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Sample records for advanced ocean radiometer

  1. Requirements for an Advanced Ocean Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; McClain, Charles R.; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Bailey, Sean W.; Barnes, Robert A.; Brown, Steven; Eplee, Robert E.; Franz, Bryan; Holmes, Alan; Monosmith, W. Bryan; Patt, Frederick S.; Stumpf, Richard P.; Turpie, Kevin R.; Werdell, P. Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    This document suggests requirements for an advanced ocean radiometer, such as e.g. the ACE (Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystem) ocean radiometer. The ACE ocean biology mission objectives have been defined in the ACE Ocean Biology white paper. The general requirements presented therein were chosen as the basis for the requirements provided in this document, which have been transformed into specific, testable requirements. The overall accuracy goal for the advanced ocean radiometer is that the total radiometric uncertainties are 0.5% or smaller for all bands. Specific mission requirements of SeaWiFS, MODIS, and VIIRS were often used as a model for the requirements presented here, which are in most cases more demanding than the heritage requirements. Experience with on-orbit performance and calibration (from SeaWiFS and MODIS) and prelaunch testing (from SeaWiFS, MODIS, and VIIRS) were important considerations when formulating the requirements. This document describes requirements in terms of the science data products, with a focus on qualities that can be verified by prelaunch radiometric characterization. It is expected that a more comprehensive requirements document will be developed during mission formulation

  2. Visible and infrared imaging radiometers for ocean observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The current status of visible and infrared sensors designed for the remote monitoring of the oceans is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on multichannel scanning radiometers that are either operational or under development. Present design practices and parameter constraints are discussed. Airborne sensor systems examined include the ocean color scanner and the ocean temperature scanner. The costal zone color scanner and advanced very high resolution radiometer are reviewed with emphasis on design specifications. Recent technological advances and their impact on sensor design are examined.

  3. Advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer development program is considered. The program covered the design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was also developed for use on the program.

  4. NISTAR: The NIST Advanced Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, J. P.; Lorentz, S. R.; Lykke, K.; Smith, R. C.; Valero, F. P.

    2011-12-01

    The NIST Advanced Radiometer (NISTAR) is an instrument designed to measure the absolute spectrally-integrated irradiance reflected and emitted from the sunlit face of Earth as viewed from an orbit around the Earth-Sun L-1 point during a future NASA mission. Along with its companion imaging spectroradiometer, the Enhanced Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC), this will enable the first ever Earth-observations from this vantage point, as most space-based Earth observations are made from low-Earth orbits or geostationary orbits. NISTAR will provide new data on the Earth radiation balance for climate monitoring, as well as help calibrate the EPIC data. The NISTAR instrument consists of four detectors: three electrical substitution active cavity radiometers and a photodiode, plus several band-defining optical filters that can be used with any of the detectors. It was designed and built between 1999 and 2001 by a collaboration of Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation and the NIST Optical Technology Division, in conjunction with the Scripps Institute of Oceanography and NASA. In preparation for a possible future launch, NISTAR was recently calibrated in 2010 against a portable version of the NIST Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations using Uniform Sources (SIRCUS) facility. The calibration was performed with the NISTAR space-flight instrument in a thermal vacuum chamber in a clean-room environment at NIST. This calibration included system-level measurements of the relative spectral response of the NISTAR bands using a wavelength-tunable laser, and absolute responsivity measurements of each of the four NISTAR detectors at 532 nm. The standard uncertainty of the absolute responsivity calibration obtained using this technique was 0.12 % (k=1). This presentation will describe the NISTAR instrument, its calibration, and its potential impact on scientific observations from the L-1 point.

  5. Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer (AASIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Design information for the Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer is reported, which was developed to determine the configuration of a sensor for IR and visible imaging. The areas of technology reported include: systems design, optics, mechanics, electronics, detectors, radiative cooler, and radiometric calibration.

  6. Advanced Microwave Radiometer (AMR) for SWOT mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the SWOT (Surface Water & Ocean Topography) satellite mission is to measure wide-swath, high resolution ocean topography and terrestrial surface waters. Since main payload radar will use interferometric SAR technology, conventional microwave radiometer system which has single nadir look antenna beam (i.e., OSTM/Jason-2 AMR) is not ideally applicable for the mission for wet tropospheric delay correction. Therefore, SWOT AMR incorporates two antenna beams along cross track direction. In addition to the cross track design of the AMR radiometer, wet tropospheric error requirement is expressed in space frequency domain (in the sense of cy/km), in other words, power spectral density (PSD). Thus, instrument error allocation and design are being done in PSD which are not conventional approaches for microwave radiometer requirement allocation and design. A few of novel analyses include: 1. The effects of antenna beam size to PSD error and land/ocean contamination, 2. Receiver error allocation and the contributions of radiometric count averaging, NEDT, Gain variation, etc. 3. Effect of thermal design in the frequency domain. In the presentation, detailed AMR design and analyses results will be discussed.

  7. Optical design of the ocean radiometer for carbon assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Mark E.; McClain, Charles; Monosmith, Bryan; Quijada, Manuel; Waluschka, Eugene; Thompson, Patrick L.; Brown, Steven

    2011-10-01

    The Ocean Radiometer for Carbon Assessment (ORCA) is a new design for the next generation remote sensing of oceans biology and biogeochemistry satellite. ORCA is configured to meet the requirements of the Decadal Survey recommended Aerosol, Cloud, and Ecology (ACE ), the Ocean Ecosystem (OES) radiometer and the Pre-ACE climate data continuity mission (PACE). Under the auspices of a 2007 grant from NASA's Research Opportunity in Space and Earth Science (ROSES) and the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) , a team at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been working on a functional prototype of a hyperspectral imager with flightlike optics and scan mechanisms. This paper discusses the requirements and optomechanical design of this prototype.

  8. AVHRR/1-FM Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer is discussed. The program covers design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical/structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was developed for use on the program. The flight model program objectives were to fabricate, assemble and test four of the advanced very high resolution radiometers along with a bench cooler and collimator.

  9. The advanced microwave precipitation radiometer: A new aircraft radiometer for passive precipitation remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Spencer, Roy W.; James, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    Past studies of passive microwave measurements of precipitating systems have yielded broad empirical relationships between hydrometeors and microwave transmission. In general, these relationships fall into two categories of passive microwave precipitation retrievals rely upon the observed effect of liquid precipitation to increase the brightness temperature of a radiometrically cold background such as an ocean surface. A scattering-based method is based upon the effect that frozen hydrometeors tend to decrease the brightness temperature of a radiometrically warm background such as land. One step toward developing quantitative brightness temperature-rain rate relationships is the recent construction of a new aircraft instrument sponsored by National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC). This instrument is the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) designed and built by Georgia Tech Research Institute to fly aboard high altitude research aircraft such as the NASA ER-2. The AMPR and its accompanying data acquisition system are mounted in the Q-bay compartment of the NASA ER-2.

  10. Sensitivity of Spacebased Microwave Radiometer Observations to Ocean Surface Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Timothy W.; Li, Li

    2000-01-01

    Ocean surface evaporation and the latent heat it carries are the major components of the hydrologic and thermal forcing on the global oceans. However, there is practically no direct in situ measurements. Evaporation estimated from bulk parameterization methods depends on the quality and distribution of volunteer-ship reports which are far less than satisfactory. The only way to monitor evaporation with sufficient temporal and spatial resolutions to study global environment changes is by spaceborne sensors. The estimation of seasonal-to-interannual variation of ocean evaporation, using spacebased measurements of wind speed, sea surface temperature (SST), and integrated water vapor, through bulk parameterization method,s was achieved with reasonable success over most of the global ocean, in the past decade. Because all the three geophysical parameters can be retrieved from the radiance at the frequencies measured by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on Nimbus-7, the feasibility of retrieving evaporation directly from the measured radiance was suggested and demonstrated using coincident brightness temperatures observed by SMMR and latent heat flux computed from ship data, in the monthly time scale. However, the operational microwave radiometers that followed SMMR, the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), lack the low frequency channels which are sensitive to SST. This low frequency channels are again included in the microwave imager (TMI) of the recently launched Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM). The radiance at the frequencies observed by both TMI and SSM/I were simulated through an atmospheric radiative transfer model using ocean surface parameters and atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles produced by the reanalysis of the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). From the same ECMWF data set, coincident evaporation is computed using a surface layer turbulent transfer model. The sensitivity of the radiance to

  11. Determination of Electromagnetic Properties of Mesh Material Using Advanced Radiometer Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, R. F.; Blume, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The need for a large diameter deployable antenna to map soil moisture with a 10 kilometer or better resolution using a microwave radiometer is discussed. A 6 meter deployable antenna is also needed to map sea surface temperature on the Navy Remote Ocean Sensor System (NROSS). Both of these deployable antennas require a mesh membrane material as the reflecting surface. The determination of the electromagnetic properties of mesh materials is a difficult problem. The Antenna and Microwave Research Branch (AMRB) of Langley Research Center was asked to measure the material to be used on MROSS by NRL. A cooperative program was initiated to measure this mesh material using two advanced radiometer techniques.

  12. Potential of Future Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Ocean Surface Wind Observations for Determining Tropical Storm Vortex Intensity and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, R.; Atlas, R.; Bailey, M.; Black, P.; James, M. W.; Johnson, J.; Jones, L.; Miller, T.; Ruf, C.; Uhlhorn, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an innovative technology development, which offers the potential of new and unique remotely sensed observations of both extreme oceanic wind events and strong precipitation from either UAS or satellite platforms. It is based on the airborne Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which is a proven aircraft remote sensing technique for observing tropical cyclone ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates, including those of major hurricane intensity. The proposed HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer technology. This sensor will operate over 4-7 GHz (C-band frequencies) where the required tropical cyclone remote sensing physics has been validated by both SFMR and WindSat radiometers. HIRAD incorporates a unique, technologically advanced array antenna and several other technologies successfully demonstrated by the NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. A brassboard version of the instrument is complete and has been successfully tested in an anechoic chamber, and development of the aircraft instrument is well underway. HIRAD will be a compact, lightweight, low-power instrument with no moving parts that will produce wide-swath imagery of ocean vector winds and rain during hurricane conditions when existing microwave sensors (radiometers or scatterometers) are hindered. Preliminary studies show that HIRAD will have a significant positive impact on analyses as either a new aircraft or satellite sensor.

  13. Potential of Future Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Ocean Surface Wind Observations for Determining Tropical Storm Vortex Intensity and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, Robert; Bailey, M. C.; Black, Peter; James, Mark; Johnson, James; Jones, Linwood; Miller, Timothy; Ruf, Christopher; Uhlhorn, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an innovative technology development, which offers the potential of new and unique remotely sensed observations of both extreme oceanic wind events and strong precipitation from either UAS or satellite platforms. It is based on the airborne Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which is a proven aircraft remote sensing technique for observing tropical cyclone ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates, including those of major hurricane intensity. The proposed HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer technology. This sensor will operate over 4-7 GHz (C-band frequencies) where the required tropical cyclone remote sensing physics has been validated by both SFMR and WindSat radiometers. HIRAD incorporates a unique, technologically advanced array antenna and several other technologies successfully demonstrated by the NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. A brassboard version of the instrument is complete and has been successfully tested in an anechoic chamber, and development of the aircraft instrument is well underway. HIRAD will be a compact, lightweight, low-power instrument with no moving parts that will produce wide-swath imagery of ocean vector winds and rain during hurricane conditions when existing microwave sensors (radiometers or scatterometers) are hindered. Preliminary studies show that HIRAD will have a significant positive impact on analyses as either a new aircraft or satellite sensor.

  14. Advanced microwave radiometer antenna system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummer, W. H.; Villeneuve, A. T.; Seaton, A. F.

    1976-01-01

    The practicability of a multi-frequency antenna for spaceborne microwave radiometers was considered in detail. The program consisted of a comparative study of various antenna systems, both mechanically and electronically scanned, in relation to specified design goals and desired system performance. The study involved several distinct tasks: definition of candidate antennas that are lightweight and that, at the specified frequencies of 5, 10, 18, 22, and 36 GHz, can provide conical scanning, dual linear polarization, and simultaneous multiple frequency operation; examination of various feed systems and phase-shifting techniques; detailed analysis of several key performance parameters such as beam efficiency, sidelobe level, and antenna beam footprint size; and conception of an antenna/feed system that could meet the design goals. Candidate antennas examined include phased arrays, lenses, and optical reflector systems. Mechanical, electrical, and performance characteristics of the various systems were tabulated for ease of comparison.

  15. Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) for remote observation of precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galliano, J. A.; Platt, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    The design, development, and tests of the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) operating in the 10 to 85 GHz range specifically for precipitation retrieval and mesoscale storm system studies from a high altitude aircraft platform (i.e., ER-2) are described. The primary goals of AMPR are the exploitation of the scattering signal of precipitation at frequencies near 10, 19, 37, and 85 GHz together to unambiguously retrieve precipitation and storm structure and intensity information in support of proposed and planned space sensors in geostationary and low earth orbit, as well as storm-related field experiments. The development of AMPR will have an important impact on the interpretation of microwave radiances for rain retrievals over both land and ocean for the following reasons: (1) A scanning instrument, such as AMPR, will allow the unambiguous detection and analysis of features in two dimensional space, allowing an improved interpretation of signals in terms of cloud features, and microphysical and radiative processes; (2) AMPR will offer more accurate comparisons with ground-based radar data by feature matching since the navigation of the ER-2 platform can be expected to drift 3 to 4 km per hour of flight time; and (3) AMPR will allow underflights of the SSM/I satellite instrument with enough spatial coverage at the same frequencies to make meaningful comparisons of the data for precipitation studies.

  16. Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Composites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is a broad-band scanner with four to six bands, depending on the model. The AVHRR senses in the visible, near-, middle-, and thermal- infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. This sensor is carried on a series of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), beginning with the Television InfraRed Observation Satellite (TIROS-N) in 1978. Since 1989, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) has been mapping the vegetation condition of the United States and Alaska using satellite information from the AVHRR sensor. The vegetation condition composites, more commonly called greenness maps, are produced every week using the latest information on the growth and condition of the vegetation. One of the most important aspects of USGS greenness mapping is the historical archive of information dating back to 1989. This historical stretch of information has allowed the USGS to determine a 'normal' vegetation condition. As a result, it is possible to compare the current week's vegetation condition with normal vegetation conditions. An above normal condition could indicate wetter or warmer than normal conditions, while a below normal condition could indicate colder or dryer than normal conditions. The interpretation of departure from normal will depend on the season and geography of a region.

  17. CAROLS: A New Airborne L-Band Radiometer for Ocean Surface and Land Observations

    PubMed Central

    Zribi, Mehrez; Pardé, Mickael; Boutin, Jacquline; Fanise, Pascal; Hauser, Daniele; Dechambre, Monique; Kerr, Yann; Leduc-Leballeur, Marion; Reverdin, Gilles; Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten; Albergel, Clement; Calvet, Jean Christophe; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Rius, Antonio; Tenerelli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The “Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies” (CAROLS) L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed on board a dedicated French ATR42 research aircraft, in conjunction with other airborne instruments (C-Band scatterometer—STORM, the GOLD-RTR GPS system, the infrared CIMEL radiometer and a visible wavelength camera). Following initial laboratory qualifications, three airborne campaigns involving 21 flights were carried out over South West France, the Valencia site and the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean) in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in coordination with in situ field campaigns. In order to validate the CAROLS data, various aircraft flight patterns and maneuvers were implemented, including straight horizontal flights, circular flights, wing and nose wags over the ocean. Analysis of the first two campaigns in 2007 and 2008 leads us to improve the CAROLS radiometer regarding isolation between channels and filter bandwidth. After implementation of these improvements, results show that the instrument is conforming to specification and is a useful tool for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite validation as well as for specific studies on surface soil moisture or ocean salinity. PMID:22346599

  18. Advanced modelling of the Planck-LFI radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, P.; Franceschet, C.; Zonca, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Butler, R. C.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Davis, R. J.; Galeotta, S.; Guzzi, P.; Hoyland, R.; Hughes, N.; Jukkala, P.; Kettle, D.; Laaninen, M.; Leonardi, R.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Meinhold, P.; Mennella, A.; Platania, P.; Terenzi, L.; Tuovinen, J.; Varis, J.; Villa, F.; Wilkinson, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) is a radiometer array covering the 30-70 GHz spectral range on-board the ESA Planck satellite, launched on May 14th, 2009 to observe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with unprecedented precision. In this paper we describe the development and validation of a software model of the LFI pseudo-correlation receivers which enables to reproduce and predict all the main system parameters of interest as measured at each of the 44 LFI detectors. These include system total gain, noise temperature, band-pass response, non-linear response. The LFI Advanced RF Model (LARFM) has been constructed by using commercial software tools and data of each radiometer component as measured at single unit level. The LARFM has been successfully used to reproduce the LFI behavior observed during the LFI ground-test campaign. The model is an essential element in the database of LFI data processing center and will be available for any detailed study of radiometer behaviour during the survey.

  19. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Anne B.; Hook, Simon J.; Nichols, David A.; Schier, Marguerite L.; Tsu, Hiroji

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is a multispectral imaging radiometer scheduled to fly in Earth orbit in 1998 on NASA's Earth Observation System platform. The instrument will have 14 spectral bands from the visible to thermal infrared wavelength regions with high spectral and spatial resolution and with along-track stereoscopic capability. ASTER imagery will be used to study such phenomena as Earth surface properties, elements of the surface heat balance, cloud cover characteristics, glacier and sea ice extent, patterns of vegetation and land use, volcanoes, coral reefs and coastal processes, geology and topography, and hydrology. ASTER will have three separate radiometer subsystems, each with a swath width of 60 km. Any point on the globe will be accessible at least once every 16 days for the short wavelength infrared and thermal infrared subsystems, and once every five days for the visible and near infrared subsystem. Instrument and spacecraft resources are allocated to support an 8 percent average duty cycle, corresponding to over 700 60 by 60-km scenes per day. ASTER data will be acquired and processed according to specific user requirements over its five-year mission.

  20. NOAA Operational Ocean Products from AMSR-2 Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelenak, Zorana; Chang, Paul; Alsweiss, Suleiman; Park, Jun; Meyers, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM) consists of two satellite series, Water (GCOM-W) and Climate (GCOM-C). The first satellite of the GCOM program, GCOM-W1, was launched on May 18, 2012 carrying the follow-on to the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), AMSR-2. NOAA's GCOM-W1 product development and validation project will provide NOAA's users access to critical geophysical products derived from AMSR-2. These products, which are detailed in NOAA's Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Level 1 Requirements Document Supplement, include: NOAA AMSR-2 Product Requirements: Day 1 Product Capability • Microwave Brightness Temperature (MBT) • Total Precipitable Water (TPW) • Cloud Liquid Water (CLW) • Precipitation Type/Rate (PT/R) • Sea Surface Temperature (SST) • Sea Surface Wind Speed (SSW) Day 2 Product Capability • Soil Moisture (SM) • Sea Ice Characterization (SIC) • Snow Cover/Depth (SC/D) • Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) • Surface Type (ST) GCOM-W1 data is being captured at the KSAT Svalbard Ground Station and assembled into APID packets. Using the JPSS (NPP) infrastructure, the GCOM raw data (APID packets) are routed to the NOAA Interface Data Processing System (IDPS), in near-real time. Once received at the IDPS, the APID packets will be reformatted into Raw Data Records (RDRs) and sent to the NPP Data Exploitation (NDE) system for distribution to the Environmental Satellite Date Processing System where further processing to brightness temperatures (Level 1)/sensor data records (SDRs) and geophysical products (Level 2)/Environmental Data Records (EDRs) will be performed. The RDRs are processed to SDRs utilizing software provided by JAXA. The goal of the product processing system is to provide validated operational L2 products from the AMSR-2 instrument that address the GCOM-W1 requirements in the JPSS L1RD Supplemental for distribution to operational users

  1. Advanced Passive Microwave Radiometer Technology for GPM Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Im, Eastwood; Kummerow, Christian; Principe, Caleb; Ruf, Christoper; Wilheit, Thomas; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An interferometer-type passive microwave radiometer based on MMIC receiver technology and a thinned array antenna design is being developed under the Instrument Incubator Program (TIP) on a project entitled the Lightweight Rainfall Radiometer (LRR). The prototype single channel aircraft instrument will be ready for first testing in 2nd quarter 2003, for deployment on the NASA DC-8 aircraft and in a ground configuration manner; this version measures at 10.7 GHz in a crosstrack imaging mode. The design for a two (2) frequency preliminary space flight model at 19 and 35 GHz (also in crosstrack imaging mode) has also been completed, in which the design features would enable it to fly in a bore-sighted configuration with a new dual-frequency space radar (DPR) under development at the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) in Tokyo, Japan. The DPR will be flown as one of two primary instruments on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's core satellite in the 2007 time frame. The dual frequency space flight design of the ERR matches the APR frequencies and will be proposed as an ancillary instrument on the GPM core satellite to advance space-based precipitation measurement by enabling better microphysical characterization and coincident volume data gathering for exercising combined algorithm techniques which make use of both radar backscatter and radiometer attenuation information to constrain rainrate solutions within a physical algorithm context. This talk will discuss the design features, performance capabilities, applications plans, and conical/polarametric imaging possibilities for the LRR, as well as a brief summary of the project status and schedule.

  2. The Aquarius Ocean Salinity Mission High Stability L-band Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerano, Fernando A.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Triesky, Michael; Horgan, Kevin; Forgione, Joshua; Caldwell, James; Wilson, William J.; Yueh, Simon; Spencer, Michael; McWatters, Dalia; Freedman, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Earth Science System Pathfinder (ESSP) mission Aquarius, will measure global ocean surface salinity with approx.120 km spatial resolution every 7-days with an average monthly salinity accuracy of 0.2 psu (parts per thousand). This requires an L-band low-noise radiometer with the long-term calibration stability of less than or equal to 0.15 K over 7 days. The instrument utilizes a push-broom configuration which makes it impractical to use a traditional warm load and cold plate in front of the feedhorns. Therefore, to achieve the necessary performance Aquarius utilizes a Dicke radiometer with noise injection to perform a warm - hot calibration. The radiometer sequence between antenna, Dicke load, and noise diode has been optimized to maximize antenna observations and therefore minimize NEDT. This is possible due the ability to thermally control the radiometer electronics and front-end components to 0.1 Crms over 7 days.

  3. Sensor Calibration and Ocean Products for TRMM Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Richard J. (Technical Monitor); Wentz, Frank J.

    2003-01-01

    During the three years of fundin& we have carefully corrected for two sensor/platform problems, developed a physically based retrieval algorithm to calculate SST, wind speed, water vapor, cloud liquid water and rain rates, validated these variables, and demonstrated that satellite microwave radiometers can provide very accurate SST retrievals through clouds. Prior to this, there was doubt by some scientists that the technique of microwave SST retrieval from satellites is a viable option. We think we have put these concerns to rest, and look forward to making microwave SSTs a standard component of the Earth science data sets. Our TMI SSTs were featured on several network news broadcasts and were reported in Science magazine. Additionally, we have developed a SST algorithm for VIRS to facilitate IR/MW inter-comparisons and completed research into diurnal cycles and air-sea interactions.

  4. Sensor Calibration and Ocean Products for TRMM Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, Frank J.; Lawrence, Richard J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    During the three years of finding, we have carefully corrected for two sensor/platform problems, developed a physically based retrieval algorithm to calculate SST, wind speed, water vapor, cloud liquid water and rain rates, validated these variables, and demonstrated that satellite microwave radiometers can provide very accurate SST retrievals through clouds. Prior to this, there was doubt by some scientists that the technique of microwave SST retrieval from satellites is a viable option. We think we have put these concerns to rest, and look forward to making microwave SSTs a standard component of the Earth science data sets. Our TMI SSTs were featured on several network news broadcasts and were reported in Science magazine. Additionally, we have developed a SST algorithm for VIRS to facilitate IR/MW inter-comparisons and completed research into diurnal cycles and air-sea interactions.

  5. Environmental remote sensing using the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR). (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the acquisition, processing, and applications of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) used on polar satellites operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the Department of Commerce. AVHRR provides global visible and infrared imagery. The cited reports contain information on calibration, registration, and image processing of AVHRR data. Included are reports on AHVRR use in the study of aerosols, atmospheric circulation, agriculture, forest fires, deforestation, sun glint, sedimentation, cloud classification, sea ice, snowmelts, ocean productivity, sea surface temperatures, and vegetation. (Contains a minimum of 120 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched Terra, the Earth Observing System's (EOS) flagship satellite platform on December 18, 1999. The polar-orbiting Terra contains five remote sensing instruments, which enable the scientific study and analyses of global terrestrial processes and manifestations of global change. One of the five instruments is the multispectral Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), which is built in Japan by a consortium of government, industry, and research groups. It has three spectral bands in the visible near-infrared region (VNIR), six bands in the shortwave infrared region (SWIR), and five bands in the thermal infrared region (TIR), with 15-, 30-, and 90-meter ground resolutions, respectively. This combination of wide spectral coverage and high spatial resolution allows ASTER to discriminate among a wide variety of surface materials. The VNIR subsystem also has a backward-viewing telescope for high-resolution (15-meter) stereoscopic observation in the along-track direction, which facilitates the generation of digital elevation models (DEM).

  7. Advanced very high resolution radiometer, Mod 2 engineering report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Advanced High Resolution Radiometer, Mod 2 (AVHRR/2) is a modification of the original AVHRR (AVHRR/1) to expand the number of channels from four to five and provide additional sensing in the infrared region. A comparison of the spectral regions employed in the two instruments is given. Three of the channels are the same on both instruments. The difference in instruments is in the long wave IR region where a single channel was replaced by two channels. The modification from AVHRR/1 to AVHRR/2 was done with a minimum of changes. The areas of change are highlighted and the modifications by module are summarized. It is seen that the primary changes are in the relay optics and in the cooler. In this development program only two models are involved. The first model, the Optical Test Model was constructed and tested to prove the performance and structural integrity of the optical system and the modified cooler. The second model constructed is the Protoflight. Only the areas of the AVHRR/2 which were modified from the AVHRR/1 design are discussed.

  8. North American vegetation patterns observed with the NOAA-7 advanced very high resolution radiometer. [North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goward, S. N.; Tucker, C. J.; Dye, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Spectral vegetation index measurements derived from remotely sensed observations show great promise as a means to improve knowledge of land vegetation patterns. The daily, global observations acquired by the advanced very high resolution radiometer, a sensor on the current series of U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration meteorological satellites, may be particularly well suited for global studies of vegetation. Preliminary results from analysis of North American observations, extending from April to November 1982, show that the vegetation index patterns observed correspond to the known seasonality of North American natural and cultivated vegetation. Integration of the observations over the growing season produced measurements that are related to net primary productivity patterns of the major North American natural vegetation formations. Regions of intense cultivation were observed as anomalous areas in the integrated growing season measurements. Significant information on seasonality, annual extent and interannual variability of vegetation photosynthetic activity at continental and global scales can be derived from these satellite observations.

  9. High-resolution imaging of rain systems with the advanced microwave precipitation radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy W.; Hood, Robbie E.; Lafontaine, Frank J.; Smith, Eric A.; Platt, Robert; Galliano, Joe; Griffin, Vanessa L.; Lobl, Elena

    1994-01-01

    An advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) has been developed and flown in the NASA ER-2-high-altitude aircraft for imaging various atmospheric and surface processes, primarily the internal structure of rain clouds. The AMPR is a scanning four-frequency total power microwave radiometer that is externally calibrated with high-emissivity warm and cold loads. Separate antenna systems allow the sampling of the 10.7- and 19.35-GHz channels at the same spatial resolution, while the 37.1- and 85.5-GHz channels utilize the same multifrequency feedhorn as the 19.35-GHz channel. Spatial resolutions from an aircraft altitude of 20-km range from 0.6 km at 85.5 GHz to 2.8 km at 19.35 and 10.7 GHz. All channels are sampled every 0.6 km in both along-track and cross-track directions, leading to a contiguous sampling pattern of the 85.5-GHz 3-dB beamwidth footprints, 2.3X oversampling of the 37.1-GHz data, and 4.4X oversampling of the 19.35- and 10.7-GHz data. Radiometer temperature sensitivities range from 0.2 to 0.5 C. Details of the system are described, including two different calibration systems and their effect on the data collected. Examples of oceanic rain systems are presented from Florida and the tropical west Pacific that illustrate the wide variety of cloud water, rainwater, and precipitation-size ice combinations that are observable from aircraft altitudes.

  10. Microwave radiometer studies of atmospheric water over the oceans, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsaros, Kristina B.

    1992-01-01

    Since Seasat carried the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) into space, shortly followed by the SMMR on Nimbus 7, a new type of data source on atmospheric water vapor and other meteorological parameters has been available for analysis of weather systems over the ocean. Since 1987, the Scanning Multichannel Microwave/Imager (SMM/I) has provided similar data. A collection of work using this data is presented.

  11. Development of a L-band ocean emissivity electromagnetic model using observations from the Aquarius Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazin, Y.; Jones, W.; El-Nimri, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D ocean salinity measurement mission was launched into polar orbit during the summer of 2011. The prime sensor is an L-band radiometer/scatterometer developed jointly by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This paper deals with the development of an ocean emissivity model using AQ radiometer brightness temperature (Tb) observations. This model calculates the ocean surface emissivity as a function of ocean salinity, sea surface temperature, surface wind speed and direction. One unique aspect of this model is that it calculates ocean emissivity over wide ranges of Earth incidence angles (EIAs) from nadir to > 60°and ocean wind speeds from 0 m/s to > 70 m/s. This physical electromagnetic model with empirical coefficients follows the form of Stogryn [1967] that treats the ocean as a mixture of foam and clean rough water. The CFRSL ocean surface emissivity (ɛocean) is modeled as a linear sum of foam (ɛfoam) and foam-free seawater (ɛrough) emissivities, according to ɛocean = FF * ɛfoam + (1 - FF) * ɛrough (1) where FF is the fractional area coverage by foam. The foam emissivity is modeled as ɛfoam = Q(freq, U10, EIA) (2) where Q( ) is the empirical dependence of foam emissivity on radiometer frequency, the 10-m neutral stability wind speed and EIA according to El-Nimri [2010]. Following Stogryn, the foam-free seawater emissivity (ɛrough) is modeled ɛrough = ɛsmooth +Δɛexcess (3) where ɛsmooth = (1 - Γ) is the smooth surface emissivity, Γ is the Fresnel power reflection coefficient, and Δɛexcess is the wind-induced excess emissivity, given by Δɛexcess = G(freq, U10, WDir, EIA) (4) Where G( ) is the empirical signature of foam-free rough ocean, which depends upon the surface wind speed and wind direction. This function is determined empirically from measured AQ radiometer Tb's associated with surface wind vector from collocated NOAA GDAS numerical weather model. Ocean emissivity calculations are compared

  12. Retrieval of Ocean Surface Windspeed and Rainrate from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Brightness Temperature Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Sayak K.; Jones, Linwood; Roberts, Jason; Ruf, Christopher; Ulhorn, Eric; Miller, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a new airborne synthetic aperture passive microwave radiometer capable of wide swath imaging of the ocean surface wind speed under heavy precipitation e.g. in tropical cyclones. It uses interferometric signal processing to produce upwelling brightness temperature (Tb) images at its four operating frequencies 4, 5, 6 and 6.6 GHz [1,2]. HIRAD participated in NASA s Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) mission during 2010 as its first science field campaign. It produced Tb images with 70 km swath width and 3 km resolution from a 20 km altitude. From this, ocean surface wind speed and column averaged atmospheric liquid water content can be retrieved across the swath. The column averaged liquid water then could be related to an average rain rate. The retrieval algorithm (and the HIRAD instrument itself) is a direct descendant of the nadir-only Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer that is used operationally by the NOAA Hurricane Research Division to monitor tropical cyclones [3,4]. However, due to HIRAD s slant viewing geometry (compared to nadir viewing SFMR) a major modification is required in the algorithm. Results based on the modified algorithm from the GRIP campaign will be presented in the paper.

  13. Calibration Performance and Capabilities of the New Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. T.; Focardi, P.; Kitiyakara, A.; Maiwald, F.; Montes, O.; Padmanabhan, S.; Redick, R.; Russell, D.; Wincentsen, J.

    2014-12-01

    The paper describes performance and capabilities of a new satellite conically imaging microwave radiometer system, the Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer (COWVR), being built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for an Air Force demonstration mission. COWVR is an 18-34 GHz fully polarimetric radiometer designed to provide measurements of ocean vector winds with an accuracy that meets or exceeds that provided by WindSat, but using a simpler design which has both calibration and cost advantages. Heritage conical radiometer systems, such as WindSat, AMSR, GMI or SSMI(S), all have a similar overall architecture and have exhibited significant intra-channel and inter-sensor calibration biases, due in part to the relative independence of the radiometers between the different polarizations and frequencies in the system. The COWVR system uses a broadband compact hybrid combining architecture and Electronic Polarization Basis Rotation to minimize the number of free calibration parameters between polarization and frequencies, as well as providing a definitive calibration reference from the modulation of the mean polarized signal from the Earth. This second calibration advantage arises because the sensor modulates the incoming polarized signal at the input antenna aperture in a known way based only on the instrument geometry which forces relative calibration consistency between the polarimetric channels of the sensor and provides a gain and offset calibration independent of a model or other ancillary data source, which has typically been a weakness in the calibration and inter-calibration of heritage microwave sensors. This paper will give a description of the COWVR instrument and an overview of the technology demonstration mission. We will discuss the overall calibration approach for this system, its advantages over existing systems and how many of the calibration issues that impact existing satellite radiometers can be eliminated in future operational systems based on

  14. Development of a High-Stability Microstrip-based L-band Radiometer for Ocean Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerano, Fernando A.; Horgan, Kevin A.; Wilson, William J.; Tanner, Alan B.

    2004-01-01

    The development of a microstrip-based L-band Dicke radiometer with the long-term stability required for future ocean salinity measurements to an accuracy of 0.1 psu is presented. This measurement requires the L-band radiometers to have calibration stabilities of less than or equal to 0.05 K over 2 days. This research has focused on determining the optimum radiometer requirements and configuration to achieve this objective. System configuration and component performance have been evaluated with radiometer test beds at both JPL and GSFC. The GSFC testbed uses a cryogenic chamber that allows long-term characterization at radiometric temperatures in the range of 70 - 120 K. The research has addressed several areas including component characterization as a function of temperature and DC bias, system linearity, optimum noise diode injection calibration, and precision temperature control of components. A breadboard radiometer, utilizing microstrip-based technologies, has been built to demonstrate this long-term stability.

  15. Optical component performance for the Ocean Radiometer for Carbon Assessment (ORCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Wilson, Mark; Waluschka, Eugene; McClain, Charles R.

    2011-10-01

    The Ocean Radiometer for Carbon Assessment (ORCA) is a new design for the next generation remote sensing of ocean biology and biogeochemistry. ORCA is configured to meet all the measurement requirements of the Decadal Survey Aerosol, Cloud, and Ecology (ACE ), the Ocean Ecosystem (OES) radiometer and the Pre-ACE climate data continuity mission (PACE). Under the auspices of a 2007 grant from NASA Research Opportunity in Space and Earth Science (ROSES) and the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) , a team at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been working on a functional prototype with flightlike fore and aft optics and scan mechanisms. As part of the development efforts to bring ORCA closer to a flight configuration, we have conducted component-level optical testing using standard spectrophometers and system-level characterizations using nonflight commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) focal plane array detectors. Although these arrays would not be able to handle flight data rates, they are adequate for optical alignment and performance testing. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the results of this testing performed at GSFC and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) at the component and system level. Specifically, we show results for ORCA's spectral calibration ranging from the near UV, visible, and near-infrared spectral regions.

  16. Microwave radiometer studies of atmospheric water over the oceans, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsaros, Kristina B.

    1992-01-01

    Since the Seasat carried the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) into space in July of 1978, shortly followed by the SMMR on Nimbus 7, which operated for almost a decade, a new type of data source on atmospheric water vapor and other meteorological parameters has been available for analysis of weather systems over the ocean. Since 1987, we have had the Scanning Multichannel Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) instrument on Defense Meteorological Satellites providing similar data. We present a collection of our work performed over the last years of the study.

  17. A Radar/Radiometer Instrument for Mapping Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Peter H.; Hilliard, Laurence; Rincon, Rafael; LeVine, David; Mead, James

    2003-01-01

    The RadSTAR instrument combines an L-band, digital beam-forming radar with an L-band synthetic aperture, thinned array (STAR) radiometer. The RadSTAR development will support NASA Earth science goals by developing a novel, L-band scatterometer/ radiometer that measures Earth surface bulk material properties (surface emissions and backscatter) as well as surface characteristics (backscatter). Present, real aperture airborne L-Band active/passive measurement systems such as the JPUPALS (Wilson, et al, 2000) provide excellent sampling characteristics, but have no scanning capabilities, and are extremely large; the huge JPUPALS horn requires a the C-130 airborne platform, operated with the aft loading door open during flight operation. The approach used for the upcoming Aquarius ocean salinity mission or the proposed Hydros soil mission use real apertures with multiple fixed beams or scanning beams. For real aperture instruments, there is no upgrade path to scanning over a broad swath, except rotation of the whole aperture, which is an approach with obvious difficulties as aperture size increases. RadSTAR will provide polarimetric scatterometer and radiometer measurements over a wide swath, in a highly space-efficient configuration. The electronic scanning approaches provided through STAR technology and digital beam forming will enable the large L-band aperture to scan efficiently over a very wide swath. RadSTAR technology development, which merges an interferometric radiometer with a digital beam forming scatterometer, is an important step in the path to space for an L-band scatterometer/radiometer. RadSTAR couples a patch array antenna with a 1.26 GHz digital beam forming radar scatterometer and a 1.4 GHz STAR radiometer to provide Earth surface backscatter and emission measurements in a compact, cross-track scanning instrument with no moving parts. This technology will provide the first L-band, emission and backscatter measurements in a compact aircraft instrument

  18. Advanced atmospheric sounder and imaging radiometer /AASIR/ for STORMSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    The principal mission of the three-axis stabilized STORMSAT spacecraft is to provide the necessary meteorological data for tracking, studying the detailed structure, and modeling mesoscale weather phenomena. In the area of mesoscale events, the following meteorological objectives are indicated: high-quality imagery, visible and infrared; wind velocity from cloud tracers (1 m/sec), atmospheric temperature profiles (1 K), and atmospheric humidity sounding. These objectives are reflected in the functional characteristics of the AASIR, which is a second generation meteorological sensor based on the Visible Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer (VISSR) and the Atmospheric Sounder (VAS). The AASIR design and interface constraints with the STORMSAT spacecraft is discussed.

  19. Observations of oceanic surface-wind fields from the Nimbus-7 microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. R.; Geyser, J. E.; Chang, A. T. C.; Wilheit, T. T., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Brightness temperatures from the five-frequency dual-polarized scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) on Nimbus 7 have been used to obtain surface wind fields over the ocean. The satellite-derived wind field for 1200Z, Feb. 19, 1979, in the eastern North Pacific has been compared with an operationally generated surface-wind analysis field. Previous point comparisons at selected locations have indicated that satellite winds are accurate to 3 m/sec. The results, although of a preliminary nature, indicate that SMMR-derived winds may be used to determine large-scale wind fields over the ocean, particularly in areas of strong wind gradients such as found in cyclonic systems.

  20. Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) and uncertainty in the ocean color calibration methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpie, Kevin R.; Eplee, Robert E.; Meister, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    During the first few years of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) mission, the NASA Ocean Color calibration team continued to improve on their approach to the on-orbit calibration of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). As the calibration was adjusted for changes in ocean band responsitivity, the team also estimated a theoretic residual error in the calibration trends well within a few tenths of a percent, which could be translated into trend uncertainties in regional time series of surface reflectance and derived products, where biases as low as a few tenths of a percent in certain bands can lead to significant effects. This study looks at effects from spurious trends inherent to the calibration and biases that arise between reprocessing efforts because of extrapolation of the timedependent calibration table. With the addition of new models for instrument and calibration system trend artifacts, new calibration trends led to improved estimates of ocean time series uncertainty. Table extrapolation biases are presented for the first time. The results further the understanding of uncertainty in measuring regional and global biospheric trends in the ocean using VIIRS, which better define the roles of such records in climate research.

  1. Mesoscale oceanic response to wind events off central California in spring 1989: CTD surveys and AVHRR imagery. [Conductivity/temperature/depth surveys; Selected Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer satellite imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schwing, F.B.; Husby, D.M. ); Garfield, N.; Tracy, D.E. )

    1991-11-01

    Analysis of hydrographic data obtained during juvenile groundfish surveys, in relation to local wind forcing and AVHRR sea-surface temperature imagery, reveals that the oceanic region off central California between Point Reyes and Point Sur in spring 1989 was characterized by complex circulation patterns and considerable temporal and mesoscale variability. The 'spring transition' to upwelling-favorable winds is most clearly evidenced by rapid, large decreases in SST (up to 4-5C) measured at four meteorological buoys. Daily-averaged winds are spatially coherent and oscillate between upwelling-favorable and relaxation conditions at 3-10-day intervals. Persistent upwelling centers near Point Reyes and Point Ano Nuevo were characterized by relatively cool, salty (8-10C, 33.6-34.0 psu) water in the upper 50 m, which is derived from offshore water at depths of 50-100 m. Water-mass analysis reveals that upwelled water is advected equatorward from its source. Some upwelled water is transported into shallow coastal areas and warmed. Alongshelf fronts between relatively warm, low-salinity ([gt]13C, [lt]33.5 psu) offshore water and cool, higher-salinity upwelled water are advected onshore in response to wind relaxation or reversal events: frontal gradients intensify at these times. AVHRR imagery verifies the spatial patterns and complex mesoscale variability of the near-surface patterns observed in the CTD survey data. Eddylike hydrographic features are noted with horizontal scales on the order of the station spacing (10 km). How the complex circulation patterns and intense mesoscale spatial and temporal variability affect the survival and subsequent recruitment of juvenile groundfish is discussed.

  2. High altitude airborne remote sensing mission using the advanced microwave precipitation radiometer (AMPR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galliano, J.; Platt, R. H.; Spencer, Roy; Hood, Robbie

    1991-01-01

    The advanced microwave precipitation radiometer (AMPR) is an airborne multichannel imaging radiometer used to better understand how the earth's climate structure works. Airborne data results from the October 1990 Florida thunderstorm mission in Jacksonville, FL, are described. AMPR data on atmospheric precipitation in mesoscale storms were retrieved at 10.7, 19.35, 37.1, and 85.5 GHz onboard the ER-2 aircraft at an altitude of 20 km. AMPR's three higher-frequency data channels were selected to operate at the same frequencies as the spaceborne special sensor microwave/imager (SSM/I) presently in orbit. AMPR uses two antennas to receive the four frequencies: the lowest frequency channel uses a 9.7-in aperture lens antennas, while the three higher-frequency channels share a separate 5.3-in aperture lens antenna. The radiometer's temperature resolution performance is summarized.

  3. A synthetic aperture microwave radiometer to measure soil moisture and ocean salinity from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Hilliard, L. M.; Swift, C. T.; Ruf, C. S.; Garrett, L. B.

    1991-01-01

    A concept is presented for a microwave radiometer in space to measure soil moisture and ocean salinity as part of an 'Earth Probe' mission. The measurements could be made using an array of stick antennas. The L-band channel (1.4 GHz) would be the primary channel for determining soil moisture, with the S-band (2.65-GHz) and C-band (5.0-GHz) channels providing ancillary information to help correct for the effects of the vegetation canopy and possibly to estimate a moisture profile. A preliminary study indicates that an orbit at 450 km would provide coverage of better than 95 percent of the earth every 3 days. A 10-km resolution cell (at nadir) requires stick antennas about 9.5-m long at L-band. The S-band and C-band sticks would be substantially shorter (5 m and 2.7 m, respectively).

  4. Retrieving aerosol optical depth and type in the boundary layer over land and ocean from simultaneous GOME spectrometer and ATSR-2 radiometer measurements, 1, Method description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer-Popp, T.; Schroedter, M.; Gesell, G.

    2002-11-01

    A new aerosol retrieval method called Synergetic Aerosol Retrieval (SYNAER), using simultaneous measurements of the radiometer Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR-2) and the spectrometer Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) in the visible and near-infrared spectra, was developed. Both instruments are flown onboard the European Remote Sensing (ERS-2) satellite. SYNAER delivers boundary layer aerosol optical thickness (BLAOT) and aerosol type both over land and over ocean, the latter as BLAOT percentage of six representative components from the Optical Parameters of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) data set. The high spatial resolution of ATSR-2 permits accurate cloud detection. It allows BLAOT calculation over automatically selected dark pixels and surface albedo correction for a set of boundary layer aerosol mixtures. After spatial integration and colocation to GOME pixels, these parameters are used to simulate GOME spectra for the same set of aerosol mixtures. A least squares fit of these spectra to the measured and cloud-corrected GOME spectrum chooses the aerosol mixture. First validation studies are presented in part 2 of this paper [, 2002]. The method will be used for the future sensor pairs Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY)/Advanced ATSR (AATSR) on Envisat and GOME-2/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on METOP. Thus, SYNAER holds the potential to extract a long-term climatological data set.

  5. The enhanced NOAA global land dataset from the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, G.; Tarpley, D.; Ignatov, A.

    1995-07-01

    Global mapped data of reflected radiation in the visible (0.63 {mu}m) and near-infrared (0.85 {mu}m) wavebands on the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellites have been collected as the global vegetation index (GVI) dataset since 1982. Its primary objective has been vegetation studies (hence its title) using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) calculated from the visible and near-IR data. The second-generation GVI, which started in April 1985, has also included brightness temperatures in the thermal IR (11 and 12 {mu}m) and the associated observation-illumination geometry. This multiyear, multispectral, multisatellite dataset is a unique tool for global land studies. At the same time, it raises challenging remote sensing and data management problems with respect to uniformity in time, enhancement of signal-to-noise ratio, retrieval of geophysical parameters from satellite radiances, and large data volumes. The authors explored a four-level generic structure for processing AVHRR data-the first two levels being remote sensing oriented and the other two directed at environmental studies-and will describe the present status of each level. The uniformity of GVI data was improved by applying an updated calibration, and noise was reduced by applying a more accurate cloud-screening procedure. In addition to the enhanced weekly data (recalibrated with appended quality/cloud flags), the available land environmental products include monthly 0-15{degrees}-resolution global maps of top-of-the-atmosphere visible and near-IR reflectances, NDVI, brightness temperatures, and a precipitable water index for April 1985-September 1994. For the first time, a 5-yr monthly climatology (means and standard deviations) of each quantity was produced. These products show strong potential for detecting and analyzing large-scale spatial and seasonal land variability. 57 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Absolute intensity calibration of the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Zhao, H. L.; Liu, Y. Li, E. Z.; Han, X.; Ti, A.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-09-15

    This paper presents the results of the in situ absolute intensity calibration for the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The hot/cold load method is adopted, and the coherent averaging technique is employed to improve the signal to noise ratio. Measured spectra and electron temperature profiles are compared with those from an independent calibrated Michelson interferometer, and there is a relatively good agreement between the results from the two different systems.

  7. Absolute intensity calibration of the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Zhao, H L; Liu, Y; Li, E Z; Han, X; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Ti, A; Hu, L Q; Zhang, X D

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the in situ absolute intensity calibration for the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The hot/cold load method is adopted, and the coherent averaging technique is employed to improve the signal to noise ratio. Measured spectra and electron temperature profiles are compared with those from an independent calibrated Michelson interferometer, and there is a relatively good agreement between the results from the two different systems. PMID:25273727

  8. Relocation of Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer 1 to Deep Space Station 55

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, J.; Riley, L.; Hubbard, A.; Rosenberger, H.; Tanner, A.; Keihm, S.; Jacobs, C.; Lanyi, G.; Naudet, C.

    2005-01-01

    In June of 2004, the Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer (AWVR) unit no. 1 was relocated to the Deep Space Station (DSS) 55 site in Madrid, Spain, from DSS 25 in Goldstone, California. This article summarizes the relocation activity and the subsequent operation and data acquisition. This activity also relocated the associated Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) and Surface Meteorology (SurfMET) package that collectively comprise the Cassini Media Calibration System (MCS).

  9. Relocation of Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer 1 to Deep Space Station 55

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, J.; Riley, L.; Hubbard, A.; Rosenberger, H.; Tanner, A.; Keihm, S.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Lanyi. G. E.; Naudet, C. J.

    2005-11-01

    In June of 2004, the Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer (AWVR) unit no. 1 was relocated to the Deep Space Station (DSS) 55 site in Madrid, Spain, from DSS 25 in Goldstone, California. This article summarizes the relocation activity and the subsequent operation and data acquisition. This activity also relocated the associated Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) and Surface Meteorology (SurfMET) package that collectively comprise the Cassini Media Calibration System (MCS).

  10. PC-SEAPAK - ANALYSIS OF COASTAL ZONE COLOR SCANNER AND ADVANCED VERY HIGH RESOLUTION RADIOMETER DATA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    PC-SEAPAK is a user-interactive satellite data analysis software package specifically developed for oceanographic research. The program is used to process and interpret data obtained from the Nimbus-7/Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS), and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). PC-SEAPAK is a set of independent microcomputer-based image analysis programs that provide the user with a flexible, user-friendly, standardized interface, and facilitates relatively low-cost analysis of oceanographic satellite data. Version 4.0 includes 114 programs. PC-SEAPAK programs are organized into categories which include CZCS and AVHRR level-1 ingest, level-2 analyses, statistical analyses, data extraction, remapping to standard projections, graphics manipulation, image board memory manipulation, hardcopy output support and general utilities. Most programs allow user interaction through menu and command modes and also by the use of a mouse. Most programs also provide for ASCII file generation for further analysis in spreadsheets, graphics packages, etc. The CZCS scanning radiometer aboard the NIMBUS-7 satellite was designed to measure the concentration of photosynthetic pigments and their degradation products in the ocean. AVHRR data is used to compute sea surface temperatures and is supported for the NOAA 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 satellites. The CZCS operated from November 1978 to June 1986. CZCS data may be obtained free of charge from the CZCS archive at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. AVHRR data may be purchased through NOAA's Satellite Data Service Division. Ordering information is included in the PC-SEAPAK documentation. Although PC-SEAPAK was developed on a COMPAQ Deskpro 386/20, it can be run on most 386-compatible computers with an AT bus, EGA controller, Intel 80387 coprocessor, and MS-DOS 3.3 or higher. A Matrox MVP-AT image board with appropriate monitor and cables is also required. Note that the authors have received some reports of

  11. Life test results for the advanced very high resolution radiometer scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenz, James

    1996-01-01

    The following paper reports the results obtained during a 3.33-year life test on the TIROS Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer/3 (AVHRR/3) Scanner. The bearing drag torque and lubricant loss over life will be compared to predicted values developed through modeling. The condition of the lubricant at the end of the test will be described and a theory presented to explain the results obtained. The differences (if any) in the predicted and measured values of drag torque and lubricant loss will be discussed and possible reasons for these examined.

  12. Global Climate Monitoring with the EOS PM-Platform's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy W.

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Microwave Scanning 2 Radiometer (AMSR-E) is being built by NASDA to fly on NASA's PM Platform (now called Aqua) in December 2000. This is in addition to a copy of AMSR that will be launched on Japan's ADEOS-II satellite in 2001. The AMSRs improve upon the window frequency radiometer heritage of the SSM/I and SMMR instruments. Major improvements over those instruments include channels spanning the 6.9 GHz to 89 GHz frequency range, and higher spatial resolution from a 1.6 m reflector (AMSR-E) and 2.0 m reflector (ADEOS-II AMSR). The ADEOS-II AMSR also will have 50.3 and 52.8 GHz channels, providing sensitivity to lower tropospheric temperature. NASA funds an AMSR-E Science Team to provide algorithms for the routine production of a number of standard geophysical products. These products will be generated by the AMSR-E Science Investigator-led Processing System (SIPS) at the Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) in Huntsville, Alabama. While there is a separate NASDA-sponsored activity to develop algorithms and produce products from AMSR, as well as a Joint (NASDA-NASA) AMSR Science Team 3 activity, here I will review only the AMSR-E Team's algorithms and how they benefit from the new capabilities that AMSR-E will provide. The US Team's products will be archived at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC).

  13. Determining coniferous forest cover and forest fragmentation with NOAA-9 advanced very high resolution radiometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripple, William J.

    1995-01-01

    NOAA-9 satellite data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) were used in conjunction with Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data to determine the proportion of closed canopy conifer forest cover in the Cascade Range of Oregon. A closed canopy conifer map, as determined from the MSS, was registered with AVHRR pixels. Regression was used to relate closed canopy conifer forest cover to AVHRR spectral data. A two-variable (band) regression model accounted for more variance in conifer cover than the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). The spectral signatures of various conifer successional stages were also examined. A map of Oregon was produced showing the proportion of closed canopy conifer cover for each AVHRR pixel. The AVHRR was responsive to both the percentage of closed canopy conifer cover and the successional stage in these temperate coniferous forests in this experiment.

  14. Determining coniferous forest cover and forest fragmentation with NOAA-9 advanced very high resolution radiometer data

    SciTech Connect

    Ripple, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    NOAA-9 satellite data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) were used in conjunction with Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data to determine the proportion of closed canopy conifer forest cover in the Cascade Range of Oregon. A closed canopy conifer map, as determined from the MSS, was registered with AVHRR pixels. Regression was used to relate closed canopy conifer forest cover to AVHRR spectral data. A two-variable (band) regression model accounted for more variance in conifer cover than the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). The spectral signatures of various conifer successional stages were also examined. A map of Oregon was produced showing the proportion of closed canopy conifer cover for each AVHRR pixel. The AVHRR was responsive to both the percentage of closed canopy conifer cover and the successional stage in these temperate coniferous forests in this experiment.

  15. Spectral transmissometer and radiometer - Design and initial results. [of free drifting experiment in Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, Kendall L.; Steward, Robert G.; Peacock, Thomas G.; Payne, Paul R.; Peck, Wayne

    1988-01-01

    A new solid-state spectral transmissometer and radiometer is described. The radiometer measures upwelling radiance, downwelling irradiance, and beam transmittance from 390 to 750 nm with channel widths of 2.35 nm. The spectrometer consists of a 256 element CCD linear array collecting light dispersed by a reflection grating in a modified Littrow configuration. The spectrometer is time and space-shared among the three signal types. The instrument has been deployed as a free-drifting buoy and in the profiling mode, with data stored internally on a magnetic bubble memory or sent up a conducting cable as desired. Power can be supplied either by a detachable external battery pack or through conducting cable. The instrument has been deployed in the oligotrophic North Pacific Central Gyre and in the eutrophic Straits of Juan de Fuca, and preliminary results for each region are discussed.

  16. Unbiased estimation of oceanic mean rainfall from satellite borne radiometer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittal, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    The statistical properties of the radar derived rainfall obtained during the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) are used to derive quantitative estimates of the spatial and temporal sampling errors associated with estimating rainfall from brightness temperature measurements such as would be obtained from a satelliteborne microwave radiometer employing a practical size antenna aperture. A basis for a method of correcting the so called beam filling problem, i.e., for the effect of nonuniformity of rainfall over the radiometer beamwidth is provided. The method presented employs the statistical properties of the observations themselves without need for physical assumptions beyond those associated with the radiative transfer model. The simulation results presented offer a validation of the estimated accuracy that can be achieved and the graphs included permit evaluation of the effect of the antenna resolution on both the temporal and spatial sampling errors.

  17. Global Climate Monitoring with the Eos Pm-Platform's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy W.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) is being built by NASDA to fly on NASA's PM Platform (now called "Aqua") in December 2000. This is in addition to a copy of AMSR that will be launched on Japan's ADEOS-11 satellite in 2001. The AMSRs improve upon the window frequency radiometer heritage of the SSM[l and SMMR instruments. Major improvements over those instruments include channels spanning the 6.9 GHz to 89 GHz frequency range, and higher spatial resolution from a 1.6 m reflector (AMSR-E) and 2.0 m reflector (ADEOS-11 AMSR). The ADEOS-11 AMSR also will have 50.3 and 52.8 GHz channels, providing sensitivity to lower tropospheric temperature. NASA funds an AMSR-E Science Team to provide algorithms for the routine production of a number of standard geophysical products. These products will be generated by the AMSR-E Science Investigator-led Processing System (SIPS) at the Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) in Huntsville, Alabama. While there is a separate NASDA-sponsored activity to develop algorithms and produce products from AMSR, as well as a Joint (NASDA-NASA) AMSR Science Team activity, here I will review only the AMSR-E Team's algorithms and how they benefit from the new capabilities that AMSR-E will provide. The U.S. Team's products will be archived at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). Further information about AMSR-E can be obtained at http://www.jzhcc.msfc.nasa.Vov/AMSR.

  18. Computational ocean acoustics: Advances in 3D ocean acoustic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Jensen, Finn B.

    2012-11-01

    The numerical model of ocean acoustic propagation developed in the 1980's are still in widespread use today, and the field of computational ocean acoustics is often considered a mature field. However, the explosive increase in computational power available to the community has created opportunities for modeling phenomena that earlier were beyond reach. Most notably, three-dimensional propagation and scattering problems have been prohibitive computationally, but are now addressed routinely using brute force numerical approaches such as the Finite Element Method, in particular for target scattering problems, where they are being combined with the traditional wave theory propagation models in hybrid modeling frameworks. Also, recent years has seen the development of hybrid approaches coupling oceanographic circulation models with acoustic propagation models, enabling the forecasting of sonar performance uncertainty in dynamic ocean environments. These and other advances made over the last couple of decades support the notion that the field of computational ocean acoustics is far from being mature. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research, Code 321OA].

  19. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD): Instrument Status and Performance Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Christopher; Bailey, M. C.; Gross, Steven; Hood, Robbie; James, Mark; Johnson, James; Jones, Linwood; Miller, Timothy; Uhlhorn, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an innovative radiometer which offers new and unique remotely sensed observations of both extreme oceanic wind events and strong precipitation. It is based on the airborne Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) [Uhlhorn and Black, 2004]. The HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer (STAR) technology [Ruf et al., 1988]. This sensor operates over 4-7 GHz, where the required tropical cyclone remote sensing physics has been validated by both SFMR and WindSat radiometer [Bettenhausen et al., 2006; Brown et al., 2006]. HIRAD incorporates a new and unique array antenna design along with several technologies successfully demonstrated by the Lightweight Rain Radiometer instrument [Ruf et al., 2002; Ruf and Principe, 2003]. HIRAD will be a compact, lightweight, low-power instrument with no moving parts that will produce wide-swath imagery of ocean winds and rain in hurricane conditions. Accurate observations of surface ocean vector winds (OVW) with high spatial and temporal resolution are required for understanding and predicting tropical cyclones. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an innovative architecture which offers new and unique remotely sensed observations of both extreme oceanic wind events and strong precipitation. It is based on the airborne Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which is a proven remote sensing technique for observing tropical cyclone (TC) ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates. The proposed HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer (STAR) technology combined with a a unique array antenna design. The overarching design concept of HIRAD is to combine the multi-frequency C-band observing strategy of the SFMR with STAR technology to

  20. Contrast enhancing and adjusting advanced very high resolution radiometer scenes for solar illumination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zokaites, David M.

    1993-01-01

    The AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) satellite sensors provide daily coverage of the entire Earth. As a result, individual scenes cover broad geographic areas (roughly 3000 km by 5000 km) and can contain varying levels of solar illumination. Mosaics of AVHRR scenes can be created for large (continental and global) study areas. As the north-south extent of such mosaics increases, the lightness variability within the mosaic increases. AVHRR channels one and two of multiple daytime scenes were histogrammed to find a relationship between solar zenith and scene lightness as described by brightness value distribution. This relationship was used to determine look-up tables (luts) which removed effects of varying solar illumination. These luts were combined with a contrast enhancing lut and stored online. For individual scenes, one precomputed composite lut was applied to the entire scene based on the solar zenith at scene center. For mosaicked scenes, each pixel was adjusted based on the solar zenith at that pixel location. These procedures reduce lightness variability within and between scenes and enhance scene contrast to provide visually pleasing imagery.

  1. EOSDIS support for the advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, David A.; Schwaller, Matthew; Pniel, Moshe; Geller, Gary

    1995-12-01

    The end-to-end ground data system supporting the advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER) consists of elements provided by both Japan ASTER Ground Data System and the highly distributed Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). These two systems must interoperate to provide complex mission operations support and process high-rate (approximately 8 Megabits/sec) data into standard level 1, level 2 and higher data products. The EOS Data and Operations System (EDOS) will provide ground data capture, rate buffering, and level 0 data processing. The EOS Operations Center will provide the operational interface between the Japanese Instrument Control Center and the spacecraft and will monitor the instrument health and safety. The Land Processes Distributed active Archive Center (DAAC) at the EROS Data Center will produce higher-level products based on software provided by the ASTER Science Team and systems provided by the EOSDIS Core System. Higher-level data product quality assurance, as well as U. S. Science Team support for instrument scheduling, will be performed at a science computing facility located at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. All of these elements are being developed together to assure that this international mission produces data which will serve the needs of the science community.

  2. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) after fifteen years: Review of global products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Michael; Tsu, Hiroji; Hulley, Glynn; Iwao, Koki; Pieri, David; Cudahy, Tom; Kargel, Jeffrey

    2015-06-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is a 15-channel imaging instrument operating on NASA's Terra satellite. A joint project between the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry, ASTER has been acquiring data for 15 years, since March 2000. The archive now contains over 2.8 million scenes; for the majority of them, a stereo pair was collected using nadir and backward telescopes imaging in the NIR wavelength. The majority of users require only a few to a few dozen scenes for their work. Studies have ranged over numerous scientific disciplines, and many practical applications have benefited from ASTER's unique data. A few researchers have been able to mine the entire ASTER archive, that is now global in extent due to the long duration of the mission. Six examples of global products are described in this contribution: the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM), the most complete, highest resolution DEM available to all users; the ASTER Emissivity Database (ASTER GED), a global 5-band emissivity map of the land surface; the ASTER Global Urban Area Map (AGURAM), a 15-m resolution database of over 3500 cities; the ASTER Volcano Archive (AVA), an archive of over 1500 active volcanoes; ASTER Geoscience products of the continent of Australia; and the Global Ice Monitoring from Space (GLIMS) project.

  3. Compression of regions in the global advanced very high resolution radiometer 1-km data set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kess, Barbara L.; Steinwand, Daniel R.; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1994-01-01

    The global advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) 1-km data set is a 10-band image produced at USGS' EROS Data Center for the study of the world's land surfaces. The image contains masked regions for non-land areas which are identical in each band but vary between data sets. They comprise over 75 percent of this 9.7 gigabyte image. The mask is compressed once and stored separately from the land data which is compressed for each of the 10 bands. The mask is stored in a hierarchical format for multi-resolution decompression of geographic subwindows of the image. The land for each band is compressed by modifying a method that ignores fill values. This multi-spectral region compression efficiently compresses the region data and precludes fill values from interfering with land compression statistics. Results show that the masked regions in a one-byte test image (6.5 Gigabytes) compress to 0.2 percent of the 557,756,146 bytes they occupy in the original image, resulting in a compression ratio of 89.9 percent for the entire image.

  4. Science Data Processing for the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer: Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, H. Michael; Regner, Kathryn; Conover, Helen; Ashcroft, Peter; Wentz, Frank; Conway, Dawn; Lobl, Elena; Beaumont, Bruce; Hawkins, Lamar; Jones, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration established the framework for the Science Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPS) to enable the Earth science data products to be produced by personnel directly associated with the instrument science team and knowledgeable of the science algorithms. One of the first instantiations implemented for NASA was the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) SIPS. The AMSR-E SIPS is a decentralized, geographically distributed ground data processing system composed of two primary components located in California and Alabama. Initial science data processing is conducted at Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) in Santa Rosa, California. RSS ingests antenna temperature orbit data sets from JAXA and converts them to calibrated, resampled, geolocated brightness temperatures. The brightness temperatures are sent to the Global Hydrology and Climate Center in Huntsville, Alabama, which generates the geophysical science data products (e.g., water vapor, sea surface temperature, sea ice extent, etc.) suitable for climate research and applications usage. These science products are subsequently sent to the National Snow and Ice Data Center Distributed Active Archive Center in Boulder, Colorado for archival and dissemination to the at-large science community. This paper describes the organization, coordination, and production techniques employed by the AMSR-E SIPS in implementing, automating and operating the distributed data processing system.

  5. PHOCUS radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, O.; Murtagh, D.; Belitsky, V.

    2012-01-01

    PHOCUS - Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer Mesosphere is a Swedish sounding rocket experiment, launched in July 2011, with the main goal of investigating the upper atmosphere in the altitude range 50-110 km. This paper describes the SondRad instrument in the PHOCUS payload, the radiometer comprising two frequency channels, 183 GHz and 557 GHz, aimed at exploring the water vapour concentration distribution in connection with the appearance of noctilucent (night shining) clouds. The design of the radiometer system has been done in a collaboration between Omnisys Instruments AB and the Group for Advanced Receiver Development (GARD) at Chalmers University of Technology where Omnisys was responsible for the overall design, implementation, and verification of the radiometers and backend whereas GARD was responsible for the radiometer optics and calibration systems. The SondRad instrument covers the water absorption lines at 183 GHz and 557 GHz. The 183 GHz channel is a side-looking radiometer while the 557 GHz radiometer is placed along the rocket axis looking in the forward direction. Both channels employ sub-harmonically pumped Schottky mixers and FFT spectrometer backends with 67 kHz resolution. The radiometers include novel calibration systems specifically adjusted for use with each frequency channel. The 183 GHz channel employs a CW-pilot signal calibrating the entire receiving chain while the IF-chain of the 557 GHz channel is calibrated by injecting a signal from a reference noise source through a directional coupler. The instrument collected complete spectra for both the 183 GHz and the 557 GHz with 300 Hz data rate for the 183 GHz channel and 10 Hz data rate for the 557 GHz channel for about 60 s reaching the apogee of the flight trajectory and 100 s after that. With lossless data compression using variable resolution over the spectrum, the data set was reduced to 2 × 12 MByte. The first results indicate that the instrument has

  6. PHOCUS radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, O.; Murtagh, D.; Belitsky, V.

    2012-06-01

    PHOCUS - Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer Mesosphere is a Swedish sounding rocket experiment, launched in July 2011, with the main goal of investigating the upper atmosphere in the altitude range 50-110 km. This paper describes the SondRad instrument in the PHOCUS payload, a radiometer comprising two frequency channels (183 GHz and 557 GHz) aimed at exploring the water vapour concentration distribution in connection with the appearance of noctilucent (night shining) clouds. The design of the radiometer system has been done in a collaboration between Omnisys Instruments AB and the Group for Advanced Receiver Development (GARD) at Chalmers University of Technology where Omnisys was responsible for the overall design, implementation, and verification of the radiometers and backend, whereas GARD was responsible for the radiometer optics and calibration systems. The SondRad instrument covers the water absorption lines at 183 GHz and 557 GHz. The 183 GHz channel is a side-looking radiometer, while the 557 GHz radiometer is placed along the rocket axis looking in the forward direction. Both channels employ sub-harmonically pumped Schottky mixers and Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FFTS) backends with 67 kHz resolution. The radiometers include novel calibration systems specifically adjusted for use with each frequency channel. The 183 GHz channel employs a continuous wave CW pilot signal calibrating the entire receiving chain, while the intermediate frequency chain (the IF-chain) of the 557 GHz channel is calibrated by injecting a signal from a reference noise source through a directional coupler. The instrument collected complete spectra for both the 183 GHz and the 557 GHz with 300 Hz data rate for the 183 GHz channel and 10 Hz data rate for the 557 GHz channel for about 60 s reaching the apogee of the flight trajectory and 100 s after that. With lossless data compression using variable resolution over the spectrum, the data set was

  7. Advances in radiometry for ocean color

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, S.W.; Clark, D.K.; Johnson, B.C.; Yoon, H.; Lykke, K.R.; Flora, S.J.; Feinholz, M.E.; Souaidia, N.; Pietras, C.; Stone, T.C.; Yarbrough, M.A.; Kim, Y.S.; Barnes, R.A.; Mueller, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    We have presented a number of recent developments in radiometry that directly impact the uncertainties achievable in ocean-color research. Specifically, a new (2000) U. S. national irradiance scale, a new LASER-based facility for irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations, and applications of the LASER facility for the calibration of sun photometers and characterization of spectrographs were discussed. For meaningful long-time-series global chlorophyll-a measurements, all instruments involved in radiometric measurements, including satellite sensors, vicarious calibration sensors, sensors used in the development of bio-optical algorithms and atmospheric characterization need to be fully characterized and corrected for systematic errors, including, but not limited to, stray light. A unique, solid-state calibration source is under development to reduce the radiometric uncertainties in ocean color instruments, in particular below 400 nm. Lunar measurements for trending of on-orbit sensor channel degradation were described. Unprecedented assessments, within 0.1 %, of temporal stability and drift in a satellite sensor's radiance responsivity are achievable with this approach. These developments advance the field of ocean color closer to the desired goal of reducing the uncertainty in the fundamental radiometry to a small component of the overall uncertainty in the derivation of remotely sensed ocean-color data products such as chlorophyll a.

  8. Accuracy of sea ice temperature derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Rothrock, D. A.; Lindsay, R. W.

    1995-03-01

    The accuracy of Arctic sea ice surface temperatures Ts derived from advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) thermal channels is evaluated in the cold seasons by comparing them with surface air temperatures Tair from drifting buoys and ice stations. We use three different estimates of satellite surface temperatures, a direct estimate from AVHRR channel 4 with only correction for the snow surface emissivity but not for the atmosphere, a single-channel regression of Ts with Tair, and Key and Haefliger's (1992) polar multichannel algorithm. We find no measurable bias in any of these estimates and few differences in their statistics. The similar performance of all three methods indicates that an atmospheric water vapor correction is not important for the dry winter atmosphere in the central Arctic, given the other sources of error that remain in both the satellite and the comparison data. The errors are not reduced by regression with both thermal channels and the satellite scan angle. A record of drifting station data shows winter air temperature to be 1.4°C wanner than the snow surface temperature. "Correcting" air temperatures to skin temperature by subtracting this amount implies that satellite Ts estimates are biased warm with respect to skin temperature by about this amount. A case study with low-flying aircraft data suggests that ice crystal precipitation can cause satellite estimates of Ts to be several degrees warmer than radiometric measurements taken close to the surface, presumably below the ice crystal precipitation layer. An analysis in which errors are assumed to exist in all measurements, not just the satellite measurements, gives a standard deviation in the satellite estimates of 0.9°C, about half the standard deviation of 1.7°C estimated by assigning all the variation between Ts and Tair to errors in Ts.

  9. Accuracy of sea ice temperature derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Y.; Rothrock, D. A.; Lindsay, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    The accuracy of Arctic sea ice surface temperatures T(sub s) dericed from advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) thermal channels is evaluated in the cold seasons by comparing them with surface air temperatures T(sub air) from drifting buoys and ice stations. We use three different estimates of satellite surface temperatures, a direct estimate from AVHRR channel 4 with only correction for the snow surface emissivity but not for the atmosphere, a single-channel regression of T(sub s) with T(sub air), and Key and Haefliger's (1992) polar multichannel algorithm. We find no measurable bias in any of these estimates and few differences in their statistics. The similar performance of all three methods indicates that an atmospheric water vapor correction is not important for the dry winter atmosphere in the central Arctic, given the other sources of error that remain in both the satellite and the comparison data. A record of drifting station data shows winter air temperature to be 1.4 C warmer than the snow surface temperature. `Correcting' air temperatures to skin temperature by subtracting this amount implies that satellite T(sub s) estimates are biased warm with respect to skin temperature by about this amount. A case study with low-flying aircraft data suggests that ice crystal precipitation can cause satellite estimates of T(sub s) to be several degrees warmer than radiometric measurements taken close to the surface, presumably below the ice crystal precipitation layer. An analysis in which errors are assumed to exist in all measurements, not just the satellite measurements, gives a standard deviation in the satellite estimates of 0.9 C, about half the standard deviation of 1.7 C estimated by assigning all the variation between T(sub s) and T(sub air) to errors in T(sub s).

  10. Biases in Total Precipitable Water Vapor Climatologies from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Eldering, Annmarie; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2006-01-01

    We examine differences in total precipitable water vapor (PWV) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) experiments sharing the Aqua spacecraft platform. Both systems provide estimates of PWV over water surfaces. We compare AIRS and AMSR-E PWV to constrain AIRS retrieval uncertainties as functions of AIRS retrieved infrared cloud fraction. PWV differences between the two instruments vary only weakly with infrared cloud fraction up to about 70%. Maps of AIRS-AMSR-E PWV differences vary with location and season. Observational biases, when both instruments observe identical scenes, are generally less than 5%. Exceptions are in cold air outbreaks where AIRS is biased moist by 10-20% or 10-60% (depending on retrieval processing) and at high latitudes in winter where AIRS is dry by 5-10%. Sampling biases, from different sampling characteristics of AIRS and AMSR-E, vary in sign and magnitude. AIRS sampling is dry by up to 30% in most high-latitude regions but moist by 5-15% in subtropical stratus cloud belts. Over the northwest Pacific, AIRS samples conditions more moist than AMSR-E by a much as 60%. We hypothesize that both wet and dry sampling biases are due to the effects of clouds on the AIRS retrieval methodology. The sign and magnitude of these biases depend upon the types of cloud present and on the relationship between clouds and PWV. These results for PWV imply that climatologies of height-resolved water vapor from AIRS must take into consideration local meteorological processes affecting AIRS sampling.

  11. Observations of frozen skin of southern ocean from multifrequency scanning microwave radiometer (MSMR) onboard oceansat - 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, N.; Bhandari, S.; Dash, M.; Pandey, P.; Khare, N.

    Encircling the Antarctic, Southern Ocean connects all the three oceans of the world with fastest current system found anywhere in the world. The region is thermally very stable and is covered with ice, which has a strong seasonal variability. The sea ice pulsates annually with seasonal migration varying from 4 million square kilometer to 20 million square kilometer during summer and winter respectively. This has strong influence on energy balance of the ocean-ice-atmosphere system, and hence on atmospheric general circulation affecting weather and climate. Sea ice also works as an insulator thus inhibiting the energy flux between ocean and atmosphere. It also influences the ecosystem of the southern ocean, which has rich fish resources with global economic values such as krill and tooth fish. During winter Krill survives on algae found at the under side of the sea ice. The southern ocean is known to have high nutrition but low concentration of chlorophyll-a, which is a proxy of the phytoplankton. It is now understood that iron is the limiting factor as has been shown by various iron fertilization experiments. Passive microwave radiometry from space has been extensively used for the study of sea ice types and concentration in the Arctic and the Antarctic regions. Since late 1970s, data from SMMR and SSM/I have been used to study trends in sea ice extent and area. We have further extended the above studies by using data from OCEANSAT - 1 MSMR. The data, acquired at 18 GHz (H) with 50 kilometer resolution and having a swath of 1360 kilometer and a repeat cycle of 2 days, was processed to generate the brightness temperature maps over the Antarctica for a period of 2 years and the results were analyzed in conjunction with those obtained earlier (since 1978) through the study of SMMR and SSM/I data. Besides strong seasonal variability, our analysis shows an increasing trend in the sea ice extent during the recent years and the rate appears to be accelerating contrary to

  12. Rainfall estimation over oceans from scanning multichannel microwave radiometer and special sensor microwave/imager microwave data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Dalu, G.; Liberti, G. L.; Nucciarone, J. J.; Suhasini, R.

    1991-01-01

    The brightness temperature (T sub b) measured at 37 GHz shows fairly strong emission from rain, and only slight effects caused by scattering by ice above the rain clouds. At frequencies below 37 GHz, were the fov is larger and the volume extinction coefficient is weaker, it is found that the observations do not yield appreciable additional information about rain. At 85 GHz (fov = 15 km), where the volume extinction is considerably larger, direct information about rain below the clouds is usually masked. Based on the above ideas, 37 GHz observations with a 30 km fov from SMMR and SSM/I are selected to develop an empirical method for the estimation of rain rate. In this method, the statistics of the observed T sub b's at 37 GHz in a rain storm are related to the rain rate statistics in that storm. The underestimation of rain rate, arising from the inability of the radiometer to respond sensitively to rain rate above a given threshold, is rectified in this technique with the aid of two parameters that depend on the total water vapor content in the atmosphere. The retrieved rain rates compare favorably with radar observations and monthly mean global maps of rain derived from this technique over the oceans.

  13. Remote sensing of volcanic plumes using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henney, Lorna Alison

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) has been used to quantify SO2 emissions from passively degassing volcanoes. This dissertation explores ASTER's capability to detect SO 2 with satellite validation, enhancement techniques and extensive processing of images at a variety of volcanoes. ASTER is compared to the Mini UV Spectrometer (MUSe), a ground based instrument, to determine if reasonable SO2 fluxes can be quantified from a plume emitted from Lascar, Chile. The two sensors were in good agreement with ASTER proving to be a reliable detector of SO2. ASTER illustrated the advantages of imaging a plume in 2D, with better temporal resolution than the MUSe. SO2 plumes in ASTER imagery are not always discernible in the raw TIR data. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Decorrelation Stretch (DCS) enhancement techniques were compared to determine how well they highlight a variety of volcanic plumes. DCS produced a consistent output and the composition of the plumes was easy to identify from explosive eruptions. As the plumes became smaller and lower in altitude they became harder to distinguish using DCS. PCA proved to be better at identifying smaller low altitude plumes. ASTER was used to investigate SO2 emissions at Lascar, Chile. Activity at Lascar has been characterized by cyclic behavior and persistent degassing (Matthews et al. 1997). Previous studies at Lascar have primarily focused on changes in thermal infrared anomalies, neglecting gas emissions. Using the SO2 data along with changes in thermal anomalies and visual observations it is evident that Lascar is at the end an eruptive cycle that began in 1993. Declining gas emissions and crater temperatures suggest that the conduit is sealing. ASTER and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were used to determine the annual contribution of SO2 to the troposphere from the Central and South American volcanic arcs between 2000 and 2011. Fluxes of 3.4 Tg/a for Central America and 3

  14. Assessing coastal plain wetland composition using advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaleoni, Eva

    Establishing wetland gains and losses, delineating wetland boundaries, and determining their vegetative composition are major challenges that can be improved through remote sensing studies. We used the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) to separate wetlands from uplands in a study of 870 locations on the Virginia Coastal Plain. We used the first five bands from each of two ASTER scenes (6 March 2005 and 16 October 2005), covering the visible to the short-wave infrared region (0.52-2.185mum). We included GIS data layers for soil survey, topography, and presence or absence of water in a logistic regression model that predicted the location of over 78% of the wetlands. While this was slightly less accurate (78% vs. 86%) than current National Wetland Inventory (NWI) aerial photo interpretation procedures of locating wetlands, satellite imagery analysis holds great promise for speeding wetland mapping, lowering costs, and improving update frequency. To estimate wetland vegetation composition classes, we generated a classification and regression tree (CART) model and a multinomial logistic regression (logit) model, and compared their accuracy in separating woody wetlands, emergent wetlands and open water. The overall accuracy of the CART model was 73.3%, while for the logit model was 76.7%. The CART producer's accuracy of the emergent wetlands was higher than the accuracy from the multinomial logit (57.1% vs. 40.7%). However, we obtained the opposite result for the woody wetland category (68.7% vs. 52.6%). A McNemar test between the two models and NWI maps showed that their accuracies were not statistically different. We conducted a subpixel analysis of the ASTER images to estimate canopy cover of forested wetlands. We used top-of-atmosphere reflectance from the visible and near infrared bands, Delta Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and a tasseled cap brightness, greenness, and wetness in linear regression model with canopy

  15. Probabilistic approach to cloud and snow detection on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musial, J. P.; Hüsler, F.; Sütterlin, M.; Neuhaus, C.; Wunderle, S.

    2014-03-01

    Derivation of probability estimates complementary to geophysical data sets has gained special attention over the last years. Information about a confidence level of provided physical quantities is required to construct an error budget of higher-level products and to correctly interpret final results of a particular analysis. Regarding the generation of products based on satellite data a common input consists of a cloud mask which allows discrimination between surface and cloud signals. Further the surface information is divided between snow and snow-free components. At any step of this discrimination process a misclassification in a cloud/snow mask propagates to higher-level products and may alter their usability. Within this scope a novel probabilistic cloud mask (PCM) algorithm suited for the 1 km × 1 km Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data is proposed which provides three types of probability estimates between: cloudy/clear-sky, cloudy/snow and clear-sky/snow conditions. As opposed to the majority of available techniques which are usually based on the decision-tree approach in the PCM algorithm all spectral, angular and ancillary information is used in a single step to retrieve probability estimates from the precomputed look-up tables (LUTs). Moreover, the issue of derivation of a single threshold value for a spectral test was overcome by the concept of multidimensional information space which is divided into small bins by an extensive set of intervals. The discrimination between snow and ice clouds and detection of broken, thin clouds was enhanced by means of the invariant coordinate system (ICS) transformation. The study area covers a wide range of environmental conditions spanning from Iceland through central Europe to northern parts of Africa which exhibit diverse difficulties for cloud/snow masking algorithms. The retrieved PCM cloud classification was compared to the Polar Platform System (PPS) version 2012 and Moderate Resolution Imaging

  16. Over-ocean Evaluation of a GPM Radar-Radiometer Combined Algorithm Using TRMM-based Synthetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, M.; Olson, W.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the performance of a combined radar-radiometer retrieval algorithm for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is investigated using synthetic data derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations. The combined retrieval algorithm is based on the generation of an ensemble of dual-frequency radar-only precipitation profile estimates and the calculation of associated microwave brightness temperatures. A statistical analysis of the agreement between calculated and observed brightness temperatures identifies the radar-only estimates that are most consistent with the observed brightness temperatures. Variables that are necessary for the calculation of brightness temperatures but which are not essential in the derivation of the radar-only retrievals are stochastically prescribed and refined based on the agreement between simulated and observed radiometer brightness temperatures. To evaluate this algorithm over oceans, TRMM observations are used. That is, vertical profiles particles size distribution (PSD) intercepts are assumed (one profile per Precipitation Radar (PR) footprint) for a large number of TRMM orbits. A single frequency radar-retrieval algorithm is applied to TRMM PR observations to derive vertical PSD profiles consistent with both the assumed PSD intercepts and the TRMM PR observations. TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) observations are used to derive surface conditions (i.e. sea surface temperatures and sea surface winds) and parameterized information regarding the vertical distribution of water vapor and clouds in rain-free fields of view (FOVs). The surface conditions in rain FOVs are determined by interpolation of rain-free FOVs. The vertical profiles of water vapor, water and ice clouds are statistically prescribed in rain FOVs. The TMI derived surface conditions, the PR derived PSDs and the statistically prescribed water vapor and cloud profiles are used to synthesize Ka-band radar observations and associated

  17. Overview of the NOAA/NASA advanced very high resolution radiometer Pathfinder algorithm for sea surface temperature and associated matchup database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, K. A.; Podestá, G. P.; Evans, R.

    2001-05-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/NASA Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature (SST) data are derived from measurements made by the advanced very high resolution radiometers (AVHRRs) on board the NOAA 7, 9, 11, and 14 polar orbiting satellites. All versions of the Pathfinder SST algorithm are based on the NOAA/National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service nonlinear SST operational algorithm (NLSST). Improvements to the NLSST operational algorithm developed by the Pathfinder program include the use of monthly calibration coefficients selected on the basis of channel brightness temperature difference (T4-T5). This channel difference is used as a proxy for water vapor regime. The latest version (version 4.2) of the Pathfinder processing includes the use of decision trees to determine objectively pixel cloud contamination and quality level (0-7) of the SST retrieval. The 1985-1998 series of AVHRR global measurements has been reprocessed using the Pathfinder version 4.2 processing protocol and is available at various temporal and spatial resolutions from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center. One of the highlights of the Pathfinder program is that in addition to the daily global area coverage fields, a matchup database of coincident in situ buoy and satellite SST observations also is made available for independent algorithm development and validation.

  18. New Observations of C-band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate From the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Buckley, C. D.; Biswas, S.; May, C.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, Cerese

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on the WB-57 during NASA's GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August September of 2010. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP campaign will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the GRIP campaign, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eyewall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  19. Comparison of sea surface wind speed fields by SEASAT radar altimeter, scatterometer and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer with an emphasis on the Southern Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mognard, N. M.; Campbell, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    The SEASAT altimeter (ALT), scatterometer (SASS), and scanning microwave multichannel radiometer (SMMR) measured sea surface wind speed. During the satellite lifetime from June to October 1978, the Austral winter, the highest wind speeds were recorded in the Southern Ocean. Three-month, monthly, and three-day surface wind speed fields deduced from the three Seasat wind speed sensors are compared. The monthly and three-day fields show a pronounced mesoscale (1000 km) variability in wind speed. At all space and time scales analyzed, differences of 40% are found in the magnitude of the wind speed features, with the ALT consistently yielding the lowest wind speed and the SMMR the highest.

  20. GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: spectral response functions and radiometric biases with the NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite evaluated for desert calibration sites.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, Aaron; Pogorzala, David; Cao, Changyong

    2013-11-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), which will be launched in late 2015 on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-series satellite, will be evaluated in terms of its data quality postlaunch through comparisons with other satellite sensors such as the recently launched Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite. The ABI has completed much of its prelaunch characterization and its developers have generated and released its channel spectral response functions (response versus wavelength). Using these responses and constraining a radiative transfer model with ground reflectance, aerosol, and water vapor measurements, we simulate observed top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectances for analogous visible and near infrared channels of the VIIRS and ABI sensors at the Sonoran Desert and White Sands National Monument sites and calculate the radiometric biases and their uncertainties. We also calculate sensor TOA reflectances using aircraft hyperspectral data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer to validate the uncertainties in several of the ABI and VIIRS channels and discuss the potential for validating the others. Once on-orbit, calibration scientists can use these biases to ensure ABI data quality and consistency to support the numerical weather prediction community and other data users. They can also use the results for ABI or VIIRS anomaly detection and resolution. PMID:24216671

  1. Design and characterization of a 32-channel heterodyne radiometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Han, X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. Li, E. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-07-15

    A 32-channel heterodyne radiometer has been developed for the measurement of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). This system collects X-mode ECE radiation spanning a frequency range of 104–168 GHz, where the frequency coverage corresponds to a full radial coverage for the case with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.3 T. The frequency range is equally spaced every 2 GHz from 105.1 to 167.1 GHz with an RF bandwidth of ∼500 MHz and the video bandwidth can be switched among 50, 100, 200, and 400 kHz. Design objectives and characterization of the system are presented in this paper. Preliminary results for plasma operation are also presented.

  2. Application of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer vegetation index to study atmosphere-biosphere exchange of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, I. Y.; Tucker, C. J.; Prentice, K. C.

    1987-01-01

    Normalized difference vegetation indices derived from radiances measured by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer were used to prescribe the phasing of terrestrial photosynthesis. The satellite data were combined with field data on soil respiration and a global map of net primary productivity to obtain the seasonal exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. The monthly fluxes of CO2 thus obtained were employed as source/sink functions in a global three-dimensional atmospheric tracer transport model to simulate the annual oscillations of CO2 in the atmosphere. The results demonstrate that satellite data of high spatial and temporal resolution can be used to provide quantitative information about seasonal and longer-term variations of photosynthetic activity on a global scale.

  3. Design and characterization of a 32-channel heterodyne radiometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Liu, X; Liu, Y; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Li, E Z; Hu, L Q; Gao, X

    2014-07-01

    A 32-channel heterodyne radiometer has been developed for the measurement of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). This system collects X-mode ECE radiation spanning a frequency range of 104-168 GHz, where the frequency coverage corresponds to a full radial coverage for the case with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.3 T. The frequency range is equally spaced every 2 GHz from 105.1 to 167.1 GHz with an RF bandwidth of ~500 MHz and the video bandwidth can be switched among 50, 100, 200, and 400 kHz. Design objectives and characterization of the system are presented in this paper. Preliminary results for plasma operation are also presented. PMID:25085139

  4. ESTAR: The Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer for remote sensing measurement of soil moisture and ocean salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The product of a working group assembled to help define the science objectives and measurement requirements of a spaceborne L-band microwave radiometer devoted to remote sensing of surface soil moisture and sea surface salinity is presented. Remote sensing in this long-wavelength portion of the microwave spectrum requires large antennas in low-Earth orbit to achieve acceptable spatial resolution. The proposed radiometer, ESTAR, is unique in that it employs aperture synthesis to reduce the antenna area requirements for a space system.

  5. METSAT information content: Cloud screening and solar correction investigations on the influence of NOAA-6 advanced very high resolution radiometer derived vegetation assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the cloud indicator index (CII) for use with METSAT's advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) is described. The CII is very effective at identification of clouds. Also, explored are different solar correction and standard techniques and the impact of these corrections have on the information content of AVHRR data.

  6. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER): Data Products for the High Spatial Resolution Imager on NASA's EOS-AMI Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is a high spatial resolution, multispectral imager with along-track stereo capabilities scheduled for launch on the first NASA spacecraft of the Earth Observing System (EOS AM-1) in mid-1999.

  7. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) during GRIP and HS3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, C.

    2013-01-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and at the time of this writing plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  8. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Observations of Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate During NASA's GRIP and HS3 Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, C.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain spatial resolution of approximately 2 km, out to roughly 30 km each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. The physical retrieval technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  9. Observations of C-band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; May, C.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on the WB-57 over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010. HIRAD is a new Cband radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. (The resulting swath width for a platform at 60,000 feet is roughly 60 km, and resolution for most of the swath is around 2 km.) By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP campaign will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the GRIP campaign, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eyewall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  10. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Observations Of Brightness Temperatures And Ocean Surface Wind Speed And Rain Rate During NASA's GRIP And HS3 Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T. L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, L.; Biswas, S. K.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R. M.; Black, P. G.; Albers, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA's GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain spatial resolution of approximately 2 km, out to roughly 30 km each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. The physical retrieval technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  11. Automated sensor networks to advance ocean science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, O.; Orcutt, J. A.; Arrott, M.; Vernon, F. L.; Peach, C. L.; Meisinger, M.; Krueger, I.; Kleinert, J.; Chao, Y.; Chien, S.; Thompson, D. R.; Chave, A. D.; Balasuriya, A.

    2010-12-01

    The National Science Foundation has funded the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), which over the next five years will deploy infrastructure to expand scientist’s ability to remotely study the ocean. The deployed infrastructure will be linked by a robust cyberinfrastructure (CI) that will integrate marine observatories into a coherent system-of-systems. OOI is committed to engaging the ocean sciences community during the construction pahse. For the CI, this is being enabled by using a “spiral design strategy” allowing for input throughout the construction phase. In Fall 2009, the OOI CI development team used an existing ocean observing network in the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) to test OOI CI software. The objective of this CI test was to aggregate data from ships, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), shore-based radars, and satellites and make it available to five different data-assimilating ocean forecast models. Scientists used these multi-model forecasts to automate future glider missions in order to demonstrate the feasibility of two-way interactivity between the sensor web and predictive models. The CI software coordinated and prioritized the shared resources that allowed for the semi-automated reconfiguration of assett-tasking, and thus enabled an autonomous execution of observation plans for the fixed and mobile observation platforms. Efforts were coordinated through a web portal that provided an access point for the observational data and model forecasts. Researchers could use the CI software in tandem with the web data portal to assess the performance of individual numerical model results, or multi-model ensembles, through real-time comparisons with satellite, shore-based radar, and in situ robotic measurements. The resulting sensor net will enable a new means to explore and study the world’s oceans by providing scientists a responsive network in the world’s oceans that can be accessed via any wireless network.

  12. Preliminary assessment of industrial needs for an advanced ocean technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mourad, A. G.; Maher, K. M.; Balon, J. E.; Coyle, A. G.; Henkener, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    A quick-look review of selected ocean industries is presented for the purpose of providing NASA OSTA with an assessment of technology needs and market potential. The size and growth potential, needs and problem areas, technology presently used and its suppliers, are given for industries involved in deep ocean mining, petrochemicals ocean energy conversion. Supporting services such as ocean bottom surveying; underwater transportation, data collection, and work systems; and inspection and diving services are included. Examples of key problem areas that are amenable to advanced technology solutions are included. Major companies are listed.

  13. Advancing the First World Ocean Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirpak, Elizabeth; Halpern, David

    2013-04-01

    World Ocean Assessment (WOA) regional workshops enlist expertise for the WOA Pool of Experts, update regional knowledge on the marine environment, and build capacity to conduct assessments and benefit from assessments. WOA was described in Eos (93(50), 521, doi:10.1029/2012EO500001). For the Wider Caribbean Region (WCR) Workshop, the United States Mission to the United Nations (UN) invited all UN missions, in accordance with WOA guidelines. The WCR workshop attracted 94 people from 32 countries with a wide range of expertise, including ocean, fishery, and biodiversity sciences; living and nonliving resource management; and capacity building. Attendees represented academia, governments, industry, and nongovernmental organizations.

  14. Lithologic mapping in the Mountain Pass, California area using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, L.C.; Mars, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of an Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image of the Mountain Pass, California area indicates that several important lithologic groups can be mapped in areas with good exposure by using spectral-matching techniques. The three visible and six near-infrared bands, which have 15-m and 30-m resolution, respectively, were calibrated by using in situ measurements of spectral reflectance. Calcitic rocks were distinguished from dolomitic rocks by using matched-filter processing in which image spectra were used as references for selected spectral categories. Skarn deposits and associated bright coarse marble were mapped in contact metamorphic zones related to intrusion of Mesozoic and Tertiary granodioritic rocks. Fe-muscovite, which is common in these intrusive rocks, was distinguished from Al-muscovite present in granitic gneisses and Mesozoic granite. Quartzose rocks were readily discriminated, and carbonate rocks were mapped as a single broad unit through analysis of the 90-m resolution, five-band surface emissivity data, which is produced as a standard product at the EROS Data Center. Three additional classes resulting from spectral-angle mapper processing ranged from (1) a broad granitic rock class (2) to predominately granodioritic rocks and (3) a more mafic class consisting mainly of mafic gneiss, amphibolite and variable mixtures of carbonate rocks and silicate rocks. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Calibration of the Visible and Near-Infrared Channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) After Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, C. R. Nagaraja; Chen, Jianhua

    1993-01-01

    The relative degradation in time of the visible(channel 1: approx.0.58-0.6 microns) and near-infrared(channel 2: approx. O.72-1.1 microns) channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer(AVHRR), onboard the NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites(POES), has been determined, using the southeastern Libyan desert(21-23 deg N latitude; 28- 29 deg E longitude) as a time-invariant calibration target. A statistical procedure was used on the reflectance data for the two channels from the B3 data of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project(ISCCP) to obtain the degradation rates for the AVERRs on NOAA-7, -9, and -11 spacecraft. The degradation rates per year for channels 1 and 2 are respectively: 3.6% and 4.3%(NOAA-7); 5.9% and 3.5%(NOAA-9); and 1.2% and 2.0%(NOAA-11). The use of the degradation rates thus determined, in conjunction with 'absolute' calibrations obtained from congruent aircraft and satellite measurements, in the development of correction algorithms is illustrated with the AVHRR on the NOAA-9 spacecraft.

  16. Effects of orbital drift on advanced very high resolution radiometer products: Normalized difference vegetation index and sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Privette, J.L.; Fowler, C.; Wick, G.A.; Baldwin, D.; Emery, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    Although orbits of the NOAA TIROS-N satellites are designed to be sun-synchronous, epheremis data shows that the afternoon, ascending node satellites currently cross the equator hours later than they did upon launch. This delay results in different illumination conditions for measurements made by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). The effects of illumination on two standard AVHRR products--normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and sea surface temperature (SST)--are modeled here. Combining orbital data with model results, the effects of the NOAA-11 orbital drift on NDVI are quantitatively assessed for three earth targets: an equatorial Africa site (0{degree} N), the First ISLSCP field Experiment (FIFE) site (39{degree} N), and the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) site (55{degree} N). Top-of-atmosphere NDVI corrections for solar zenith angle are developed for a dense, deciduous forest. Orbital drift effects on SST are given for an equatorial site. Although results vary with season, latitude, atmosphere and time since launch, NDVI differences of up to 0.23 and SST differences of up to 0.5 K may occur due strictly to orbital drift.

  17. Advancing Ocean Monitoring Near Coral Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Scott F.; Steinberg, Craig R.; Heron, Mal L.; Mantovanelli, Alessandra; Jaffrés, Jasmine B. D.; Skirving, William J.; McAllister, Felicity; Rigby, Paul; Wisdom, Daniel; Bainbridge, Scott

    2010-10-01

    Corals, the foundation of tropical marine ecosystems, exist in a symbiotic relationship with zooxanthellae (algae). The corals obtain much of their energy by consuming compounds derived from photosynthesis by these microorganisms; the microorganisms, which reside in the coral tissue, in turn use waste products from the corals to sustain photosynthesis. This symbiosis is very sensitive to subtle changes in environment, such as increased ocean acidity, temperature, and light. When unduly stressed, the colorful algae are expelled from the corals, causing the corals to “bleach” and potentially die [e.g., van Oppen and Lough, 2009].

  18. Airborne full polarization radiometry using the MSFC Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, Al J.; Kunkee, D. B.

    1993-01-01

    The applications of vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures in both atmospheric and surface remote sensing have been long recognized by many investigators, particularly those studying SMMR and SSM/I data. Here, the large contrast between the first two Stokes' parameters (T(sub V) and T(sub H)) can be used for detection of sea ice, measurement of ocean surface wind speed, and measurement of cloud and water vapor opacity. High-resolution aircraft data from instruments such as the NASA/MSFC AMPR is crucial for verifying radiative transfer models and developing retrieval algorithms. Currently, the AMPR is outfitted with single-polarization channels at 10, 18, 37 and 85 GHz. To increase its utility, it is proposed that additional orthogonal linearly polarized channels be added to the AMPR. Since the AMPR's feedhorns are already configured for dual orthogonal linearly polarized modes, this would require only a duplication of the currently existing receivers. To circumvent the resulting polarization basis skew caused by the cross-track scanning mechanism, the technique of Electronic Polarization Basis Rotation is proposed to be implemented. Implementation of EPBR requires precise measurement of the third Stokes parameter and will eliminate polarization skew by allowing the feedhorn basis skew angle to be corrected in software. In addition to upgrading AMPR to dual polarization capability (without skew), the modifications will provide an opportunity to demonstrate EPBR on an airborne platform. This is a highly desirable intermediate step prior to satellite implementation.

  19. The absolute radiometric calibration of the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.; Teillet, P. M.; Ding, Y.

    1988-01-01

    An increasing number of remote sensing investigations require radiometrically calibrated imagery from NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiation (AVHRR) sensors. Although a prelaunch calibration is done for these sensors, there is no capability for monitoring any changes in the in-flight absolute calibration for the visible and near infrared spectral channels. Hence, the possibility of using the reflectance-based method developed at White Sands for in-orbit calibration of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) and SPOT Haute Resolution Visible (HVR) data to calibrate the AVHRR sensor was investigated. Three diffrent approaches were considered: Method 1 - ground and atmospheric measurements and reference to another calibrated satellite sensor; Method 2 - ground and atmospheric measurements with no reference to another sensor; and Method 3 - no ground and atmospheric measurements but reference to another satellite sensor. The purpose is to describe an investigation on the use of Method 2 to calibrate NOAA-9 AVHRR channels 1 and 2 with the help of ground and atmospheric measurements at Rogers (dry) Lake, Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in the Mojave desert of California.

  20. Aerosol Optical Properties over the Oceans: Summary and Interpretation of Shadow-Band Radiometer Data from Six Cruises. Chapter 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Mark A.; Reynolds, R. M.; Bartholomew, Mary Jane

    2001-01-01

    The aerosol scattering component of the total radiance measured at the detectors of ocean color satellites is determined with atmospheric correction algorithms. These algorithms are based on aerosol optical thickness measurements made in two channels that lie in the near-infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The aerosol properties in the near-infrared region are used because there is no significant contribution to the satellite-measured radiance from the underlying ocean surface in that spectral region. In the visible wavelength bands, the spectrum of radiation scattered from the turbid atmosphere is convolved with the spectrum of radiation scattered from the surface layers of the ocean. The radiance contribution made by aerosols in the visible bands is determined from the near-infrared measurements through the use of aerosol models and radiation transfer codes. Selection of appropriate aerosol models from the near-infrared measurements is a fundamental challenge. There are several challenges with respect to the development, improvement, and evaluation of satellite ocean-color atmospheric correction algorithms. A common thread among these challenges is the lack of over-ocean aerosol data. Until recently, one of the most important limitations has been the lack of techniques and instruments to make aerosol measurements at sea. There has been steady progress in this area over the past five years, and there are several new and promising devices and techniques for data collection. The development of new instruments and the collection of more aerosol data from over the world's oceans have brought the realization that aerosol measurements that can be directly compared with aerosol measurements from ocean color satellite measurements are difficult to obtain. There are two problems that limit these types of comparisons: the cloudiness of the atmosphere over the world's oceans and the limitations of the techniques and instruments used to collect aerosol data from

  1. [Research advances in methyl bromide in the ocean].

    PubMed

    Du, Hui-na; Xie, Wen-xia; Cui, Yu-qian; Chen, Jian-lei; Ye, Si-yuan

    2014-12-01

    Methyl bromide is an important atmospheric trace gas, which plays significant roles in the global warming and atmospheric chemistry. The ocean plays important and complex roles in the global biogeochemical cycles of methyl bromide, not only the source of atmospheric methyl bromide, but also the sink. Therefore, developing the chemical research of the soluble methyl bromide in the ocean, will not only have a certain guiding significance to the atmospheric ozone layer protection, but also provide a theoretical basis for estimating methyl bromide's contribution to the global environmental change on global scale. This paper reviewed the research advances on methyl bromide in the ocean, from the aspects of the biogeochemical cycle of methyl bromide in the ocean, the analysis and determination method, the concentration distribution, the sea-to-air flux and its sources and sinks in the atmosphere. Some deficiencies in the current studies were put forward, and the directions of the future studies were prospected. PMID:25876424

  2. Characteristics of the Alaskan 1-Km Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data sets used for analysis of vegetation biophysical properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markon, Carl J.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, data characteristics for composited, multitemporal Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data sets for Alaska were assessed for a 7- year period from 1991 to 1997. This involved consideration of the satellite sensors used, data processing performed, and data set compilation, along with an analysis of acquisition date, solar zenith angle, satellite viewing angle, presence of clouds, and registration accuracy for each year. Each year?s worth of data are available on CD-ROM in byte format. All data sets have an initial start date of April 1, but had varying ending dates (mid-September to late October) because of satellite sensor malfunction or the presence of clouds or snow; no data set extended beyond October 31. Satellite scan angles were summarized in seven categories: data obtained at nadir, data within 30, 40, and 55 degrees of nadir, data greater than 55 degrees off nadir, and proportions of the data representing east or west look angles. Minimum, maximum, and average solar zenith angles were provided for each period. Estimates of cloud cover for each period were based on three tests: reflectance gross cloud test, channel 3 minus channel 4, and channel 4 minus channel 5. Registration accuracy was estimated using a gray-level autocorrelation technique. Results of this investigation indicate that the composited data available on CD-ROM should be useful for a number of different regional assessments of Earth cover properties. However, caution is advised when using these data because (1) loss in precision from the conversion to a byte format, (2) low sun angles and high viewing angles in the September and October data, and (3) registration inaccuracies of 2 to 8 pixels.

  3. Arctic sea ice concentrations from special sensor microwave imager and advanced very high resolution radiometer satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, W. J.; Fowler, C.; Maslanik, J.

    1994-01-01

    Nearly coincident data from the special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) and the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) are used to compute and compare Arctic sea ice concentrations for different regions and times of the year. To help determine overall accuracies and to highlight sources of differences between passive microwave, optical wavelength, and thermal wavelength data, ice concentrations are estimated using two operational SSM/I ice concentration algorithms and with visible- and thermal-infrared wavelength AVHRR data. All algorithms capture the seasonal patterns of ice growth and melt. The ranges of differences fall within the general levels of uncertainty expected for each method and are similar to previous accuracy estimates. The estimated ice concentrations are all highly correlated, with uniform biases, although differences between individual pairs of observations can be large. On average, the NASA Team algorithm yielded 5% higher ice concentrations than the Bootstrap algorithm, while during nonmelt periods the two SSM/I algorithms agree to within 0.5%. These seasonal differences are consistent with the ways that the 19-GHz and 37-GHz microwave channels are used in the algorithms. When compared to the AVHRR-derived ice concentrations, the Team-algorithm results are more similar on average in terms of correlation and mean differences. However, the Team algorithm underestimates concentrations relative to the AVHRR output by 6% during cold months and overestimates by 3% during summer. Little seasonal difference exists between the Bootstrap and AVHRR results, with a mean difference of about 5%. Although the mean differences are less between the SSM/I-derived concentrations and concentrations estimated using AVHRR channel 1, the correlations appear substantially better between the SSM/I data and concentrations derived from AVHRR channel 4, particularly for the Team algorithm output.

  4. Lithologic mapping of the Mordor, NT, Australia ultramafic complex by using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, L.C.; Mars, J.C.; Simpson, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Spectral measurements made in the Mordor Pound, NT, Australia study area using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), in the laboratory and in situ show dominantly Al-OH and ferric-iron VNIR-SWIR absorption features in felsic rock spectra and ferrous-iron and Fe,Mg-OH features in the mafic-ultramafic rock spectra. ASTER ratio images, matched-filter, and spectral-angle mapper processing (SAM) were evaluated for mapping the lithologies. Matched-filter processing in which VNIR + SWIR image spectra were used for reference resulted in 4 felsic classes and 4 mafic-ultramafic classes based on Al-OH or Fe,Mg-OH absorption features and, in some, subtle reflectance differences related to differential weathering and vegetation. These results were similar to those obtained by match-filter analysis of HyMap data from a previous study, but the units were more clearly demarcated in the HyMap image. ASTER TIR spectral emittance data and laboratory emissivity measurements document a wide wavelength range of Si-O spectral features, which reflect the lithological diversity of the Mordor ultramafic complex and adjacent rocks. SAM processing of the spectral emittance data distinguished 2 classes representing the mafic-ultramafic rocks and 4 classes comprising the quartzose to intermediate composition rocks. Utilization of the complementary attributes of the spectral reflectance and spectral emittance data resulted in discrimination of 4 mafic-ultramafic categories; 3 categories of alluvial-colluvial deposits; and a significantly more completely mapped quartzite unit than could be accomplished by using either data set alone. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Determining the susceptibility of cloud albedo to changes in droplet concentration with the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Platnick, S.; Twomey, S.

    1994-03-01

    Combustion processes that produce greenhouse gases also increase cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, which in turn increase cloud droplet concentrations and thereby cloud albedo. A calculation of cloud susceptibility, defined in this work as the increase in albedo resulting from the addition of one cloud droplet per cubic centimeter (as cloud liquid water content remains constant), is made through the satellite remote sensing of cloud droplet radius and optical thickness. The remote technique uses spectral channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument on board NOAA polar-orbiting satellites. Radiative transfer calculations of reflectance and effective surface and cloud emissivities are made for applicable sun and satellite viewing angles, including azimuth, at various radii and optical thicknesses for each AVHRR channel. Emission in channel 3 (at 3.75 {mu}m) is removed to give the reflected solar component. These calculations are used to infer the radius and optical thickness that best match the satellite measurements. An approximation for the effect of the atmosphere on the signal received by the AVHRR is included in the analysis. Marine stratus clouds, as well as being important modifiers of climate, are cleaner that continental clouds and so likely to be of higher susceptibility. Analysis of several stratus scenes, including some containing ship tracks, supports this expectation. The retrieved range of susceptibilities for all marine stratus clouds studied varied by about two orders of magnitude. This variation implies that climate studies that include possible marine stratus albedo modification from anthropogenic CCN are incomplete without accounting for existing susceptibilities. 54 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Solutions Network Formulation Report. Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer Data Products for National Drought Monitor Decision Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, Leland

    2007-01-01

    Drought effects are either direct or indirect depending on location, population, and regional economic vitality. Common direct effects of drought are reduced crop, rangeland, and forest productivity; increased fire hazard; reduced water levels; increased livestock and wildlife mortality rates; and damage to wildlife and fish habitat. Indirect impacts follow on the heels of direct impacts. For example, a reduction in crop, rangeland, and forest productivity may result in reduced income for farmers and agribusiness, increased prices for food and timber, unemployment, reduced tax revenues, increased crime, foreclosures on bank loans to farmers and businesses, migration, and disaster relief programs. In the United States alone, drought is estimated to result in annual losses of between $6 - 8 billion. Recent sustained drought in the United States has made decision-makers aware of the impacts of climate change on society and environment. The eight major droughts that occurred in the United States between 1980 and 1999 accounted for the largest percentage of weather-related monetary losses. Monitoring drought and its impact that occurs at a variety of scales is an important government activity -- not only nationally but internationally as well. The NDMC (National Drought Mitigation Center) and the USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) RMA (Risk Management Agency) have partnered together to develop a DM-DSS (Drought Monitoring Decision Support System). This monitoring system will be an interactive portal that will provide users the ability to visualize and assess drought at all levels. This candidate solution incorporates atmospherically corrected VIIRS data products, such as NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and Ocean SST (sea surface temperature), and AMSR-E soil moisture data products into two NDMC vegetation indices -- VegDRI (Vegetation Drought Response Index) and VegOUT (Vegetation Outlook) -- which are then input into the DM-DSS.

  7. Broadband radiometer

    DOEpatents

    Cannon, T.W.

    1994-07-26

    A broadband radiometer is disclosed including (a) an optical integrating sphere having generally spherical integrating chamber and an entry port for receiving light (e.g., having visible and ultraviolet fractions), (b) a first optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to broadband radiation, (c) a second optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to a predetermined wavelength fraction of the broadband radiation, and (d) an output for producing an electrical signal which is proportional to the difference between the two electrical output signals. The radiometer is very useful, for example, in measuring the absolute amount of ultraviolet light present in a given light sample. 8 figs.

  8. Broadband radiometer

    DOEpatents

    Cannon, Theodore W.

    1994-01-01

    A broadband radiometer including (a) an optical integrating sphere having a enerally spherical integrating chamber and an entry port for receiving light (e.g., having visible and ultraviolet fractions), (b) a first optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to broadband radiation, (c) a second optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to a predetermined wavelength fraction of the broadband radiation, and (d) an output for producing an electrical signal which is proportional to the difference between the two electrical output signals. The radiometer is very useful, for example, in measuring the absolute amount of ultraviolet light present in a given light sample.

  9. Laser radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, A.; Kaldor, A.; Rabinowitz, P.

    1983-11-29

    The present invention teaches a unique laser radiometer capable of accurately measuring the radiation temperature of a radiant surface and independently measuring the surface's emissivity. A narrow-band radiometer is combined with a laser reflectometer to measure concurrently radiance and emissivity of a remote, hot surface. Together, radiance and emissivity yield the true surface temperature of the remote target. A narrow receiver bandwidth is attained by one of two methods; (a) heterodyne detection or (b) optical filtering. A direct measurement of emissivity is used to adjust the value obtained for the thermal radiation signal to substantially enhance the accuracy of the temperature measurement for a given subject surface. The technique provides substantially high detection sensitivity over a very narrow spectral bandwidth.

  10. Seasonal warming of Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound in 1997: Advanced very high resolution radiometer sea surface temperature and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Mary Frances; Kester, Dana R.; Andrews, James E.; Magnuson, Andrea; Zoski, Cynthia G.

    2000-09-01

    The warming of Narragansett Bay and the offshore waters of Rhode Island Sound (RIS) and Buzzards Bay in the spring and early summer of 1997 was studied using in situ time series data and remotely sensed advanced very high resolution radiometer sea surface temperature (SST) satellite images. High-resolution SST images of the New England area were expanded to highlight Narragansett Bay and RIS. To validate this procedure, the remotely sensed data were compared to in situ data at the NOAA buoy in Buzzards Bay and at a spar buoy in mid-Narragansett Bay. The standard error (1.3°C) observed at the buoy in Narragansett Bay was slightly higher than that observed at the buoy in Buzzards Bay (1.0°C). A transect line down Narragansett Bay and into RIS and another across the entrance of Narragansett Bay and Buzzards Bay were extracted from the 47 images. A thermal front was observed at the mouth of the bay with the bay being warmer in the summer and cooler in the winter than the sound. Two areas of cold water were identified in the RIS transect: a cold water plume at the tip of Long Island and a second area near the Elizabeth Islands. We believe that both were caused by vertical mixing. There were three sources of in situ time series data to compare with the SST: (1) a spar buoy with sensors in the surface and bottom waters located near the middle of the Bay, (2) observations from a shore site near the mouth of the Bay, and (3) a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration buoy at the mouth of Buzzards Bay. Using the spar buoy data, we were able to calculate the vertical density gradient, and we found that salinity was more important than temperature in controlling the density structure at this site. Time series temperature data from the surface water in Buzzards Bay were almost identical to those observed in the bottom waters of Narragansett Bay, indicating that bottom water in the bay originates as surface water in RIS. Using a cooling event in the surface waters at

  11. Advances in a distributed approach for ocean model data interoperability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.; Snowden, Derrick P.

    2014-01-01

    An infrastructure for earth science data is emerging across the globe based on common data models and web services. As we evolve from custom file formats and web sites to standards-based web services and tools, data is becoming easier to distribute, find and retrieve, leaving more time for science. We describe recent advances that make it easier for ocean model providers to share their data, and for users to search, access, analyze and visualize ocean data using MATLAB® and Python®. These include a technique for modelers to create aggregated, Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata convention datasets from collections of non-standard Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) output files, the capability to remotely access data from CF-1.6-compliant NetCDF files using the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Observation Service (SOS), a metadata standard for unstructured grid model output (UGRID), and tools that utilize both CF and UGRID standards to allow interoperable data search, browse and access. We use examples from the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®) Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed, a project in which modelers using both structured and unstructured grid model output needed to share their results, to compare their results with other models, and to compare models with observed data. The same techniques used here for ocean modeling output can be applied to atmospheric and climate model output, remote sensing data, digital terrain and bathymetric data.

  12. Resolution Enhancement of Spaceborne Radiometer Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krim, Hamid

    2001-01-01

    Our progress over the last year has been along several dimensions: 1. Exploration and understanding of Earth Observatory System (EOS) mission with available data from NASA. 2. Comprehensive review of state of the art techniques and uncovering of limitations to be investigated (e.g. computational, algorithmic ...). and 3. Preliminary development of resolution enhancement algorithms. With the advent of well-collaborated satellite microwave radiometers, it is now possible to obtain long time series of geophysical parameters that are important for studying the global hydrologic cycle and earth radiation budget. Over the world's ocean, these radiometers simultaneously measure profiles of air temperature and the three phases of atmospheric water (vapor, liquid, and ice). In addition, surface parameters such as the near surface wind speed, the sea surface temperature, and the sea ice type and concentration can be retrieved. The special sensor microwaves imager SSM/I has wide application in atmospheric remote sensing over the ocean and provide essential inputs to numerical weather-prediction models. SSM/I data has also been used for land and ice studies, including snow cover classification measurements of soil and plant moisture contents, atmospheric moisture over land, land surface temperature and mapping polar ice. The brightness temperature observed by SSM/I is function of the effective brightness temperature of the earth's surface and the emission scattering and attenuation of the atmosphere. Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) is a new instrument that will measure the earth radiation over the spectral range from 7 to 90 GHz. Over the world's ocean, it will be possible to retrieve the four important geographical parameters SST, wind speed, vertically integrated water vapor, vertically integrated cloud liquid water L.

  13. Present status of the global change observation mission 1st - water 'SHIZUKU' (GCOM-W1) and the advanced microwave scanning radiometer 2 (AMSR2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Imaoka, Keiji; Kachi, Misako; Maeda, Takeshi; Kasahara, Marehito; Ito, Norimasa; Oki, Taikan; Shimoda, Haruhisa

    2014-11-01

    The Global Change Observation Mission 1st - Water (CGOM-W1) or "SHIZUKU" was launched on May 18, 2012 (JST) from the JAXA's Tanegashima Space Center. Subsequently, the GCOM-W1 satellite was joined to the NASA's A-train orbit since June 29, 2012 to succeed observation by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) and to provide combined utilization with other A-train satellites. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2), which is a successor of AMSR-E, onboard GCOM-W1 has started its scientific observation since July 3, 2012. AMSR-E was halted its scientific observation on October 4, 2011, but has restarted observation in slow antenna rotation rate since December 4, 2012 for cross-calibration with AMSR2. AMSR2 has multi-frequency, total-power microwave radiometer systems with dual polarization channels for all frequency bands, and continues AMSR-E observations: 1) Water vapor, 2) Cloud liquid water, 3) Precipitation, 4) SST, 5) Sea surface wind speed, 6) Sea ice concentration, 7) Snow depth, 8) Soil moisture. JAXA opened the AMSR2's brightness temperature products to the public since January 2013 after initial calibration/validation period by the GCOM-W1 Data Providing Service (https://gcomwl.jaxa.jp/). Thereafter, the retrieval algorithms of standard geophysical products for water vapor, cloud liquid water, precipitation, sea surface temperature, sea surface wind speed, sea ice concentration, snow depth and soil moisture were modified, and JAXA opened these standard geophysical products to the public since May 2013. In this paper, we present the present operation status of AMSR2.

  14. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  15. AEOS radiometer system: a multichannel imaging radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchett, Donald G.; Hendrick, Roy W.; Moore, Douglas K.; Briscoe, David E.; Bishop, Joseph; Medrano, Robert S.; Vigil, Michael L.

    1999-07-01

    A four channel imaging radiometer is now operational as the first sensor on the U.S. Air Force 3.67-meter Advanced Electro Optical System (AEOS) telescope at the Maui Space Surveillance Site on Mt. Haleakala. The four AEOS Radiometer System (ARS) channels cover the visible/near infrared, MWIR (2.0 - 5.5 micrometers ), LWIR (7.9 - 13.2 micrometers ), and VLWIR (16.2 - 23 micrometers ). The bands are separated by dichroic mirrors that direct the visible channel into a cooled enclosure and the infrared channels into a common cryogenic Dewar. Interference filters separate each band into multiple subbands. A novel background suppression technique uses array data and a circular scan generated by the telescope secondary. The ARS design meets challenges in volume constraint on the trunnion, a low vibration cryogenic system, thermal dissipation control, internal calibration, remotely operating four integrated focal plane arrays, high frame rates with their attendant large data handling and processing requirements, and integration into an observatory wide control system. This paper describes the design, integration, and first light test results of the ARS at the AEOS facility.

  16. Estimation of surface energy balance from radiant surface temperature and NOAA AVHRR sensor reflectances over agricultural and native vegetation. [AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer)

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xinmei; Lyons, T.J. ); Smith, R.C.G. ); Hacker, J.M.; Schwerdtfeger, P. )

    1993-08-01

    A model is developed to evaluate surface heat flux densities using the radiant surface temperature and red and near-infrared reflectances from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer sensor. Net radiation is calculated from an empirical formulation and albedo estimated from satellite observations. Infrared surface temperature is corrected to aerodynamic surface temperature in estimating the sensible heat flux and the latent flux is evaluated as the residual of the surface energy balance. When applied to relatively homogeneous agricultural and native vegetation, the model yields realistic estimates of sensible and latent heat flux density in the surface layer for cases where either the sensible or latent flux dominates. 29 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Effects of atmosphere and view and illumination geometry on visible and near infrared radiance data from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Fraser, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Dave's models to evaluate satellite off-nadir remote sensing of green vegetation cover types by simulating the visible and near-infrared advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) NOAA-6 and NOAA-7 radiances for three green-leaf biomass levels and bare soil. Ground measurements of surface reflectances were used. The simulations were done along a scan line at 30 deg latitude during the summer solstice, equinox, and winter solstice. The simulation models are described and the effect of atmosphere over moderately vegetated surfaces is discussed. The results show that sensor response to atmospheric path length can be substantial for the AVHRR visible and near-infrared channels and normalized difference values, but they can be minimized by high sun and clear atmospheric viewing. The results indicate that AVHRR data would be most useful for monitoring low green leaf biomas canopies.

  18. Classification of simulated and actual NOAA-6 AVHRR data for hydrologic land-surface feature definition. [Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    An examination of the possibilities of using Landsat data to simulate NOAA-6 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data on two channels, as well as using actual NOAA-6 imagery, for large-scale hydrological studies is presented. A running average was obtained of 18 consecutive pixels of 1 km resolution taken by the Landsat scanners were scaled up to 8-bit data and investigated for different gray levels. AVHRR data comprising five channels of 10-bit, band-interleaved information covering 10 deg latitude were analyzed and a suitable pixel grid was chosen for comparison with the Landsat data in a supervised classification format, an unsupervised mode, and with ground truth. Landcover delineation was explored by removing snow, water, and cloud features from the cluster analysis, and resulted in less than 10% difference. Low resolution large-scale data was determined useful for characterizing some landcover features if weekly and/or monthly updates are maintained.

  19. Slope adjustment of runoff curve number (CN) using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) for Kuantan River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Abolghasem

    2015-10-01

    The Natural Resources Conservation Service Curve Number (NRCS-CN) method is widely used for predicting direct runoff from rainfall. It employs the hydrologic soil groups and landuse information along with period soil moisture conditions to derive NRCS-CN. This method has been well documented and available in popular rainfall-runoff models such as HEC-HMS, SWAT, SWMM and many more. The Sharply-Williams and Hank methods was used to adjust CN values provided in standard table of TR-55. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) is used to derive slope map with spatial resolution of 30 m for Kuantan River Basin (KRB). The two investigated method stretches the conventional CN domain to the lower values. The study shows a successful application of remote sensing data and GIS tools in hydrological studies. The result of this work can be used for rainfall-runoff simulation and flood modeling in KRB.

  20. Hydrothermal alteration maps of the central and southern Basin and Range province of the United States compiled from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mars, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data and Interactive Data Language (IDL) logical operator algorithms were used to map hydrothermally altered rocks in the central and southern parts of the Basin and Range province of the United States. The hydrothermally altered rocks mapped in this study include (1) hydrothermal silica-rich rocks (hydrous quartz, chalcedony, opal, and amorphous silica), (2) propylitic rocks (calcite-dolomite and epidote-chlorite mapped as separate mineral groups), (3) argillic rocks (alunite-pyrophyllite-kaolinite), and (4) phyllic rocks (sericite-muscovite). A series of hydrothermal alteration maps, which identify the potential locations of hydrothermal silica-rich, propylitic, argillic, and phyllic rocks on Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) band 7 orthorectified images, and geographic information systems shape files of hydrothermal alteration units are provided in this study.

  1. An Update on Oceanic Precipitation Rate and its Zonal Distribution in Light of Advanced Observations from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrangi, Ali; Stephens, Graeme; Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George J.; Lambrigsten, Bjorn; Lebstock, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This study contributes to the estimation of the global mean and zonal distribution of oceanic precipitation rate using complementary information from advanced precipitation measuring sensors and provides an independent reference to assess current precipitation products. Precipitation estimates from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) and CloudSat cloud profiling radar (CPR) were merged, as the two complementary sensors yield an unprecedented range of sensitivity to quantify rainfall from drizzle through the most intense rates. At higher latitudes, where TRMM PR does not exist, precipitation estimates from Aqua's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) complemented CloudSat CPR to capture intense precipitation rates. The high sensitivity of CPR allows estimation of snow rate, an important type of precipitation at high latitudes, not directly observed in current merged precipitation products. Using the merged precipitation estimate from the CloudSat, TRMM, and Aqua platforms (this estimate is abbreviated to MCTA), the authors' estimate for 3-yr (2007-09) nearglobal (80degS-80degN) oceanic mean precipitation rate is approx. 2.94mm/day. This new estimate of mean global ocean precipitation is about 9% higher than that of the corresponding Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) value (2.68mm/day) and about 4% higher than that of the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP; 2.82mm/day). Furthermore, MCTA suggests distinct differences in the zonal distribution of precipitation rate from that depicted in GPCPand CMAP, especially in the Southern Hemisphere.

  2. Radiant Temperature Nulling Radiometer and Polarization Enhanced Thermal Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, John

    2002-01-01

    The two radiometers profiled in this viegraph presentation, the Radiant Temperature Nulling Radiometer and the Polarization Enhanced Thermal Radiometer, were developed for the calibration of remote sensing equipment. This presentation profiles the theory and components of each type of radiometer.

  3. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization

    1994-12-31

    The Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) software is a data acquisition and data archival system for performing Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL). RCC provides a unique method of calibrating solar radiometers using techniques that reduce measurement uncertainty and better characterize a radiometer’s response profile. The RCC software automatically monitors and controls many of the components that contribute to uncertainty in an instrument’s responsivity.

  4. Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data evaluation for use in monitoring vegetation. Volume 1: Channels 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, N. C.; Gray, T. I.; Mccrary, D. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite system (NOAA-6 satellite) were analyzed to study their nonmeteorological uses. A file of charts, graphs, and tables was created form the products generated. It was found that the most useful data lie between pixel numbers 400 and 2000 on a given scan line. The analysis of the generated products indicates that the Gray-McCrary Index can discern vegetation and associated daily and seasonal changes. The solar zenith-angle correction used in previous studies was found to be a useful adjustment to the index. The METSAT system seems best suited for providing large-area analyses of surface features on a daily basis.

  5. Linkages Between Global Vegetation and Climate: An Analysis Based on NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Data. Degree awarded by Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Los, Sietse Oene

    1998-01-01

    A monthly global 1 degree by 1 degree data set from 1982 until 1990 was derived from data collected by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on board the NOAA 7, 9, and 11 satellites. This data set was used to study the interactions between variations in climate and variations in the "greenness" of vegetation. Studies with the Colorado State University atmospheric general circulation model coupled to the Simple Biosphere model showed a large sensitivity of the hydrological balance to changes in vegetation at low latitudes. The depletion of soil moisture as a result of increased vegetation density provided a negative feedback in an otherwise positive association between increased vegetation, increased evaporation, and increased precipitation proposed by Charney and coworkers. Analysis of climate data showed, at temperate to high latitudes, a positive association between variation in land surface temperature, sea surface temperature and vegetation greenness. At low latitudes the data indicated a positive association between variations in sea surface temperature, rainfall and vegetation greenness. The variations in mid- to high latitude temperatures affected the global average greenness and this could provide an explanation for the increased carbon uptake by the terrestrial surface over the past couple of decades.

  6. Seven-year phenological record of the Alaskan ecoregions derived from advanced very high resolution radiometer normalized difference vegetation index data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markon, Carl J.

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal properties of vegetation covering northern boreal and arctic landscapes are considered important as input to numerous climate change studies. In this study, multitemporal phenological characteristics of Alaskan vegetation were studied for the State as a whole, and 19 of 20 ecoregions were studied using seasonally truncated, composited advanced very high resolution radiometer derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data. Phenological characteristics included four temporal and six greenness metrics derived for each year from 1991 to 1997. Temporal metrics included date of onset of greenness, last day of greenness, date of maximum greenness, and total days of greenness. Greenness metrics consisted of NDVI values recorded during the onset and last day of greenness, maximum greenness, mean greenness for the growing season, and estimated rates of greenup and greendown in the spring and autumn, respectively. Results indicated that over many areas of Alaska there was a trend toward earlier onset of greenness each spring from 1992 to 1997, but the last day of greenness in the autumn was roughly the same. Earlier greenup dates in the spring resulted in a lengthened growing season greenup of up to 20 days in some areas of Alaska from 1992 to 1997. Climate data, however, did not always corroborate these findings. In general, greenness values dropped from 1991 to 1992 and then increased from 1992 to 1997. Values obtained after 1991 may have been affected by atmospheric perturbations owing to the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption and lasting until at least 1997.

  7. Time series analysis of discolored seawater reflectance observed by Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2) at Fukutoku-Okonaba submarine volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring submarine volcanoes is not an easy task compared to land volcanoes because they are covered by seawater and located in remote areas. Satellite remote sensing is a powerful tool for monitoring underwater volcanic activities such as discolored seawater, floating material and volcanic plumes. Discolored seawater is a good indicator of submarine volcanic activities. Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2) made extensive observations from 2006 to 2011 of the Fukutoku-Okanoba submarine volcano, which is located 1300 km south of Tokyo, and is one of the most active submarine volcanoes in Japan. The high discolored seawater brightness coincides with relatively high activity of Fukutoku-Okanoba. No discolored seawater was observed for 6 months before the 2010 Fukutoku-Okanoba submarine eruption, meaning that Fukutoku-Okanoba was quiescent before the eruption. Both high brightness and apparent color change of discolored seawater derived from AVNIR-2 mean emergence of large amount of hot spring water, implying that the submarine volcano is highly active. This study demonstrates that satellite remote sensing is an effective tool for monitoring activities of inaccessible submarine volcanoes.

  8. Digital simulation of dynamic processes in radiometer systems. [microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    The development and application of several computer programs for simulating different classes of microwave radiometers are described. The programs are dynamic in nature, and they may be used to determine the instantaneous behavior of system variables as a function of time. Some of the programs employ random variable models in the simulations so that the statistical nature of the results may be investigated. The programs have been developed to utilize either the Continuous System Modeling Program or the Advanced Continuous System Language. The validity of most of the programs was investigated using statistical tests, and the results show excellent correlation with theoretical predictions. The programs are currently being used in the investigation of new design techniques for microwave radiometers.

  9. Surface Wind Vector and Rain Rate Observation Capability of Future Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy; Atlas, Robert; Bailey, M. C.; Black, Peter; El-Nimri, Salem; Hood, Robbie; James, Mark; Johnson, James; Jones, Linwood; Ruf, Christopher; Uhlhorn, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is the next-generation Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), and it will offer the capability of simultaneous wide-swath observations of both extreme ocean surface wind vector and strong precipitation from either aircraft (including UAS) or satellite platforms. HIRAD will be a compact, lightweight, low-power instrument with no moving parts that will produce valid wind observations under hurricane conditions when existing microwave sensors (radiometers or scatterometers) are hindered by precipitation. The SFMR i s a proven aircraft remote sensing system for simultaneously observing extreme ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates, including those of major hurricane intensity. The proposed HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer technology. The first version of the instrument will be a single polarization system for wind speed and rain rate, with a dual-polarization system to follow for wind vector capability. This sensor will operate over 4-7 GHz (C-band frequencies) where the required tropical cyclone remote sensing physics has been validated by both SFMR and WindSat radiometers. HIRAD incorporates a unique, technologically advanced array antenna and several other technologies successfully demonstrated by NASA s Instrument Incubator Program. A brassboard (laboratory) version of the instrument has been completed and successfully tested in a test chamber. Development of the aircraft instrument is underway, with flight testing planned for the fall of 2009. Preliminary Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) show that HIRAD will have a significant positive impact on surface wind analyses as either a new aircraft or satellite sensor. New off-nadir data collected in 2008 by SFMR that affirms the ability of this measurement technique to obtain wind speed data at non-zero incidence angle will

  10. Radiometer on a Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran; Lee, Choonsup; Schlecht, Erich T.; Skalare, Anders; Ward, John S.; Siegel, Peter H.; Thomas, Bertrand C.

    2009-01-01

    The radiometer on a chip (ROC) integrates whole wafers together to p rovide a robust, extremely powerful way of making submillimeter rece ivers that provide vertically integrated functionality. By integratin g at the wafer level, customizing the interconnects, and planarizing the transmission media, it is possible to create a lightweight asse mbly performing the function of several pieces in a more conventiona l radiometer.

  11. Monitored background radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruel, C.; Larouche, M.; Donato, M.

    1986-01-01

    The infrared (IR) testing of the Olympus thermal model has provided a capability to perform cost effective thermal balance testing of satellites and satellite components. A high-accuracy monitored background radiometer was developed for the measurement of absorbed radiation heat flux encountered during IR thermal vacuum testing of spacecraft. The design, development, and calibration of this radiometer is described.

  12. Advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The program covered the design, construction, and test of a Breadboard Model, Engineering Model, Protoflight Model, Mechanical/Structural Model, and a Life Test Model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was also developed for use on the program. Initially, the instrument was to operate from a 906 n.mi. orbit and be thermally isolated from the spacecraft. The Breadboard Model and the Mechanical/Structural Model were designed and built to these requirements. The spacecraft altitude was changed to 450 n.mi., IFOVs and spectral characteristics were modified, and spacecraft interfaces were changed. The final spacecraft design provided a temperature-controlled Instrument Mounting Platform (IMP) to carry the AVHRR and other instruments. The design of the AVHRR was modified to these new requirements and the modifications were incorporated in the Engineering Model. The Protoflight Model and the Flight Models conform to this design.

  13. Analysis of simulated advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection (ASTER) radiometer data of the Iron Hill, Colorado, study area for mapping lithologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, L.C.

    1998-01-01

    The advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection (ASTER) radiometer was designed to record reflected energy in nine channels with 15 or 30 m resolution, including stereoscopic images, and emitted energy in five channels with 90 m resolution from the NASA Earth Observing System AM1 platform. A simulated ASTER data set was produced for the Iron Hill, Colorado, study area by resampling calibrated, registered airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) data, and thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS) data to the appropriate spatial and spectral parameters. A digital elevation model was obtained to simulate ASTER-derived topographic data. The main lithologic units in the area are granitic rocks and felsite into which a carbonatite stock and associated alkalic igneous rocks were intruded; these rocks are locally covered by Jurassic sandstone, Tertiary rhyolitic tuff, and colluvial deposits. Several methods were evaluated for mapping the main lithologic units, including the unsupervised classification and spectral curve-matching techniques. In the five thermal-infrared (TIR) channels, comparison of the results of linear spectral unmixing and unsupervised classification with published geologic maps showed that the main lithologic units were mapped, but large areas with moderate to dense tree cover were not mapped in the TIR data. Compared to TIMS data, simulated ASTER data permitted slightly less discrimination in the mafic alkalic rock series, and carbonatite was not mapped in the TIMS nor in the simulated ASTER TIR data. In the nine visible and near-infrared channels, unsupervised classification did not yield useful results, but both the spectral linear unmixing and the matched filter techniques produced useful results, including mapping calcitic and dolomitic carbonatite exposures, travertine in hot spring deposits, kaolinite in argillized sandstone and tuff, and muscovite in sericitized granite and felsite, as well as commonly occurring illite

  14. Mapping hydrothermally altered rocks at Cuprite, Nevada, using the advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (Aster), a new satellite-imaging system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, L.C.; Hook, S.J.; Abrams, M.J.; Mars, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is a 14-band multispectral instrument on board the Earth Observing System (EOS), TERRA. The three bands between 0.52 and 0.86 ??m and the six bands from 1.60 and 2.43 ??m, which have 15- and 30-m spatial resolution, respectively, were selected primarily for making remote mineralogical determinations. The Cuprite, Nevada, mining district comprises two hydrothermal alteration centers where Tertiary volcanic rocks have been hydrothermally altered mainly to bleached silicified rocks and opalized rocks, with a marginal zone of limonitic argilized rocks. Country rocks are mainly Cambrian phyllitic siltstone and limestone. Evaluation of an ASTER image of the Cuprite district shows that spectral reflectance differences in the nine bands in the 0.52 to 2.43 ??m region provide a basis for identifying and mapping mineralogical components which characterize the main hydrothermal alteration zones: opal is the spectrally dominant mineral in the silicified zone; whereas, alunite and kaolinite are dominant in the opalized zone. In addition, the distribution of unaltered country rocks was mapped because of the presence of spectrally dominant muscovite in the siltstone and calcite in limestone, and the tuffaceous rocks and playa deposits were distinguishable due to their relatively flat spectra and weak absorption features at 2.33 and 2.20 ??m, respectively. An Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) image of the study area was processed using a similar methodology used with the ASTER data. Comparison of the ASTER and AVIRIS results shows that the results are generally similar, but the higher spectral resolution of AVIRIS (224 bands) permits identification of more individual minerals, including certain polymorphs. However, ASTER has recorded images of more than 90 percent of the Earth's land surface with less than 20 percent cloud cover, and these data are available at nominal or no cost

  15. Time scales of pattern evolution from cross-spectrum analysis of advanced very high resolution radiometer and coastal zone color scanner imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, Kenneth L.; Abbott, Mark R.

    1994-01-01

    We have selected square subareas (110 km on a side) from coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) and advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) images for 1981 in the California Current region off northern California for which we could identify sequences of cloud-free data over periods of days to weeks. We applied a two-dimensional fast Fourier transformation to images after median filtering, (x, y) plane removal, and cosine tapering. We formed autospectra and coherence spectra as functions of a scalar wavenumber. Coherence estimates between pairs of images were plotted against time separation between images for several wide wavenumber bands to provide a temporal lagged coherence function. The temporal rate of loss of correlation (decorrelation time scale) in surface patterns provides a measure of the rate of pattern change or evolution as a function of spatial dimension. We found that patterns evolved (or lost correlation) approximately twice as rapidly in upwelling jets as in the 'quieter' regions between jets. The rapid evolution of pigment patterns (lifetime of about 1 week or less for scales of 50-100 km) ought to hinder biomass transfer to zooplankton predators compared with phytoplankton patches that persist for longer times. We found no significant differences between the statistics of CZCS and AVHRR images (spectral shape or rate of decorrelation). In addition, in two of the three areas studied, the peak correlation between AVHRR and CZCS images from the same area occurred at zero lag, indicating that the patterns evolved simutaneously. In the third area, maximum coherence between thermal and pigment patterns occurred when pigment images lagged thermal images by 1-2 days, mirroring the expected lag of high pigment behind low temperatures (and high nutrients) in recently upwelled water. We conclude that in dynamic areas such as coastal upwelling systems, the phytoplankton cells (identified by pigment color patterns) behave largely as passive scalars at the

  16. Iron Resources and Oceanic Nutrients: Advancement of Global Environment Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debaar, H. J.

    2002-12-01

    The concept of a single factor limiting plankton blooms, is presently giving way to co-limitation by light, and the nutrients N, P, Si and Fe. Primary production, export into the deep sea, and CO2 uptake from the atmosphere together form the 'biological pump' in Ocean Biogeochemical Climate Models (OBCM's). Thus far OBCM's assume just one limiting nutrient (P) and one universal phytoplankton species, for C budgets and CO2 exchange. New realistic OBCM's are being developed for budgeting and exchanges of both CO2 and DMS, implementing (i) co-limitation by 4 nutrients of 5 major taxonomic classes of phytoplankton, (ii) DMS(P) pathways, (iii) global iron cycling, (iv) chemical forms of iron and (v) iron supply into surface waters. The new OBCM's will predict realistic climate scenario's, notably climatic feedbacks on oceanic biogeochemistry. IRONAGES is a European consortium of twelve institutes and is coordinated by Royal NIOZ. Input from below of iron from anoxic sediments of coastal margins has been assessed (March 2002) along a 2-D vertical section from Europe into the centre of the north Atlantic. Input from above of Fe(II) dissolved in rainwater from Sahara dust blown over the central Atlantic will be quantified at sea (October 2002), and related to observed plankton production. Different chemical forms of iron are being assessed and a certification excercise for Fe in seawater also under aegis of SCOR Working Group 109 is being completed (December 2002). For two major DMS-producing algal groups Phaeocystis sp. and Emiliania huxleyi the life cycle, Fe limitation, export production, CO2 uptake and DMS emissions have been synthesized from existing literature and laboratory experiments. This is being fed into ecosystem modeling, as well as into DMS(P) pathway modeling. Also know-how has been synthesized for three other major classes (diatoms, N2-fixing Trichodesmium and nano-pico-plankton) and fed into the ecosystem modeling. Pathways of DMS(P) in blooms are being

  17. Ultra Stable Microwave Radiometers for Future Sea Surface Salinity Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Tanner, Alan B.; Pellerano, Fernando A.; Horgan, Kevin A.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Earth Science System Pathfinder (ESSP) mission Aquarius will measure global sea surface salinity with 100-km spatial resolution every 8 days with an average monthly salinity accuracy of 0.2 psu (parts per thousand). This requires an L-band low-noise radiometer with the long-term calibration stability of less than 0.1 K over 8 days. This three-year research program on ultra stable radiometers has addressed the radiometer requirements and configuration necessary to achieve this objective for Aquarius and future ocean salinity missions. The system configuration and component performance have been evaluated with radiometer testbeds at both JPL and GSFC. The research has addressed several areas including component characterization as a function of temperature, a procedure for the measurement and correction for radiometer system non-linearity, noise diode calibration versus temperature, low noise amplifier performance over voltage, and temperature control requirements to achieve the required stability. A breadboard radiometer, utilizing microstrip-based technologies, has been built to demonstrate this long-term stability. This report also presents the results of the radiometer test program, a detailed radiometer noise model, and details of the operational switching sequence optimization that can be used to achieve the low noise and stability requirements. Many of the results of this research have been incorporated into the Aquarius radiometer design and will allow this instrument to achieve its goals.

  18. Advances in ocean modeling for climate change research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, William R.; Capotondi, Antonietta; Holland, Marika M.

    1995-07-01

    An adequate understanding of climate variability and the eventual prediction of climate change are among the most urgent and far-reaching efforts of the scientific community. The climate system is in an ever-changing state with vast impact on mankind in all his activities. Both short and long-term aspects of climate variability are of concern, and the unravelling of "natural" variability from "man-induced" climate change is required to prepare for and ameliorate, if possible, the potentially devastating aspects of such change. In terms of scientific effort, the climate community can be thought of as the union of the disciplinary sciences of meteorology, oceanography, sea ice and glaciology, and land surface processes. Since models are based upon mathematical and numerical constructs, mathematics and computer sciences are also directly involved. In addition, some of the problems of man-induced climate change (release of greenhouse gases, the ozone-hole problem, etc.) are basically chemical in nature, and the expertise of the atmospheric and oceanic chemist is also required. In addition, some part of the response to climate perturbations will arise in the biological world, due to upsetting the balance in the great food web that binds communities together on both the land and the sea. Thus, the problems to be solved are extraordinarily complex and require the efforts of many kinds of scientist.

  19. NASA and U.S. Geological Survey Long-Term Archive for the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, M.; Meyer, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is a 14-channel optical imaging instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft. ASTER is a joint project between Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry; and U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Since its launch in December, 1999, ASTER has acquired over 2.4 million multispectral images. The Level 0 data are sent to Japan by NASA, where they are processed to Level 1A (reconstructed, unprocessed instrument data with geometric and radiometric parameters attached). A copy of the L1A data is sent to the U.S. to the Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LPDAAC), operated for NASA by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the EROS Center. The joint US/Japan ASTER Science Team (AST) has provided algorithms to produce 14 Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 products. The duplicate data distribution systems in Japan and the U.S. create these products 'on-demand' as users submit data requests. Only the L0 and L1A data are archived. After the termination of the mission, the USGS has the responsibility for creating, managing and distributing ASTER data products from a Long-Term Archive (LTA). In cooperation with the LPDAAC, the U.S. AST discussed various scenarios on how the LTA should operate. The two leading plans considered were: (1) duplicating the 'on-demand' system, fulfilling user requests as they arrived; this would require a high level of technical support for algorithm/software maintenance, user services to answer questions, hardware maintenance, and in general, was quite labor-intensive; (2) creating a static archive of all of the data products for every one of the L1A image granules; the LPDAAC would produce each of the 14 higher level data products from every L1A image currently archived. Users would order data products from this greatly expanded archive, with little human intervention. In both cases, complete documentation would be available to users, detailing the

  20. Lake surface water temperatures of European Alpine lakes (1989-2013) based on the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) 1 km data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffler, M.; Lieberherr, G.; Wunderle, S.

    2015-02-01

    Lake water temperature (LWT) is an important driver of lake ecosystems and it has been identified as an indicator of climate change. Consequently, the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) lists LWT as an essential climate variable. Although for some European lakes long in situ time series of LWT do exist, many lakes are not observed or only on a non-regular basis making these observations insufficient for climate monitoring. Satellite data can provide the information needed. However, only few satellite sensors offer the possibility to analyse time series which cover 25 years or more. The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is among these and has been flown as a heritage instrument for almost 35 years. It will be carried on for at least ten more years, offering a unique opportunity for satellite-based climate studies. Herein we present a satellite-based lake surface water temperature (LSWT) data set for European water bodies in or near the Alps based on the extensive AVHRR 1 km data record (1989-2013) of the Remote Sensing Research Group at the University of Bern. It has been compiled out of AVHRR/2 (NOAA-07, -09, -11, -14) and AVHRR/3 (NOAA-16, -17, -18, -19 and MetOp-A) data. The high accuracy needed for climate related studies requires careful pre-processing and consideration of the atmospheric state. The LSWT retrieval is based on a simulation-based scheme making use of the Radiative Transfer for TOVS (RTTOV) Version 10 together with ERA-interim reanalysis data from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts. The resulting LSWTs were extensively compared with in situ measurements from lakes with various sizes between 14 and 580 km2 and the resulting biases and RMSEs were found to be within the range of -0.5 to 0.6 K and 1.0 to 1.6 K, respectively. The upper limits of the reported errors could be rather attributed to uncertainties in the data comparison between in situ and satellite observations than inaccuracies of the satellite

  1. PAU-SA: A Synthetic Aperture Interferometric Radiometer Test Bed for Potential Improvements in Future Missions

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Perez, Isaac; Camps, Adriano; Bosch-Lluis, Xavi; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Nereida; Valencia-Domènech, Enric; Park, Hyuk; Forte, Giuseppe; Vall-llosera, Merce

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is an Earth Explorer Opportunity mission from the European Space Agency (ESA). Its goal is to produce global maps of soil moisture and ocean salinity using the Microwave Imaging Radiometer by Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS). The purpose of the Passive Advanced Unit Synthetic Aperture (PAU-SA) instrument is to study and test some potential improvements that could eventually be implemented in future missions using interferometric radiometers such as the Geoestacionary Atmosferic Sounder (GAS), the Precipitation and All-weather Temperature and Humidity (PATH) and the Geostationary Interferometric Microwave Sounder (GIMS). Both MIRAS and PAU-SA are Y-shaped arrays with uniformly distributed antennas, but the receiver topology and the processing unit are quite different. The purpose of this work is to identify the elements in the MIRAS's design susceptible of improvement and apply them in the PAU-SA instrument demonstrator, to test them in view of these future interferometric radiometer missions. PMID:22969371

  2. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) during GRIP and HS3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Biswas, S.; Jones, W. L.; Johnson, J.; Farrar, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    HIRAD is a new technology developed by NASA/MSFC, in partnership with NOAA and the Universities of Central Florida, Michigan, and Alabama-Huntsville. HIRAD is designed to measure wind speed and rain rate over a wide swath in heavy-rain, strong-wind conditions. HIRAD is expected to eventually fly routinely on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) such as Global Hawk over hurricanes threatening the U.S. coast and other Atlantic basin areas, and possibly in the Western Pacific as well. HIRAD first flew on GRIP in 2010 and is part of the 2012-14 NASA Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission on the Global Hawk, a high-altitude UAV. The next-generation HIRAD will include wind direction observations, and the technology can eventually be used on a satellite platform to extend the dynamical range of Ocean Surface Wind (OSV) observations from space.

  3. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; James, Mark W.; Roberts, J. Brent; Bisawas, Sayak K.; Jones, W. Linwood; Johnson, James; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem; Ruf, Christopher S.; Morris, Mary; Black, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a synthetic thinned array passive microwave radiometer designed to allow retrieval of surface wind speed in hurricanes, up through category five intensity. The retrieval technology follows the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which measures surface wind speed in hurricanes along a narrow strip beneath the aircraft. HIRAD has flown in the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiement in 2010 on a WB-57 aircraft, and on a Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in 2012 and 2013 as part of NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) program. The GRIP program included flights over Hurricanes Earl and Karl (2010). The 2012 HS3 deployment did not include any hurricane flights for the UAS carrying HIRAD. Hurricane flights are expected for HIRAD in 2013 during HS3. This presentation will describe the HIRAD instrument, its results from the 2010 hurricane flights, and hopefully results from hurricane flights in August and September 2013.

  4. Scientific advances of the MyOcean projects underpinning the transition towards the Marine Copernicus service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    The MyOcean projects supported by the European Commission period have been developed during the 2008-2015 period to build an operational service of ocean physical state and ecosystem information to intermediate and downstream users in the areas of marine safety, marine resources, marine and coastal environment and weather, climate and seasonal forecasting. The "core" information provided to users is obtained through the combination of satellite and in situ observations, eddy-resolving modelling of the global ocean and regional european seas, biochemistry, ecosystem and sea-ice modelling, and data assimilation for global to basin scale circulation. A comprehensive R&D plan was established in 2010 to ensure the collection and provision of information of best possible quality for daily estimates of the ocean state (real-time), its short-term evolution, and its history over the past (reanalyses). A service validation methodology was further developed to ensure proper scientific evaluation and routine monitoring of the accuracy of MyOcean products. In this presentation, we will present an overview of the main scientific advances achieved in MyOcean using the NEMO modelling platform, ensemble-based assimilation schemes, coupled circulation-ecosystem, sea-ice assimilative models and probabilistic methodologies for ensemble validation. We will further highlight the key areas that will require additional innovation effort to support the Marine Copernicus service evolution.

  5. Aquarius Radiometer Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Piepmeier, J. R.; Dinnat, E. P.; de Matthaeis, P.; Utku, C.; Abraham, S.; Lagerloef, G.S.E.; Meissner, T.; Wentz, F.

    2014-01-01

    Aquarius was launched on June 10, 2011 as part of the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory and the instrument has been operating continuously since being turned on in August of the same year. The initial map of sea surface salinity was released one month later (September) and the quality of the retrieval has continuously improved since then. The Aquarius radiometers include several special features such as measurement of the third Stokes parameter, fast sampling, and careful thermal control, and a combined passive/active instrument. Aquarius is working well and in addition to helping measure salinity, the radiometer special features are generating new results.

  6. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, VR

    2006-08-01

    The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

  7. Stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates

    DOEpatents

    Mease, R.C.; Srivastava, S.C.; Gestin, J.F.

    1994-08-02

    The present invention relates to new rigid chelating structures, to methods for preparing these materials, and to their use in preparing radiometal labeled immunoconjugates. These new chelates include cyclohexyl EDTA monohydride, the trans forms of cyclohexyl DTPA and TTHA, and derivatives of these cyclohexyl polyaminocarboxylate materials. No Drawings

  8. Stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates

    DOEpatents

    Mease, Ronnie C.; Srivastava, Suresh C.; Gestin, Jean-Francois

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to new rigid chelating structures, to methods for preparing these materials, and to their use in preparing radiometal labeled immunoconjugates. These new chelates include cyclohexyl EDTA monohydride, the trans forms of cyclohexyl DTPA and TTHA, and derivatives of these cyclohexyl polyaminocarboxylate materials.

  9. Mapping technologically and economically important materials at lunar and terrestrial sites using Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standart, Douglas Laurence

    the samples were collected. A least-squares regression to the ilmenite vs. 1-μm absorption data is then used to predict ilmenite concentrations of mare basalts from M3 spectra. Using this methodology, we built ilmenite maps for the following nearside mare: western Mare Imbrium; southern Oceanus Procellarum; eastern Mare Nubium; Mare Serenitatis; and Tranquillitatis. Based on the concentrations of Th and ilmenite associated with the eruptions, we determined that at least three eruption episodes of mare basalts occurred, each with different geochemical signatures. In addition we identified late stage (<3.1 Gya) ilmenite- and Th-rich basalts within the PKT, which we suggest were supplied by the arrival of a KREEP-, and ilmenite-rich plume that formed at the core-mantle boundary after ilmenite-rich and KREEP-rich melts sank into the mantle. However, areas outside of PKT, such as Tranquillitatis and Serenatatis, do not exhibit both high KREEP and high ilmenite concentrations. Instead, early stage basaltic eruptions---consisting of low-Th, ilmenite-rich basalts are present at Mare Tranquillitatis and Th- and ilmenite-poor basalts are present at Serenitatis. We propose two possible scenarios to explain this. In the first, the Ti-rich but Th-poor mare basalts would have erupted after (or during) a degree-1 downwelling that affected the nearby PKT early in lunar history. In the second scenario, the Ti-rich but Th-poor mare basalts would have erupted prior to the degree-1 downwelling. Project III: Alunite (KAl3(SO4) 2(OH)6) is a sulfate mineral that is commonly found in argillic alteration zones of porphyry and epithermal systems, and in other supergene enriched mineral deposits. Using ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) data, we target spectral features associated with hydroxyl (OH-) and sulfate (SO42-). Previous studies have used OH- absorptions near 2.2 μm to target alunite, but their methods can confuse alunite with carbonates, detrital

  10. Mapping technologically and economically important materials at lunar and terrestrial sites using Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standart, Douglas Laurence

    the samples were collected. A least-squares regression to the ilmenite vs. 1-μm absorption data is then used to predict ilmenite concentrations of mare basalts from M3 spectra. Using this methodology, we built ilmenite maps for the following nearside mare: western Mare Imbrium; southern Oceanus Procellarum; eastern Mare Nubium; Mare Serenitatis; and Tranquillitatis. Based on the concentrations of Th and ilmenite associated with the eruptions, we determined that at least three eruption episodes of mare basalts occurred, each with different geochemical signatures. In addition we identified late stage (<3.1 Gya) ilmenite- and Th-rich basalts within the PKT, which we suggest were supplied by the arrival of a KREEP-, and ilmenite-rich plume that formed at the core-mantle boundary after ilmenite-rich and KREEP-rich melts sank into the mantle. However, areas outside of PKT, such as Tranquillitatis and Serenatatis, do not exhibit both high KREEP and high ilmenite concentrations. Instead, early stage basaltic eruptions---consisting of low-Th, ilmenite-rich basalts are present at Mare Tranquillitatis and Th- and ilmenite-poor basalts are present at Serenitatis. We propose two possible scenarios to explain this. In the first, the Ti-rich but Th-poor mare basalts would have erupted after (or during) a degree-1 downwelling that affected the nearby PKT early in lunar history. In the second scenario, the Ti-rich but Th-poor mare basalts would have erupted prior to the degree-1 downwelling. Project III: Alunite (KAl3(SO4) 2(OH)6) is a sulfate mineral that is commonly found in argillic alteration zones of porphyry and epithermal systems, and in other supergene enriched mineral deposits. Using ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) data, we target spectral features associated with hydroxyl (OH-) and sulfate (SO42-). Previous studies have used OH- absorptions near 2.2 μm to target alunite, but their methods can confuse alunite with carbonates, detrital

  11. Microwave radiometer and scatterometer design for the aquarius sea surface Salinity Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Yueh, Simon H.; Pellerano, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of sea surface salinity with L-band microwave radiometers is a very challenging task. Since the L-band brightness temperature variations associated with salinity changes are small, it is necessary to have a very sensitive and stable radiometer. In addition, the corrections for the ocean surface roughness require real time scatterometer measurements. The designs of the Aquarius radiometer and scatterometer are described in this paper.

  12. Millimeter radiometer system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Swanson, P. N.

    1989-01-01

    JPL has had a large amount of experience with spaceborne microwave/millimeter wave radiometers for remote sensing. All of the instruments use filled aperture antenna systems from 5 cm diameter for the microwave Sounder Units (MSU), 16 m for the microwave limb sounder (MLS) to 20 m for the large deployable reflector (LDR). The advantages of filled aperture antenna systems are presented. The requirements of the 10 m Geoplat antenna system, 10 m multified antenna, and the MLS are briefly discussed.

  13. Six mechanisms used on the SSM/1 radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, H. R.

    1985-01-01

    Future USAF Block 5D Defense Meteorological Satellites will carry a scanning microwave radiometer sensor (SSM/1). SSM/1 senses the emission of microwave energy and returns to earth data used to determine weather conditions, such as rainfall rates, soil moisture, and oceanic wind speed. The overall design of the SSM/1 radiometer was largely influenced by the mechanisms. The radiometer was designed to be stowed in a cavity on the existing spacecraft. The deployment of the sensor is complex due to the constraint of this cavity and the need for precision in the deployment. The radiometer will continuously rotate, instead of oscillate, creating the need for a bearing and power transfer assembly and a momentum compensation device. The six mechanisms developed for this program are described.

  14. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Biswas, Sayak K.; James, Mark W.; Roberts, J. Brent; Jones, W. Linwood; Johnson, James; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem; Ruf, Christopher S.; Morris, Mary; Black, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a synthetic thinned array passive microwave radiometer designed to allow retrieval of surface wind speed in hurricanes, up through category five intensity. The retrieval technology follows the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which measures surface wind speed in hurricanes along a narrow strip beneath the aircraft. HIRAD maps wind speeds in a swath below the aircraft, about 50-60 km wide when flown in the lower stratosphere. HIRAD has flown in the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment in 2010 on a WB-57 aircraft, and on a Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in 2012 and 2013 as part of NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) program. The GRIP program included flights over Hurricanes Earl and Karl (2010). The 2012 HS3 deployment did not include any hurricane flights for the UAS carrying HIRAD. The 2013 HS3 flights included one flight over the predecessor to TS Gabrielle, and one flight over Hurricane Ingrid. This presentation will describe the HIRAD instrument, its results from the 2010 and 2013 flights, and potential future developments.

  15. Calibration of electron cyclotron emission radiometer for KSTAR.

    PubMed

    Kogi, Y; Jeong, S H; Lee, K D; Akaki, K; Mase, A; Kuwahara, D; Yoshinaga, T; Nagayama, Y; Kwon, M; Kawahata, K

    2010-10-01

    We developed and installed an electron cyclotron emission radiometer for taking measurements of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) plasma. In order to precisely measure the absolute value of electron temperatures, a calibration measurement of the whole radiometer system was performed, which confirmed that the radiometer has an acceptably linear output signal for changes in input temperature. It was also found that the output power level predicted by a theoretical calculation agrees with that obtained by the calibration measurement. We also showed that the system displays acceptable noise-temperature performance around 0.23 eV. PMID:21033948

  16. Detection of Rain-on-Snow (ROS) Events Using the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) and Weather Station Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, E. M.; Brucker, L.; Forman, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    During the winter months, the occurrence of rain-on-snow (ROS) events can impact snow stratigraphy via generation of large scale ice crusts, e.g., on or within the snowpack. The formation of such layers significantly alters the electromagnetic response of the snowpack, which can be witnessed using space-based microwave radiometers. In addition, ROS layers can hinder the ability of wildlife to burrow in the snow for vegetation, which limits their foraging capability. A prime example occurred on 23 October 2003 in Banks Island, Canada, where an ROS event is believed to have caused the deaths of over 20,000 musk oxen. Through the use of passive microwave remote sensing, ROS events can be detected by utilizing observed brightness temperatures (Tb) from AMSR-E. Tb observed at different microwave frequencies and polarizations depends on snow properties. A wet snowpack formed from an ROS event yields a larger Tb than a typical dry snowpack would. This phenomenon makes observed Tb useful when detecting ROS events. With the use of data retrieved from AMSR-E, in conjunction with observations from ground-based weather station networks, a database of estimated ROS events over the past twelve years was generated. Using this database, changes in measured Tb following the ROS events was also observed. This study adds to the growing knowledge of ROS events and has the potential to help inform passive microwave snow water equivalent (SWE) retrievals or snow cover properties in polar regions.

  17. Precipitation Estimation Using Combined Radar/Radiometer Measurements Within the GPM Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    satellite of JAXA, (3) the Multi-Frequency Microwave Scanning Radiometer (MADRAS) and the multi-channel microwave humidity sounder (SAPHIR) on the French-Indian Megha- Tropiques satellite, (4) the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-19, (5) MHS instruments on MetOp satellites launched by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), (6) the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP), and (7) ATMS instruments on the NOAA-NASA Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) satellites. Data from Chinese and Russian microwave radiometers may also become available through international collaboration under the auspices of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). The current generation of global rainfall products combines observations from a network of uncoordinated satellite missions using a variety of merging techniques. GPM will provide next-generation precipitation products characterized by: (1) more accurate instantaneous precipitation estimate (especially for light rain and cold-season solid precipitation), (2) intercalibrated microwave brightness temperatures from constellation radiometers within a consistent framework, and (3) unified precipitation retrievals from constellation radiometers using a common a priori hydrometeor database constrained by combined radar/radiometer measurements provided by the GPM Core Observatory.

  18. Observations of deep convection from an airborne high-frequency (92 and 183 GHz) passive microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkarinen, I. M.; Adler, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Spencer et al. (1983) have reported that very low Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) brightness temperatures at 37 GHz over land coincide with heavy thunderstorm rainfall, while Wilheit et al. (1982) used an aircraft-mounted radiometer operating at 92 and 183 GHz to observe convective precipitation associated with a tropical storm over the ocean. A scanning version of the instrument employed by Wilheit et al. is the Advanced Microwave Moisture Sounder (AMMS). The present paper has the objective to summarize the preliminary results of AMMS observations of convective raining clouds and to determine whether empirical relationships between rain rate and microwave brightness temperature, such as those developed for 37 GHz satellite data by Spencer et al., can be extended to higher microwave frequencies.

  19. The Radiometer Atmospheric Cubesat Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, B.; Bryk, M.; Clark, J.; Donahue, K.; Ellyin, R.; Misra, S.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Statham, S.; Steinkraus, J.; Lightsey, E. G.; Fear, A.; Francis, P.; Kjellberg, H.; McDonald, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been developing the Radiometer Atmospheric CubeSat Experiment (RACE) since 2012, which consists of a water vapor radiometer integrated on a 3U CubeSat platform. RACE will measure 2 channels of the 183 GHz water vapor line, and will be used to validate new low noise amplifier (LNA) technology and a novel amplifier based internal calibration subsystem. The 3U spacecraft is provided by the University of Texas at Austin's Satellite Design Laboratory. RACE will advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the 183 GHz receiver subsystem from TRL 4 to TRL 6 and a CubeSat 183 GHz radiometer system from TRL 4 to TRL 7. Measurements at 183 GHz are used to retrieve integrated products and vertical profiles of water vapor. Current full scale satellite missions that can utilize the technology include AMSU, ATMS, SSMIS and Megha-Tropiques. The LNAs are designed at JPL, based on a 35 nm indium phosphide (InP) high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMT) technology developed by Northrop Grumman. The resulting single chip LNAs require only 25 mW of power. Current pre-launch instrument performance specifications include an RF gain of over 30 dB and a room noise figure of < 9.5 dB. The noise figure is dominated by the insertion loss of the Dicke switch which at these frequencies are > 5dB. If a coupler based calibration system is shown to be sufficient, future receiver systems will have noise figures < 4 dB. The gain and noise figure variation over temperature is approximately 0.55 dB/K. The NEDT of the system is < 1K, and on orbit performance is expected to improve due to the thermal environment. The current system is configured for direct detection to reduce power consumption by eliminating the need for a local oscillator. A 2012 NASA CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) selection, RACE is manifested for launch on the Orbital 3 (Orb-3) mission scheduled for October 2014. RACE will be deployed from the International Space Station (ISS) by NanoRacks.

  20. Implementation of the Community Radiative Transfer Model in Advanced Clear-Sky Processor for Oceans and validation against nighttime AVHRR radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xing-Ming; Ignatov, Alexander; Kihai, Yury

    2009-03-01

    The fast Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) has been integrated into National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service's newly developed Advanced Clear-Sky Processor for Oceans (ACSPO). CRTM is used in conjunction with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecast System atmospheric profiles and Reynolds weekly version 2 sea surface temperatures (SST) to simulate clear-sky brightness temperatures (BT). Model BTs are used to improve the ACSPO clear-sky mask, monitor quality of advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) BTs, and explore physical SST retrievals. This paper documents CRTM implementation in ACSPO version 1 and evaluates nighttime "model minus observation" (M-O) BT biases in three bands (3.7, 11, and 12 μm) of four AVHRR/3 instruments onboard NOAA-16, NOAA-17, NOAA-18, and MetOp-A. With careful treatment of input atmospheric and SST data, the agreement is generally good, showing only weak dependencies of M-O biases on view zenith angle, column water vapor, and wind speed. The agreement improves if Reynolds weekly SST is used instead of NCEP SST. Including surface reflection also reduces the M-O bias. After all optimizations, the M-O biases are within several tenths of a Kelvin. Consistency between different platforms is ˜0.1K, except for NOAA-16 channel 3B, which is biased low compared to other platforms by ˜0.4K. Our future plans include extending the analyses to daytime data and exploring physical SST retrievals. A web-based tool is being established to continuously monitor the M-O biases and physical SSTs. The validation methodology employed in this paper will be used to quantitatively measure the effect of each improvement on the M-O bias and physical SST.

  1. On the Long-Term Stability of Microwave Radiometers Using Noise Diodes for Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Shannon T.; Desai, Shailen; Lu, Wenwen; Tanner, Alan B.

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented from the long-term monitoring and calibration of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jason Microwave Radiometer (JMR) on the Jason-1 ocean altimetry satellite and the ground-based Advanced Water Vapor Radiometers (AWVRs) developed for the Cassini Gravity Wave Experiment. Both radiometers retrieve the wet tropospheric path delay (PD) of the atmosphere and use internal noise diodes (NDs) for gain calibration. The JMR is the first radiometer to be flown in space that uses NDs for calibration. External calibration techniques are used to derive a time series of ND brightness for both instruments that is greater than four years. For the JMR, an optimal estimator is used to find the set of calibration coefficients that minimize the root-mean-square difference between the JMR brightness temperatures and the on-Earth hot and cold references. For the AWVR, continuous tip curves are used to derive the ND brightness. For the JMR and AWVR, both of which contain three redundant NDs per channel, it was observed that some NDs were very stable, whereas others experienced jumps and drifts in their effective brightness. Over the four-year time period, the ND stability ranged from 0.2% to 3% among the diodes for both instruments. The presented recalibration methodology demonstrates that long-term calibration stability can be achieved with frequent recalibration of the diodes using external calibration techniques. The JMR PD drift compared to ground truth over the four years since the launch was reduced from 3.9 to - 0.01 mm/year with the recalibrated ND time series. The JMR brightness temperature calibration stability is estimated to be 0.25 K over ten days.

  2. A cloud physics radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyle, H. L.; Curran, R. J.; Barnes, W. L.; Escoe, D.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the design features and capabilities of a seven-channel cloud physics radiometer (CPR) for remote sensing of cloud properties. The CPR channel characteristics and functions are tabulated and diagrammed. Each of the first three channels utilizes a photo-multipler detector, with the high-voltage power supply integrated with the tube into a single unit. In operation a heater is used to keep the optics temperature at or above 273 K and this temperature is constantly monitored. The last four channel detectors and filters are all cooled to the temperature of liquid nitrogen. The inclined scanning mirror rotates at a rate of 3.48 rps. Registration pulses are triggered and recorded as the mirror enters and leaves the + or -45 deg earth observation region. The ice-cloud, water cloud, snow discriminator detector has worked quite well in general. Interesting radiometer data have been obtained and their analysis is under way. The combination of the CPR and the Cloud Lidar System will make possible sophisticated remote sensing cloud studies.

  3. Radiometer system requirements for microwave remote sensing from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jeng-Nan

    1990-01-01

    An area of increasing interest is the establishment of a significant research program in microwave remote sensing from satellites, particularly geosynchronous satellites. Due to the relatively small resolution cell sizes, a severe requirement is placed on beam efficiency specifications for the radiometer antenna. Geostationary satellite microwave radiometers could continuously monitor several important geophysical parameters over the world's oceans. These parameters include the columnar content of atmospheric liquid water (both cloud and rain) and water vapor, air temperature profiles, and possibly sea surface temperature. Two principle features of performance are of concern. The first is the ability of the radiometer system to resolve absolute temperatures with a very small absolute error, a capability that depends on radiometer system stability, on frequency bandwidth, and on footprint dwell time. The second is the ability of the radiometer to resolve changes in temperature from one resolution cell to the next when these temperatures are subject to wide variation over the overall field-of-view of the instrument. Both of these features are involved in the use of the radiometer data to construct high-resolution temperature maps with high absolute accuracy.

  4. An Advanced Data Assimilation System for Estuary and Coastal Ocean Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, M. J.; Murtugudde, R.; Brown, C. W.

    2008-12-01

    We are developing an advanced data assimilation system for the Chesapeake Bay Forecast System, a regional Earth System Prediction model. To accomplish this, the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) implementation on the Chesapeake Bay (ChesROMS) has been interfaced with the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) to create an efficient data assimilation system. The LETKF, an ensemble Kalman filtering scheme developed at the University of Maryland, is among the most advanced data assimilation methods and is very effective for large, non-linear dynamical systems in both sparse and dense data coverage situations. Crucial to the LETKF-ChesROMS assimilation system is having accurate open ocean boundary conditions from GODAE and other large scale products. Currently, the assimilation system is run with prescribed climatological boundary conditions in a relatively coarse resolution. In perfect model experiments using ChesROMS, the filter converges quickly and greatly reduces the analysis and subsequent forecast errors in the temperature, salinity, and velocity fields. This error reduction has proved fairly robust to sensitivity studies such as reduced data coverage. The LETKF also provides an efficient algorithm for error estimation and facilitates the investigation of the spatial distribution of the error. This information will be used to determine areas where more monitoring is needed and to address other issues of the observational impacts on the analyses and observational system simulation experiments, in addition to forecast initialization experiments and regional reanalyses for the past decade.

  5. Single-Pole Double-Throw MMIC Switches for a Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.

    2012-01-01

    In order to reduce the effect of gain and noise instabilities in the RF chain of a microwave radiometer, a Dicke radiometer topology is often used, as in the case of the proposed surface water and ocean topography (SWOT) radiometer instrument. For this topology, a single-pole double-throw (SPDT) microwave switch is needed, which must have low insertion loss at the radiometer channel frequencies to minimize the overall receiver noise figure. Total power radiometers are limited in accuracy due to the continuous variation in gain of the receiver. High-frequency SPDT switches were developed in the form of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) using 75 micron indium phosphide (InP) PIN-diode technology. These switches can be easily integrated into Dicke switched radiometers that utilize microstrip technology.

  6. Advances in large-scale ocean dynamics from a decade of satellite altimetric measurement of ocean surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. L.; Menard, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The past decade has seen the most intensive observations of the global ocean surface topography from satellite altimeters. The Joint U.S./France TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) Mission has become the longest radar mission ever flown in space, providing the most accurate measurements for the study of ocean dynamics since October 1992.

  7. Wideband Agile Digital Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd C.; Brown, Shannon T.; Ruf, Christopher; Gross, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to take the initial steps needed to develop a field programmable gate array (FPGA)- based wideband digital radiometer backend (>500 MHz bandwidth) that will enable passive microwave observations with minimal performance degradation in a radiofrequency-interference (RFI)-rich environment. As manmade RF emissions increase over time and fill more of the microwave spectrum, microwave radiometer science applications will be increasingly impacted in a negative way, and the current generation of spaceborne microwave radiometers that use broadband analog back ends will become severely compromised or unusable over an increasing fraction of time on orbit. There is a need to develop a digital radiometer back end that, for each observation period, uses digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms to identify the maximum amount of RFI-free spectrum across the radiometer band to preserve bandwidth to minimize radiometer noise (which is inversely related to the bandwidth). Ultimately, the objective is to incorporate all processing necessary in the back end to take contaminated input spectra and produce a single output value free of manmade signals to minimize data rates for spaceborne radiometer missions. But, to meet these objectives, several intermediate processing algorithms had to be developed, and their performance characterized relative to typical brightness temperature accuracy re quirements for current and future microwave radiometer missions, including those for measuring salinity, soil moisture, and snow pack.

  8. Characterization of an Ellipsoidal Radiometer

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Annageri V.; Wetterlund, Ingrid; DeWitt, David P.

    2003-01-01

    An ellipsoidal radiometer has been characterized using a 25 mm variable-temperature blackbody as a radiant source. This radiometer is intended for separating radiation from convection effects in fire test methods. The characterization included angular response, responsivity, and purge-gas flow effect studies. The angular response measurements showed that the reflection from the radiometer cavity was higher on one of the cavity halves relative to the other half. Further development work may be necessary to improve the angular response. The responsivity measured with reference to a transfer-standard electrical-substitution radiometer showed dependence on the distance of the radiometer from the blackbody cavity. The purge-gas had the effect of reducing the signal output nearly linearly with flow rate.

  9. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperature and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate in Hurricanes Earl And Karl (2010)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy; James, Mark; Roberts, Brent J.; Biswax, Sayak; Uhlhorn, Eric; Black, Peter; Linwood Jones, W.; Johnson, Jimmy; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem

    2012-01-01

    Ocean surface emission is affected by: a) Sea surface temperature. b) Wind speed (foam fraction). c) Salinity After production of calibrated Tb fields, geophysical fields wind speed and rain rate (or column) are retrieved. HIRAD utilizes NASA Instrument Incubator Technology: a) Provides unique observations of sea surface wind, temp and rain b) Advances understanding & prediction of hurricane intensity c) Expands Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer capabilities d) Uses synthetic thinned array and RFI mitigation technology of Lightweight Rain Radiometer (NASA Instrument Incubator) Passive Microwave C-Band Radiometer with Freq: 4, 5, 6 & 6.6 GHz: a) Version 1: H-pol for ocean wind speed, b) Version 2: dual ]pol for ocean wind vectors. Performance Characteristics: a) Earth Incidence angle: 0deg - 60deg, b) Spatial Resolution: 2-5 km, c) Swath: approx.70 km for 20 km altitude. Observational Goals: WS 10 - >85 m/s RR 5 - > 100 mm/hr.

  10. Undersea compound radiometer.

    PubMed

    Doss, W; Wells, W

    1992-07-20

    We have built a simple, undersea radiometer that measures ten integral moments of the radiance as functions of depth in natural waters. From these data it is possible to calculate nine spherical moments of the scattering function, provided that this function varies slowly in the horizontal planes (i.e., the water is fairly stratified). This technique inverts the equations of radiative transfer, which avoids some of the limitations of conventional instruments. We took the instrument on a voyage in the coastal waters of San Diego and were able to measure the absorption coefficient in real time and in situ; we have been able to recover scattering functions with the help of nearly concurrent attenuation measurements. PMID:20725411

  11. Very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronson, A. I.

    1974-01-01

    A primary sensor used in environmental and earth-resource observation, the Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR) was designed for use on the ITOS D series spacecraft. The VHRR provides a 0.47 mile resolution made possible with a mercury-cadmium-telluride detector cooled to approximately 105 K by a passive radiator cooler. The components of this system are described. The optical subsystem of the VHRR consists of a scanning mirror, a Dall-Kirkham telescope, a dichroic beam splitter, relay lenses, spectral filters, and an IR detector. Signal electronics amplify and condition the signals from the infrared and visible light detector. Sync generator electronics provides the necessary time signals. Scan-drive electronics is used for commutation of the motor winding, velocity, and phase control. A table lists the performance parameters of the VHRR.

  12. Cloud absorption radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strange, M. G.

    1988-01-01

    The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) was developed to measure spectrally how light is scattered by clouds and to determine the single scattering albedo, important to meteorology and climate studies, with unprecedented accuracy. This measurement is based on ratios of downwelling to upwelling radiation within clouds, and so is not strongly dependent upon absolute radiometric calibration of the instrument. The CAR has a 5-inch aperture and 1 degree IFOV, and spatially scans in a plane orthogonal to the flight vector from the zenith to nadir at 1.7 revolutions per second. Incoming light is measured in 13 spectral bands, using silicon, germanium, and indium-antimonide detectors. Data from each channel is digitally recorded in flight with 10-bit (0.1 percent) resolution. The instrument incorporates several novel features. These features are briefly detailed.

  13. Radiant Temperature Nulling Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A self-calibrating nulling radiometer for non-contact temperature measurement of an object, such as a body of water, employs a black body source as a temperature reference, an optomechanical mechanism, e.g., a chopper, to switch back and forth between measuring the temperature of the black body source and that of a test source, and an infrared detection technique. The radiometer functions by measuring radiance of both the test and the reference black body sources; adjusting the temperature of the reference black body so that its radiance is equivalent to the test source; and, measuring the temperature of the reference black body at this point using a precision contact-type temperature sensor, to determine the radiative temperature of the test source. The radiation from both sources is detected by an infrared detector that converts the detected radiation to an electrical signal that is fed with a chopper reference signal to an error signal generator, such as a synchronous detector, that creates a precision rectified signal that is approximately proportional to the difference between the temperature of the reference black body and that of the test infrared source. This error signal is then used in a feedback loop to adjust the reference black body temperature until it equals that of the test source, at which point the error signal is nulled to zero. The chopper mechanism operates at one or more Hertz allowing minimization of l/f noise. It also provides pure chopping between the black body and the test source and allows continuous measurements.

  14. Inter-Satellite Calibration Linkages for the Visible and Near-Infrared Channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on the NOAA-7, -9, and -11 Spacecraft. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    NagarajaRao, C. R.; Chen, J.

    1996-01-01

    The post-launch degradation of the visible (channel 1: 0.58- 068 microns) and near-infrared (channel 2: approx. 0.72 - l.l microns) channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-7, -9, and -11 Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) was estimated using the south-eastern part of the Libyan Desert as a radiometrically stable calibration target. The relative annual degradation rates, in per cent, for the two channels are, respectively: 3.6 and 4.3 (NOAA-7); 5.9 and 3.5 (NOAA-9); and 1.2 and 2.0 (NOAA-11). Using the relative degradation rates thus determined, in conjunction with absolute calibrations based on congruent path aircraft/satellite radiance measurements over White Sands, New Mexico (USA), the variation in time of the absolute gain or slope of the AVHRR on NOAA-9 was evaluated. Inter-satellite calibration linkages were established, using the AVHRR on NOAA-9 as a normalization standard. Formulae for the calculation of calibrated radiances and albedos (AVHRR usage), based on these interlinkages, are given for the three AVHRRs.

  15. Advanced marine information delivery. [data transmission from oceanic satellites to ships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durstenfeld, R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper examines the information delivery challenges of the follow-on programs to Seasat-1 as they may progress through the next decade. These challenges include coping with the vast amounts of data to be transferred, fulfilling the temporal requirements on data delivery, and the tradeoffs and developments needed to accomplish the various levels of processing required to convert sensor output into useful information. A need for critical development is clearly identifiable in the areas of (1) low cost ground terminals capable of image extraction and image correlation; (2) dynamic data assimilation to accommodate forecasters; (3) low resolution onboard correlators; and (4) low cost user advisory (display) terminals. The system planners for the Ocean Satellite advanced programs are using an end-to-end data systems approach in meeting these challenges.

  16. An assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion as an advanced electric generation methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydt, Gerald T.

    1993-03-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a process that employs the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean water to alternately evaporate and condense a working fluid. In the open-cycle OTEC configuration, the working fluid is seawater. In the closed-cycle configuration, a working fluid such as propane is used. In this paper, OTEC is assessed for its practical merits for electric power generation, and the history of the process is reviewed. Because the OTEC principle operates under a small net temperature difference regime, rather large amounts of seawater and working fluid are required. The energy requirements for pumping these fluids may be greater than the energy recovered from the OTEC engine itself. The concept of net power production is discussed. The components of a typical OTEC plant are discussed with emphasis on the evaporator heat exchanger. Operation of an OTEC electric generating station is discussed, including transient operation. Perhaps the most encouraging aspect of OTEC is the recent experiments and efforts at the Natural Energy Laboratory in Hawaii, which are discussed in the paper. Remarks are made on bottlenecks and the future of OTEC as an advanced electric generation methodology.

  17. An assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion as an advanced electric generation methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Heydt, G.T. . School of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a process that employs the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean water to alternately evaporate and condense a working fluid. In the open-cycle OTEC configuration, the working fluid is seawater. In the closed-cycle configuration, a working fluid such as propane is used. In this paper, OTEC is assessed for its practical merits for electric power generation. The process is not new--and its history is reviewed. Because the OTEC principle operates under a small net temperature difference regime, rather large amounts of seawater and working fluid are required. The energy requirements for pumping these fluids may be greater than the energy recovered from the OTEC engine itself. The concept of net power production is discussed. The components of a typical OTEC plant are discussed with emphasis on the evaporator heat exchanger. Operation of an OTEC electric generating station is discussed, including transient operation. Perhaps the most encouraging aspect of OTEC is the recent experiments and efforts at the Natural Energy Laboratory--Hawaii (NELH). The NELH work is summarized in the paper. Remarks are made on bottlenecks and the future of OTEC as an advanced electric generation methodology.

  18. Radiometers Optimize Local Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Radiometrics Corporation, headquartered in Boulder, Colorado, engaged in Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements with Glenn Research Center that resulted in a pencil-beam radiometer designed to detect supercooled liquid along flight paths -- a prime indicator of dangerous icing conditions. The company has brought to market a modular radiometer that resulted from the SBIR work. Radiometrics' radiometers are used around the world as key tools for detecting icing conditions near airports and for the prediction of weather conditions like fog and convective storms, which are known to produce hail, strong winds, flash floods, and tornadoes. They are also employed for oceanographic research and soil moisture studies.

  19. Multiband radiometer for field research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, B. F.; Bauer, M. E.; Dewitt, D. P.; Silva, L. F.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1979-01-01

    A multiband radiometer for field research with 8 bands between 0.4 and 12.5 micrometers is described. The data acquisition system will record the results from the radiometer, a precision radiation thermometer, and ancillary sources. The radiometer and data handling systems will be adaptable to helicopter, truck, to tripod platforms; the system will also be suitable for portable hand-held operation. The general characteristics of this system are that it will be (1) inexpensive to acquire, maintain, and operate, (2) simple to calibrate, (3) complete with data handling hardware and software, and (4) well-documented for use by researchers.

  20. Optical element for photographic radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, M.J.

    1984-02-21

    An optical element for filtering infrared light for use in a radiometer is disclosed wherein at least one metalorganic infrared absorbing dye is at least partially dissolved homogeniously throughout a molded optical plastic.

  1. Estimating observing locations for advancing beyond the winter predictability barrier of Indian Ocean dipole event predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Rong; Duan, Wansuo; Mu, Mu

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we explored potential observing locations (i.e., the sensitive areas) of positive Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) events to advance beyond the winter predictability barrier (WPB) using the geophysical fluid dynamics laboratory climate model version 2p1 (GFDL CM2p1). The sensitivity analysis is conducted through perfect model predictability experiments, in which the model is assumed to be perfect and so any prediction errors are caused by initial errors. The results show that the initial errors with an east-west dipole pattern are more likely to result in a significant WPB than spatially correlated noises; the areas where the large values of the dipole pattern initial errors are located have great effects on prediction uncertainties in winter and provide useful information regarding the sensitive areas. Further, the prediction uncertainties in winter are more sensitive to the initial errors in the subsurface large value areas than to those in the surface large value areas. The results indicate that the subsurface large value areas are sensitive areas for advancing beyond the WPB of IOD predictions and if we carry out intensive observations across these areas, the prediction errors in winter may be largely reduced. This will lead to large improvements in the skill of wintertime IOD event forecasts.

  2. Globe Anemo-radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayoshi, Makoto; Kanda, Manabu; de Dear, Richard

    2015-05-01

    We report on a new sensing technology for wind speed and shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes ( and , respectively) known as a "globe anemo-radiometer" (GAR). The GAR is intended for portable use in mobile observations along individual human pathways. The device was carefully designed to be compact, light, and omnidirectional, with low power consumption. The GAR evaluates the heat transfer coefficient , and by solving the simultaneous heat balance equations of three globe thermometers with different surface properties. The optimal combination of the three globe thermometers, namely a black globe thermometer, a white globe thermometer, and a black globe thermometer with a heat source inside the sphere, was determined experimentally. was evaluated using the empirical regression of against , with the relationship between the Nusselt number and Reynolds number experimentally regressed for the conversion from to , and the result compared with previous values from the literature. The performance of the GAR as a stationary sensor was evaluated in both field and wind-tunnel experiments and compared with that of reference meteorological sensors. The accuracy of determining obtained by the GAR was averaged over a 1-min time frame, and that of and , applying a 5-min moving average, 19 and 15 W m respectively. Both the accuracy and response delay of the globe thermometers were possible sources of error.

  3. HELIOS dual swept frequency radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The HELIOS dual swept frequency radiometer, used in conjunction with a dipole antenna, was designed to measure electromagnetic radiation in space. An engineering prototype was fabricated and tested on the HELIOS spacecraft. Two prototypes and two flight units were fabricated and three of the four units were integrated into the HELIOS spacecraft. Two sets of ground support equipment were provided for checkout of the radiometer.

  4. GPM Plans for Radiometer Intercalibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz; Stout, John; Chou, Joyce

    2011-01-01

    The international Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission led by NASA and JAXA is planned as a multi-radiometer constellation mission. A key mission component is the ability to intercalibrate the Tb from the partner constellation radiometers and create inter-calibrated, mission consistent Tc. One of the enabling strategies for this approach is the launching of a joint NASA/JAXA core satellite which contains a JAXA/NICT provided dual precipitation radar and a NASA provided Microwave Imaging passive radiometer. The observations from these instruments on the core satellite provide the opportunity to develop a transfer reference standard that can then be applied across the partner provided constellation radiometers that enables the creation of mission consistent brightness temperatures. The other aspect of the strategy is the development of a community consensus intercalibration algorithm that will be applied to the Tb observations from partner radiometers and create the best calibrated Tc. Also described is the development of the framework in which the inter-calibration is included in the final algorithm. A part of the latter effort has been the development of a generic, logical structure which can be applied across radiometer types and which guarantees the user community that key information for using Tc properly is recorded. Key

  5. A survey of ATL-compatible radiometer antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, A. W.

    1975-01-01

    A survey was made of antennas suitable for remote sensing of the earth's surface, in particular the world ocean, by means of microwave radiometers operating in the 1 to 26 GHz frequency region and carried on board the shuttle-launched advanced technology laboratory. Array antennas are found to be unattractive and unsuited to the task. Reflectors, including Cassegrain and offset types, as well as horn-reflectors are possible candidates but all have shortcomings which impair the accuracy of measurement. Horns of the corrugated type have excellent electrical characteristics. Although they are physically very large and will require development of suitable deployment mechanisms, they appear to be valid candidates for the task. The evolution of the periscope antenna is outlined, and it is shown to possess nearly ideal electrical characteristics for the intended application. Its only shortcoming is that the feed horn creates aperture blocking; there is no blocking due to struts or any other source. The periscope antenna is recommended for ATL radiometry.

  6. PAU/RAD: Design and Preliminary Calibration Results of a New L-Band Pseudo-Correlation Radiometer Concept

    PubMed Central

    Bosch-Lluis, Xavier; Camps, Adriano; Ramos-Perez, Isaac; Marchan-Hernandez, Juan Fernando; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Nereida; Valencia, Enric

    2008-01-01

    The Passive Advanced Unit (PAU) for ocean monitoring is a new type of instrument that combines in a single receiver and without time multiplexing, a polarimetric pseudo-correlation microwave radiometer at L-band (PAU-RAD) and a GPS reflectometer (PAU-GNSS/R). These instruments in conjunction with an infra-red radiometer (PAU-IR) will respectively provide the sea surface temperature and the sea state information needed to accurately retrieve the sea surface salinity from the radiometric measurements. PAU will consist of an array of 4×4 receivers performing digital beamforming and polarization synthesis both for PAU-RAD and PAU-GNSS/R. A concept demonstrator of the PAU instrument with only one receiver has been implemented (PAU-One Receiver or PAU-OR). PAU-OR has been used to test and tune the calibration algorithms that will be applied to PAU. This work describes in detail PAU-OR's radiometer calibration algorithms and their performance.

  7. High Frequency PIN-Diode Switches for Radiometer Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Reising, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Internally calibrated radiometers are needed for ocean topography and other missions. Typically internal calibration is achieved with Dicke switching as one of the techniques. We have developed high frequency single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switches in the form of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) that can be easily integrated into Dicke switched radiometers that utilize microstrip technology. In particular, the switches we developed can be used for a radiometer such as the one proposed for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Satellite Mission whose three channels at 92, 130, and 166 GHz would allow for wet-tropospheric path delay correction near coastal zones and over land. This feat is not possible with the current Jason-class radiometers due to their lower frequency signal measurement and thus lower resolution. The MMIC chips were fabricated at NGST using their InP PIN diode process and measured at JPL using high frequency test equipment. Measurement and simulation results will be presented.

  8. Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2011-06-01

    It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

  9. Solid-state spectral transmissometer and radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L.; Steward, R. G.; Payne, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    An in situ instrument designed to measure the spectral attenuation coefficient of seawater and the ocean remote-sensing reflectance from 400 to 750 nm is in the test and development stage. It employs a 256 channel, charge-coupled type of linear array measuring the spectral intensities diffracted by a grating. Examples of the types of data delivered by this instrument have been simulated using a breadboard laboratory instrument and an above-water, solid-state radiometer. Algorithms developed using data from these instruments provide measures of chlorophyll a plus phaeophytin a concentrations from less than 0.1 to 77.0 mg/cu m, gelbstoff spectral absorption coefficients, and detrital spectral backscattering coefficients for waters of the west Florida shelf.

  10. Analysis of EMC tests for interferometric radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Gambau, V.; Torres, F.; Benito, F. J.; Closa, J.; Martín-Neira, M.

    2008-10-01

    The Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) [1] is the single payload of the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission of the European Space Agency (ESA), to be launched on spring 2009 [2]. MIRAS performance was successfully tested during spring 2007 by the prime contractor, EADS-CASA Espacio Spain, at ESA premises in ESTEC and after payload integration with the Proteus platform at Thales Alenia Space in Cannes, France. This work presents the results of specific tests designed to assess the impact of a number of possible operating conditions and/or perturbations on MIRAS system performance. The major challenge to easily assess the impact of any perturbation comes from the large number of measurements that have to be dealed with.

  11. Radiometer Testbed Development for SWOT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Brown, Shannon; Gaier, Todd; Dawson, Douglas; Harding, Dennis; Fu, Lee-Lueng; Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Conventional altimeters include nadir looking colocated 18-37 GHz microwave radiometer to measure wet tropospheric path delay. These have reduced accuracy in coastal zone (within 50 km from land) and do not provide wet path delay over land. The addition of high frequency channels to Jason-class radiometer will improve retrievals in coastal regions and enable retrievals over land. High-frequency window channels, 90, 130 and 166 GHz are optimum for improving performance in coastal region and channels on 183 GHz water vapor line are ideal for over-land retrievals.

  12. Ocean Engineering Teaching at the University Level. Recommended Guidelines from the Unesco/IOC/ECOR Workshop on Advanced University Curricula in Ocean Engineering and Related Fields (Paris, France, October, 1982). Unesco Reports in Marine Science, No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    This report contains recommendations on advanced university curricula in ocean engineering and related areas, emphasizing the needs of developing countries. A decision matrix is included to assist users in developing the necessary criteria for designing appropriate curricula to prepare university students for careers in different ocean engineering…

  13. An Overview of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Accurate observations of ocean surface vector winds (OSVW) with high spatial and temporal resolution are critically important to improve both our understanding and predictability of tropical cyclones. As the successful NASA QuikSCAT satellite continues to age beyond its planned life span, many members of the tropical cyclone research and operational community recognize the need to develop new observational technologies and strategies to meet the essential need for OSVW information. This concern has been expressed in both the "Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond" developed by the National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space and the "Interagency Strategic Research Plan for Tropical Cyclone The Way Ahead" developed by the Joint Action Group for Tropical Cyclone Research (JAG-TCR) sponsored by the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology. One innovative technology development which offers the potential for new, unique remotely sensed observations of tropical cyclone OSVW and precipitation is the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD). This new instrument is passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center that will operate at the C-Band frequencies of 4, 5, 6, and 7 GHz. These frequencies have been successfully demonstrated by the NOAA nadir-staring Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) as useful for monitoring tropical cyclone ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates from low altitude reconnaissance aircraft. The HIRAD design incorporates a unique antenna design as well as several technologies that have been successfully demonstrated by the University of Michigan Lightweight Rain Radiometer sponsored by NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program. HIRAD will be a compact, lightweight, low-power instrument with no moving parts that will produce imagery of ocean wind surface

  14. A 94/183 GHz multichannel radiometer for Convair flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliano, J. A.; Stratigos, J. A.; Forsythe, R. E.; Schuchardt, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A multichannel 94/183 GHz radiometer was designed, built, and installed on the NASA Convair 990 research aircraft to take data for hurricane penetration flights, SEASAT-A underflights for measuring rain and water vapor, and Nimbus-G underflights for new sea ice signatures and sea surface temperature data (94 GHz only). The radiometer utilized IF frequencies of 1, 5, and 8.75 GHz about the peak of the atmospheric water vapor absorption line, centered at 183.3 GHz, to gather data needed to determine the shape of the water molecule line. Another portion of the radiometer operated at 94 GHz and obtained data on the sea brightness temperature, sea ice signatures, and on areas of rain near the ocean surface. The radiometer used a multiple lens antenna/temperature calibration technique using 3 lenses and corrugated feed horns at 94 GHz and 183 GHz. Alignment of the feed beams at 94 GHz and 183 GHz was accomplished using a 45 deg oriented reflecting surface which permitted simultaneous viewing of the feeds on alternate cycles of the chopping intervals.

  15. A 94/183 GHz aircraft radiometer system for Project Storm Fury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliano, J. A.; Stratigos, J. A.; Forsythe, R. E.; Schuchardt, J. M.; Welch, J. M.; Gallentine, D. O.

    1980-01-01

    A radiometer design suitable for use in NASA's WB-57F aircraft to collect data from severe storm regions was developed. The design recommended was a 94/183 GHz scanning radiometer with 3 IF channels on either side of the 183.3 GHz water vapor line and a single IF channel for a low loss atmospheric window channel at 94 GHz. The development and construction of the 94/183 GHz scanning radiometer known as the Advanced Microwave Moisture Sounder (AMMS) is presented. The radiometer scans the scene below the aircraft over an angle of + or - 45 degrees with the beamwidth of the scene viewed of approximately 2 degrees at 94 GHz and 1 degree at 183 GHz. The AMMS data collection system consists of a microcomputer used to store the radiometer data on the flight cartridge recorder, operate the stepper motor driven scanner, and collect housekeeping data such as thermistor temperature readings and aircraft time code.

  16. Reliability analysis in aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers: Application to L band Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vall-Llossera, M.; Duffo, N.; Camps, A.; Corbella, I.; Torres, F.; Bará, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) instrument will be the first radiometer using aperture synthesis techniques for Earth observation. It will be boarded in the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission of the European Space Agency and launched in 2005. The configuration under study in the MIRAS Demonstrator Pilot Project is a Y-shaped array with 27 dual-polarization L band antennas in each arm, spaced 0.89 wavelengths. In addition to these 81 antennas there are 3 additional ones between the arms for phase restoration and redundancy purposes and an extra one at the center of the Y array that is connected to a noise injection radiometer. The digitized in-phase and quadrature outputs of each receiver are multiplexed in groups of four and optically transmitted to the hub where the complex cross correlations are computed. In this configuration there are 85 antennas-receiving channels and 21 multiplexers. The objectives of this paper are twofold: (1) the study of the performance degradation of Y-shaped aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers in case of single or multiple subsystem failures and (2) a reliability analysis at subsystem level.

  17. NASA'S Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed (COAST): Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L. S.; Dungan, J. L.; Edwards, M.; Russell, P. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Kudela, R. M.; Myers, J. S.; Livingston, J.; Lobitz, B.; Torres-Perez, J.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed (COAST) project advances coastal ecosystems research and ocean color calibration and validation capability by providing a unique airborne payload optimized for remote sensing in the optically complex coastal zone. The COAST instrument suite combines a customized imaging spectrometer, sunphotometer system, and a new bio-optical radiometer package to obtain ocean/coastal/atmosphere data simultaneously in flight for the first time. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue region of the spectrum to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data is accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Coastal Airborne In situ Radiometers (C-AIR, Biospherical Instruments, Inc.), developed for COAST for airborne campaigns from field-deployed microradiometer instrumentation, will provide measurements of apparent optical properties at the land/ocean boundary including optically shallow aquatic ecosystems. Ship-based measurements allowed validation of airborne measurements. Radiative transfer modeling on in-water measurements from the HyperPro and Compact-Optical Profiling System (C-OPS, the in-water companion to C-AIR) profiling systems allows for comparison of airborne and in-situ water leaving radiance measurements. Results of the October 2011 Monterey Bay COAST mission include preliminary data on coastal ocean color products, coincident spatial and temporal data on aerosol optical depth and water vapor column content, as well as derived exact water-leaving radiances.

  18. A design study for an advanced ocean color scanner system. [spaceborne equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. H.; Fraser, R. S.; Thompson, L. L.; Bahethi, O.

    1980-01-01

    Along with a colorimetric data analysis scheme, the instrumental parameters which need to be optimized in future spaceborne ocean color scanner systems are outlined. With regard to assessing atmospheric effects from ocean colorimetry, attention is given to computing size parameters of the aerosols in the atmosphere, total optical depth measurement, and the aerosol optical thickness. It is suggested that sensors based on the use of linear array technology will meet hardware objectives.

  19. A study of radio frequency interference with the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    One of the important objectives of the NIMBUS-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) is to demonstrate the feasibility of all weather measurements of various ocean parameters; such as sea surface temperature (SST) and near surface wind speed (WS). These ocean parameters can be determined from multispectral measurements of ocean brightness temperatures in the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum. These microwave measurements, however, are distorted if the field of view of the SMMR antenna encounters radio transmissions from terrestrial sources. Sources of terrestrial Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) in the SMMR ocean data were identified. Its extent and characteristics over different ocean areas on the Earth were determined.

  20. BESST: A Miniature, Modular Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warden, Robert; Good, William; Baldwin-Stevens, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A new radiometer assembly has been developed that incorporates modular design principles in order to provide flexibility and versatility. The assembly, shown in Figure 1, is made up of six modules plus a central cubical frame. A small thermal imaging detector is used to determine the temperature of remote objects. To improve the accuracy of the temperature reading, frequent calibration is required. The detector must view known temperature targets before viewing the remote object. Calibration is achieved by using a motorized fold mirror to select the desired scene the detector views. The motor steps the fold mirror through several positions, which allows the detector to view the calibration targets or the remote object. The details, features, and benefits of the radiometer are described in this paper.

  1. Surface composition mapping radiometer instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, development, and fabrication of a three-channel scanning radiometer are discussed. The instrument was flown on Nimbus 5 satellite and measured infrared energy in the 8.3 to 9.3, 10.2 to 11.2, and 0.8 to 1.1 micron spectral regions. The instrument parameters are presented. Theoretical discussions of the instrument subassemblies are provided. Operational details of the mechanical and electrical portions of the instrument are included.

  2. Cloud Top Scanning radiometer (CTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A scanning radiometer to be used for measuring cloud radiances in each of three spectral regions is described. Significant features incorporated in the Cloud Top Scanner design are: (1) flexibility and growth potential through use of easily replaceable modular detectors and filters; (2) full aperture, multilevel inflight calibration; (3) inherent channel registration through employment of a single shared field stop; and (4) radiometric sensitivity margin in a compact optical design through use of Honeywell developed (Hg,Cd)Te detectors and preamplifiers.

  3. L-Band Radiometer Experiment in the SMOS Test Site Upper Danube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlenz, Florian; Gebhardt, Timo; Loew, Alexander; Marzahn, Philip; Mauser, Wolfram

    2010-12-01

    In the frame of calibration and validation activities for ESA's soil moisture and ocean salinity mission, SMOS, the University of Munich operates a ground based L-band radiometer (ELBARA II) at 1.4 GHz to test and validate the radiative transfer model L-MEB also used in the SMOS Level 2 processor. The radiometer is situated on a test site near Puch, about 30 km west of Munich in the Upper Danube watershed in southern Germany in a temperate agricultural area. It is mounted on a scaffolding that allows to rotate the antenna which enables it to look at 2 different fields with grass and winter rape as land use respectively. In addition to the radiometer, a variety of complementary sensors are installed measuring all important meteorological and hydrological parameters. First datasets of the radiometer experiment are presented.

  4. Nimbus observation of oceanic upwelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szekielda, K.

    1972-01-01

    Observing the development of upwelling on the northeast coast of Africa by measuring ocean surface emission with infrared radiometers on Nimbus satellites is reported. Using the temperature of the ocean as telemetered by the satellite, the biological potential of an area is estimated, and consequently the highest potential for fisheries.

  5. Precipitation from the GPM Microwave Imager and Constellation Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Randel, David; Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Kulie, Mark; Wang, Nai-Yu

    2014-05-01

    Satellite precipitation retrievals from microwave sensors are fundamentally underconstrained requiring either implicit or explicit a-priori information to constrain solutions. The radiometer algorithm designed for the GPM core and constellation satellites makes this a-priori information explicit in the form of a database of possible rain structures from the GPM core satellite and a Bayesian retrieval scheme. The a-priori database will eventually come from the GPM core satellite's combined radar/radiometer retrieval algorithm. That product is physically constrained to ensure radiometric consistency between the radars and radiometers and is thus ideally suited to create the a-priori databases for all radiometers in the GPM constellation. Until a robust product exists, however, the a-priori databases are being generated from the combination of existing sources over land and oceans. Over oceans, the Day-1 GPM radiometer algorithm uses the TRMM PR/TMI physically derived hydrometer profiles that are available from the tropics through sea surface temperatures of approximately 285K. For colder sea surface temperatures, the existing profiles are used with lower hydrometeor layers removed to correspond to colder conditions. While not ideal, the results appear to be reasonable placeholders until the full GPM database can be constructed. It is more difficult to construct physically consistent profiles over land due to ambiguities in surface emissivities as well as details of the ice scattering that dominates brightness temperature signatures over land. Over land, the a-priori databases have therefore been constructed by matching satellite overpasses to surface radar data derived from the WSR-88 network over the continental United States through the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ) initiative. Databases are generated as a function of land type (4 categories of increasing vegetation cover as well as 4 categories of increasing snow depth), land surface temperature and

  6. Ocean circulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblinsky, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Remotely sensed signatures of ocean surface characteristics from active and passive satellite-borne radiometers in conjunction with in situ data were utilized to examine the large scale, low frequency circulation of the world's oceans. Studies of the California Current, the Gulf of California, and the Kuroshio Extension Current in the western North Pacific were reviewed briefly. The importance of satellite oceanographic tools was emphasized.

  7. Recent advances in the Mercator-Ocean reanalysis system: Application to an Arctic configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testut, Charles-Emmanuel; Garric, Gilles; Chanut, Jérome; Bricaud, Clément; Smith, Greg

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the Myocean EU (FP7 and Horizon 2020) funded projects , Mercator Ocean, the French operational oceanography center, is in charge of the development and of the production of real time analysis and forecasts and reanalysis for the global ocean at the resolution of 1/12°. The operational systems are all based on the ocean and sea ice model NEMO and the multivariate data assimilation system SAM2 (Système d'Assimilation Mercator V2). The assimilation method is a reduced order Kalman filter based on SEEK formulation with bias correction scheme for temperature and salinity and an Incremental Analysis Update. The strong need of a realistic description of the mean state and variability of the rapid changing Arctic Ocean and its adjacent seas over the last decades motivated the use of the Canadian Arctic Ocean and Nordic seas configuration (CREG). This dedicated configuration at 1/12° developed by the Canadian research teams has been coupled to the multivariate data assimilation system SAM2. The objectives of this pan-Arctic platform is both to improve the sea ice assimilation method used in the Mercator Ocean and Canadian analysis and forecasting systems and to produce reanalysis over recent periods at lower numerical cost in order to prepare global higher resolution reanalysis. After a description of this Arctic reanalysis system, we present first results on the abilities of this configuration to reproduce sea ice extent and volume interannual variability without assimilation and, secondly, the impact of assimilating sea ice data on the sea ice cover with short hindcasts experiments.

  8. NASA ESTO's strategic investments in space-based radiometer technology and flight validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Charles D.; Pasciuto, Michael P.

    2014-06-01

    NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) performs strategic investments in instrument subsystems, information systems, and most recently the use of CubeSat platforms to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of relevant Earth Science Decadal Survey technologies to reduce and retire risk before infusion into flight missions. In this talk we describe the ESTO philosophy to strategic investment focusing on radiometer technology development and testing including new work involving spaceborne flight validation of radiometer technologies using CubeSats.

  9. A novel algorithm for detection of precipitation in tropical regions using PMW radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casella, D.; Panegrossi, G.; Sanò, P.; Milani, L.; Petracca, M.; Dietrich, S.

    2015-03-01

    A novel algorithm for the detection of precipitation is described and tested. The algorithm is applicable to any modern passive microwave radiometer on board polar orbiting satellites independent of the observation geometry and channel frequency assortment. The algorithm is based on the application of canonical correlation analysis and on the definition of a threshold to be applied to the resulting linear combination of the brightness temperatures in all available channels. The algorithm has been developed using a 2-year data set of co-located Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation radar (TRMM-PR) measurements and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) Microwave Humidity Sounder and TRMM-PR measurements. This data set was partitioned into four classes depending on the background surface emissivity (vegetated land, arid land, ocean, and coast) with the same procedure applied for each surface class. In this paper we describe the procedure and evaluate the results in comparison with many well-known algorithms for the detection of precipitation. The algorithm shows a small rate of false alarms and superior detection capability; it can efficiently detect (probability of detection between 0.55 and 0.71) minimum rain rate varying from 0.14 mm h-1 (AMSU over ocean) to 0.41 (SSMIS over coast) with the remarkable result of 0.25 mm h-1 over arid land surfaces.

  10. Two-Dimensional Synthetic-Aperture Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional synthetic-aperture radiometer, now undergoing development, serves as a test bed for demonstrating the potential of aperture synthesis for remote sensing of the Earth, particularly for measuring spatial distributions of soil moisture and ocean-surface salinity. The goal is to use the technology for remote sensing aboard a spacecraft in orbit, but the basic principles of design and operation are applicable to remote sensing from aboard an aircraft, and the prototype of the system under development is designed for operation aboard an aircraft. In aperture synthesis, one utilizes several small antennas in combination with a signal processing in order to obtain resolution that otherwise would require the use of an antenna with a larger aperture (and, hence, potentially more difficult to deploy in space). The principle upon which this system is based is similar to that of Earth-rotation aperture synthesis employed in radio astronomy. In this technology the coherent products (correlations) of signals from pairs of antennas are obtained at different antenna-pair spacings (baselines). The correlation for each baseline yields a sample point in a Fourier transform of the brightness-temperature map of the scene. An image of the scene itself is then reconstructed by inverting the sampled transform. The predecessor of the present two-dimensional synthetic-aperture radiometer is a one-dimensional one, named the Electrically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR). Operating in the L band, the ESTAR employs aperture synthesis in the cross-track dimension only, while using a conventional antenna for resolution in the along-track dimension. The two-dimensional instrument also operates in the L band to be precise, at a frequency of 1.413 GHz in the frequency band restricted for passive use (no transmission) only. The L band was chosen because (1) the L band represents the long-wavelength end of the remote- sensing spectrum, where the problem of achieving adequate

  11. VIIRS Ocean Color Data For Coastal Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, G. S.; Arnone, R. A.; Lander, S.; Martinolich, P.; Bowers, J.; Lawson, A.

    2012-12-01

    Nine months ago, the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) began actively generating data. Preliminary data from the on-going JPSS-NASA-NOAA and NRL calibration/validation activities indicate that ocean color products are of high quality and comparable with Moderate Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (MODIS) and other heritage missions. VIIRS 750 m resolution across the entire scan is providing twice the coverage of MODIS and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), which is a substantial improvement for coastal, estuarine studies and inland lake management, in particular. As an outcome, this study will produce VIIRS data products relevant to ecosystem managers [Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) monitoring and ecosystem dynamics]. We will present examples of VIIRS ocean color products for US lakes and estuaries with river runoff that could be used by coastal and ecosystem managers and policy makers. Acknowledgements: We greatly appreciate the support we have received from our sponsors from the JPSS Program Office, NOAA and to NRL. VIIRS Chlorophyll OC3 Algorithm (July 17, 2012)

  12. High-resolution Indian Ocean simulations—Recent advances and issues from OFES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masumoto, Yukio; Morioka, Yushi; Sasaki, Hideharu

    Mean circulation and its variability in the Indian Ocean are complex due mainly to unique geographical conditions. Results from an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model (OGCM) reveal that model performances in simulating Indian Ocean variability are significantly improved. Some examples of the improvements achieved by the model, as well as remaining issues, are described. Magnitude and spatial pattern of root-mean-square variance of the simulated sea surface height variability are nearly identical to the observed ones. However, the skewness of the sea surface height variability in the equatorial region and the regions of large eddy activity show significant differences between the two, suggesting nonlinear aspects of the variability have not yet reproduced appropriately. Simulated meridional heat transport with daily forcing lies within the observed values and is increased by 34% compared to the one forced by climatological winds. Two kinds of origin of westward propagating eddies from the Arabian Sea into the Gulf of Aden are presented, as an example of the mesoscale eddy activities in the Indian Ocean. Most of the eddies are generated in the interior region of the Arabian Sea, while some eddies appearing during the boreal autumn/winter are generated in association with the strong western boundary current through the Socotra Passage. The results also demonstrate that the magnitude of the Indonesian throughflow and its pathways are realistically reproduced due to high resolution representations of the complex topography within the Indonesian Seas, although the simulated water mass characteristics in this region suggest underestimation of the vertical mixing in OGCM for the Earth Simulator (OFES).

  13. Advances in earthquake and tsunami sciences and disaster risk reduction since the 2004 Indian ocean tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was the worst tsunami disaster in the world's history with more than 200,000 casualties. This disaster was attributed to giant size (magnitude M ~ 9, source length >1000 km) of the earthquake, lacks of expectation of such an earthquake, tsunami warning system, knowledge and preparedness for tsunamis in the Indian Ocean countries. In the last ten years, seismology and tsunami sciences as well as tsunami disaster risk reduction have significantly developed. Progress in seismology includes implementation of earthquake early warning, real-time estimation of earthquake source parameters and tsunami potential, paleoseismological studies on past earthquakes and tsunamis, studies of probable maximum size, recurrence variability, and long-term forecast of large earthquakes in subduction zones. Progress in tsunami science includes accurate modeling of tsunami source such as contribution of horizontal components or "tsunami earthquakes", development of new types of offshore and deep ocean tsunami observation systems such as GPS buoys or bottom pressure gauges, deployments of DART gauges in the Pacific and other oceans, improvements in tsunami propagation modeling, and real-time inversion or data assimilation for the tsunami warning. These developments have been utilized for tsunami disaster reduction in the forms of tsunami early warning systems, tsunami hazard maps, and probabilistic tsunami hazard assessments. Some of the above scientific developments helped to reveal the source characteristics of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, which caused devastating tsunami damage in Japan and Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station accident. Toward tsunami disaster risk reduction, interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary approaches are needed for scientists with other stakeholders.

  14. Monitoring vegetation using Nimbus-7 scanning mutichannel microwave radiometer's data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Tucker, C. J.; Golus, R. E.; Newcomb, W. W.

    1987-01-01

    Field studies and radiative transfer model calculations have shown that brightness temperature at high microwave frequencies is strongly affected by vegetation. The daytime observations for six consecutive years (1979 to 1984) over the Sahara, Senegalese Sahel, Burkina Fasso (Upper Volta), and U.S. Southern Great Plains at 37 GHz frequency of the Sanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on board the Nimbus-7 satellite are analyzed, and a high correlation with the normalized difference vegetation index derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on board the NOAA-7 satellite is found. The SMMR data appear to provide a valuable new long-term global data set for monitoring vegetation. In particular, the differing responses of vegetation (for example, annual grasses versus woody plants) to drought and the stability of the desert/steppe boundary of northern Africa might be studied using the time series data.

  15. Evaluating Solar Resource Data Obtained from Multiple Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Andreas, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-09-01

    Solar radiation resource measurements from radiometers are used to predict and evaluate the performance of photovoltaic and concentrating solar power systems, validate satellite-based models for estimating solar resources, and advance research in solar forecasting and climate change. This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances (GHI) and direct normal irradiances (DNI). These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband irradiometers, and a pyranometer with a shading ring deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL). The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference GHI and DNI.

  16. Thermal infrared radiometer calibration and experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, JiAn; Wang, Difeng; Gong, Fang; Yan, Bai; He, Xianqiang

    2015-08-01

    Thermal infrared radiometers play a vital role in obtaining information in field measurements and also in verifying information from remote sensing satellite sensor data. However, the calibration precision of the thermal infrared radiometers directly affects the accuracy of the remote sensing data analysis and application. It is therefore necessary to ensure that the calibration of thermal infrared radiometers is of sufficient and reliable precision. In this paper, the theory of a six-band thermal infrared radiometer (CE 312-2 ASTER) calibration method was introduced, with the calibration being conducted by using a blackbody source in the laboratory. The sources of error during the calibration procedure were analyzed, and the results of the calibration were provided. Then, laboratory experiments using the radiometer were described. The measurements of the surface temperature of a water sample that was contained in a thermostatic water bath, performed by using the radiometer, were compared to the water sample's temperature controlled by another device. These experiments were used to evaluate the calibration precision of the CE 312-2 ASTER radiometer, by means of assessing the measurement accuracy of the experiments. The results demonstrated that the calibration coefficients of the CE 312-2 ASTER thermal infrared radiometer displayed a very good performance, with highly accurate measurements, and could be used to detect phenomena related to a thermal infrared target.

  17. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microwave Radiometers : an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, Andreas; McKague, Darren

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes 1) the progress of the work of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) Instrumentation and Future Technologies Technical Committee (IFT-TC) Microwave Radiometer Working Group and 2) an overview of the development of interferometric synthetic aperture microwave radiometers as an introduction to a dedicated session.

  18. Portable Radiometer Identifies Minerals in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, A. F. H.; Machida, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Hand-held optical instrument aids in identifying minerals in field. Can be used in exploration for minerals on foot or by aircraft. The radiometer is especially suitable for identifying clay and carbonate minerals. Radiometer measures reflectances of mineral at two wavelengths, computes ratio of reflectances, and displays ratio to user.

  19. Comparison of Two Cryogenic Radiometers at NIST

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Jeanne M.; Livigni, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Two cryogenic radiometers from NIST, one from the Optical Technology Division and the other from the Optoelectronics Division, were compared at three visible laser wavelengths. For this comparison, each radiometer calibrated two photodiode trap detectors for spectral responsivity. The calibration values for the two trap detectors agreed within the expanded (k = 2) uncertainties. This paper describes the measurement and results of this comparison.

  20. An aircraft radiometer front end, addendum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustincic, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed description is given of a completely quasi-optical aircraft radiometer for use at frequencies of 150 GHz and above. The radiometer calibration and beam switching is described as well as a reflection isolator utilizing a reciprocating mirror and a quasi-optical local oscillator injection system. Receiver applications and performance levels are also given.

  1. Measuring the instrument function of radiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, R.; Littlejohn, R.G.

    1997-12-31

    The instrument function is a function of position and angle, the knowledge of which allows one to compute the response of a radiometer to an incident wave field in any state of coherence. The instrument function of a given radiometer need not be calculated; instead, it may be measured by calibration with incident plane waves.

  2. The importance of altimeter and scatterometer data for ocean prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlburt, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    The prediction of ocean circulation using satellite altimeter data is discussed. Three classes of oceanic response to atmospheric forcing are outlined and examined. Storms, surface waves, eddies, and ocean currents were evaluated in terms of forecasting time requirements. Scatterometer and radiometer applications to ocean prediction are briefly reviewed.

  3. Radiometer Design Analysis Based Upon Measurement Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, Paul E.; Lang, Roger H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a method for predicting the performance of a radiometer design based on calculating the measurement uncertainty. The variety in radiometer designs and the demand for improved radiometric measurements justify the need for a more general and comprehensive method to assess system performance. Radiometric resolution, or sensitivity, is a figure of merit that has been commonly used to characterize the performance of a radiometer. However when evaluating the performance of a calibration design for a radiometer, the use of radiometric resolution has limited application. These limitations are overcome by considering instead the measurement uncertainty. A method for calculating measurement uncertainty for a generic radiometer design including its calibration algorithm is presented. The result is a generalized technique by which system calibration architectures and design parameters can be studied to optimize instrument performance for given requirements and constraints. Example applications demonstrate the utility of using measurement uncertainty as a figure of merit.

  4. Linking Across Institutional Repositories: Recent Advances with Ocean Drilling Sample Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fils, D.; Arko, R. A.; Moore, C.; Lehnert, K. A.; Song, L.

    2013-12-01

    Links across institutional data collections have historically been difficult to maintain. The brittle nature of hard coding links across institutions and thus across governance practices results in stale, or worse, erroneous or broken connections. Emerging practices around the use of structured and embedded structured data in Web sites following schema.org, RDFa Lite, and JSON-LD patterns provide a means to expose hooks in data. These hooks are locally maintained and thus more reliably relevant to the associated data. The Semantic nature of these data and associated vocabularies make it possible to programmatically maintain connections across a collection of associated sites. This can be done dynamically by client processes or by a periodic process of selective indexing of the sites. The results of this indexing can then be exposed as precomputed links or graph style representations. Examples of connecting data from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) facility, and Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples (IMLGS) associated with ocean drilling sample information, core images, geochemical analyses, and lithology data will be demonstrated. Structured data embedded in resources and exposed by Linked Open Data and other Semantic methods are used as a foundation, with the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) as a shared/persistent identifier. This foundation allows discovery of resources (such as core images), which then expose sufficient structured data to allow other associated content (such as samples or lithologies) to be discovered. This approach is demonstrated dynamically via both Web applications and computed indexes.

  5. Intraterrestrial life in igneous ocean crust: advances, technologies, and the future (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, K. J.; Wheat, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    The “next frontier” of scientific investigation in the deep sub-seafloor microbial biosphere lies in a realm that has been a completely unexplored until just the past decade: the igneous oceanic crust. Problems that have hampered exploration of the “hard rock” marine deep biosphere have revolved around sample access (hard rock drilling is technologically complex), contamination (a major hurdle), momentum (why take on this challenge when the relatively “easier” marine muds also have been a frontier) and suspicion that microbes in more readily accessed using (simpler) non-drilling technologies - like vents - are truly are endemic of subsurface clades/activities. Since the late 1990’s, however, technologies and resultant studies on microbes in the igneous ocean crust deep biosphere have risen sharply, and offer a new and distinct view on this biome. Moreover, microbiologists are now taking leading roles in technological developments that are critically required to address this biosphere - interfacing and collaborating closely with engineers, genomic biologists, geologists, seismologists, and geochemists to accomplish logistically complex and long-term studies that bring observatory research to this deep realm. The future of this field for the least decade is rich - opportunities abound for microbiologists to play new roles in how we study microbiology in the deep subsurface in an oceanographic and Earth system science perspective.

  6. Satellite Ocean Color: Present Status, Future Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; McClain, Charles R.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We are midway into our 5th consecutive year of nearly continuous, high quality ocean color observations from space. The Ocean Color and Temperature Scanner/Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (OCTS/POLDER: Nov. 1996 - Jun. 1997), the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS: Sep. 1997 - present), and now the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS: Sep. 2000 - present) have and are providing unprecedented views of chlorophyll dynamics on global scales. Global synoptic views of ocean chlorophyll were once a fantasy for ocean color scientists. It took nearly the entire 8-year lifetime of limited Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) observations to compile seasonal climatologies. Now SeaWIFS produces comparably complete fields in about 8 days. For the first time, scientists may observe spatial and temporal variability never before seen in a synoptic context. Even more exciting, we are beginning to plausibly ask questions of interannual variability. We stand at the beginning of long-time time series of ocean color, from which we may begin to ask questions of interdecadal variability and climate change. These are the scientific questions being addressed by users of the 18-year Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer time series with respect to terrestrial processes and ocean temperatures. The nearly 5-year time series of ocean color observations now being constructed, with possibilities of continued observations, can put us at comparable standing with our terrestrial and physical oceanographic colleagues, and enable us to understand how ocean biological processes contribute to, and are affected by global climate change.

  7. 77 FR 19030 - Automated Commercial Environment Required for the Transmission of Advance Ocean and Rail Cargo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Automated Commercial Environment Required for the Transmission... recently completed the testing of the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) for the transmission of..., rail or truck. See Required Advance Electronic ] Presentation of Cargo Information, 68 FR...

  8. Baseline Observations of Hemispheric Sea Ice with the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, Per

    1998-01-01

    The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on board the NASA Nimbus 7 satellite was designed to obtain data for sea surface temperatures (SSTs), near-surface wind speeds, sea ice coverage and type, rainfall rates over the oceans, cloud water content, snow water equivalent, and soil moisture. In this paper, I shall emphasize the sea ice observations and mention briefly some important SST observations. A prime factor contributing to the importance of SMMR sea ice observations lies in their successful integration into a long-term time series, presently being extended by observations from the series of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI) on board the DOD/DMSP F8, Fl1, and F12 satellites. This currently constitutes a 19-year data set. Almost half of this was provided by the SMMR. Unfortunately, the 4-year data set produced earlier by the single-channel Electrically Scanned Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) was not successfully integrated into the SMMR/SSMI data set. This resulted primarily from the lack of an overlap period to provide intersensor adjustment, but also because of the large difference between the algorithms to produce ice concentrations and large temporal gaps in the ESMR data. The lack of overlap between the SeaSat and Nimbus 7 SMMR data sets was an important consideration for also excluding the SeatSat one, but the spatial gaps especially in the Southern Hemisphere daily SeaSat observations was another. The sea ice observations will continue into the future by means of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) on board the ADEOS II and EOS satellites due to be launched in mid- and late-2000, respectively. Analysis of the sea ice data has been carried out by a number of different techniques. Long-term trends have been examined by means of ordinary least squares and band-limited regression. Oscillations in the data have been examined by band-limited Fourier analysis. Here, I shall present results from a novel combination of Principal

  9. FixO3: Advancement towards Open Ocean Observatory Data Management Harmonisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnken, Andree; Pagnani, Maureen; Huber, Robert; Lampitt, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Since 2002 there has been a sustained effort, supported as European framework projects, to harmonise both the technology and the data management of Open Ocean fixed observatories run by European nations. FixO3 started in September 2013, and for 3 more years will coordinate the convergence of data management best practice across a constellation of moorings in the Atlantic, in both hemispheres, and in the Mediterranean. To ensure the continued existence of these unique sources of oceanographic data as sustained observatories it is vital to improve access to the data collected, both in terms of methods of presentation, real-time availability, long-term archiving and quality assurance. The data management component of FixO3 improves access to marine observatory data by harmonising data management standards, formats and workflows covering the complete life cycle of data from real time data acquisition to long-term archiving. Legal and data policy aspects have been examined and discussed to identify transnational barriers to open-access to marine observatory data. As a result, a harmonised FixO3 data policy was drafted, which provides a formal basis for data exchange between FixO3 infrastructures, and also enables open access to data for the general public. FixO3 interacts with other European infrastructures such as EMODnet, SeaDataNet, PANGAEA, and especially aims to harmonise efforts with OceanSites and MyOcean. The project landing page (www.fixo3.eu) offers detailed information about every observatory as well as data visualisations and direct downloads. In addition to this, metadata for all FixO3 - relevant data are available from the searchable FixO3 metadata catalogue, which is also accessible from the project web page. This catalogue is hosted by PANGAEA and receives updates in regular intervals. The FixO3 Standards & Services registry ties in with the GEOSS Components and Services Registry (CSR) and provides additional observatory information. The data management

  10. U.S. Tsunami Warning System: Advancements since the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, P.

    2009-12-01

    The U.S. government embarked on a strengthening program for the U.S. Tsunami Warning System (TWS) in the aftermath of the disastrous 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. The program was designed to improve several facets of the U.S. TWS, including: upgrade of the coastal sea level network - 16 new stations plus higher transmission rates; expansion of the deep ocean tsunameter network - 7 sites increased to 39; upgrade of seismic networks - both USGS and Tsunami Warning Center (TWC); increase of TWC staff to allow 24x7 coverage at two centers; development of an improved tsunami forecast system; increased preparedness in coastal communities; expansion of the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center facility; and improvement of the tsunami data archive effort at the National Geophysical Data Center. The strengthening program has been completed and has contributed to the many improvements attained in the U.S. TWS since 2004. Some of the more significant enhancements to the program are: the number of sea level and seismic sites worldwide available to the TWCs has more than doubled; the TWC areas-of-responsibility expanded to include the U.S./Canadian Atlantic coasts, Indian Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and U.S. Arctic coast; event response time decreased by approximately one-half; product accuracy has improved; a tsunami forecast system developed by NOAA capable of forecasting inundation during an event has been delivered to the TWCs; warning areas are now defined by pre-computed or forecasted threat versus distance or travel time, significantly reducing the amount of coast put in a warning; new warning dissemination techniques have been implemented to reach a broader audience in less time; tsunami product content better reflects the expected impact level; the number of TsunamiReady communities has quadrupled; and the historical data archive has increased in quantity and accuracy. In addition to the strengthening program, the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP

  11. Tropical cyclone rainfall as measured by the Nimbus 5 electrically scanning microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J.; Wilheit, T. T.; Rodgers, E. B.; Fett, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A selected group of 1973 North Pacific Ocean tropical cyclones was studied by using data from the Nimbus 5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR), the Temperature-Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR), NOAA-2 and USAF DMSP imageries. From the unique combination of infrared, visible, and microwave data, it was possible during various stages of storm development to differentiate between dense cirrus outflow and rain areas, to identify centers of circulation and areas of low-level moisture, and by the use of a theoretical model to estimate semi-quantitatively areas of light, moderate, and heavy rainfall rates.

  12. Phase aligner for the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chren, William A., Jr.; Zomberg, Brian G.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype Phase Aligner (PA) or the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer instrument has been designed and tested. Implemented in a single Xilinx XC3042PC84-125 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), it is a dual-port register file which allows independent storage and phase coherent retrieval of antenna array data by the Central Processing Unit (CPU). It has dimensions of 4 x 20 bits and can be used at clock frequencies as high as 25 MHz. The ESTAR is a passive synthetic-aperture radiometer designed to sense soil moisture and ocean salinity at L-band.

  13. Low-frequency microwave radiometer for N-ROSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollinger, J. P.; Lo, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The all weather, global determination of sea surface temperature (SST) has been identified as a requirement needed to support naval operations. The target SST accuracy is + or - 1.0 K with a surface resolution of 10 km. Investigations of the phenomenology and technology of remote passive microwave sensing of the ocean environment over the past decade have demonstrated that this objective is presently attainable. Preliminary specification and trade off studies were conducted to define the frequency, polarization, scan geometry, antenna size, and other esstential parameters of the low frequency microwave radiometer (LFMR). It will be a dual polarized, dual frequency system at 5.2 and 10.4 GHz using a 4.9 meter deployable mesh surface antenna. It is to be flown on the Navy-Remote Ocean Sensing System (N-ROSS) satellite scheduled to be launched in late 1988.

  14. Calibration and Image Reconstruction for the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Christopher; Roberts, J. Brent; Biswas, Sayak; James, Mark W.; Miller, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a new airborne passive microwave synthetic aperture radiometer designed to provide wide swath images of ocean surface wind speed under heavy precipitation and, in particular, in tropical cyclones. It operates at 4, 5, 6 and 6.6 GHz and uses interferometric signal processing to synthesize a pushbroom imager in software from a low profile planar antenna with no mechanical scanning. HIRAD participated in NASA s Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) mission during Fall 2010 as its first science field campaign. HIRAD produced images of upwelling brightness temperature over a aprox 70 km swath width with approx 3 km spatial resolution. From this, ocean surface wind speed and column averaged atmospheric liquid water content can be retrieved across the swath. The calibration and image reconstruction algorithms that were used to verify HIRAD functional performance during and immediately after GRIP were only preliminary and used a number of simplifying assumptions and approximations about the instrument design and performance. The development and performance of a more detailed and complete set of algorithms are reported here.

  15. Combining microwave radiometer and wind profiler radar measurements to improve accuracy and resolution of atmospheric humidity profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, L.; Cimini, D.; Ware, R.; Marzano, F.

    2003-04-01

    37'N, longitude: 97^o30'W, altitude: 313 m ASL). Results show that the synergy of microwave radiometer and wind profiler measurements significantly improves both the accuracy and spatial vertical resolution of atmospheric humidity profiles. Bianco, L., and J. M. Wilczak, 2002: Convective boundary layer depth: Improved measurement by Doppler Radar Wind Profiler using fuzzy logic methods, J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol., 19, 1745-1758. Stankov, B. B., E. E. Gossard, B. L. Weber, R. J. Lataitis, A. B. White, D. E. Wolfe, and D. C. Welsh, 2002: Humidity gradient profiles from Wind Profiling Radars using the NOAA/ETL advanced Signal Processing System (SPS), Accepted for publication in JTECH. White, A. B., R. J. Lataitis, and R. S. Lawrence, 1999: Space and time filtering of remotely sensed velocity turbulence, J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol., 16, 1967-1971. Han, Y., and E. R. Westwater, 1995: Remote sensing of tropospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water by integrated ground-based sensors, J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol., 12, 1050-1059.

  16. Combining Microwave Radiometer and Wind Profiler Radar Measurements to Improve Accuracy and Resolution of Atmospheric Humidity Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, L.; Cimini, D.; Ware, R.; Marzano, F.

    2003-04-01

    37'N, longitude: 97^o 30'W, altitude: 313 m ASL). Results show that the synergy of microwave radiometer and wind profiler measurements significantly improves both the accuracy and spatial vertical resolution of atmospheric humidity profiles. Bianco, L., and J. M. Wilczak, 2002: Convective boundary layer depth: Improved measurement by Doppler Radar Wind Profiler using fuzzy logic methods, J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol., 19, 1745-1758. Stankov, B. B., E. E. Gossard, B. L. Weber, R. J. Lataitis, A. B. White, D. E. Wolfe, and D. C. Welsh, 2002: Humidity gradient profiles from Wind Profiling Radars using the NOAA/ETL advanced Signal Processing System (SPS), Accepted for publication in JTECH. White, A. B., R. J. Lataitis, and R. S. Lawrence, 1999: Space and time filtering of remotely sensed velocity turbulence, J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol., 16, 1967-1971. Han, Y., and E. R. Westwater, 1995: Remote sensing of tropospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water by integrated ground-based sensors, J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol., 12, 1050-1059.

  17. Source analysis of spaceborne microwave radiometer interference over land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Li; Zhang, Sibo

    2016-03-01

    Satellite microwave thermal emissions mixed with signals from active sensors are referred to as radiofrequency interference (RFI). Based on Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) observations from June 1 to 16, 2011, RFI over Europe was identified and analyzed using the modified principal component analysis algorithm in this paper. The X band AMSR-E measurements in England and Italy are mostly affected by the stable, persistent, active microwave transmitters on the surface, while the RFI source of other European countries is the interference of the reflected geostationary TV satellite downlink signals to the measurements of spaceborne microwave radiometers. The locations and intensities of the RFI induced by the geostationary TV and communication satellites changed with time within the observed period. The observations of spaceborne microwave radiometers in ascending portions of orbits are usually interfered with over European land, while no RFI was detected in descending passes. The RFI locations and intensities from the reflection of downlink radiation are highly dependent upon the relative geometry between the geostationary satellite and the measuring passive sensor. Only these fields of view of a spaceborne instrument whose scan azimuths are close to the azimuth relative to the geostationary satellite are likely to be affected by RFI.

  18. The Water Vapour Radiometer at Effelsberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A. L.; Teuber, U.; Keller, R.

    We have installed a scanning 18 GHz to 26 GHz water vapour radiometer on the focus cabin of the Effelsberg 100 m telescope for tropospheric phase, delay and opacity correction during high-frequency VLBI observations. It is based on the design by Tahmoush & Rogers (2000) but with noise injection for calibration, weather-proof housing, and temperature stabilization. The radiometer is delivering data into an archive since July 2003, from which they are available for download. The data will be delivered automatically to PIs of EVN experiments in a calibration table attached by the EVN calibration pipeline. This paper describes the radiometer and its performance.

  19. EarthCube: Advancing Partnerships, Collaborative Platforms and Knowledge Networks in the Ocean Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, Diggs; Lee, Allison

    2014-05-01

    The National Science Foundation's EarthCube initiative aims to create a community-driven data and knowledge management system that will allow for unprecedented data sharing across the geosciences. More than 2,500 participants through forums, work groups, EarthCube events, and virtual and in-person meetings have participated. The individuals that have engaged represent the core earth-system sciences of solid Earth, Atmosphere, Oceans, and Polar Sciences. EarthCube is a cornerstone of NSF's Cyberinfrastructure for the 21st Century (CIF21) initiative, whose chief objective is to develop a U.S. nationwide, sustainable, and community-based cyberinfrastructure for researchers and educators. Increasingly effective community-driven cyberinfrastructure allows global data discovery and knowledge management and achieves interoperability and data integration across scientific disciplines. There is growing convergence across scientific and technical communities on creating a networked, knowledge management system and scientific data cyberinfrastructure that integrates Earth system and human dimensions data in an open, transparent, and inclusive manner. EarthCube does not intend to replicate these efforts, but build upon them. An agile development process is underway for the development and governance of EarthCube. The agile approach was deliberately selected due to its iterative and incremental nature while promoting adaptive planning and rapid and flexible response. Such iterative deployment across a variety of EarthCube stakeholders encourages transparency, consensus, accountability, and inclusiveness.

  20. A conceptual design study for a two-dimensional, electronically scanned thinned array radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutton, Philip; Chromik, Christopher C.; Dixon, Iain; Statham, Richard B.; Stillwagen, Frederic H.; Vontheumer, Alfred E.; Sasamoto, Washito A.; Garn, Paul A.; Cosgrove, Patrick A.; Ganoe, George G.

    1993-01-01

    A conceptual design for the Two-Dimensional, Electronically Steered Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) is described. This instrument is a synthetic aperture microwave radiometer that operates in the L-band frequency range for the measurement of soil moisture and ocean salinity. Two auxiliary instruments, an 8-12 micron, scanning infrared radiometer and a 0.4-1.0 micron, charge coupled device (CCD) video camera, are included to provided data for sea surface temperature measurements and spatial registration of targets respectively. The science requirements were defined by Goddard Space Flight Center. Instrument and the spacecraft configurations are described for missions using the Pegasus and Taurus launch vehicles. The analyses and design trades described include: estimations of size, mass and power, instrument viewing coverage, mechanical design trades, structural and thermal analyses, data and communications performance assessments, and cost estimation.

  1. ELBARA II, an L-Band Radiometer System for Soil Moisture Research

    PubMed Central

    Schwank, Mike; Wiesmann, Andreas; Werner, Charles; Mätzler, Christian; Weber, Daniel; Murk, Axel; Völksch, Ingo; Wegmüller, Urs

    2010-01-01

    L-band (1–2 GHz) microwave radiometry is a remote sensing technique that can be used to monitor soil moisture, and is deployed in the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). Performing ground-based radiometer campaigns before launch, during the commissioning phase and during the operative SMOS mission is important for validating the satellite data and for the further improvement of the radiative transfer models used in the soil-moisture retrieval algorithms. To address these needs, three identical L-band radiometer systems were ordered by ESA. They rely on the proven architecture of the ETH L-Band radiometer for soil moisture research (ELBARA) with major improvements in the microwave electronics, the internal calibration sources, the data acquisition, the user interface, and the mechanics. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design of the instruments and the main characteristics that are relevant for the user. PMID:22315556

  2. Recent advances in vibro-impact dynamics and collision of ocean vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Raouf A.

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of ship impacts and collisions takes different approaches depending on the emphasis of each discipline. For example, dynamicists, physicist, and mathematicians are dealing with developing analytical models and mappings of vibro-impact systems. On the other hand, naval architects and ship designers are interested in developing design codes and structural assessments due to slamming loads, liquid sloshing impact loads in liquefied natural gas tanks and ship grounding accidents. The purpose of this review is to highlight the main differences of the two disciplines. It begins with a brief account of the theory of vibro-impact dynamics based on modeling and mapping of systems experiencing discontinuous changes in their state of motion due to collision. The main techniques used in modeling include power-law phenomenological modeling, Hertzian modeling, and non-smooth coordinate transformations originally developed by Zhuravlev and Ivanov. In view of their effectiveness, both Zhuravlev and Ivanov non-smooth coordinate transformations will be described and assessed for the case of ship roll dynamics experiencing impact with rigid barriers. These transformations have the advantage of converting the vibro-impact oscillator into an oscillator without barriers such that the corresponding equation of motion does not contain any impact term. One of the recent results dealing with the coefficient of restitution is that its value monotonically decreases with the impact velocity and not unique but random in nature. Slamming loads and grounding events of ocean waves acting on the bottom of high speed vessels will be assessed with reference to the ship structural damage. It will be noticed that naval architects and marine engineers are treating these problems using different approaches from those used by dynamicists. The problem of sloshing impact in liquefied natural gas cargo and related problems will be assessed based on the numerical and experimental results. It is

  3. L-band radiometer experiment in the SMOS test site Upper Danube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlenz, Florian; Gebhardt, Timo; Loew, Alexander; Marzahn, Philip; Mauser, Wolfram

    2010-05-01

    In the frame of calibration and validation activities for ESA's soil moisture and ocean salinity mission, SMOS, the University of Munich operates a ground based L-band radiometer (ELBARA II) on an experimental farm in Southern Germany since September 2009. It is being used to validate the radiative transfer model, L-MEB, used in the SMOS Level 2 processor. The radiometer measures the natural emission of two fields in the microwave domain with a wavelength of 1.4 GHz. Its working principle is similar to that of SMOS, for which reason it can be used for validation of the radiative transfer model on the field scale. To support the validation, extensive environmental measurements are being made at the test site. The radiometer is situated on an experimental farm near Puch, about 30 km west of Munich in the Upper Danube watershed in southern Germany in a temperate agricultural area. It is mounted on a 4 m high scaffolding that allows to turn the radiometer to look at 2 different fields with grass and winter rape as land use respectively. In addition to the L-band measurements, thermal infrared (IR) measurements are performed. For this purpose, one thermal IR radiometer is attached to the ELBARA antenna to look into the same direction and two IR radiometers are constantly pointed at the two fields. Next to the radiometer is a meteorological station providing soil and air temperature profiles, precipitation, global radiation, wind speed and relative humidity measurements with an hourly resolution. In addition to that, soil moisture is measured with TDR probes in 2 profiles under each of the two fields with several probes installed at depths between 5 and 50cm. Vegetation and snow parameters are also recorded on a regularly basis. Soil roughness is measured with a photogrammetric approach. An overview about the infrastructure and existing datasets is presented.

  4. Microwave Radiometer-High Frequency (MWRHF) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Caddedu, MP

    2011-03-17

    The 90/150-GHz Vapor Radiometer provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from two channels centered at 90 and 150 GHz. These two channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  5. Design studies of large aperture, high-resolution Earth science microwave radiometers compatible with small launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Lyle C.; Bailey, M. C.; Harrington, Richard F.; Kendall, Bruce M.; Campbell, Thomas G.

    1994-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution microwave radiometer sensing from space with reasonable swath widths and revisit times favors large aperture systems. However, with traditional precision antenna design, the size and weight requirements for such systems are in conflict with the need to emphasize small launch vehicles. This paper describes tradeoffs between the science requirements, basic operational parameters, and expected sensor performance for selected satellite radiometer concepts utilizing novel lightweight compactly packaged real apertures. Antenna, feed, and radiometer subsystem design and calibration are presented. Preliminary results show that novel lightweight real aperture coupled with state-of-the-art radiometer designs are compatible with small launch systems, and hold promise for high-resolution earth science measurements of sea ice, precipitation, soil moisture, sea surface temperature, and ocean wind speeds.

  6. Galileo Photopolarimeter/Radiometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, E. E.; Brown, F. G.; Chandos, R. A.; Fincher, W. C.; Kubel, L. F.; Lacis, A. A.; Travis, L. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Photopolarimeter/Radiometer (PPR) is a remote sensing instrument on the Galileo Orbiter designed to measure the degree of linear polarization and the intensity of reflected sunlight in ten spectral channels between 410 and 945 nm to determine the physical properties of Jovian clouds and aerosols, and to characterize the texture and microstructure of satellite surfaces. The PPR also measures thermal radiation in five spectral bands between 15 and 100 microns to sense the upper tropospheric temperature structure. Two additional channels which measure spectrally integrated solar and solar plus thermal radiation are used to determine the planetary radiation budget components. The PPR photopolarimetric measurements utilize previously flown technology for high-precision polarimetry using a calcite Wollaston prism and two silicon photodiodes to enable simultaneous detection of the two orthogonal polarization components. The PPR radiometry measurements are made with a lithium tantalate pyroelectric detector utilizing a unique arrangement of radiometric stops and a scene/space chopper blade to enable a warm instrument to sense accurately the much colder scene temperatures.

  7. MMIC Receiver For Water-Vapor Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukamto, Lin M.; Cooley, Thomas W.; Janssen, Michael A.; Parks, Gary S.

    1993-01-01

    MMIC receiver puts out signal, frequency of which proportioned to brightness temperature of sky at input frequency of 31 GHz. Miniaturization enhances thermal stability and stability of calibration of water-vapor radiometer. Potential for mass production at relatively low cost. Facilitating widespread use of MMIC water vapor radiometers in meteorology and aviation, deployed at several global sites to improve capability of general circulation models and at airports to monitor icing conditions by measuring supercooled liquid water in clouds.

  8. Advances and Limitations of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observations with GPS Occultation over Southeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, F.; Wu, D. L.; Ao, C. O.; Mannucci, A. J.; Kursinski, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    The typical atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over the southeast (SE) Pacific Ocean is featured with a strong temperature inversion and a sharp moisture gradient across the ABL top. The strong moisture and temperature gradients result in a sharp refractivity gradient that can be precisely detected by the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) measurements. In this paper, the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere & Climate (COSMIC) GPS RO soundings, radiosondes and the high-resolution ECMWF analysis over the SE Pacific are analyzed. COSMIC RO is able to detect a wide range of ABL height variations (1-2 kilometer) as observed from the radiosondes. However, the ECMWF analysis systematically underestimates the ABL heights. The sharp refractivity gradient at the ABL top frequently exceeds the critical refraction (e.g., -157 N-unit per kilometer) and becomes the so-called ducting condition, which results in a systematic RO refractivity bias (or called N-bias) inside the ABL. Simulation study based on radiosonde profiles reveals the magnitudes of the N-biases are vertical resolution dependent. The N-bias is also the primary cause of the systematically smaller refractivity gradient (rarely exceeding -110 N-unit per kilometer) at the ABL top from RO measurement. However, the N-bias seems not affect the ABL height detection. Instead, the very large RO bending angle and the sharp refractivity gradient due to ducting allow reliable detection of the ABL height from GPS RO. The seasonal mean climatology of ABL heights derived from a nine-month composite of COSMIC RO soundings over the SE Pacific reveals significant differences from the ECMWF analysis. Both show an increase of ABL height from the shallow stratocumulus near the coast to a much higher trade wind inversion further off the coast. However, COSMIC RO shows an overall deeper ABL and reveals different locations of the minimum and maximum ABL heights as compared to the ECMWF analysis

  9. NASA's Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L. S.; Dungan, J. L.; Edwards, M.; Russell, P. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Hooker, S.; Myers, J.; Kudela, R. M.; Dunagan, S.; Soulage, M.; Ellis, T.; Clinton, N. E.; Lobitz, B.; Martin, K.; Zell, P.; Berthold, R. W.; Smith, C.; Andrew, D.; Gore, W.; Torres, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed (COAST) Project is a NASA Earth-science flight mission that will advance coastal ecosystems research by providing a unique airborne payload optimized for remote sensing in the optically complex coastal zone. Teaming NASA Ames scientists and engineers with Biospherical Instruments, Inc. (San Diego) and UC Santa Cruz, the airborne COAST instrument suite combines a customized imaging spectrometer, sunphotometer system, and a new bio-optical radiometer package to obtain ocean/coastal/atmosphere data simultaneously in flight for the first time. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue region of the spectrum to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data will be accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Based on optical detectors called microradiometers, the NASA Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry Calibration and Validation (cal/val) Office team has deployed advanced commercial off-the-shelf instrumentation that provides in situ measurements of the apparent optical properties at the land/ocean boundary including optically shallow aquatic ecosystems (e.g., lakes, estuaries, coral reefs). A complimentary microradiometer instrument package (Biospherical Instruments, Inc.), optimized for use above water, will be flown for the first time with the airborne instrument suite. Details of the October 2011 COAST airborne mission over Monterey Bay demonstrating this new airborne instrument suite capability will be presented, with associated preliminary data on coastal ocean color products, coincident spatial and temporal data on aerosol optical depth and water vapor column content, as well as derived exact water-leaving radiances.

  10. Precipitation from the GPM Microwave Imager and Constellation Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite precipitation retrievals are fundamentally underconstrained requiring either implicit or explicit a-prior information to constrain the solutions. The radiometer algorithm being designed for the GPM core and constellation satellites makes this a-priori information explicit in the form of an a-priori database of possible rain structures and a Bayesian retrieval scheme. The a-priori database has its heritage in the TRMM satellite which ushered in an era of active/passive microwave retrievals. Because the output from such retrievals is physically consistent with the rainfall seen by the radar and the brightness temperatures seen by the radiometer, they are ideally suited for the a-priori database. This approach will be repeated for the Global Precipitation Mission, now scheduled for launch in February 2014. Its core satellite will carry a dual frequency radar and state of the art microwave radiometer. This combination of sensors, and the accompanying multi-sensor algorithm will provide a basis for creating the a-priori database for the radiometer only retrievals that is applicable not only to the wider swath of the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), but to all the constellation radiometers. This talk will present the pre-launch synthesis of various satellite systems to simulate the core satellite retrieval necessary to have a reasonably robust database in place for the launch of the GPM core satellite. The talk will then focus on the implementation of the algorithm itself. This algorithm has a number of advances over previous versions. Most importantly, is the absence of screening routines that previously identified pixels as being raining or non-raining. This was particularly important over land where the surface could easily be mistaken for ice scattering in raining clouds. By having much better controls over the land surface and land surface emissivities, along with robust a-priori databases, the new algorithm relies completely on the Tb signature to determine

  11. A Microwave Radiometer for Internal Body Temperature Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Robert Patterson

    This thesis presents the analysis and design of a microwave radiometer for internal body temperature measurements. There is currently no available method for non-invasive temperature measurement inside the human body. However, knowledge of both relative and absolute temperature variations over time is important to a number of medical applications. The research presented in this thesis details a proof-of-concept near-field microwave radiometer demonstrating relative thermometry of a multi-layer phantom. There are a number of technical challenges addressed in this thesis for radiometric determination of sub-degree temperature variations in the human body. A theoretical approach is developed for determining sensing depth from known complex layered tissues, which is defined as a figure of merit, and is shown to be dependent on frequency, electrical properties of the tissues, and the near-field probe. In order to obtain depth resolution, multiple frequency operation can be used, so multi-frequency probes are designed and demonstrated in this work. The choice of frequencies is determined not only by the tissue material properties, but also by the ever increasing radio interference in the environment. In this work, quiet bands allocated to radio astronomy are investigated. The radiometer and probe need to be compact to be wearable, and several advancements are made towards a fully wearable device: multi-frequency low-profile probes are designed and fabricated on a flexible substrate and the process of on-chip integration is demonstrated by a GaAs MMIC cold noise source for radiometer calibration. The implemented proof-of-concept device consists of two radiometers at 1.4 GHz and 2.7 GHz, designed with commercial inexpensive devices that can enable sufficient sensitivity. The device is tested on a phantom with two water layers whose temperatures are varied in a controlled manner, and focused on the human body temperature range. Measured results are discussed qualitatively

  12. Surface and atmosphere parameter maps from earth-orbiting radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.

    1976-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that an earth-orbiting electrically scanned microwave radiometer (ESMR) is capable of inferring the extent, concentration, and age of sea ice; the extent, concentration, and thickness of lake ice; rainfall rates over oceans; surface wind speeds over open water; particle size distribution in the deep snow cover of continental ice sheets; and soil moisture content in unvegetated fields. Most other features of the surface of the earth and its atmosphere require multispectral imaging techniques to unscramble the combined contributions of the atmosphere and the surface. Multispectral extraction of surface parameters is analyzed on the basis of a pertinent equation in terms of the observed brightness temperature, the emissivity of the surface which depends on wavelength and various parameters, the sensible temperature of the surface, and the total atmospheric opacity which is also wavelength dependent. Implementation of the multispectral technique is examined. Properties of the surface of the earth and its atmosphere to be determined from a scanning multichannel microwave radiometer are tabulated.

  13. Oceanic Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busalacchi, Antonio J.

    1997-01-01

    For many years, merchant ships and the naval fleets of various countries have been the major source of data over and in the open ocean. Oceanographic research experiments and process studies in the field have also contributed to the climatological data bases for the global ocean, but, for the most part, these have been limited in duration and extent. However, over the last 10 years under the auspices of the World Climate Research Program and the International Geosphere Biosphere Program the role of the oceans in global and climate change has taken on increased significance. This has created a need for a considerably improved understanding of the seasonal, interannual, decadal and longer time-scale variability of the physical and biogeochemical attributes of the global ocean. As a result, over the past 10 years several major international field programs have been implemented and have had a tremendous impact on the number of in situ observations obtained for the global ocean. The Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program, the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), and the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) were designed with observational, modelling, and process study components aimed at analyzing different aspects of the ocean's role in the coupled climate system. In parallel with the field programs, continuous space-based observations of sea surface temperature, sea surface topography, and sea surface winds spanning nearly a decade or longer have become a reality. During this same time period, numerical ocean models and computational power have advanced to the point where the oceanographic observations, both in situ and remotely sensed, can be assimilated into numerical ocean models in order to provide a four-dimensional (x-y-z-t) depiction of the evolving state of the global ocean.

  14. Narrow Angle Wide Spectral Range Radiometer Design FEANICS/REEFS Radiometer Design Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camperchioli, William

    2005-01-01

    A critical measurement for the Radiative Enhancement Effects on Flame Spread (REEFS) microgravity combustion experiment is the net radiative flux emitted from the gases and from the solid fuel bed. These quantities are measured using a set of narrow angle, wide spectral range radiometers. The radiometers are required to have an angular field of view of 1.2 degrees and measure over the spectral range of 0.6 to 30 microns, which presents a challenging design effort. This report details the design of this radiometer system including field of view, radiometer response, radiometric calculations, temperature effects, error sources, baffling and amplifiers. This report presents some radiometer specific data but does not present any REEFS experiment data.

  15. Flight measurement and analysis of AAFE RADSCAT wind speed signature of the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, L. C.; Jones, W. L.; Schaffner, P. R.; Mitchell, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The advanced aerospace flight experiment radiometer scatterometer (AAFE RADSCAT) which was developed as a research tool to evaluate the use of microwave frequency remote sensors to provide wind speed information at the ocean surface is discussed. The AAFE RADSCAT helped establish the feasibility of the satellite scatterometer for measuring both wind speed and direction. The most important function of the AAFE RADSCAT was to provide a data base of ocean normalized radar cross section (NRCS) measurements as a function of surface wind vector at 13.9 GHz. The NRCS measurements over a wide parametric range of incidence angles, azimuth angles, and winds were obtained in a series of RADSCAT aircraft missions. The obtained data base was used to model the relationship between k sub u band radar signature and ocean surface wind vector. The models developed therefrom are compared with those used for inversion of the SEASAT-A satellite scatterometer (SASS) radar measurements to wind speeds.

  16. Ocean Data Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.; Cavanaugh, J.; Smith, J.; Esaias, W.

    1988-01-01

    The Ocean Data Acquisition System (ODAS) is a low cost instrument with potential commercial application. It is easily mounted on a small aircraft and flown over the coastal zone ocean to remotely measure sea surface temperature and three channels of ocean color information. From this data, chlorophyll levels can be derived for use by ocean scientists, fisheries, and environmental offices. Data can be transmitted to shipboard for real-time use with sea truth measurements, ocean productivity estimates and fishing fleet direction. The aircraft portion of the system has two primary instruments: an IR radiometer to measure sea surface temperature and a three channel visible spectro-radiometer for 460, 490, and 520 nm wavelength measurements from which chlorophyll concentration can be derived. The aircraft package contains a LORAN-C unit for aircraft location information, clock, on-board data processor and formatter, digital data storage, packet radio terminal controller, and radio transceiver for data transmission to a ship. The shipboard package contains a transceiver, packet terminal controller, data processing and storage capability, and printer. Both raw data and chlorophyll concentrations are available for real-time analysis.

  17. The Passive Microwave Neural Network Precipitation Retrieval (PNPR) for AMSU/MHS and ATMS cross-track scanning radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano', Paolo; Casella, Daniele; Panegrossi, Giulia; Cinzia Marra, Anna; Dietrich, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Spaceborne microwave cross-track scanning radiometers, originally developed for temperature and humidity sounding, have shown great capabilities to provide a significant contribution in precipitation monitoring both in terms of measurement quality and spatial/temporal coverage. The Passive microwave Neural network Precipitation Retrieval (PNPR) algorithm for cross-track scanning radiometers, originally developed for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit/Microwave Humidity Sounder (AMSU-A/MHS) radiometers (on board the European MetOp and U.S. NOAA satellites), was recently newly designed to exploit the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on board the Suomi-NPP satellite and the future JPSS satellites. The PNPR algorithm is based on the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approach. The main PNPR-ATMS algorithm changes with respect to PNPR-AMSU/MHS are the design and implementation of a new ANN able to manage the information derived from the additional ATMS channels (respect to the AMSU-A/MHS radiometer) and a new screening procedure for not-precipitating pixels. In order to achieve maximum consistency of the retrieved surface precipitation, both PNPR algorithms are based on the same physical foundation. The PNPR is optimized for the European and the African area. The neural network was trained using a cloud-radiation database built upon 94 cloud-resolving simulations over Europe and the Mediterranean and over the African area and radiative transfer model simulations of TB vectors consistent with the AMSU-A/MHS and ATMS channel frequencies, viewing angles, and view-angle dependent IFOV sizes along the scan projections. As opposed to other ANN precipitation retrieval algorithms, PNPR uses a unique ANN that retrieves the surface precipitation rate for all types of surface backgrounds represented in the training database, i.e., land (vegetated or arid), ocean, snow/ice or coast. This approach prevents different precipitation estimates from being inconsistent with one

  18. View-limiting shrouds for insolation radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, E. W.; Trentelman, G. F.

    1985-01-01

    Insolation radiometers (normal incidence pyrheliometers) are used to measure the solar radiation incident on solar concentrators for calibrating thermal power generation measurements. The measured insolation value is dependent on the atmospheric transparency, solar elevation angle, circumsolar radiation, and radiometer field of view. The radiant energy entering the thermal receiver is dependent on the same factors. The insolation value and the receiver input will be proportional if the concentrator and the radiometer have similar fields of view. This report describes one practical method for matching the field of view of a radiometer to that of a solar concentrator. The concentrator field of view can be calculated by optical ray tracing methods and the field of view of a radiometer with a simple shroud can be calculated by using geometric equations. The parameters for the shroud can be adjusted to provide an acceptable match between the respective fields of view. Concentrator fields of view have been calculated for a family of paraboloidal concentrators and receiver apertures. The corresponding shroud parameters have also been determined.

  19. Deep-sea low-light radiometer system.

    PubMed

    Haag, Justin M; Roberts, Paul L D; Papen, George C; Jaffe, Jules S; Li, Linhai; Stramski, Dariusz

    2014-12-01

    Two single-waveband low-light radiometers were developed to characterize properties of the underwater light field relevant to biological camouflage at mesopelagic ocean depths. Phenomena of interest were vertical changes in downward irradiance of ambient light at wavelengths near 470 nm and 560 nm, and flashes from bioluminescent organisms. Depth profiles were acquired at multiple deep stations in different geographic regions. Results indicate significant irradiance magnitudes at 560 nm, providing direct evidence of energy transfer as described by Raman scattering. Analysis of a night profile yielded multiple examples of bioluminescent flashes. The selection of high-sensitivity, high-speed silicon photomultipliers as detectors enabled measurement of spectrally-resolved irradiance to greater than 400 m depth. PMID:25606937

  20. Mission definition for a large-aperture microwave radiometer spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An Earth-observation measurements mission is defined for a large-aperture microwave radiometer spacecraft. This mission is defined without regard to any particular spacecraft design concept. Space data application needs, the measurement selection rationale, and broad spacecraft design requirements and constraints are described. The effects of orbital parameters and image quality requirements on the spacecraft and mission performance are discussed. Over the land the primary measurand is soil moisture; over the coastal zones and the oceans important measurands are salinity, surface temperature, surface winds, oil spill dimensions and ice boundaries; and specific measurement requirements have been selected for each. Near-all-weather operation and good spatial resolution are assured by operating at low microwave frequencies using an extremely large aperture antenna in a low-Earth-orbit contiguous mapping mode.

  1. Detection of radio frequency interference over ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoxu

    The geostationary satellite television (TV) signals that are reflected off the ocean surfaces could enter the AMSR-E antenna, resulting in RFI (Radio Frequency Interference) contamination in AMSR-E 10.65 and 18.7 GHz channels. If not detected, the presence of RFI signals can result in false retrievals of oceanic environmental parameters (e.g., sea surface temperature, sea surface wind speed, rain water path) from microwave imaging radiance measurements. This study first examined the geometric relationship between the RFI source, geostationary TV satellite, and AMSR-E observation. Then a normalized Principal Component Analysis (NPCA) method is proposed and applied for RFI detection over oceans in Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR)-E observations. It is found that the RFI-contaminated observations on AMSR-E descending node at 10.65 and 18.7 GHz can be successively detected near coastal areas surrounding Europe and United States continents. The results yielded from the geometric examination at another angle verify those signals detected with NPCA. The proposed NPCA algorithm is applicable in an operational environment for fast data processing and data dissemination, and is different from earlier methods, which often require a priori information.

  2. CHARM: A CubeSat Water Vapor Radiometer for Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Boon; Mauro, David; DeRosee, Rodolphe; Sorgenfrei, Matthew; Vance, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Ames Research Center (ARC) are partnering in the CubeSat Hydrometric Atmospheric Radiometer Mission (CHARM), a water vapor radiometer integrated on a 3U CubeSat platform, selected for implementation under NASA Hands-On Project Experience (HOPE-3). CHARM will measure 4 channels at 183 GHz water vapor line, subsets of measurements currently performed by larger and more costly spacecraft (e.g. ATMS, AMSU-B and SSMI/S). While flying a payload that supports SMD science objectives, CHARM provides a hands-on opportunity to develop technical, leadership, and project skills. CHARM will furthermore advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the 183 GHz receiver subsystem from TRL 4 to TRL 6 and the CubeSat 183 GHz radiometer system from TRL 4 to TRL 7.

  3. Novel Cyclotron-Based Radiometal Production

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrado, Timothy R.

    2013-10-31

    Accomplishments: (1) Construction of prototype solution target for radiometal production; (2) Testing of prototype target for production of following isotopes: a. Zr-89. Investigation of Zr-89 production from Y-89 nitrate solution. i. Defined problems of gas evolution and salt precipitation. ii. Solved problem of precipitation by addition of nitric acid. iii. Solved gas evolution problem with addition of backpressure regulator and constant degassing of target during irradiations. iv. Investigated effects of Y-89 nitrate concentration and beam current. v. Published abstracts at SNM and ISRS meetings; (3) Design of 2nd generation radiometal solution target. a. Included reflux chamber and smaller target volume to conserve precious target materials. b. Included aluminum for prototype and tantalum for working model. c. Included greater varicosities for improved heat transfer; and, (4) Construction of 2nd generation radiometal solution target started.

  4. Microwave radiometer for subsurface temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Bechis, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A UHF radiometer, operating at a frequency of 800 MHz, was modified to provide an integral, three frequency voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) circuit in the radio frequency (RF) head. The VSWR circuit provides readings of power transmission at the antenna-material interface with an accuracy of plus or minus 5 percent. The power transmission readings are numerically equal to the emissivity of the material under observation. Knowledge of material emissivity is useful in the interpretation of subsurface apparent temperatures obtained on phantom models of biological tissue. The emissivities of phantom models consisting of lean beefsteak were found to lie in the range 0.623 to 0.779, depending on moisture content. Radiometric measurements performed on instrumented phantoms showed that the radiometer was capable of sensing small temperature changes occurring at depths of at least 19 to 30 mm. This is consistent with previously generated data which showed that the radiometer could sense temperatures at a depth of 38 mm.

  5. A sea ice concentration estimation algorithm utilizing radiometer and SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvonen, J.

    2014-09-01

    We have studied the possibility of combining the high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) segmentation and ice concentration estimated by radiometer brightness temperatures. Here we present an algorithm for mapping a radiometer-based concentration value for each SAR segment. The concentrations are estimated by a multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network which has the AMSR-2 (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2) polarization ratios and gradient ratios of four radiometer channels as its inputs. The results have been compared numerically to the gridded Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) ice chart concentrations and high-resolution AMSR-2 ASI (ARTIST Sea Ice) algorithm concentrations provided by the University of Hamburg and also visually to the AMSR-2 bootstrap algorithm concentrations, which are given in much coarser resolution. The differences when compared to FMI daily ice charts were on average small. When compared to ASI ice concentrations, the differences were a bit larger, but still small on average. According to our comparisons, the largest differences typically occur near the ice edge and sea-land boundary. The main advantage of combining radiometer-based ice concentration estimation and SAR segmentation seems to be a more precise estimation of the boundaries of different ice concentration zones.

  6. Low-cost microprocessor controlled shadowband radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalsky, J. J.; Lebaron, B. A.; Harrison, L. C.

    1985-06-01

    This paper describes the second phase in the development of a low-cost microprocessor-controlled rotating shadowband radiometer at PNL. The initial work, to develop a solar photometer, resulted in a mechanical design that is adopted for the solar radiometer with only minor changes. The goals of this effort are: (1) to improve the data acquisition system; and (2) to derive corrections for the silicon cell-based pyranometer that would allow measurements of total horizontal, diffuse horizontal, and direct normal solar radiation approaching first-class instrumentation accuracy at a fraction of the cost. Significant progress on temperature, cosine and spectral corrections is achieved.

  7. Characterization of the DARA solar absolute radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finsterle, W.; Suter, M.; Fehlmann, A.; Kopp, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Davos Absolute Radiometer (DARA) prototype is an Electrical Substitution Radiometer (ESR) which has been developed as a successor of the PMO6 type on future space missions and ground based TSI measurements. The DARA implements an improved thermal design of the cavity detector and heat sink assembly to minimize air-vacuum differences and to maximize thermal symmetry of measuring and compensating cavity. The DARA also employs an inverted viewing geometry to reduce internal stray light. We will report on the characterization and calibration experiments which were carried out at PMOD/WRC and LASP (TRF).

  8. Electrically scanning microwave radiometer for Nimbus E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An electronically scanning microwave radiometer system has been designed, developed, and tested for measurement of meteorological, geomorphological and oceanographic parameters from NASA/GSFC's Nimbus E satellite. The system is a completely integrated radiometer designed to measure the microwave brightness temperature of the earth and its atmosphere at a microwave frequency of 19.35 GHz. Calibration and environmental testing of the system have successfully demonstrated its ability to perform accurate measurements in a satellite environment. The successful launch and data acquisition of the Nimbus 5 (formerly Nimbus E) gives further demonstration to its achievement.

  9. Salinity surveys using an airborne microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.; Droppleman, J. D.; Evans, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Barnes PRT-5 infrared radiometer and L-band channel of the multifrequency microwave radiometer are used to survey the distribution of surface water temperature and salinity. These remote sensors were flown repetitively in November 1971 over the outflow of the Mississippi River into the Gulf of Mexico. Data reduction parameters were determined through the use of flight data obtained over a known water area. With these parameters, the measured infrared and microwave radiances were analyzed in terms of the surface temperature and salinity.

  10. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer: Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Biswas, S. K.; Cecil, D.; Jones, W. L.; Johnson, J.; Farrar, S.; Sahawneh, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Morris, M.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Black, P. G.

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an airborne passive microwave radiometer designed to provide high resolution, wide swath imagery of surface wind speed in tropical cyclones from a low profile planar antenna with no mechanical scanning. Wind speed and rain rate images from HIRAD's first field campaign (GRIP, 2010) are presented here followed, by a discussion on the performance of the newly installed thermal control system during the 2012 HS3 campaign. The paper ends with a discussion on the next generation dual polarization HIRAD antenna (already designed) for a future system capable of measuring wind direction as well as wind speed.

  11. The development of a stepped frequency microwave radiometer and its application to remote sensing of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    The design, development, application, and capabilities of a variable frequency microwave radiometer are described. This radiometer demonstrated the versatility, accuracy, and stability required to provide contributions to the geophysical understanding of ocean and ice processes. A closed-loop feedback method was used, whereby noise pulses were added to the received electromagnetic radiation to achieve a null balance in a Dicke switched radiometer. Stability was achieved through the use of a constant temperature enclosure around the low loss microwave front end. The Dicke reference temperature was maintained to an absolute accuracy of 0.1 K using a closed-loop proportional temperature controller. A microprocessor based digital controller operates the radiometer and records the data on computer compatible tapes. This radiometer exhibits an absolute accuracy of better than 0.5 K when the sensitivity is 0.1 K. The sensitivity varies between 0.0125 K and 1.25 K depending upon the bandwidth and integration time selected by the digital controller. Remote sensing experiments were conducted from an aircraft platform and the first radiometeric mapping of an ocean polar front; exploratory experiments to measure the thickness of lake ice; first discrimination between first year and multiyear ice below 10 GHz; and the first known measurements of frequency sensitive characteristics of sea ice.

  12. An investigation of radiometer design using digital processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    The use of digital signal processing techniques in Dicke switching radiometer design was investigated. The general approach was to develop an analytical model of the existing analog radiometer and identify factors which adversly affect its performance. A digital processor was then proposed to verify the feasibility of using digital techniques to minimize these adverse effects and improve the radiometer performance. Analysis and preliminary test results comparing the digital and analog processing approaches in radiometers design were analyzed.

  13. Radiometer gives true absorption and emission coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    Novel radiometer, unaffected by scattering and polarization, measures true absorption and emmission coefficients for arbitrary mixture of gases and polluting particles. It has potential astronomical, meteorological, and environmental applications, such as determination of radiative heat budget, aerosol relative concentration, and morphology of cloud, haze, and fog formations. Data and temperature can be coupled directly to small computer for online calculation of radiation coefficients.

  14. Planck-LFI radiometers' spectral response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, A.; Franceschet, C.; Battaglia, P.; Villa, F.; Mennella, A.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Silvestri, R.; Bersanelli, M.; Artal, E.; Butler, R. C.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; Galeotta, S.; Hughes, N.; Jukkala, P.; Kilpiä, V.-H.; Laaninen, M.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Mendes, L.; Sandri, M.; Terenzi, L.; Tuovinen, J.; Varis, J.; Wilkinson, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) is an array of pseudo-correlation radiometers on board the Planck satellite, the ESA mission dedicated to precision measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background. The LFI covers three bands centred at 30, 44 and 70 GHz, with a goal bandwidth of 20% of the central frequency. The characterization of the broadband frequency response of each radiometer is necessary to understand and correct for systematic effects, particularly those related to foreground residuals and polarization measurements. In this paper we present the measured band shape of all the LFI channels and discuss the methods adopted for their estimation. The spectral characterization of each radiometer was obtained by combining the measured spectral response of individual units through a dedicated RF model of the LFI receiver scheme. As a consistency check, we also attempted end-to-end spectral measurements of the integrated radiometer chain in a cryogenic chamber. However, due to systematic effects in the measurement setup, only qualitative results were obtained from these tests. The measured LFI bandpasses exhibit a moderate level of ripple, compatible with the instrument scientific requirements.

  15. LARSPEC spectroradiometer-multiband radiometer data formats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehl, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    The data base software system, LARSPEC, is discussed and the data base format for agronomic, meteorological, spectroradiometer, and multiband radiometer data is described. In addition, the contents and formats of each record of data and the wavelength tables are listed and the codes used for some of the parameters are described.

  16. A new solid-state logarithmic radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrous, C. N.; Deboo, G. J.; Page, W. A.; Whiting, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Combination of temperature-compensated logarithmic amplifiers and p-i-n photodiodes operating in zero-bias mode provides lightweight radiometer for detecting spectral intensities encompassing more than three decades over a range of at least 300 to 800 nanometers at low power levels.

  17. Balloon-borne radiometer profiler: Field observations

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D.; Anderson, G.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Hubbe, J.M.; Scott, K.A.

    1995-03-01

    This project involves the development of the capability of making routine soundings of broadband radiative fluxes and radiative flux divergences to heights of 1500m AGL. Described in this document are radiometers carried on a stabilized platform in a harness inserted in the tetherline of a tethered balloon meteriological sounding system. Field test results are given.

  18. Heat capacity mapping radiometer for AEM spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnek, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    The operation, maintenance, and integration of the applications explorer mission heat capacity mapping radiometer is illustrated in block diagrams and detail schematics of circuit functions. Data format and logic timing diagrams are included along with radiometric and electronic calibration data. Mechanical and electrical configuration is presented to provide interface details for integration of the HCMR instrument to AEM spacecraft.

  19. The microwave radiometer spacecraft: A design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, R. L. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    A large passive microwave radiometer spacecraft with near all weather capability of monitoring soil moisture for global crop forecasting was designed. The design, emphasizing large space structures technology, characterized the mission hardware at the conceptual level in sufficient detail to identify enabling and pacing technologies. Mission and spacecraft requirements, design and structural concepts, electromagnetic concepts, and control concepts are addressed.

  20. Accounting For Nonlinearity In A Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelzried, Charles T.

    1991-01-01

    Simple mathematical technique found to account adequately for nonlinear component of response of microwave radiometer. Five prescribed temperatures measured to obtain quadratic calibration curve. Temperature assumed to vary quadratically with reading. Concept not limited to radiometric application; applicable to other measuring systems in which relationships between quantities to be determined and readings of instruments differ slightly from linearity.

  1. Scanning and focusing mechanisms of METEOSAT radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jouan, J.

    1977-01-01

    Two mechanisms, both of screw-jack type are described. The scanning mechanism, an oil lubricated and sealed unit drives and accurately positions the telescope of the METEOSAT radiometer. The dry lubricated focusing mechanism is used to adjust the focus of this telescope. The METEOSAT program is nearly completed, and the first flight model will be launched at the end of the year.

  2. Global Ocean Phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, B. A.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Siegel, D. A.; Werdell, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are responsible for roughly half the net primary production (NPP) on Earth, fixing atmospheric CO2 into food that fuels global ocean ecosystems and drives the ocean's biogeochemical cycles. Phytoplankton growth is highly sensitive to variations in ocean physical properties, such as upper ocean stratification and light availability within this mixed layer. Satellite ocean color sensors, such as the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS; McClain 2009) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS; Esaias 1998), provide observations of sufficient frequency and geographic coverage to globally monitor physically-driven changes in phytoplankton distributions. In practice, ocean color sensors retrieve the spectral distribution of visible solar radiation reflected upward from beneath the ocean surface, which can then be related to changes in the photosynthetic phytoplankton pigment, chlorophyll- a (Chla; measured in mg m-3). Here, global Chla data for 2013 are evaluated within the context of the 16-year continuous record provided through the combined observations of SeaWiFS (1997-2010) and MODIS on Aqua (MODISA; 2002-present). Ocean color measurements from the recently launched Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS; 2011-present) are also considered, but results suggest that the temporal calibration of the VIIRS sensor is not yet sufficiently stable for quantitative global change studies. All MODISA (version 2013.1), SeaWiFS (version 2010.0), and VIIRS (version 2013.1) data presented here were produced by NASA using consistent Chla algorithms.

  3. Application of Uncooled Monolithic Thermoelectric Linear Arrays to Imaging Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Paul W.

    Introduction Identification of Incipient Failure of Railcar Wheels Technical Description of the Model IR 1000 Imaging Radiometer Performance of the Model IR 1000 Imaging Radiometer Initial Application Summary Imaging Radiometer for Predictive and Preventive Maintenance Description Operation Specifications Summary References INDEX CONTENTS OF VOLUMES IN THIS SERIES

  4. Ocean Optics Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Validation. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; Mueller, James L.

    2000-01-01

    The document stipulates protocols for measuring bio-optical and radiometric data for the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project activities and algorithm development. This document supersedes the earlier version (Mueller and Austin 1995) published as Volume 25 in the SeaWiFS Technical Report Series. This document marks a significant departure from, and improvement on, theformat and content of Mueller and Austin (1995). The authorship of the protocols has been greatly broadened to include experts specializing in some key areas. New chapters have been added to provide detailed and comprehensive protocols for stability monitoring of radiometers using portable sources, abovewater measurements of remote-sensing reflectance, spectral absorption measurements for discrete water samples, HPLC pigment analysis and fluorometric pigment analysis. Protocols were included in Mueller and Austin (1995) for each of these areas, but the new treatment makes significant advances in each topic area. There are also new chapters prescribing protocols for calibration of sun photometers and sky radiance sensors, sun photometer and sky radiance measurements and analysis, and data archival. These topic areas were barely mentioned in Mueller and Austin (1995).

  5. Microfluidic radiolabeling of biomolecules with PET radiometals

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Dexing; Desai, Amit V.; Ranganathan, David; Wheeler, Tobias D.; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Reichert, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A robust, versatile and compact microreactor has been designed, fabricated and tested for the labeling of bifunctional chelate conjugated biomolecules (BFC-BM) with PET radiometals. Methods The developed microreactor was used to radiolabel a chelate, either 1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) or 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) that had been conjugated to cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-DPhe-Lys) peptide, with both 64Cu and 68Ga respectively. The microreactor radiolabeling conditions were optimized by varying temperature, concentration and residence time. Results Direct comparisons between the microreactor approach and conventional methods showed improved labeling yields and increased reproducibility with the microreactor under identical labeling conditions, due to enhanced mass and heat transfer at the microscale. More importantly, over 90% radiolabeling yields (incorporation of radiometal) were achieved with a 1:1 stoichiometry of bifunctional chelate biomolecule conjugate (BFC-BM) to radiometal in the microreactor, which potentially obviates extensive chromatographic purification that is typically required to remove the large excess of unlabeled biomolecule in radioligands prepared using conventional methods. Moreover, higher yields for radiolabeling of DOTA-functionalized BSA protein (Bovine Serum Albumin) were observed with 64Cu/68Ga using the microreactor, which demonstrates the ability to label both small and large molecules. Conclusions A robust, reliable, compact microreactor capable of chelating radiometals with common chelates has been developed and validated. Based on our radiolabeling results, the reported microfluidic approach overall outperforms conventional radiosynthetic methods, and is a promising technology for the radiometal labeling of commonly utilized BFC-BM in aqueous solutions. PMID:23078875

  6. Using Advanced Data Assimilation For Assessing The Capabilities And Limits Of Using The GOCE Geoid To Improve The Shelf And Coastal Ocean Low-Frequency Circulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, L.; Pierre J., D.; Guilhem, M.; Georges, B.; Matthieu, L.; Muriel, L.; Roger, H.; Catherine, B.

    2008-12-01

    Realistic ocean modelling is part of the new challenges that has arisen in the past decade in order to access precise and accurate knowledge of the ocean circulation, especially at regional and coastal scales. An efficient ocean modelling system is now built both on both a hydrodynamic model and a data assimilation technique. Altimetric data plays a central role because of their relative abundance, coverage and repetitive sampling. At the large scales, using a geostrophic balance equation, the upper-layer ocean circulation could be approximately retrieved from the ocean surface topography, assuming that the ocean surface reference level, given by the geoid, is known with sufficient accuracy. However the geoid solutions do not contain the smaller scales characterizing coastal dynamics. More generally, the lack of control over the permanent circulations is a serious limitation for the regional ocean modelling and forecasting. The need for better ocean geoids has then been identified for a long time, and the recent gravimetric satellite missions are a first step to solve the problem. The GOCE satellite, developed at ESA and scheduled for lift- off in September 2008, will operate between two and two and a half years. Its main objective is to further improve our knowledge of the geopotential in providing a higher resolution static model for a variety of applications, especially in oceanography. The scientific community expects that the improved geoid model from GOCE will significantly advance our skill at modelling the mean ocean circulation, by using (1) precise geocentric sea surface elevations obtained from global altimetric measurements, (2) a mean geoid model with an accuracy of the order of one centimeter on spatial scales down to the width of boundary currents, (3) additional oceanographic data sets required to constrain ocean circulation models with data assimilation. The study presented here aims to assess the capabilities and the limits of the use of the GOCE

  7. Aerosol optical properties from sky radiometer measurement on board R/V Shirase during the JARE Japan Antarctica cruises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiobara, M.; Yabuki, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Hara, K.; Osada, K.; Hashida, G.; Sakuraba, T.; Yamano, M.; Muraji, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Sky radiometer measurement on board the Antarctic R/V Shirase has been continued for investigating the aerosol optical properties over the Western Pacific, Indian Ocean and Antarctic Ocean during the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) Japan Antarctica annual cruises since 2000. The Prede POM-01 Mark II sky-radiometer is designed for shipboard measurements and was put on the upper deck of R/V Shirase for full-automatic operations being controlled by a PC placed in a laboratory room during cruises. In this paper, a brief summary of results from the 2000 - 2005 cruises is shown and discussed on optical properties such as the aerosol optical thickness, single scattering albedo, complex refractive index, etc. to be compared with those which have been simultaneously obtained from in-situ measurements with an optical particle counter, an integrating nephelometer and a PSAP for marine boundary layer aerosols, especially in the Asian tropical ocean area.

  8. The interdisciplinary marine system of the Amundsen Sea, Southern Ocean: Recent advances and the need for sustained observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Michael P.; Ducklow, Hugh W.; Schofield, Oscar; Wåhlin, Anna; Newman, Louise; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    The Southern Ocean exerts a profound influence on the functioning of the Earth System, in part because its location and unique bathymetric configuration enable direct linkages to the other major ocean basins (Ganachaud and Wunsch, 2000; Lumpkin and Speer, 2007). It is the site of the world's largest current system, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which transfers waters and climatically/ecologically-important tracers between the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans (Rintoul et al., 2001). In addition to the strong horizontal connectivity, the ACC is also characterized by a vigorous overturning circulation, which upwells warm, nutrient-rich waters from intermediate depth to the surface, where they are modified by interactions with the atmosphere and cryosphere to form new water masses, some of which are lighter and others more dense (Marshall and Speer, 2012). This overturning circulation structures the Southern Ocean both horizontally and vertically, dictates the levels of its communication with the rest of the global ocean, and is a fundamental control on the sequestration of carbon from the atmosphere into the ocean interior (Sallée et al., 2012). In some locations, the upwelled waters can intrude onto the Antarctic shelves, supplying heat and nutrients to the shallower regions. This is believed to be especially effective in west Antarctica, where the southern edge of the ACC moves close to the shelf break (Martinson, 2011; Orsi et al., 1995; Thoma et al., 2008).

  9. Thermal Modeling and Analysis of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauro, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad) is a payload carried by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at altitudes up to 60,000 ft with the purpose of measuring ocean surface wind speeds and near ocean surface rain rates in hurricanes. The payload includes several components that must maintain steady temperatures throughout the flight. Minimizing the temperature drift of these components allows for accurate data collection and conclusions to be drawn concerning the behavior of hurricanes. HIRad has flown on several different UAVs over the past two years during the fall hurricane season. Based on the data from the 2011 flight, a Thermal Desktop model was created to simulate the payload and reproduce the temperatures. Using this model, recommendations were made to reduce the temperature drift through the use of heaters controlled by resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensors. The suggestions made were implemented for the 2012 hurricane season and further data was collected. The implementation of the heaters reduced the temperature drift for a portion of the flight, but after a period of time, the temperatures rose. With this new flight data, the thermal model was updated and correlated. Detailed analysis was conducted to determine a more effective way to reduce the temperature drift. The final recommendations made were to adjust the set temperatures of the heaters for 2013 flights and implement hardware changes for flights beyond 2013.

  10. Modeling and Analysis of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauro, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad) is a payload carried by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at altitudes up to 60,000 ft with the purpose of measuring ocean surface wind speeds and near ocean surface rain rates in hurricanes. The payload includes several components that must maintain steady temperatures throughout the flight. Minimizing the temperature drift of these components allows for accurate data collection and conclusions to be drawn concerning the behavior of hurricanes. HIRad has flown on several different UAVs over the past two years during the fall hurricane season. Based on the data from the 2011 flight, a Thermal Desktop model was created to simulate the payload and reproduce the temperatures. Using this model, recommendations were made to reduce the temperature drift through the use of heaters controlled by resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensors. The suggestions made were implemented for the 2012 hurricane season and further data was collected. The implementation of the heaters reduced the temperature drift for a portion of the flight, but after a period of time, the temperatures rose. With this new flight data, the thermal model was updated and correlated. Detailed analysis was conducted to determine a more effective way to reduce the temperature drift. The final recommendations made were to adjust the set temperatures of the heaters for 2013 flights and implement hardware changes for flights beyond 2013.

  11. The Chinese FY-1 Meteorological Satellite Application in Observation on Oceanic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimin, S.

    meteorological satellite is stated in this paper. exploration of the ocean resources has been a very important question of global strategy in the world. The exploration of the ocean resources includes following items: Making full use of oceanic resources and space, protecting oceanic environment. to observe the ocean is by using of satellite. In 1978, US successfully launched the first ocean observation satellite in the world --- Sea Satellite. It develops ancient oceanography in to advanced space-oceanography. FY-1 B and FY- IC respectively. High quality data were acquired at home and abroad. FY-1 is Chinese meteorological satellite, but with 0.43 ~ 0.48 μm ,0.48 ~ 0.53 μm and 0.53 ~ 0.58 μm three ocean color channels, actually it is a multipurpose remote sensing satellite of meteorology and oceanography. FY-1 satellite's capability of observation on ocean partly, thus the application field is expanded and the value is increased. With the addition of oceanic channels on FY-1, the design of the satellite is changed from the original with meteorological observation as its main purpose into remote sensing satellite possessing capability of observing meteorology and ocean as well. Thus, the social and economic benefit of FY-1 is increased. the social and economic benefit of the development of the satellite is the key technique in the system design of the satellite. technically feasible but also save the funds in researching and manufacturing of the satellite, quicken the tempo of researching and manufacturing satellite. the scanning radiometer for FY-1 is conducted an aviation experiment over Chinese ocean. This experiment was of vital importance to the addition of oceanic observation channel on FY-1. FY-1 oceanic channels design to be correct. detecting ocean color. This is the unique character of Chinese FY-1 meteorological satellite. meteorological remote sensing channel on FY-1 to form detecting capability of three visible channels: red, yellow and blue

  12. MAPIR: An Airborne Polarmetric Imaging Radiometer in Support of Hydrologic Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, C.; Al-Hamdan, M.; Crosson, W.; Limaye, A.; McCracken, J.; Meyer, P.; Richeson, J.; Sims, W.; Srinivasan, K.; Varnevas, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this age of dwindling water resources and increasing demands, accurate estimation of water balance components at every scale is more critical to end users than ever before. Several near-term Earth science satellite missions are aimed at global hydrologic observations. The Marshall Airborne Polarimetric Imaging Radiometer (MAPIR) is a dual beam, dual angle polarimetric, scanning L band passive microwave radiometer system developed by the Observing Microwave Emissions for Geophysical Applications (OMEGA) team at MSFC to support algorithm development and validation efforts in support of these missions. MAPIR observes naturally-emitted radiation from the ground primarily for remote sensing of land surface brightness temperature from which we can retrieve soil moisture and possibly surface or water temperature and ocean salinity. MAPIR has achieved Technical Readiness Level 6 with flight heritage on two very different aircraft, the NASA P-3B, and a Piper Navajo.

  13. Studies of Atmospheric Water in Storms with the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsaros, K. B.

    1984-01-01

    The new tools for the study of midlattitude cyclones by atmospheric water channels of the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) on Nimbus 7, were discussed. The integrated atmospheric water vapor, total cloud liquid water and rain data were obtained from the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR). The frontal structure of several midlattitude cyclones over the North Pacific Ocean as they approached the West Coast of North America were studied. It is found that fronts are consistently located at the leading edge of the strongest gradient in integrated water vapor. The cloud liquid water content has patterns which are consistent with the structure seen in visible and infrared imagery. The rain distribution is a good indicator of frontal location. It is concluded that the onset of rain on the coast can be forecast accurately by simple advection of the SMMR observed rain areas.

  14. The PREMOS/PICARD Radiometer: An Overview after 3 Years of Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, Gaël; Schmutz, Werner; Shapiro, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance are key input parameters to atmospheric/oceanic and space weather models. We present here spectral solar irradiance data from the radiometer PREMOS onboard the PICARD satellite for three years. This instrument covers the solar spectrum from the Ultraviolet to near-infrared, and provide valuable information, which helps to constrain theoretical models. An overview of the results involving PREMOS result will be presented including observations and modelling. We use the radiative transfer code COSI to model the variability of the irradiance. We will then introduce the COCOSIS model (for Combination of COSI Spectra) which assumes that the variability is determined by the evolution of the solar surface magnetic field as seen with SDO/HMI data. A direct comparison shows a very good correlation for most of channels from PREMOS. Those data could also been used for reconstructing the whole solar spectrum using then the PREMOS radiometer as a spectrometer.

  15. The Split Window Microwave Radiometer (SWMR) for hurricane wind speed measurement from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Calvin T.; Black, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    The monitoring of hurricanes demands considerable resources each year by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Even with the extensive use of satellite and airborne probing of those storms, there is still much uncertainty involved in predicting landfall for timely evacuation of people subject to the threat. The concept of the Split Window Microwave Radiometer (SWMR) is to add an additional capability of remotely measuring surface winds to hopefully improve prediction capabilities or at least define the severity of the storm while it is far from land. Some of the present science and observational needs are addressed in this report as are remote sensing limitations which impact the design of a minimal system which can be launched into low earth orbit by a low cost launch system. This study has concluded that wind speed and rain rate maps of hurricanes can be generated with an X-Band radiometer system with an antenna whose aperture is 2 m on a side.

  16. Nulling Infrared Radiometer for Measuring Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A nulling, self-calibrating infrared radiometer is being developed for use in noncontact measurement of temperature in any of a variety of industrial and scientific applications. This instrument is expected to be especially well-suited to measurement of ambient or near-ambient temperature and, even more specifically, for measuring the surface temperature of a natural body of water. Although this radiometer would utilize the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) portion of the spectrum (wavelengths of 8 to 12 m), its basic principle of operation could also be applied to other spectral bands (corresponding to other temperature ranges) in which the atmosphere is transparent and in which design requirements for sensitivity and temperature-measurement accuracy could be satisfied.

  17. 183-GHz Radiometer Handbook - November 2006

    SciTech Connect

    MP Cadeddu

    2006-11-30

    The G-Band Vapor Radiometer (GVR) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from four double sideband channels centered at ± 1, ± 3, ± 7, and ± 14 GHz around the 183.31-GHz water vapor line. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. The 183.31 ± 14-GHz channel is particularly sensitive to the presence of liquid water. The sensitivity to water vapor of the 183.31-GHz line is approximately 30 times higher than at the frequencies of the two-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) for a precipitable water vapor (PWV) amount of less than 2.5 mm. Measurements from this nstrument are therefore especially useful during low-humidity conditions (PWV < 5 mm).

  18. Multichannel radiometer calibration: a new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Susana; Booth, Charles R.; Armstrong, Roy; Brunat, Claudio; Cabrera, Sergio; Camilion, Carolina; Casiccia, Claudio; Deferrari, Guillermo; Fuenzalida, Humberto; Lovengreen, Charlotte; Paladini, Alejandro; Pedroni, Jorge; Rosales, Alejandro; Zagarese, Horacio; Vernet, Maria

    2005-09-01

    The error in irradiance measured with Sun-calibrated multichannel radiometers may be large when the solar zenith angle (SZA) increases. This could be particularly detrimental in radiometers installed at mid and high latitudes, where SZAs at noon are larger than 50° during part of the year. When a multiregressive methodology, including the total ozone column and SZA, was applied in the calculation of the calibration constant, an important improvement was observed. By combining two different equations, an improvement was obtained at almost all the SZAs in the calibration. An independent test that compared the irradiance of a multichannel instrument and a spectroradiometer installed in Ushuaia, Argentina, was used to confirm the results.

  19. Multichannel radiometer calibration: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Susana; Booth, Charles R; Armstrong, Roy; Brunat, Claudio; Cabrera, Sergio; Camilion, Carolina; Casiccia, Claudio; Deferrari, Guillermo; Fuenzalida, Humberto; Lovengreen, Charlotte; Paladini, Alejandro; Pedroni, Jorge; Rosales, Alejandro; Zagarese, Horacio; Vernet, Maria

    2005-09-10

    The error in irradiance measured with Sun-calibrated multichannel radiometers may be large when the solar zenith angle (SZA) increases. This could be particularly detrimental in radiometers installed at mid and high latitudes, where SZAs at noon are larger than 50 degrees during part of the year. When a multiregressive methodology, including the total ozone column and SZA, was applied in the calculation of the calibration constant, an important improvement was observed. By combining two different equations, an improvement was obtained at almost all the SZAs in the calibration. An independent test that compared the irradiance of a multichannel instrument and a spectroradiometer installed in Ushuaia, Argentina, was used to confirm the results. PMID:16161648

  20. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit water vapor radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukamto, L. M.; Cooley, T. W.; Janssen, M. A.; Parks, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    A proof of concept Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Water Vapor Radiometer (WVR) is under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). WVR's are used to remotely sense water vapor and cloud liquid water in the atmosphere and are valuable for meteorological applications as well as for determination of signal path delays due to water vapor in the atmosphere. The high cost and large size of existing WVR instruments motivate the development of miniature MMIC WVR's, which have great potential for low cost mass production. The miniaturization of WVR components allows large scale deployment of WVR's for Earth environment and meteorological applications. Small WVR's can also result in improved thermal stability, resulting in improved calibration stability. Described here is the design and fabrication of a 31.4 GHz MMIC radiometer as one channel of a thermally stable WVR as a means of assessing MMIC technology feasibility.

  1. On the importance of spectral responsivity of Robertson-Berger-type ultraviolet radiometers for long-term observations.

    PubMed

    di Sarra, Alcide; Disterhoft, Patrick; DeLuisi, John J

    2002-07-01

    A system to determine the spectral responsivity of ultraviolet (UV) radiometers has been developed and is routinely operated at the Central Ultraviolet Calibration Facility, at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The instrument and the measurement methodologies are described. Results of measurements from thermally controlled broadband UV radiometers of the Robertson-Berger (R-B)-type are described. Systematic differences in the spectral response curves for these instruments have been detected. The effect of these differences on the field operation of UV-B radiometers has been studied by calculating the instrumental response from modeled UV spectra. The differences of the weighted spectral UV irradiances, measured by two radiometers with different spectral response functions, caused by the daily variation in the position of the sun were estimated for fixed values of total ozone, altitude and albedo, and for cloud-free conditions. These differences increase with the solar zenith angle and are as large as 8%. Larger differences in the instrumental response may be produced by ozone variations. Thus, care must be taken when analyzing data from R-B radiometers and comparing results from different instruments. Routine cycling of UV-B radiometers in operative networks without a careful determination of the spectral responsivity, or small drifts of the spectral responsivity, may strongly affect the accuracy of UV radiation measurements and produce an erroneous trend. Because of the possible differences among radiometers, it would not be practical to derive the long-term behavior of UV radiation without routine and thorough characterization of the spectral responsivities of the instruments. PMID:12126309

  2. Galileo Net Flux Radiometer Report 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomasko, Martin G.

    1997-01-01

    On 7 December 1995, the Galileo probe entered Jupiter's atmosphere. The Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) on board the probe, measured upward and downward fluxes in the visible and infrared. At the University of Arizona, we have analyzed the data from the two visible-light channels, as well as the solar contributions to the thermal channels. The results are being prepared for submission to JGR in early September.

  3. The infrared cloud ice radiometer (IRCIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Joe K.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Best, Fred A.; Knuteson, Robert O.; Mulligan, Mark P.; Thielman, Don; LaPorte, Dan D.; Garcia, Ray K.; Ackerman, Steve; Starr, David O.; Spinhirne, James D.; Lancaster, Redgie S.; Harris, Michael

    2007-04-01

    The Submillimeter-wave and Infrared Ice Cloud Experiment (SIRICE) concept would provide global measurements of ice water path (IWP - the vertically integrated mass of ice particles per unit area), and weighted mean mass particle diameter (D me). The SIRICE payload consists of two instruments, the Sub-millimeter/Millimeter (SM4) Radiometer, and the Infrared Cloud Ice Radiometer (IRCIR). IRCIR is a compact, low-cost, multi-spectral, wide field of view pushbroom infrared imaging radiometer. IRCIR will employ four IR sensor assemblies to produce 90° cross-track (contiguous along-track) coverage in three spectral bands with a spatial resolution of 0.6 km at nadir. Each IR sensor assembly consists of an uncooled microbolometer focal plane array (FPA), associated sensor core electronics, a stripe filter fixed at the FPA, and an IR lens assembly. A single scene mirror is used to provide two Earth view angles, as well as calibration views of space and the on-board calibration blackbody. The two Earth view angles will be used for stereo cloud height retrievals.

  4. Recent Advances in Immersive Visualization of Ocean Data: Virtual Reality Through the Web on Your Laptop Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, A. J.; Moore, C.; Soreide, N. N.

    2002-12-01

    Ocean circulation is irrefutably three dimensional, and powerful new measurement technologies and numerical models promise to expand our three-dimensional knowledge of the dynamics further each year. Yet, most ocean data and model output is still viewed using two-dimensional maps. Immersive visualization techniques allow the investigator to view their data as a three dimensional world of surfaces and vectors which evolves through time. The experience is not unlike holding a part of the ocean basin in one's hand, turning and examining it from different angles. While immersive, three dimensional visualization has been possible for at least a decade, the technology was until recently inaccessible (both physically and financially) for most researchers. It is not yet fully appreciated by practicing oceanographers how new, inexpensive computing hardware and software (e.g. graphics cards and controllers designed for the huge PC gaming market) can be employed for immersive, three dimensional, color visualization of their increasingly huge datasets and model output. In fact, the latest developments allow immersive visualization through web servers, giving scientists the ability to "fly through" three-dimensional data stored half a world away. Here we explore what additional insight is gained through immersive visualization, describe how scientists of very modest means can easily avail themselves of the latest technology, and demonstrate its implementation on a web server for Pacific Ocean model output.

  5. Remote sensing of ocean color and detection of chlorophyll content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deschamps, P. Y.; Lecompte, P.; Viollier, M.

    1977-01-01

    The chlorophyll enrichment of the water in an equatorial upwelling was surveyed and described with the aid of a radiometer specially designed for the airborne measurement of ocean color. A relation is proposed between airborne measurement of difference of albedos at two wavelengths in the blue and green, and the concentration of chlorophyll in the ocean.

  6. Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Design Concepts and Performance Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Meister, Gerhard; Monosmith, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    In late 1978, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched the Nimbus-7 satellite with the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) and several other sensors, all of which provided major advances in Earth remote sensing. The inspiration for the CZCS is usually attributed to an article in Science by Clarke et al. who demonstrated that large changes in open ocean spectral reflectance are correlated to chlorophyll-a concentrations. Chlorophyll-a is the primary photosynthetic pigment in green plants (marine and terrestrial) and is used in estimating primary production, i.e., the amount of carbon fixed into organic matter during photosynthesis. Thus, accurate estimates of global and regional primary production are key to studies of the earth's carbon cycle. Because the investigators used an airborne radiometer, they were able to demonstrate the increased radiance contribution of the atmosphere with altitude that would be a major issue for spaceborne measurements. Since 1978, there has been much progress in satellite ocean color remote sensing such that the technique is well established and is used for climate change science and routine operational environmental monitoring. Also, the science objectives and accompanying methodologies have expanded and evolved through a succession of global missions, e.g., the Ocean Color and Temperature Sensor (OCTS), the Seaviewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), and the Global Imager (GLI). With each advance in science objectives, new and more stringent requirements for sensor capabilities (e.g., spectral coverage) and performance (e.g., signal-to-noise ratio, SNR) are established. The CZCS had four bands for chlorophyll and aerosol corrections. The Ocean Color Imager (OCI) recommended for the NASA Pre-Aerosol, Cloud, and Ocean Ecosystems (PACE) mission includes 5 nanometers hyperspectral coverage from 350 to

  7. Satellite Merged Microwave Radiometer Datasets for Climate Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. K.; Mears, C. A.; Hilburn, K. A.; Ricciardulli, L.

    2013-12-01

    With more than two decades of continuous accurate monitoring over the global oceans, microwave satellite observations provide a very valuable data record for climate research and climate models validation. Observations of columnar water vapor, rain rates, cloud liquid water, and surface winds from microwave radiometers are retrieved twice daily since 1987 from a number of sensors: SSM/I F08 through F15, SSMIS F16 and F17, AMSR-E, TMI and WindSat. Sea surface temperature measurements through clouds are available since 1998. These datasets have been carefully intercalibrated at the brightness temperature level. The recently released V7 ocean products have been produced with a consistent methodology common to all sensors. Given the enormous amount of data, using these observations for climate research and model evaluation is time-consuming and proper quality control is non-trivial. At Remote Sensing Systems we are focusing on creating merged monthly gridded data records suitable for climate research for all these ocean products. The methodology to construct these merged datasets has been carefully developed after exploring different methods of combining the data from different sensors. Important aspects of the methodology include: selection of input data, requirement of minimal data values per grid cell, use of extended area rain flagging, use of extended area ice flagging, averaging method applied, and application of derived merging parameters. The resulting merged datasets are monthly timeseries of global gridded data over the ocean, with a 1-deg resolution. The timeseries starts in January 1988, and they are stored in a single NetCDF file which is updated every month. Included in the file are: monthly average timeseries, monthly climatology, monthly anomaly timeseries, trend map, and time-latitude array. Water vapor is the first of these merged datasets, and has been released in early 2013. Merged ocean surface winds and precipitation rates are currently under

  8. Oceans '88

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the following papers: Solid waste disposal crisis; Plastics in Ocean; Continental shelf environmental research; Seafood technology advancements; Gulf of Mexico chemosynthetic petroleum seep communities; Water reuse on onshore mariculture and processing facilities; Oil and gas industry conflicts on the outer continental shelf; Cumulative environmental effects of the oil and gas leasing program; Oil and gas exploration; and Oil and gas resource management; Aids to navigation systems and equipment; and Surveillance experiments.

  9. A new radiometer for earth radiation budget studies

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for radiation balance studies. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on (small) satellites, aircraft, or Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs). Some considerations for the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite are given. 17 refs.

  10. A new radiometer for earth radiation budget studies

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-05-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for radiation balance studies. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on (small) satellites, aircraft, or Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs). Some considerations for the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite are given. 17 refs.

  11. Airborne Spectral Measurements of Ocean Directional Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; King, Michael D.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Arnold, G. Thomas; Redemann, Jens

    2004-01-01

    During summer of 2001 NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) obtained measurement of ocean angular distribution of reflected radiation or BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) aboard the University of Washington Convair CV-580 research aircraft under cloud-free conditions. The measurements took place aver the Atlantic Ocean off the eastern seaboard of the U.S. in the vicinity of the Chesapeake Light Tower and at nearby National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Buoy Stations. The measurements were in support of CLAMS, Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites, field campaign that was primarily designed to validate and improve NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite data products being derived from three sensors: MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectro-Radiometer), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer) and CERES (Clouds and Earth s Radiant Energy System). Because of the high resolution of the CAR measurements and its high sensitivity to detect weak ocean signals against a noisy background, results of radiance field above the ocean are seen in unprecedented detail. The study also attempts to validate the widely used Cox-Munk model for predicting reflectance from a rough ocean surface.

  12. Validation of Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer Soil Moisture Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Validation is an important and particularly challenging task for remote sensing of soil moisture. The key issue in the validation of soil moisture products is the disparity in spatial scales between satellite and in situ observations. Conventional measurements of soil moisture are made at a point wh...

  13. A Global View of the Biosphere Using the Spaceborne POLDER Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, P.; Leroy, M.; Hautecoeur, O.; Loisel, H.; Moulin, C.; Nicolas, J.; Nicolas, J.; Richaume, P.; Richaume, P.

    2001-05-01

    The POLDER radiometer is a wide field-of-view radiometer in the visible and near infrared radiometer with an original multiangular and polarization observational capability. Its mission is the global observation of ocean color, land vegetation, aerosols, and clouds. The French POLDER-1 experiment has successfully acquired data during the lifetime of the ADEOS-1 Japanese satellite. The data set covers the period November 1996 to June 1997. A second instrument, POLDER-2, will be launched on board ADEOS-2 in 2002. The POLDER-1 processing has been performed at CNES with the support of expert laboratories. Algorithms and products will be described and illustrated. They include the following parameters of interest for the study the biosphere: (i)over the ocean: chlorophyll surface concentration, marine reflectances, seawater optical coefficients, (ii)over the land surface: Bidirectional Reflectance Functions (BRDF), LAI, (iii) atmospheric aerosol properties. When feasible, the accuracy of the POLDER retrieved parameters will be shown by comparison with in-situ measurements. Issues about the future of space observation will be identified. We are concerned by: (i) the assessment of the accuracy of the retrieved parameters using adequately in-situ measurements and models, (ii) the retrieval of more elaborate parameters e.g., fAPAR, albedo, vegetation cover chlorophyll content over the land surface, and phytoplankton species over the ocean, (iii) the merging of multisource data set, e.g. from the POLDER, MERIS and VEGETATION instruments, (iv) the production of consistent long term time series of the significant parameters, past and future, through adequate ground and space segments.

  14. Preliminary development of digital signal processing in microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Topics covered involve a number of closely related tasks including: the development of several control loop and dynamic noise model computer programs for simulating microwave radiometer measurements; computer modeling of an existing stepped frequency radiometer in an effort to determine its optimum operational characteristics; investigation of the classical second order analog control loop to determine its ability to reduce the estimation error in a microwave radiometer; investigation of several digital signal processing unit designs; initiation of efforts to develop required hardware and software for implementation of the digital signal processing unit; and investigation of the general characteristics and peculiarities of digital processing noiselike microwave radiometer signals.

  15. PV-MCT working standard radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppeldauer, George P.; Podobedov, V. B.

    2012-06-01

    Sensitive infrared working-standard detectors with large active area are needed to extend the signal dynamic range of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) pyroelectric transfer-standards used for infrared spectral power responsivity calibrations. Increased sensitivity is especially important for irradiance mode responsivity measurements. The noise equivalent power (NEP) of the NIST used pyroelectric transfer-standards is about 8 nW/Hz1/2, equal to a D*= 5.5 x 107 cm Hz1/2/W. A large-area photovoltaic HgCdTe (PV-MCT) detector was custom made for the 2.5 μm to 11 μm wavelength range using a 4-stage thermoelectric cooler. At least an order of magnitude lower NEP was expected than that of the pyroelectric transfer-standards to measure irradiance. The large detector area was produced with multiple p-n junctions. The periodical, multiple-junction structure produced a spatial non-uniformity in the detector response. The PV-MCT radiometer was characterized for spatial non-uniformity of response using different incident beam sizes to evaluate the uncertainty component caused by the spatial non-uniformity. The output voltage noise and also the current and voltage responsivities were evaluated at different signal gains and frequencies. The output voltage noise was decreased and the voltage responsivity was increased to lower the NEP of the radiometer. The uncertainty of the spectral power responsivity measurements was evaluated. It is recommended to use a bootstrap type trans-impedance amplifier along with a cold field-of-view limiter to improve the NEP of the PV-MCT radiometer.

  16. Coastal salinity measurement using a Doppler Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Benjamin S.; Tatnall, Adrian R. L.; Lewis, Hugh G.

    2012-10-01

    Coastal salinity is characterised by large and variable salinity contrasts on relatively small scales. Measurements of salinity at a resolution compatible with these coastal regions on a regular basis would provide a rich source of information that could be used for a number of applications that have a fundamental bearing on the world's lifestyle. Doppler radiometry offers an approach to capture such measurements, as it reduces the number of required antennas needed to form an image, compared with an Interferometer type instrument. In this work, a Doppler Radiometer type instrument on free-flying satellites is introduced. This approach removes the need for a physical connection between all the antennas, affords the system a degree of reconfigurability, yet is still able to provide data of sufficient resolution. A Y-shaped central hub (similar to the SMOS configuration) is employed with additional antennas mounted on free flying platforms surrounding the central hub. The additional baselines formed between the antennas of the free flying satellites and central hub as well as between the free flying satellites extend the u-v coverage beyond that of just the central hub. The spatial resolution of a Doppler Radiometer system with a Y-shaped hub with a SMOS configuration of antennas, with each arm extended by five 6 m spaced free flying antennas would be of the order of 5 km, when imaging from 800 km. This paper will present some initial results from a study into an instrument concept that could provide coastal salinity measurements at microwave wavelengths. The study focuses on antenna array design and on quantifying the improvement in spatial resolution available by using this method, and includes an investigation into the effects of the relative motion between the hub and the free flying satellites on the imaging. Further, whilst this paper focuses on the application of the Doppler Radiometer to salinity measurement, the techniques described are applicable to other

  17. RF Reference Switch for Spaceflight Radiometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuble, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this technology is to provide improved calibration and measurement sensitivity to the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP) radiometer. While RF switches have been used in the past to calibrate microwave radiometers, the switch used on SMAP employs several techniques uniquely tailored to the instrument requirements and passive remote-sensing in general to improve radiometer performance. Measurement error and sensitivity are improved by employing techniques to reduce thermal gradients within the device, reduce insertion loss during antenna observations, increase insertion loss temporal stability, and increase rejection of radar and RFI (radio-frequency interference) signals during calibration. The two legs of the single-pole double-throw reference switch employ three PIN diodes per leg in a parallel-shunt configuration to minimize insertion loss and increase stability while exceeding rejection requirements at 1,413 MHz. The high-speed packaged diodes are selected to minimize junction capacitance and resistance while ensuring the parallel devices have very similar I-V curves. Switch rejection is improved by adding high-impedance quarter-wave tapers before and after the diodes, along with replacing the ground via of one diode per leg with an open circuit stub. Errors due to thermal gradients in the switch are reduced by embedding the 50-ohm reference load within the switch, along with using a 0.25-in. (approximately equal to 0.6-cm) aluminum prebacked substrate. Previous spaceflight microwave radiometers did not embed the reference load and thermocouple directly within the calibration switch. In doing so, the SMAP switch reduces error caused by thermal gradients between the load and switch. Thermal issues are further reduced by moving the custom, highspeed regulated driver circuit to a physically separate PWB (printed wiring board). Regarding RF performance, previous spaceflight reference switches have not employed high-impedance tapers to improve

  18. Receivers for the Microwave Radiometer on Juno

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiwald, F.; Russell, D.; Dawson, D.; Hatch, W.; Brown, S.; Oswald, J.; Janssen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Six receivers for the MicroWave Radiometer (MWR) are currently under development at JPL. These receivers cover a frequency range of 0.6 to 22 GHz in approximately octave steps, with 4 % bandwidth. For calibration and diagnosis three noise diodes and a Dicke switch are integrated into each receiver. Each receiver is connected to its own antenna which is mounted with its bore sights perpendicular to the spin axis of the spacecraft. As the spacecraft spins at 2 RPM, the antenna field of view scans Jupiter's atmosphere from limb to nadir to limb, measuring microwave emission down to 1000-bar.

  19. The PREMOS/PICARD Radiometer: An overview after 3 years of observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, Gaël; Schmutz, Werner; Shapiro, Alexander

    Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance are key input parameters to atmospheric/oceanic and space weather models. We present here spectral solar irradiance data from the radiometer PREMOS onboard the PICARD satellite for three years, which covers covers the solar spectrum from the Ultraviolet to near-infrared. We will also introduce the algorithm COCOSIS (for Combination of COSI Spectra) which allows us to retrieve the solar variability of the irradiance. Our investigation shows that COCOSIS is highly successful at reproducing solar spectral irradiance over rotational periods for most of channels from PREMOS.

  20. Meteorological interpretations of the images from Nimbus 5 electrically scanned microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, T.; Theon, J.; Shenk, W. E.; Allison, L.

    1973-01-01

    The Electrically Scanned Microwave Radiometer on the Nimbus 5 satellite measures microwave radiation in a band centered at 1.55 cm. It scans perpendicular to the satellite motion from 50 deg to the left to 50 deg to the right in the 78 steps every 4 seconds producing an image with a best resolution of 25 km. It is shown that these images can be used to delineate areas of rain over the oceans. This data can be used to approximate the location of fronts, the rain/snow boundary and secondary cyclogenesis.

  1. Regional Ocean Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Christopher A.; Moore, Andrew M.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Cornuelle, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the past 15 years of developments in regional ocean data assimilation. A variety of scientific, management, and safety-related objectives motivate marine scientists to characterize many ocean environments, including coastal regions. As in weather prediction, the accurate representation of physical, chemical, and/or biological properties in the ocean is challenging. Models and observations alone provide imperfect representations of the ocean state, but together they can offer improved estimates. Variational and sequential methods are among the most widely used in regional ocean systems, and there have been exciting recent advances in ensemble and four-dimensional variational approaches. These techniques are increasingly being tested and adapted for biogeochemical applications.

  2. Radiometer requirements for Earth-observation systems using large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr.; Harrington, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Requirements are defined for Earth observation microwave radiometry for the decade of the 1990's by using large space antenna (LSA) systems with apertures in the range from 50 to 200 m. General Earth observation needs, specific measurement requirements, orbit mission guidelines and constraints, and general radiometer requirements are defined. General Earth observation needs are derived from NASA's basic space science program. Specific measurands include soil moisture, sea surface temperature, salinity, water roughness, ice boundaries, and water pollutants. Measurements are required with spatial resolution from 10 to 1 km and with temporal resolution from 3 days to 1 day. The primary orbit altitude and inclination ranges are 450 to 2200 km and 60 to 98 deg, respectively. Contiguous large scale coverage of several land and ocean areas over the globe dictates large (several hundred kilometers) swaths. Radiometer measurements are made in the bandwidth range from 1 to 37 GHz, preferably with dual polarization radiometers with a minimum of 90 percent beam efficiency. Reflector surface, root mean square deviation tolerances are in the wavelength range from 1/30 to 1/100.

  3. Information theoretic approach using neural network for determining radiometer observations from radar and vice versa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Srinivasa Ramanujam; Chandrasekar, V.

    2016-05-01

    Even though both the rain measuring instruments, radar and radiometer onboard the TRMM observe the same rain scenes, they both are fundamentally different instruments. Radar is an active instrument and measures backscatter component from vertical rain structure; whereas radiometer is a passive instrument that obtains integrated observation of full depth of the cloud and rain structure. Further, their spatial resolutions on ground are different. Nevertheless, both the instruments are observing the same rain scene and retrieve three dimensional rainfall products. Hence it is only natural to seek answer to the question, what type of information about radiometric observations can be directly retrieved from radar observations. While there are several ways to answer this question, an informational theoretic approach using neural networks has been described in the present work to find if radiometer observations can be predicted from radar observations. A database of TMI brightness temperature and collocated TRMM vertical attenuation corrected reflectivity factor from the year 2012 was considered. The entire database is further classified according to surface type. Separate neural networks were trained for land and ocean and the results are presented.

  4. Ensuring Continuity of Coastal Ocean Optical Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crout, Richard L.; Ladner, Sherwin; Lawson, Adam; Martinolich, Paul; Arnone, Bob; Vandermeulen, Ryan; Bowers, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Satellite ocean colour remote sensing evolved rapidly following the 1978 launch of the Color Zone Coastal Scanner (CZCS). Since that launch, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed and transitioned tactical ocean optical products (diver visibility, laser penetration depth, chlorophyll concentration, and inherent optical products) from polar-orbiting ocean color sensors to the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO). Beginning with CZCS, NRL exploited the succession of ocean color sensors, including Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (Aqua MODIS), MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Visible Infra Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (S-NPP VIIRS). Additionally, the geostationary Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (COMS GOCI) is also being exploited. Future sensors of interest include the Sentinel-3 series Ocean and Land Color Imager (OLCI) and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) VIIRS. NRL’s Automated Optical Processing System (AOPS) processes ocean color satellite data to provide an operational near-real time depiction of the bio-optical ocean environment. These products are also used for validation of/or assimilation into ocean forecast models and to predict the impact of the environment on Navy coastal operations. NRL contributes to advancements in satellite processing techniques, atmospheric correction for coastal waters, enhanced resolution optical properties using imaging bands, cloud masking, and sensor merging for optimal operational products. Multiple satellites are necessary to provide changing conditions throughout the day allowing for detection of rapid optical temporal and spatial changes due to tides, winds, and river outflow. The Sentinel-3A and -3B OLCIs are critical to Navy coastal operations due to the quality of the data and the morning orbit that complements MODIS Aqua and

  5. The Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Jackson, D. M.; Adler, R. F.; Dod, L. R.; Shiue, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) is a new instrument being designed for studies of airborne passive microwave retrieval of tropospheric water vapor, clouds, and precipitation parameters. The MIR is a total-power cross-track scanning radiometer for use on either the NASA ER-2 (high-altitude) or DC-8 (medium altitude) aircraft. The current design includes millimeter-wave (MMW) channels at 90, 166, 183 +/- 1,3,7, and 220 GHz. An upgrade for the addition of submillimeter-wave (SMMW) channels at 325 +/- 1,3,7 and 340 GHz is planned. The nadiral spatial resolution is approximately 700 meters at mid-altitude when operated aboard the NASA ER-2. The MIR consists of a scanhead and data acquisition system, designed for installation in the ER-2 superpod nose cone. The scanhead will house the receivers (feedhorns, mixers, local oscillators, and preamplifiers), a scanning mirror, hot and cold calibration loads, and temperature sensors. Particular attention is being given to the characterization of the hot and cold calibration loads through both laboratory bistatic scattering measurements and analytical modeling. Other aspects of the MIR and the data acquisition system are briefly discussed, and diagrams of the location of the MIR in the ER-2 superpod nosecone and of the data acquisition system are presented.

  6. Infrared Correlation Radiometer for GEO-CAPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, D. O.; Boldt, J.; Edwards, D. P.; Yee, J.

    2009-12-01

    We present our plans as part of NASA’s Instrument Incubator Program to characterize the performance of a 2.3 μm infrared correlation radiometer (IRCR) prototype subsystem for an instrument designed specifically to measure carbon monoxide (CO) from geostationary orbit. The Earth Science and Applications Decadal Survey mission GEO-CAPE specifies infrared correlation radiometry to measure CO in two spectral regions. CO measurements at 2.3 μm are uniformly sensitive throughout the troposphere, and 4.7 μm measurements are most sensitive to the free troposphere. In combination, the measurements yield information of this Criteria Pollutant near Earth's surface. The success of NASA’s Shuttle-based Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) and Terra/MOPITT infrared gas correlation radiometers for CO measurements at 4.7 μm shifts the technology focus toward improving existing 2.3 μm CO measurement capability. GEO-CAPE uses this robust IRCR measurement technique at GEO, nearly 50 times farther away than the Terra/MOPITT orbit, to determine hourly changes in CO across a continental domain. We have structured the IRCR project around an analytical performance model to enable rapid evaluation of design specifics once the mission is defined. We present the architecture of the performance model, and the design of the simulator hardware and test plan which will populate the performance model.

  7. COBE differential microwave radiometers - Calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Janssen, M.; Gulkis, S.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Backus, C.; Hauser, M. G.; Mather, J. C.; Rokke, L.

    1992-01-01

    The COBE spacecraft was launched November 18, 1989 UT carrying three scientific instruments into earth orbit for studies of cosmology. One of these instruments, the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR), is designed to measure the large-angular-scale temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation at three frequencies (31.5, 53, and 90 GHz). This paper presents three methods used to calibrate the DMR. First, the signal difference between beam-filling hot and cold targets observed on the ground provides a primary calibration that is transferred to space by noise sources internal to the instrument. Second, the moon is used in flight as an external calibration source. Third, the signal arising from the Doppler effect due to the earth's motion around the barycenter of the solar system is used as an external calibration source. Preliminary analysis of the external source calibration techniques confirms the accuracy of the currently more precise ground-based calibration. Assuming the noise source behavior did not change from the ground-based calibration to flight, a 0.1-0.4 percent relative and 0.7-2.5 percent absolute calibration uncertainty is derived, depending on radiometer channel.

  8. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  9. Scanning and focusing mechanisms of METEOSAT radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jouan, J.

    1977-01-01

    The scanning and focusing mechanisms settled onboard the METEOSAT Radiometer are described. A large camera which will take line by line pictures of the earth from a geostationary satellite in the same manner as a TV picture using both the spin of the spacecraft and the tilt of a telescope is included. The scanning mechanism provides the + or - 9 degrees tilt angle of the telescope through 2,500 elementary steps of 1.256 0.0001 radian. As the radiometer image quality is closely dependent on the characteristics of the scanning law, the mechanism is required to fulfill functional performances specifications particularly severe in terms of linearity of the scan curve, accuracy of each step as well as repeatability of the short-term scanning. The focusing mechanism allows + or - 12 millimeters shift of the telescope focus by step increments of 0.140 mm. The focus adjustment is achieved by moving a dihedral reflector according to a pure straight-line motion. The main requirements of each mechanism are summarized and their design and performances are described in detail.

  10. Early On-Orbit Performance of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Onboard the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Changyong; DeLuccia, Frank J.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wolfe, Robert; Weng, Fuzhong

    2014-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is one of the key environmental remote-sensing instruments onboard the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership spacecraft, which was successfully launched on October 28, 2011 from the Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Following a series of spacecraft and sensor activation operations, the VIIRS nadir door was opened on November 21, 2011. The first VIIRS image acquired signifies a new generation of operational moderate resolution-imaging capabilities following the legacy of the advanced very high-resolution radiometer series on NOAA satellites and Terra and Aqua Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer for NASA's Earth Observing system. VIIRS provides significant enhancements to the operational environmental monitoring and numerical weather forecasting, with 22 imaging and radiometric bands covering wavelengths from 0.41 to 12.5 microns, providing the sensor data records for 23 environmental data records including aerosol, cloud properties, fire, albedo, snow and ice, vegetation, sea surface temperature, ocean color, and nigh-time visible-light-related applications. Preliminary results from the on-orbit verification in the postlaunch check-out and intensive calibration and validation have shown that VIIRS is performing well and producing high-quality images. This paper provides an overview of the onorbit performance of VIIRS, the calibration/validation (cal/val) activities and methodologies used. It presents an assessment of the sensor initial on-orbit calibration and performance based on the efforts from the VIIRS-SDR team. Known anomalies, issues, and future calibration efforts, including the long-term monitoring, and intercalibration are also discussed.

  11. Conceptual radiometer design studies for Earth observations from low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    A conceptual radiometer design study was performed to determine the optimum design approach for spaceborne radiometers in low Earth orbit. Radiometric system configurations which included total power radiometers, unbalanced Dicke radiometers, and balanced Dicke, or as known as noise injection, radiometers were studied. Radiometer receiver configurations which were analyzed included the direct detection radiometer receiver, the double sideband homodyne radiometer receiver, and the single sideband heterodyne radiometer receiver. Radiometer system performance was also studied. This included radiometric sensitivity analysis of the three different radiometer system configurations studied. Both external and internal calibration techniques were analyzed. An accuracy analysis with and without mismatch losses was performed. It was determined that the balanced Dicke radiometer system configuration with direct detection receivers and external calibrations was optimum where frequent calibration such as once per minute were not feasible.

  12. NREL and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Support of Ocean Renewable Power Company's TidGen™ Power System Technology Readiness Advancement Initiative Project

    SciTech Connect

    LiVecchi, Al

    2015-05-07

    This document summarizes the tasks identified for National Laboratory technical support of Ocean Renewable Power Corporation (ORPC) DOE grant awarded under the FY10 Industry Solicitation DE-FOA-0000293: Technology Readiness Advancement Initiative. The system ORPC will deploy in Cobscook Bay, ME is known as the TidGen™ Power System. The Turbine Generator Unit (TGU) each have a rated capacity of 150 to 175 kW, and they are mounted on bottom support frames and connected to an onshore substation using an underwater power and control cable. This system is designed for tidal energy applications in water depths from 60 to 150 feet. In funding provided separately by DOE, National Laboratory partners NREL and SNL will provide in-kind resources and technical expertise to help ensure that industry projects meet DOE WWPP (Wind and Water Power Program) objectives by reducing risk to these high value projects.

  13. The DC-8 Submillimeter-Wave Cloud Ice Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven J.; Batelaan, Paul; Siegel, Peter; Evans, K. Franklin; Evans, Aaron; Balachandra, Balu; Gannon, Jade; Guldalian, John; Raz, Guy; Shea, James

    2000-01-01

    An airborne radiometer is being developed to demonstrate the capability of radiometry at submillimeter-wavelengths to characterize cirrus clouds. At these wavelengths, cirrus clouds scatter upwelling radiation from water vapor in the lower troposphere. Radiometric measurements made at multiple widely spaced frequencies permit flux variations caused by changes in scattering due to crystal size to be distinguished from changes in cloud ice content. Measurements at dual polarizations can also be used to constrain the mean crystal shape. An airborne radiometer measuring the upwelling submillimeter-wave flux should then able to retrieve both bulk and microphysical cloud properties. The radiometer is being designed to make measurements at four frequencies (183 GHz, 325 GHz, 448 GHz, and 643 GHz) with dual-polarization capability at 643 GHz. The instrument is being developed for flight on NASA's DC-8 and will scan cross-track through an aircraft window. Measurements with this radiometer in combination with independent ground-based and airborne measurements will validate the submillimeter-wave radiometer retrieval techniques. The goal of this effort is to develop a technique to enable spaceborne characterization of cirrus, which will meet a key climate measurement need. The development of an airborne radiometer to validate cirrus retrieval techniques is a critical step toward development of spaced-based radiometers to investigate and monitor cirrus on a global scale. The radiometer development is a cooperative effort of the University of Colorado, Colorado State University, Swales Aerospace, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory and is funded by the NASA Instrument Incubator Program.

  14. Non-Scanning Radiometer Results for Earth Radiation Budget Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Green, Richard N.; Lee, Robert B., III; Bess, T. Dale; Rutan, David

    1992-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) included non-scanning radiometers (Luther, 1986) flown aboard a dedicated mission of Earth Radiation Budget Satellite, and the NOAA-9 and -10 operational meteorological spacecraft (Barkstrom and Smith, 1986). The radiometers first began providing Earth radiation budget data in November 1984 and have remained operational, providing a record of nearly 8 years of data to date for researchers. Although they do not produce measurements with the resolution given by the scanning radiometers, the results from the non-scanning radiometers are extremely useful for climate research involving long-term radiation data sets. This paper discusses the non-scanning radiometers, their stability, the method of analyzing the data, and brief scientific results from the data.

  15. Large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) is a high resolution 4 meter aperture scanning radiometer system designed to determine sea surface temperature and wind speed, atmospheric water vapor and liquid water, precipitation, and various sea ice parameters by interpreting brightness temperature images from low Earth orbiting satellites. The LAMMR with dual linear horizontal and vertical polarization radiometer channels from 1.4 to 91 GHZ can provide multidiscipline data with resolutions from 105 to 7 km. The LAMMR baseline radiometer system uses total power radiometers to achieve delta T's in the 0.5 to 1.7 K range and system calibration accuracies in the 1 to 2 deg range. A cold sky horn/ambient load two point calibration technique is used in this baseline concept and the second detector output uses an integrated and dump circuit to sample the scanning cross-tract resolution cells.

  16. MCM Polarimetric Radiometers for Planar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Dawson, Douglas; Gaier, Todd

    2007-01-01

    A polarimetric radiometer that operates at a frequency of 40 GHz has been designed and built as a prototype of multiple identical units that could be arranged in a planar array for scientific measurements. Such an array is planned for use in studying the cosmic microwave background (CMB). All of the subsystems and components of this polarimetric radiometer are integrated into a single multi-chip module (MCM) of substantially planar geometry. In comparison with traditional designs of polarimetric radiometers, the MCM design is expected to greatly reduce the cost per unit in an array of many such units. The design of the unit is dictated partly by a requirement, in the planned CMB application, to measure the Stokes parameters I, Q, and U of the CMB radiation with high sensitivity. (A complete definition of the Stokes parameters would exceed the scope of this article. In necessarily oversimplified terms, I is a measure of total intensity of radiation, while Q and U are measures of the relationships between the horizontally and vertically polarized components of radiation.) Because the sensitivity of a single polarimeter cannot be increased significantly, the only way to satisfy the high-sensitivity requirement is to make a large array of polarimeters that operate in parallel. The MCM includes contact pins that can be plugged into receptacles on a standard printed-circuit board (PCB). All of the required microwave functionality is implemented within the MCM; any required supporting non-microwave ("back-end") electronic functionality, including the provision of DC bias and control signals, can be implemented by standard PCB techniques. On the way from a microwave antenna to the MCM, the incoming microwave signal passes through an orthomode transducer (OMT), which splits the radiation into an h + i(nu) beam and an h - i(nu) beam (where, using complex-number notation, h denotes the horizontal component, nu denotes the vertical component, and +/-i denotes a +/-90deg phase

  17. Polarimetric measurements of sea surface brightness temperatures using an aircraft K-band radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Wilson, William J.; Li, Fuk K.; Nghiem, Son V.; Ricketts, William B.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the first experimental evidence that the polarimetric brightness temperatures of sea surfaces are sensitive to ocean wind direction in the incidence angle range of 30 to 50 degrees. Our experimental data were collected by a K-band (19.35 GHz) polarimetric wind radiometer (WINDRAD) mounted on the NASA DC-8 aircraft. A set of aircraft radiometer flights was successfully completed in November 1993. We performed circle flights over National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) moored buoys deployed off the northern California coast, which provided ocean wind measurements. The first WINDRAD flight was made on November 4, 1993. There was clear weather with a wind speed of 12 m/s at 330 degrees around the Pt. Arena buoy. We circled the buoy at three incidence angles, and all data when plotted as functions of azimuth angles show clear modulations of several Kelvin. At 40 degrees incidence angle, there is a 5 Kelvin peak-to-peak signal in the second Stokes parameter Q and the third Stokes parameter U. The Q data maximum is in the upwind direction and U has a 45 degrees phase shift in azimuth as predicted by theory. There is also an up/downwind asymmetry of 2 Kelvin in the Q data, and 1 Kelvin in the U data. At 50 degrees incidence angle, the collected data show very similar wind direction signatures to the SSM/I model function. Additional flights were made on other days under cloudy conditions. Data taken at a wind speed of 8 m/s show that at 40 degrees incidence Q and U have a smaller azimuthal modulation of 3 Kelvin, probably due to the lower wind speed. Additionally, the simultaneously recorded video images of sea surfaces suggested that Q and U data were less sensitive to unpolarized geophysical variations, such as clouds and whitecaps, while the T(v) and T(h) increased by a few Kelvin when the radiometer beam crossed over clouds, or there was a sudden increase of whitecaps in the radiometer footprint. The results of our aircraft flights indicate that passive

  18. Validation of Vegetation Index Time Series from Suomi NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Using Tower Radiation Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, T.; Kato, A.; Wang, J.; Vargas, M.; Lindquist, M.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite vegetation index (VI) time series data serve as an important means to monitor and characterize seasonal changes of terrestrial vegetation and their interannual variability. It is, therefore, critical to ensure quality of such VI products and one method of validating VI product quality is cross-comparison with in situ flux tower measurements. In this study, we evaluated the quality of VI time series derived from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) spacecraft by cross-comparison with in situ radiation flux measurements at select flux tower sites over North America and Europe. VIIRS is a new polar-orbiting satellite sensor series, slated to replace National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer in the afternoon overpass and to continue the highly-calibrated data streams initiated with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Observing System. The selected sites covered a wide range of biomes, including croplands, grasslands, evergreen needle forest, woody savanna, and open shrublands. The two VIIRS indices of the Top-of-Atmosphere (TOA) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the atmospherically-corrected, Top-of-Canopy (TOC) Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) (daily, 375 m spatial resolution) were compared against the TOC NDVI and a two-band version of EVI (EVI2) calculated from tower radiation flux measurements, respectively. VIIRS and Tower VI time series showed comparable seasonal profiles across biomes with statistically significant correlations (> 0.60; p-value < 0.01). "Start-of-season (SOS)" phenological metric values extracted from VIIRS and Tower VI time series were also highly compatible (R2 > 0.95), with mean differences of 2.3 days and 5.0 days for the NDVI and the EVI, respectively. These results indicate that VIIRS VI time series can capture seasonal evolution of

  19. Validation of Vegetation Index Time Series from Suomi NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Using Tower Radiation Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, T.; Kato, A.; Wang, J.; Vargas, M.; Lindquist, M.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite vegetation index (VI) time series data serve as an important means to monitor and characterize seasonal changes of terrestrial vegetation and their interannual variability. It is, therefore, critical to ensure quality of such VI products and one method of validating VI product quality is cross-comparison with in situ flux tower measurements. In this study, we evaluated the quality of VI time series derived from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) spacecraft by cross-comparison with in situ radiation flux measurements at select flux tower sites over North America and Europe. VIIRS is a new polar-orbiting satellite sensor series, slated to replace National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer in the afternoon overpass and to continue the highly-calibrated data streams initiated with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Observing System. The selected sites covered a wide range of biomes, including croplands, grasslands, evergreen needle forest, woody savanna, and open shrublands. The two VIIRS indices of the Top-of-Atmosphere (TOA) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the atmospherically-corrected, Top-of-Canopy (TOC) Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) (daily, 375 m spatial resolution) were compared against the TOC NDVI and a two-band version of EVI (EVI2) calculated from tower radiation flux measurements, respectively. VIIRS and Tower VI time series showed comparable seasonal profiles across biomes with statistically significant correlations (> 0.60; p-value < 0.01). "Start-of-season (SOS)" phenological metric values extracted from VIIRS and Tower VI time series were also highly compatible (R2 > 0.95), with mean differences of 2.3 days and 5.0 days for the NDVI and the EVI, respectively. These results indicate that VIIRS VI time series can capture seasonal evolution of

  20. Comparison of SMOS and SMAP Soil Moisture Retrieval Approaches Using Tower-based Radiometer Data over a Vineyard Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernecki, Maciej; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Kerr, Yann; DeJeu, Richard; DeLannoy, Gabielle J. M.; Jackson, Tom J.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Shwank, Mike; Moran, Roberto Fernandez; Bircher, Simone; Laurence, Heather; Mialon, Arnaud; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Richaume, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare several approaches to soil moisture (SM) retrieval using L-band microwave radiometry. The comparison was based on a brightness temperature (TB) data set acquired since 2010 by the L-band radiometer ELBARA-II over a vineyard field at the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS) site. ELBARA-II, provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) within the scientific program of the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission, measures multiangular TB data at horizontal and vertical polarization for a range of incidence angles (30-60). Based on a three year data set (2010-2012), several SM retrieval approaches developed for spaceborne missions including AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS), SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) and SMOS were compared. The approaches include: the Single Channel Algorithm (SCA) for horizontal (SCA-H) and vertical (SCA-V) polarizations, the Dual Channel Algorithm (DCA), the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM) and two simplified approaches based on statistical regressions (referred to as 'Mattar' and 'Saleh'). Time series of vegetation indices required for three of the algorithms (SCA-H, SCA-V and Mattar) were obtained from MODIS observations. The SM retrievals were evaluated against reference SM values estimated from a multiangular 2-Parameter inversion approach. The results obtained with the current base line algorithms developed for SMAP (SCA-H and -V) are in very good agreement with the reference SM data set derived from the multi-angular observations (R2 around 0.90, RMSE varying between 0.035 and 0.056 m3m3 for several retrieval configurations). This result showed that, provided the relationship between vegetation optical depth and a remotely-sensed vegetation index can be calibrated, the SCA algorithms can provide results very close to those obtained from multi-angular observations in this study area. The approaches based on statistical regressions provided similar results and the

  1. The radiometer transfer function for the AAFE composite two-frequency radiometer scatterometer. M.S. Thesis - Pennsylvania Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    A model was developed for the switching radiometer utilizing a continuous method of calibration. Sources of system degradation were identified and include losses and voltage standing wave ratios in front of the receiver input. After computing the three modes of operation, expressions were developed for the normalized radiometer output, the minimum detectable signal (normalized RMS temperature fluctuation), sensitivity, and accuracy correction factors).

  2. The Use of Rotating Shadowband Radiometers and Microwave Radiometers to Obtain Cloud Properties in Arctic Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, James C. ); Liljegren, James C.; Min, Qilong; Doran, J Christopher )

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the use of rotating shadowband radiometers and microwave radiometers to find shortwave cloud optical depth and cloud effective radius at two Arctic sites. These sites are the SHEBA ice camp site (a field study undertaken in 1997 and 1998) and the ARM Barrow (AK) site. Special measures are necessary to process the data from the SHEBA site to account for the harsh environment in which the instruments reside. The analysis shows that, over the summer of 1998, the median cloud optical depth at the SHEBA site is greater than the median cloud optical depth at the Barrow site. The cloud droplet effective radius is less at the SHEBA site than the Barrow site.

  3. Ozone height profiles using laser heterodyne radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    The monitoring of vertical profiles of ozone and related minor constituents in the atmosphere are of great significance to understanding the complex interaction between atmospheric dynamics, chemistry and radiation budget. An ultra high spectral resolution tunable CO2 laser heterodyne radiometer has been designed, developed and set up at the National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi to obtain vertical profiles of various minor constituents the characteristic absorption lines in 9 to 11 micron spectral range. Due to its high spectral resolution the lines can be resolved completely and data obtained are inverted to get vertical profiles using an inversion technique developed by the author. In the present communication the salient features of the laser heterodyne system and the results obtained are discussed in detail.

  4. Prototype Cryospheric Experimental Synthetic Aperture Radiometer (CESAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilliard, Lawrence M.; Phelps, Norman L.; Riley, J. Thomas; Markus, Thorsten M.; Bland, Geoffrey L.; Ruf, Christopher; Lawrence, Roland W.; Reising, Steven C.; Pichel, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Present satellite microwave radiometers typically have a coarse spatial resolution of several kilometers or more. This is only adequate only over homogenous areas. Significantly enhanced spatial resolution is critically important to reduce the uncertainty of estimated cryospheric parameters in heterogeneous and climatically-sensitive areas. Examples include: (1) dynamic sea ice areas with frequent lead and polynya developments and variable ice thicknesses, (2) mountainous areas that require improved retrieval of snow water equivalent, and (3) melting outlet glacier or ice shelf areas along the coast of Greenland and Antarctica. For these situations and many others, an Earth surface spot size of no more than 100 m is necessary to retrieve the information needed for significant new scientific progress, including the synthesis of field observations with satellite observations with high confidence.

  5. The EarthCARE broadband radiometer detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proulx, Christian; Williamson, Fraser; Allard, Martin; Baldenberger, Georges; Gay, David; Garcia-Blanco, Sonia; Côté, Patrice; Martin, Louis; Larouche, Carl; Ilias, Samir; Pope, Tim; Caldwell, Martin; Ward, Kim; Delderfield, John

    2009-08-01

    The Broadband Radiometer (BBR) is an instrument being developed for the ESA EarthCARE satellite. The BBR instrument objective is to provide top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance measurements in two spectral channels, and over three along-track directions. The instrument has three fixed telescopes (one for each view) each containing a broadband detector. Each detector consists of an uncooled 30-pixel linear focal plane array (FPA) coated with gold black in order to ensure uniform spectral responsivity from 0.2 μm to 50 μm. The FPA is hybridized with a readout integrated circuit (ROIC) and a proximity electronics circuit-card assembly (CCA) packaged in an aluminum base plate with cover. This paper provides a technical description of the detector design and operation. Performance data at the FPA pixel level as well as unit-level test results on early prototypes of the detectors are also presented.

  6. Net Flux Radiometer for a Saturn Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, S.; Amato, M.; Atkinson, D. H.; Colaprete, A.; Hewagama, T.; Jennings, D. E.; Lunine, J. I.; Nixon, C. A.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Mousis, O.; Wollack, E. J.; Quilligan, G. T.

    2015-10-01

    A Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) concept is presented that can be included in an atmospheric structure instrument suite for any future NASA or ESA led Saturn Probe Mission. The current design has two spectral channels i.e., a solar channel (0.4-to-5 μm) and a thermal channel (4-to-50 μm). The NFR is capable of viewing five distinct viewing angles during the descent. Non-imaging Winston cones with window and filter combinations define the spectral channels with a 5° Field-Of View (FOV). Uncooled thermopile detectors are used in each spectral channel and are read out using a custom designed Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC).

  7. Ship-borne rotating shadowband radiometer observations for determination of components of spectral irradiance and aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Jonas; Deneke, Hartwig; Macke, Andreas; Bernhard, Germar

    2015-04-01

    The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) has been established as a sub-project of AERONET and a long-term program to collect ship-borne aerosol optical depth measurements over ocean. Its purpose is to serve as reliable reference database for the evaluation of models and satellite products. Data are currently collected by handheld Microtops II photometers, as the automated acquisition of data from sun photometers on stabilized platforms is so far too expensive for wide-spread use. A promising alternative to the sun photometer is the rotating shadowband radiometer, whose principle of operation allows the determination of the direct-beam component of solar radiation without stabilizing the instrument, if the orientation of the detector horizontal is known. OCEANET, a project to investigate the exchange fluxes of energy and matter between the atmosphere and ocean, has contributed aerosol observations to MAN on several of its cruises on RV Polarstern during the transit between the hemispheres. On the recent cruise (PS 83) from Cape Town to Bremerhaven, TROPOS has operated for the first time a 19 channel rotating shadowband radiometer (GUVis-3511) built by the company Biospherical, as a possible means to provide automated irradiance and aerosol optical depth measurements. Calibration and processing of the raw data will be described, and an initial evaluation of the instrumental performance will be given. Aerosol optical depths derived from Microtops II measurements and the rotating shadowband radiometer will be compared. We show that the standard deviation of Aerosol optical depths observed with Microtops II and the shadowband radiometer is about 0.02 for matching channels, and an aerosol type classification based on Angstrom exponent shows good agreement. Also the influence of ship smoke and ocean swell is studied. The suitability of the instrument to automate MAN observations is discussed, and an outlook to the use of the instrument to also derive cloud optical properties is

  8. Four absolute cavity radiometer (pyrheliometer) intercomparisons at New River, Arizona: radiometer standards

    SciTech Connect

    Estey, R.S.; Seaman, C.H.

    1981-07-01

    Four detailed intercomparisons were made for a number of models of cavity-type self-calibrating radiometers (pyrheliometers). Each intercomparison consisted of simultaneous readings of pyrheliometers at 30-second intervals in runs of 10 minutes, with at least 15 runs per intercomparison. Twenty-seven instruments were in at least one intercomparison, and five were in all four. Summarized results and all raw data are provided from the intercomparisons.

  9. Radiometals as payloads for radioimmunotherapy for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    DeNardo, Gerald L; Kennel, Stephen J; Siegel, Jeffry A; Denardo, Sally J

    2004-10-01

    Because of their remarkable effectiveness in radioimmunotherapy (RIT), 2 anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (MAb) drugs, one labeled with indium 111 for imaging or yttrium 90 for therapy, and another labeled with iodine I 131 for imaging and therapy, have been approved for use in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Successful RIT for lymphomas is due in large part to the rapid and efficient binding of the targeted MAb to lymphoma cells. Carcinomas are more difficult to access, necessitating novel strategies matched with radionuclides with specific physical properties. Because there are many radionuclides from which to choose, a systematic approach is required to select those preferred for a specific application. Thus far, radionuclides with g emissions for imaging and particulate emissions for therapy have been investigated. Radionuclides of iodine were the first to be used for RIT. Many conventionally radioiodinated MAbs are degraded after endocytosis by target cells, releasing radioiodinated peptides and amino acids. In contrast, radiometals have been shown to have residualizing properties, advantageous when the MAb is localized in malignant tissue. b-emitting lanthanides like those of 90Y, lutetium 177, etc. have attractive combinations of biologic, physical, radiochemical, production, economic, and radiation safety characteristics. Other radiometals, such as copper-67 and copper-64, are also of interest. a-emitters, including actinium-225 and bismuth-213, have been used for therapy in selected applications. Evidence for the impact of the radionuclide is provided by data from the randomized pivotal phase III trial of 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) in patients with NHL; responses were about 2 times greater in the 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan arm than in the rituximab arm. It is clear that RIT has emerged as a safe and efficient method for treatment of NHL, especially in specific settings. PMID:15498149

  10. Aerosol Retrieval from MERIS and Ground-Based Radiometers in the German Bight, Turbid Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnert, I.; Doerffer, R.; Becu, G.; Deschamps, P.-Y.; Fomferra, N.

    2004-05-01

    Optical properties of aerosols vary with regions and seasons. Thus, radiative transfer simulations, which are used for the atmospheric correction of remotely sensed imagery of ocean surfaces, have to be based on a regional aerosol climatology [1]. Furthermore data of aerosol optical properties is used also for the global radiative budget and aerosol pollution, caused by biomass burning such as forest fires and by traffic. Data from coastal regions are collected with high temporal frequency by ground-based measurements like the AERONET network of sun-photometers from NASA [2] or by hand-held radiometers as Simbada-LOA, University Lille [3, 4] but they contain only little spatial information. In contrast, ocean colour satellite sensors, as MERIS on Envisat, provide a high spatial information, but the data is limited generally to one sequence per day. Analysis and comparison of both data is presented.

  11. Assessment of Global Forecast Ocean Assimilation Model (FOAM) using new satellite SST data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascione Kenov, Isabella; Sykes, Peter; Fiedler, Emma; McConnell, Niall; Ryan, Andrew; Maksymczuk, Jan

    2016-04-01

    There is an increased demand for accurate ocean weather information for applications in the field of marine safety and navigation, water quality, offshore commercial operations, monitoring of oil spills and pollutants, among others. The Met Office, UK, provides ocean forecasts to customers from governmental, commercial and ecological sectors using the Global Forecast Ocean Assimilation Model (FOAM), an operational modelling system which covers the global ocean and runs daily, using the NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) ocean model with horizontal resolution of 1/4° and 75 vertical levels. The system assimilates salinity and temperature profiles, sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface height (SSH), and sea ice concentration observations on a daily basis. In this study, the FOAM system is updated to assimilate Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) SST data. Model results from one month trials are assessed against observations using verification tools which provide a quantitative description of model performance and error, based on statistical metrics, including mean error, root mean square error (RMSE), correlation coefficient, and Taylor diagrams. A series of hindcast experiments is used to run the FOAM system with AMSR2 and SEVIRI SST data, using a control run for comparison. Results show that all trials perform well on the global ocean and that largest SST mean errors were found in the Southern hemisphere. The geographic distribution of the model error for SST and temperature profiles are discussed using statistical metrics evaluated over sub-regions of the global ocean.

  12. A theoretical study of the effect of subsurface oceanic bubbles on the enhanced aerosol optical depth band over the southern oceans as detected from MODIS and MISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, M.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, X.; Hyer, E. J.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-05-01

    Submerged oceanic bubbles, which have a much longer life span than whitecaps or bubble rafts, have been hypothesized to increase the water-leaving radiance and thus affect satellite-based estimates of water-leaving radiance to non-trivial levels. This study explores this effect further to determine whether such bubbles are of sufficient magnitude to impact satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals through perturbation of the lower boundary conditions. There has been significant discussion in the community regarding the high positive biases in retrieved AODs in many remote ocean regions. In this study, for the first time, the effects of oceanic bubbles on satellite retrievals of AOD are studied by using a linked Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) atmospheric and HydroLight oceanic radiative transfer models. The results suggest an insignificant impact on AOD retrievals in regions with near-surface wind speeds of less than 12 m s-1. However, the impact of bubbles on aerosol retrievals could be on the order of 0.02-0.04 for higher wind conditions within the scope of our simulations (e.g., winds < 20 m -1. This bias is propagated to global scales using 1 year of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer EOS (AMSR-E) data to investigate the possible impacts of oceanic bubbles on an enhanced AOD belt observed over the high-latitude southern oceans (also called the enhanced southern oceans anomaly, or ESOA) by some passive satellite sensors. Ultimately, this study is supportive of the null hypothesis: submerged bubbles are not the major contributor to the ESOA feature. This said, as retrievals progress to higher and higher resolutions, such as from airborne platforms, the uniform bubble correction in clean marine conditions should probably be separately accounted for against individual bright whitecaps and bubble rafts.

  13. Next-generation pushbroom filter radiometers for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarde, Richard W.; Dittman, Michael G.; Kvaran, Geir E.

    2012-09-01

    Individual focal plane size, yield, and quality continue to improve, as does the technology required to combine these into large tiled formats. As a result, next-generation pushbroom imagers are replacing traditional scanning technologies in remote sensing applications. Pushbroom architecture has inherently better radiometric sensitivity and significantly reduced payload mass, power, and volume than previous generation scanning technologies. However, the architecture creates challenges achieving the required radiometric accuracy performance. Achieving good radiometric accuracy, including image spectral and spatial uniformity, requires creative optical design, high quality focal planes and filters, careful consideration of on-board calibration sources, and state-of-the-art ground test facilities. Ball Aerospace built the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) next-generation Operational Landsat Imager (OLI) payload. Scheduled to launch in 2013, OLI provides imagery consistent with the historical Landsat spectral, spatial, radiometric, and geometric data record and completes the generational technology upgrade from the Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) whiskbroom technology to modern pushbroom technology afforded by advanced focal planes. We explain how Ball's capabilities allowed producing the innovative next-generational OLI pushbroom filter radiometer that meets challenging radiometric accuracy or calibration requirements. OLI will improve the multi-decadal land surface observation dataset dating back to the 1972 launch of ERTS-1 or Landsat 1.

  14. Middle Atmosphere Sounder and Thermal Emission Radiometer - Master

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.; Scott, D. K.; Esplin, R. W.; Bailey, S. M.; Randall, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Sounder and Thermal Emission Radiometer (MASTER) instrument is an advanced infrared limb-scanning instrument designed to measure the thermal structure, chemical composition, and energy balance from the stratosphere to the lower thermosphere. MASTER builds on NASA's long and successful heritage of infrared limb scanners including the LIMS, HIRDLS, and SABER instruments. MASTER has exceptional radiometric sensitivity with a more efficient, compact, and lightweight design. An updated focal plane enables critical new science in the areas of the carbon budget closure, geomagnetically-driven ozone destruction, and auroral energy deposition, while virtually eliminating out of band contributions via dual filtering. MASTER will continue the SABER-TIMED and EOS-Aura records of temperature, lower stratospheric water vapor, ozone, methane, and thermospheric cooling by nitric oxide and carbon dioxide. MASTER's size and mass are specifically designed to allow flexibility in the choice of small satellite buses and low cost launch vehicles. The expanded focal plane enables a choice of channels applicable to science objectives in NASA's Earth Science and Heliophysics enterprises. Due to the long and successful heritage the MASTER instrument is at an exceptionally high technology readiness level. No new technologies are required to build the MASTER flight instrument.

  15. ASTER VNIR 15 years growth to the standard imaging radiometer in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, Masaru; Inada, Hitomi; Kikuchi, Masakuni; Sakuma, Fumihiro

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer (VNIR) is the remote sensing equipment which has 3 spectral bands and one along-track stereoscopic band radiometer. ASTER VNIR's planned long life design (more than 5 years) is successfully achieved. ASTER VNIR has been imaging the World-wide Earth surface multiband images and the Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM). VNIR data create detailed world-wide maps and change-detection of the earth surface as utilization transitions and topographical changes. ASTER VNIR's geometric resolution is 15 meters; it is the highest spatial resolution instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft. Then, ASTER VNIR was planned for the geometrical basis map makers in Terra instruments. After 15-years VNIR growth to the standard map-maker for space remote-sensing. This paper presents VNIR's feature items during 15-year operation as change-detection images , DEM and calibration result. VNIR observed the World-wide Earth images for biological, climatological, geological, and hydrological study, those successful work shows a way on space remote sensing instruments. Still more, VNIR 15 years observation data trend and onboard calibration trend data show several guide or support to follow-on instruments.

  16. Measuring the CMB temperature in the classroom with a low-cost antenna and radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkare, Kirit S; Bowens-Rubin, Rachel; Connors, Jake; Dame, Thomas M.; Gao, Ryan; Harrison, Samuel; Kimberk, Robert S; Kovac, John M; Law-Smith, Jamie; Robins, Derek; Sansone, Steve; Wilson, Robert W.; Yermakova, Anya; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2014-06-01

    Estimation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature through a skydip is an ambitious undergraduate laboratory exercise in which care must be taken to understand and account for systematic errors. It is an ideal environment for learning about careful experimental design. We present two versions of a low-cost antenna and radiometer system replicating the CMB discovery measurement (Penzias and Wilson, 1965), operating at 11 and 19 GHz. We describe two small-aperture (8") antenna designs: an HDPE lens-coupled corrugated horn, and a single-groove Potter horn, both of which are simple and inexpensive to fabricate. They have been designed to minimize far sidelobe pickup from the ground in conjunction with a straight-walled or Winston cone. The radiometers are based on low-cost commercial satellite TV receivers, read out with standard laboratory equipment. We describe the design of aperture-filling calibration loads necessary to characterize the radiometer performance. Several iterations of this experiment have been run in the advanced undergraduate astrophysics laboratory course (Ay 191) at Harvard University, with the students building the apparatus starting from scratch and finishing in about 6 weeks. Positive detections of background radiation have been achieved with typical uncertainties of 0.3 K.

  17. Infrared radiometer for measuring thermophysical properties of wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corwin, R. R.; Moorman, S. L.; Becker, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    An infrared radiometer is described which was developed to measure temperature rises of wind tunnel models undergoing transient heating over a temperature range of -17.8 C to 260 C. This radiometer interfaces directly with a system which measures the effective thermophysical property square root of rho ck. It has an output temperature fluctuation of 0.26 C at low temperatures and 0.07 C at high temperatures, and the output frequency response of the radiometer is from dc to 400 hertz.

  18. Aquarius L-Band Radiometers Calibration Using Cold Sky Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Le Vine, David M.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Brown, Shannon T.; Hong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    An important element in the calibration plan for the Aquarius radiometers is to look at the cold sky. This involves rotating the satellite 180 degrees from its nominal Earth viewing configuration to point the main beams at the celestial sky. At L-band, the cold sky provides a stable, well-characterized scene to be used as a calibration reference. This paper describes the cold sky calibration for Aquarius and how it is used as part of the absolute calibration. Cold sky observations helped establish the radiometer bias, by correcting for an error in the spillover lobe of the antenna pattern, and monitor the long-term radiometer drift.

  19. Aerosol physical properties in the stratosphere (APPS) radiometer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Woodin, E. A.; Anderson, T. J.; Magee, R. J.; Karthas, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The measurement concepts and radiometer design developed to obtain earth-limb spectral radiance measurements for the Aerosol Physical Properties in the Stratosphere (APPS) measurement program are presented. The measurements made by a radiometer of this design can be inverted to yield vertical profiles of Rayleigh scatterers, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, aerosol extinction, and aerosol physical properties, including a Junge size-distribution parameter, and a real and imaginary index of refraction. The radiometer design provides the capacity for remote sensing of stratospheric constituents from space on platforms such as the space shuttle and satellites, and therefore provides for global measurements on a daily basis.

  20. The NASA Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR): A New Sensor for Earth Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2003-01-01

    The Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR) is a versatile new airborne imaging radiometer recently developed by NASA. The AESMIR design is unique in that it performs dual-polarized imaging at all standard passive microwave frequency bands (6-89 GHz) using only one sensor headscanner package, providing an efficient solution for Earth remote sensing applications (snow, soil moisture/land parameters, precipitation, ocean winds, sea surface temperature, water vapor, sea ice, etc.). The microwave radiometers themselves will incorporate state-of-the-art receivers, with particular attention given to instrument calibration for the best possible accuracy and sensitivity. The single-package design of AESMIR makes it compatible with high-altitude aircraft platforms such as the NASA ER-2s. The arbitrary 2-axis gimbal can perform conical and cross-track scanning, as well as fixed-beam staring. This compatibility with high-altitude platforms coupled with the flexible scanning configuration, opens up previously unavailable science opportunities for convection/precip/cloud science and co-flying with complementary instruments, as well as providing wider swath coverage for all science applications. By designing AESMIR to be compatible with these high-altitude platforms, we are also compatible with the NASA P-3, the NASA DC-8, C-130s and ground-based deployments. Thus AESMIR can provide low-, mid-, and high- altitude microwave imaging. Parallel filter banks allow AESMIR to simultaneously simulate the exact passbands of multiple satellite radiometers: SSM/I, TMI, AMSR, Windsat, SSMI/S, and the upcoming GPM/GMI and NPOESS/CMIS instruments --a unique capability among aircraft radiometers. An L-band option is also under development, again using the same scanner. With this option, simultaneous imaging from 1.4 to 89 GHz will be feasible. And, all receivers except the sounding channels will be configured for 4-Stokes polarimetric operation using high-speed digital

  1. Analyzing Satellite Images Of The Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    PC-SEAPAK is user-interactive software package specifically developed for analysis of data from satellites in oceanographic research. Program used to process and interpret data obtained from Nimbus-7/Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) and NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). PC-SEAPAK copyrighted product with all copyright vested in National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Zone radiometer measurements on a model rocket exhaust plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Radiometer for analytical prediction of rocket plume-to-booster thermal radiation and convective heating is described. Applications for engine combustion analysis, incineration, and pollution control by high temperature processing are discussed. Illustrations of equipment are included.

  3. Silicic Volcanism Identified by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotch, T. D.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Hagerty, J. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Ashley, J. W.; Williams, J.-P.; Petro, N. E.

    2016-05-01

    The Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has mapped and characterized a number of silicic volcanic constructs on the lunar surface. Here, we summarize Diviner's contributions to our understanding of these features.

  4. A segmented mirror antenna for radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. W.; Houshmand, B.; Zimmerman, M.; Acosta, R.

    1989-05-01

    An antenna is designed for the radiometer application of the planned NASA Earth Science Geostationary Platforms in the 1990's. The antenna consists of two parts: a regular parabolic dish of 5 meters in diameter which converts the radiation from feeds into a collimated beam, and a movable mirror that redirects the beam to a prescribed scan direction. The mirror is composed of 28 segmented planar conducting plates, mostly one square meter in size. The secondary pattern of the antenna was analyzed based on a physical optics analysis. For frequencies between 50 and 230 GHz, and for a scan range of + or -8 deg (270 beamwidths scan at 230 GHz), the worst calculated beam efficiency is 95 percent. To cover such a wide frequency and scan range, each of the 28 plates is individually controlled for a tilting less than 4 deg, and for a sliding less than 0.5 cm. The sliding is done at discrete steps. At 230 GHz, a step size of 2 mil is sufficient. The plate positions must be reset for each frequency and for each scan direction. Once the position is set, the frequency bandwidth of the antenna is very narrow.

  5. A segmented mirror antenna for radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Houshmand, B.; Zimmerman, M.; Acosta, R.

    1989-01-01

    An antenna is designed for the radiometer application of the planned NASA Earth Science Geostationary Platforms in the 1990's. The antenna consists of two parts: a regular parabolic dish of 5 meters in diameter which converts the radiation from feeds into a collimated beam, and a movable mirror that redirects the beam to a prescribed scan direction. The mirror is composed of 28 segmented planar conducting plates, mostly one square meter in size. The secondary pattern of the antenna was analyzed based on a physical optics analysis. For frequencies between 50 and 230 GHz, and for a scan range of + or -8 deg (270 beamwidths scan at 230 GHz), the worst calculated beam efficiency is 95 percent. To cover such a wide frequency and scan range, each of the 28 plates is individually controlled for a tilting less than 4 deg, and for a sliding less than 0.5 cm. The sliding is done at discrete steps. At 230 GHz, a step size of 2 mil is sufficient. The plate positions must be reset for each frequency and for each scan direction. Once the position is set, the frequency bandwidth of the antenna is very narrow.

  6. Global irradiance calibration of multifilter UV radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedehierro, A. A.; Cancillo, M. L.; Serrano, A.; Antón, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the amount of ultraviolet solar radiation (UV) reaching the Earth's surface is governed by stratospheric ozone, which has exhibited notable variations since the late 1970s. A thorough monitoring of UV radiation requires long-term series of accurate measurements worldwide, and to keep track of its evolution, it is essential to use high-quality instrumentation with an excellent long-term performance capable of detecting low UV signal. There are several UV monitoring networks worldwide based on multifilter UV radiometers; however, there is no general agreement about the most suitable methodology for the global irradiance calibration of these instruments. This paper aims to compare several calibration methods and to analyze their behavior for different ranges of solar zenith angle (SZA). Four methods are studied: the two currently most frequently used methods referred to in the literature and two new methods that reduce systematic errors in calibrated data at large solar zenith angles. The results evidence that proposed new methods show a clear improvement compared to the classic approaches at high SZA, especially for channels 305 and 320 nm. These two channels are of great interest for calculating the total ozone column and other products such as dose rates of biological interest in the UV range (e.g., the erythemal dose).

  7. Bolometric detectors: optimization for differential radiometers.

    PubMed

    Glezer, E N; Lange, A E; Wilbanks, T M

    1992-12-01

    A differential radiometer can be constructed by placing two matched bolometric detectors in an ac bridge, thus producing a signal that is proportional to the difference in power incident on the two detectors. In conditions of large and time-varying common-mode radiative load, the common-mode response resulting from imperfectly matched detectors can limit the stability of the difference signal. For semiconductor thermistor bolometers we find that the bridge can always be trimmed to null the common-mode response for a given instantaneous value of the radiative load. However, subsequent changes in the commonmode radiative load change the operating point of the detectors, giving rise to a second-order common-mode response. This response can be minimized by increasing the electrical-power dissipation in the detectors at the cost of sensitivity. For the case that we are analyzing, and for mismatches in detector parameters that are typical of randomly paired detectors, common-mode rejection ratios in excess of 10(3) can be achieved under 20% changes in radiative load. PMID:20802585

  8. Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, GB; Michalsky, JJ

    2011-02-07

    The visible Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is a passive instrument that measures global and diffuse components of solar irradiance at six narrowband channels and one open, or broadband, channel (Harrison et al. 1994). Direct irradiance is not a primary measurement, but is calculated using the diffuse and global measurements. To collect one data record, the MFRSR takes measurements at four different shadowband positions. The first measurement is taken with the shadowband in the nadir (home) position. The next three measurements are, in order, the first side-band, sun-blocked, and second side-band. The side-band measurements are used to correct for the portion of the sky obscured by the shadowband. The nominal wavelengths of the narrowband channels are 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's aerosol optical depth at each wavelength. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Harrison and Michalsky 1994) and other atmospheric constituents.

  9. A low-noise beta-radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, G.I.; Savina, V.I.

    1995-12-01

    The two-channel detector for a low-noise (down to 0.06 sec{sup -1}) beta-radiometer for measuring the mass concentration of {sup 90}Sr in the environment after the chemical extraction of strontium by the oxalate-nitrate method was certified at the D.I. Mendeleev Institute of Metrology (certificate No. 137/93). A detector unit using two end-window self-quenching counters with thin input windows (8 {mu}m thick and 60 mm in diameter) operating as a Geiger-Mueller counter and filled with a mixture of 90% helium (atomic gas) and 10% ethanol (organic molecules) can measure the beta-activity of two substrates concurrently. It is often used to detect the beta-radiation of {sup 90}Sr. This isotope produces particles with energies ranging from 180 to 1000 keV, and the detection efficiency is 50% at a level of 0.1 Bq after measuring for 20 min with an uncertainty of 25%.

  10. Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe Solar Flux Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomasko, M. G.; Doose, L. R.; Palmer, J. M.; Holmes, A.; Wolfe, W. L.; Debell, A. G.; Brod, L. G.; Sholes, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    The Solar Flux Radiometer aboard the Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe operated successfully during its descent through the atmosphere of Venus. The instrument measured atmospheric radiance over the spectral range from 400 to 1800 nm as a function of altitude. Elevation and azimuthal measurements on the radiation field were made with five optical channels. Twelve filtered Si and Ge photovoltaic detectors were maintained near 30 C with a phase-change material. The detector output currents were processed with logarithmic transimpedance converters and digitized with an 11-bit A/D converter. Atmospheric sampling in both elevation and azimuth was done according to a Gaussian integration scheme. The serial output data averaged 20 bits/sec, including housekeeping (sync, spin period, sample timing and mode). The data were used to determine the deposition of solar energy in the atmosphere of Venus between 67 km and the surface along with upward and downward fluxes and radiances with an altitude resolution of several hundred meters. The results allow for more accurate modeling of the radiation balance of the atmosphere than previously possible.

  11. Automated statistical approach to Langley evaluation for a solar radiometer.

    PubMed

    Kuester, Michele A; Thome, Kurtis J; Reagan, John A

    2003-08-20

    We present a statistical approach to Langley evaluation (SALE) leading to an improved method of calibration of an automated solar radiometer. Software was developed with the SALE method to first determine whether a day is a good calibration day and then to automatically calculate an intercept value for the solar radiometer. Results from manual processing of calibration data sets agree with those of the automated method to within the errors of each approach. PMID:12952339

  12. Automated statistical approach to Langley evaluation for a solar radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuester, Michele A.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Reagan, John A.

    2003-08-01

    We present a statistical approach to Langley evaluation (SALE) leading to an improved method of calibration of an automated solar radiometer. Software was developed with the SALE method to first determine whether a day is a good calibration day and then to automatically calculate an intercept value for the solar radiometer. Results from manual processing of calibration data sets agree with those of the automated method to within the errors of each approach.

  13. Method and apparatus for precision control of radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estey, R. S.; Hanna, M. F. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A radiometer controller of a radiation detector is provided with a calibration method and apparatus comprised of mounting all temperature sensitive elements of the controller in thermostatically controlled ovens during calibration and measurements, using a selected temperature that is above any which might be reached in the field. The instrument is calibrated in situ by adjusting heater power (EI) to the receptor cavity in the radiometer detector to a predetermined full scale level and is displayed by a meter.

  14. The Cloud Absorption Radiometer HDF Data User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jason Y.; Arnold, G. Thomas; Meyer, Howard G.; Tsay, Si-Chee; King, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) Instrument, methods used in the CAR Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) data processing, the structure and format of the CAR HDF data files, and methods for accessing the data. Examples of CAR applications and their results are also presented. The CAR instrument is a multiwavelength scanning radiometer that measures the angular distributions of scattered radiation.

  15. The Temperature Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR) subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherrix, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    The infrared radiation from the earth in two spectral bands during both day and night portions of the orbit is measured. Pictures of cloud cover, three dimensional mappings of cloud cover, temperature mappings of clouds, land, and ocean surface, cirrus cloud content, atmospheric contamination, and relative humidity are provided.

  16. The 1982-1983 El Nino Atlas: Nimbus-7 microwave radiometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy

    1987-01-01

    Monthly maps of sea surface temperature, atmospheric water vapor, and surface level wind speed as measured by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on the Nimbus-7 satellite for the tropical Pacific from June 1982 to October 1983, during one of the most intense El Nino Southern Oscillations (ENSO) episodes, are presented. The non-ENSO annual cycle was compiled by averaging the 1980 and 1981 data for each calendar month and was removed from monthly fields of 1982 and 1983 to reveal the anomalous distributions. The anomaly fields and part of the non-ENSO annual cycle are also presented. This study and earlier evaluations demonstrate that the Nimbus/SMMR can be used to monitor large scale and low frequency variabilities in the tropical ocean. The SMMR data support and extend conventional measurements. The variabilities of the three parameters are found to represent various aspects of ENSO related through ocean atmosphere interaction. Their simultaneous and quantitative descriptions pave the way for the derivation of ocean atmosphere latent heat exchange and further the understanding of the coupled atmospheric and oceanic thermodynamics.

  17. Development of a Two Dimensional Synthetic Aperture Radiometer at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Carver, K.; Goodberlet, M.; Popstefanija, I.; Mead, J.

    2000-01-01

    A radiometer that uses aperture synthesis in two dimensions is being built as part of research under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. The instrument development team consists of engineers at the Goddard Space Flight Center, the University of Massachusetts and Quadrant Engineering. This will be an aircraft instrument operating at L-band which builds on the heritage of ESTAR. The choice of L-band was made because the problem of achieving adequate resolution in space is most critical at this wavelength and because a polarimetric, conical scanning airborne radiometer for future experiments to validate soil moisture and ocean salinity retrieval algorithms is not currently available. The instrument will be designed to fly on the NASA P-3 aircraft in a nadir pointing mode, although other options are possible. The antenna will consist of an array of modules arranged in a rectangular grid. Each module will be comprised of a printed circuit dual-polarized patch and integrated receiver. The distribution of modules within the rectangular array will be adjustable so that several different imaging configurations (e.g. "+","Y", "T") can be employed. The integrated receiver will provide amplification and conversion to IF. The IF signal will be routed to a processor where the required correlations performed. The I and Q channels will be created digitally and the correlations will be done digitally in this processor. The digitization will be done with sufficient bits to study the effects of quantization on radiometer performance. A computer/controller will store the data for conversion to an image and will also perform temperature control and other data interfacing and housekeeping tasks. The instrument is currently in the bread boarding phase of development. A design of the critical components has been completed and hardware is being assembled to test the individual elements. It is expected that a complete 2-channel correlator will be tested by the summer of 2000 and that the

  18. Simulation of the Impact of New Aircraft and Satellite-Based Ocean Surface Wind Measurements on H*Wind Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, TImothy L.; Atlas, R. M.; Black, P. G.; Case, J. L.; Chen, S. S.; Hood, R. E.; Johnson, J. W.; Jones, L.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlborn, E. W.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate observations of surface ocean vector winds (OVW) with high spatial and temporal resolution are required for understanding and predicting tropical cyclones. As NASA's QuikSCAT and Navy's WindSat operate beyond their design life, many members of the weather and climate science communities recognize the importance of developing new observational technologies and strategies to meet the essential need for OVW information to improve hurricane intensity and location forecasts. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an innovative technology development which offers new and unique remotely sensed satellite observations of both extreme oceanic wind events and strong precipitation. It is based on the airborne Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which is the only proven remote sensing technique for observing tropical cyclone (TC) ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates. The proposed HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer (STAR) technology. This sensor will operate over 4-7 GHz (C-band frequencies) where the required TC remote sensing physics has been validated by both SFMR and WindSat radiometers. The instrument is described in more detail in a paper by Jones et al. presented to the Tropical Meteorology Special Symposium at this AMS Annual Meeting. Simulated HIRAD passes through a simulation of hurricane Frances are being developed to demonstrate HIRAD estimation of surface wind speed over a wide swath in the presence of heavy rain. These are currently being used in "quick" OSSEs (Observing System Simulation Experiments) with H'Wind analyses as the discriminating tool. The H'Wind analysis, a product of the Hurricane Research Division of NOAA's Atlantic , Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, brings together wind measurements from a variety of observation platforms into an objective analysis of the distribution of wind

  19. Ocean observing satellite study: instrument and satellite constellation architecture options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, A. J.; McGuire, J.; Cunningham, J. D.; Pichel, W. G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides: (1) an overview of the set of active and passive instruments identified by the IPO designed to make the ocean measurements including visible and infrared medium and high resolution imagers, radiometers, altimeters, and synthetic aperture radars and (2) the instrument and satellite constellation architecture options studied, and their ability to meet the set of measurement requirements.

  20. Intercomparison Between Microwave Radiometer and Radiosonding Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toanca, Florica; Stefan, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to compare relative humidity and temperature vertical profiles measured by ground based Microwave Radiometer (MWR) RPG HATPRO installed at the Romanian Atmospheric Observatory (Magurele, 44.35 N, 26.03 E) and by radio-sounding (RS) (Baneasa, 44.30 N, 26.04 E) provided by National Meteorological Administration. MWR uses passive microwave detection in the 22.335 to 31.4 GHz and 51to 58 GHz bands to obtain the vertical profiles of temperature and relative humidity up to 10km with a temporal resolution of several minutes. The reliability of atmospheric temperature and relative humidity profiles retrieved continuously by the MWR for the winter and summer of year 2013 was studied. The study was conducted, comparing the temperature and humidity profiles from the MWR with the ones from the radio soundings at 0:00 a.m. Two datasets of the humidity show a fairly good agreement for the interval between ground and 1.5 km in the January month for winter and up to 2 km in the July month for summer. Above 2 km, for the both seasons, the humidity profiles present in most of the selected cases the same trend evolution. The temperature vertical profiles agreed in 95% of the cases during summer and 85% during winter. It is very important for intercomparison that for both seasons almost all temperature vertical profiles highlight temperature inversions. Two cases have been analyzed in order to find possible explanations for the discrepancies between vertical profiles, focusing on advantages and disadvantages of MWR measurements.

  1. NASA Oceanic Processes Program, fiscal year 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. M. (Editor); Pieri, D. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Accomplishments, activities, and plans are highlighted for studies of ocean circulation, air sea interaction, ocean productivity, and sea ice. Flight projects discussed include TOPEX, the ocean color imager, the advanced RF tracking system, the NASA scatterometer, and the pilot ocean data system. Over 200 papers generated by the program are listed.

  2. Suomi NPP VIIRS Ocean Color Data Product Early Mission Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turpie, Kevin R.; Robinson, Wayne D.; Franz, Bryan A.; Eplee, Robert E., Jr.; Meister, Gerhard; Fireman, Gwyn F.; Patt, Frederick S.; Barnes, Robert A.; McClain, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Following the launch of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polarorbiting Partnership (NPP) spacecraft, the NASA NPP VIIRS Ocean Science Team (VOST) began an evaluation of ocean color data products to determine whether they could continue the existing NASA ocean color climate data record (CDR). The VOST developed an independent evaluation product based on NASA algorithms with a reprocessing capability. Here we present a preliminary assessment of both the operational ocean color data products and the NASA evaluation data products regarding their applicability to NASA science objectives.

  3. Capabilities and Impact on Wind Analyses of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; Amarin, Ruba; Atlas, Robert; Bailey, M. C.; Black, Peter; Buckley, Courtney; James, Mark; Johnson, James; Jones, Linwood; Ruf, Christopher; Simmons, David; Uhlhorn, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a new airborne microwave remote sensor for hurricane observations that is currently under development by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in partnership with the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/Hurricane Research Division, the University of Central Florida, the University of Michigan, and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The instrument is being test flown in January and is expected to participate in or collaborate with the tropical cyclone experiment GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) in the 2010 season. HIRAD is designed to study the wind field in some detail within strong hurricanes and to enhance the real-time airborne ocean surface winds observation capabilities of NOAA and USAF Weather Squadron hurricane hunter aircraft currently using the operational Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR). Unlike SFMR, which measures wind speed and rain rate along the ground track at a single point directly beneath the aircraft, HIRAD will provide images of the surface wind and rain field over a wide swath (approx.3 x the aircraft altitude) with approx.2 km resolution. See Figure 1, which depicts a simulated HIRAD swath versus the line of data obtained by SFMR.

  4. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  5. Evaluation of geophysical parameters measured by the Nimbus-7 microwave radiometer for the TOGA Heat Exchange Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Mock, Donald R.

    1986-01-01

    The data distributed by the National Space Science Data Center on the Geophysical parameters of precipitable water, sea surface temperature, and surface-level wind speed, measured by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on Nimbus-7, are evaluated with in situ measurements between Jan. 1980 and Oct. 1983 over the tropical oceans. In tracking annual cycles and the 1982-83 E1 Nino/Southern Oscillation episode, the radiometer measurements are coherent with sea surface temperatures and surface-level wind speeds measured at equatorial buoys and with precipitable water derived from radiosonde soundings at tropical island stations. However, there are differences between SMMR and in situ measurements. Corrections based on radiosonde and ship data were derived supplementing correction formulae suggested in the databook. This study is the initial evaluation of the data for quantitative description of the 1982-83 E1 Nino/Southern Oscillation episode. It paves the way for determination of the ocean-atmosphere moisture and latent heat exchanges, a priority of the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Heat Exchange Program.

  6. Satellite soil moisture for advancing our understanding of earth system processes and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorigo, Wouter; de Jeu, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Soil moisture products obtained from active and passive microwave satellites have reached maturity during the last decade (De Jeu and Dorigo, 2016): On the one hand, research algorithms that were initially applied to sensors designed for other purposes, e.g., for measuring wind speed (e.g. the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT)), sea ice, or atmospheric parameters (e.g. the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System AMSR-E), have developed into fully operational products. On the other hand, dedicated soil moisture satellite missions were designed and launched by ESA (the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission) and NASA (the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission).

  7. Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction in Climate Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy

    1999-01-01

    The diagram, which attests the El Nino teleconnection observed by the NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) in 1997, is an example of the results of our research in air-sea interaction - the core component of our three-part contribution to the Climate Variability Program. We have established an interplay among scientific research, which turns spacebased data into knowledge, a push in instrument technology, which improves observations of climate variability, and an information system, which produces and disseminates new data to support our scientific research. Timothy Liu led the proposal for advanced technology, in response to the NASA Post-2002 Request for Information. The sensor was identified as a possible mission for continuous ocean surface wind measurement at higher spatial resolution, and with the unique capability to measure ocean surface salinity. He is participating in the Instrument Incubator Program to improve the antenna technology, and is initiating a study to integrate the concept on Japanese missions. He and his collaborators have set up a system to produce and disseminate high level (gridded) ocean surface wind/stress data from NSCAT and European missions. The data system is being expanded to produce real-time gridded ocean surface winds from Quikscat, and precipitation and evaporation from the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission. It will form the basis for a spacebased data analysis system which will include momentum, heat and water fluxes. The study on 1997 El Nino teleconnection illustrates our interdisciplinary and multisensor approach to study climate variability. The diagram shows that the collapse of trade wind and the westerly wind anomalies in the central equatorial Pacific led to the equatorial ocean warming. The equatorial wind anomalies are connected to the anomalous cyclonic wind pattern in the northeast Pacific. The anomalous warming along the west coast of the United States is the result of the movement of the pre-existing warm sea surface

  8. APHID: A Wideband, Multichannel Radiometer for Phase Delay Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staguhn, J.; Harris, A. I.; Munday, L. G.; Woody, D. P.

    Atmospheric phase fluctuations of mm and sub-mm signals are predominantly caused by line of sight fluctuations in the amount of water vapor. Measurements of the line emission from tropospheric water vapor can be used to track and correct these fluctuations. We present model calculations which led to the design of a multichannel water vapor radiometer for phase correction of millimeter arrays. Our particular emphasis is on designing a phase correction scheme for mid-latitude sites (BIMA, OVRO), and for high-altitude sites. The instrument being implemented at OVRO and BIMA is a cooled double-sideband heterodyne receiver centered on the 22.2GHz water vapor line with a 0.5 - 4.0GHz IF. The back end is a 16 channel analog lag correlator similar to the WASP spectrometer (Harris et al 1998). We present two applications for the multichannel radiometer. A line fit to the observed spectra is expected to provide sufficient accuracy for mm phase correction with the 22 GHZ line. The radiometer can also be used for the determination of the vertical water vapor distribution from the observed line shape. We discuss how this information can be used to improve the accuracy of water vapor radiometers which have too few channels to observe the line shape, and for phase correction schemes which are based on a 183 GHz water line radiometer.

  9. The importance of radiometer angular response for ultraviolet phototherapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, C. J.; Currie, G. D.; Pye, S. D.

    1999-04-01

    The influence of the angular response of radiometer probes on measurements of irradiance in ultraviolet phototherapy has been studied. Irradiance measurements were made using nine ultraviolet (UV) radiometers employed by phototherapy centres in Scotland and Northern Ireland, and compared with measurements made using two spectroradiometers. The light sources used were UVB TL01 fluorescent lamps, arranged in different geometries. Irradiances within TL01 whole body treatment cabinets were assessed based on a comparison with one of the spectroradiometers. The results show variations of 50% in cabinet irradiance measurements made by different radiometers, even when they were calibrated using the same source geometry and spectroradiometer. Differences in radiometer probe design and construction lead to an under- or over-response at angles of incidence greater than zero. Angular responses of different probes were assessed using banks of fluorescent lamps. The differences found are large enough to account for the variations in measurements of cabinet irradiance. The variations in irradiance measurements are significant in terms of planning and monitoring patient exposure during TL01 phototherapy. Accurate dosimetry can only be achieved if radiometer probes have a good cosine response and recommendations are made for better calibration techniques.

  10. Sea surface temperatures from the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer on Nimbus 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, A. S.; Wilheit, T. T.

    1985-01-01

    Because of problems with the design and calibration of the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) on Nimbus 7, sea surface temperature (SST) algorithms had to be developed that corrected for instrument effects. Several stages of this development are reported here. The quality of the SST products from the final version is assessed. Thirty-four months of data have been analyzed; the average SST error is about 1.12 C over the whole globe. The error is smaller in the equatorial region and larger in the northern oceans. The main source of error is due to heating of the SMMR instrument. Specific problems in the design of the instrument are discussed. The details of the ST algorithms are given in an appendix.

  11. NPOESS Preparatory Project Validation Program for the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, T.; Arnone, R. A.; Hutchison, K.; Jackson, J. M.; Kilcoyne, H.; Plonski, M.; Reed, B.; Sei, A.; Starr, D.; Wong, E.; Privette, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Program, in partnership with National Aeronautical Space Administration (NASA), will launch the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP), a risk reduction and data continuity mission, prior to the first operational NPOESS launch. The NPOESS Program, in partnership with Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, will execute the NPP Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) program to ensure the data products comply with the requirements of the sponsoring agencies. The Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite will produce 22 EDRs, including Imagery, cloud, aerosol, ocean, and land products. The calibration and validation plans establish science and user community leadership and participation, and demonstrated, cost-effective Cal/Val approaches. This presentation will provide an overview of the NPP Cal/Val plans for the VIIRS environmental data products.

  12. Observing atmospheric water in storms with the Nimbus 7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsaros, K. B.; Lewis, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Employing data on integrated atmospheric water vapor, total cloud liquid water and rain rate obtainable from the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR), we study the frontal structure of several mid-latitude cyclones over the North Pacific Ocean as they approach the West Coast of North America in the winter of 1979. The fronts, analyzed with all available independent data, are consistently located at the leading edge of the strongest gradient in integrated water vapor. The cloud liquid water content, which unfortunately has received very little in situ verification, has patterns which are consistent with the structure seen in visible and infrared imagery. The rain distribution is also a good indicator of frontal location and rain amounts are generally within a factor of two of what is observed with rain gauges on the coast. Furthermore, the onset of rain on the coast can often be accurately forecast by simple advection of the SMMR observed rain areas.

  13. Topical cyclone rainfall characteristics as determined from a satellite passive microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E. B.; Adler, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Data from the Nimbus-5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR-5) were used to calculate latent heat release and other rainfall parameters for over 70 satellite observations of 21 tropical cyclones in the tropical North Pacific Ocean. The results indicate that the ESMR-5 measurements can be useful in determining the rainfall characteristics of these storms and appear to be potentially useful in monitoring as well as predicting their intensity. The ESMR-5 derived total tropical cyclone rainfall estimates agree favorably with previous estimates for both the disturbance and typhoon stages. The mean typhoon rainfall rate (1.9 mm h(-1)) is approximately twice that of disturbances (1.1 mm h(-1)).

  14. Developments in multisensor ocean feature monitoring: the ocean fronts feature analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownsword, Chris; Jory, Ian

    1994-12-01

    Traditionally oceanographic features such as fronts and eddies have been monitored using satellites equipped with optical sensors such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). The disadvantage of using AVHRR, however, is that it requires cloud free conditions to view the Earth's surface. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provides all weather, day/night image acquisition capabilities. Currently little is known about the effects of sea surface temperature variations on the returned SAR signal, though it is known that some variation in surface roughness is present where oceanographic features occur. Research into these phenomena is being undertaken at the Defence Research Agency (DRA) in Farnborough, U.K.. To investigate the capabilities of SAR, for ocean front detection, the Ocean Fronts Feature Analysis System (OFFAS) has been developed by Earth Observation Sciences Limited under contract to DRA. Using OFFAS, AVHRR data is used to verify and validate the SAR responses to oceanographic features. This paper is an update to that presented at Oceanology International '94, in Brighton which discussed the research and development work into the use of SAR data from the ERS-1 satellite to identify oceanographic features. Since then the modifications to the software, mentioned in that paper, have been made. OFFAS II now provides the capability to geometrically rectify the images to a regular map projection prior to the simultaneous display and manipulation of both image types. Thus allowing faster location of features of interest identified within a reference image (e.g. AVHRR), delineation of them using a tracing procedure, then the automatic redrawing of the trace on the corresponding target image (e.g. SAR). In addition the geometrically rectified SAR images can be mosaiced together, this is particularly useful where large oceanographic features span more than one image. To date, trials performed using OFFAS have indicated its value in aiding interpretation

  15. Attitude angle effects on Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer radiances and geophysical parameter retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmillan, Daniel S.; Han, Daesoo

    1989-01-01

    The attitude of the Nimbus-7 spacecraft has varied significantly over its lifetime. A summary of the orbital and long-term behavior of the attitude angles and the effects of attitude variations on Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) brightness temperatures is presented. One of the principal effects of these variations is to change the incident angle at which the SMMR views the Earth's surface. The brightness temperatures depend upon the incident angle sensitivities of both the ocean surface emissivity and the atmospheric path length. Ocean surface emissivity is quite sensitive to incident angle variation near the SMMR incident angle, which is about 50 degrees. This sensitivity was estimated theoretically for a smooth ocean surface and no atmosphere. A 1-degree increase in the angle of incidence produces a 2.9 C increase in the retrieved sea surface temperature and a 5.7 m/sec decrease in retrieved sea surface wind speed. An incident angle correction is applied to the SMMR radiances before using them in the geophysical parameter retrieval algorithms. The corrected retrieval data is compared with data obtained without applying the correction.

  16. Progress in Low-Power Digital Microwave Radiometer Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Kim, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    Three component technologies were combined into a digital correlation microwave radiometer. The radiometer comprises a dual-channel X-band superheterodyne receiver, low-power high-speed cross-correlator (HSCC), three-level ADCs, and a correlated noise source (CNS). The HSCC dissipates 10 mW and operates at 500 MHz clock speed. The ADCs are implemented using ECL components and dissipate more power than desired. Thus, a low-power ADC development is underway. The new ADCs arc predicted to dissipated less than 200 mW and operate at 1 GSps with 1.5 GHz of input bandwidth. The CNS provides different input correlation values for calibration of the radiometer. The correlation channel had a null offset of 0.0008. Test results indicate that the correlation channel can be calibrated with 0.09% error in gain.

  17. Remote sensing of soil moisture with microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T.; Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T.; Geiger, F.

    1974-01-01

    Microwave radiometry has been used for the remote sensing of soil moisture in a series of aircraft flights over an agricultural test area in the vicinity of Phoenix, Arizona. The radiometers covered the wavelength range 0.8-21 cm. Ground truth in the form of gravimetric measurements of the soil moisture in the top 15 cm were obtained for 200 fields at this site. The results indicate that it is possible to monitor moisture variations with airborne radiometers. The emission is a function of the radiometer wavelength and the distribution of the moisture in the soil. At a wavelength of 1.55 cm there is little or no variation in the emission for soil moisture values below 10 or 15% moisture content by weight. Above this value, there is a linear decrease in the emission with a slope of approximately 3 K for each percentage point increase in soil moisture.

  18. Inter-calibrating Brightness Temperatures of a Constellation of Radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz; Berg, Wesley; Kummerow, Christian; Stout, John

    2006-01-01

    In 2010, the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) of the U.S.A. and the Japanese Exploration Agency (JAXA) of Japan in cooperation with other U.S. and international partners will launch the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. The mission center-piece is a core U.S. provided satellite holding a scanning microwave imager provided by the U.S. A. and a dual-frequency precipitation radar provided by Japan. The core satellite is in a 65 deg inclination (the current Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission -TRMM is in a 35 deg inclination). Joining the core satellite are a constellation of approximately 8 satellites containing scanning radiometers. The purpose of the constellation is to increase the global sampling capability of the mission. One constellation satellite will be provided by NASA. Some of the constellation radiometers will provided by other U.S. agencies with existing (e.g. SSMI/S) or planned (NPOESS) radiometer assets. International groups have also expressed interest in contributing to the GPM mission including providing radiometer data for the GPM constellation. The use of a heterogeneous group of scanning radiometers each with its own unique purpose, characteristics and calibration offers a significant challenge for combining brightness temperatures or rain retrievals to create meaningful combined global radiometer products. However, the availability of active dual precipitation radar on the GPM core in combination with a well-calibrated radiometer on the same platform offers the possibility of inter-calibrating the constellation radiometers using the core satellite as a calibrator. This paper describes a joint NASA/GSFC and Colorado State University prototype effort at inter-calibrating existing radiometers using such a core calibrator approach. In the prototype, existing radiometers (i.e. SSM/I and AMSR-E) are intercalibrated, as required, using the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) as the calibration core

  19. Variability of Earth's radiation budget components during 2009 - 2015 from radiometer IKOR-M data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherviakov, Maksim

    2016-04-01

    budget components seem to be within observational uncertainty and natural variability governed by cloudiness, water vapor and aerosol variations. It was assessed spatial and temporal variations of albedo and the absorbed solar radiation over different regions. Latitudinal distributions of albedo and ASR were estimated in more detail. Meridional cross sections over oceans and land were used separately for this estimation. It was shown that the albedo and ASR data received from the radiometer IKOR-M can be used to detect El Nino in the Pacific Ocean and monitoring of the East Asian Summer Monsoon. The report will be presented more detailed results. The reported study was funded by RFBR according to the research project No.16-35-00284 mol_a.

  20. Hybrid Atmospheric, Land, and Oceanic (HALO) Measurements for Next-Generation Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, G. H.; Morrow, J. H.; Booth, C. R.; Hooker, S.

    2011-12-01

    irradiance; Langley plots; aerosol optical depth; aerosol size distributions; single scattering albedo; total ozone; cloud optical depth, and sky radiance distributions. Novel methods for shadowband operation, spectrograph stray light correction, and retrieval of high-resolution spectra from the filter-channel measurements are also presented. Measurements of global spectral irradiance agree with similar measurements of a high-resolution scanning spectroradiometer to within ±1.5%. Measurements of total ozone agree with observations of an Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to within ±3%. Data processing software is currently being advanced to include additional data products such as aerosol phase function, precipitable water vapor, polarimetry, and water-leaving radiance. Future NASA missions couple remote sensing observations with next-generation satellites. The oceanographic community has embraced the synergism of such a mission, coupling the use of novel, near surface (<2 m) optical profilers and new airborne microradiometer systems such as those deployed during NASA's Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed (COAST) mission. Dynamic positioning of airborne radiometers for satellite mission cal/val and sun photometry is a provocative next step.

  1. An Automated Neural Network Cloud Classifier for Use over Land and Ocean Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Shawn W.; Emery, William J.

    1997-10-01

    An automated neural network cloud classifier that functions over both land and ocean backgrounds is presented. Motivated by the development of a combined visible, infrared, and microwave rain-rate retrieval algorithm for use with data from the 1997 Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), an automated cloud classification technique is sought to discern different types of clouds and, hence, different types of precipitating systems from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) type imagery. When this technique is applied to TRMM visible-infrared imagery, it will allow the choice of a passive microwave rain-rate algorithm, which performs well for the observed precipitation type, theoretically increasing accuracy at the instantaneous level when compared with the use of any single microwave algorithm. A neural network classifier, selected because of the strengths of neural networks with respect to within-class variability and nonnormal cluster distributions, is developed, trained, and tested on AVHRR data received from three different polar-orbiting satellites and spanning the continental United States and adjacent waters, as well as portions of the Tropics from the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE). The results are analyzed and suggestions are made for future work on this technique. The network selected the correct class for 96% of the training samples and 82% of the test samples, indicating that this type of approach to automated cloud classification holds considerable promise and is worthy of additional research and refinement.

  2. Classification of Tropical Oceanic Precipitation using High Altitude Aircraft: Microwave and Electric Field Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Cecil, Daniel; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Blakeslee, Richard; Mach, Douglas; Heymsfield, Gerald; Marks, Frank, Jr.; Zipser, Edward

    2004-01-01

    During the 1998 and 2001 hurricane seasons of the western Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR), the ER-2 Doppler (EDOP) radar, and the Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) were flown aboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration ER-2 high altitude aircraft as part of the Third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) and the Fourth Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4). Several hurricanes, tropical storms, and other precipitation systems were sampled during these experiments. An oceanic rainfall screening technique has been developed using AMPR passive microwave observations of these systems collected at frequencies of 10.7, 19.35,37.1, and 85.5 GHz. This technique combines the information content of the four AMPR frequencies regarding the gross vertical structure of hydrometeors into an intuitive and easily executable precipitation mapping format. The results have been verified using vertical profiles of EDOP reflectivity and lower altitude horizontal reflectivity scans collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D Orion radar. Matching the rainfall classification results with coincident electric field information collected by the LIP readily identifies convective rain regions within the precipitation fields. This technique shows promise as a real-time research and analysis tool for monitoring vertical updraft strength and convective intensity from airborne platforms such as remotely operated or uninhabited aerial vehicles. The technique is analyzed and discussed for a wide variety of precipitation types using the 26 August 1998 observations of Hurricane Bonnie near landfall.

  3. The Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data - HOAPS-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, A.; Fennig, K.; Klepp, C.; Bakan, S.; Graßl, H.; Schulz, J.

    2010-05-01

    The availability of microwave instruments on satellite platforms allows the retrieval of essential water cycle components at high quality for improved understanding and evaluation of water processes in climate modelling. HOAPS-3, the latest version of the satellite climatology "Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data" provides fields of turbulent heat fluxes, evaporation, precipitation, freshwater flux and related atmospheric variables over the global ice-free ocean. This paper describes the content, methodology and retrievals of the HOAPS climatology. A sophisticated processing chain, including all available Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) instruments aboard the satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program (DMSP) and careful inter-sensor calibration, ensures a homogeneous time-series with dense data sampling and hence detailed information of the underlying weather situations. The completely reprocessed data set with a continuous time series from 1987 to 2005 contains neural network based algorithms for precipitation and wind speed and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) based SST fields. Additionally, a new 85 GHz synthesis procedure for the defective SSM/I channels on DMSP F08 from 1989 on has been implemented. Freely available monthly and pentad means, twice daily composites and scan-based data make HOAPS-3 a versatile data set for studying ocean-atmosphere interaction on different temporal and spatial scales. HOAPS-3 data products are available via http://www.hoaps.org.

  4. The Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data - HOAPS-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, A.; Fennig, K.; Klepp, C.; Bakan, S.; Graßl, H.; Schulz, J.

    2010-09-01

    The availability of microwave instruments on satellite platforms allows the retrieval of essential water cycle components at high quality for improved understanding and evaluation of water processes in climate modelling. HOAPS-3, the latest version of the satellite climatology "Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data" provides fields of turbulent heat fluxes, evaporation, precipitation, freshwater flux and related atmospheric variables over the global ice-free ocean. This paper describes the content, methodology and retrievals of the HOAPS climatology. A sophisticated processing chain, including all available Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) instruments aboard the satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program (DMSP) and careful inter-sensor calibration, ensures a homogeneous time-series with dense data sampling and hence detailed information of the underlying weather situations. The completely reprocessed data set with a continuous time series from 1987 to 2005 contains neural network based algorithms for precipitation and wind speed and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) based SST fields. Additionally, a new 85 GHz synthesis procedure for the defective SSM/I channels on DMSP F08 from 1988 on has been implemented. Freely available monthly and pentad means, twice daily composites and scan-based data make HOAPS-3 a versatile data set for studying ocean-atmosphere interaction on different temporal and spatial scales. HOAPS-3 data products are available via http://www.hoaps.org.

  5. Specular UV reflectance measurements for cavity radiometer design

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Specular reflectance measurements were made on a black paint used in a solar constant monitoring cavity radiometer. Interference filters peaking at 180, 200, and 220 nm were used in conjunction with a deuterium lamp source and a silicon photodiode detector. Results showed that the black paint was specular for light incident 60/sup 0/ from normal and it reflected approx.8% of the light at these wavelengths. We conclude that the high absorptance of the radiometer calculated for visible wavelengths should remain valid down to approx.190-nm UV wavelengths.

  6. Remote monitoring of soil moisture using airborne microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    The current status of microwave radiometry is provided. The fundamentals of the microwave radiometer are reviewed with particular reference to airborne operations, and the interpretative procedures normally used for the modeling of the apparent temperature are presented. Airborne microwave radiometer measurements were made over selected flight lines in Chickasha, Oklahoma and Weslaco, Texas. Extensive ground measurements of soil moisture were made in support of the aircraft mission over the two locations. In addition, laboratory determination of the complex permittivities of soil samples taken from the flight lines were made with varying moisture contents. The data were analyzed to determine the degree of correlation between measured apparent temperatures and soil moisture content.

  7. Active radiometer for self-calibrated furnace temperature measurements

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Titus, Charles H.; Wittle, J. Kenneth; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1996-01-01

    Radiometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The radiometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/submillimeter-wave receiver including a millimeter/submillimeter-wave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement.

  8. Maser radiometer for cosmic background radiation anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wilkinson, D. T.

    1982-06-01

    A maser amplifier was incorporated into a low noise radiometer designed to measure large-scale anisotropy in the 3 deg K microwave background radiation. To minimize emission by atmospheric water vapor and oxygen, the radiometer is flown in a small balloon to an altitude to 25 km. Three successful flights were made - two from Palestine, Texas and one from Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil. Good sky coverage is important to the experiment. Data from the northern hemisphere flights has been edited and calibrated.

  9. Maser radiometer for cosmic background radiation anisotropy measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wilkinson, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    A maser amplifier was incorporated into a low noise radiometer designed to measure large-scale anisotropy in the 3 deg K microwave background radiation. To minimize emission by atmospheric water vapor and oxygen, the radiometer is flown in a small balloon to an altitude to 25 km. Three successful flights were made - two from Palestine, Texas and one from Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil. Good sky coverage is important to the experiment. Data from the northern hemisphere flights has been edited and calibrated.

  10. Experimental characterization of edge force on the Crookes radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ventura, Austin L.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.; Gimelshein, Natalia E.; Gimelshein, Sergey F.

    2014-12-09

    The contribution of edge force on the Crookes radiometer is experimentally investigated with three vane geometries. This work examines increasing the force per unit weight of a radiometer vane for applications such as near-space propulsion by increasing the vane’s perimeter while decreasing the total surface area of the vane by means of machined holes in the vanes. Experimental results are given for three vane geometries. These results indicate that although force to vane weight ratios can be improved, the maximum force is achieved by a vane geometry that contains no hole features.

  11. Passive microwave radiometer experiment for GOES-NEXT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonder Haar, Thomas H.; Shenk, William E.; Graul, Donald W.

    1986-01-01

    A new passive microwave radiometer (PMR) experiment for GOES-NEXT is described. The PMR, expected to be in orbit in the early 1990's, is a multichannel microwave radiometer which will allow new measurements of temperature and moisture structure and precipitation by penetrating much of the overlying cloud cover near significant weather systems. PMR experimental objectives are to use a geostationary platform for the first time to obtain passive microwave imagery and soundings in a high time frequency mode to address several scientific objectives. These scientific objectives address current problems of atmospheric science at the mesoscale and in climate research.

  12. ESTAR - A synthetic aperture microwave radiometer for measuring soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Griffis, A.; Swift, C. T.; Jackson, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of soil moisture from space requires putting relatively large microwave antennas in orbit. Aperture synthesis, an interferometric technique for reducing the antenna aperture needed in space, offers the potential for a practical means of meeting these requirements. An aircraft prototype, electronically steered thinned array L-band radiometer (ESTAR), has been built to develop this concept and to demonstrate its suitability for the measurement of soil moisture. Recent flights over the Walnut Gulch Watershed in Arizona show good agreement with ground truth and with measurements with the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR).

  13. Mineral discrimination using a portable ratio-determining radiometer.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.; Abrams, M.J.; Goetz, A.F.H.

    1983-01-01

    A portable ratio-determining radiometer has been tested in the laboratory to evaluate the use of narrow band filters for separating geologically important minerals. The instrument has 10 bands in the visible and near-infrared portion of the spectrum (0.5-2.4mm), positioned to sample spectral regions having absorption bands characteristic of minerals in this wavelength region. Measurements and statistical analyses were performed on 66 samples, which were characterized by microscopic and X-ray diffraction analyses. Comparison with high-resolution laboratory spectral reflectance curves indicated that the radiometer's raw values faithfully reproduced the shapes of the spectra. -from Authors

  14. Twelve month performance evaluation for the rotating shadowband radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Andrew L.; Roberg, Jeffrey M.

    1994-09-01

    The Southwest Technology Development institute staff compared twelve months of 10-minute average data from a rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) with data from three thermopile-based reference radiometers. Particular attention was focused on determining the accuracy of the direct normal irradiance data reported by the RSR. Accurate measurement of direct normal irradiance is the most critical requirement of the RSR when used for performance assessment of concentrating solar thermal collectors. Evaluation of three different methods of post-collection data processing was also performed.

  15. Atmospheric temperature profiling using an infrared heterodyne radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yustein, D.; Chiou, W. C.; Peyton, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of a high resolution infrared heterodyne radiometer for atmospheric temperature profiling is considered. Upwelling radiation at the 754.321/cm and the 945.976/cm rotational-vibrational lines of CO2 are monitored by a six IF channel infrared heterodyne radiometer with spectral specificity between 0.002 and 0.012/cm. Computer simulated retrievals have been carried out which indicate a maximum temperature inaccuracy of 3.5 K for vertical profiles between ground level and 50 km and a system integration time of 8 seconds.

  16. Interpreting measurements obtained with the cloud absorption radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The software developed for the analysis of data from the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) is discussed. The CAR is a multichannel radiometer designed to measure the radiation field in the middle of an optically thick cloud (the diffusion domain). It can also measure the surface albedo and escape function. The instrument currently flies on a C-131A aircraft operated by the University of Washington. Most of this data was collected during the First International satellite cloud climatology project Regional Experiment (FIRE) Marine Stratocumulus Intensive Field Observation program off San Diego during July 1987. Earlier flights of the CAR have also been studied.

  17. Design of an L-band Microwave Radiometer with Active Mitigation of Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, S. W.; Johnson, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) impairs L-band radiometry outside the protected 20 MHz frequency band around 1413 MHz. However, bandwidths of 100 MHz or more are desired for certain remote sensing applications as well as certain astronomy applications. Because much of the RFI in this band is from radars with pulse lengths on the order of microseconds, traditional radiometers (i.e., those which directly measure total power or power spectral density integrated over time scales of milliseconds or greater) are poorly-suited to this task. Simply reducing integration time and discarding contaminated outputs may not be a practical answer due to the wide variety of modulations and pulse lengths observed in L-band RFI signals, the dynamic and complex nature of the associated propagation channels, and the logistical effort associated with post-measurement data editing. This motivates the design and development of radiometers capable of coherent sampling and adaptive, real-time mitigation of interference. Such a radiometer will be described in this presentation. This design is capable of coherently-sampling up to 100 MHz bandwidth at L-band. RFI mitigation is implemented in FPGA components so that real-time suppression is achieved. The system currently uses a cascade of basic time- and frequency- domain detection and blanking techniques; more advanced algorithms are un- der consideration. The modular FPGA-based architecture provides other benefits, such as the ability to implement extremely stable digital filters and the ability to reconfigure the system "on the fly". An overview of the basic design along with on-the-air results from an initial implementation will be provided in the presentation. Related L-band RFI surveys will be described to illustrate the relevance of this approach in a variety of operating conditions.

  18. Design of an L-band Microwave Radiometer with Active Mitigation of Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampson, G. A.; Ellingson, S. W.; Johnson, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) impairs L-band radiometry outside the protected 20 MHz frequency band around 1413 MHz. However, bandwidths of 100 MHz or more are desired for certain remote sensing applications as well as certain astronomy applications. Because much of the RFI in this band is from radars with pulse lengths on the order of microseconds, traditional radiometers (i.e., those which directly measure total power or power spectral density integrated over time scales of milliseconds or greater) are poorly-suited to this task. Simply reducing integration time and discarding contaminated outputs may not be a practical answer due to the wide variety of modulations and pulse lengths observed in L-band RFI signals, the dynamic and complex nature of the associated propagation channels, and the logistical effort associated with post-measurement data editing. This motivates the design and development of radiometers capable of coherent sampling and adaptive, real-time mitigation of interference. Such a radiometer will be described in this presentation. This design is capable of coherently-sampling up to 100 MHz bandwidth at L-band. RFI mitigation is implemented in FPGA components so that real-time suppression is achieved. The system currently uses a cascade of basic time- and frequency-domain detection and blanking techniques; more advanced algorithms are under consideration. The modular FPGA-based architecture provides other benefits, such as the ability to implement extremely stable digital filters and the ability to reconfigure the system "on the fly". An overview of the basic design along with on-the-air results from an initial implementation will be provided in the presentation. Related L-band RFI surveys will be described to illustrate the relevance of this approach in a variety of operating conditions.

  19. Radiometer uncertainty equation research of 2D planar scanning PMMW imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Taiyang; Xu, Jianzhong; Xiao, Zelong

    2009-07-01

    With advances in millimeter-wave technology, passive millimeter-wave (PMMW) imaging technology has received considerable concerns, and it has established itself in a wide range of military and civil practical applications, such as in the areas of remote sensing, blind landing, precision guidance and security inspection. Both the high transparency of clothing at millimeter wavelengths and the spatial resolution required to generate adequate images combine to make imaging at millimeter wavelengths a natural approach of screening people for concealed contraband detection. And at the same time, the passive operation mode does not present a safety hazard to the person who is under inspection. Based on the description to the design and engineering implementation of a W-band two-dimensional (2D) planar scanning imaging system, a series of scanning methods utilized in PMMW imaging are generally compared and analyzed, followed by a discussion on the operational principle of the mode of 2D planar scanning particularly. Furthermore, it is found that the traditional radiometer uncertainty equation, which is derived from a moving platform, does not hold under this 2D planar scanning mode due to the fact that there is no absolute connection between the scanning rates in horizontal direction and vertical direction. Consequently, an improved radiometer uncertainty equation is carried out in this paper, by means of taking the total time spent on scanning and imaging into consideration, with the purpose of solving the problem mentioned above. In addition, the related factors which affect the quality of radiometric images are further investigated under the improved radiometer uncertainty equation, and ultimately some original results are presented and analyzed to demonstrate the significance and validity of this new methodology.

  20. Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer detection assembly design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppo, Peter; Mastrandrea, Carmine; Stagi, Moreno; Calamai, Luciano; Nieke, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometers (SLSTRs) are high-accuracy radiometers selected for the Copernicus mission Sentinel-3 space component to provide sea surface temperature (SST) data continuity with respect to previous (Advanced) Along Track Scanning Radiometers [(A)ATSRs] for climatology. Many satellites are foreseen over a 20-year period, each with a 7.5-year lifetime. Sentinel-3A will be launched in 2015 and Sentinel-3B at least six months later, implying that two identical satellites will be maintained in the same orbit with a 180-deg phase delay. Each SLSTR has an improved design with respect to AATSR affording wider near-nadir and oblique view swaths (1400 and 740 km) for SST/land surface temperature global coverage at a 1-km spatial resolution (at SSP) with a daily revisit time (with two satellites), appropriate for both climate and meteorology. Cloud screening and other products are obtained with 0.5 km spatial resolution [at sub-satellite point (SSP)] in visible and short wave infrared (SWIR) bands, while two additional channels are included to monitor high temperature events such as forest fires. The two swaths are obtained with two conical scans and telescopes combined optically at a common focus, representing the input of a cooled focal plane assembly, where nine channels are separated with dichroic and are focalized on detectors with appropriate optical relays. IR and SWIR optics/detectors are cooled to 85 K by an active mechanical cryo-cooler with vibration compensation, while the VIS ones are maintained at a stable temperature. The opto-mechanical design and the expected electro-optical performance of the focal plane assembly are described and the model predictions at system level are compared with experimental data acquired in the vacuum chamber in flight representative thermal conditions or in the laboratory.

  1. Cloud Absorption Radiometer Autonomous Navigation System - CANS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Duncan; Gatebe, Charles; McCune, Bill; Hellwig, Dustan

    2013-01-01

    CAR (cloud absorption radiometer) acquires spatial reference data from host aircraft navigation systems. This poses various problems during CAR data reduction, including navigation data format, accuracy of position data, accuracy of airframe inertial data, and navigation data rate. Incorporating its own navigation system, which included GPS (Global Positioning System), roll axis inertia and rates, and three axis acceleration, CANS expedites data reduction and increases the accuracy of the CAR end data product. CANS provides a self-contained navigation system for the CAR, using inertial reference and GPS positional information. The intent of the software application was to correct the sensor with respect to aircraft roll in real time based upon inputs from a precision navigation sensor. In addition, the navigation information (including GPS position), attitude data, and sensor position details are all streamed to a remote system for recording and later analysis. CANS comprises a commercially available inertial navigation system with integral GPS capability (Attitude Heading Reference System AHRS) integrated into the CAR support structure and data system. The unit is attached to the bottom of the tripod support structure. The related GPS antenna is located on the P-3 radome immediately above the CAR. The AHRS unit provides a RS-232 data stream containing global position and inertial attitude and velocity data to the CAR, which is recorded concurrently with the CAR data. This independence from aircraft navigation input provides for position and inertial state data that accounts for very small changes in aircraft attitude and position, sensed at the CAR location as opposed to aircraft state sensors typically installed close to the aircraft center of gravity. More accurate positional data enables quicker CAR data reduction with better resolution. The CANS software operates in two modes: initialization/calibration and operational. In the initialization/calibration mode

  2. Ocean Wave Studies with Applications to Ocean Modeling and Improvement of Satellite Altimeter Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1999-01-01

    view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data on sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll concentration jointly with TOPEX/POSEIDON data on SSH variations.

  3. Quantitative mapping of rainfall rates over the oceans utilizing Nimbus-5 ESMR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. S. V.; Abbott, W. V.

    1976-01-01

    The electrically scanning microwave radiometer (ESMR) data from the Nimbus 5 satellite was used to deduce estimates of precipitation amount over the oceans. An atlas of the global oceanic rainfall was prepared and the global rainfall maps analyzed and related to available ground truth information as well as to large scale processes in the atmosphere. It was concluded that the ESMR system provides the most reliable and direct approach yet known for the estimation of rainfall over sparsely documented, wide oceanic regions.

  4. Spectroradiometric considerations for advanced land observing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1986-01-01

    Research aimed at improving the inflight absolute radiometric calibration of advanced land observing systems was initiated. Emphasis was on the satellite sensor calibration program at White Sands. Topics addressed include: absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing; atmospheric effects on reflected radiation; inflight radiometric calibration; field radiometric methods for reflectance and atmospheric measurement; and calibration of field relectance radiometers.

  5. ATS-6 - The Geosynchronous Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenk, W. E.; Stephanides, C. C.; Sonnek, G. E.; Howell, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Geosynchronous Very High Resolution Radiometer (GVHRR), flown on the three-axis stabilized geosynchronous satellite, Applications Technology Satellite-6 (ATS-6), collected meteorological data for two months during the summer of 1974. Several hundred images were successfully taken. Data collection terminated when the instrument chopper motor failed. The instrument, its supporting ground equipment, and the data collected in orbit are described.

  6. Topographic Signatures in Aquarius Radiometer/Scatterometer Response: Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, C.; LeVine, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of topography on remote sensing at L-band is examined using the co-located Aquarius radiometer and scatterometer observations over land. A correlation with slope standard deviation is demonstrated for both the radiometer and scatterometer at topographic scales. Although the goal of Aquarius is remote sensing of sea surface salinity, the radiometer and scatterometer are on continuously and collect data for remote sensing research over land. Research is reported here using the data over land to determine if topography could have impact on the passive remote sensing at L-band. In this study, we report observations from two study regions: North Africa between 15 deg and 30 deg Northern latitudes and Australia less the Tasmania Island. Common to these two regions are the semi-arid climate and low population density; both favorable conditions to isolate the effect of topography from other sources of scatter and emission such as vegetation and urban areas. Over these study regions, topographic scale slopes within each Aquarius pixel are computed and their standard deviations are compared with Aquarius scatterometer and radiometer observations over a 36 day period between days 275 and 311 of 2011.

  7. Mapping the sky with the COBE differential microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssen, M. A.; Gulkis, S.

    1992-01-01

    The Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument on COBE is designed to determine the anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background by providing all-sky maps of the diffuse sky brightness at microwave frequencies. The principal intent of this lecture is to show how these maps are generated from differential measurements.

  8. A cavity radiometer for Earth albedo measurement, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Radiometric measurements of the directional albedo of the Earth requires a detector with a flat response from 0.2 to 50 microns, a response time of about 2 seconds, a sensitivity of the order of 0.02 mw/sq cm, and a measurement uncertainty of less than 5 percent. Absolute cavity radiometers easily meet the spectral response and accuracy requirements for Earth albedo measurements, but the radiometers available today lack the necessary sensitivity and response time. The specific innovations addressed were the development of a very low thermal mass cavity and printed/deposited thermocouple sensing elements which were incorporated into the radiometer design to produce a sensitive, fast response, absolute radiometer. The cavity is applicable to the measurement of the reflected and radiated fluxes from the Earth surface and lower atmosphere from low Earth orbit satellites. The effort consisted of requirements and thermal analysis; design, construction, and test of prototype elements of the black cavity and sensor elements to show proof-of-concept. The results obtained indicate that a black body cavity sensor that has inherently a flat response from 0.2 to 50 microns can be produced which has a sensitivity of at least 0.02 mw/sq cm per micro volt ouput and with a time constant of less than two seconds. Additional work is required to develop the required thermopile.

  9. High resolution soil moisture radiometer. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, T. T.

    1978-01-01

    An electrically scanned pushbroom phased antenna array is described for a microwave radiometer which can provide agriculturally meaningful measurements of soil moisture. The antenna size of 100 meters at 1400 MHz or 230 meters at 611 MHz requires several shuttle launches and orbital assembly. Problems inherent to the size of the structure and specific instrument problems are discussed as well as the preliminary design.

  10. Cryogenic environment and performance for testing the Planck radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terenzi, L.; Lapolla, M.; Laaninen, M.; Battaglia, P.; Cavaliere, F.; De Rosa, A.; Hughes, N.; Jukkala, P.; Kilpiä, V.-H.; Morgante, G.; Tomasi, M.; Varis, J.; Bersanelli, M.; Butler, R. C.; Ferrari, F.; Franceschet, C.; Leutenegger, P.; Mandolesi, N.; Mennella, A.; Silvestri, R.; Stringhetti, L.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Villa, F.

    2009-12-01

    The Planck LFI Radiometer Chain Assemblies (RCAs) have been calibrated in two dedicated cryogenic facilities. In this paper the facilities and the related instrumentation are described. The main satellite thermal interfaces for the single chains have to be reproduced and stability requirements have to be satisfied. Setup design, problems occurred and improving solutions implemented are discussed. Performance of the cryogenic setup are reported.

  11. Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cadeddu, MP

    2012-05-04

    The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  12. ENVISAT-1 Microwave Radiometer (MWR): validation campaign achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, Ornella; L'Abbate, Michele; Svara, Carlo; Caltagirone, Francesco; Guijarro, J.

    1998-12-01

    Alenia Aerospazio Remote Sensing Division started in 1986 the study of microwave radiometers under Italian Space Agency fundings, and since 1989 the definition and development of radiometric systems under European Space Agency (ESA) contracts. In particular the Multifrequency Imaging Microwave Radiometer (MIMR) and the ENVISAT Microwave Radiometer (MWR) were both developed by the European Industry, with Alenia Aerospazio as Prime Contractor. MWR is an instrument designed and developed as part of the Envisat-1 satellite scientific payload, with Alenia Spazio engaged in the phase C-D as instrument Prime Contractor, leading an industrial consortium of European and American companies. The Flight Model of the Instrument has been delivered to ESA at the end of July 1997, after completion of test and calibration activities. Given the MWR in-flight calibration concept, a specific pre-flight calibration and characterization activity was performed to define a radiometer mathematical model and a relevant ground characterization database including all model coefficients. The model and its database will be used by on-ground processing during instrument in-flight operation to retrieve the antenna-measured temperature. Standing its complexity and iterative measurement concept, the pre-flight characterization and calibration of the instrument is the key aspect of its development phase. Within this paper the key instrument design topics are summarized, and after a summary overview of the overall flight model qualification campaign, emphasis will be on the pre-flight calibration and characterization activities and radiometric performance achievements among several test phases.

  13. Absolute Radiometer for Reproducing the Solar Irradiance Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapritskii, V. I.; Pavlovich, M. N.

    1989-01-01

    A high-precision absolute radiometer with a thermally stabilized cavity as receiving element has been designed for use in solar irradiance measurements. The State Special Standard of the Solar Irradiance Unit has been built on the basis of the developed absolute radiometer. The Standard also includes the sun tracking system and the system for automatic thermal stabilization and information processing, comprising a built-in microcalculator which calculates the irradiance according to the input program. During metrological certification of the Standard, main error sources have been analysed and the non-excluded systematic and accidental errors of the irradiance-unit realization have been determined. The total error of the Standard does not exceed 0.3%. Beginning in 1984 the Standard has been taking part in a comparison with the Å 212 pyrheliometer and other Soviet and foreign standards. In 1986 it took part in the international comparison of absolute radiometers and standard pyrheliometers of socialist countries. The results of the comparisons proved the high metrological quality of this Standard based on an absolute radiometer.

  14. A horizontal vane radiometer: Experiment, theory, and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, David; Larraza, Andres; Garcia, Alejandro

    2016-03-01

    The existence of two motive forces on a Crookes radiometer has complicated the investigation of either force independently. The thermal creep shear force in particular has been subject to differing interpretations of the direction in which it acts and its order of magnitude. In this article, we provide a horizontal vane radiometer design which isolates the thermal creep shear force. The horizontal vane radiometer is explored through experiment, kinetic theory, and the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The qualitative agreement between the three methods of investigation is good except for a dependence of the force on the width of the vane even when the temperature gradient is narrower than the vane which is present in the DSMC method results but not in the theory. The experimental results qualitatively resemble the theory in this regard. The quantitative agreement between the three methods of investigation is better than an order of magnitude in the cases examined. The theory is closer to the experimental values for narrow vanes and the simulations are closer to the experimental values for the wide vanes. We find that the thermal creep force acts from the hot side to the cold side of the vane. We also find the peak in the radiometer's angular speed as a function of pressure is explained as much by the behavior of the drag force as by the behavior of the thermal creep force.

  15. Global measurements of air pollution from satellites. [employing radiometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. L.; Bartle, E. R.; Griggs, M.; Hall, G. D.; Hesketh, W. D.; Ludwig, C. B.; Malkmus, W.; Reichle, H.

    1974-01-01

    The conceptual design of an FOV nadir radiometer was examined for its applicability to monitoring the radiation process in the atmosphere as it relates to aerosol behavior. The instrument employs a gas filter correlation technique and is suitable for transportation onboard satellite.

  16. Improved cavity-type absolute total-radiation radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Sr.; Plamondon, J. A., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Conical cavity-type absolute radiometer measures the intensity of radiant energy to an accuracy of one to two percent in a vacuum of ten to the minus fifth torr or lower. There is a uniform response over the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared range, and it requires no calibration or comparison with a radiation standard.

  17. Radiometer calibration procedure and beacon attenuation estimation reference level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objectives are to compare radiometer attenuation with beacon attenuation and to compare sky temperature estimates with calculations using simultaneous meteorological data. Secondary objectives are: (1) noise diode and reference load measurements and (2) to adjust for outside temperature and component temperature changes.

  18. Inflatable Antenna Microwave Radiometer for Soil Moisture Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Kendall, Bruce M.; Schroeder, Lyle C.; Harrington, Richard F.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave measurements of soil moisture are not being obtained at the required spatial Earth resolution with current technology. Recently, new novel designs for lightweight reflector systems have been developed using deployable inflatable antenna structures which could enable lightweight real-aperture radiometers. In consideration of this, a study was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to determine the feasibility of developing a microwave radiometer system using inflatable reflector antenna technology to obtain high spatial resolution radiometric measurements of soil moisture from low Earth orbit and which could be used with a small and cost effective launch vehicle. The required high resolution with reasonable swath width coupled with the L-band measurement frequency for soil moisture dictated the use of a large (30 meter class) real aperture antenna in conjunction with a pushbroom antenna beam configuration and noise-injection type radiometer designs at 1.4 and 4.3 GHz to produce a 370 kilometer cross-track swath with a 10 kilometer resolution that could be packaged for launch with a Titan 2 class vehicle. This study includes design of the inflatable structure, control analysis, structural and thermal analysis, antenna and feed design, radiometer design, payload packaging, orbital analysis, and electromagnetic losses in the thin membrane inflatable materials.

  19. Dual-Polarization, Multi-Frequency Antenna Array for use with Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, John

    2013-01-01

    Advancements in common aperture antenna technology were employed to utilize its proprietary genetic algorithmbased modeling tools in an effort to develop, build, and test a dual-polarization array for Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) applications. Final program results demonstrate the ability to achieve a lightweight, thin, higher-gain aperture that covers the desired spectral band. NASA employs various passive microwave and millimeter-wave instruments, such as spectral radiometers, for a range of remote sensing applications, from measurements of the Earth's surface and atmosphere, to cosmic background emission. These instruments such as the HIRAD, SFMR (Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer), and LRR (Lightweight Rainfall Radiometer), provide unique data accumulation capabilities for observing sea surface wind, temperature, and rainfall, and significantly enhance the understanding and predictability of hurricane intensity. These microwave instruments require extremely efficient wideband or multiband antennas in order to conserve space on the airborne platform. In addition, the thickness and weight of the antenna arrays is of paramount importance in reducing platform drag, permitting greater time on station. Current sensors are often heavy, single- polarization, or limited in frequency coverage. The ideal wideband antenna will have reduced size, weight, and profile (a conformal construct) without sacrificing optimum performance. The technology applied to this new HIRAD array will allow NASA, NOAA, and other users to gather information related to hurricanes and other tropical storms more cost effectively without sacrificing sensor performance or the aircraft time on station. The results of the initial analysis and numerical design indicated strong potential for an antenna array that would satisfy all of the design requirements for a replacement HIRAD array. Multiple common aperture antenna methodologies were employed to achieve exceptional gain over the entire

  20. A Texture-Polarization Method for Estimating Convective/Stratiform Precipitation Area Coverage from Passive Microwave Radiometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Hong, Ye; Kummerow, Christian D.; Turk, Joseph; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Observational and modeling studies have described the relationships between convective/stratiform rain proportion and the vertical distributions of vertical motion, latent heating, and moistening in mesoscale convective systems. Therefore, remote sensing techniques which can quantify the relative areal proportion of convective and stratiform, rainfall can provide useful information regarding the dynamic and thermodynamic processes in these systems. In the present study, two methods for deducing the convective/stratiform areal extent of precipitation from satellite passive microwave radiometer measurements are combined to yield an improved method. If sufficient microwave scattering by ice-phase precipitating hydrometeors is detected, the method relies mainly on the degree of polarization in oblique-view, 85.5 GHz radiances to estimate the area fraction of convective rain within the radiometer footprint. In situations where ice scattering is minimal, the method draws mostly on texture information in radiometer imagery at lower microwave frequencies to estimate the convective area fraction. Based upon observations of ten convective systems over ocean and nine systems over land, instantaneous 0.5 degree resolution estimates of convective area fraction from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager (TRMM TMI) are compared to nearly coincident estimates from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR). The TMI convective area fraction estimates are slightly low-biased with respect to the PR, with TMI-PR correlations of 0.78 and 0.84 over ocean and land backgrounds, respectively. TMI monthly-average convective area percentages in the tropics and subtropics from February 1998 exhibit the greatest values along the ITCZ and in continental regions of the summer (southern) hemisphere. Although convective area percentages. from the TMI are systematically lower than those from the PR, monthly rain patterns derived from the TMI and PR rain algorithms are very similar

  1. PHyTIR - A Prototype Thermal Infrared Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Hook, Simon J.; Johnson, William R.; Foote, Marc C.; Paine, Christopher G.; Pannell, Zack W.; Smythe, Robert F.; Kuan, Gary M.; Jakoboski, Julie K.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the PHyTIR (Prototype HyspIRI Thermal Infrared Radiometer) instrument, which is the engineering model for the proposed HyspIRI (Hyperspectral Infrared Imager) earth observing instrument. The HyspIRI mission would be comprised of the HyspIRI TIR (Thermal Infrared Imager), and a VSWIR (Visible Short-Wave Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer). Both instruments would be used to address key science questions related to the earth's carbon cycle, ecosystems, climate, and solid earth properties. Data gathering of volcanic activities, earthquakes, wildfires, water use and availability, urbanization, and land surface compositions and changes, would aid the predictions and evaluations of such events and the impact they create. Even though the proposed technology for the HyspIRI imager is mature, the PHyTIR prototype is needed to advance the technology levels for several of the instrument's key components, and to reduce risks, in particular to validate 1) the higher sensitivity, spatial resolution, and higher throughput required for this focal plane array, 2) the pointing accuracy, 2) the characteristics of several spectral channels, and 4) the use of ambient temperature optics. The PHyTIR telescope consists of the focal plane assembly that is housed within a cold housing located inside a vacuum enclosure; all mounted to a bulkhead, and an optical train that consists of 3 powered mirrors; extending to both sides of the bulkhead. A yoke connects the telescope to a scan mirror. The rotating mirror enables to scan- a large track on the ground. This structure is supported by kinematic mounts, linking the telescope assembly to a base plate that would also become the spacecraft interface for HyspIRI. The focal plane's cooling units are also mounted to the base plate, as is an overall enclosure that has two viewing ports with large exterior baffles, shielding the focal plane from incoming stray light. PHyTIR's electronics is distributed inside and near the vacuum

  2. A New Way to Demonstrate the Radiometer as a Heat Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hladkouski, V. I.; Pinchuk, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    While the radiometer is readily available as a toy, A. E. Woodruff notes that it is also a very useful tool to help us understand how to resolve certain scientific problems. Many physicists think they know how the radiometer works, but only a few actually understand it. Here we present a demonstration that shows that a radiometer can be thought of…

  3. Design and Development of the SMAP Microwave Radiometer Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Medeiros, James J.; Horgan, Kevin A.; Brambora, Clifford K.; Estep, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer will measure land surface brightness temperature at L-band (1413 MHz) in the presence of radio frequency interference (RFI) for soil moisture remote sensing. The radiometer design was driven by the requirements to incorporate internal calibration, to operate synchronously with the SMAP radar, and to mitigate the deleterious effects of RFI. The system design includes a highly linear super-heterodyne microwave receiver with internal reference loads and noise sources for calibration and an innovative digital signal processor and detection system. The front-end comprises a coaxial cable-based feed network, with a pair of diplexers and a coupled noise source, and radiometer front-end (RFE) box. Internal calibration is provided by reference switches and a common noise source inside the RFE. The RF back-end (RBE) downconverts the 1413 MHz channel to an intermediate frequency (IF) of 120 MHz. The IF signals are then sampled and quantized by high-speed analog-to-digital converters in the radiometer digital electronics (RDE) box. The RBE local oscillator and RDE sampling clocks are phase-locked to a common reference to ensure coherency between the signals. The RDE performs additional filtering, sub-band channelization, cross-correlation for measuring third and fourth Stokes parameters, and detection and integration of the first four raw moments of the signals. These data are packetized and sent to the ground for calibration and further processing. Here we discuss the novel features of the radiometer hardware particularly those influenced by the need to mitigate RFI.

  4. Ocean energy program summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The oceans are the world's largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71% of the earth's surface, they collect and store this energy as waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. The purpose of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Ocean Energy Technology (OET) Program is to develop techniques that harness this ocean energy cost-effectively and in a way that does not harm the environment. The program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point where industry can accurately assess whether the technology is a viable energy conversion alternative, or supplement, to current power-generating systems. In past studies, DOE identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), which uses the temperature difference between warm surface water and cold deep water, as the most promising of the ocean energy technologies. As a result, the OET Program is concentrating on research that advances the OTEC technology. The program also continues to monitor and study developments in wave energy, ocean current, and salinity gradient concepts; but it is not actively developing these technologies now. 13 figs.

  5. Ocean energy program summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    The oceans are the world's largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71 percent of the earth's surface, they collect and store this energy as waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ocean Energy Technology (OET) Program is to develop techniques that harness this ocean energy cost effectively and in a way that does not harm the environment. The program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point where industry can accurately assess whether the technology is a viable energy conversion alternative, or supplement, to current power generating systems. In past studies, DOE identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), which uses the temperature difference between warm surface water and cold deep water, as the most promising of the ocean energy technologies. As a result, the OET Program is concentrating on research that advances the OTEC technology. The program also continues to monitor and study developments in wave energy, ocean current, and salinity gradient concepts; but it is not actively developing these technologies now.

  6. Wearable system-on-a-chip radiometer for remote temperature sensing and its application to the safeguard of emergency operators.

    PubMed

    Fonte, A; Alimenti, F; Zito, D; Neri, B; De Rossi, D; Lanatà, A; Tognetti, A

    2007-01-01

    The remote sensing and the detection of events that may represent a danger for human beings have become more and more important thanks to the latest advances of the technology. A microwave radiometer is a sensor capable to detect a fire or an abnormal increase of the internal temperature of the human body (hyperthermia), or an onset of a cancer, or even meteorological phenomena (forest fires, pollution release, ice formation on road pavement). In this paper, the overview of a wearable low-cost low-power system-on-a-chip (SoaC) 13 GHz passive microwave radiometer in CMOS 90 nm technology is presented. In particular, we focused on its application to the fire detection for civil safeguard. In detail, this sensor has been thought to be inserted into the fireman jacket in order to help the fireman in the detection of a hidden fire behind a door or a wall. The simulation results obtained by Ptolemy system simulation have confirmed the feasibility of such a SoaC microwave radiometer in a low-cost standard silicon technology for temperature remote sensing and, in particular, for its application to the safeguard of emergency operators. PMID:18003310

  7. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-02-01

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  8. DESIGN OF MEDICAL RADIOMETER FRONT-END FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE

    PubMed Central

    Klemetsen, Ø.; Birkelund, Y.; Jacobsen, S. K.; Maccarini, P. F.; Stauffer, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of building a singleband Dicke radiometer that is inexpensive, small-sized, stable, highly sensitive, and which consists of readily available microwave components. The selected frequency band is at 3.25–3.75 GHz which provides a reasonable compromise between spatial resolution (antenna size) and sensing depth for radiometry applications in lossy tissue. Foreseen applications of the instrument are non-invasive temperature monitoring for breast cancer detection and temperature monitoring during heating. We have found off-the-shelf microwave components that are sufficiently small (< 5 mm × 5 mm) and which offer satisfactory overall sensitivity. Two different Dicke radiometers have been realized: one is a conventional design with the Dicke switch at the front-end to select either the antenna or noise reference channels for amplification. The second design places a matched pair of low noise amplifiers in front of the Dicke switch to reduce system noise figure. Numerical simulations were performed to test the design concepts before building prototype PCB front-end layouts of the radiometer. Both designs provide an overall power gain of approximately 50 dB over a 500 MHz bandwidth centered at 3.5 GHz. No stability problems were observed despite using triple-cascaded amplifier configurations to boost the thermal signals. The prototypes were tested for sensitivity after calibration in two different water baths. Experiments showed superior sensitivity (36% higher) when implementing the low noise amplifier before the Dicke switch (close to the antenna) compared to the other design with the Dicke switch in front. Radiometer performance was also tested in a multilayered phantom during alternating heating and radiometric reading. Empirical tests showed that for the configuration with Dicke switch first, the switch had to be locked in the reference position during application of microwave heating to avoid damage to the active components

  9. Retrievals on Tropical small scale humidity variability from multi-channel microwave radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianhao; Zuidema, Paquita; Turner, David

    2016-04-01

    Small-scale atmospheric humidity structure is important to many atmospheric process studies. In the Tropics especially, convection is sensitive to small variations in humidity. High temporal-resolution humidity profiles and spatially-resolved humidity fields are valuable for understanding the relationship of convection to tropical humidity, such as at convectively-induced cold pools and as part of the shallow-to-deep cloud transition. Radiosondes can provide high resolution vertical profiles of temperature and humidity, but are relatively infrequent. Microwave radiometers (MWR) are able to profile and scan autonomously and output measurements frequently (~1 Hz). To date, few assessments of microwave humidity profiling in the Tropics have been undertaken. Löhnert et al. (2009) provide one evaluation for Darwin, Australia. We build on this using four months of data from the equatorial Indian Ocean, at Gan Island, collected from University of Miami's (UM) multi-channel radiometer during the Dynamics of Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) field campaign. Liquid Water Path (LWP) and Water Vapor Path (WVP) are physically retrieved using the MWR RETrieval (MWRRET) algorithm (Turner et al., 2007b), and humidity profiles in the tropics are retrieved using the Integrated Profiling Technique (Löhnert et al., 2004). Tropical temperature variability is weak and a climatological temperature profile is assumed, with humidity information drawn from five channels between 22 to 30 GHz. Scanning measurements were coordinated with the scanning pattern of NCAR's S-Pol-Ka radar. An analysis of the humidity information content gathered from both the profiling and scanning measurements will be presented.

  10. Development, Capabilities, and Impact on Wind Analyses of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T.; Amarin, R.; Atlas, R.; Bailey, M.; Black, P.; Buckley, C.; Chen, S.; El-Nimri, S.; Hood, R.; James, M.; Johnson, J.; Jones, W.; Ruf, C.; Simmons, D.; Uhlhorn, E.; Inglish, C.

    2010-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a new airborne microwave remote sensor for hurricane observations that is currently under development by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in partnership with the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/Hurricane Research Division, the University of Central Florida, the University of Michigan, and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The instrument is being test flown in January and is expected to participate in the tropical cyclone experiment GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) in the 2010 season. HIRAD is being designed to study the wind field in some detail within strong hurricanes and to enhance the real-time airborne ocean surface winds observation capabilities of NOAA and USAF Weather Squadron hurricane hunter aircraft currently using the operational Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR). Unlike SFMR, which measures wind speed and rain rate along the ground track at a single point directly beneath the aircraft, HIRAD will provide images of the surface wind and rain field over a wide swath (approximately 3 x the aircraft altitude) with approximately 2 km resolution. This paper describes the HIRAD instrument and the physical basis for its operations, including chamber test data from the instrument. The potential value of future HIRAD observations will be illustrated with a summary of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) in which measurements from the new instrument as well as those from existing instruments (air, surface, and space-based) are simulated from the output of a detailed numerical model, and those results are used to construct simulated H*Wind analyses. Evaluations will be presented on the impact on H*Wind analyses of using the HIRAD instrument observations to replace those of the SFMR instrument, and also on the impact of a future satellite-based HIRAD in comparison to instruments with more limited capabilities for observing strong winds through heavy

  11. Considerations on ejection velocity estimations from infrared radiometer data: A case study at Stromboli volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Laure; Donnadieu, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Synchronous recordings of normal Strombolian explosions with a thermal camera and infrared radiometers provide a unique opportunity to understand signals from less expensive radiometers. Using records from Stromboli volcano, we analyze in particular the limitations of using signals from infrared radiometers alone to quantify the plume ascent kinetics. We conclude that infrared radiometers pointing close to the vent, either single or coupled, are often insufficient for velocity retrieval due to the complex structure and dynamics of the plumes and their evolution with time. In addition to practical implementation difficulties in the field, this is mainly due to the rapid succession and overlapping of thermal components in the radiometer's field of view. Optimized geometries of radiometer fields of view and new retrieval methodologies are proposed to improve velocity estimates from one or coupled radiometers.

  12. Exploring the Turbulent Urban Boundary by Use of Lidars and Microwave Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arend, Mark; Valerio, Ivan; Neufeld, Stephen; Bishir, Raymond; Wu, Younghu; Moshary, Fred; Melecio-Vazquez, David; Gonzalez, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    A Doppler lidar has been developed using fiber optic based technologies and advanced signal processing techniques. Although this system has been operated in a scanning mode in the past, for this application, the system is operated in a vertically pointing mode and delivers a time series of vertical velocity profiles. By cooperating the Doppler lidar with other instruments, including a back scatter lidar, and a microwave radiometer, models of atmospheric stability can be tested, opening up an exciting path for researchers, applied scientists and engineers to discover unique phenomena related to fundamental atmospheric science processes. A consistent set of retrievals between each of these instruments emphasizes the utility for such a network of instruments to better characterize the turbulent atmospheric urban boundary layers which is expected to offer a useful capability for assessing and improving models that are in great need of such ground truth.

  13. A multiband radiometer and data acquisition system for remote sensing field research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Robinson, B. F.; Dewitt, D. P.; Silva, L. F.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1981-01-01

    Specifications are described for a recently developed prototype multispectral data acquisition system which consists of multiband radiometer with 8 bands between 0.4 and 12.5 micrometers and a data recording module to record data from the radometer and ancillary sources. The systems is adaptable to helicopter, truck, or tripod platforms, as well as hand-held operation. The general characteristics are: (1) comparatively inexpensive to acquire, maintain and operate; (2) simple to operate and calibrate; (3) complete with data hardware and software; and (4) well documented for use by researchers. The instrument system is to be commercially available and can be utilized by many researchers to obtain large numbers of accurate, calibrated spectral measurements. It can be a key element in improving and advancing the capability for field research in remote sensing.

  14. A Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer for Greenhouse Gas Measurements in the Atmospheric Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steel, Emily Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Laser Heterodyne Radiometry is a technique adapted from radio receiver technology has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere since the 1960s.By leveraging advances in the telecommunications industry, it has been possible to miniaturize this technology.The mini-LHR (Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer) has been under development at NASA Goddard Space flight Center since 2009. This sun-viewing instrument measures carbon dioxide and methane in the atmospheric column and operates in tandem with an AERONET sun photometer producing a simultaneous measure of aerosols. The mini-LHR has been extensively field tested in a range of locations ranging in the continental US as well as Alaska and Hawaii and now operates autonomously with sensitivities of approximately 0.2 ppmv and approximately10 ppbv, for carbon dioxide and methane respectively, for 10 averaged scans under clear sky conditions.

  15. A conceptual design of a large aperture microwave radiometer geostationary platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garn, Paul A.; Garrison, James L.; Jasinski, Rachel

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design of a Large Aperture Microwave Radiometer (LAMR) Platform has been developed and technology areas essential to the design and on-orbit viability of the platform have been defined. Those technologies that must be developed to the requirement stated here for the LAMR mission to be viable include: advanced radiation resistant solar cells, integrated complex structures, large segmented reflector panels, sub 3 kg/m(exp 2) areal density large antennas, and electric propulsion systems. Technology areas that require further development to enhance the capabilities of the LAMR platform (but are not essential for viability) include: electrical power storage, on-orbit assembly, and on-orbit systems checkout and correction.

  16. Satellite Ocean-Color Validation Using Ships of Opportunity. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Cutchin, David L.; Gross-Colzy, Lydwine; Poteau, Antoine; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves

    2003-01-01

    The investigation s main objective is to collect from platforms of opportunity (merchant ships, research vessels) concomitant normalized water-leaving radiance and aerosol optical thickness data over the world s oceans. A global, long-term data set of these variables is needed to verify whether satellite retrievals of normalized water-leaving radiance are within acceptable error limits and, eventually, to adjust atmospheric correction schemes. To achieve this objective, volunteer officers, technicians, and scientists onboard the selected ships collect data from portable SIMBAD and Advanced SIMBAD (SIMBADA) radiometers. These instruments are specifically designed for evaluation of satellite-derived ocean color. They measure radiance in spectral bands typical of ocean-color sensors. The SIMBAD version measures in 5 spectral bands centered at 443, 490, 560, 670, and 870 nm, and the Advanced SIMBAD version in 11 spectral bands centered at 350, 380, 412, 443, 490, 510, 565, 620, 670, 750, and 870 nm. Aerosol optical thickness is obtained by viewing the sun disk like a classic sun photometer. Normalized water-leaving radiance, or marine reflectance, is obtained by viewing the ocean surface through a vertical polarizer in a specific geometry (nadir angle of 45o and relative azimuth angle of 135deg) to minimize direct sun glint and reflected sky radiation. The SIMBAD and SIMBADA data, after proper quality control and processing, are delivered to the SIMBIOS project office for inclusion in the SeaBASS archive. They complement data collected in a similar way by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique of the University of Lille, France. The SIMBAD and SIMBADA data are used to check the radiometric calibration of satellite ocean-color sensors after launch and to evaluate derived ocean-color variables (i.e., normalized water-leaving radiance, aerosol optical thickness, and aerosol type). Analysis of the SIMBAD and SIMBADA data provides information on the accuracy of satellite

  17. A Compact L-band Radiometer for High Resolution sUAS-based Imaging of Soil Moisture and Surface Salinity Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Stachura, M.; Dai, E.; Elston, J.; McIntyre, E.; Leuski, V.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the long electrical wavelengths required along with practical aperture size limitations the scaling of passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture and salinity from spaceborne low-resolution (~10-100 km) applications to high resolution (~10-1000 m) applications requires use of low flying aerial vehicles. This presentation summarizes the status of a project to develop a commercial small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) hosting a microwave radiometer for mapping of soil moisture in precision agriculture and sea surface salinity studies. The project is based on the Tempest electric-powered UAS and a compact L-band (1400-1427 MHz) radiometer developed specifically for extremely small and lightweight aerial platforms or man-portable, tractor, or tower-based applications. Notable in this combination are a highly integrated sUAS/radiometer antenna design and use of both the upwelling emitted signal from the surface and downwelling cold space signal for precise calibration using a unique lobe-differencing correlating radiometer architecture. The system achieves a spatial resolution comparable to the altitude of the UAS above the surface while referencing upwelling measurements to the constant and well-known background temperature of cold space. The radiometer has been tested using analog correlation detection, although future builds will include infrared, near-infrared, and visible (red) sensors for surface temperature and vegetation biomass correction and digital sampling for radio frequency interference mitigation. This NASA-sponsored project is being developed for commercial application in cropland water management (for example, high-value shallow root-zone crops), landslide risk assessment, NASA SMAP satellite validation, and NASA Aquarius salinity stratification studies. The system will ultimately be capable of observing salinity events caused by coastal glacier and estuary fresh water outflow plumes and open ocean rainfall events.

  18. Airborne Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Temperature Using the Ball Experimental Sea Surface Temperature (BESST) Radiometer With A Discussion of the 2013 Marginal Ice Zone Observation Processes EXperiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooth, M.; Emery, W. J.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne remote sensing has opened up new possibilities for scientists to study oceanic and atmospheric problems that are relevant to industry, environmental groups, and the scientific community as a whole. Data obtained from these platforms can provide much higher resolution imagery in comparison to satellite observations that allow for more detailed analyses of important regions. Sea surface temperature (SST) data obtained from instruments like the BESST radiometer can be used to provide more insight into issues like natural disasters and oceanographic problems of interest; such as the influence of melting sea ice on SST. During the 2013 Marginal Ice Zone Observation Processes EXperiment (MIZOPEX), BESST was flown on a Scan Eagle UAS in the Alaskan Marginal Ice Zone to acquire SST data. These observations will be discussed, along with possible future uses for the BESST radiometer.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  20. Thermoelectric temperature control system for the pushbroom microwave radiometer (PBMR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Averill, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A closed loop thermoelectric temperature control system is developed for stabilizing sensitive RF integrated circuits within a microwave radiometer to an accuracy of + or - 0.1 C over a range of ambient conditions from -20 C to +45 C. The dual mode (heating and cooling) control concept utilizes partial thermal isolation of the RF units from an instrument deck which is thermally controlled by thermoelectric coolers and thin film heaters. The temperature control concept is simulated with a thermal analyzer program (MITAS) which consists of 37 nodes and 61 conductors. A full scale thermal mockup is tested in the laboratory at temperatures of 0 C, 21 C, and 45 C to confirm the validity of the control concept. A flight radiometer and temperature control system is successfully flight tested on the NASA Skyvan aircraft.

  1. Phased Array Radiometer Calibration Using a Radiated Noise Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutoch S.; Laymon, Charles A.; Meyer, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic beam steering capability of phased array antenna systems offer significant advantages when used in real aperture imaging radiometers. The sensitivity of such systems is limited by the ability to accurately calibrate variations in the antenna circuit characteristics. Passive antenna systems, which require mechanical rotation to scan the beam, have stable characteristics and the noise figure of the antenna can be characterized with knowledge of its physical temperature [1],[2]. Phased array antenna systems provide the ability to electronically steer the beam in any desired direction. Such antennas make use of active components (amplifiers, phase shifters) to provide electronic scanning capability while maintaining a low antenna noise figure. The gain fluctuations in the active components can be significant, resulting in substantial calibration difficulties [3]. In this paper, we introduce two novel calibration techniques that provide an end-to-end calibration of a real-aperture, phased array radiometer system. Empirical data will be shown to illustrate the performance of both methods.

  2. Transmission of radiometer data from the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The Synchronous Meteorological Satellite uses a spin scanner radiometer which generates eight visual signals and two infrared signals. These signals are multiplexed and converted into a 28-Mbps data stream. This signal is transmitted to ground by quadriphase modulation at 1686.1 MHz. On the ground, the digital signal is reconstructed to an analog signal. To conserve bandwidth, an analog-to-digital converter with a nonlinear transfer function was used for the visual signals. The size of the quantization step was made proportional to the noise output of the scanner photomultiplier tube which increases as the square root of incident light. The radiometer data transmission link was simulated on a digital computer to determine the transfer function. Some results of the simulation are shown.

  3. Active radiometer for self-calibrated furnace temperature measurements

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, P.P.; Cohn, D.R.; Titus, C.H.; Wittle, J.K.; Surma, J.E.

    1996-11-12

    A radiometer is described with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The radiometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/submillimeter-wave receiver including a millimeter/submillimeter-wave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement. 5 figs.

  4. G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Caddeau, MP

    2010-06-23

    The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from 15 channels between 170 and 183.310 GHz. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. Channels between 170.0 and 176.0 GHz are particularly sensitive to the presence of liquid water. The sensitivity to water vapor of the 183.31-GHz line is approximately 30 times higher than at the frequencies of the two-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) for a precipitable water vapor (PWV) amount of less than 2.5 mm. Measurements from the GVRP instrument are therefore especially useful during low-humidity conditions (PWV < 5 mm). In addition to integrated water vapor and liquid water, the GVRP can provide low-resolution vertical profiles of water vapor in very dry conditions.

  5. Rotating shadowband radiometer development and analysis of spectral shortwave data

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.; Min, Q.

    1996-04-01

    Our goals in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are improved measurements of spectral shortwave radiation and improved techniques for the retrieval of climatologically sensitive parameters. The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) that was developed during the first years of the ARM program has become a workhorse at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site, and it is widely deployed in other climate programs. We have spent most of our effort this year developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had some success in calculating shortwave surface diffuse spectral irradiance. Using the surface albedo and the global irradiance, we have calculated cloud optical depths. From cloud optical depth and liquid water measured with the microwave radiometer, we have calculated effective liquid cloud particle radii. The rest of the text will provide some detail regarding each of these efforts.

  6. Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer (NFOV) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, C; Marshak, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, JC; Schmelzer, J

    2008-11-01

    The two-channel narrow field-of-view radiometer (NFOV2) is a ground-based radiometer that looks straight up and measures radiance directly above the instrument at wavelengths of 673 and 870 nm. The field-of-view of the instrument is 1.2 degrees, and the sampling time resolution is one second. Measurements of the NFOV2 have been used to retrieve optical properties for overhead clouds that range from patchy to overcast. With a one-second sampling rate of the NFOV2, faster than almost any other ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrument, we are able, for the first time, to capture changes in cloud optical properties at the natural time scale of cloud evolution.

  7. Measuring Ocean Literacy: What teens understand about the ocean using the Survey of Ocean Literacy and Engagement (SOLE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greely, T. M.; Lodge, A.

    2009-12-01

    Ocean issues with conceptual ties to science and global society have captured the attention, imagination, and concern of an international audience. Climate change, over fishing, marine pollution, freshwater shortages and alternative energy sources are a few ocean issues highlighted in our media and casual conversations. The ocean plays a role in our life in some way everyday, however, disconnect exists between what scientists know and the public understands about the ocean as revealed by numerous ocean and coastal literacy surveys. While the public exhibits emotive responses through care, concern and connection with the ocean, there remains a critical need for a baseline of ocean knowledge. However, knowledge about the ocean must be balanced with understanding about how to apply ocean information to daily decisions and actions. The present study analyzed underlying factors and patterns contributing to ocean literacy and reasoning within the context of an ocean education program, the Oceanography Camp for Girls. The OCG is designed to advance ocean conceptual understanding and decision making by engagement in a series of experiential learning and stewardship activities from authentic research settings in the field and lab. The present study measured a) what understanding teens currently hold about the ocean (content), b) how teens feel toward the ocean environment (environmental attitudes and morality), and c) how understanding and feelings are organized when reasoning about ocean socioscientific issues (e.g. climate change, over fishing, energy). The Survey of Ocean Literacy and Engagement (SOLE), was used to measure teens understanding about the ocean. SOLE is a 57-item survey instrument aligned with the Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts of Ocean Literacy (NGS, 2007). Rasch analysis was used to refine and validate SOLE as a reasonable measure of ocean content knowledge (reliability, 0.91). Results revealed that content knowledge and environmental

  8. BCube Ocean Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Mattia; Schofield, Oscar; Pearlman, Jay; Nativi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    To address complex Earth system issues such as climate change and water resources, geoscientists must work across disciplinary boundaries; this requires them to access data outside of their fields. Scientists are being called upon to find, access, and use diverse and voluminous data types that are described with semantics. Within the framework of the NSF EarthCube programme, the BCube project (A Broker Framework for Next Generation Geoscience) is addressing the need for effective and efficient multi-disciplinary collaboration and interoperability through the advancement of brokering technologies. BCube develops science scenarios as key elements in providing an environment for demonstrating capabilities, benefits, and challenges of the developed e-infrastructure. The initial focus is on hydrology, oceans, polar and weather, with the intent to make the technology applicable and available to all the geosciences. This presentation focuses on the BCube ocean scenario. The purpose of this scenario is to increase the understanding of the ocean dynamics through incorporation of a wide range of in-situ and satellite data into ocean models using net primary productivity as the initial variable. The science scenario aims to identify spatial and temporal domains in ocean models, and key ecological variables. Field data sets and remote observations data sets from distributed and heterogeneous systems are accessed through the broker and will be incorporated into the models. In this work we will present the achievements in the development of the BCube ocean scenario.

  9. ARM Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR): irradiances

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hodges, Gary

    1993-07-04

    The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) takes spectral measurements of direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. These measurements are at nominal wavelengths of 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. The measurements are made at a user-specified time interval, usually about one minute or less. The sampling rate for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility MFRSRs is 20 seconds. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's optical depth at the wavelengths mentioned above. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Michalsky et al. 1994) and other atmospheric constituents. A silicon detector is also part of the MFRSR. This detector provides a measure of the broadband direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. A MFRSR head that is mounted to look vertically downward can measure upwelling spectral irradiances. In the ARM system, this instrument is called a multifilter radiometer (MFR). At the Southern Great Plains (SGP) there are two MFRs; one mounted at the 10-m height and the other at 25 m. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites, the MFRs are mounted at 10 m. MFRSR heads are also used to measure normal incidence radiation by mounting on a solar tracking device. These are referred to as normal incidence multi-filter radiometers (NIMFRs) and are located at the SGP and NSA sites. Another specialized use for the MFRSR is the narrow field of view (NFOV) instrument located at SGP. The NFOV is a ground-based radiometer (MFRSR head) that looks straight up.

  10. Electromagnetic design of a microwave radiometer antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. K.; Cockrell, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary electromagnetic (EM) design of a radiometric antenna system was developed for the microwave radiometer spacecraft mission. The antenna system consists of a large spherical reflector and an array of feed horns along a concentric circular arc in front of the reflector. The reflector antenna was sized to simultaneously produce 200 contiguous 1 km diameter footprints with an overall beam efficiency of 90 percent, and the feed horns and feed horn array were designed to monitor the radiation from the footprints.

  11. Characterization of spectral irradiance system based on a filter radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, M. S.; Silva, T. F.; Duarte, I.; Correa, J. S.; Viana, D.; Sousa, W. A.; Almeida, G. B.; Couceiro, I. B.

    2016-07-01

    The spectral irradiance scale has been realized recently. It is based on a filter radiometer that was mounted and characterized. The optical system was assembled and the procedures of the methodology were defined, including the mounting of FEL lamp jig, alignment of the optical system, calibration of the instruments and optical devices used on the experimental system. The main uncertainty components were evaluated and the preliminary uncertainty budget of the spectral irradiance system is presented.

  12. A One-Dimensional Synthetic-Aperture Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doiron, Terence; Piepmeier, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A proposed one-dimensional synthetic- aperture microwave radiometer could serve as an alternative to either the two-dimensional synthetic-aperture radiometer described in the immediately preceding article or to a prior one-dimensional one, denoted the Electrically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR), mentioned in that article. The proposed radiometer would operate in a pushbroom imaging mode, utilizing (1) interferometric cross-track scanning to obtain cross-track resolution and (2) the focusing property of a reflector for along-track resolution. The most novel aspect of the proposed system would be the antenna (see figure), which would include a cylindrical reflector of offset parabolic cross section. The reflector could be made of a lightweight, flexible material amenable to stowage and deployment. Other than a stowage/deployment mechanism, the antenna would not include moving parts, and cross-track scanning would not entail mechanical rotation of the antenna. During operation, the focal line, parallel to the cylindrical axis, would be oriented in the cross-track direction, so that placement of receiving/radiating elements at the focal line would afford the desired along-track resolution. The elements would be microwave feed horns sparsely arrayed along the focal line. The feed horns would be oriented with their short and long cross-sectional dimensions parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the cylindrical axis to obtain fan-shaped beams having their broad and narrow cross-sectional dimensions parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the cylindrical axis. The interference among the beams would be controlled in the same manner as in the ESTAR to obtain along-cylindrical- axis (cross-track) resolution and cross-track scanning.

  13. A combined radar-radiometer with variable polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument is described that provides both radar and radiometer data at the same time. The antenna and receiver are time shared for the two sensor functions. The antenna polarization can be electronically scanned at rates up to 5000 changes for both the transmit and receive signal paths. This equipment is to investigate target signatures for remote sensing applications. The function of the equipment is described and the results for observations of asphalt, grass, and gravel surfaces are presented.

  14. ENVISAT-1 Microwave Radiometer MWR: current design status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Abbate, Michele; Bombaci, Ornella; Caltagirone, Francesco

    1996-12-01

    ENVISAT-1 microwave radiometer (MWR) is an instrument designed and developed for the European Space Agency by the European Industry. The instrument will be part of the ENVISAT-1 satellite scientific payload. Alenia Spazio is engaged in the phase C-D as instrument Prime Contractor, responsible for design and development, leading an industrial consortium of European and American companies. The current design takes also benefits from Alenia Spazio activities as MIMR radiometer Prime Contractor in the frame of METOP ESA program. The MWR design concept derives from the experimental radiometers embarked on ERS-1 satellite.It is a two channels passive Dicke microwave radiometer, operating at 23.8 and 36.5 GHz. By receiving and analyzing the earth's generated and reflected radiation at these two frequencies, this instrument is able to measure the amount of water content in the atmosphere within a 20 Km diameter field of view immediately beneath the satellite's track. A two points calibration scheme is adopted with hot and old calibration reference points, so that periodically the measurements of earth scene radiation are interrupted to allow the measurement of an on-board calibration load and of the deep cold space. The MWR output products are of prime importance for wind/wave products of radar altimeter instrument part of the ENVISAT-1 payload, providing correction of atmospheric propagation data, but also for direct evaluation of brightness temperature to characterize polar ice, land surface properties and for sea surface temperature accurate measurements. Within this paper, after an overview of the instrument design concept, the MWR radiometric performance prediction is presented, with emphasis on the design and technology applied to radiometric receivers.

  15. The DC-8 Submillimeter-Wave Cloud Ice Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven; Batelaan, Paul; Siegel, Peter; Evans, K. Franklin; Evans, Aaron; Balachandra, Balu; Gannon, Jade; Guldalian, John; Raz, Guy; Shea, James; Smith, Christopher; Thomassen, John

    2000-01-01

    Submillimeter-wave cloud ice radiometry is an innovative technique for determining the amount of ice present in cirrus clouds, measuring median crystal size, and constraining crystal shape. The radiometer described in this poster is being developed to acquire data to validate radiometric retrievals of cloud ice at submillimeter wavelengths. The goal of this effort is to develop a technique to enable spaceborne characterization of cirrus, meeting key climate modeling and NASA measurement needs.

  16. Analysis of Anechoic Chamber Testing of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenigstein, David; Ruf, Chris; James, Mark; Simmons, David; Miller, Timothy; Buckley, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer System (HIRAD) is a new airborne passive microwave remote sensor developed to observe hurricanes. HIRAD incorporates synthetic thinned array radiometry technology, which use Fourier synthesis to reconstruct images from an array of correlated antenna elements. The HIRAD system response to a point emitter has been measured in an anechoic chamber. With this data, a Fourier inversion image reconstruction algorithm has been developed. Performance analysis of the apparatus is presented, along with an overview of the image reconstruction algorithm

  17. Multifrequency Aperture-Synthesizing Microwave Radiometer System (MFASMR). Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, C. A.; Chang, M. U.

    1981-01-01

    Background material and a systems analysis of a multifrequency aperture - synthesizing microwave radiometer system is presented. It was found that the system does not exhibit high performance because much of the available thermal power is not used in the construction of the image and because the image that can be formed has a resolution of only ten lines. An analysis of image reconstruction is given. The system is compared with conventional aperture synthesis systems.

  18. Color coded data obtained by JPL's Shuttle Multispectral Infrared radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Color coded data obtained from Baja California, Mexico to Texas by JPL's Shuttle Multispectral Infrared radiometer is pictured. The map shows where data was obtained on the 19th orbit of the mission. Yellow and green areas represent water. The first brown segment at left is Baja California, and the second begins at the coast of mainland Mexico and extends into Texas. The dark brown strips at the right are clouds.

  19. Three field tests of a gas filter correlation radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, S. A.; Casas, J. C.; Condon, E. P.

    1977-01-01

    Test flights to remotely measure nonurban carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations by gas filter correlation radiometry are discussed. The inferred CO concentrations obtained through use of the Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR) agreed with independent measurements obtained by gas chromatography air sample bottle analysis to within 20 percent. The equipment flown on board the aircraft, the flight test procedure, the gas chromatograph direct air sampling procedure, and the GFCR data analysis procedure are reported.

  20. Scanning mechanism study for multi-frequency microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, I.

    1976-01-01

    Scanning mode for a microwave radiometer having large aperture antenna is determined from scientific needs by engineering tradeoffs. Two configurations of the scan drive mechanism with an integral momentum compensation are formulated for 1.OM and 1.4M diameter antennas. As the formulation is based on currently available components, it is possible to design and fabricate the formulated mechanism without new hardware development. A preliminary specification for major components of formulated drives is also included in the report.

  1. Responses of the Tropical Pacific to Wind Forcing as Observed by Spaceborne Sensors and Simulated by an Ocean General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Qenqing; Atlas, Robert

    1996-01-01

    In this study, satellite observations, in situ measurements, and model simulations are combined to assess the oceanic response to surface wind forcing in the equatorial Pacific. The surface wind fields derived from observations by the spaceborne special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) and from the operational products of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) are compared. When SSM/I winds are used to force a primitive-equation ocean general circulation model (OGCM), they produce 3 C more surface cooling than ECMWF winds for the eastern equatorial Pacific during the cool phase of an El Nino-Southern Oscillation event. The stronger cooling by SSM/I winds is in good agreement with measurements at the moored buoys and observations by the advanced very high resolution radiometer, indicating that SSM/I winds are superior to ECMWF winds in forcing the tropical ocean. In comparison with measurements from buoys, tide gauges, and the Geosat altimeter, the OGCM simulates the temporal variations of temperature, steric, and sea level changes with reasonable realism when forced with the satellite winds. There are discrepancies between model simulations and observations that are common to both wind forcing fields, one of which is the simulation of zonal currents; they could be attributed to model deficiencies. By examining model simulations under two winds, vertical heat advection and uplifting of the thermocline are found to be the dominant factors in the anomalous cooling of the ocean mixed layer.

  2. Extratropical Influence of Sea Surface Temperature and Wind on Water Recycling Rate Over Oceans and Coastal Lands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Hua; Liu, W. Timothy

    1999-01-01

    Water vapor and precipitation are two important parameters confining the hydrological cycle in the atmosphere and over the ocean surface. In the extratropical areas, due to variations of midlatitude storm tracks and subtropical jetstreams, water vapor and precipitation have large variability. Recently, a concept of water recycling rate defined previously by Chahine et al. (GEWEX NEWS, August, 1997) has drawn increasing attention. The recycling rate of moisture is calculated as the ratio of precipitation to total precipitable water (its inverse is the water residence time). In this paper, using multi-sensor spacebased measurements we will study the role of sea surface temperature and ocean surface wind in determining the water recycling rate over oceans and coastal lands. Response of water recycling rate in midlatitudes to the El Nino event will also be discussed. Sea surface temperature data are derived from satellite observations from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) blended with in situ measurements, available for the period 1982-1998. Global sea surface wind observations are obtained from spaceborne scatterometers aboard on the European Remote-Sensing Satellite (ERS1 and 2), available for the period 1991-1998. Global total precipitable water provided by the NASA Water Vapor Project (NVAP) is available for the period 1988-1995. Global monthly mean precipitation provided by the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) is available for the period 1987-1998.

  3. Experimental measurements and noise analysis of a cryogenic radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, S. M.; Woods, S. I.; Jung, T. M.; Carter, A. C.; Datla, R. U.

    2014-07-15

    A cryogenic radiometer device, intended for use as part of an electrical-substitution radiometer, was measured at low temperature. The device consists of a receiver cavity mechanically and thermally connected to a temperature-controlled stage through a thin-walled polyimide tube which serves as a weak thermal link. With the temperature difference between the receiver and the stage measured in millikelvin and the electrical power measured in picowatts, the measured responsivity was 4700 K/mW and the measured thermal time constant was 14 s at a stage temperature of 1.885 K. Noise analysis in terms of Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) was used to quantify the various fundamental and technical noise contributions, including phonon noise and Johnson-Nyquist noise. The noise analysis clarifies the path toward a cryogenic radiometer with a noise floor limited by fundamental phonon noise, where the magnitude of the phonon NEP is 6.5 fW/√(Hz) for the measured experimental parameters.

  4. Experimental measurements and noise analysis of a cryogenic radiometer.

    PubMed

    Carr, S M; Woods, S I; Jung, T M; Carter, A C; Datla, R U

    2014-07-01

    A cryogenic radiometer device, intended for use as part of an electrical-substitution radiometer, was measured at low temperature. The device consists of a receiver cavity mechanically and thermally connected to a temperature-controlled stage through a thin-walled polyimide tube which serves as a weak thermal link. With the temperature difference between the receiver and the stage measured in millikelvin and the electrical power measured in picowatts, the measured responsivity was 4700 K/mW and the measured thermal time constant was 14 s at a stage temperature of 1.885 K. Noise analysis in terms of Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) was used to quantify the various fundamental and technical noise contributions, including phonon noise and Johnson-Nyquist noise. The noise analysis clarifies the path toward a cryogenic radiometer with a noise floor limited by fundamental phonon noise, where the magnitude of the phonon NEP is 6.5 fW/√Hz for the measured experimental parameters. PMID:25085171

  5. Remote sensing of soil moisture with microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T.; Wilheit, T.; Webster, W., Jr.; Gloerson, P.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented that were derived from measurements made by microwave radiometers during the March 1972 and February 1973 flights of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Convair-9900 aircraft over agricultural test sites in the southwestern part of United States. The purpose of the missions was to study the use of microwave radiometers for the remote sensing of soil moisture. The microwave radiometers covered the 0.8- to 21-cm wavelength range. The results show a good linear correlation between the observed microwave brightness temperature and moisture content of the 0- to 1-cm layer of the soil. The results at the largest wavelength (21 cm) show the greatest sensitivity to soil moisture variations and indicate the possibility of sensing these variations through a vegetative canopy. The effect of soil texture on the emission from the soil was also studied and it was found that this effect can be compensated for by expressing soil moisture as a percent of field capacity for the soil. The results were compared with calculations based on a radiative transfer model for layered dielectrics and the agreement is very good at the longer wavelengths. At the shorter wavelengths, surface roughness effects are larger and the agreement becomes poorer.

  6. A cross beam interferometer radiometer for high resolution microwave sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malliot, Harold A.

    The conceptual design of a cross beam interferometer radiometer (CBIR) for sea surface temperature sensing at 5.0 GHz is described. In a 833-km orbit, the radiometer provides 0.48 K sensitivity with a spatial resolution less than 25 km in a 1561-km swath. The radiometer consists of a pair of rectangular phased arrays in a T configuration. Each array forms ten colinear beams that project ten pairs of crossed elliptical footprints on the sea surface. The footprints from the horizontal array have minor axes that range from 14.6 km to 22.9 km and are oriented in the cross-track direction. The footprints from the vertical array have minor axes that range from 18.6 km to 25.0 km and are oriented in the along-track direction. The Mills periodic 0-180-deg switching radio telescope technique is used to sense the variations in sea surface radio-thermal brightness temperature in the coincidence areas where the beams overlap. The CBIR concept, system design approach, antenna design and beamforming technique are described.

  7. Size-of-Source Effect Sensitivities in Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dury, M. R.; Arneil, T. C.; Machin, G.; Goodman, T. M.

    2014-07-01

    When performing high accuracy radiation thermometry, the size-of-source effect (SSE) of a radiometer can provide a significant contribution to the uncertainties associated with the measurements. During the development of a new radiometer designed specifically to measure the melting points of high-temperature fixed-point cells, indirect SSE measurements were performed on a prototype instrument to aid selection of optical components and their optimum positions with the aim of minimizing its SSE. As the radiometer's objective lens can produce much of the scattered light that contributes to the SSE, a set of objective lenses was compared and found to have SSEs between and . Further improvements were found by controlling the positioning and size of the stray light reducing Lyot stop. The diameter of the Lyot stop had to be set carefully: too small a diameter and it provides a low SSE but reduces the instrument's signal from the source; too large a diameter and it provides little or no reduction in the SSE. The sensitivities in the Lyot stop and collimating lens positions were tested, and the instrument's SSE was found to be tolerant of small displacements of either the lens or Lyot stop, however, larger movements yielded an increase in the SSE. The extremes in position increased the SSE to for the collimating lens and for the Lyot stop.

  8. Radiometer system to map the cosmic background radiation.

    PubMed

    Gorenstein, M V; Muller, R A; Smoot, G F; Tyson, J A

    1978-04-01

    We have developed a 33-GHz airborne radiometer system to map large angular scale variations in the temperature of the 3 K cosmic background radiation. A ferrite circulator switches a room-temperature mixer between two antennas pointing 60 degrees apart in the sky. In 40 min of observing, the radiometer can measure the anisotropy of the microwave background with an accuracy of +/-1 mK rms, or about 1 part in 3000 of 3 K. The apparatus is flown in a U-2 jet to 20 km altitude where 33-GHz thermal microwave emission from the atmosphere is at a low level. A second radiometer, tuned to 54 GHz near oxygen emission lines, monitors spurious signals from residual atmospheric radiation. The antennas, which have an extremely low side-lobe response of less than -65 dB past 60 degrees , reject anisotropic radiation from the earth's surface. Periodic interchange of the antenna positions and reversal of the aircraft's flight direction cancel equipment-based imbalances. The system has been operated successfully in U-2 aircraft flown from NASA-Ames at Moffett Field, CA. PMID:18699121

  9. Calibration Methodology for the Lightweight Rainfall Radiometer STAR Aircraft Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Principe, Caleb; Ruf, Christopher; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A proposed methodology for the in-flight calibration of a Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (STAR) airborne sensor with the potential application to a space flight version. The application of the spaceflight version of this instrument will address several pressing issues related to the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM). The X-Band Lightweight Rainfall Radiometer using STAR technology (LRR-X) is an aircraft sensor that is jointly developed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Michigan. This paper will describe the theory of calibration as well as the hardware design specifications used by the method. The on-board hardware uses individual uncorrelated warm loads on each receiver as well as to a single noise diode providing a correlated noise source to each receiver. A procedure for maintaining onboard calibration with an optimum running average using correlated bursts of thermal noise interleaved with scene data will be exercised during the maiden flight of the LRR-X instrument during the spring of 2003. The final component of calibration of a synthetic aperture radiometer is the image reconstruction algorithm that uses the measured correlations to produce the temperature brightness (TB) images. An overview of system-level testing, both on the ground and in-flight, will be presented to validate the absolute accuracy of the image reconstruction algorithm.

  10. The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) - precision infrared radiometer (PIR) platform in Fairbanks: Scientific objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Stamnes, K.; Leontieva, E.

    1996-04-01

    The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) and precision infrared radiometer (PIR) have been employed at the Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks to check their performance under arctic conditions. Drawing on the experience of the previous measurements in the Arctic, the PIR was equipped with a ventilator to prevent frost and moisture build-up. We adopted the Solar Infrared Observing Sytem (SIROS) concept from the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) to allow implementation of the same data processing software for a set of radiation and meteorological instruments. To validate the level of performance of the whole SIROS prior to its incorporation into the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site instrumental suite for flux radiatin measurements, the comparison between measurements and model predictions will be undertaken to assess the MFRSR-PIR Arctic data quality.

  11. Radiogenic Isotopes As Paleoceanographic Tracers in Deep-Sea Corals: Advances in TIMS Measurements of Pb Isotopes and Application to Southern Ocean Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. J.; van de Flierdt, T.; Bridgestock, L. J.; Paul, M.; Rehkamper, M.; Robinson, L. F.; Adkins, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Deep-sea corals have emerged as a valuable archive of deep ocean paleoceanographic change, with uranium-series dating providing absolute ages and the potential for centennial resolution. In combination with measurements of radiocarbon, neodymium isotopes and clumped isotopes, this archive has recently been exploited to reconstruct changes in ventilation, water mass sourcing and temperature in relation to millennial climate change. Lead (Pb) isotopes in both corals and seawater have also been used to track anthropogenic inputs through space and time and to trace transport pathways within the oceans. Better understanding of the oceanic Pb cycle is emerging from the GEOTRACES programme. However, while Pb isotopes have been widely used in environmental studies, their full potential as a (pre-anthropogenic) paleoceanographic tracer remains to be exploited. In deep-sea corals, challenges exist from low Pb concentrations in aragonite in comparison to secondary coatings, the potential for contamination, and the efficient elemental separation required for measurement by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS). Here we discuss progress in measuring Pb isotopes in coral aragonite using a 207Pb-204Pb double spike on a ThermoFinnigan Triton TIMS. For a 2 ng NIST-981 Pb standard, the long term reproducibility (using 1011 Ω resistors) is ~1000 ppm (2 s.d.) on 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb ratios. We now show that using a new 1012 Ω resistor to measure the small 204Pb beam improves the internal precision on these ratios from ~500 ppm (2 s.e.) to ~250 ppm (2 s.e.) and we envisage a potential improvement in the long term reproducibility as a consequence. We further assess the internal precision and external reproducibility of our method using a BCR-2 rock standard and an in-house coral standard. Preliminary evidence on the application of this method to natural samples is derived from cleaning experiments and replication tests on deep-sea corals from the Southern

  12. Low-cost solar array project: Four absolute cavity radiometer (pyrheliometer) intercomparisons at New River, Arizona: Radiometer standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estey, R. S.; Seaman, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    Four detailed intercomparisons were made for a number of models of cavity-type self-calibrating radiometers (pyrheliometers). Each intercomparison consisted of simultaneous readings of pyrheliometers at 30-second intervals in runs of 10 minutes, with at least 15 runs per intercomparison. Twenty-seven instruments were in at least one intercomparison, and five were in all four. Summarized results and all raw data are provided from the intercomparisons.

  13. A theory of microwave apparent temperature over the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Fung, A. K.

    1973-01-01

    In the microwave region combined active (scatterometer) and passive (radiometer) remote sensors over the ocean show promise of providing surface wind speeds and weather information to the oceanographer and meteorologist. This has aroused great interest in the investigation of the scattering of waves from the sea surface. A composite surface scattering theory is investigated. The two-scale scattering theory proposed by Semyonov was specifically extended to compute the emmision and scattering characteristics of ocean surfaces. The effects of clouds and rain on the radiometer and scatterometer observations are also investigated using horizontally stratified model atmospheres with rough sea surfaces underneath. Various cloud and rain models proposed by meteorologist were employed to determine the rise in the microwave temperature when viewing downward through these model atmospheres. For heavy rain-fall rates the effects of scattering on the radiative transfer process are included.

  14. Aquarius Whole Range Calibration: Celestial Sky, Ocean, and Land Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Le Vine, David M.; Bindlish, Rajat; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Brown, Shannon T.

    2014-01-01

    Aquarius is a spaceborne instrument that uses L-band radiometers to monitor sea surface salinity globally. Other applications of its data over land and the cryosphere are being developed. Combining its measurements with existing and upcoming L-band sensors will allow for long term studies. For that purpose, the radiometers calibration is critical. Aquarius measurements are currently calibrated over the oceans. They have been found too cold at the low end (celestial sky) of the brightness temperature scale, and too warm at the warm end (land and ice). We assess the impact of the antenna pattern model on the biases and propose a correction. We re-calibrate Aquarius measurements using the corrected antenna pattern and measurements over the Sky and oceans. The performances of the new calibration are evaluated using measurements over well instrument land sites.

  15. Classification of Tropical Oceanic Precipitation using High-Altitude Aircraft Microwave and Electric Field Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Cecil, Daniel J.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas m.; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Marks, Frank D., Jr.; Zipser, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    During the 1998 and 2001 hurricane seasons of the western Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR), the ER-2 Doppler (EDOP) radar, and the Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) were flown aboard the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft as part of the Third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) and the Fourth Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4). Several hurricanes, tropical storms, and other precipitation systems were sampled during these experiments. An oceanic rainfall screening technique has been developed using AMPR passive microwave observations of these systems collected at frequencies of 10.7, 19.35, 37.1, and 85.5 GHz. This technique combines the information content of the four AMPR frequencies regarding the gross vertical structure of hydrometeors into an intuitive and easily executable precipitation mapping format. The results have been verified using vertical profiles of EDOP reflectivity and lower-altitude horizontal reflectivity scans collected by the NOAA WP3D Orion radar. Matching the rainfall classification results with coincident electric field information collected by the LIP readily identifies convective rain regions within the precipitation fields. This technique shows promise as a real-time research and analysis tool for monitoring vertical updraft strength and convective intensity from airborne platforms such as remotely operated or uninhabited aerial vehicles. The technique is analyzed and discussed for a wide variety of precipitation types using the 26 August 1998 observations of Hurricane Bonnie near landfall.

  16. Solar heating of the Arctic Ocean in the context of ice-albedo feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinker, Rachel T.; Niu, Xiaolei; Ma, Yingtao

    2014-12-01

    To study the relationship of solar heat input into the Arctic open water and the variations of sea ice extent, improved satellite-based estimates of shortwave radiative (SWR) fluxes and most recent observations of ice extent are used. The SWR flux estimates are based on observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) for the period of 1984-2009. Ice extent information at 25 km resolution comes from Nimbus-7 SMMR and DMSP SSM/I Passive Microwave Data as generated with the NASA Team algorithm developed by the Oceans and Ice Branch, Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The trends of the solar heat input into the ocean and the open water fraction for 1984-2009 are found to be positive: 0.3%/yr and 0.8%/yr, respectively, at a 99% confidence level. There is an obvious transition region separating the 26 years into two periods: one with moderate change: 1984-2002, and the other with an abrupt growth in both solar heat input and open water fraction: 2003-2009. The impact of the observed changes on the reduction of winter ice growth in 2007 is estimated to be about 44 cm, and a delay in fall freezeup as about 10-36 days.

  17. Satellite Ocean Color Validation Using Merchant Ships. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Cutchin, David L.; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves

    2001-01-01

    A collaborative measurement program for evaluating satellite-derived ocean color has been developed based on ships of opportunity (merchant, oceanographic) and specific instrumentation, the SIMBAD radiometer. The purpose of the measurement program is to complement, in a cost-effective way, dedicated evaluation experiments at sea, which are expensive, cannot be carried out over the full range of expected oceanic and atmospheric conditions, and generally provide a few match-ups. Ships participate in the program on a volunteer basis or at a very small cost, and measurement procedures do not interfere with other ship activities. The SIMBAD radiometer is a portable, easy-to-operate instrument that measures the basic ocean color variables, namely aerosol optical thickness and water-leaving radiance, in typical spectral bands of ocean-color sensors, i.e., 443, 490, 560, 670, and 870 nm. Measuring these variables at the time of satellite overpass is usually sufficient to verify satellite-derived ocean color and to evaluate atmospheric correction algorithms. Any ordinary crew can learn quickly how to make measurements. Importantly, the ship is not required to stop, making it possible to collect data along regular routes traveled by merchant ships in the world's oceans.

  18. Development of Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuzuki, Toshiyuki; Iwasaki, Nobuo; Hara, Norikazu

    ADEOS ia a large satellite which could be called a polar orbiting platform. The weight is 3.5 tons and power is 4.5 KW at the end of three years of mission life. It is scheduled to be launched in early 1995 by the H-II launch vehicle from Tanegashima Space Center. ADEOS carries two core sensors and six Announcement Opportunity (AO) sensors. The core sensors are called the Ocean Color and Temperature Scanner (OCTS) and the Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer (ANVIR), which are being developed by NASDA. The AO sensors are the NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT), the NASA Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), the Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances of CNES, the Interferometric Monitor for Greenhouse gases of MITI, the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer of Environment Agency (EA) of the Japanese government, and the EA Retroreflector In Space. This paper discusses the present status of the design and development of ADEOS putting emphasis on several features incorporated in the ADEOS bus system and several issues imposed at the system Preliminary Design Review.

  19. The measurement of the winds near the ocean surface with a radiometer-scatterometer on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J.; Moore, R. K.; Mcclain, E. P. (Principal Investigator); Cardone, V. J.; Young, J. D.; Greenwood, J. A.; Greenwood, C.; Fung, A. K.; Salfi, R.; Chan, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. There were a total of twenty-six passes in the ZLV mode that yielded useful data. Six were in the in-track noncontiguous mode; all others were in the cross-track noncontiguous mode. The wind speed and direction, as effectively determined in a neutral atmosphere at 19.5 m above the sea surface, were found for each cell scanned by S193. It is shown how the passive microwave measurements were used both to compute the attenuation of the radar beam and to determine those cells where the backscatter measurement was suspect. Given the direction of the wind from some independent source, with the typical accuracy of measurement by available meteorological methods, a backscatter measurement at a nadir angle of 50, 43, or 32 deg can be used to compute the speed of the wind averaged over the illuminated area.

  20. Enhanced ocean observational capability

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, A M; Esser, B K

    2000-01-10

    Coastal oceans are vital to world health and sustenance. Technology that enables new observations has always been the driver of discovery in ocean sciences. In this context, we describe the first at sea deployment and operation of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS) for continuous measurement of trace elements in seawater. The purpose of these experiments was to demonstrate that an ICPMS could be operated in a corrosive and high vibration environment with no degradation in performance. Significant advances occurred this past year due to ship time provided by Scripps Institution of Oceanography (UCSD), as well as that funded through this project. Evaluation at sea involved performance testing and characterization of several real-time seawater analysis modes. We show that mass spectrometers can rapidly, precisely and accurately determine ultratrace metal concentrations in seawater, thus allowing high-resolution mapping of large areas of surface seawater. This analytical capability represents a significant advance toward real-time observation and understanding of water mass chemistry in dynamic coastal environments. In addition, a joint LLNL-SIO workshop was convened to define and design new technologies for ocean observation. Finally, collaborative efforts were initiated with atmospheric scientists at LLNL to identify realistic coastal ocean and river simulation models to support real-time analysis and modeling of hazardous material releases in coastal waterways.