using the Extended Kalman Filter. The results over Belgium show that the forecast scores are similar between the Extended Kalman Filter and the classical Optimal Interpolation scheme. Finally, concerning the upper air scores, the introduction of SURFEX either gives improvement or neutral impact in the free atmosphere.

  7. On the marginal stability of upwind schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressier, J.; Moschetta, J.-M.

    Following Quirk's analysis of Roe's scheme, general criteria are derived to predict the odd-even decoupling. This analysis is applied to Roe's scheme, EFM Pullin's scheme, EIM Macrossan's scheme and AUSM Liou's scheme. Strict stability is shown to be desirable to avoid most of these flaws. Finally, the link between marginal stability and accuracy on shear waves is established.

  8. A NON-OSCILLATORY SCHEME FOR OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In modeling shocks in open channel flows, the traditional finite difference schemes become inefficient and warrant special numerical treatment for smooth computations. This paper provides a general introduction to the non-oscillatory high-resolution methodology, coupled with the ...

  9. TE/TM alternating direction scheme for wake field calculation in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorodnov, Igor; Weiland, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    In the future, accelerators with very short bunches will be used. It demands developing new numerical approaches for long-time calculation of electromagnetic fields in the vicinity of relativistic bunches. The conventional FDTD scheme, used in MAFIA, ABCI and other wake and PIC codes, suffers from numerical grid dispersion and staircase approximation problem. As an effective cure of the dispersion problem, a numerical scheme without dispersion in longitudinal direction can be used as it was shown by Novokhatski et al. [Transition dynamics of the wake fields of ultrashort bunches, TESLA Report 2000-03, DESY, 2000] and Zagorodnov et al. [J. Comput. Phys. 191 (2003) 525]. In this paper, a new economical conservative scheme for short-range wake field calculation in 3D is presented. As numerical examples show, the new scheme is much more accurate on long-time scale than the conventional FDTD approach.

  10. Ferrofluids: Modeling, numerical analysis, and scientific computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas, Ignacio

    This dissertation presents some developments in the Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) describing the behavior of ferrofluids. The most widely accepted PDE model for ferrofluids is the Micropolar model proposed by R.E. Rosensweig. The Micropolar Navier-Stokes Equations (MNSE) is a subsystem of PDEs within the Rosensweig model. Being a simplified version of the much bigger system of PDEs proposed by Rosensweig, the MNSE are a natural starting point of this thesis. The MNSE couple linear velocity u, angular velocity w, and pressure p. We propose and analyze a first-order semi-implicit fully-discrete scheme for the MNSE, which decouples the computation of the linear and angular velocities, is unconditionally stable and delivers optimal convergence rates under assumptions analogous to those used for the Navier-Stokes equations. Moving onto the much more complex Rosensweig's model, we provide a definition (approximation) for the effective magnetizing field h, and explain the assumptions behind this definition. Unlike previous definitions available in the literature, this new definition is able to accommodate the effect of external magnetic fields. Using this definition we setup the system of PDEs coupling linear velocity u, pressure p, angular velocity w, magnetization m, and magnetic potential ϕ We show that this system is energy-stable and devise a numerical scheme that mimics the same stability property. We prove that solutions of the numerical scheme always exist and, under certain simplifying assumptions, that the discrete solutions converge. A notable outcome of the analysis of the numerical scheme for the Rosensweig's model is the choice of finite element spaces that allow the construction of an energy-stable scheme. Finally, with the lessons learned from Rosensweig's model, we develop a diffuse-interface model describing the behavior of two-phase ferrofluid flows and present an energy-stable numerical scheme for this model. For a

  11. Unconditionally stable time marching scheme for Reynolds stress models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor-Yossef, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Progress toward a stable and efficient numerical treatment for the compressible Favre-Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a Reynolds-stress model (RSM) is presented. The mean-flow and the Reynolds stress model equations are discretized using finite differences on a curvilinear coordinates mesh. The convective flux is approximated by a third-order upwind biased MUSCL scheme. The diffusive flux is approximated using second-order central differencing, based on a full-viscous stencil. The novel time-marching approach relies on decoupled, implicit time integration, that is, the five mean-flow equations are solved separately from the seven Reynolds-stress closure equations. The key idea is the use of the unconditionally positive-convergent implicit scheme (UPC), originally developed for two-equation turbulence models. The extension of the UPC scheme for RSM guarantees the positivity of the normal Reynolds-stress components and the turbulence (specific) dissipation rate for any time step. Thanks to the UPC matrix-free structure and the decoupled approach, the resulting computational scheme is very efficient. Special care is dedicated to maintain the implicit operator compact, involving only nearest neighbor grid points, while fully supporting the larger discretized residual stencil. Results obtained from two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations demonstrate the significant progress achieved in this work toward optimally convergent solution of Reynolds stress models. Furthermore, the scheme is shown to be unconditionally stable and positive.

  12. Runge-Kutta methods combined with compact difference schemes for the unsteady Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    1992-01-01

    Recent development using compact difference schemes to solve the Navier-Stokes equations show spectral-like accuracy. A study was made of the numerical characteristics of various combinations of the Runge-Kutta (RK) methods and compact difference schemes to calculate the unsteady Euler equations. The accuracy of finite difference schemes is assessed based on the evaluations of dissipative error. The objectives are reducing the numerical damping and, at the same time, preserving numerical stability. While this approach has tremendous success solving steady flows, numerical characteristics of unsteady calculations remain largely unclear. For unsteady flows, in addition to the dissipative errors, phase velocity and harmonic content of the numerical results are of concern. As a result of the discretization procedure, the simulated unsteady flow motions actually propagate in a dispersive numerical medium. Consequently, the dispersion characteristics of the numerical schemes which relate the phase velocity and wave number may greatly impact the numerical accuracy. The aim is to assess the numerical accuracy of the simulated results. To this end, the Fourier analysis is to provide the dispersive correlations of various numerical schemes. First, a detailed investigation of the existing RK methods is carried out. A generalized form of an N-step RK method is derived. With this generalized form, the criteria are derived for the three and four-step RK methods to be third and fourth-order time accurate for the non-linear equations, e.g., flow equations. These criteria are then applied to commonly used RK methods such as Jameson's 3-step and 4-step schemes and Wray's algorithm to identify the accuracy of the methods. For the spatial discretization, compact difference schemes are presented. The schemes are formulated in the operator-type to render themselves suitable for the Fourier analyses. The performance of the numerical methods is shown by numerical examples. These examples

  13. Software Partitioning Schemes for Advanced Simulation Computer Systems. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clymer, S. J.

    Conducted to design software partitioning techniques for use by the Air Force to partition a large flight simulator program for optimal execution on alternative configurations, this study resulted in a mathematical model which defines characteristics for an optimal partition, and a manually demonstrated partitioning algorithm design which…

  14. High-Order Central WENO Schemes for Multi-Dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present new third- and fifth-order Godunov-type central schemes for approximating solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) equation in an arbitrary number of space dimensions. These are the first central schemes for approximating solutions of the HJ equations with an order of accuracy that is greater than two. In two space dimensions we present two versions for the third-order scheme: one scheme that is based on a genuinely two-dimensional Central WENO reconstruction, and another scheme that is based on a simpler dimension-by-dimension reconstruction. The simpler dimension-by-dimension variant is then extended to a multi-dimensional fifth-order scheme. Our numerical examples in one, two and three space dimensions verify the expected order of accuracy of the schemes.

  15. Godunov-type schemes with an inertia term for unsteady full Mach number range flow calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moguen, Yann; Delmas, Simon; Perrier, Vincent; Bruel, Pascal; Dick, Erik

    2015-01-01

    An inertia term is introduced in the AUSM+-up scheme. The resulting scheme, called AUSM-IT (IT for Inertia Term), is designed as an extension of the AUSM+-up scheme allowing for full Mach number range calculations of unsteady flows including acoustic features. In line with the continuous asymptotic analysis, the AUSM-IT scheme satisfies the conservation of the discrete linear acoustic energy at first order in the low Mach number limit. Its capability to properly handle low Mach number unsteady flows, that may include acoustic waves or discontinuities, is numerically illustrated. The approach for building the AUSM-IT scheme from the AUSM+-up scheme is applicable to any other Godunov-type scheme.

  16. Accuracy and stability of finite element schemes for the duct transmission problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astley, R. J.; Walkington, N. J.; Eversman, W.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation is conducted regarding the feasibility of approaches for improving the efficiency and stability of existing finite element method (FEM) schemes, taking into account both analytical and numerical studies. Of the four schemes considered for the 'steady' problem, the Hermitian Galerkin formulation appears to be the most efficient and therefore the most suitable scheme for futher full scale implementation. The Hermitian residual least squares (RLS) scheme although comparable in accuracy for the cases considered exhibits a slight tendency to cumulative errors. The performance of both the Lagrangian element schemes considered compares poorly with that of their Hermitian element counterparts. This is particularly true of the Lagrangian RLS scheme. The presence of internal oscillatory components is an inevitable consequence of all Galerkin schemes irrespective of element type.

  17. Design and Analysis of a Dynamic Mobility Management Scheme for Wireless Mesh Network

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sudipta

    2013-01-01

    Seamless mobility management of the mesh clients (MCs) in wireless mesh network (WMN) has drawn a lot of attention from the research community. A number of mobility management schemes such as mesh network with mobility management (MEMO), mesh mobility management (M3), and wireless mesh mobility management (WMM) have been proposed. The common problem with these schemes is that they impose uniform criteria on all the MCs for sending route update message irrespective of their distinct characteristics. This paper proposes a session-to-mobility ratio (SMR) based dynamic mobility management scheme for handling both internet and intranet traffic. To reduce the total communication cost, this scheme considers each MC's session and mobility characteristics by dynamically determining optimal threshold SMR value for each MC. A numerical analysis of the proposed scheme has been carried out. Comparison with other schemes shows that the proposed scheme outperforms MEMO, M3, and WMM with respect to total cost. PMID:24311982

  18. Comparison of two numerical techniques for aerodynamic model identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhaegen, M. H.

    1987-01-01

    An algorithm, called the Minimal Residual QR algorithm, is presented to solve subset regression problems. It is shown that this scheme can be used as a numerically reliable implementation of the stepwise regression technique, which is widely used to identify an aerodynamic model from flight test data. This capability as well as the numerical superiority of this scheme over the stepwise regression technique is demonstrated in an experimental simulation study.

  19. Parallel processing numerical method for confined vortex dynamics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistrian, Diana Alina

    2013-10-01

    This paper explores a combined analytical and numerical technique to investigate the hydrodynamic instability of confined swirling flows, with application to vortex rope dynamics in a Francis turbine diffuser, in condition of sophisticated boundary constraints. We present a new approach based on the method of orthogonal decomposition in the Hilbert space, implemented with a spectral descriptor scheme in discrete space. A parallel implementation of the numerical scheme is conducted reducing the computational time compared to other techniques.

  20. Residual Distribution Schemes for Conservation Laws Via Adaptive Quadrature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy; Abgrall, Remi; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper considers a family of nonconservative numerical discretizations for conservation laws which retains the correct weak solution behavior in the limit of mesh refinement whenever sufficient order numerical quadrature is used. Our analysis of 2-D discretizations in nonconservative form follows the 1-D analysis of Hou and Le Floch. For a specific family of nonconservative discretizations, it is shown under mild assumptions that the error arising from non-conservation is strictly smaller than the discretization error in the scheme. In the limit of mesh refinement under the same assumptions, solutions are shown to satisfy an entropy inequality. Using results from this analysis, a variant of the "N" (Narrow) residual distribution scheme of van der Weide and Deconinck is developed for first-order systems of conservation laws. The modified form of the N-scheme supplants the usual exact single-state mean-value linearization of flux divergence, typically used for the Euler equations of gasdynamics, by an equivalent integral form on simplex interiors. This integral form is then numerically approximated using an adaptive quadrature procedure. This renders the scheme nonconservative in the sense described earlier so that correct weak solutions are still obtained in the limit of mesh refinement. Consequently, we then show that the modified form of the N-scheme can be easily applied to general (non-simplicial) element shapes and general systems of first-order conservation laws equipped with an entropy inequality where exact mean-value linearization of the flux divergence is not readily obtained, e.g. magnetohydrodynamics, the Euler equations with certain forms of chemistry, etc. Numerical examples of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows containing discontinuities together with multi-level mesh refinement are provided to verify the analysis.

  1. Assessment of Two Planetary Boundary Layer Schemes (ACM2 and YSU) within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J.; Harrold, M.; Xu, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is a highly configurable numerical weather prediction system used in both research and operational forecasting applications. Rigorously testing select configurations and evaluating the performance for specific applications is necessary due to the flexibility offered by the system. The Developmental Testbed Center (DTC) performed extensive testing and evaluation with the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) dynamic core for two physics suite configurations with a goal of assessing the impact that the planetary boundary layer (PBL) scheme had on the final forecast performance. The baseline configuration was run with the Air Force Weather Agency's physics suite, which includes the Yonsei University PBL scheme, while the second configuration was substituted with the Asymmetric Convective Model (ACM2) PBL scheme. This presentation will focus on assessing the forecast performance of the two configurations; both configurations were run over the same set of cases, allowing for a direct comparison of performance. The evaluation was performed over a 15 km CONUS domain for a testing period from September 2013 through August 2014. Simulations were initialized every 36 hours and run out to 48 hours; a 6-hour "warm start" spin-up, including data assimilation using the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation system preceded each simulation. The extensive testing period allows for robust results as well as the ability to investigate seasonal and regional differences between the two configurations. Results will focus on the evaluation of traditional verification metrics for surface and upper air variables, along with an assessment of statistical and practical significance.

  2. Implicit TVD schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws in curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Harten, A.

    1985-01-01

    The Harten (1983, 1984) total variation-diminishing (TVD) schemes, constituting a one-parameter explicit and implicit, second-order-accurate family, have the property of not generating spurious oscillations when applied to one-dimensional, nonlinear scalar hyperbolic conservation laws and constant coefficient hyperbolic systems. These methods are presently extended to the multidimensional hyperbolic conservation laws in curvilinear coordinates. Means by which to linearize the implicit operator and solution strategies, in order to improve the computation efficiency of the implicit algorithm, are discussed. Numerical experiments with steady state airfoil calculations indicate that the proposed linearized implicit TVD schemes are accurate and robust.

  3. A natural partitioning scheme for parallel simulation of multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiou, J. C.; Park, K. C.; Farhat, C.

    1993-01-01

    A parallel partitioning scheme based on physical-co-ordinate variables is presented to systematically eliminate system constraint forces and yield the equations of motion of multibody dynamics systems in terms of their independent coordinates. Key features of the present scheme include an explicit determination of the independent coordinates, a parallel construction of the null space matrix of the constraint Jacobian matrix, an easy incorporation of the previously developed two-stage staggered solution procedure and a Schur complement based parallel preconditioned conjugate gradient numerical algorithm.

  4. Crab Crossing Schemes and Studies for Electron Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, Y. Derbenev, V. Morozov, A. Castilla, G.A. Krafft, B. Yunn, Y. Zhang, J.R. Delayen

    2011-09-01

    This report shows our progress in crab crossing consideration for future electron-ion collider envisioned at JLab. In this design phase, we are evaluating two crabbing schemes viz., the deflecting and dispersive. The mathematical formulations and lattice design for these schemes are discussed in this paper. Numerical simulations involving particle tracking through a realistic deflecting RF cavity and optics illustrate the desired crab tilt of 25 mrad for 1.35 MV. Evolution of beam propagation are shown which provides the physical insight of the crabbing phenomenon.

  5. An improved lambda-scheme for one-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.; Dipiano, M. T.

    1983-01-01

    A code for the calculation of one-dimensional flows is presented, which combines a simple and efficient version of the lambda-scheme with tracking of discontinuities. The latter is needed to identify points where minor departures from the basic integration scheme are applied to prevent infiltration of numerical errors. Such a tracking is obtained via a systematic application of Boolean algebra. It is, therefore, very efficient. Fifteen examples are presented and discussed in detail. The results are exceptionally good. All discontinuites are captured within one mesh interval.

  6. A natural partitioning scheme for parallel simulation of multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiou, J. C.; Park, K. C.; Farhat, C.

    1991-01-01

    A parallel partitioning scheme based on physical-coordinate variables is presented to systematically eliminate system constraint forces and yield the equations of motion of multibody dynamics systems in terms of their independent coordinates. Key features of the present scheme include an explicit determination of the independent coordinates, a parallel construction of the null space matrix of the constraint Jacobian matrix, an easy incorporation of the previously developed two-stage staggered solution procedure, and Schur complement based parallel preconditioned conjugate gradient numerical algorithm.

  7. Grid and Zone Selection for AMR and ALE Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, L; Johnson, J; Bihari, B; Eliason, D; Peyser, T

    2002-09-11

    Numerical algorithms are based fundamentally on polynomial interpolation. In regions of the computational domain where a low order polynomial fits the data well one will find small errors in the computed quantities. Therefore, in order to design robust methods for grid selection for AMR schemes or zone selection for ALE schemes, one needs some information on the local polynomial structure of the fields being computed. We provide here algorithms and software for selecting zones based on local estimates of polynomial interpolation error. The algorithms are based on multiresolution and wavelet analysis.

  8. A Gas-Kinetic Scheme for Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lian,Youg-Sheng; Xu, Kun

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the gas-kinetic BGK scheme for the compressible flow equations is extended to chemical reactive flow. The mass fraction of the unburnt gas is implemented into the gas kinetic equation by assigning a new internal degree of freedom to the particle distribution function. The new variable can be also used to describe fluid trajectory for the nonreactive flows. Due to the gas-kinetic BGK model, the current scheme basically solves the Navier-Stokes chemical reactive flow equations. Numerical tests validate the accuracy and robustness of the current kinetic method.

  9. Fourier analysis of finite element preconditioned collocation schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deville, Michel O.; Mund, Ernest H.

    1990-01-01

    The spectrum of the iteration operator of some finite element preconditioned Fourier collocation schemes is investigated. The first part of the paper analyses one-dimensional elliptic and hyperbolic model problems and the advection-diffusion equation. Analytical expressions of the eigenvalues are obtained with use of symbolic computation. The second part of the paper considers the set of one-dimensional differential equations resulting from Fourier analysis (in the tranverse direction) of the 2-D Stokes problem. All results agree with previous conclusions on the numerical efficiency of finite element preconditioning schemes.

  10. Iterative schemes for nonsymmetric and indefinite elliptic boundary value problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Leyk, Z.; Pasciak, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. The first is to describe some simple and robust iterative schemes for nonsymmetric and indefinite elliptic boundary value problems. The schemes are based in the Sobolev space H ([Omega]) and require minimal hypotheses. The second is to develop algorithms utilizing a coarse-grid approximation. This leads to iteration matrices whose eigenvalues lie in the right half of the complex plane. In fact, for symmetric indefinite problems, the iteration is reduced to a well-conditioned symmetric positive definite system which can be solved by conjugate gradient interation. Applications of the general theory as well as numerical examples are given. 20 refs., 8 tabs.

  11. A review of thrust-vectoring schemes for fighter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Re, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a review of thrust vectoring schemes for advanced fighter applications. Results are presented from wind tunnel and system integration studies on thrust vectoring nozzle concepts. Vectoring data are presented from wind tunnel tests of axisymmetric C-D (convergent-divergent) and nonaxisymmetric wedge, C-D, single ramp and USB (upper-surface blowing) nozzle concepts. Results from recent airframe/nozzle integration studies on the impact of thrust vectoring on weight, cooling and performance characteristics are discussed. This review indicates that the aircraft designer has, at his disposal, a wide range of thrust vectoring schemes which offer potential for added or improved aircraft capability.

  12. Extension of Low Dissipative High Order Hydrodynamics Schemes for MHD Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to extend our recently developed highly parallelizable nonlinear stable high order schemes for complex multiscale hydrodynamic applications to the viscous MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) equations. These schemes employed multiresolution wavelets as adaptive numerical dissipation controls to limit the amount and to aid the selection and/or blending of the appropriate types of dissipation to be used. The new scheme is formulated for both the conservative and non-conservative form of the MHD equations in curvi-linear grids. The three features of the present MHD scheme over existing schemes in the open literature are as follows. First, the scheme is constructed for long-time integrations of shock/turbulence/combustion magnetized flows. Available schemes are too diffusive for long-time integrations and/or turbulence/combustion problems. Second, unlike existing schemes for the conservative MHD equations which suffer from ill-conditioned eigen-decompositions, the present scheme makes use of a well-conditioned eigen-decomposition to solve the conservative form of the MHD equations. This is due to, partly. the fact that the divergence of the magnetic field condition is a different type of constraint from its incompressible Navier-Stokes cousin. Third, a new approach to minimize the numerical error of the divergence free magnetic condition for high order scheme is introduced.

  13. High resolution finite volume scheme for the quantum hydrodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chin-Tien; Yeh, Jia-Yi; Chen, Jiun-Yeu

    2009-03-01

    The theory of quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) helps nanotechnology engineers to understand the physical effect of quantum forces. Although the governing equations of quantum fluid dynamics and classical fluid mechanics have the same form, there are two numerical simulation problems must be solved in QFD. The first is that the quantum potential term becomes singular and causes a divergence in the numerical simulation when the probability density is very small and close to zero. The second is that the unitarity in the time evolution of the quantum wave packet is significant. Accurate numerical evaluations are critical to the simulations of the flow fields that are generated by various quantum fluid systems. A finite volume scheme is developed herein to solve the quantum hydrodynamic equations of motion, which significantly improve the accuracy and stability of this method. The QFD equation is numerically implemented within the Eulerian method. A third-order modified Osher-Chakravarthy (MOC) upwind-centered finite volume scheme was constructed for conservation law to evaluate the convective terms, and a second-order central finite volume scheme was used to map the quantum potential field. An explicit Runge-Kutta method is used to perform the time integration to achieve fast convergence of the proposed scheme. In order to meet the numerical result can conform to the physical phenomenon and avoid numerical divergence happening due to extremely low probability density, the minimum value setting of probability density must exceed zero and smaller than certain value. The optimal value was found in the proposed numerical approach to maintain a converging numerical simulation when the minimum probability density is 10 -5 to 10 -12. The normalization of the wave packet remains close to unity through a long numerical simulation and the deviations from 1.0 is about 10 -4. To check the QFD finite difference numerical computations, one- and two-dimensional particle motions were

  14. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  15. Nonlinear Secret Image Sharing Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2⁡m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  16. Energy partitioning schemes: a dilemma.

    PubMed

    Mayer, I

    2007-01-01

    Two closely related energy partitioning schemes, in which the total energy is presented as a sum of atomic and diatomic contributions by using the "atomic decomposition of identity", are compared on the example of N,N-dimethylformamide, a simple but chemically rich molecule. Both schemes account for different intramolecular interactions, for instance they identify the weak C-H...O intramolecular interactions, but give completely different numbers. (The energy decomposition scheme based on the virial theorem is also considered.) The comparison of the two schemes resulted in a dilemma which is especially striking when these schemes are applied for molecules distorted from their equilibrium structures: one either gets numbers which are "on the chemical scale" and have quite appealing values at the equilibrium molecular geometries, but exhibiting a counter-intuitive distance dependence (the two-center energy components increase in absolute value with the increase of the interatomic distances)--or numbers with too large absolute values but "correct" distance behaviour. The problem is connected with the quick decay of the diatomic kinetic energy components. PMID:17328441

  17. Evolution of Advection Upstream Splitting Method Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the evolution of advection upstream splitting method(AUSM) schemes. The main ingredients that have led to the development of modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been reviewed, thus the ideas behind AUSM. First and foremost is the concept of upwinding. Second, the use of Riemann problem in constructing the numerical flux in the finite-volume setting. Third, the necessity of including all physical processes, as characterised by the linear (convection) and nonlinear (acoustic) fields. Fourth, the realisation of separating the flux into convection and pressure fluxes. The rest of this review briefly outlines the technical evolution of AUSM and more details can be found in the cited references. Keywords: Computational fluid dynamics methods, hyperbolic systems, advection upstream splitting method, conservation laws, upwinding, CFD

  18. Numerical integration for ab initio many-electron self energy calculations within the GW approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fang; Lin, Lin; Vigil-Fowler, Derek; Lischner, Johannes; Kemper, Alexander F.; Sharifzadeh, Sahar; Jornada, Felipe H. da; Deslippe, Jack; Yang, Chao; and others

    2015-04-01

    We present a numerical integration scheme for evaluating the convolution of a Green's function with a screened Coulomb potential on the real axis in the GW approximation of the self energy. Our scheme takes the zero broadening limit in Green's function first, replaces the numerator of the integrand with a piecewise polynomial approximation, and performs principal value integration on subintervals analytically. We give the error bound of our numerical integration scheme and show by numerical examples that it is more reliable and accurate than the standard quadrature rules such as the composite trapezoidal rule. We also discuss the benefit of using different self energy expressions to perform the numerical convolution at different frequencies.

  19. Conservation properties of unstructured staggered mesh schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Perot, B.

    2000-03-20

    Classic Cartesian staggered mesh schemes have a number of attractive properties. They do not display spurious pressure modes and they have been shown to locally conserve, mass, momentum, kinetic energy, and circulation to machine precision. Recently, a number of generalizations of the staggered mesh approach have been proposed for unstructured (triangular or tetrahedral) meshes. These unstructured staggered mesh methods have been created to retain the attractive pressure aspects and mass conservation properties of the classic Cartesian mesh method. This work addresses the momentum, kinetic energy, and circulation conservation properties of unstructured staggered mesh methods. It is shown that with certain choices of the velocity interpolation, unstructured staggered mesh discretization of the divergence form of the Navier-Stokes equations can conserve kinetic energy and momentum both locally and globally. In addition, it is shown that unstructured staggered mesh discretization of the rotational form of the Navier-Stokes equations can conserve kinetic energy and circulation both locally and globally. The analysis includes viscous terms and a generalization of the concept of conservation in the presence of viscosity to include a negative definite dissipation term in the kinetic energy equation. These novel conserving unstructured staggered mesh schemes have not been previously analyzed. It is shown that they are first-order accurate on nonuniform two-dimensional unstructured meshes and second-order accurate on uniform unstructured meshes. Numerical confirmation of the conservation properties and the order of accuracy of these unstructured staggered mesh methods is presented.

  20. A subgrid parameterization scheme for precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, S.; Brenguier, J.-L.; Lac, C.

    2011-07-01

    With increasing computing power, the horizontal resolution of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models is improving and today reaches 1 to 5 km. Nevertheless, clouds and precipitation are still subgrid scale processes for most cloud types, such as cumulus and stratocumulus. Subgrid scale parameterizations for water vapor condensation have been in use for many years and are based on a prescribed PDF of relative humidity spatial variability within the grid, thus providing a diagnosis of the cloud fraction. A similar scheme is developed and tested here. It is based on a prescribed PDF of cloud water variability and a threshold value of liquid water content for droplet collection to derive a rain fraction within the model grid. Precipitation of rainwater raises additional concerns relative to the overlap of cloud and rain fractions, however. The scheme is developed following an analysis of data collected during field campaigns in stratocumulus (DYCOMS-II) and fair weather cumulus (RICO) and tested in a 1-D framework against large eddy simulations of these observed cases. The new parameterization is then implemented in a 3-D NWP model with a horizontal resolution of 2.5 km to simulate real cases of precipitating cloud systems over France.