Science.gov

Sample records for advanced optical components

  1. Advanced micromoulding of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Hans-Dieter; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Paatzsch, Thomas; Smaglinski, Ingo; Weber, Lutz

    1999-09-01

    There is a growing need for micro-optical components in the field of tele- and datacom applications. Such components have to be very precise and should be available in reasonable numbers. Microtechnology provides manufacturing techniques that fulfill both requirements. Using micro electro discharge machining, laser micromachining, ultra precision milling and deep lithography with subsequent electroforming methods, complex tools for the replication of highly precise plastic parts have been manufactured. In many cases a combination of methods enumerated above gives a tool which shows both functionality and cost-efficiency. As examples we present the realization of integrated-optical components with passive fiber-waveguide coupling used as components in optical networks and as velocity sensors for two-phase flows, like liquids containing small gas bubbles or particles. In the first case multimode 4 X 4 star couplers have been manufactured in a pilot series that show excess loss values below 3 dB and a uniformity better than 3 dB at 830 nm. This performance becomes possible by using a compression molding process. By stamping the microstructured mold into a semifinished PMMA plate exact replication of the molds as well as very low surface roughness of the waveguide side walls could be observed. In the second case the waveguide channels of the flow sensors show dimensions of between 20 micrometer and 100 micrometer and an aspect ratio of about 20. These structures have been replicated by injection molding of PMMA using variotherm process treatment with a cycle time of about 2 - 3 min.

  2. Advanced Integrated Optical Signal Processing Components.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastani, Kasra

    This research was aimed at the development of advanced integrated optical components suitable for devices capable of processing multi-dimensional inputs. In such processors, densely packed waveguide arrays with low crosstalk are needed to provide dissection of the information that has been partially processed. Waveguide arrays also expand the information in the plane of the processor while maintaining its coherence. Rib waveguide arrays with low loss, high mode confinement and highly uniform surface quality (660 elements, 8 μm wide, 1 μm high, and 1 cm long with 2 mu m separations) were fabricated on LiNbO _3 substrates through the ion beam milling technique. A novel feature of the multi-dimensional IO processor architecture proposed herein is the implementation of large area uniform outcoupling (with low to moderate outcoupling efficiencies) from rib waveguide arrays in order to access the third dimension of the processor structure. As a means of outcoupling, uniform surface gratings (2 μm and 4 μm grating periods, 0.05 μm high and 1 mm long) with low outcoupling efficiencies (of approximately 2-18%/mm) were fabricated on the nonuniform surface of the rib waveguide arrays. As a practical technique of modulating the low outcoupling efficiencies of the surface gratings, it was proposed to alter the period of the grating as a function of position along each waveguide. Large aperture (2.5 mm) integrated lenses with short positive focal lengths (1.2-2.5 cm) were developed through a modification of the titanium-indiffused proton exchanged (TIPE) technique. Such integrated lenses were fabricated by increasing the refractive index of the slab waveguides by the TIPE process while maintaining the refractive index of the lenses at the lower level of Ti:LiNbO _3 waveguide. By means of curvature reversal of the integrated lenses, positive focal length lenses have been fabricated while providing high mode confinement for the slab waveguide. The above elements performed as

  3. Advances in telecom and datacom optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.

    2001-07-01

    We review and contrast key technologies developed to address the optical components market for telecom and datacom applications. We first look at different material systems, compare their properties, and describe the functions achieved to date in each of them. The material systems reviewed include glass fiber, silica on silicon, silicon on insulator, silicon oxynitride, sol-gels, polymers, thin film dielectrics, lithium niobate, indium phosphide, gallium arsenide, magneto-optic materials, and birefringent crystals. We then look at the most commonly used classes of technology and present their pros and cons as well as the functions achieved to date in each. The technologies reviewed include passive, actuation, and active technologies. The passive technologies described include fused fibers, dispersion-compensating fiber, beam steering (e.g., AWG), Bragg gratings, diffraction gratings, holographic elements, thin film filters, photonic crystals, microrings, and birefringent elements. The actuation technologies include thermo-optics, electro-optics, acousto- optics, magneto-optics, liquid crystals, total internal reflection technologies (e.g., bubble technology), and mechanical actuation (e.g., moving fibers and MEMS). We finally describe active technologies including heterostructures, quantum wells, rare earth doping, and semiconductor optical amplifiers. We also investigate the use of different material systems and technologies to achieve building block functions including lasers, amplifiers, detectors, modulators, polarization controllers, couplers, filters, switches, attenuators, nonreciprocal elements (Faraday rotators or nonreciprocal phase shifters) for isolators and circulators, wavelength converters, and dispersion compensators.

  4. Overview of advanced components for fiber optic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Stowe, David W.

    1986-01-01

    The basic operating principles and potential performance of several state-of-the-art fiber-optic devices are illustrated with diagrams and briefly characterized. Technologies examined include high-birefringence polarization-maintaining fibers and directional couplers, single-mode fiber polarizers and cut-off polarizers, optical-fiber modulators with radially poled piezoactive polymer (PVF2) jackets, and piezoelectric-squeezer polarization modulators. The need for improved manufacturing techniques to make such fiber-optic devices cost-competitive with their thin-film integrated-optics analogs is indicated.

  5. NASA SBIR Subtopic S2.04 "Advanced Optical Components"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this subtopic is to develop and demonstrate technologies to manufacture ultra-low-cost precision optical systems for very large x-ray, UV/optical or infrared telescopes. Potential solutions include but are not limited to direct precision machining, rapid optical fabrication, slumping or replication technologies to manufacture 1 to 2 meter (or larger) precision quality mirror or lens segments (either normal incidence for uv/optical/infrared or grazing incidence for x-ray). An additional key enabling technology for UV/optical telescopes is a broadband (from 100 nm to 2500 nm) high-reflectivity mirror coating with extremely uniform amplitude and polarization properties which can be deposited on 1 to 3 meter class mirror.

  6. XUV synchrotron optical components for the Advanced Light Source: Summary of the requirements and the developmental program

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, W.; Irick, S.; Lunt, D.

    1992-07-01

    We give a brief summary of the requirements for water cooled optical components for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third generation synchrotron radiation source under construction at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Materials choices, surface figure and smoothness specifications, and metrology systems for measuring the plated metal surfaces are discussed. Results from a finished water cooled copper alloy mirror will be used to demonstrate the state of the art in optical metrology with the Takacs Long Trace Profiler (LTP II).

  7. On the characterization of ultra-precise X-ray optical components: advances and challenges in ex situ metrology.

    PubMed

    Siewert, F; Buchheim, J; Zeschke, T; Störmer, M; Falkenberg, G; Sankari, R

    2014-09-01

    To fully exploit the ultimate source properties of the next-generation light sources, such as free-electron lasers (FELs) and diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs), the quality requirements for gratings and reflective synchrotron optics, especially mirrors, have significantly increased. These coherence-preserving optical components for high-brightness sources will feature nanoscopic shape accuracies over macroscopic length scales up to 1000 mm. To enable high efficiency in terms of photon flux, such optics will be coated with application-tailored single or multilayer coatings. Advanced thin-film fabrication of today enables the synthesis of layers on the sub-nanometre precision level over a deposition length of up to 1500 mm. Specifically dedicated metrology instrumentation of comparable accuracy has been developed to characterize such optical elements. Second-generation slope-measuring profilers like the nanometre optical component measuring machine (NOM) at the BESSY-II Optics laboratory allow the inspection of up to 1500 mm-long reflective optical components with an accuracy better than 50 nrad r.m.s. Besides measuring the shape on top of the coated mirror, it is of particular interest to characterize the internal material properties of the mirror coating, which is the domain of X-rays. Layer thickness, density and interface roughness of single and multilayer coatings are investigated by means of X-ray reflectometry. In this publication recent achievements in the field of slope measuring metrology are shown and the characterization of different types of mirror coating demonstrated. Furthermore, upcoming challenges to the inspection of ultra-precise optical components designed to be used in future FEL and DLSR beamlines are discussed. PMID:25177985

  8. Advanced optical instruments technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William

    1992-01-01

    The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

  9. Advanced matrix-based algorithm for ion-beam milling of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnal, Charles L.; Egert, Charles M.; Hylton, Kathy W.

    1992-12-01

    Control of an ion beam for milling optical surfaces is a nontrivial problem in two-dimensional deconvolution. The ion milling operation is performed by moving an ion beam gun through a grid of points over the surface of an optical workpiece. The control problem is to determine the amount of time to dwell at each point in the grid to obtain a desired surface profile. This research treats the problem in linear algebra terms. The required dwell times are the solutions to a large, sparse system of linear equations. Traditional factorization methods such as Gaussian elimination cannot be used because the linear equations are severely ill conditioned. Theoretically, a least-squares solution to this problem exists. Practical approaches to finding a minimal least-squares solution are discussed.

  10. Advancement of Optical Component Control for an Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Cook, William B.; Flood, Michael A.; Campbell, Joel F.; Boyer, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    Risk mitigation activities associated with a prototype imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) system are continuing at the NASA Langley Research Center. The system concept and technology center about enabling and improving future space-based atmospheric composition missions, with a current focus on observing tropospheric ozone around 9.6 micron, while having applicability toward measurement in different spectral regions and other applications. Recent activities have focused on improving an optical element control subsystem to enable precise and accurate positioning and control of etalon plates; this is needed to provide high system spectral fidelity critical for enabling the required ability to spectrally-resolve atmospheric line structure. The latest results pertaining to methodology enhancements, system implementation, and laboratory characterization testing will be reported

  11. Revealing Optical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Optical Vector Analyzer (OVA) 1550 significantly reduces the time and cost of testing sophisticated optical components. The technology grew from the research Luna Technologies' Dr. Mark Froggatt conducted on optical fiber strain measurement while working at Langley Research Center. Dr. Froggatt originally developed the technology for non- destructive evaluation testing at Langley. The new technique can provide 10,000 independent strain measurements while adding less than 10 grams to the weight of the vehicle. The OVA is capable of complete linear characterization of single-mode optical components used in high- bit-rate applications. The device can test most components over their full range in less than 30 seconds, compared to the more than 20 minutes required by other testing methods. The dramatically shortened measurement time results in increased efficiency in final acceptance tests of optical devices, and the comprehensive data produced by the instrument adds considerable value for component consumers. The device eliminates manufacturing bottlenecks, while reducing labor costs and wasted materials during production.

  12. Advanced Power Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will give a description and status of the Advanced Power Electronics Materials and Components Technology program being conducted by the NASA Glenn Research Center for future aerospace power applications. The focus of this research program is on the following: 1) New and/or significantly improved dielectric materials for the development of power capacitors with increased volumetric efficiency, energy density, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and composite ceramic dielectrics and diamond-like carbon films; 2) New and/or significantly improved high frequency, high temperature, low loss soft magnetic materials for the development of transformers/inductors with increased power/energy density, electrical efficiency, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and nanocomposite soft magnetic materials; 3) Packaged high temperature, high power density, high voltage, and low loss SiC diodes and switches. Development of high quality 4H- and 6H- SiC atomically smooth substrates to significantly improve device performance is a major emphasis of the SiC materials program; 4) Demonstration of high temperature (> 200 C) circuits using the components developed above.

  13. Optical communication components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay

    2004-03-01

    We review and contrast key technologies developed to address the optical components market for communication applications. We first review the component requirements from a network perspective. We then look at different material systems, compare their properties, and describe the functions achieved to date in each of them. The material systems reviewed include silica fiber, silica on silicon, silicon on insulator, silicon oxynitride, sol-gels, polymers, thin-film dielectrics, lithium niobate, indium phosphide, gallium arsenide, magneto-optic materials, and birefringent crystals. We then describe the most commonly used classes of optical device technology and present their pros and cons as well as the functions achieved to date in each of them. The technologies reviewed include passive, actuation, and active technologies. The passive technologies described include fused fibers, dispersion-compensating fiber, beam steering, Bragg gratings, diffraction gratings, holographic elements, thin-film filters, photonic crystals, microrings, and birefringent elements. The actuation technologies include thermo-optics, electro-optics, acousto-optics, magneto-optics, electroabsorption, liquid crystals, total internal reflection technologies, and mechanical actuation. The active technologies include heterostructures, quantum wells, rare-earth doping, dye doping, Raman amplification, and semiconductor amplification. We also investigate the use of different material systems and device technologies to achieve building-block functions, including lasers, amplifiers, detectors, modulators, polarization controllers, couplers, filters, switches, attenuators, isolators, circulators, wavelength converters, chromatic dispersion compensators, and polarization mode dispersion compensators. Some of the technologies presented are well established in the industry and in some cases have reached the commodity stage, others have recently become ready for commercial introduction, while some others

  14. Advanced optical manufacturing digital integrated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Li, Wei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    It is necessarily to adapt development of advanced optical manufacturing technology with modern science technology development. To solved these problems which low of ration, ratio of finished product, repetition, consistent in big size and high precision in advanced optical component manufacturing. Applied business driven and method of Rational Unified Process, this paper has researched advanced optical manufacturing process flow, requirement of Advanced Optical Manufacturing integrated System, and put forward architecture and key technology of it. Designed Optical component core and Manufacturing process driven of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Digital Integrated System. the result displayed effective well, realized dynamic planning Manufacturing process, information integration improved ratio of production manufactory.

  15. On the characterization of ultra-precise X-ray optical components: advances and challenges in ex situ metrology

    PubMed Central

    Siewert, F.; Buchheim, J.; Zeschke, T.; Störmer, M.; Falkenberg, G.; Sankari, R.

    2014-01-01

    To fully exploit the ultimate source properties of the next-generation light sources, such as free-electron lasers (FELs) and diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs), the quality requirements for gratings and reflective synchrotron optics, especially mirrors, have significantly increased. These coherence-preserving optical components for high-brightness sources will feature nanoscopic shape accuracies over macroscopic length scales up to 1000 mm. To enable high efficiency in terms of photon flux, such optics will be coated with application-tailored single or multilayer coatings. Advanced thin-film fabrication of today enables the synthesis of layers on the sub-nanometre precision level over a deposition length of up to 1500 mm. Specifically dedicated metrology instrumentation of comparable accuracy has been developed to characterize such optical elements. Second-generation slope-measuring profilers like the nanometre optical component measuring machine (NOM) at the BESSY-II Optics laboratory allow the inspection of up to 1500 mm-long reflective optical components with an accuracy better than 50 nrad r.m.s. Besides measuring the shape on top of the coated mirror, it is of particular interest to characterize the internal material properties of the mirror coating, which is the domain of X-rays. Layer thickness, density and interface roughness of single and multilayer coatings are investigated by means of X-ray reflectometry. In this publication recent achievements in the field of slope measuring metrology are shown and the characterization of different types of mirror coating demonstrated. Furthermore, upcoming challenges to the inspection of ultra-precise optical components designed to be used in future FEL and DLSR beamlines are discussed. PMID:25177985

  16. Advanced environmental control as a key component in the development of ultrahigh accuracy ex situ metrology for x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Lacey, Ian; McKinney, Wayne R.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2015-10-01

    The advent of fully coherent free-electron laser and diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation storage ring sources of x-rays is catalyzing the development of new ultrahigh accuracy metrology methods. To fully exploit these sources, metrology needs to be capable of determining the figure of an optical element with subnanometer height accuracy. The major limiting factors of the current absolute accuracy of ex situ metrology are drift errors due to temporal instabilities of the lab's environmental conditions and systematic errors inherent to the metrology instruments. Here, we discuss in detail work at the Advanced Light Source X-Ray Optics Laboratory on building of advanced environmental control that is a key component in the development of ultrahigh accuracy ex situ metrology for x-ray optics. By a few examples, we show how the improvement of the environmental conditions in the lab allows us to significantly gain efficiency in performing ex situ metrology with high-quality x-ray mirrors. The developed concepts and approaches, included in the design of the new X-Ray Optics Laboratory, are described in detail. These data are essential for construction and successful operation of a modern metrology facility for x-ray optics, as well as high-precision measurements in many fields of experimental physics.

  17. The advanced LIGO input optics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Chris L; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan T; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Martin, Rodica M; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Tanner, David B; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design. PMID:26827334

  18. The advanced LIGO input optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Chris L.; Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan. T.; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V.; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J.; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z.; Martin, Rodica M.; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H.; Tanner, David B.; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F.; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  19. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  20. Diamond turning microstructure optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenda

    2009-05-01

    Microstructure optical components in the form of Fresnel, TIR, microgroove, micro lens array provide a lot design freedom for high compact optical systems. It is a key factor which enables the cutting edge technology for telecommunication, surveillance and high-definition display system. Therefore, the demand of manufacturing such element is rapidly increasing. These elements usually contain high precision, tiny structure and complex form, which have posed many new challenges for tooling, programming as well as ultra-precision machining. To cope with the fast development of the technology and meet the increasing demand of the market, we have developed our own manufacturing process to fabricate microstructure optical components by way of Diamond tuning, Shaping, Raster cutting, Slow Slide Servo (SSS), Diamond milling and Post polishing. This paper is to focus on how we employed these methods to produce complex prototype of microstructure optical components and precision mold inserts which either contains aspheric lens array or freeform V grooves. The high quality finish of these surfaces meets application requirements. Measurement results are presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are compared and discussed in the paper.

  1. Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Watterson, C.E.

    1997-05-01

    The Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices project was initiated in march 1991 to support design laboratory guidance on electro-optic device packaging and evaluation. Sandia National Laboratory requested AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), to prepare for future packaging efforts in electro-optic integrated circuits. Los Alamos National Laboratory requested the evaluation of electro-optic waveguide devices for nuclear surety applications. New packaging techniques involving multiple fiber optic alignment and attachment, binary lens array development, silicon V-groove etching, and flip chip bonding were requested. Hermetic sealing of the electro-optic hybrid and submicron alignment of optical components present new challenges to be resolved. A 10-channel electro-optic modulator and laser amplifier were evaluated for potential surety applications.

  2. Optical components for the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wallerstein, E.P.; Baker, P.C.; Brown, N.J.

    1982-05-17

    In addition to its other characteristics, the Nova Laser Fusion facility may well be the largest precision optical project ever undertaken. Moreover, during the course of construction, concurrent research and development has been successfully conducted, and has resulted in significant advances in various technical areas, including manufacturing efficiency. Although assembly of the first two beams of Nova is just commencing, the optical production, including construction of the special facilities required for many of the components, has been underway for over three years, and many phases of the optical manufacturing program for the first 10 beams will be completed within the next two years. On the other hand, new requirements for second and third harmonic generation have created the need to initiate new research and development. This work has been accomplished through the enormous cooperation DOE/LLNL has received from commercial industry on this project. In many cases, industry, where much of the optical component research and development and virtually all of the manufacturing is being done, has made substantial investment of its own funds in facilities, equipment, and research and development, in addition to those supplied by DOE/LLNL.

  3. Fiber optics for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The increased use of composites makes the digital control more susceptible to electromagnetic effects. In order to provide the protection to the digital control additional shielding will be required as well as protective circuitry for the electronics. This results in increased weight and reduced reliability. The advantages that fiber optic technology provides for advanced aircraft applications is recognized. The use of optical signals to carry information between the aircraft and the control module provides immunity from contamination by electromagnetic sources as well as other important benefits such as reduced weight and volume resulting from the elimination of the shielding and the replacement of metal conductors with low weight glass fibers. In 1975 NASA began work to develop passive optical sensors for use with fiber optics in aircraft control systems. The problem now is to choose the best optical sensor concepts and evaluate them for use. In 1985 NASA and DOD entered into a joint program, Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI), to look at optical technology specifically for use in advanced aircraft systems. The results of this program are discussed. The conclusion of the study indicated that the use of fiber optic technology in advanced aircraft systems is feasible and desirable. The study pointed to a lack of available sensors from vendors capable of operating in the adverse environments of advanced aircraft.

  4. Fiber optics for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    The increased use of composites makes the digital control more susceptible to electromagnetic effects. In order to provide the protection to the digital control additional shielding will be required as well as protective circuitry for the electronics. This results in increased weight and reduced reliability. The advantages that fiber optic technology provides for advanced aircraft applications is recognized. The use of optical signals to carry information between the aircraft and the control module provides immunity from contamination by electromagnetic sources as well as other important benefits such as reduced weight and volume resulting from the elimination of the shielding and the replacement of metal conductors with low weight glass fibers. In 1975 NASA began work to develop passive optical sensors for use with fiber optics in aircraft control systems. The problem now is to choose the best optical sensor concepts and evaluate them for use. In 1985 NASA and DOD entered into a joint program, Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI), to look at optical technology specifically for use in advanced aircraft systems. The results of this program are discussed. The conclusion of the study indicated that the use of fiber optic technology in advanced aircraft systems is feasible and desirable. The study pointed to a lack of available sensors from vendors capable of operating in the adverse environments of advanced aircraft.

  5. Optical components damage parameters database system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Jin, Yuquan; Xie, Dongmei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    Optical component is the key to large-scale laser device developed by one of its load capacity is directly related to the device output capacity indicators, load capacity depends on many factors. Through the optical components will damage parameters database load capacity factors of various digital, information technology, for the load capacity of optical components to provide a scientific basis for data support; use of business processes and model-driven approach, the establishment of component damage parameter information model and database systems, system application results that meet the injury test optical components business processes and data management requirements of damage parameters, component parameters of flexible, configurable system is simple, easy to use, improve the efficiency of the optical component damage test.

  6. Advances In Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. H.; Giallorenzi, T. G.; Bucaro, J. A.

    1981-07-01

    Over the past several years, a new non-communication optical fiber application has emerged. This application utilizes optical fibers for sensing. Initial interest centered around rate rotation sensing. Since that time, however, acoustic, magnetic, and temperature sensing utilizing optical fibers has evolved into a viable research effort with significant potential payoff. As an example, laboratory fiber optic acoustic sensors now rival the best sensitivity obtained with piezoelectric ceramics. These sensors possess a unique geometric versatility previously unavailable. In conjunction with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Navy has begun a Fiber Optic Sensor System (FOSS) program to develop associated technology necessary to realize these sensors. Substantial effort is ongoing at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and other Navy laboratories with considerable contractual effort from universities and industry. This paper reviews the status of the FOSS program.

  7. Optical actuation of micromechanical components

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    Electromagnetic momentum is a fundamental physical concept that has been demonstrated experimentally and incorporated theoretically in various areas of physics. In spite of the weak character of the electromagnetic momentum transfer process, the combination of latter-day, high-energy laser light sources and microminiature mechanical elements suggested the possibility of optical excitation of these structures. One outcome of the present theoretical analysis is the prediction of an optopiezic effect wherein electromagnetic momentum causes a mechanical stress on a dielectric layer. If this is a valid prediction, such an optically induced, expansional pressure effect could be utilized as an extensional optical-to-mechanical transduction means. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  8. Optical access: networks and components (overview)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynbaev, Djafar K.

    2004-09-01

    The exponential gtowth of traffic delivered to an individual customer both for business and personal needs puts tremendous pressure on the telecommunications networks. Because the development of the long-haul and metro networks has advanced rapidly and their capacity much eceeds demand, tremendous pressure now falls in the local networks to provide customers with access to the global telecom infrastructure. Building a broadband access network enabling fast delivery of high-volume traffic is the current task of network operators. A brief review of broadband access networks brings us to the conclusion that only wired optical networks can serve as an immediate and future solution to the "last-mile" problem. After discussin goptical access network classification, we focus mainly on passive optical networks (PON) because PON is a major technology today. From the network standpoint, we discuss the principle of PON operation, architectures, topologies, protocols and standards, design issues, and network management and services. We also discuss the main problems with PON and the use of WDM technology. From the hardware standpoint, we consider both active and passive components. We analyze the structure and elements of these components, including their technical characteristics.

  9. Advanced Electrical Materials and Component Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2003-01-01

    The primary means to develop advanced electrical components is to develop new and improved materials for magnetic components (transformers, inductors, etc.), capacitors, and semiconductor switches and diodes. This paper will give a description and status of the internal and external research sponsored by NASA Glenn Research Center on soft magnetic materials, dielectric materials and capacitors, and high quality silicon carbide (SiC) atomically smooth substrates. The rationale for and the benefits of developing advanced electrical materials and components for the PMAD subsystem and also for the total power system will be briefly discussed.

  10. Advances in optical imaging for pharmacological studies

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Imaging approaches are an essential tool for following up over time representative parameters of in vivo models, providing useful information in pharmacological studies. Main advantages of optical imaging approaches compared to other imaging methods are their safety, straight-forward use and cost-effectiveness. A main drawback, however, is having to deal with the presence of high scattering and high absorption in living tissues. Depending on how these issues are addressed, three different modalities can be differentiated: planar imaging (including fluorescence and bioluminescence in vivo imaging), optical tomography, and optoacoustic approaches. In this review we describe the latest advances in optical in vivo imaging with pharmacological applications, with special focus on the development of new optical imaging probes in order to overcome the strong absorption introduced by different tissue components, especially hemoglobin, and the development of multimodal imaging systems in order to overcome the resolution limitations imposed by scattering. PMID:26441646

  11. Stitching Techniques Advance Optics Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Because NASA depends on the fabrication and testing of large, high-quality aspheric (nonspherical) optics for applications like the James Webb Space Telescope, it sought an improved method for measuring large aspheres. Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Goddard Space Flight Center, QED Technologies, of Rochester, New York, upgraded and enhanced its stitching technology for aspheres. QED developed the SSI-A, which earned the company an R&D 100 award, and also developed a breakthrough machine tool called the aspheric stitching interferometer. The equipment is applied to advanced optics in telescopes, microscopes, cameras, medical scopes, binoculars, and photolithography."

  12. Advanced Electrical Materials and Components Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    All aerospace systems require power management and distribution (PMAD) between the energy and power source and the loads. The PMAD subsystem can be broadly described as the conditioning and control of unregulated power from the energy source and its transmission to a power bus for distribution to the intended loads. All power and control circuits for PMAD require electrical components for switching, energy storage, voltage-to-current transformation, filtering, regulation, protection, and isolation. Advanced electrical materials and component development technology is a key technology to increasing the power density, efficiency, reliability, and operating temperature of the PMAD. The primary means to develop advanced electrical components is to develop new and/or significantly improved electronic materials for capacitors, magnetic components, and semiconductor switches and diodes. The next important step is to develop the processing techniques to fabricate electrical and electronic components that exceed the specifications of presently available state-of-the-art components. The NASA Glenn Research Center's advanced electrical materials and component development technology task is focused on the following three areas: 1) New and/or improved dielectric materials for the development of power capacitors with increased capacitance volumetric efficiency, energy density, and operating temperature; 2) New and/or improved high-frequency, high-temperature soft magnetic materials for the development of transformers and inductors with increased power density, energy density, electrical efficiency, and operating temperature; 3) Packaged high-temperature, high-power density, high-voltage, and low-loss SiC diodes and switches.

  13. Fabrication of an optical component

    DOEpatents

    Nichols, Michael A.; Aikens, David M.; Camp, David W.; Thomas, Ian M.; Kiikka, Craig; Sheehan, Lynn M.; Kozlowski, Mark R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for forming optical parts used in laser optical systems such as high energy lasers, high average power lasers, semiconductor capital equipment and medical devices. The optical parts will not damage during the operation of high power lasers in the ultra-violet light range. A blank is first ground using a fixed abrasive grinding method to remove the subsurface damage formed during the fabrication of the blank. The next step grinds and polishes the edges and forms bevels to reduce the amount of fused-glass contaminants in the subsequent steps. A loose abrasive grind removes the subsurface damage formed during the fixed abrasive or "blanchard" removal process. After repolishing the bevels and performing an optional fluoride etch, the surface of the blank is polished using a zirconia slurry. Any subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind will be removed during this zirconia polish. A post polish etch may be performed to remove any redeposited contaminants. Another method uses a ceria polishing step to remove the subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind. However, any residual ceria may interfere with the optical properties of the finished part. Therefore, the ceria and other contaminants are removed by performing either a zirconia polish after the ceria polish or a post ceria polish etch.

  14. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. Thermal, mechanical, and structural considerations leading to the design of the tray hardware are discussed. In general, changes in the retested component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials, multilayer optical interference filters, and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  15. Advanced Placement: Model Policy Components. Policy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinth, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Placement (AP), launched in 1955 by the College Board as a program to offer gifted high school students the opportunity to complete entry-level college coursework, has since expanded to encourage a broader array of students to tackle challenging content. This Education Commission of the State's Policy Analysis identifies key components of…

  16. New engine and advanced component design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on new engine and advance component design. Topics covered include: development of low emission high performance four valve engines, the effect of engine build options on powerplant inertias, silicon nitride turbocharger rotor for high performance automotive engines and development of Toyota reflex Burn (TRB) system in DI diesel.

  17. Nonintrusive temperature measurements on advanced turbomachinery components

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Turley, W.D.; Lewis, W.

    1992-12-31

    A nonintrusive, noncontacting method we developed for temperature measurements in hostile environments is well-suited for measurements on advanced turbine components. The method is not only superior to thermocouples in sufficiently difficult environments, but also is the only known method for making measurements in situations where no form of pyrometry works. We demonstrated the method, which uses laser-induced fluorescence of thermographic phosphors bonded to the component surfaces, on turbine blades and vanes in developmental turbine engines. The method is extendable to the much-higher temperatures expected inside advanced turbomachinery. Of particular note is the adaptability of the method to surface-temperature measurements on ceramics operating at high temperatures. In this temperature range, the ceramics become translucent, and surface emissivity becomes meaningless. We shall discuss the method, its advantages and limitations, recent test results on operating turbine engines, and the extension to ceramic components.

  18. Advanced nozzle and engine components test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltran, Luis R.; Delroso, Richard L.; Delrosario, Ruben

    1992-01-01

    A test facility for conducting scaled advanced nozzle and engine component research is described. The CE-22 test facility, located in the Engine Research Building of the NASA Lewis Research Center, contains many systems for the economical testing of advanced scale-model nozzles and engine components. The combustion air and altitude exhaust systems are described. Combustion air can be supplied to a model up to 40 psig for primary air flow, and 40, 125, and 450 psig for secondary air flow. Altitude exhaust can be simulated up to 48,000 ft, or the exhaust can be atmospheric. Descriptions of the multiaxis thrust stand, a color schlieren flow visualization system used for qualitative flow analysis, a labyrinth flow measurement system, a data acquisition system, and auxiliary systems are discussed. Model recommended design information and temperature and pressure instrumentation recommendations are included.

  19. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six-inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. The experimental results for those component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  20. Advanced photonic integrated technologies for optical routing and switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masanovic, Milan L.; Burmeister, Emily; Dummer, Matthew M.; Koch, Brian; Nicholes, Steven C.; Jevremovic, Biljana; Nguyen, Kim; Lal, Vikrant; Bowers, John E.; Coldren, Larry A.; Blumenthal, Daniel J.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the latest advances in implementation of the photonic integrated circuits (PICs) required for optical routing. These components include high-speed, high-performance integrated tunable wavelength converters and packet forwarding chips, integrated optical buffers, and integrated mode-locked lasers.

  1. Session: CSP Advanced Systems: Optical Materials (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.

    2008-04-01

    The Optical Materials project description is to characterize advanced reflector, perform accelerated and outdoor testing of commercial and experimental reflector materials, and provide industry support.

  2. Welding mechanics for advanced component safety assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, Dieter

    2011-06-01

    Numerical methods are nowadays a useful tool for the calculation of distortion and residual stresses as a result from the welding process. Modern finite element codes not only allow for calculation of deformations and stresses due to the welding process but also take into account the change of microstructure due to different heating and cooling rates. As an extension to the pure welding simulation, the field of welding mechanics combines the mechanics and the material behaviour from the welding process with the assessment of service behaviour of welded components. In the paper, new results of experimental and numerical work in the field of welding mechanics are described. Through examples from automotive, nuclear and pipe-line applications it is demonstrated that an equilibrated treatment and a close interaction of "process", "properties" and "defects" are necessary to come up with an advanced fitness-forservice assessment of welded components.

  3. Advancing High Contrast Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, M.; Poyneer, L.; GPI Team

    2014-09-01

    A long-standing challenge has been to directly image faint extrasolar planets adjacent to their host suns, which may be ~1-10 million times brighter than the planet. Several extreme AO systems designed for high-contrast observations have been tested at this point, including SPHERE, Magellan AO, PALM-3000, Project 1640, NICI, and the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI, Macintosh et al. 2014). The GPI is the world's most advanced high-contrast adaptive optics system on an 8-meter telescope for detecting and characterizing planets outside of our solar system. GPI will detect a previously unstudied population of young analogs to the giant planets of our solar system and help determine how planetary systems form. GPI employs a 44x44 woofer-tweeter adaptive optics system with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor operating at 1 kHz. The controller uses Fourier-based reconstruction and modal gains optimized from system telemetry (Poyneer et al. 2005, 2007). GPI has an apodized Lyot coronal graph to suppress diffraction and a near-infrared integral field spectrograph for obtaining planetary spectra. This paper discusses current performance limitations and presents the necessary instrumental modifications and sensitivity calculations for scenarios related to high-contrast observations of non-sidereal targets.

  4. Advanced optical document security elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereš, Marek; Svoboda, Jakub; Possolt, Martin; Květoš, Milan; Fiala, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Synthetic diffractive structures represent an important tool in the optical document security. Their macroscopic visual behavior is based on properties of a very fine micro-structure which cannot be copied using common copying techniques. The visual effects can be easily observed by a common observer without any special inspection tools. However, when a high level of security is needed, additional features are often included based on an optical encryption of information. In this paper, a novel encryption technique is presented, which is based on utilizing the plastic holographic foil as a waveguide and special diffractive structures as coupling elements. When an in-coupling area is illuminated with a defined light beam, the light is coupled into the waveguide and travels to an out-coupling part. The encrypted information is encoded either in the shape of the out-coupling area or it can be formed from an out-coupling hologram in free space above the element. Both laser and normal white light sources can be used for reading the information. The coupling areas can be mixed with diffractive micro-structures forming visual effects and can be invisible during a normal observation of the hologram. The couplers can be realized using the technology fully compatible with the standard process for mastering and replication of the security elements. Several extensions of the described idea of waveguide cryptograms are also included. Finally, a set of real samples of the security elements is presented, which were realized using an advanced matrix laser lithography technique.

  5. Fabrication of Submillimeter Axisymmetric Optical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grudinin, Ivan; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2007-01-01

    It is now possible to fashion transparent crystalline materials into axisymmetric optical components having diameters ranging from hundreds down to tens of micrometers, whereas previously, the smallest attainable diameter was 500 m. A major step in the fabrication process that makes this possible can be characterized as diamond turning or computer numerically controlled machining on an ultrahigh-precision lathe.

  6. Degradation of optical components in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    This report concerns two types of optical components: multilayer filters and mirrors, and self-scanned imaging arrays using charge coupled device (CCD) readouts. For the filters and mirrors, contamination produces a strong reduction in transmittance in the ultraviolet spectral region, but has little or no effect in the visible and infrared spectral regions. Soft substrates containing halides are unsatisfactory as windows or substrates. Materials choice for dielectric layers should also reflect such considerations. Best performance is also found for the harder materials. Compaction of the layers and interlayer diffusion causes a blue shift in center wavelength and loss of throughput. For sensors using CCD's, shifts in gate voltage and reductions in transfer efficiency occur. Such effects in CCD's are in accord with expectations of the effects of the radiation dose on the device. Except for optical fiber, degradation of CCD's represents the only ionizing-radiation induced effect on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) optical systems components that has been observed.

  7. Polyguide polymeric technology for optical interconnect circuits and components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Bruce L.; Marchegiano, Joseph E.; Chang, Catherine T.; Furmanak, Robert J.; Graham, Douglas M.; Wagner, Richard G.

    1997-04-01

    The expanding information revolution has been made possible by the development of optical communication technology. To meet the escalating demand for information transmitted and processed at high data rates and the need to circumvent the growing electronic circuit bottlenecks, mass deployment of not only optical fiber networks but manufacturable optical interconnect circuits, components and connectors for interfacing fibers and electronics that meet economic and performance constraints are absolutely necessary. Polymeric waveguide optical interconnection are considered increasingly important to meet these market needs. DuPont's polyguide polymeric integrated optic channel waveguide system is thought by many to have considerable potential for a broad range of passive optical interconnect applications. In this paper the recent advances, status, and unique attributes of the technology are reviewed. Product and technology developments currently in progress including parallel optical ink organization and polymer optical interconnect technology developments funded by DARPA are used as examples to describe polyguide breadth and potential for manufacture and deployment of optical interconnection products for single and multimode telecom and datacom waveguide applications.

  8. Plasma surface figuring of large optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdain, R.; Castelli, M.; Morantz, P.; Shore, P.

    2012-04-01

    Fast figuring of large optical components is well known as a highly challenging manufacturing issue. Different manufacturing technologies including: magnetorheological finishing, loose abrasive polishing, ion beam figuring are presently employed. Yet, these technologies are slow and lead to expensive optics. This explains why plasma-based processes operating at atmospheric pressure have been researched as a cost effective means for figure correction of metre scale optical surfaces. In this paper, fast figure correction of a large optical surface is reported using the Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) process. Achievements are shown following the scaling-up of the RAP figuring process to a 400 mm diameter area of a substrate made of Corning ULE®. The pre-processing spherical surface is characterized by a 3 metres radius of curvature, 2.3 μm PVr (373nm RMS), and 1.2 nm Sq nanometre roughness. The nanometre scale correction figuring system used for this research work is named the HELIOS 1200, and it is equipped with a unique plasma torch which is driven by a dedicated tool path algorithm. Topography map measurements were carried out using a vertical work station instrumented by a Zygo DynaFiz interferometer. Figuring results, together with the processing times, convergence levels and number of iterations, are reported. The results illustrate the significant potential and advantage of plasma processing for figuring correction of large silicon based optical components.

  9. Ion beam figuring of small optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drueding, Thomas W.; Fawcett, Steven C.; Wilson, Scott R.; Bifano, Thomas G.

    1995-12-01

    Ion beam figuring provides a highly deterministic method for the final precision figuring of optical components with advantages over conventional methods. The process involves bombarding a component with a stable beam of accelerated particles that selectively removes material from the surface. Figure corrections are achieved by rastering the fixed-current beam across the workplace at appropriate, time-varying velocities. Unlike conventional methods, ion figuring is a noncontact technique and thus avoids such problems as edge rolloff effects, tool wear, and force loading of the workpiece. This work is directed toward the development of the precision ion machining system at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. This system is designed for processing small (approximately equals 10-cm diam) optical components. Initial experiments were successful in figuring 8-cm-diam fused silica and chemical-vapor-deposited SiC samples. The experiments, procedures, and results of figuring the sample workpieces to shallow spherical, parabolic (concave and convex), and non-axially-symmetric shapes are discussed. Several difficulties and limitations encountered with the current system are discussed. The use of a 1-cm aperture for making finer corrections on optical components is also reported.

  10. Compact component for integrated quantum optic processing

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Partha Pratim

    2015-01-01

    Quantum interference is indispensable to derive integrated quantum optic technologies (1–2). For further progress in large scale integration of quantum optic circuit, we have introduced first time two mode interference (TMI) coupler as an ultra compact component. The quantum interference varying with coupling length corresponding to the coupling ratio is studied and the larger HOM dip with peak visibility ~0.963 ± 0.009 is found at half coupling length of TMI coupler. Our results also demonstrate complex quantum interference with high fabrication tolerance and quantum visibility in TMI coupler. PMID:26584759

  11. Experimental assessment of advanced Stirling component concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziph, B.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an experimental assessment of some advanced Stirling engine component concepts are presented. High performance piston rings, reciprocating oil scrapers and heat pipes with getters and with mechanical couplings were tested. The tests yielded the following results: (1) Bonded, split, pumping piston rings, in preliminary testing, proved a promising concept, exhibiting low leakage and friction losses. Solid piston rings proved impractical in view of their sensitivity to the operating temperature; (2) A babbit oil scraper in a compliant housing performed well in atmospheric endurance testing. In pressurized tests the scraper did not perform well as a containment seal. The latter tests suggest modifications which may adapt Ti successfully to that application; and (3) Heat pipe endurance tests indicated the adequacy of simple, inexpensive fabrication and filling procedures. Getters were provided to increase the tolerance of the heat pipes to the presence of air and commercially available couplings were demonstrated to be suitable for heat pipe application. In addition to the above tests, the program also included a design effort for a split shaft applicable to a swashplate driven engine with a pressurized crank-case. The design is aimed, and does accomplish, an increase in component life to more than 10,000 hours.

  12. Recent Advances in Miniaturized Optical Gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Olio, F.; Tatoli, T.; Ciminelli, C.; Armenise, M. N.

    2014-03-01

    Low-cost chip-scale optoelectronic gyroscopes having a resolution ≤ 10 °/h and a good reliability also in harsh environments could have a strong impact on the medium/high performance gyro market, which is currently dominated by well-established bulk optical angular velocity sensors. The R&D activity aiming at the demonstration of those miniaturized sensors is crucial for aerospace/defense industry, and thus it is attracting an increasing research effort and notably funds. In this paper the recent technological advances on the compact optoelectronic gyroscopes with low weight and high energy saving are reviewed. Attention is paid to both the so-called gyroscope-on-a-chip, which is a novel sensor, at the infantile stage, whose optical components are monolithically integrated on a single indium phosphide chip, and to a new ultra-high Q ring resonator for gyro applications with a configuration including a 1D photonic crystal in the resonant path. The emerging field of the gyros based on passive ring cavities, which have already shown performance comparable with that of optical fiber gyros, is also discussed.

  13. Key optical components for spaceborne lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhring, J.; Winzen, M.; Faidel, H.; Miesner, J.; Plum, D.; Klein, J.; Fitzau, O.; Giesberts, M.; Brandenburg, W.; Seidel, A.; Schwanen, N.; Riesters, D.; Hengesbach, S.; Hoffmann, H.-D.

    2016-03-01

    Spaceborne lidar (light detection and ranging) systems have a large potential to become powerful instruments in the field of atmospheric research. Obviously, they have to be in operation for about three years without any maintenance like readjusting. Furthermore, they have to withstand strong temperature cycles typically in the range of -30 to +50 °C as well as mechanical shocks and vibrations, especially during launch. Additionally, the avoidance of any organic material inside the laser box is required, particularly in UV lasers. For atmospheric research pulses of about several 10 mJ at repetition rates of several 10 Hz are required in many cases. Those parameters are typically addressed by DPSSL that comprise components like: laser crystals, nonlinear crystals in pockels cells, faraday isolators and frequency converters, passive fibers, diode lasers and of course a lot of mirrors and lenses. In particular, some components have strong requirements regarding their tilt stability that is often in the 10 μrad range. In most of the cases components and packages that are used for industrial lasers do not fulfil all those requirements. Thus, the packaging of all these key components has been developed to meet those specifications only making use of metal and ceramics beside the optical component itself. All joints between the optical component and the laser baseplate are soldered or screwed. No clamps or adhesives are used. Most of the critical properties like tilting after temperature cycling have been proven in several tests. Currently, these components are used to build up first prototypes for spaceborne systems.

  14. Recent Advances in Photonic Devices for Optical Computing and the Role of Nonlinear Optics-Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis E.; Paley, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The twentieth century has been the era of semiconductor materials and electronic technology while this millennium is expected to be the age of photonic materials and all-optical technology. Optical technology has led to countless optical devices that have become indispensable in our daily lives in storage area networks, parallel processing, optical switches, all-optical data networks, holographic storage devices, and biometric devices at airports. This chapters intends to bring some awareness to the state-of-the-art of optical technologies, which have potential for optical computing and demonstrate the role of nonlinear optics in many of these components. Our intent, in this Chapter, is to present an overview of the current status of optical computing, and a brief evaluation of the recent advances and performance of the following key components necessary to build an optical computing system: all-optical logic gates, adders, optical processors, optical storage, holographic storage, optical interconnects, spatial light modulators and optical materials.

  15. Optical system components for navigation grade fiber optic gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Marcus; Liesegang, Maximilian; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Schröder, Henning; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-10-01

    Interferometric fiber optic gyroscopes belong to the class of inertial sensors. Due to their high accuracy they are used for absolute position and rotation measurement in manned/unmanned vehicles, e.g. submarines, ground vehicles, aircraft or satellites. The important system components are the light source, the electro optical phase modulator, the optical fiber coil and the photodetector. This paper is focused on approaches to realize a stable light source and fiber coil. Superluminescent diode and erbium doped fiber laser were studied to realize an accurate and stable light source. Therefor the influence of the polarization grade of the source and the effects due to back reflections to the source were studied. During operation thermal working conditions severely affect accuracy and stability of the optical fiber coil, which is the sensor element. Thermal gradients that are applied to the fiber coil have large negative effects on the achievable system accuracy of the optic gyroscope. Therefore a way of calculating and compensating the rotation rate error of a fiber coil due to thermal change is introduced. A simplified 3 dimensional FEM of a quadrupole wound fiber coil is used to determine the build-up of thermal fields in the polarization maintaining fiber due to outside heating sources. The rotation rate error due to these sources is then calculated and compared to measurement data. A simple regression model is used to compensate the rotation rate error with temperature measurement at the outside of the fiber coil. To realize a compact and robust optical package for some of the relevant optical system components an approach based on ion exchanged waveguides in thin glass was developed. This waveguides are used to realize 1x2 and 1x4 splitter with fiber coupling interface or direct photodiode coupling.

  16. Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2006-01-03

    A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

  17. Advances in transmission x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ceglio, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics are reviewed. Specific advances in coded aperture imaging, zone plate lens fabrication, time and space resolved spectroscopy, and CCD x-ray detection are discussed.

  18. Advanced component technologies for energy-efficient turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, N. T.

    1980-01-01

    A cooperative government-industry effort, the Energy Efficient Engine Project, to develop the advanced technology base for future commercial development of a new generation of more fuel conservative turbofan engines for airline use is described. Engine configurations that are dependent upon technology advances in each major engine component are defined and current design and development of the advanced components are included.

  19. Conceptual design of an on-board optical processor with components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, J. R.; Shackelford, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    The specification of components for a spacecraft on-board optical processor was investigated. A space oriented application of optical data processing and the investigation of certain aspects of optical correlators were examined. The investigation confirmed that real-time optical processing has made significant advances over the past few years, but that there are still critical components which will require further development for use in an on-board optical processor. The devices evaluated were the coherent light valve, the readout optical modulator, the liquid crystal modulator, and the image forming light modulator.

  20. Quasi-optical components at submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ediss, G. A.; Keen, N. J.; Mischerikow, K.-D.; Schulz, A.; Korn, A.

    1987-02-01

    Individual components of the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastonomie 650 micron Schottky barrier diode waveguide mixer-receiver and their performance at 650 microns wavelength are reported on. Scalar, dual-mode, and pyramidal horns are considered, and attempts to measure insertion losses by comparing the gain of the horn with that of a fundamental moded waveguide lead to estimates of the upper limits for horn losses at 650 microns. Radiometric loss measurements of an 8-mm thick Teflon lens and a 5-mm thick Rexolite lens are both larger than would be expected from the material loss tangents, probably due to reflections. The performance of various diplexers is also considered. Performance of the present quasi-optical components at 650 and 172 microns is not found to be significantly worse than at 1300 microns wavelength, with the probable exception of horn insertion losses.

  1. Recent advances in optical computing in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Satoshi

    The results of recent Japanese research in optical and hybrid computer systems and components are summarized and illustrated with drawings and diagrams, and the organizational structure of the research efforts is outlined. Topics addressed include optical logic devices, spatial light modulators, two-dimensional lasers, optical bistable devices, device theory, optically controlled array processing, an optical bus for a multiprocessor system, real-time multiple-matrix-product processing, optical numerical processing, optical parallel-array logic systems, optical associative memory, and neural-network computation. Consideration is given to the roles of the Optical Computer Group of the Japan Society of Applied Physics, industry, and government (through the universities and Ministry of Education and through the Ministry of International Trade and Industry).

  2. Advanced optical disk storage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haritatos, Fred N.

    1996-01-01

    There is a growing need within the Air Force for more and better data storage solutions. Rome Laboratory, the Air Force's Center of Excellence for C3I technology, has sponsored the development of a number of operational prototypes to deal with this growing problem. This paper will briefly summarize the various prototype developments with examples of full mil-spec and best commercial practice. These prototypes have successfully operated under severe space, airborne and tactical field environments. From a technical perspective these prototypes have included rewritable optical media ranging from a 5.25-inch diameter format up to the 14-inch diameter disk format. Implementations include an airborne sensor recorder, a deployable optical jukebox and a parallel array of optical disk drives. They include stand-alone peripheral devices to centralized, hierarchical storage management systems for distributed data processing applications.

  3. Making Ceramic Components For Advanced Aircraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. E.; Ezis, A.

    1994-01-01

    Lightweight, oxidation-resistant silicon nitride components containing intricate internal cooling and hydraulic passages and capable of withstanding high operating temperatures made by ceramic-platelet technology. Used to fabricate silicon nitride test articles of two types: components of methane-cooled regenerator for air turbo ramjet engine and components of bipropellant injector for rocket engine. Procedures for development of more complex and intricate components established. Technology has commercial utility in automotive, aircraft, and environmental industries for manufacture of high-temperature components for use in regeneration of fuels, treatment of emissions, high-temperature combustion devices, and application in which other high-temperature and/or lightweight components needed. Potential use in fabrication of combustors and high-temperature acoustic panels for suppression of noise in future high-speed aircraft.

  4. Advanced centering of mounted optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Christian; Winkelmann, Ralf; Klar, Rainer; Philippen, Peter; Garden, Ron; Pearlman, Sasha; Pearlman, Guy

    2016-03-01

    Camera objectives or laser focusing units consist of complex lens systems with multiple lenses. The optical performance of such complex lens systems is dependent on the correct positioning of lenses in the system. Deviations in location or angle within the system directly affect the achievable image quality. To optimize the achievable performance of lens systems, these errors can be corrected by machining the mount of the lens with respect to the optical axis. The Innolite GmbH and Opto Alignment Technology have developed a novel machine for such center turning operation. A confocal laser reflection measurement sensor determines the absolute position of the optical axis with reference to the spindle axis. As a strong advantage compared to autocollimator measurements the utilized Opto Alignment sensor is capable of performing centration and tilt measurements without changing objectives on any radius surface from 2 mm to infinity and lens diameters from 0.5 mm to 300 mm, including cylinder, aspheric, and parabolic surfaces. In addition, it performs significantly better on coated lenses. The optical axis is skewed and offset in reference to the spindle axis as determined by the measurement. Using the information about the mount and all reference surfaces, a machine program for an untrue turning process is calculated from this data in a fully automated manner. Since the optical axis is not collinear with the spindle axis, the diamond tool compensates for these linear and tilt deviations with small correction movements. This results in a simple machine setup where the control system works as an electronic alignment chuck. Remaining eccentricity of <1 μm and angular errors of < 10 sec are typical alignment results.

  5. Advanced rotorcraft helmet display sighting system optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynal, Francois; Chen, Muh-Fa

    2002-08-01

    Kaiser Electronics' Advanced Rotorcraft Helmet Display Sighting System is a Biocular Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) for Rotary Wing Aviators. Advanced Rotorcraft HMDs requires low head supported weight, low center of mass offsets, low peripheral obstructions of the visual field, large exit pupils, large eye relief, wide field of view (FOV), high resolution, low luning, sun light readability with high contrast and low prismatic deviations. Compliance with these safety, user acceptance and optical performance requirements is challenging. The optical design presented in this paper provides an excellent balance of these different and conflicting requirements. The Advanced Rotorcraft HMD optical design is a pupil forming off axis catadioptric system that incorporates a transmissive SXGA Active Matrix liquid Crystal Display (AMLCD), an LED array backlight and a diopter adjustment mechanism.

  6. Advanced Materials and Cell Components for NASA's Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2009-01-01

    This is an introductory paper for the focused session "Advanced Materials and Cell Components for NASA's Exploration Missions". This session will concentrate on electrochemical advances in materials and components that have been achieved through efforts sponsored under NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD). This paper will discuss the performance goals for components and for High Energy and Ultra High Energy cells, advanced lithium-ion cells that will offer a combination of higher specific energy and improved safety over state-of-the-art. Papers in this session will span a broad range of materials and components that are under development to enable these cell development efforts.

  7. Advanced NDE research in electromagnetic, thermal, and coherent optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, S. Ballou

    1992-01-01

    A new inspection technology called magneto-optic/eddy current imaging was investigated. The magneto-optic imager makes readily visible irregularities and inconsistencies in airframe components. Other research observed in electromagnetics included (1) disbond detection via resonant modal analysis; (2) AC magnetic field frequency dependence of magnetoacoustic emission; and (3) multi-view magneto-optic imaging. Research observed in the thermal group included (1) thermographic detection and characterization of corrosion in aircraft aluminum; (2) a multipurpose infrared imaging system for thermoelastic stress detection; (3) thermal diffusivity imaging of stress induced damage in composites; and (4) detection and measurement of ice formation on the space shuttle main fuel tank. Research observed in the optics group included advancements in optical nondestructive evaluation (NDE).

  8. Method for the continuous processing of hermetic fiber optic components and the resultant fiber optic-to-metal components

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, Daniel P.

    1994-08-09

    Hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components and method for making hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components by assembling and fixturing elements comprising a metal shell, a glass preform, and a metal-coated fiber optic into desired relative positions and then sealing said fixtured elements preferably using a continuous heating process. The resultant hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components exhibit high hermeticity and durability despite the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion among the various elements.

  9. Advanced channel monitoring for optical layer management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weiguo; Zheng, Zheng

    2003-12-01

    We categorized synchronous optical network (SONET) operations, administration, maintenance, and provisioning (OAM&P) requirements according to their time urgency as related to the network operation and assigned them to a three-layer telecommunications management network for transparent networks accordingly. Because all-optical bit-by-bit processing at data rates is not yet available, a solution that is currently feasible for optical management layer requirements is proposed on the basis of a previously demonstrated advanced channel-monitoring method. Indicators for signal quality as well as channel use can be provided, and the scheme is transparent to current SONET network elements.

  10. Digital polarization holography advancing geometrical phase optics.

    PubMed

    De Sio, Luciano; Roberts, David E; Liao, Zhi; Nersisyan, Sarik; Uskova, Olena; Wickboldt, Lloyd; Tabiryan, Nelson; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    Geometrical phase or the fourth generation (4G) optics enables realization of optical components (lenses, prisms, gratings, spiral phase plates, etc.) by patterning the optical axis orientation in the plane of thin anisotropic films. Such components exhibit near 100% diffraction efficiency over a broadband of wavelengths. The films are obtained by coating liquid crystalline (LC) materials over substrates with patterned alignment conditions. Photo-anisotropic materials are used for producing desired alignment conditions at the substrate surface. We present and discuss here an opportunity of producing the widest variety of "free-form" 4G optical components with arbitrary spatial patterns of the optical anisotropy axis orientation with the aid of a digital spatial light polarization converter (DSLPC). The DSLPC is based on a reflective, high resolution spatial light modulator (SLM) combined with an "ad hoc" optical setup. The most attractive feature of the use of a DSLPC for photoalignment of nanometer thin photo-anisotropic coatings is that the orientation of the alignment layer, and therefore of the fabricated LC or LC polymer (LCP) components can be specified on a pixel-by-pixel basis with high spatial resolution. By varying the optical magnification or de-magnification the spatial resolution of the photoaligned layer can be adjusted to an optimum for each application. With a simple "click" it is possible to record different optical components as well as arbitrary patterns ranging from lenses to invisible labels and other transparent labels that reveal different images depending on the side from which they are viewed. PMID:27505793

  11. Advanced NDE Technologies for Powder Metal Components

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P; Haskins, J; Thomas, G; Dolan, K

    2003-05-01

    Nondestructive evaluation encompasses numerous technologies that assess materials and determine important properties. This paper demonstrates the applicability of several of these technologies to the field of powder metallurgy. The usual application of nondestructive evaluation is to detect and quantify defects in fully sintered product. But probably its most appealing role is to sense problems earlier in the manufacturing process to avoid making defects at all. Also nondestructive evaluation can be incorporated into the manufacturing processes to monitor important parameters and control the processes to produce defect free product. Nondestructive evaluation can characterize powders, evaluate components in the green state, monitor the sintering process, and inspect the final component.

  12. Advanced Geothermal Optical Transducer (AGOT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-01

    Today's geothermal pressure-temperature measuring tools are short endurance, high value instruments, used sparingly because their loss is a major expense. In this project LEL offered to build and test a rugged, affordable, downhole sensor capable ofretuming an uninterrupted data stream at pressures and of 10,000 psi and temperatures up to 250 C, thus permitting continuous deep-well logging. It was proposed to meet the need by specializing LEL's patented 'Twin Column Transducer' technology to satisfy the demands of geothermal pressure/temperature measurements. TCT transducers have very few parts, none of which are moving parts, and all of which can be fabricated from high-temperature super alloys or from ceramics; the result is an extremely rugged device, essentially impervious to chemical attack and readily modified to operate at high pressure and temperature. To measure pressure and temperature they capitalize on the relative expansion of optical elements subjected to thermal or mechanical stresses; if one element is maintained at a reference pressure while the other is opened to ambient, the differential displacement then serves as a measure of pressure. A transducer responding to temperature rather than pressure is neatly created by 'inverting' the pressure-measuring design so that both deflecting structures see identical temperatures and temperature gradients, but whose thermal expansion coefficients are deliberately mismatched to give differential expansion. The starting point for development of a PT Tool was the company's model DPT feedback-stabilized 5,000 psi sensor (U.S. Patent 5,311,014, 'Optical Transducer for Measuring Downhole Pressure', claiming a pressure transducer capable of measuring static, dynamic, and true bi-directional differential pressure at high temperatures), shown in the upper portion of Figure 1. The DPT occupies a 1 x 2 x 4-inch volume, weighs 14 ounces, and is accurate to 1 percent of full scale. Employing a pair of identical, low

  13. Bulk Electro-Optical Polymer Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottsche, Allan; Perry, Joseph W.; Perry, Kelly J.

    1992-01-01

    Polymer serves in high-voltage sensors and laser-beam modulators. Electro-optical polymer of relatively low cost formed as bulk specimen from azo dye 4-(4-nitrophenylazo)-N-ethyl, N-2-hydroxyethylaniline, also known as Disperse Red 1 or DR1, and transparent epoxy. More stable than prior electro-optical polymers based on DR1 and poly(methylmethacrylate). If polymer were sandwiched between electrodes, it provides direct measurement of high voltage via electro-optical effect. Has significant nonlinear optical properties. Material useful in microelectronics, micro-optics, integrated optics, and testing of materials. Polymer withstands electric fields up to 120 kV/cm.

  14. Advanced optics in an interdisciplinary graduate program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nic Chormaic, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, established in November 2011, provides a 5- year interdisciplinary PhD program, through English, within Japan. International and Japanese students entering the program undertake coursework and laboratory rotations across a range of topics, including neuroscience, molecular science, physics, chemistry, marine science and mathematics, regardless of previous educational background. To facilitate interdisciplinarity, the university has no departments, ensuring seamless interactions between researchers from all sectors. As part of the PhD program a course in Advanced Optics has been developed to provide PhD students with the practical and theoretical skills to enable them to use optics tools in any research environment. The theoretical aspect of the course introduces students to procedures for complex beam generation (e.g. Laguerre-Gaussian), optical trapping, beam analysis and photon optics, and is supported through a practical program covering introductory interference/diffraction experiments through to more applied fiber optics. It is hoped that, through early exposure to optics handling and measurement techniques, students will be able to develop and utilize optics tools regardless of research field. In addition to the formal course in Advanced Optics, a selection of students also undertakes 13 week laboratory rotations in the Light-Matter Interactions research laboratory, where they work side-by-side with physicists in developing optics tools for laser cooling, photonics or bio-applications. While currently in the first year, conclusive results about the success of such an interdisciplinary PhD training are speculative. However, initial observations indicate a rich cross-fertilization of ideas stemming from the diverse backgrounds of all participants.

  15. Advanced components for spaceborne infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, A. W.

    1984-01-01

    The need for improved cryogenic components to be used in future spaceborne infrared astronomy missions was identified. Improved low noise cryogenic amplifiers operated with infrared detectors, and better cryogenic actuators and motors with extremely low power dissipation are needed. The feasibility of achieving technological breakthroughs in both of these areas was studied. An improved silicon junction field effect transistor (JFET) could be developed if: (1) high purity silicon; (2) optimum dopants; and (3) very high doping levels are used. The feasibility of a simple stepper motor equipped with superconducting coils is demonstrated by construction of such a device based on a standard commercial motor. It is found that useful levels of torque at immeasurably low power levels were achieved. It is concluded that with modest development and optimization efforts, significant performance gains is possible for both cryogenic preamplifiers and superconducting motors and actuators.

  16. Chemical Approaches for Advanced Optical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhixing

    Advances in optical microscopy have been constantly expanding our knowledge of biological systems. The achievements therein are a result of close collaborations between physicists/engineers who build the imaging instruments and chemists/biochemists who design the corresponding probe molecules. In this work I present a number of chemical approaches for the development of advanced optical imaging methods. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the recent advances of novel imaging approaches taking advantage of chemical tag technologies. Chapter 2 describes the second-generation covalent trimethoprim-tag as a viable tool for live cell protein-specific labeling and imaging. In Chapter 3 we present a fluorescence lifetime imaging approach to map protein-specific micro-environment in live cells using TMP-Cy3 as a chemical probe. In Chapter 4, we present a method harnessing photo-activatable fluorophores to extend the fundamental depth limit in multi-photon microscopy. Chapter 5 describes the development of isotopically edited alkyne palette for multi-color live cell vibrational imaging of cellular small molecules. These studies exemplify the impact of modern chemical approaches in the development of advanced optical microscopies.

  17. Optical Fiber Sensors for Advanced Civil Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Marten Johannes Cornelius

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation is to develop, analyze, and implement optical fiber-based sensors for the nondestructive quantitative evaluation of advanced civil structures. Based on a comparative evaluation of optical fiber sensors that may be used to obtain quantitative information related to physical perturbations in the civil structure, the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) optical fiber sensor is selected as the most attractive sensor. The operation of the EFPI sensor is explained using the Kirchhoff diffraction approach. As is shown in this dissertation, this approach better predicts the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of gap length than methods employed previously. The performance of the optical fiber sensor is demonstrated in three different implementations. In the first implementation, performed with researchers in the Civil Engineering Department at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, optical fiber sensors were used to obtain quantitative strain information from reinforced concrete interior and exterior column-to-beam connections. The second implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the United States Bureau of Mines in Spokane, Washington, used optical fiber sensors to monitor the performance of roof bolts used in mines. The last implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the Turner-Fairbanks Federal Highway Administration Research Center in McLean, Virginia, used optical fiber sensors, attached to composite prestressing strands used for reinforcing concrete, to obtain absolute strain information. Multiplexing techniques including time, frequency and wavelength division multiplexing are briefly discussed, whereas the principles of operation of spread spectrum and optical time domain reflectometery (OTDR) are discussed in greater detail. Results demonstrating that spread spectrum and OTDR techniques can be used to multiplex optical fiber sensors are presented. Finally, practical

  18. A final look at LDEF electro-optic systems components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1995-01-01

    Postrecovery characteristics of LDEF electro-optic components from the GTRI tray are compared with their prelaunch characteristics and with the characteristics of similar components from related experiments. Components considered here include lasers, light-emitting diodes, semiconducting radiation detectors and arrays, optical substrates, filters, and mirrors, and specialized coatings. Our understanding of the physical effects resulting from low earth orbit are described, and guidelines and recommendations for component and materials choices are presented.

  19. Advance lightpath provisioning in interdomain optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafid, A.; Maach, A.; Khair, M. G.; Drissi, J.

    2005-11-01

    In interconnected optical networks, users submit lightpath requests at the time they wish to establish the lightpath. The service provider consults the information gathered by the interdomain routing protocols for available resources. For each request, the network must decide immediately whether to accept or reject the request. In this model, there is always the uncertainty of whether the user will be able to establish the desired lightpath at the desired time or not. Furthermore, in the context of a number of applications, e.g., grid applications, users need to set up lightpaths in advance to perform their activities that are planned in advance. We propose a new interdomain routing protocol called Advance Optical Routing Border Gateway Protocol (AORBGP) and a scheme that allows the setup of interdomain lightpaths in advance. AORBGP allows gathering information about interdomain paths and availability of wavelengths in the future. The proposed advance lightpath setup scheme makes use of AORBGP to get information about available resources (i.e., wavelengths) required to process lightpath setup requests. One of the key innovations of the scheme is that it provides the user with alternatives, carefully selected, when his or her request cannot be accommodated because of resource shortages. Indeed, the scheme provides the user with options to set up a lightpath later than the requested start time or with shorter duration than the requested duration. We performed a set of simulations to evaluate the benefits of the proposed scheme and the effect of a number of parameters on the performance of AORBGP.

  20. Advanced optical blade tip clearance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, M. J.; Honeycutt, R. E.; Nordlund, R. E.; Robinson, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced electro-optical system was developed to measure single blade tip clearances and average blade tip clearances between a rotor and its gas path seal in an operating gas turbine engine. This system is applicable to fan, compressor, and turbine blade tip clearance measurement requirements, and the system probe is particularly suitable for operation in the extreme turbine environment. A study of optical properties of blade tips was conducted to establish measurement system application limitations. A series of laboratory tests was conducted to determine the measurement system's operational performance characteristics and to demonstrate system capability under simulated operating gas turbine environmental conditions. Operational and environmental performance test data are presented.

  1. Fiber optics wavelength division multiplexing(components)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1985-01-01

    The long term objectives are to develop optical multiplexers/demultiplexers, different wavelength and modulation stable semiconductor lasers and high data rate transceivers, as well as to test and evaluate fiber optic networks applicable to the Space Station. Progress in each of the above areas is briefly discussed.

  2. Penetrating radiation impact on NIF final optic components

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, C.D.; Speth, J.A.; DeLoach, L.D.; Payne, S.A.

    1996-10-15

    Goal of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is to achieve thermonuclear ignition in a laboratory environment in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This will enable NIF to service the DOE stockpile stewardship management program, inertial fusion energy goals, and advance scientific frontiers. All of these applications will make use of the extreme conditions that the facility will create in the target chamber. In the case of a prospected 20 MJ yield scenario, NIF will produce 10{sup 19} neutrons with DT fusion 14 MeV energy per neutron. There will also be high-energy x rays as well as solid, liquid, and gaseous target debris produced either directly or indirectly by the inertial confinement fusion process. A critical design issue is the protection of the final optical components as well as sophisticated target diagnostics in such a harsh environment.

  3. Advancements in metro optical network architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschis, Loukas

    2005-02-01

    This paper discusses the innovation in network architectures, and optical transport, that enables metropolitan networks to cost-effectively scale to hundreds Gb/s of capacity, and to hundreds km of reach, and to also meet the diverse service needs of enterprise and residential applications. A converged metro network, where Ethernet/IP services, and traditional TDM traffic operate over an intelligent WDM transport layer is increasingly becoming the most attractive architecture addressing the primary need of network operators for significantly improved capital and operational network cost. At the same time, this converged network has to leverage advanced technology, and introduce intelligence in order to significantly improve the deployment and manageability of WDM transport. The most important system advancements and the associated technology innovations that enhance the cost-effectiveness of metropolitan optical networks are being reviewed.

  4. Recent advances in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhihua; Wang, Chuan; Shen, Yi; Huang, Liangming; Wu, Lan; Du, Chixin

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports recent advances in spectral domain Doppler optical coherence tomography (SD-DOCT) in our group. A high speed SD-DOCT system is developed and applied to animal study and microchip evaluation. Further improvements concerning SD-DOCT are presented, those including higher-order cross-correlation for phase retrieval, transit-time analysis for velocity quantification, and orthogonal dispersive SD-OCT for depth extension.

  5. Electro-optic component mounting device

    DOEpatents

    Gruchalla, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    A technique is provided for integrally mounting a device such as an electro-optic device (50) in a transmission line to avoid series resonant effects. A center conductor (52) of the transmission line has an aperture (58) formed therein for receiving the device (50). The aperture (58) splits the center conductor into two parallel sections on opposite sides of the device. For a waveguide application, the center conductor is surrounded by a conductive ground surface (54), which is spaced apart from the center conductor with a dielectric material (56). One set of electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device (50) is directly connected to the center conductor 52 and an electrode formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the conductive ground surface (54). The electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device are formed on curved sections of the surface of the device to mate with correspondingly shaped electrodes on the conductor and ground surface to provide a uniform electric field across the electro-optic device. The center conductor includes a passage ( 60) formed therein for passage of optical signals to an electro-optic device.

  6. Electro-optic component mounting device

    DOEpatents

    Gruchalla, M.E.

    1994-09-13

    A technique is provided for integrally mounting a device such as an electro-optic device in a transmission line to avoid series resonant effects. A center conductor of the transmission line has an aperture formed therein for receiving the device. The aperture splits the center conductor into two parallel sections on opposite sides of the device. For a waveguide application, the center conductor is surrounded by a conductive ground surface which is spaced apart from the center conductor with a dielectric material. One set of electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the center conductor and an electrode formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the conductive ground surface. The electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device are formed on curved sections of the surface of the device to mate with correspondingly shaped electrodes on the conductor and ground surface to provide a uniform electric field across the electro-optic device. The center conductor includes a passage formed therein for passage of optical signals to an electro-optic device. 10 figs.

  7. Russian collaborations on lasers and advanced optics

    SciTech Connect

    Munroe, J.; Cooper, D.; Koym, V.; Salesky, E.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. There are several technological areas where the Russians appear to be well ahead of the West. Russian work in lasers and advanced optics, high power nonlinear optics, and optical phase conjugation in particular, are some of these areas. The objective of this project is to establish collaboration with key Russian scientists in this area to analytically and experimentally validate the technologies and identify potential applications. This technology has the potential to solve very important military, civil, and commercial problems. The emphasis of this project is on civil and commercial applications, but the technologies have dual-use applications.

  8. Ceramic component processing development for advanced gas-turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcentire, B. J.; Hengst, R. R.; Collins, W. T.; Taglialavore, A. P.; Yeckley, R. L.; Bright, E.; Bingham, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    A review of ceramic component advancements directed at developing manufacturing technologies for rotors, stators, vane-seat platforms and scrolls is presented. The first three components are being produced from HIPed Si3N4, while scrolls were prepared from a series of siliconized silicon-carbide materials. Developmental work has been conducted on all aspects of the fabrication process utilizing Taguchi experimental design methods. An assessment of material properties for various components from each process and material are made.

  9. Atom optics with permanent magnetic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschede, Dieter; Bloch, Immanuel; Goepfert, A.; Haubrich, D.; Kreis, M.; Lison, F.; Schuetze, R.; Wynands, Robert

    1997-05-01

    We have fabricated and investigated efficient magnetic lenses, waveguides, and mirrors from rare earth permanent materials. They are affordable and maintenance free. In contrast to corresponding light force components they do not need any supplies, they have large apertures, high reflectivity, and there is no spontaneous emission. The cylindrical shape of magnetic components is furthermore well suited to steer atomic beams.

  10. Method for the continuous processing of hermetic fiber optic components and the resultant fiber optic-to-metal components

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, D.P.

    1994-08-09

    Hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components and method for making hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components by assembling and fixturing elements comprising a metal shell, a glass preform, and a metal-coated fiber optic into desired relative positions and then sealing said fixtured elements preferably using a continuous heating process is disclosed. The resultant hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components exhibit high hermeticity and durability despite the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion among the various elements. 3 figs.

  11. Optical design and characterization of an advanced computational imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, R. Hamilton; Fernandez-Cull, Christy; Raskar, Ramesh; Shi, Boxin; Barsi, Christopher; Zhao, Hang

    2014-09-01

    We describe an advanced computational imaging system with an optical architecture that enables simultaneous and dynamic pupil-plane and image-plane coding accommodating several task-specific applications. We assess the optical requirement trades associated with custom and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) optics and converge on the development of two low-cost and robust COTS testbeds. The first is a coded-aperture programmable pixel imager employing a digital micromirror device (DMD) for image plane per-pixel oversampling and spatial super-resolution experiments. The second is a simultaneous pupil-encoded and time-encoded imager employing a DMD for pupil apodization or a deformable mirror for wavefront coding experiments. These two testbeds are built to leverage two MIT Lincoln Laboratory focal plane arrays - an orthogonal transfer CCD with non-uniform pixel sampling and on-chip dithering and a digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) with advanced on-chip per-pixel processing capabilities. This paper discusses the derivation of optical component requirements, optical design metrics, and performance analyses for the two testbeds built.

  12. Application of advanced coating techniques to rocket engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The materials problem in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) is reviewed. Potential coatings and the method of their application for improved life of SSME components are discussed. A number of advanced coatings for turbine blade components and disks are being developed and tested in a multispecimen thermal fatigue fluidized bed facility at IIT Research Institute. This facility is capable of producing severe strains of the degree present in blades and disk components of the SSME. The potential coating systems and current efforts at IITRI being taken for life extension of the SSME components are summarized.

  13. Advanced component technologies for energy-efficient turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, N. T.

    1980-01-01

    The paper reviews NASA's Energy Efficient Engine Project which was initiated to provide the advanced technology base for a new generation of fuel-conservative engines for introduction into airline service by the late 1980s. Efforts in this project are directed at advancing engine component and systems technologies to a point of demonstrating technology-readiness by 1984. Early results indicate high promise in achieving most of the goals established in the project.

  14. Improved evaluation of optical depth components from Langley plot data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggar, S. F.; Gellman, D. I.; Slater, P. N.

    1990-01-01

    A simple, iterative procedure to determine the optical depth components of the extinction optical depth measured by a solar radiometer is presented. Simulated data show that the iterative procedure improves the determination of the exponent of a Junge law particle size distribution. The determination of the optical depth due to aerosol scattering is improved as compared to a method which uses only two points from the extinction data. The iterative method was used to determine spectral optical depth components for June 11-13, 1988 during the MAC III experiment.

  15. The input optics of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, D. B.; Arain, M. A.; Ciani, G.; Feldbaum, D.; Fulda, P.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, R.; Heintze, M.; Martin, R. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Williams, L. F.; Mueller, G.; Quetschke, V.; Korth, W. Z.; Reitze, D. H.; Derosa, R. T.; Effler, A.; Kokeyama, K.; Frolov, V. V.; Mullavey, A.; Poeld, J.

    2016-03-01

    The Input Optics (IO) of advanced LIGO will be described. The IO consists of all the optics between the laser and the power recycling mirror. The scope of the IO includes the following hardware: phase modulators, power control, input mode cleaner, an in-vacuum Faraday isolator, and mode matching telescopes. The IO group has developed and characterized RTP-based phase modulators capable of operation at 180 W cw input power. In addition, the Faraday isolator is compensated for depolarization and thermal lensing effects up to the same power and is capable of achieving greater than 40 dB isolation. This research has been supported by the NSF through Grants PHY-1205512 and PHY-1505598. LIGO-G1600067.

  16. [Advances in independent component analysis and its application].

    PubMed

    Chen, Huafu; Yao, Dezhong

    2003-06-01

    The independent component analysis (ICA) is a new technique in statistical signal processing, which decomposes mixed signals into statistical independent components. The reported applications in biomedical and radar signal have demonstrated its good prospect in various blind signal separation. In this paper, the progress of ICA in such as its principle, algorithm and application and advance direction of ICA in future is reviewed. The aim is to promote the research in theory and application in the future. PMID:12856621

  17. Component Development - Advanced Fuel Cells for Transportation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, William

    2000-06-19

    Report summarizes results of second phase of development of Vairex air compressor/expander for automotive fuel cell power systems. Project included optimizing key system performance parameters, as well as reducing number of components and the project cost, size and weight of the air system. Objectives were attained. Advanced prototypes are in commercial test environments.

  18. MATERIALS AND COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT FOR ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROJECT SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M A

    2010-06-18

    Future hydrogen-fired or oxy-fuel turbines will likely experience an enormous level of thermal and mechanical loading, as turbine inlet temperatures (TIT) approach 1425-1760C (2600-3200F) with pressures of 300-625 psig, respectively. Maintaining the structural integrity of future turbine components under these extreme conditions will require (1) durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), (2) high temperature creep resistant metal substrates, and (3) effective cooling techniques. While advances in substrate materials have been limited for the past decades, thermal protection of turbine airfoils in future hydrogen-fired and oxy-fuel turbines will rely primarily on collective advances in the TBCs and aerothermal cooling. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the Office of Research and Development (ORD) at National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has continued its collaborative research efforts with the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University, while working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers. This paper presents the technical accomplishments that were made during FY09 in the initial areas of advanced materials, aerothermal heat transfer and non-destructive evaluation techniques for use in advanced land-based turbine applications in the Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems project, and introduces three new technology areas high temperature overlayer coating development, diffusion barrier coating development, and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy development that are being conducted in this effort.

  19. Integral window hermetic fiber optic components

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, R.D.; Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.; Waker, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    In the fabrication of igniters, actuators, detonators, and other pyrotechnic devices to be activated by a laser beam, an integral optical glass window is formed by placing a preform in the structural member of the device and then melting the glass and sealing it in place by heating at a temperature between the ceramming temperature of the glass and the melting point of the metal, followed by rapid furnace cooling to avoid devitrification. No other sealing material is needed to achieve hermeticity. A preferred embodiment of this type of device is fabricated by allowing the molten glass to flow further and form a plano-convex lens integral with and at the bottom of the window. The lens functions to decrease the beam divergence caused by refraction of the laser light passing through the window when the device is fired by means of a laser beam.

  20. Advanced optic fabrication using ultrafast laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lauren L.; Qiao, Jun; Qiao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Advanced fabrication and finishing techniques are desired for freeform optics and integrated photonics. Methods including grinding, polishing and magnetorheological finishing used for final figuring and polishing of such optics are time consuming, expensive, and may be unsuitable for complex surface features while common photonics fabrication techniques often limit devices to planar geometries. Laser processing has been investigated as an alternative method for optic forming, surface polishing, structure writing, and welding, as direct tuning of laser parameters and flexible beam delivery are advantageous for complex freeform or photonics elements and material-specific processing. Continuous wave and pulsed laser radiation down to the nanosecond regime have been implemented to achieve nanoscale surface finishes through localized material melting, but the temporal extent of the laser-material interaction often results in the formation of a sub-surface heat affected zone. The temporal brevity of ultrafast laser radiation can allow for the direct vaporization of rough surface asperities with minimal melting, offering the potential for smooth, final surface quality with negligible heat affected material. High intensities achieved in focused ultrafast laser radiation can easily induce phase changes in the bulk of materials for processing applications. We have experimentally tested the effectiveness of ultrafast laser radiation as an alternative laser source for surface processing of monocrystalline silicon. Simulation of material heating associated with ultrafast laser-material interaction has been performed and used to investigate optimized processing parameters including repetition rate. The parameter optimization process and results of experimental processing will be presented.

  1. Advanced X-ray diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Comamala, J.; Jefimovs, K.; Pilvi, T.; Ritala, M.; Sarkar, S. S.; Solak, H. H.; Guzenko, V. A.; Stampanoni, M.; Marone, F.; Raabe, J.; Tzvetkov, G.; Fink, R. H.; Grolimund, D.; Borca, C. N.; Kaulich, B.; David, C.

    2009-09-01

    X-ray microscopy greatly benefits from the advances in x-ray optics. At the Paul Scherrer Institut, developments in x-ray diffractive optics include the manufacture and optimization of Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) and diffractive optical elements for both soft and hard x-ray regimes. In particular, we demonstrate here a novel method for the production of ultra-high resolution FZPs. This technique is based on the deposition of a zone plate material (iridium) onto the sidewalls of a prepatterned template structure (silicon) by atomic layer deposition. This approach overcomes the limitations due to electron-beam writing of dense patterns in FZP fabrication and provides a clear route to push the resolution into sub-10 nm regime. A FZP fabricated by this method was used to resolve test structures with 12 nm lines and spaces at the scanning transmission x-ray microscope of the PolLux beamline of the Swiss Light Source at 1.2 keV photon energy.

  2. Specification of optical components using the power spectral density function

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.K.; Wolfe, C.R.; Manes, K.R.; Trenholme, J.B.; Aikens, D.M.; English, R.E. Jr.

    1995-06-20

    This paper describes the use of Fourier techniques to characterize the wavefront of optical components, specifically, the use of the power spectral density, (PSD), function. The PSDs of several precision optical components will be shown. Many of the optical components of interest to us have square, rectangular or irregularly shaped apertures with major dimensions up-to 800 mm. The wavefronts of components with non-circular apertures cannot be analyzed with Zernicke polynomials since these functions are an orthogonal set for circular apertures only. Furthermore, Zernicke analysis is limited to treating low frequency wavefront aberrations; mid-spatial scale and high frequency error are expressed only as ``residuals.`` A more complete and powerful representation of the optical wavefront can be obtained by Fourier analysis in 1 or 2 dimensions. The PSD is obtained from the amplitude of frequency components present in the Fourier spectrum. The PSD corresponds to the scattered intensity as a function of scattering angle in the wavefront and can be used to describe the intensity distribution at focus. The shape of a resultant wavefront or the focal spot of a complex multi-component laser system can be calculated and optimized using the PSDs of individual optical components which comprise it.

  3. Coherent Terahertz Wireless Signal Transmission Using Advanced Optical Fiber Communication Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Kuri, Toshiaki; Morohashi, Isao; Hosako, Iwao; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Yuki; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2015-02-01

    Coherent terahertz signal transmission with multilevel modulation and demodulation is demonstrated using an optical sub-harmonic IQ mixer (SHIQM), which consists of optical components in advanced optical fiber communication technologies. An optical-frequency-comb-employed signal generator is capable of vector modulation as well as frequency tunability. Digital signal processing (DSP) adopted from the recently developed optical digital coherent communication can easily demodulate multi-level modulated terahertz signals by using electrical heterodyning for intermediate-frequency (IF) down conversion. This technique is applicable for mobile backhauling in the next-generation mobile communication technology directly connected to an optical fiber network as a high-speed wireless transmission link.

  4. Long-term stability of polymeric integrated optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Wing-Ying

    2006-02-01

    Traditionally, glass has been a suitable waveguide material and passive integrated optical circuits in glass substrates are widely used as passive components. Long-term tests of optical glass flats with a high level of internal stress revealed gradual systematic-change with time to produce inconsistent results. Since long-term stability has been the primary concern for users of specific applications, investigations of instabilities in various optical materials have been carried out via measurements and tests. From the development of the integrated optical systems' point-of-view, polymers are promising candidates that possess excellent compatibility with all other materials and their associated processes. Polymeric materials offer large refractive-index contrasts, high performance, environmental stability, simple low-cost fabrication and may be processed by unconventional forming techniques. Polymer technologies can be designed to form stress-free films, so that stress-induced losses can be eliminated. Optical polymers may also be tailored to meet specific requirements for optical waveguide devices and can be highly transparent in such a way that they are not a limiting factor in components' lifetime. In this paper, tests results and characteristics of polymeric materials shall be reviewed; different types of polymer are detail-studied and a brief analysis shall be presented. Examples of passive polymeric integrated optical components are single-mode splitters, couplers, polarizers, routers, gratings, bend waveguides, power dividers, wavelength filters and wavelength multiplexers/de-multiplexers, which may find applications in the optical communication and the telecommunication industries.

  5. Advanced Electrical Materials and Components Development: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2005-01-01

    The primary means to develop advanced electrical components is to develop new and improved materials for magnetic components (transformers, inductors, etc.), capacitors, and semiconductor switches and diodes. This paper will give an update of the Advanced Power Electronics and Components Technology being developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center for use in future Power Management and Distribution subsystems used in space power systems for spacecraft and lunar and planetary surface power. The initial description and status of this technology program was presented two years ago at the First International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference held at Portsmouth, Virginia, August 2003. The present paper will give a brief background of the previous work reported and a summary of research performed the past several years on soft magnetic materials characterization, dielectric materials and capacitor developments, high quality silicon carbide atomically smooth substrates, and SiC static and dynamic device characterization under elevated temperature conditions. The rationale for and the benefits of developing advanced electrical materials and components for the PMAD subsystem and also for the total power system will also be briefly discussed.

  6. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Damevski, Kostadin

    2009-03-30

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discover through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedened computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative hig-performance scientific computing.

  7. Development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, William H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 'Development of Sensors for Ceramics Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems' program was divided into two phases. The objectives of Phase 1 were to analyze, evaluate and recommend sensor concepts for the measurement of surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion systems. The results of this effort were previously published in NASA CR-182111. As a result of Phase 1, three approaches were recommended for further development: pyrometry, thin-film sensors, and thermographic phosphors. The objectives of Phase 2 were to fabricate and conduct laboratory demonstration tests of these systems. A summary report of the Phase 2 effort, together with conclusions and recommendations for each of the categories evaluated, has been submitted to NASA. Emittance tests were performed on six materials furnished by NASA Lewis Research Center. Measurements were made of various surfaces at high temperature using a Thermogage emissometer. This report describes the emittance test program and presents a summary of the results.

  8. Characterization of optical components for use in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Michelle; Morelli, Gregg

    2006-08-01

    The characterization of mounted and/or bonded optical assemblies for survivability in harsh environments is crucial for the development of robust laser-optical firing systems. Customized mounts, bonded assemblies and packaging strategies were utilized for each of the laser resonator optics with the goal of developing and fielding a reliable initiation system for use in extreme conditions. Specific components were selected for initial testing based on past experience, material properties and optical construction. Shock, vibration and temperature testing was performed on three mounted optical components; polarizing cube beam splitters, Q-switch assemblies and xenon flashlamps. Previously, flashlamps of a solder-sealed construction type were successfully tested and characterized. This test regiment characterized the more fragile glass-to-metal seal constructed flashlamps. Components were shock-tested to a maximum impulse level of 5700 G's with a 1.1 millisecond long pulse. Vibration tests were performed to a maximum level of 15.5 grms for forty seconds in each of three axes. During each test, components were functionally tested and visually inspected at a specified point to verify survival. Temperature tests were performed over a range extending from a maximum of 75 degrees C to a minimum of -55 degrees C, allowing for a two hour soak at each temperature set point. Experimental results obtained from these tests will be discussed as will their impact on future component mounting strategies.

  9. Advanced diesel engine component development program, tasks 4-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaushal, Tony S.; Weber, Karen E.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development (ADECD) Program to develop and demonstrate critical technology needed to advance the heavy-duty low heat rejection engine concept. Major development activities reported are the design, analysis, and fabrication of monolithic ceramic components; vapor phase and solid film lubrication; electrohydraulic valve actuation; and high pressure common rail injection. An advanced single cylinder test bed was fabricated as a laboratory tool in studying these advanced technologies. This test bed simulates the reciprocator for a system having no cooling system, turbo compounding, Rankine bottoming cycle, common rail injection, and variable valve actuation to achieve fuel consumption of 160 g/kW-hr (.26 lb/hp-hr). The advanced concepts were successfully integrated into the test engine. All ceramic components met their functional and reliability requirements. The firedeck, cast-in-place ports, valves, valve guides, piston cap, and piston ring were made from silicon nitride. Breakthroughs required to implement a 'ceramic' engine included the fabrication of air-gap cylinder heads, elimination of compression gaskets, machining of ceramic valve seats within the ceramic firedeck, fabrication of cast-in-place ceramic port liners, implementation of vapor phase lubrication, and elimination of the engine coolant system. Silicon nitride valves were successfully developed to meet several production abuse test requirements and incorporated into the test bed with a ceramic valve guide and solid film lubrication. The ADECD cylinder head features ceramic port shields to increase insulation and exhaust energy recovery. The combustion chamber includes a ceramic firedeck and piston cap. The tribological challenge posed by top ring reversal temperatures of 550 C was met through the development of vapor phase lubrication using tricresyl phosphate at the ring-liner interface. A solenoid-controlled, variable valve actuation system

  10. MATERIALS AND COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT FOR ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Alvin

    2009-06-12

    Future hydrogen-fired or oxy-fuel turbines will likely experience an enormous level of thermal and mechanical loading, as turbine inlet temperatures (TIT) approach 1425-1760ºC with pressures of 300-625 psig, respectively. Maintaining the structural integrity of future turbine components under these extreme conditions will require durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), high temperature creep resistant metal substrates, and effective cooling techniques. While advances in substrate materials have been limited for the past decades, thermal protection of turbine airfoils in future hydrogen-fired and oxy-fuel turbines will rely primarily on collective advances in TBCs and aerothermal cooling. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) at the Office of Research and Development (ORD) has initiated a research project effort in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh (UPitt), and West Virginia University (WVU), working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers, to develop advanced materials, aerothermal configurations, as well as non-destructive evaluation techniques for use in advanced land-based gas turbine applications. This paper reviews technical accomplishments recently achieved in each of these areas.

  11. Electro-optic architecture for servicing sensors and actuators in advanced aircraft propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, G. L.; Glasheen, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed design of a fiber optic propulsion control system, integrating favored sensors and electro-optics architecture is presented. Layouts, schematics, and sensor lists describe an advanced fighter engine system model. Components and attributes of candidate fiber optic sensors are identified, and evaluation criteria are used in a trade study resulting in favored sensors for each measurand. System architectural ground rules were applied to accomplish an electro-optics architecture for the favored sensors. A key result was a considerable reduction in signal conductors. Drawings, schematics, specifications, and printed circuit board layouts describe the detailed system design, including application of a planar optical waveguide interface.

  12. Low-power photonic components for optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Po; Liao, Shirong; Liang, Hong; Feng, Ning-Ning; Qian, Wei; Shafiiha, Roshanak; Feng, Dazeng; Li, Guoliang; Zheng, Xuezhe; Cunningham, John E.; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V.; Asghari, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Silicon-based optical interconnects are expected to provide high bandwidth and low power consumption solutions for chip-level communication applications, due to their electronics integration capability, proven manufacturing record and attractive price volume curve. In order to compete with electrical interconnects, the energy requirement is projected to be sub-pJ per bit for an optical link in chip to chip communication. Such low energies pose significant challenges for the optical components used in these applications. In this paper, we review several low power photonic components developed at Kotura for DARPA's Ultraperformance Nanophotonic Intrachip Communications (UNIC) project. These components include high speed silicon microring modulators, wavelength (de)multiplexers using silicon cascaded microrings, low power electro-optic silicon switches, low loss silicon routing waveguides, and low capacitance germanium photodetectors. Our microring modulators demonstrate an energy consumption of { 10 fJ per bit with a drive voltage of 1 V. Silicon routing waveguides have a propagation loss of < 0.3 dB/cm, enabling a propagation length of a few tens of centimeters. The germanium photodetectors can have a low device capacitance of a few fF, a high responsivity up to 1.1 A/W and a high speed of >30 GHz. These components are potentially sufficient to construct a full optical link with an energy consumption of less than 1 pJ per bit.

  13. Low-temperature hermetic sealing of optical fiber components

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, D.P.

    1995-12-31

    A method for manufacturing low-temperature hermetically sealed optical fiber components is provided. The method comprises the steps of: inserting an optical fiber into a housing, the optical fiber having a glass core, a glass cladding and a protective buffer layer disposed around the core and cladding; heating the housing to a predetermined temperature, the predetermined temperature being below a melting point for the protective buffer layer and above a melting point of a solder; placing the solder in communication with the heated housing to allow the solder to form an eutectic and thereby fill a gap between the interior of the housing and the optical fiber; and cooling the housing to allow the solder to form a hermetic compression seal between the housing and the optical fiber.

  14. Low-temperature hermetic sealing of optical fiber components

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, Daniel P.

    1996-10-22

    A method for manufacturing low-temperature hermetically sealed optical fi components is provided. The method comprises the steps of: inserting an optical fiber into a housing, the optical fiber having a glass core, a glass cladding and a protective buffer layer disposed around the core and cladding; heating the housing to a predetermined temperature, the predetermined temperature being below a melting point for the protective buffer layer and above a melting point of a solder; placing the solder in communication with the heated housing to allow the solder to form an eutectic and thereby fill a gap between the interior of the housing and the optical fiber; and cooling the housing to allow the solder to form a hermetic compression seal between the housing and the optical fiber.

  15. Low-temperature hermetic sealing of optical fiber components

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, D.P.

    1996-10-22

    A method for manufacturing low-temperature hermetically sealed optical fiber components is provided. The method comprises the steps of: inserting an optical fiber into a housing, the optical fiber having a glass core, a glass cladding and a protective buffer layer disposed around the core and cladding; heating the housing to a predetermined temperature, the predetermined temperature being below a melting point for the protective buffer layer and above a melting point of a solder; placing the solder in communication with the heated housing to allow the solder to form an eutectic and thereby fill a gap between the interior of the housing and the optical fiber; and cooling the housing to allow the solder to form a hermetic compression seal between the housing and the optical fiber. 5 figs.

  16. Performance evaluation of fiber optic components in nuclear plant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, M.C.; Miller, D.W.; James, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    Over the past several years, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has funded several projects to evaluate the performance of commercially available fiber optic cables, connective devices, light sources, and light detectors under environmental conditions representative of normal and abnormal nuclear power plant operating conditions. Future projects are planned to evaluate commercially available fiber optic sensors and to install and evaluate performance of instrument loops comprised of fiber optic components in operating nuclear power plant applications. The objective of this research is to assess the viability of fiber optic components for replacement and upgrade of nuclear power plant instrument systems. Fiber optic instrument channels offer many potential advantages: commercial availability of parts and technical support, small physical size and weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference, relatively low power requirements, and high bandwidth capabilities. As existing nuclear power plants continue to replace and upgrade I&C systems, fiber optics will offer a low-cost alternative technology which also provides additional information processing capabilities. Results to date indicate that fiber optics are a viable technology for many nuclear applications, both inside and outside of containments. This work is funded and manage& under the Operations & Maintenance Cost Control research target of EPRI`s Nuclear Power Group. The work is being performed by faculty and students in the Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Departments and the staff of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory of the Ohio State University.

  17. Subwavelength-diameter silica wires for microscale optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Limin; Mazur, Eric

    2005-04-01

    Subwavelength-diameter silica wires fabricated using a taper-drawing approach exhibit excellent diameter uniformity and atomic-level smoothness, making them suitable for low-loss optical wave guiding from the UV to the near-infrared. Such air-clad silica wires can be used as single-mode waveguides; depending on wavelength and wire diameter, they either tightly confine the optical fields or leave a certain amount of guided energy outside the wire in the form of evanescent waves. Using these wire waveguides as building blocks we assembled microscale optical components such as linear waveguides, waveguide bends and branch couplers on a low-index, non-dissipative silica aerogel substrate. These components are much smaller than comparable existing devices and have low optical loss, indicating that the wire-assembly technique presented here has great potential for developing microphotonics devices for future applications in a variety of fields such as optical communication, optical sensing and high-density optical integration.

  18. Reliability Quantification of Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Korovaichuk, Igor; Zampino, Edward

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor, is intended to provide power for an unmanned planetary spacecraft and has an operational life requirement of 17 years. Over this 17 year mission, the ASC must provide power with desired performance and efficiency and require no corrective maintenance. Reliability demonstration testing for the ASC was found to be very limited due to schedule and resource constraints. Reliability demonstration must involve the application of analysis, system and component level testing, and simulation models, taken collectively. Therefore, computer simulation with limited test data verification is a viable approach to assess the reliability of ASC components. This approach is based on physics-of-failure mechanisms and involves the relationship among the design variables based on physics, mechanics, material behavior models, interaction of different components and their respective disciplines such as structures, materials, fluid, thermal, mechanical, electrical, etc. In addition, these models are based on the available test data, which can be updated, and analysis refined as more data and information becomes available. The failure mechanisms and causes of failure are included in the analysis, especially in light of the new information, in order to develop guidelines to improve design reliability and better operating controls to reduce the probability of failure. Quantified reliability assessment based on fundamental physical behavior of components and their relationship with other components has demonstrated itself to be a superior technique to conventional reliability approaches based on utilizing failure rates derived from similar equipment or simply expert judgment.

  19. Prognostics Health Management for Advanced Small Modular Reactor Passive Components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-10-18

    In the United States, sustainable nuclear power to promote energy security is a key national energy priority. Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMR), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts using non-light-water reactor (LWR) coolants such as liquid metal, helium, or liquid salt may provide a longer-term alternative to more conventional LWR-based concepts. The economics of AdvSMRs will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional LWRs and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance costs. Therefore, achieving the full benefits of AdvSMR deployment requires a new paradigm for plant design and management. In this context, prognostic health management of passive components in AdvSMRs can play a key role in enabling the economic deployment of AdvSMRs. In this paper, the background of AdvSMRs is discussed from which requirements for PHM systems are derived. The particle filter technique is proposed as a prognostics framework for AdvSMR passive components and the suitability of the particle filter technique is illustrated by using it to forecast thermal creep degradation using a physics-of-failure model and based on a combination of types of measurements conceived for passive AdvSMR components.

  20. Advanced integrated spectrometer designs for miniaturized optical coherence tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akca, B. I.; Považay, B.; Chang, L.; Alex, A.; Wörhoff, K.; de Ridder, R. M.; Drexler, W.; Pollnau, M.

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has enabled clinical applications that revolutionized in vivo medical diagnostics. Nevertheless, its current limitations owing to cost, size, complexity, and the need for accurate alignment must be overcome by radically novel approaches. Exploiting integrated optics, the central components of a spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) system can be integrated on a chip. Arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) spectrometers with their high spectral resolution and compactness are excellent candidates for on-chip SD-OCT systems. However, specific design-related issues of AWG spectrometers limit the performance of on-chip SD-OCT systems. Here we present advanced AWG designs which could overcome the limitations arising from free spectral range, polarization dependency, and curved focal plane of the AWG spectrometers. Using these advanced AWG designs in an SD-OCT system can provide not only better overall performance but also some unique aspects that a commercial system does not have. Additionally, a partially integrated OCT system comprising an AWG spectrometer and an integrated beam splitter, as well as the in vivo imaging using this system are demonstrated.

  1. Low-power MOEMS components for active optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castracane, James; Yan, Dong; Madison, Seth; Xu, Bai

    2004-01-01

    The eventual, widespread insertion of Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) into the marketplace rests fundamentally on the ability to produce viable components that maximize optical performance while minimizing power consumption and size. In addition, the incorporation of optical reconfigurability into custom MOEMS devices offers an extra degree of freedom not possible with conventional components. Active control of surface topology allows for one component to perform multiple functions thus reducing cost and complexity. This paper will focus on the current status of the MOEMS research program at the University at Albany Institute for Materials" (UAIM) NanoFab 200 with several examples described to illustrate component and system development. In particular, among the MOEMS research portfolio at UAIM, the development of selected MOEMS-based, active optics will be discussed. This active control of diffraction and reflection forms the basis for the utility of such devices. Leveraging the extensive research expertise on the patented MEMS Compound Grating (MCG), emphasis will be placed on the extension of the approach to novel designs, materials and fabrication methods to yield low power, high performance prototypes. The main focus of this paper is on the development of a polymer version (including sacrificial layer, in some designs) of the MCG which allows for ease of fabrication and a reduced electrostatic actuation voltage. Following a system design effort, several generations of the component were fabricated to optimize the process flow. Component metrology, electromechanical characterization and initial results of optical tests will be reported. A second example presented is the design and prototype fabrication of a spring micrograting using a customized SOI process. This highly flexible component builds on the MCG concept and yields an order of magnitude reduction in actuation voltage. These examples will be presented against a backdrop of the broad UAIM

  2. Optical methods of stress analysis applied to cracked components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    After briefly describing the principles of frozen stress photoelastic and moire interferometric analyses, and the corresponding algorithms for converting optical data from each method into stress intensity factors (SIF), the methods are applied to the determination of crack shapes, SIF determination, crack closure displacement fields, and pre-crack damage mechanisms in typical aircraft component configurations.

  3. Qualification and Lessons Learned with Space Flight Fiber Optic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    This presentation covers lessons learned during the design, development, manufacturing and qualification of space flight fiber optic components. Changes at NASA, including short-term projects and decreased budgets have brought about changes to vendors and parts. Most photonics for NASA needs are now commercial off the shelf (COTS) products. The COTS Tecnology Assurance approach for space flight and qualification plans are outlined.

  4. Six Degree-of-Freedom Positioner for Optical Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, Robert; Roberts, Scott C.; Anthony, Andre

    2003-03-01

    The Six Degree-of-Freedom (6DOF) positioner was developed to position the four off-axis conic mirrors in Altair (Gemini** North's facility adaptive optics system). This positioner takes a unique approach to 6DOF positioning by combining two 3DOF parallel mechanisms in series to create a hybrid mechanism. The mechanism design provides a number of benefits including small size, simple adjustment, position locking, relatively simple kinematics and repeatable removal and replacement of optical components. The 6DOF positioner is capable of positioning optics at the micron level in translation and at the arcsecond level in rotation. It also maintains the position of the optics to a few microns with changing gravity vector. The position of an attached optical component can be adjusted using a computer program to provide precision adjustment about an arbitrary coordinate system. However, the arrangement of the adjustments are such that any desired motion can be made with a single actuator or with a sensible combination of actuators. This is unlike other 6DOF positioning solutions like a Stewart Platform in which all 6DOF are completely coupled making it impossible to move the platform in any desired direction without moving all six actuators. This paper will present the design of the positioner, a kinematic analysis of the mechanism and a discussion about the effectiveness of the positioner in the optical alignment of Altair.

  5. The design and fabrication of common optical components lithography lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiun-Woei

    2015-07-01

    The design and fabrication of common optical components lithography Lens has been carried out for a 1 to 1 stepper. The specification of lens is fulfilled the 3-D lithography system as 2 micron in resolution for 1 inch x 2.8 inches system. The lens has been sophistically designed by dual path in a triplet to reduce the number of components. A single aspherical surface has been applied to reduce the aberration to diffraction limit in lens. The well-made shapes of lens have been suggested. Then, the fabrication of lens has been in the process. Finally, the optical axis of tolerance optical mechanical mountings for lens system in assembly has been analyzed, and valuable for assembly and fabrication.

  6. Hydrogen-bromine fuel cell advance component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charleston, Joann; Reed, James

    1988-01-01

    Advanced cell component development is performed by NASA Lewis to achieve improved performance and longer life for the hydrogen-bromine fuel cells system. The state-of-the-art hydrogen-bromine system utilizes the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) technology, similar to the SPE technology developed for the hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell system. These studies are directed at exploring the potential for this system by assessing and evaluating various types of materials for cell parts and electrode materials for Bromine-hydrogen bromine environment and fabricating experimental membrane/electrode-catalysts by chemical deposition.

  7. Advanced component research in the solar thermal program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. T.

    The capabilities, equipment, and programs of the DoE advanced components test facility (ACTF) for developing solar thermal technologies are reviewed. The ACTF has a heliostat field, a rigid structural steel test tower at the geometric center of the heliostat field, an experiment platform on the tower, a heat rejection system, and computerized instrumentation. Tests have been performed on a directly-heated fluidized-bed solar receiver, a high pressure single-pass-to-superheat steam generator, a liquid Na heat pipe receiver, a flash pyrolysis biomass gasifier, and a grid-connected Stirling engine powered electrical generator. Helium served as the 720 C working fluid in the Stirling engine, and 18.8 kWe continuous was produced for the grid. Verified components qualified for further development are subjected to larger scale testing at a 5 MW facility in Albuquerque, NM.

  8. Hybrid optical (freeform) components--functionalization of nonplanar optical surfaces by direct picosecond laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Roman; Kampmann, Ronald; Stoebenau, Sebastian; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    The performance of optical systems is typically improved by increasing the number of conventionally fabricated optical components (spheres, aspheres, and gratings). This approach is automatically connected to a system enlargement, as well as potentially higher assembly and maintenance costs. Hybrid optical freeform components can help to overcome this trade-off. They merge several optical functions within fewer but more complex optical surfaces, e.g., elements comprising shallow refractive/reflective and high-frequency diffractive structures. However, providing the flexibility and precision essential for their realization is one of the major challenges in the field of optical component fabrication. In this article we present tailored integrated machining techniques suitable for rapid prototyping as well as the fabrication of molding tools for low-cost mass replication of hybrid optical freeform components. To produce the different feature sizes with optical surface quality, we successively combine mechanical machining modes (ultraprecision micromilling and fly cutting) with precisely aligned direct picosecond laser ablation in an integrated fabrication approach. The fabrication accuracy and surface quality achieved by our integrated fabrication approach are demonstrated with profilometric measurements and experimental investigations of the optical performance. PMID:21743521

  9. Application of advanced austenitic alloys to fossil power system components

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    Most power and recovery boilers operating in the US produce steam at temperatures below 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) and pressures below 24 MPa (3500 psi). For these operating conditions, carbon steels and low alloy steels may be used for the construction of most of the boiler components. Austenitic stainless steels often are used for superheater/reheater tubing when these components are expected to experience temperatures above 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) or when the environment is too corrosive for low alloys steels. The austenitic stainless steels typically used are the 304H, 321H, and 347H grades. New ferritic steels such as T91 and T92 are now being introduced to replace austenitic: stainless steels in aging fossil power plants. Generally, these high-strength ferritic steels are more expensive to fabricate than austenitic stainless steels because the ferritic steels have more stringent heat treating requirements. Now, annealing requirements are being considered for the stabilized grades of austenitic stainless steels when they receive more than 5% cold work, and these requirements would increase significantly the cost of fabrication of boiler components where bending strains often exceed 15%. It has been shown, however, that advanced stainless steels developed at ORNL greatly benefit from cold work, and these steels could provide an alternative to either conventional stainless steels or high-strength ferritic steels. The purpose of the activities reported here is to examine the potential of advanced stainless steels for construction of tubular components in power boilers. The work is being carried out with collaboration of a commercial boiler manufacturer.

  10. 24 CFR 242.47 - Insured advances for building components stored off-site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (d) Advances. (1) Before an advance for a building component stored off-site is insured: (i) The... for building components stored off-site. (a) Building components. In insured advances for building..., if the components are stored at a location approved by the mortgagee and HUD. (2) Each...

  11. Advanced scanning methods with tracking optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Daniel; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Ustun, Teoman; Wollstein, Gadi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Gabriele, Michelle L.; Dilworth, William D.; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    An upgraded optical coherence tomography system with integrated retinal tracker (TOCT) was developed. The upgraded system uses improved components to extend the tracking bandwidth, fully integrates the tracking hardware into the optical head of the clinical OCT system, and operates from a single software platform. The system was able to achieve transverse scan registration with sub-pixel accuracy (~10 μm). We demonstrate several advanced scan sequences with the TOCT, including composite scans averaged (co-added) from multiple B-scans taken consecutively and several hours apart, en face images collected by summing the A-scans of circular, line, and raster scans, and three-dimensional (3D) retinal maps of the fovea and optic disc. The new system achieves highly accurate OCT scan registration yielding composite images with significantly improved spatial resolution, increased signal-to-noise ratio, and reduced speckle while maintaining well-defined boundaries and sharp fine structure compared to single scans. Precise re-registration of multiple scans over separate imaging sessions demonstrates TOCT utility for longitudinal studies. En face images and 3D data cubes generated from these data reveal high fidelity image registration with tracking, despite scan durations of more than one minute. PMID:19498823

  12. Advanced manufacturing methods for chalcogenide molded optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogburn, Gabriel

    2011-06-01

    As Chalcogenide glass and Precision Molded Optics (PMO) have developed and matured to a point of being accepted as replacements for Germanium Single Point Diamond Turned (SPDT) optics; technological research is being dedicated to developing infrared PMO that can be used in a broader application base. These include laser arrays, large aperture molded chalcogenide optics, and molded in mount infrared optics. This paper presents applications for infrared laser arrays and the corresponding optics that must be closely mechanically mounted to avoid clipping the beams. Different molding and mounting techniques will be discussed to solve this issue which include; dicing chalcogenide optic lenses, molded in mount chalcogenide optics and stepped optic shape molding for mounting purposes. Accompanying the research and discussion of these techniques will be experiments and molded chalcogenide glass lenses showing the results and application for each lens type.

  13. 77 FR 65713 - Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... COMMISSION Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products... the United States after importation of certain optoelectronic devices for fiber optic communications... importation of certain optoelectronic devices for fiber optic communications, components thereof, and...

  14. Airborne molecular contamination: quality criterion for laser and optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Airborne molecular contaminations (AMCs) have been recognized as a major problem in semiconductor fabrication. Enormous technical and financial efforts are made to remove or at least reduce these contaminations in production environments to increase yield and process stability. It can be shown that AMCs from various sources in laser devices have a negative impact on quality and lifetime of lasers and optical systems. Outgassing of organic compounds, especially condensable compounds were identified as the main source for deterioration of optics. These compounds can lead to hazing on surfaces of optics, degradation of coating, reducing the signal transmission or the laser signal itself and can enhance the probability of laser failure and damage. Sources of organic outgassing can be molding materials, resins, seals, circuit boards, cable insulation, coatings, paints and others. Critical compounds are siloxanes, aromatic amines and high boiling aromatic hydrocarbons like phthalates which are used as softeners in plastic materials. Nowadays all sensitive assembly steps are performed in controlled cleanroom environments to reduce risks of contamination. We will demonstrate a high efficient air filter concept to remove AMCs for production environments with special AMC filters and methods for the qualification and monitoring of these environments. Additionally, we show modern techniques and examples for the pre-qualification of materials. For assembled components, we provide sampling concepts for a routine measurement for process, component and product qualification. A careful selection of previously tested and certified materials and components is essential to guarantee the quality of lasers and optical devices.

  15. Direct-write diffracting tubular optical components using femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Ben; Bellouard, Yves

    2014-03-01

    Over the last decade, femtosecond lasers have been used extensively for the fabrication of optical elements via direct writing and in combination with chemical etching. These processes have been an enabling technology for manufacturing a variety of devices such as waveguides, fluidic channels, and mechanical components. Here, we present high quality micro-scale optical components buried inside various glass substrates such as soda-lime glass or fused silica. These components consist of high-precision, simple patterns with tubular shapes. Typical diameters range from a few microns to one hundred microns. With the aid of high-bandwidth, high acceleration flexure stages, we achieve highly symmetric pattern geometries, which are particularly important for achieving homogeneous stress distribution within the substrate. We model the optical properties of these structures using beam propagation simulation techniques and experimentally demonstrate that such components can be used as cost-effective, low-numerical aperture lenses. Additionally, we investigate their capability for studying the stress-distribution induced by the laser-affected zones and possible related densification effects.

  16. Highly precise and robust packaging of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leers, Michael; Winzen, Matthias; Liermann, Erik; Faidel, Heinrich; Westphalen, Thomas; Miesner, Jörn; Luttmann, Jörg; Hoffmann, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we present the development of a compact, thermo-optically stable and vibration and mechanical shock resistant mounting technique by soldering of optical components. Based on this technique a new generation of laser sources for aerospace applications is designed. In these laser systems solder technique replaces the glued and bolted connections between optical component, mount and base plate. Alignment precision in the arc second range and realization of long term stability of every single part in the laser system is the main challenge. At the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT a soldering and mounting technique has been developed for high precision packaging. The specified environmental boundary conditions (e.g. a temperature range of -40 °C to +50 °C) and the required degrees of freedom for the alignment of the components have been taken into account for this technique. In general the advantage of soldering compared to gluing is that there is no outgassing. In addition no flux is needed in our special process. The joining process allows multiple alignments by remelting the solder. The alignment is done in the liquid phase of the solder by a 6 axis manipulator with a step width in the nm range and a tilt in the arc second range. In a next step the optical components have to pass the environmental tests. The total misalignment of the component to its adapter after the thermal cycle tests is less than 10 arc seconds. The mechanical stability tests regarding shear, vibration and shock behavior are well within the requirements.

  17. Degradation effects of optical components in the low orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Dirk-Roger; Ringel, Gabriele; Kratz, Frank; Neubauer, Rudolf; Swoboda, Helmut; Hampe, Jans

    1994-09-01

    Optical components which are being used for space instrumentation have been exposed to space conditions to examine degradation effects. The samples have been mounted into the SESAM (Surface Effects Sample Monitor) instrument which was integrated on the ASTRO-SPAS Satellite. Exposition occurred during the STS-51 mission. It was found out that especially supersmooth glass samples made of BK7 show damage effects which increase the roughness from i.e. 0.05 nm to 0.19 nm.

  18. Free-form optical components in some early commercial products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, William T.

    2005-08-01

    In the period from 1973 through 1992, Polaroid introduced six different free-form aspheric optical surfaces in some unusually innovative instant photographic cameras, made in the millions. In each case these peculiar components were used to solve unusual problems of product size, shape, and function. This presentation relates how and why those surfaces were used and how they were tooled and manufactured with high quality.

  19. Laser damage testing of optical components under cryogenic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulehla, Jindrich; Pokorný, Pavel; Lazar, Josef

    2012-11-01

    In this contribution we present a technology for deposition and testing of interference coatings for optical components designed to operate in power pulsed lasers. The aim of the technology is to prepare components for high power laser facilities such as ELI (Extreme Light Infrastructure) or HiLASE. ELI is a part of the European plan to build a new generation of large research facilities selected by the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). These facilities rely on the use of diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSL). The choice of the material for the lasers' optical components is critical. Some of the most important properties include the ability to be antireflection and high reflection coated to reduce the energy losses and increase the overall efficiency. As large amounts of heat need to be dissipated during laser operation, cryogenic cooling is necessary. The conducted experiments served as preliminary tests of laser damage threshold measurement methodology that we plan to use in the future. We designed a special apparatus consisting of a vacuum chamber and a cooling system. The samples were placed into the vacuum chamber which was evacuated and then the samples were cooled down to approximately 120K and illuminated by a pulsed laser. Pulse duration was in the nanosecond region. Multiple test sites on the sample's surface were used for different laser pulse energies. We used optical and electron microscopy and spectrophotometer measurements for coating investigation after the conducted experiments.

  20. Optical protocols for advanced spacecraft networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    Most present day fiber optic networks are in fact extensions of copper wire networks. As a result, their speed is still limited by electronics even though optics is capable of running three orders of magnitude faster. Also, the fact that photons do not interact with one another (as electrons do) provides optical communication systems with some unique properties or new functionality that is not readily taken advantage of with conventional approaches. Some of the motivation for implementing network protocols in the optical domain, a few possible approaches including optical code-division multiple-access (CDMA), and how this class of networks can extend the technology life cycle of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) with increased performance and functionality are described.

  1. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project, ceramic component developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teneyck, M. O.; Macbeth, J. W.; Sweeting, T. B.

    1987-01-01

    The ceramic component technology development activity conducted by Standard Oil Engineered Materials Company while performing as a principal subcontractor to the Garrett Auxiliary Power Division for the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project (NASA Contract DEN3-167) is summarized. The report covers the period October 1979 through July 1987, and includes information concerning ceramic technology work categorized as common and unique. The former pertains to ceramic development applicable to two parallel AGT projects established by NASA contracts DEN3-168 (AGT100) and DEN3-167 (AGT101), whereas the unique work solely pertains to Garrett directed activity under the latter contract. The AGT101 Technology Development Project is sponsored by DOE and administered by NASA-Lewis. Standard Oil directed its efforts toward the development of ceramic materials in the silicon-carbide family. Various shape forming and fabrication methods, and nondestructive evaluation techniques were explored to produce the static structural components for the ceramic engine. This permitted engine testing to proceed without program slippage.

  2. Advanced lithography for micro-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitner, U. D.; Kley, E.-B.

    2006-08-01

    Since the beginning of micro-optics fabrication most of the used technologies have been adapted from or are related to semiconductor fabrication techniques. These are widely known and the special microelectronics fabrication tools, especially lithography machines, are available at numerous places. Besides the fact that therefore micro-optics was able to took advantage of the steady development of semiconductor technology this tight linkage has also a lot of drawbacks. The adaptation of element properties to the fabrication limits given by the available technologies is very often connected with compromises in optical performance. In nowadays micro-optics fabrication has reached a level which justifies the development of fabrication tools specialized to its own demands. In the article the special demands of optical microstructures on the fabrication technologies are discussed and newly developed mico-optics fabrication tools are introduced. The first one is an electron-beam lithography machine for use with up substrates up to 300mm large and 15mm thick achieving a very high overlay accuracy and writing speed. The second one is a laser-lithography system capable to expose micro-optical structures onto non-planar substrates.

  3. Degradation of electro-optic components aboard LDEF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1993-04-01

    Remeasurement of the properties of a set of electro-optic components exposed to the low-earth environment aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) indicates that most components survived quite well. Typical components showed some effects related to the space environment unless well protected. The effects were often small but significant. Results for semiconductor infrared detectors, lasers, and LED's, as well as filters, mirrors, and black paints are described. Semiconductor detectors and emitters were scarred but reproduced their original characteristics. Spectral characteristics of multi-layer dielectric filters and mirrors were found to be altered and degraded. Increased absorption in black paints indicates an increase in absorption sites, giving rise to enhanced performance as coatings for baffles and sunscreens.

  4. Degradation of electro-optic components aboard LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    Remeasurement of the properties of a set of electro-optic components exposed to the low-earth environment aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) indicates that most components survived quite well. Typical components showed some effects related to the space environment unless well protected. The effects were often small but significant. Results for semiconductor infrared detectors, lasers, and LED's, as well as filters, mirrors, and black paints are described. Semiconductor detectors and emitters were scarred but reproduced their original characteristics. Spectral characteristics of multi-layer dielectric filters and mirrors were found to be altered and degraded. Increased absorption in black paints indicates an increase in absorption sites, giving rise to enhanced performance as coatings for baffles and sunscreens.

  5. Evaluation of systems and components for hybrid optical firing sets

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, M.J.; Rupert, J.W.; Mittas, A.

    1989-06-01

    High-energy density light appears to be a unique energy form that may be used to enhance the nuclear safety of weapon systems. Hybrid optical firing sets (HOFS) utilize the weak-link/strong-link exclusion region concept for nuclear safety; this method is similar to present systems, but uses light to transmit power across the exclusion region barrier. This report describes the assembling, operating, and testing of fourteen HOFS. These firing sets were required to charge a capacitor-discharge unit to 2.0 and 2.5 kV (100 mJ) in less than 1 s. First, we describe the components, the measurement techniques used to evaluate the components, and the different characteristics of the measured components. Second, we describe the HOFS studied, the setups used for evaluating them, and the resulting characteristics. Third, we make recommendations for improving the overall performance and suggest the best HOFS for packaging. 36 refs., 145 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Recent advances in digital camera optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Keizo

    2012-10-01

    The digital camera market has extremely expanded in the last ten years. The zoom lens for digital camera is especially the key determining factor of the camera body size and image quality. Its technologies have been based on several analog technological progresses including the method of aspherical lens manufacturing and the mechanism of image stabilization. Panasonic is one of the pioneers of both technologies. I will introduce the previous trend in optics of zoom lens as well as original optical technologies of Panasonic digital camera "LUMIX", and in addition optics in 3D camera system. Besides, I would like to suppose the future trend in digital cameras.

  7. Key notes to the advancement of optical scanning (Keynote Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiser, Leo

    2005-08-01

    In forming an historical perspective of the development of optical scanning, we ask a probing question: What was the first major optical scanning innovation? We offer one having unexpected attributes, and seek audience ideas. We then demonstrate the pioneering work in Optical Scanning for information transfer, some created long before we arrived on the scene. Our job has been and is: Make it Faster and Better. The body of the presentation addresses how our technology advanced to this useful state.

  8. Analysis of advanced optical glass and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry; Feng, Chen

    1991-01-01

    Optical lens systems performance utilizing optical materials comprising reluctant glass forming compositions was studied. Such special glasses are being explored by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) researchers utilizing techniques such as containerless processing in space on the MSFC Acoustic Levitation Furnace and on the High Temperature Acoustic Levitation Furnace in the conceptual design phase for the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML) series of shuttle flights. The application of high refractive index and low dispersive power glasses in optical lens design was investigated. The potential benefits and the impacts to the optical lens design performance were evaluated. The results of the studies revealed that the use of these extraordinary glasses can result in significant optical performance improvements. Recommendations of proposed optical properties for potential new glasses were also made. Applications of these new glasses are discussed, including the impact of high refractive index and low dispersive power, improvements of the system performance by using glasses which are located outside of traditional glass map, and considerations in establishing glass properties beyond conventional glass map limits.

  9. Ageing of optical components under laser irradiation at 532nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, S.; Delrive, L.; Bouchut, P.; Andre, B.; Geffraye, F.

    2005-09-01

    The pulsed Laser Induced Damage Threshold (LIDT) of optical components usually reaches several hundreds of MW/cm2. When exposed to laser power several order of magnitude below their LIDT, the optical component lifetime is, by default, considered infinite. Under specific conditions, the accumulation of laser pulses may lead to a contamination of the surface and a degradation of its optical properties and LIDT. In the first order, these phenomena depend on the experimental conditions such as the irradiation time, the laser power, and the environment. In order to better understand the physics emphasizing this degradation, we developed an experimental cell with an in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry diagnostic. The dry-pumped cell sheltering the sample is associated with a mass spectrometer that enables us to follow the environmental conditions in which we experiment the ageing. Anti-reflection coatings on fused silica were tested under 10 kHz-532 nm laser ageing. We present first results of degradation obtained in these conditions.

  10. Reduced cost and improved figure of sapphire optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Mark; Bartlett, Kevin; Brophy, Matthew R.; DeGroote Nelson, Jessica; Medicus, Kate

    2015-10-01

    Sapphire presents many challenges to optical manufacturers due to its high hardness and anisotropic properties. Long lead times and high prices are the typical result of such challenges. The cost of even a simple 'grind and shine' process can be prohibitive. The high precision surfaces required by optical sensor applications further exacerbate the challenge of processing sapphire thereby increasing cost further. Optimax has demonstrated a production process for such windows that delivers over 50% time reduction as compared to traditional manufacturing processes for sapphire, while producing windows with less than 1/5 wave rms figure error. Optimax's sapphire production process achieves significant improvement in cost by implementation of a controlled grinding process to present the best possible surface to the polishing equipment. Following the grinding process is a polishing process taking advantage of chemical interactions between slurry and substrate to deliver excellent removal rates and surface finish. Through experiments, the mechanics of the polishing process were also optimized to produce excellent optical figure. In addition to reducing the cost of producing large sapphire sensor windows, the grinding and polishing technology Optimax has developed aids in producing spherical sapphire components to better figure quality. In addition to reducing the cost of producing large sapphire sensor windows, the grinding and polishing technology Optimax has developed aids in producing spherical sapphire components to better figure quality. Through specially developed polishing slurries, the peak-to-valley figure error of spherical sapphire parts is reduced by over 80%.

  11. Research on ultrasonic cleaning technology of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Lingyan; Tong, Yi; Cui, Ying; Chen, Jianhua; Bai, Qingguang

    2014-08-01

    Along with the higher demand of super smooth optical surface, the cleaning technique that is the critical process to obtain super smooth surface has to meet even higher standards. In virtue of higher efficiency and better effect, the ultrasonic cleaning technology has been widely used in cleaning high-end optical lenses. This paper introduced the process, principle and method of the ultrasonic cleaning technology for a super smooth surface. The basis of determining the main technical parameters, such as the power and frequency of ultrasonic wave, the ultrasonic time, the components of cleaning agent and its operating temperature, were also discussed. In addition, the progress situations of ultrasonic cleaning technologies including the characteristics of complex frequency ultrasonic and megasonics cleaning technology and the removal mechanism of different granularity of dirt were analyzed. The mechanism of complex frequency ultrasound produces chemical process and the relationship between megasonics boundary layer and the particles removing were studied. Results showed that the chemical functions of complex frequency ultrasound and megasonics were better than that of single frequency ultrasound for the particles removal effect. Therefore, the new complex frequency ultrasonic and megasonic cleaning technologies are very necessary for cleaning optical components.

  12. Passive alignment and soldering technique for optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faidel, Heinrich; Gronloh, Bastian; Winzen, Matthias; Liermann, Erik; Esser, Dominik; Morasch, Valentin; Luttmann, Jörg; Leers, Michael; Hoffmann, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    The passive-alignment-packaging technique presented in this work provides a method for mounting tolerance-insensitive optical components e.g. non-linear crystals by means of mechanical stops. The requested tolerances for the angle deviation are +/-100 μrad and for the position tolerance +/-100 μm. Only the angle tolerances were investigated, because they are more critical. The measurements were carried out with an autocollimator. Fused silica components were used for test series. A solder investigation was carried out. Different types of solder were tested. Due to good solderability on air and low induced stress in optical components, Sn based solders were indicated as the most suitable solders. In addition several concepts of reflow soldering configuration were realized. In the first iteration a system with only the alignment of the yaw angle was implemented. The deviation for all materials after the thermal and mechanical cycling was within the tolerances. The solderability of BBO and LBO crystals was investigated and concepts for mounting were developed.

  13. Holographic optical elements as laser irradiation sensor components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leib, Kenneth G.; Pernick, Benjamin J.

    1991-12-01

    The use of holographic optical elements (HOEs) to discriminate between coherent irradiation and broadband, noncoherent light has been experimentally demonstrated under adverse scattering and attenuating conditions. As a passive sensor component in a laser irradiation detection system, an HOE can be used in several application areas, e.g., data transmission systems, aircraft warning system, underwater communications, and alignment systems, where wavelength and direction of arrival information can be used. The efficient concentration or focusing of laser light by an HOE onto a detector stage and, of equal importance, the ability to form bright, unique geometric patterns are characteristics that establish the HOE's use as a readily compatible irradiation sensor component. In addition, there is a considerable size and weight advantage over other functionally comparable optical components. Finally, as a passive element, an HOE can fmd use with CW or pulsed illumination. The properties and advantages, pros and cons, of the use of HOEs as sensor elements are discussed in the paper and illustrated in several laboratory experiments and a field test.

  14. Correlation of Test Data from Some NIF Small Optical Components

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; McBurney, M; Eickelberg, W K; Williams, W H; Thomas, M D

    2001-06-12

    The NIF injection laser system requires over 8000 precision optical components. Two special requirements for such optics are wavefront and laser damage threshold. Wavefront gradient is an important specification on the NIF ILS optics. The gradient affects the spot size and, in the second order, the contrast ratio of the laser beam. Wavefront errors are specified in terms of peak-to-valley, rms, and rms gradient, with filtering requirements. Typical values are lambda/8 PV, lambda/30 rms, and lambda/30/cm rms gradient determined after filtering for spatial periods greater than 2 mm. One objective of this study is to determine whether commercial software supplied with common phase measuring interferometers can filter, perform the gradient analysis, and produce numbers comparable to that by CVOS, the LLNL wavefront analysis application. Laser survivability of optics is another important specification for the operational longevity of the laser system. Another objective of this study is to find alternate laser damage test facilities. The addition of non-NIF testing would allow coating suppliers to optimize their processes according to their test plans and NIF integrators to validate the coatings from their sub-tiered suppliers. The maximum level required for anti-reflective, 45-degree high reflector, and polarizer coatings are 20, 30, and 5 J/cm{sup 2} (1064 nm, 3 ns pulse-width), respectively. The damage threshold correlation between a common set of samples tested by LLNL and a commercial test service is given.

  15. Advanced data services over optical transport networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Lyndon; Razdan, Rajender; Wang, Yalin

    2005-11-01

    Work on optical network control plane protocols has enabled faster and more efficient provisioning and management of carrier core optical networks, thereby reducing operational costs and capital expenditure. Many potential data applications for such capabilities, however, require Ethernet as the physical interface into the network, rather than SONET/SDH or OTN (Optical Transport Network) interfaces. Support of such services over an optical network becomes a multi-layer networking problem, wherein the client layer is packet based (e.g., Ethernet) and the server layer is optical (SONET/SDH or OTN). This paper discusses the enhancements that have been created in SONET/SDH and OTN networks (e.g., GFP, VCAT, LCAS) for the efficient transport of Ethernet and other data networking protocols, and the related extensions to control plane protocols that are necessary to allow for the support of multi-layer networking. Different control-plane models are being pursued in standards bodies such as ITU-T and IETF, and prototyping is being carried out and tested in the OIF. These various approaches are discussed in detail here, with focus placed on the prototyping work that has been done in the OIF, especially for the OIF 2005 Interoperability Demonstration.

  16. US long distance fiber optic networks: Technology, evolution and advanced concepts. Volume 3: Advanced networks and economics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This study projects until 2000 the evolution of long distance fiber optic networks in the U.S. Volume 1 is the executive Summary. Volume 2 focuses on fiber optic components and systems that are directly related to the operation of long-haul networks. Optimistic, pessimistic and most likely scenarios of technology development are presented. The activities of national and regional companies implementing fiber long haul networks are also highlighted, along with an analysis of the market and regulatory forces affecting network evolution. Volume 3 presents advanced fiber optic network concept definitions. Inter-LATA traffic is quantified and forms the basis for the construction of 11-, 15-, 17-, and 23-node networks. Using the technology projections from Volume 2, a financial model identifies cost drivers and determines circuit mile costs between any two LATAs. A comparison of fiber optics with alternative transmission concludes the report.

  17. Thin film technologies for optoelectronic components in fiber optic communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perinati, Agostino

    1998-02-01

    will grow at an annual average rate of 22 percent from 1.3 million fiber-km in 1995 to 3.5 million fiber-km in 2000. The worldwide components market-cable, transceivers and connectors - 6.1 billion in 1994, is forecasted to grow and show a 19 percent combined annual growth rate through the year 2000 when is predicted to reach 17.38 billion. Fiber-in-the-loop and widespread use of switched digital services will dominate this scenario being the fiber the best medium for transmitting multimedia services. As long as communication will partially replace transportation, multimedia services will push forward technology for systems and related components not only for higher performances but for lower cost too in order to get the consumers wanting to buy the new services. In the long distance transmission area (trunk network) higher integration of electronic and optoelectronic functions are required for transmitter and receiver in order to allow for higher system speed, moving from 2.5 Gb/s to 5, 10, 40 Gb/s; narrow band wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) filters are required for higher transmission capacity through multiwavelength technique and for optical amplifier. In the access area (distribution network) passive components as splitters, couplers, filters are needed together with optical amplifiers and transceivers for point-to-multipoint optical signal distribution: main issue in this area is the total cost to be paid by the customer for basic and new services. Multimedia services evolution, through fiber to the home and to the desktop approach, will be mainly affected by the availability of technologies suitable for component consistent integration, high yield manufacturing processes and final low cost. In this paper some of the optoelectronic components and related thin film technologies expected to mainly affect the fiber optic transmission evolution, either for long distance telecommunication systems or for subscriber network, are presented.

  18. Degradation of optical components in a space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehainaut, Linda L.; Kenemuth, John; Tidler, Cynthia E.; Seegmiller, David W.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Phillips Laboratory (PL) Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiment is to determine the adverse effects of the natural space environment on laser optical component and coating materials. The LDEF experiment provides a unique opportunity for the study of optical material response to an extended low earth orbit space exposure. The PL samples consist of 10 sets of the six materials each. The materials are uncoated fused silica, magnesium fluoride coated fused silica, uncoated molybdenum, molybdenum coated with chromium, silver and thorium fluoride, diamond turned copper, and diamond turned nickel plated copper. Performance degradation will be correlated to establish trends between sample location, duration of exposure, atomic oxygen exposure and other space environmental conditions. This paper discusses the results of the tests thus far performed on the LDEF samples and the plans for the future.

  19. Advanced Imaging Optics Utilizing Wavefront Coding.

    SciTech Connect

    Scrymgeour, David; Boye, Robert; Adelsberger, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Image processing offers a potential to simplify an optical system by shifting some of the imaging burden from lenses to the more cost effective electronics. Wavefront coding using a cubic phase plate combined with image processing can extend the system's depth of focus, reducing many of the focus-related aberrations as well as material related chromatic aberrations. However, the optimal design process and physical limitations of wavefront coding systems with respect to first-order optical parameters and noise are not well documented. We examined image quality of simulated and experimental wavefront coded images before and after reconstruction in the presence of noise. Challenges in the implementation of cubic phase in an optical system are discussed. In particular, we found that limitations must be placed on system noise, aperture, field of view and bandwidth to develop a robust wavefront coded system.

  20. Advanced Constituents and Processes for Ceramic Composite Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.; Bhatt, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    The successful replacement of metal alloys by ceramic matrix composites (CMC) in hot-section engine components will depend strongly on optimizing the processes and properties of the CMC microstructural constituents so that they can synergistically provide the total CMC system with improved temperature capability and with the key properties required by the components for long-term structural service. This presentation provides the results of recent activities at NASA aimed at developing advanced silicon carbide (Sic) fiber-reinforced hybrid Sic matrix composite systems that can operate under mechanical loading and oxidizing conditions for hundreds of hours at 2400 and 2600 F, temperatures well above current metal capability. These SiC/SiC composite systems are lightweight (-30% metal density) and, in comparison to monolithic ceramics and carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, are able to reliably retain their structural properties for long times under aggressive engine environments. It is shown that the improved temperature capability of the SiC/SiC systems is related first to the NASA development of the Sylramic-iBN Sic fiber, which displays high thermal stability, creep resistance, rupture resistance, and thermal conductivity, and possesses an in-situ grown BN surface layer for added environmental durability. This fiber is simply derived from Sylramic Sic fiber type that is currently produced at ATK COI Ceramics. Further capability is then derived by using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to form the initial portion of the hybrid Sic matrix. Because of its high creep resistance and thermal conductivity, the CVI Sic matrix is a required base constituent for all the high temperature SiC/SiC systems. By subsequently thermo- mechanical-treating the CMC preform, which consists of the S ylramic-iBN fibers and CVI Sic matrix, process-related defects in the matrix are removed, further improving matrix and CMC creep resistance and conductivity.

  1. Passive endoscopic polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography with completely fiber based optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Lucas; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Ng, Samson; MacAulay, Calum E.; Poh, Catherine; Lane, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PSOCT) is a functional extension of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) that is sensitive to well-structured, birefringent tissue such as scars, smooth muscle and cartilage. In this work, we present a novel completely fiber based swept source PSOCT system using a fiber-optic rotary pullback catheter. This PSOCT implementation uses only passive optical components and requires no calibration while adding minimal additional cost to a standard structural OCT imaging system. Due to its complete fiber construction, the system can be made compact and robust, while the fiber-optic catheter allows access to most endoscopic imaging sites. The 1.5mm diameter endoscopic probe can capture 100 frames per second at pullback speeds up to 15 mm/s allowing rapid traversal of large imaging fields. We validate the PSOCT system with known birefringent tissues and demonstrate in vivo PSOCT imaging of human oral scar tissue.

  2. Advanced lightweight optics development for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbro, James W.

    1998-01-15

    A considerable amount of effort over the past year has been devoted to exploring ultra-lightweight optics for two specific NASA programs, the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), and the High Throughput X-ray Spectrometer (HTXS). Experimental investigations have been undertaken in a variety of materials including glass, composites, nickel, beryllium, Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (CSiC), Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide, Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide, and Silicon. Overall results of these investigations will be summarized, and specific details will be provided concerning the in-house development of ultra-lightweight nickel replication for both grazing incidence and normal incidence optics. This will include x-ray test results of the grazing incidence optic and cryogenic test results of the normal incidence optic. The status of two 1.5 meter diameter demonstration mirrors for NGST will also be presented. These two demonstrations are aimed at establishing the capability to manufacture and test mirrors that have an areal density of 15 kilograms per square meter. Efforts in thin membrane mirrors and Fresnel lenses will also be briefly discussed.

  3. Advanced lightweight optics development for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbro, James W.

    1998-01-01

    A considerable amount of effort over the past year has been devoted to exploring ultra-lightweight optics for two specific NASA programs, the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), and the High Throughput X-ray Spectrometer (HTXS). Experimental investigations have been undertaken in a variety of materials including glass, composites, nickel, beryllium, Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (CSiC), Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide, Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide, and Silicon. Overall results of these investigations will be summarized, and specific details will be provided concerning the in-house development of ultra-lightweight nickel replication for both grazing incidence and normal incidence optics. This will include x-ray test results of the grazing incidence optic and cryogenic test results of the normal incidence optic. The status of two 1.5 meter diameter demonstration mirrors for NGST will also be presented. These two demonstrations are aimed at establishing the capability to manufacture and test mirrors that have an areal density of 15 kilograms per square meter. Efforts in thin membrane mirrors and Fresnel lenses will also be briefly discussed.

  4. Picosecond laser welding of optical to metal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Richard M.; Troughton, Michael; Chen, Jinanyong; Elder, Ian; Thomson, Robert R.; Lamb, Robert A.; Esser, M. J. Daniel; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    We report on practical, industrially relevant, welding of optical components to themselves and aluminum alloy components. Weld formation is achieved through the tight focusing of a 5.9ps, 400kHz Trumpf laser operating at 1030nm. By selecting suitable surface preparation, clamping and laser parameters, the plasma can be confined, even with comparatively rough surfaces, by exploiting the melt properties of the glass. The short interaction time allows for a permanent weld to form between the two materials with heating limited to a region ~300 µm across. Practical application of these weld structures is typically limited due to the induced stress within the glass and, critically, the issues surrounding post-weld thermal expansion. We report on the measured strength of the weld, with a particular emphasis on laser parameters and surface preparation.

  5. 7 CFR 1000.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing... advanced pricing factors. Class prices per hundredweight of milk containing 3.5 percent butterfat, component prices, and advanced pricing factors shall be as follows. The prices and pricing factors...

  6. 7 CFR 1000.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing... advanced pricing factors. Class prices per hundredweight of milk containing 3.5 percent butterfat, component prices, and advanced pricing factors shall be as follows. The prices and pricing factors...

  7. 7 CFR 1000.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing... advanced pricing factors. Class prices per hundredweight of milk containing 3.5 percent butterfat, component prices, and advanced pricing factors shall be as follows. The prices and pricing factors...

  8. 7 CFR 1000.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing... advanced pricing factors. Class prices per hundredweight of milk containing 3.5 percent butterfat, component prices, and advanced pricing factors shall be as follows. The prices and pricing factors...

  9. 7 CFR 1000.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing... advanced pricing factors. Class prices per hundredweight of milk containing 3.5 percent butterfat, component prices, and advanced pricing factors shall be as follows. The prices and pricing factors...

  10. US long distance fiber optic networks: Technology, evolution and advanced concepts. Volume 2: Fiber optic technology and long distance networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The study projects until 2000 the evolution of long distance fiber optic networks in the U.S. Volume 1 is the Executive Summary. Volume 2 focuses on fiber optic components and systems that are directly related to the operation of long-haul networks. Optimistic, pessimistic and most likely scenarios of technology development are presented. The activities of national and regional companies implementing fiber long haul networks are also highlighted, along with an analysis of the market and regulatory forces affecting network evolution. Volume 3 presents advanced fiber optic network concept definitions. Inter-LATA traffic is quantified and forms the basis for the construction of 11-, 15-, 17-, and 23-node networks. Using the technology projections from Volume 2, a financial model identifies cost drivers and determines circuit mile costs between any two LATAs. A comparison of fiber optics with alternative transmission concludes the report.

  11. EDITORIAL: Special issue on optical neural engineering: advances in optical stimulation technology Special issue on optical neural engineering: advances in optical stimulation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoham, Shy; Deisseroth, Karl

    2010-08-01

    Neural engineering, itself an 'emerging interdisciplinary research area' [1] has undergone a sea change over the past few years with the emergence of exciting new optical technologies for monitoring, stimulating, inhibiting and, more generally, modulating neural activity. To a large extent, this change is driven by the realization of the promise and complementary strengths that emerging photo-stimulation tools offer to add to the neural engineer's toolbox, which has been almost exclusively based on electrical stimulation technologies. Notably, photo-stimulation is non-contact, can in some cases be genetically targeted to specific cell populations, can achieve high spatial specificity (cellular or even sub-cellular) in two or three dimensions, and opens up the possibility of large-scale spatial-temporal patterned stimulation. It also offers a seamless solution to the problem of cross-talk generated by simultaneous electrical stimulation and recording. As in other biomedical optics phenomena [2], photo-stimulation includes multiple possible modes of interaction between light and the target neurons, including a variety of photo-physical and photo-bio-chemical effects with various intrinsic components or exogenous 'sensitizers' which can be loaded into the tissue or genetically expressed. Early isolated reports of neural excitation with light date back to the late 19th century [3] and to Arvanitaki and Chalazonitis' work five decades ago [4]; however, the mechanism by which these and other direct photo-stimulation, inhibition and modulation events [5-7] took place is yet unclear, as is their short- and long-term safety profile. Photo-chemical photolysis of covalently 'caged' neurotransmitters [8, 9] has been widely used in cellular neuroscience research for three decades, including for exciting or inhibiting neural activity, and for mapping neural circuits. Technological developments now allow neurotransmitters to be uncaged with exquisite spatial specificity (down to

  12. Advanced Sensors Boost Optical Communication, Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Brooklyn, New York-based Amplification Technologies Inc. (ATI), employed Phase I and II SBIR funding from NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory to forward the company's solid-state photomultiplier technology. Under the SBIR, ATI developed a small, energy-efficient, extremely high-gain sensor capable of detecting light down to single photons in the near infrared wavelength range. The company has commercialized this technology in the form of its NIRDAPD photomultiplier, ideal for use in free space optical communications, lidar and ladar, night vision goggles, and other light sensing applications.

  13. Applications of fiber optic sensors in advanced engine controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitka, Edward F., II

    1989-06-01

    Measured parameters, operating ranges, accuracy requirements, environmental constraints, and speed of response of fiber optic sensors are identified for three categories of engines. The three engine categories are: (1) current turbojet, turbofan, and turboprop engines; (2) next generation and turbofan engines to be built in the 1990s; and (3) advanced supersonic/hypersonic engines represented by ramjet, scramjet, and air-turbo-ramjet concepts. The key development and test efforts in engine control applications of fiber optic sensors are discussed.

  14. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  15. Inside Single Cells: Quantitative Analysis with Advanced Optics and Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Single cell explorations offer a unique window to inspect molecules and events relevant to mechanisms and heterogeneity constituting the central dogma of biology. A large number of nucleic acids, proteins, metabolites and small molecules are involved in determining and fine-tuning the state and function of a single cell at a given time point. Advanced optical platforms and nanotools provide tremendous opportunities to probe intracellular components with single-molecule accuracy, as well as promising tools to adjust single cell activity. In order to obtain quantitative information (e.g. molecular quantity, kinetics and stoichiometry) within an intact cell, achieving the observation with comparable spatiotemporal resolution is a challenge. For single cell studies both the method of detection and the biocompatibility are critical factors as they determine the feasibility, especially when considering live cell analysis. Although a considerable proportion of single cell methodologies depend on specialized expertise and expensive instruments, it is our expectation that the information content and implication will outweigh the costs given the impact on life science enabled by single cell analysis. PMID:25430077

  16. Inside single cells: quantitative analysis with advanced optics and nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Single-cell explorations offer a unique window to inspect molecules and events relevant to mechanisms and heterogeneity constituting the central dogma of biology. A large number of nucleic acids, proteins, metabolites, and small molecules are involved in determining and fine-tuning the state and function of a single cell at a given time point. Advanced optical platforms and nanotools provide tremendous opportunities to probe intracellular components with single-molecule accuracy, as well as promising tools to adjust single-cell activity. To obtain quantitative information (e.g., molecular quantity, kinetics, and stoichiometry) within an intact cell, achieving the observation with comparable spatiotemporal resolution is a challenge. For single-cell studies, both the method of detection and the biocompatibility are critical factors as they determine the feasibility, especially when considering live-cell analysis. Although a considerable proportion of single-cell methodologies depend on specialized expertise and expensive instruments, it is our expectation that the information content and implication will outweigh the costs given the impact on life science enabled by single-cell analysis. PMID:25430077

  17. Integrated modeling of advanced optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Needels, Laura; Levine, B. Martin

    1993-02-01

    This poster session paper describes an integrated modeling and analysis capability being developed at JPL under funding provided by the JPL Director's Discretionary Fund and the JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program (CSI). The posters briefly summarize the program capabilities and illustrate them with an example problem. The computer programs developed under this effort will provide an unprecedented capability for integrated modeling and design of high performance optical spacecraft. The engineering disciplines supported include structural dynamics, controls, optics and thermodynamics. Such tools are needed in order to evaluate the end-to-end system performance of spacecraft such as OSI, POINTS, and SMMM. This paper illustrates the proof-of-concept tools that have been developed to establish the technology requirements and demonstrate the new features of integrated modeling and design. The current program also includes implementation of a prototype tool based upon the CAESY environment being developed under the NASA Guidance and Control Research and Technology Computational Controls Program. This prototype will be available late in FY-92. The development plan proposes a major software production effort to fabricate, deliver, support and maintain a national-class tool from FY-93 through FY-95.

  18. Validation of Commercial Fiber Optic Components for Aerospace Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.

    2005-01-01

    Full qualification for commercial photonic parts as defined by the Military specification system in the past, is not feasible. Due to changes in the photonic components industry and the Military specification system that NASA had relied upon so heavily in the past, an approach to technology validation of commercial off the shelf parts had to be devised. This approach involves knowledge of system requirements, environmental requirements and failure modes of the particular components under consideration. Synthesizing the criteria together with the major known failure modes to formulate a test plan is an effective way of establishing knowledge based "qualification". Although this does not provide the type of reliability assurance that the Military specification system did in the past, it is an approach that allows for increased risk mitigation. The information presented will introduce the audience to the technology validation approach that is currently applied at NASA for the usage of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) fiber optic components for space flight environments. The focus will be on how to establish technology validation criteria for commercial fiber products such that continued reliable performance is assured under the harsh environmental conditions of typical missions. The goal of this presentation is to provide the audience with an approach to formulating a COTS qualification test plan for these devices. Examples from past NASA missions will be discussed.

  19. High-resolution dual-trap optical tweezers with differential detection: alignment of instrument components.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Carlos; Chemla, Yann R; Moffitt, Jeffrey R

    2009-10-01

    Optical traps or "optical tweezers" have become an indispensable tool in understanding fundamental biological processes. Using our design, a dual-trap optical tweezers with differential detection, we can detect length changes to a DNA molecule tethering the trapped beads of 1 bp. By forming two traps from the same laser and maximizing the common optical paths of the two trapping beams, we decouple the instrument from many sources of environmental and instrumental noise that typically limit spatial resolution. The performance of a high-resolution instrument--the formation of strong traps, the minimization of background signals from trap movements, or the mitigation of the axial coupling, for example--can be greatly improved through careful alignment. This procedure, which is described in this article, starts from the laser and advances through the instrument, component by component. Alignment is complicated by the fact that the trapping light is in the near infrared (NIR) spectrum. Standard infrared viewing cards are commonly used to locate the beam, but unfortunately, bleach quickly. As an alternative, we use an IR-viewing charge-coupled device (CCD) camera equipped with a C-mount telephoto lens and display its image on a monitor. By visualizing the scattered light on a pair of irises of identical height separated by >12 in., the beam direction can be set very accurately along a fixed axis. PMID:20147041

  20. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  1. Integrated optical components in thin films of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey; Abdeldayem, Hossin; Venkateswarlu, Putcha; Teague, Zedric

    1995-01-01

    The results will be reported on the study of integrated optical components based on nonlinear optical polymeric films. Polymers poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polyimide (PI) doped with organic laser dyes 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-p dimethylaminostyryl-4H pyran (DCM) and 1, 3, 5, 7, 8 - pentamethyl-2,6 -diethyl-pyrromethene -BF2-complex (Pyrommethene 567, PM-567) were selected as materials for light guiding films. Additionally, UV polymerized polydiacetylene (PDA) on glass substrate was used as a waveguide material. Optical waveguides were fabricated using spin coating of preoxidized silicon wafers (1.5 micrometer silicon oxide layer) with organic dye/polymer solution followed by soft baking. the modes in slab waveguides were studied using prism coupling techniques. Measured values of mode coupling angles in multimode waveguides were used to calculate film thickness and refractive index for different polarizations. Refractive index anisotropy was found in PDA waveguide. The optimal conditions of spin coating for single mode waveguide fabrication were estimated. Propagation losses were measured by collecting the light scattered from the trace of a propagating mode either by scanning photo detector or by CCD camera. Different types of light coupling techniques were used including end-dire coupling, prism and grating coupling. Mechanical printing technique was developed for coupling grating fabrication resulting in gratings with 4% diffraction efficiency. The gratings demonstrated good stability with diffraction efficiency relaxation rate 2.4 dB/hour at a temperature approximately 15-20 C below glass transition point. Dye doped waveguides were transversally pumped with frequency doubled Nd:YAG Q-switched laser producing intensive light emission with apparent 6 kW/sq cm pump threshold and spectrum narrowing near 617 nm peak in the case of DCM doped waveguide. PM-567 doped waveguide pumped with CW Ar(+) laser (514 nm wavelength) far below threshold (0.1 W

  2. Recent advancements towards green optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Alan; Glesk, Ivan; Buis, Adrianus; Wang, Junjia; Chen, Lawrence

    2014-12-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth in demand for ultra high speed data transmission with end users expecting fast, high bandwidth network access. With this rapid growth in demand, data centres are under pressure to provide ever increasing data rates through their networks and at the same time improve the quality of data handling in terms of reduced latency, increased scalability and improved channel speed for users. However as data rates increase, present technology based on well-established CMOS technology is becoming increasingly difficult to scale and consequently data networks are struggling to satisfy current network demand. In this paper the interrelated issues of electronic scalability, power consumption, limited copper interconnect bandwidth and the limited speed of CMOS electronics will be explored alongside the tremendous bandwidth potential of optical fibre based photonic networks. Some applications of photonics to help alleviate the speed and latency in data networks will be discussed.

  3. Advanced Optical Technologies for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is involved in the development of photonic devices and systems for space exploration missions. Photonic technologies of particular interest are those that can be utilized for in-space communication, remote sensing, guidance navigation and control, lunar descent and landing, and rendezvous and docking. NASA Langley has recently established a class-100 clean-room which serves as a Photonics Fabrication Facility for development of prototype optoelectronic devices for aerospace applications. In this paper we discuss our design, fabrication, and testing of novel active pixels, deformable mirrors, and liquid crystal spatial light modulators. Successful implementation of these intelligent optical devices and systems in space, requires careful consideration of temperature and space radiation effects in inorganic and electronic materials. Applications including high bandwidth inertial reference units, lightweight, high precision star trackers for guidance, navigation, and control, deformable mirrors, wavefront sensing, and beam steering technologies are discussed. In addition, experimental results are presented which characterize their performance in space exploration systems.

  4. Performance and production requirements for the optical components in a high-average-power laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Doss, F.W.; Taylor, J.R.; Wong, J.N.

    1999-07-02

    Optical components needed for high-average-power lasers, such as those developed for Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS), require high levels of performance and reliability. Over the past two decades, optical component requirements for this purpose have been optimized and performance and reliability have been demonstrated. Many of the optical components that are exposed to the high power laser light affect the quality of the beam as it is transported through the system. The specifications for these optics are described including a few parameters not previously reported and some component manufacturing and testing experience. Key words: High-average-power laser, coating efficiency, absorption, optical components

  5. Characterization of the optical parameters of high aspect ratio polymer micro-optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewski, Rafal; Van Erps, Jurgen; Wissmann, Markus; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Parriaux, Olivier; Tonchev, S.; Mohr, Jurgen; Thienpont, Hugo

    2008-04-01

    Over the last decades the significant grow of interest of photonics devices is observed in various fields of applications. Due to the market demands, the current research studies are focused on the technologies providing miniaturized, reliable low-cost micro-optical systems, particularly the ones featuring the fabrication of high aspect ratio structures. A high potential of these technologies comes from the fact that fabrication process is not limited to single optical components, but entire systems integrating sets of elements could be fabricated. This could in turn result in a significant saving on the assembly and packaging costs. We present a brief overview of the most common high aspect ratio fabrication technologies for micro-optical components followed by some characterization studies of these techniques. The sidewall quality and internal homogeneity will be considered as the most crucial parameters, having an impact on the wavefront propagation in the fabricated components. We show the characterization procedure and measurement results for components prototyped with Deep Proton Writing and glass micromachining technology replicated with Hot Embossing and Elastomeric Mould Vacuum Casting technology. We discuss the pros and cons for using these technologies for the production of miniaturized interferometers blocks. In this paper we present the status of our research on the new technology chain and we show the concept of microinterferometers to be fabricated within presented technology chain.

  6. Optical diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma using advanced optical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-02-01

    Clinical imaging techniques for diagnosing breast cancer mainly include X-ray mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which have respective drawbacks. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a potentially attractive optical technique to bridge the current gap in clinical utility. In this paper, MPM was used to image normal and ductal cancerous breast tissues, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Our results showed that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of normal breast tissue, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) lesions at the molecular level comparable to histopathology. These findings indicate that, with integration of MPM into currently accepted clinical imaging system, it has the potential to make a real-time histological diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma in vivo.

  7. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    SciTech Connect

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka; M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar

    2007-09-29

    The goal of this project is to provide materials engineers, chemical engineers and plant operators with a software tool that will enable them to predict localized corrosion of process equipment including fabricated components as well as base alloys. For design and revamp purposes, the software predicts the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and assists the user in selecting the optimum alloy for a given environment. For the operation of existing plants, the software enables the users to predict the remaining life of equipment and help in scheduling maintenance activities. This project combined fundamental understanding of mechanisms of corrosion with focused experimental results to predict the corrosion of advanced, base or fabricated, alloys in real-world environments encountered in the chemical industry. At the heart of this approach is the development of models that predict the fundamental parameters that control the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and alloy composition. The fundamental parameters that dictate the occurrence of localized corrosion are the corrosion and repassivation potentials. The program team, OLI Systems and Southwest Research Institute, has developed theoretical models for these parameters. These theoretical models have been applied to predict the occurrence of localized corrosion of base materials and heat-treated components in a variety of environments containing aggressive and non-aggressive species. As a result of this project, a comprehensive model has been established and extensively verified for predicting the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and temperature by calculating the corrosion and repassivation potentials.To support and calibrate the model, an experimental database has been developed to elucidate (1) the effects of various inhibiting species as well as aggressive species on localized corrosion of nickel

  8. Advanced fiber optic face plate quality detector design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Su, Liping; Zhao, Jingxia

    2010-10-01

    A fiber optic face plate is defined by a plurality of fibers of transparent material that are fused and compressed together to transmit an image from one end to another end. Fiber optic face plates exhibit utility in the image intensifiers, cathoderay tubes, and other media displays. In this paper, the design of an advanced fiber optic face plate quality detector is presented. Modern optoelectronic imaging techniques are being used to form fiber optic plate transmission images that are suitable for analyzing the quality parameters of fiber optic face plate. The diffusing light from a halogen lamp is condensed by condenser lens then through a fiber optic face plate, a set of lenses are used to magnify the transmission image, a computer controls a long linear CCD to scan the transmission image, a data grabber captures the CCD's output data and the computer transforms the data into frame image for further analysis. Digital image processing techniques are adopted to analyze the transmission image to obtain the required quality parameters. The image analysis software combines the API that a company provided and programed API is used to acquire the quality parameter that a relevant criteria required. With the long linear CCD scanning and image analysis being computerized, it accomplishes the detection of quality parameters of fiber optic face plates automaticly. The detector can replace the manual detection method and can be widely used for the quality detection of fiber optic face plate. Manufacturers of fiber optic face plates can benefit from the detector for quality control.

  9. Polarization optical components of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueoka, Stacey Ritsuyo

    The Daniel K Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST), when completed in 2019 will be the largest solar telescope built to date. DKIST will have a suite of first light polarimetric instrumentation requiring broadband polarization modulation and calibration optical elements. Compound crystalline retarders meet the design requirements for efficient modulators and achromatic calibration retarders. These retarders are the only possible large diameter optic that can survive the high flux, 5 arc minute field, and ultraviolet intense environment of a large aperture solar telescope at Gregorian focus. This dissertation presents work performed for the project. First, I measured birefringence of the candidate materials necessary to complete designs. Then, I modeled the polarization effects with three-dimensional ray-tracing codes as a function of angle of incidence and field of view. Through this analysis I learned that due to the incident converging F/13 beam on the calibration retarders, the previously assumed linear retarder model fails to account for effects above the project polarization specifications. I discuss modeling strategies such as Mueller matrix decompositions and simplifications of those strategies while still meeting fit error requirements. Finally, I present characterization techniques and how these were applied to prototype components.

  10. Advanced optical interference filters based on metal and dielectric layers.

    PubMed

    Begou, Thomas; Lemarchand, Fabien; Lumeau, Julien

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the design and the fabrication of an advanced optical interference filter based on metal and dielectric layers. This filter respects the specifications of the 2016 OIC manufacturing problem contest. We study and present all the challenges and solutions that allowed achieving a low deviation between the fabricated prototype and the target. PMID:27607695

  11. Fiber optic (flight quality) sensors for advanced aircraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Development of flight prototype, fiber-optic sensing system components for measuring nine sensed parameters (three temperatures, two speeds, three positions, and one flame) on an F404-400 aircraft engine is described. Details of each sensor's design, functionality, and environmental testing, and the electro-optics architecture for sensor signal conditioning are presented. Eight different optical sensing techniques were utilized. Design, assembly, and environmental testing of an engine-mounted, electro-optics chassis unit (EOU), providing MIL-C-1553 data output, are related. Interconnection cables and connectors between the EOU and the sensors are identified. Results of sensor/cable/circuitry integrated testing, and installation and ground testing of the sensor system on an engine in October 1993 and April 1994 are given, including comparisons with the engine control system's electrical sensors. Lessons learned about the design, fabrication, testing, and integration of the sensor system components are included.

  12. Advanced studies on the Polycapillary Optics use at XLab Frascati

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampai, D.; Dabagov, S. B.; Cappuccio, G.

    2015-07-01

    X-ray analytical techniques are widely used in the world. By the way, due to the strong radiation-matter interaction, to design optical devices suitable for X-ray radiation remains still of wide interest. As a consequence of novel advanced material studies, in the last 30 years several typologies of X-ray lenses have been developed. In this work, a short review on the status of Polycapillary Optics (polyCO), from design and fabrication to various applications, has been presented making comparison of the results achieved by several groups through different X-ray optical elements. A focus is regarded for advanced X-ray imaging and spectroscopy tools based on combination of the modern polyCO hardware and the reconstruction software, available as homemade and commercially ones. Recent results (in three main fields, high resolution X-ray imaging, micro-XRF spectroscopy and micro-tomography) obtained at XLab Frascati have been discussed.

  13. An advanced optical system for laser ablation propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstue, Grant; Fork, Richard; Reardon, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel space-based ablation driven propulsion engine concept utilizing transmitted energy in the form of a series of ultra-short optical pulses. Key differences are generating the pulses at the transmitting spacecraft and the safe delivery of that energy to the receiving spacecraft for propulsion. By expanding the beam diameter during transmission in space, the energy can propagate at relatively low intensity and then be refocused and redistributed to create an array of ablation sites at the receiver. The ablation array strategy allows greater control over flight dynamics and eases thermal management. Research efforts for this transmission and reception of ultra-short optical pulses include: (1) optical system design; (2) electrical system requirements; (3) thermal management; (4) structured energy transmission safety. Research has also been focused on developing an optical switch concept for the multiplexing of the ultra-short pulses. This optical switch strategy implements multiple reflectors polished into a rotating momentum wheel device to combine the pulses from different laser sources. The optical system design must minimize the thermal load on any one optical element. Initial specifications and modeling for the optical system are being produced using geometrical ray-tracing software to give a better understanding of the optical requirements. In regards to safety, we have advanced the retro-reflective beam locking strategy to include look-ahead capabilities for long propagation distances. Additional applications and missions utilizing multiplexed pulse transmission are also presented. Because the research is in early development, it provides an opportunity for new and valuable advances in the area of transmitted energy for propulsion as well as encourages joint international efforts. Researchers from different countries can cooperate in order to find constructive and safe uses of ordered pulse transmission for propulsion in future space

  14. Advanced Optical Burst Switched Network Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejabati, Reza; Aracil, Javier; Castoldi, Piero; de Leenheer, Marc; Simeonidou, Dimitra; Valcarenghi, Luca; Zervas, Georgios; Wu, Jian

    In recent years, as the bandwidth and the speed of networks have increased significantly, a new generation of network-based applications using the concept of distributed computing and collaborative services is emerging (e.g., Grid computing applications). The use of the available fiber and DWDM infrastructure for these applications is a logical choice offering huge amounts of cheap bandwidth and ensuring global reach of computing resources [230]. Currently, there is a great deal of interest in deploying optical circuit (wavelength) switched network infrastructure for distributed computing applications that require long-lived wavelength paths and address the specific needs of a small number of well-known users. Typical users are particle physicists who, due to their international collaborations and experiments, generate enormous amounts of data (Petabytes per year). These users require a network infrastructures that can support processing and analysis of large datasets through globally distributed computing resources [230]. However, providing wavelength granularity bandwidth services is not an efficient and scalable solution for applications and services that address a wider base of user communities with different traffic profiles and connectivity requirements. Examples of such applications may be: scientific collaboration in smaller scale (e.g., bioinformatics, environmental research), distributed virtual laboratories (e.g., remote instrumentation), e-health, national security and defense, personalized learning environments and digital libraries, evolving broadband user services (i.e., high resolution home video editing, real-time rendering, high definition interactive TV). As a specific example, in e-health services and in particular mammography applications due to the size and quantity of images produced by remote mammography, stringent network requirements are necessary. Initial calculations have shown that for 100 patients to be screened remotely, the network

  15. Advanced solidification processing of an industrial gas turbine engine component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Mei Ling; Price, Allen; Bellows, Richard S.

    2003-03-01

    This paper will describe the efforts of the Advanced Turbine Airfoil Manufacturing Technology Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Howmet Research Corporation. The purpose of the program is to develop single-crystal and directionally solidified casting technologies to benefit Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) industrial and utility gas turbine engines. The focus is on defining and implementing advanced Vacuum Induction Melting (VIM) furnace enhancements that provide precise control of mold temperatures during solidification. Emphasis was placed on increasing the total magnitude of thermal gradients while minimizing the difference in maximum and minimum gradients produced during the solidification process. Advanced VIM casting techniques were applied to Solar Turbines Incorporated’s Titan 130 First Stage High Pressure Turbine Blade under the ATS program. A comparison of the advanced VIM casting process to the conventional Bridgeman casting process will be presented as it pertains to the thermal gradients achieved during solidification, microstructure, elemental partitioning characterization, and solution heat treat response.

  16. Advanced materials and techniques for fibre-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Philip J.

    2014-06-01

    Fibre-optic monitoring systems came of age in about 1999 upon the emergence of the world's first significant commercialising company - a spin-out from the UK's collaborative MAST project. By using embedded fibre-optic technology, the MAST project successfully measured transient strain within high-performance composite yacht masts. Since then, applications have extended from smart composites into civil engineering, energy, military, aerospace, medicine and other sectors. Fibre-optic sensors come in various forms, and may be subject to embedment, retrofitting, and remote interrogation. The unique challenges presented by each implementation require careful scrutiny before widespread adoption can take place. Accordingly, various aspects of design and reliability are discussed spanning a range of representative technologies that include resonant microsilicon structures, MEMS, Bragg gratings, advanced forms of spectroscopy, and modern trends in nanotechnology. Keywords: Fibre-optic sensors, fibre Bragg gratings, MEMS, MOEMS, nanotechnology, plasmon.

  17. 76 FR 66750 - Certain Projectors With Controlled-Angle Optical Retarders, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Projectors With Controlled-Angle Optical Retarders, Components Thereof, and Products... Optical Retarders, Components Thereof, And Products Containing Same, DN 2849; the Commission is soliciting... within the United States after importation of certain projectors with controlled-angle optical...

  18. Fabrication of ceramic components for advanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, F.; Solidum, E.

    1985-01-01

    The AGT101 ceramic gas turbine engine feasibility study has made use of the slip casting of silicon or silicon nitride powders to produce either reaction-bonded or sintered components such as turbine rotors, turbine shrouds, and inner and outer diffusers. Attention is given to the effects of processing parameters on the microstructure and properties of the finished components; the parameters encompass powder particle size distribution, casting slip viscosity, pH, and solid content fraction. The green slip cast components were consolidated by nitriding, sintering, or sinter/HIPping.

  19. 7 CFR 1001.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1001.53 Section 1001.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  20. 7 CFR 1124.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1124.53 Section 1124.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  1. 7 CFR 1131.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1131.53 Section 1131.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  2. 7 CFR 1030.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1030.53 Section 1030.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  3. 7 CFR 1007.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1007.53 Section 1007.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  4. 7 CFR 1033.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1033.53 Section 1033.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  5. 7 CFR 1006.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1006.53 Section 1006.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  6. 7 CFR 1124.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1124.53 Section 1124.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  7. 7 CFR 1007.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1007.53 Section 1007.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  8. 7 CFR 1001.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1001.53 Section 1001.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  9. 7 CFR 1001.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1001.53 Section 1001.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  10. 7 CFR 1006.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1006.53 Section 1006.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  11. 7 CFR 1030.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1030.53 Section 1030.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  12. 7 CFR 1001.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1001.53 Section 1001.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  13. 7 CFR 1131.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1131.53 Section 1131.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  14. 7 CFR 1126.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1126.53 Section 1126.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  15. 7 CFR 1033.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1033.53 Section 1033.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  16. 7 CFR 1126.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1126.53 Section 1126.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  17. 7 CFR 1131.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1131.53 Section 1131.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  18. 7 CFR 1030.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1030.53 Section 1030.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  19. 7 CFR 1006.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1006.53 Section 1006.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  20. 7 CFR 1030.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1030.53 Section 1030.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  1. 7 CFR 1005.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1005.53 Section 1005.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  2. 7 CFR 1033.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1033.53 Section 1033.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  3. 7 CFR 1005.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1005.53 Section 1005.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  4. 7 CFR 1124.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1124.53 Section 1124.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  5. 7 CFR 1007.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1007.53 Section 1007.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  6. 7 CFR 1032.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1032.53 Section 1032.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  7. 7 CFR 1006.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1006.53 Section 1006.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  8. 7 CFR 1032.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1032.53 Section 1032.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  9. 7 CFR 1030.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1030.53 Section 1030.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  10. 7 CFR 1005.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1005.53 Section 1005.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  11. 7 CFR 1033.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1033.53 Section 1033.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  12. 7 CFR 1005.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1005.53 Section 1005.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  13. 7 CFR 1131.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1131.53 Section 1131.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  14. 7 CFR 1005.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1005.53 Section 1005.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  15. 7 CFR 1126.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1126.53 Section 1126.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  16. 7 CFR 1124.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1124.53 Section 1124.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  17. 7 CFR 1007.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1007.53 Section 1007.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  18. 7 CFR 1032.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1032.53 Section 1032.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  19. 7 CFR 1006.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1006.53 Section 1006.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  20. 7 CFR 1126.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1126.53 Section 1126.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  1. 7 CFR 1033.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1033.53 Section 1033.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  2. 7 CFR 1001.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1001.53 Section 1001.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  3. 7 CFR 1032.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1032.53 Section 1032.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  4. 7 CFR 1007.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1007.53 Section 1007.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  5. 7 CFR 1032.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1032.53 Section 1032.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.53....

  6. Space Flight Requirements for Fiber Optic Components: Qualification Testing and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the qualification testing requirements for Fiber Optic Components used during space flight. Since most components for space flight fiber optic components are now commercial of the shelf (COTS) products, and the changes at Goddard Space Flight Center, such as short term projects, and low budgets and other changes, have made full qualification of Fiber Optic Components not only too expensive also impossible. This presentation reviews the environmental parameters, the testing and or testing requirements of some optical components on board some NASA satellites.

  7. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Pettit, F.; Meier, G.; Yanar, N.; Chyu, M.; Mazzotta, D.; Slaughter, W.; Karaivanov, V.; Kang, B.; Feng, C.; Chen, R.; Fu, T-C.

    2008-10-01

    In order to meet the 2010-2020 DOE Fossil Energy goals for Advanced Power Systems, future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbines will need to be operated at higher temperatures for extended periods of time, in environments that contain substantially higher moisture concentrations in comparison to current commercial natural gas-fired turbines. Development of modified or advanced material systems, combined with aerothermal concepts are currently being addressed in order to achieve successful operation of these land-based engines. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has initiated a research program effort in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh (UPitt), and West Virginia University (WVU), working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers as Howmet International and Coatings for Industry (CFI), and test facilities as Westinghouse Plasma Corporation (WPC) and Praxair, to develop advanced material and aerothermal technologies for use in future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbine applications. Our program efforts and recent results are presented.

  8. Optical spatial solitons: historical overview and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhigang; Segev, Mordechai; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2012-08-01

    Solitons, nonlinear self-trapped wavepackets, have been extensively studied in many and diverse branches of physics such as optics, plasmas, condensed matter physics, fluid mechanics, particle physics and even astrophysics. Interestingly, over the past two decades, the field of solitons and related nonlinear phenomena has been substantially advanced and enriched by research and discoveries in nonlinear optics. While optical solitons have been vigorously investigated in both spatial and temporal domains, it is now fair to say that much soliton research has been mainly driven by the work on optical spatial solitons. This is partly due to the fact that although temporal solitons as realized in fiber optic systems are fundamentally one-dimensional entities, the high dimensionality associated with their spatial counterparts has opened up altogether new scientific possibilities in soliton research. Another reason is related to the response time of the nonlinearity. Unlike temporal optical solitons, spatial solitons have been realized by employing a variety of noninstantaneous nonlinearities, ranging from the nonlinearities in photorefractive materials and liquid crystals to the nonlinearities mediated by the thermal effect, thermophoresis and the gradient force in colloidal suspensions. Such a diversity of nonlinear effects has given rise to numerous soliton phenomena that could otherwise not be envisioned, because for decades scientists were of the mindset that solitons must strictly be the exact solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation as established for ideal Kerr nonlinear media. As such, the discoveries of optical spatial solitons in different systems and associated new phenomena have stimulated broad interest in soliton research. In particular, the study of incoherent solitons and discrete spatial solitons in optical periodic media not only led to advances in our understanding of fundamental processes in nonlinear optics and photonics, but also had a

  9. Optical spatial solitons: historical overview and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhigang; Segev, Mordechai; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2012-08-01

    Solitons, nonlinear self-trapped wavepackets, have been extensively studied in many and diverse branches of physics such as optics, plasmas, condensed matter physics, fluid mechanics, particle physics and even astrophysics. Interestingly, over the past two decades, the field of solitons and related nonlinear phenomena has been substantially advanced and enriched by research and discoveries in nonlinear optics. While optical solitons have been vigorously investigated in both spatial and temporal domains, it is now fair to say that much soliton research has been mainly driven by the work on optical spatial solitons. This is partly due to the fact that although temporal solitons as realized in fiber optic systems are fundamentally one-dimensional entities, the high dimensionality associated with their spatial counterparts has opened up altogether new scientific possibilities in soliton research. Another reason is related to the response time of the nonlinearity. Unlike temporal optical solitons, spatial solitons have been realized by employing a variety of noninstantaneous nonlinearities, ranging from the nonlinearities in photorefractive materials and liquid crystals to the nonlinearities mediated by the thermal effect, thermophoresis and the gradient force in colloidal suspensions. Such a diversity of nonlinear effects has given rise to numerous soliton phenomena that could otherwise not be envisioned, because for decades scientists were of the mindset that solitons must strictly be the exact solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation as established for ideal Kerr nonlinear media. As such, the discoveries of optical spatial solitons in different systems and associated new phenomena have stimulated broad interest in soliton research. In particular, the study of incoherent solitons and discrete spatial solitons in optical periodic media not only led to advances in our understanding of fundamental processes in nonlinear optics and photonics, but also had a

  10. Devices, components, and applications of low cost using polymer optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomer, Mauro; Baldwin-Olguin, Guillermo

    2004-10-01

    Low-cost optical devices, components a polymer optical fiber (POF) are demonstrated using technical of polished. Potentially low-cost components fabrication processes are described. Several components and devices are proposed for applications in comunications or industrial applications. Experimental results obtained with POF and diffraction grating are presented.

  11. Potential for integrated optical circuits in advanced aircraft with fiber optic control and monitoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The current Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program is reviewed and the potential role of IOCs in FOCSI applications is described. The program is intended for building, environmentally testing, and demonstrating operation in piggyback flight tests (no active control with optical sensors) of a representative sensor system for propulsion and flight control. The optical sensor systems are to be designed to fit alongside the bill-of-materials sensors for comparison. The sensors are to be connected to electrooptic architecture cards which will contain the optical sources and detectors to recover and process the modulated optical signals. The FOCSI program is to collect data on the behavior of passive optical sensor systems in a flight environment and provide valuable information on installation amd maintenance problems for this technology, as well as component survivability (light sources, connectors, optical fibers, etc.).

  12. Advances in DOE modeling and optical performance for SMO applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriere, James; Stack, Jared; Childers, John; Welch, Kevin; Himel, Marc D.

    2010-04-01

    The introduction of source mask optimization (SMO) to the design process addresses an urgent need for the 32nm node and beyond as alternative lithography approaches continue to push out. To take full advantage of SMO routines, an understanding of the characteristic properties of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) is required. Greater flexibility in the DOE output is needed to optimize lithographic process windows. In addition, new and tighter constraints on the DOEs used for off-axis illumination (OAI) are being introduced to precisely predict, control and reduce the effects of pole imbalance and stray light on the CD budget. We present recent advancements in the modeling and optical performance of these DOEs.

  13. Hybrid solar collector using nonimaging optics and photovoltaic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston, Roland; Yablonovitch, Eli; Jiang, Lun; Widyolar, Bennett K.; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud; Scranton, Gregg; Cygan, David; Kozlov, Alexandr

    2015-08-01

    The project team of University of California at Merced (UC-M), Gas Technology Institute, and Dr. Eli Yablonovitch of University of California at Berkeley developed a novel hybrid concentrated solar photovoltaic thermal (PV/T) collector using nonimaging optics and world record single-junction Gallium arsenide (GaAs) PV components integrated with particle laden gas as thermal transfer and storage media, to simultaneously generate electricity and high temperature dispatchable heat. The collector transforms a parabolic trough, commonly used in CSP plants, into an integrated spectrum-splitting device. This places a spectrum-sensitive topping element on a secondary reflector that is registered to the thermal collection loop. The secondary reflector transmits higher energy photons for PV topping while diverting the remaining lower energy photons to the thermal media, achieving temperatures of around 400°C even under partial utilization of the solar spectrum. The collector uses the spectral selectivity property of Gallium arsenide (GaAs) cells to maximize the exergy output of the system, resulting in an estimated exergy efficiency of 48%. The thermal media is composed of fine particles of high melting point material in an inert gas that increases heat transfer and effectively stores excess heat in hot particles for later on-demand use.

  14. Optical inspection of large-scale technical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jueptner, Werner P. O.; Osten, Wolfgang; Kalms, Michael K.

    1999-09-01

    Optical inspection is a well-known tool for scientific research and production control since long-time. In its form as visual inspection it is one of the main inspection tools since the beginning of technology. But the amount of data to be processed is very high in common, real time application under changing conditions is usually an industrial requirement, and last not least the recognition ability of human beings is hard to be matched. However, there is a dramatic change in the last one or two decades: the laser was developed to a reliable, easy to use and economical light source. Furthermore, the fast development in computer technology in the last decade opened applications for the improvement of products and production far beyond the possibilities of the first three quarters of this century. The methods can be described in a spanning tree of increasing specialization from the way of evaluation to the application task to be performed with this metrology method. However, all inspection methods follow a fundamental set-up scheme consisting of a loading, the object to be interacted with, the detector system and the evaluation. The approach to practical application will be reported by some example of large components.

  15. Advanced Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels for High Temperature Components

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Shingledecker, J.P.; Evans, N.D.; Pollard, M.J.

    2008-10-09

    In July of 2002, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Caterpillar, Inc. (Caterpillar Technical Center) to develop and commercialize new cast stainless steels invented and initially tested on a prior CRADA. This CRADA is a direct follow-on project to CRADA ORNL-99-0533 for diesel engine exhaust component and gas turbine engine structural component applications. The goal of this new CRADA was to develop and commercialize the newly discovered cast stainless steels (primarily CF8C-Plus) with improved performance and reliability, as lower-cost upgrade alternatives to more costly cast Ni-based superalloys.

  16. Achromatic registration of quadrature components of the optical spectrum in spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Shilyagin, P A; Gelikonov, G V; Gelikonov, V M; Moiseev, A A; Terpelov, D A

    2014-07-31

    We have thoroughly investigated the method of simultaneous reception of spectral components with the achromatised quadrature phase shift between two portions of a reference wave, designed for the effective suppression of the 'mirror' artefact in the resulting image obtained by means of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). We have developed and experimentally tested a phase-shifting element consisting of a beam divider, which splits the reference optical beam into the two beams, and of delay lines being individual for each beam, which create a mutual phase difference of π/2 in the double pass of the reference beam. The phase shift achromatism over a wide spectral range is achieved by using in the delay lines the individual elements with different dispersion characteristics. The ranges of admissible adjustment parameters of the achromatised delay line are estimated for exact and inexact conformity of the geometric characteristics of its components to those calculated. A possibility of simultaneous recording of the close-to-quadrature spectral components with a single linear photodetector element is experimentally confirmed. The suppression of the artefact mirror peak in the OCT-signal by an additional 9 dB relative to the level of its suppression is experimentally achieved when the air delay line is used. Two-dimensional images of the surface positioned at an angle to the axis of the probe beam are obtained with the correction of the 'mirror' artefact while maintaining the dynamic range of the image. (laser biophotonics)

  17. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software

    SciTech Connect

    Sottile, Matthew

    2010-06-30

    The UO portion of the larger TASCS project was focused on the usability subproject identified in the original project proposal. The key usability issue that we tacked was that of supporting legacy code developers in migrating to a component-oriented design pattern and development model with minimal manual labor. It was observed during the lifetime of the TASCS (and previous CCA efforts) that more often than not, users would arrive with existing code that was developed previous to their exposure to component design methods. As such, they were faced with the task of both learning the CCA toolchain and at the same time, manually deconstructing and reassembling their existing code to fit the design constraints imposed by components. This was a common complaint (and occasional reason for a user to abandon components altogether), so our task was to remove this manual labor as much as possible to lessen the burden placed on the end-user when adopting components for existing codes. To accomplish this, we created a source-based static analysis tool that used code annotations to drive code generation and transformation operations. The use of code annotations is due to one of the key technical challenges facing this work programming languages are limited in the degree to which application-specific semantics can be represented in code. For example, data types are often ambiguous. The C pointer is the most common example cited in practice. Given a pointer to a location in memory, should it be interpreted as a singleton or an array. If it is to be interpreted as an array, how many dimensions does the array have? What are their extents? The annotation language that we designed and implemented addresses this ambiguity issue by allowing users to decorate their code in places where ambiguity exists in order to guide tools to interpret what the programmer really intends.

  18. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mathew Sottile

    2010-06-30

    The UO portion of the larger TASCS project was focused on the usability subproject identified in the original project proposal. The key usability issue that we tacked was that of supporting legacy code developers in migrating to a component-oriented design pattern and development model with minimal manual labor. It was observed during the lifetime of the TASCS (and previous CCA efforts) that more often than not, users would arrive with existing code that was developed previous to their exposure to component design methods. As such, they were faced with the task of both learning the CCA toolchain and at the same time, manually deconstructing and reassembling their existing code to fit the design constraints imposed by components. This was a common complaint (and occasional reason for a user to abandon components altogether), so our task was to remove this manual labor as much as possible to lessen the burden placed on the end-user when adopting components for existing codes. To accomplish this, we created a source-based static analysis tool that used code annotations to drive code generation and transformation operations. The use of code annotations is due to one of the key technical challenges facing this work | programming languages are limited in the degree to which application-specific semantics can be represented in code. For example, data types are often ambiguous. The C pointer is the most common example cited in practice. Given a pointer to a location in memory, should it be interpreted as a singleton or an array. If it is to be interpreted as an array, how many dimensions does the array have? What are their extents? The annotation language that we designed and implemented addresses this ambiguity issue by allowing users to decorate their code in places where ambiguity exists in order to guide tools to interpret what the programmer really intends.

  19. Recent advances in ultrafast optical parametric oscillator frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Richard A.; Zhang, Zhaowei; Reid, Derryck T.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss recent advances in the stabilization and application of femtosecond frequency combs based on optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) pumped by femtosecond lasers at 800 and 1060 nm. A method for locking to zero the carrier-envelope-offset of a Ti:sapphire-pumped OPO comb is described. The application of Yb:KYW-laser-pumped dual-combs for mid-infrared spectroscopy is detailed, specifically methane spectroscopy at approximately a 0.7% concentration at 1 atm.

  20. Labeling of virus components for advanced, quantitative imaging analyses.

    PubMed

    Sakin, Volkan; Paci, Giulia; Lemke, Edward A; Müller, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, investigation of virus-cell interactions has moved from ensemble measurements to imaging analyses at the single-particle level. Advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques provide single-molecule sensitivity and subdiffraction spatial resolution, allowing observation of subviral details and individual replication events to obtain detailed quantitative information. To exploit the full potential of these techniques, virologists need to employ novel labeling strategies, taking into account specific constraints imposed by viruses, as well as unique requirements of microscopic methods. Here, we compare strengths and limitations of various labeling methods, exemplify virological questions that were successfully addressed, and discuss challenges and future potential of novel approaches in virus imaging. PMID:26987299

  1. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M A; Pettit, F; Meier, G H; Yanar, M; Helminiak, M; Chyu, M; Siw, S; Slaughter, W S; Karaivanov, V; Kang, B S; Feng, C; Tannebaum, J M; Chen, R; Zhang, B; Fu, T; Richards, G A; Sidwell, T G; Straub, D; Casleton, K H; Dogan, O M

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen-fired and oxy-fueled land-based gas turbines currently target inlet operating temperatures of ~1425-1760°C (~2600-3200°F). In view of natural gas or syngas-fired engines, advancements in both materials, as well as aerothermal cooling configurations are anticipated prior to commercial operation. This paper reviews recent technical accomplishments resulting from NETL’s collaborative research efforts with the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University for future land-based gas turbine applications.

  2. 76 FR 12144 - Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... COMMISSION Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading March 2, 2011. It appears to the... securities of Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the... of investors require a suspension of trading in Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc. Therefore, it...

  3. Advanced simulations of optical transition and diffraction radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumeyr, T.; Billing, M. G.; Bobb, L. M.; Bolzon, B.; Bravin, E.; Karataev, P.; Kruchinin, K.; Lefevre, T.; Mazzoni, S.

    2015-04-01

    Charged particle beam diagnostics is a key task in modern and future accelerator installations. The diagnostic tools are practically the "eyes" of the operators. The precision and resolution of the diagnostic equipment are crucial to define the performance of the accelerator. Transition and diffraction radiation (TR and DR) are widely used for electron beam parameter monitoring. However, the precision and resolution of those devices are determined by how well the production, transport and detection of these radiation types are understood. This paper reports on simulations of TR and DR spatial-spectral characteristics using the physical optics propagation (POP) mode of the Zemax advanced optics simulation software. A good consistency with theory is demonstrated. Also, realistic optical system alignment issues are discussed.

  4. How the Common Component Architecture Advances Compuational Science

    SciTech Connect

    Kumfert, G; Bernholdt, D; Epperly, T; Kohl, J; McInnes, L C; Parker, S; Ray, J

    2006-06-19

    Computational chemists are using Common Component Architecture (CCA) technology to increase the parallel scalability of their application ten-fold. Combustion researchers are publishing science faster because the CCA manages software complexity for them. Both the solver and meshing communities in SciDAC are converging on community interface standards as a direct response to the novel level of interoperability that CCA presents. Yet, there is much more to do before component technology becomes mainstream computational science. This paper highlights the impact that the CCA has made on scientific applications, conveys some lessons learned from five years of the SciDAC program, and previews where applications could go with the additional capabilities that the CCA has planned for SciDAC 2.

  5. Structural Dynamics Testing of Advanced Stirling Convertor Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Salvatore M.; Williams, Zachary Douglas

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been supporting the development of Stirling energy conversion for use in space. Lockheed Martin has been contracted by the Department of Energy to design and fabricate flight-unit Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators, which utilize Sunpower, Inc., free-piston Advanced Stirling Convertors. The engineering unit generator has demonstrated conversion efficiency in excess of 20 percent, offering a significant improvement over existing radioisotope-fueled power systems. NASA Glenn has been supporting the development of this generator by developing the convertors through a technology development contract with Sunpower, and conducting research and experiments in a multitude of areas, such as high-temperature material properties, organics testing, and convertor-level extended operation. Since the generator must undergo launch, several launch simulation tests have also been performed at the convertor level. The standard test sequence for launch vibration exposure has consisted of workmanship and flight acceptance levels. Together, these exposures simulate what a flight convertor will experience. Recently, two supplementary tests were added to the launch vibration simulation activity. First was a vibration durability test of the convertor, intended to quantify the effect of vibration levels up to qualification level in both the lateral and axial directions. Second was qualification-level vibration of several heater heads with small oxide inclusions in the material. The goal of this test was to ascertain the effect of the inclusions on launch survivability to determine if the heater heads were suitable for flight.

  6. Gigabit optical interconnects: System and component analysis, design and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boncek, Raymond K.; Krol, Mark F.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Stacy, John L.; Johns, Steven T.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the results of experiments performed in various areas of technology required to develop gigabit optical interconnects for communication at 1.3 micrometer wavelength. First, we will summarize the analysis of optical correlation switches (i.e. optical AND gates) for use in time-division optical interconnects. Next, we describe the design and characterization of an all-optical, 30db contrast ratio GaAlInAs multiple quantum well asymmetric reflection modulator. Then, we comment on the characterization of polarization-dependent, strained-layer InGaAs/GaAs materials useful for light emitters and modulators. Finally, we report on the development of an optically transparent ATM packet switch testbed operating at 1.24416 Gbit/s. This work is a continuation of in-house efforts begun under 62702F, JON 4600P201 and summarized in RL-TR-91-398.

  7. Coherent optical component technologies for WDM transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mino, S.; Murata, K.; Saida, T.; Ogawa, I.

    2011-01-01

    We review our recent progress toward 100 Gbps and beyond, focusing on integrated optical devices. Topics include our recently developed integrated optical front-ends for 100 Gbps PDM-QPSK based on multi-channel micro collimator optics and hermetically sealed O/E converters, and PLC-LiNbO3 hybrid optical modulators for 100 Gbps PDM-QPSK. We also describe our recent work on exceeding 100 Gbps, including 64 QAM modulators, modulation-level-selectable modulators, and high-speed digital-analog converter ICs for future multi-level transmissions.

  8. Advancements in integrated structural/thermal/optical (STOP) analysis of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckel, Gerhard; Crompton, David; Perron, Gerard

    2007-09-01

    Applications involving optical systems with a variety of transient loading conditions in conjunction with tight optical error budgets require new tools to assess system performance accurately and quickly. For example, an optical telescope in geostationary orbit (e.g.: laser communications or weather satellite) may be required to maintain excellent optical performance with sun intermittently crossing near, or even within the telescope's field of view. To optimize the design, the designer would wish to analyze a large number of time steps through the orbit without sacrificing accuracy of the results. Historically, shortcuts have been taken to make the analysis effort manageable: contributing errors are combined in a root-sum-squared fashion; non-linear optical sensitivities to optical motions are made linear; and the surface deformation of non-circular optics and/or footprints are fit with zernike polynomials. L-3 SSG-Tinsley presents a method that eliminates these errors while allowing very fast processing of many cases. The method uses a software application that interfaces with both structural and optical analysis codes, and achieves raytrace-generated results from the optical model. This technique is shown to provide more accurate results than previous methods, as well as provide critical insights into the performance of the system that may be exploited in the design process. Results from the Advanced Baseline Imager ABI telescope are presented as an example.

  9. Methods for integrating optical fibers with advanced aerospace materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, Stephen H.; May, Russell G.; Murphy, Kent A.; Claus, Richard O.; Tran, Tuan A.; Miller, Mark S.

    1993-07-01

    Optical fibers are attractive candidates for sensing applications in near-term smart materials and structures, due to their inherent immunity to electromagnetic interference and ground loops, their capability for distributed and multiplexed operation, and their high sensitivity and dynamic range. These same attributes also render optical fibers attractive for avionics busses for fly-by-light systems in advanced aircraft. The integration of such optical fibers with metal and composite aircraft and aerospace materials, however, remains a limiting factor in their successful use in such applications. This paper first details methods for the practical integration of optical fiber waveguides and cable assemblies onto and into materials and structures. Physical properties of the optical fiber and coatings which affect the survivability of the fiber are then considered. Mechanisms for the transfer of the strain from matrix to fiber for sensor and data bus fibers integrated with composite structural elements are evaluated for their influence on fiber survivability, in applications where strain or impact is imparted to the assembly.

  10. Sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koller, A. C.; Bennethum, W. H.; Burkholder, S. D.; Brackett, R. R.; Harris, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    This report includes: (1) a survey of the current methods for the measurement of surface temperature of ceramic materials suitable for use as hot section flowpath components in aircraft gas turbine engines; (2) analysis and selection of three sensing techniques with potential to extend surface temperature measurement capability beyond current limits; and (3) design, manufacture, and evaluation of the three selected techniques which include the following: platinum rhodium thin film thermocouple on alumina and mullite substrates; doped silicon carbide thin film thermocouple on silicon carbide, silicon nitride, and aluminum nitride substrates; and long and short wavelength radiation pyrometry on the substrates listed above plus yttria stabilized zirconia. Measurement of surface emittance of these materials at elevated temperature was included as part of this effort.

  11. Effect of advanced component technology on helicopter transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental tests were performed on the NASA/Bell Helicopter Textron (BHT) 500 hp advanced technology transmission (ATT) at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The ATT was a retrofit of the OH-58C helicopter 236 kW (317 hp) main rotor transmission, upgraded to 373 kW (500 hp), with a design goal of retaining long life with a minimum increase in cost, weight, and size. Vibration, strain, efficiency, deflection, and temperature experiments were performed and the results were compared to previous experiments on the OH-58A, OH-58C, and UH-60A transmissions. The high-contact-ratio gears and the cantilevered-mounted, flexible ring gear of the ATT reduced vibration compared to that of the OH-58C. The ATT flexible ring gear improved planetary load sharing compared to that of the rigid ring gear of the UH-60A transmission. The ATT mechanical efficiency was lower than that of the OH-58A transmission, probably due to the high-contact-ratio planetary gears.

  12. Heat pipe radiation cooling of advanced hypersonic propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. A.; Keddy, M.; Merrigan, M. A.; Silverstein, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Heat transfer, heat pipe, and system studies were performed to assess the newly proposed heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) concept. With an HPRC system, heat is removed from the ramburner and nozzle of a hypersonic aircraft engine by a surrounding, high-temperature, heat pipe nacelle structure, transported to nearby external surfaces, and rejected to the environment by thermal radiation. With HPRC, the Mach number range available for using hydrocarbon fuels for aircraft operation extends into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 range, up from the current limit of about Mach 4. Heat transfer studies using a newly developed HPRC computer code determine cooling system and ramburner and nozzle temperatures, heat loads, and weights for a representative combined-cycle engine cruising at Mach 5 at 80,000 ft altitude. Heat pipe heat transport calculations, using the Los Alamos code HTPIPE, reveal that adequate heat trasport capability is available using molybdenum-lithium heat pipe technology. Results show that the HPRC system radiator area is limited in size to the ramburner-nozzle region of the engine nacelle; reasonable system weights are expected; hot section temperatures are consistent with advanced structural materials development goals; and system impact on engine performance is minimal.

  13. Occupational Doses from the use of Thoriated Optical Components.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Andreas; Kersting, Marc; Uschmann, Katja

    2016-08-01

    As a compound of high refractive optical glasses, thorium still is present in some professionally used systems-especially in optical equipment with military use. The possible exposure concerns the head and especially the eye lens, whose radiation sensitivity has been reevaluated. The dose rate measurements of the contribution of beta- and gamma-emission by the nuclei of the decay chain of Th are presented for isolated lenses and for the entire optical system, and the dose quantities H'(0.07) and H*(10) are identified. Exposure scenarios for optical technicians and users are evaluated separately. The levels of dose rates for the inspected optical systems are below those requiring radiation protection measures even for extended working time or unintentional use. PMID:27356053

  14. 77 FR 68830 - Certain Projectors With Controlled-Angle Optical Retarders, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    .... Corporation of Phoenix, Arizona (collectively ``Compound Photonics''). 76 FR 72722-23 (Nov. 25, 2011). The... COMMISSION Certain Projectors With Controlled-Angle Optical Retarders, Components Thereof, and Products... importation of certain projectors with controlled- angle optical retarders, components thereof, and...

  15. 78 FR 16296 - Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... optic communications, components thereof, and products containing the same by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S. Patent Nos. 6,947,456 and 5,596,595 (collectively, ``Asserted Patents''). 77 FR... COMMISSION Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and...

  16. Advanced optical system simulation in a coupled CAD/optical analysis package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Michael A.; Campillo, Chris J.; Jenkins, David G.

    1999-05-01

    Software packages capable of simulating complex optical systems have the power to shorten the design process for non-imaging illumination, projection display, and other imaging illumination systems, Breault Research Organization's Advanced Systems Analysis Program (ASAP) and Robert McNeel and Associates' Rhinoceros computer aided design software, together, allow complicated optical systems to be simulated and analyzed. Through the use of Rhinoceros, an optical system can be accurately modeled in a 3D design environment. ASAP is then used to assign optical properties to the Rhinoceros CAD model. After the optical system has been characterized, it can be analyzed and optimized, by way of features specific to the ASAP optical analysis engine. Using this simulation technique, an HID arc source manufactured by Ushio America, Inc. is accurately represented. 2D CCD images are gathered for the source's emitting-volume across its spectral bandwidth. The images are processed within ASAP, via the inverse Abel command, to produce a 3D emitting-volume. This emitting-volume is combined with an accurate model of the source geometry and its optical properties, to finalize a functioning virtual source model. The characterized source is then joined with a simulated optical system for detailed performance analysis: namely, a projection display system.

  17. 7 CFR 1124.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1124.50 Section 1124.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  18. 7 CFR 1124.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1124.50 Section 1124.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  19. 7 CFR 1033.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1033.50 Section 1033.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  20. 7 CFR 1007.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1007.50 Section 1007.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  1. 7 CFR 1126.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1126.50 Section 1126.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  2. 7 CFR 1006.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1006.50 Section 1006.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  3. 7 CFR 1005.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1005.50 Section 1005.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  4. 7 CFR 1000.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... advanced pricing factors. 1000.53 Section 1000.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture..., component prices, and advanced pricing factors. (a) On or before the 5th day of the month, the market... administrator for each Federal milk marketing order shall announce the following prices and pricing factors...

  5. 7 CFR 1032.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1032.50 Section 1032.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  6. 7 CFR 1000.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... advanced pricing factors. 1000.53 Section 1000.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture..., component prices, and advanced pricing factors. (a) On or before the 5th day of the month, the market... administrator for each Federal milk marketing order shall announce the following prices and pricing factors...

  7. 7 CFR 1000.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... advanced pricing factors. 1000.53 Section 1000.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture..., component prices, and advanced pricing factors. (a) On or before the 5th day of the month, the market... administrator for each Federal milk marketing order shall announce the following prices and pricing factors...

  8. 7 CFR 1001.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1001.50 Section 1001.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  9. 7 CFR 1001.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1001.50 Section 1001.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  10. 7 CFR 1005.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1005.50 Section 1005.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  11. 7 CFR 1005.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1005.50 Section 1005.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  12. 7 CFR 1005.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1005.50 Section 1005.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  13. 7 CFR 1033.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1033.50 Section 1033.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  14. 7 CFR 1131.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1131.50 Section 1131.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  15. 7 CFR 1000.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... advanced pricing factors. 1000.53 Section 1000.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture..., component prices, and advanced pricing factors. (a) On or before the 5th day of the month, the market... administrator for each Federal milk marketing order shall announce the following prices and pricing factors...

  16. 7 CFR 1126.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1126.50 Section 1126.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  17. 7 CFR 1032.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1032.50 Section 1032.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  18. 7 CFR 1006.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1006.50 Section 1006.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  19. 7 CFR 1131.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1131.50 Section 1131.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  20. 7 CFR 1124.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1124.50 Section 1124.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  1. 7 CFR 1006.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1006.50 Section 1006.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  2. 7 CFR 1000.53 - Announcement of class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... advanced pricing factors. 1000.53 Section 1000.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture..., component prices, and advanced pricing factors. (a) On or before the 5th day of the month, the market... administrator for each Federal milk marketing order shall announce the following prices and pricing factors...

  3. 7 CFR 1007.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1007.50 Section 1007.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  4. 7 CFR 1032.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1032.50 Section 1032.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  5. 7 CFR 1006.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1006.50 Section 1006.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  6. 7 CFR 1001.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1001.50 Section 1001.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  7. 7 CFR 1033.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1033.50 Section 1033.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  8. 7 CFR 1032.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1032.50 Section 1032.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  9. 7 CFR 1007.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1007.50 Section 1007.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  10. 7 CFR 1007.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1007.50 Section 1007.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  11. 7 CFR 1030.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1030.50 Section 1030.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  12. 7 CFR 1131.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1131.50 Section 1131.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  13. 7 CFR 1030.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1030.50 Section 1030.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  14. 7 CFR 1030.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1030.50 Section 1030.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  15. 7 CFR 1030.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1030.50 Section 1030.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  16. 7 CFR 1124.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1124.50 Section 1124.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  17. 7 CFR 1007.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1007.50 Section 1007.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  18. 7 CFR 1126.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1126.50 Section 1126.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  19. 7 CFR 1131.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1131.50 Section 1131.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  20. 7 CFR 1126.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1126.50 Section 1126.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  1. 7 CFR 1033.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1033.50 Section 1033.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  2. 7 CFR 1032.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1032.50 Section 1032.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  3. 7 CFR 1033.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1033.50 Section 1033.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  4. 7 CFR 1005.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1005.50 Section 1005.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  5. 7 CFR 1006.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1006.50 Section 1006.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  6. 7 CFR 1001.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1001.50 Section 1001.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  7. 7 CFR 1001.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1001.50 Section 1001.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  8. 7 CFR 1124.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1124.50 Section 1124.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  9. 7 CFR 1030.50 - Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Class prices, component prices, and advanced pricing factors. 1030.50 Section 1030.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... prices, and advanced pricing factors. See § 1000.50....

  10. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  11. Measurement of wavefront structure from large aperture optical components by phase shifting interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Lawson, J.K.; Kellam, M.; Maney, R.T.; Demiris, A.

    1995-05-12

    This paper discusses the results of high spatial resolution measurement of the transmitted or reflected wavefront of optical components using phase shifting interferometry with a wavelength of 6328 {angstrom}. The optical components studied range in size from approximately 50 mm {times} 100 mm to 400 mm {times} 750 mm. Wavefront data, in the form of 3-D phase maps, have been obtained for three regimes of scale length: ``micro roughness``, ``mid-spatial scale``, and ``optical figure/curvature.`` Repetitive wavefront structure has been observed with scale lengths from 10 mm to 100 mm. The amplitude of this structure is typically {lambda}/100 to {lambda}/20. Previously unobserved structure has been detected in optical materials and on the surfaces of components. We are using this data to assist in optimizing laser system design, to qualify optical components and fabrication processes under study in our component development program.

  12. NATO Radiation Effects Test Program For Optical Fibers And Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Peter B.; Barnes, C. A.; Friebele, E. J.; Gilbert, R.; Greenwell, R.; Henschel, H.; Johan, A.; Looney, L. D.; Wall, J. A.; Pamnalone, F.; Schneider, W.; Sigel, G.; Smith, D.; Spencer, A.; Taylor, E.; Turquet de Beauregard, G.

    1988-06-01

    Telecommunications has provided the primary impetus for the explosive growth in fiber-optics technologies over the last decade. However, although standard telecommunications is the largest volume-user of optical fibers, other applications that exploit the unique attributes of photonics systems are becoming increasingly prominent. Many of these systems require that the fiber properties remain acceptable while exposed to a challenging variety of adverse environments. Many of these environments include exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced modifications to optical materials have been studied for several decades, so it was to be anticipated that such effects would be present in optical fibers. Many papers and several comprehensive reviews",3,4 have been devoted to better understand-ing of such phenomena.

  13. Advances in optical technologies at Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Guillermo; Asmad, Miguel; Romero, Sandra; Gonzales, Franco; Gálvez, Gonzalo; Sánchez, Rubén; Córdova, Darwin

    2011-05-01

    In this work, it is shown a panoramically view of advances and works on fundamental optical technology developed and Physics Section at Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú PUCP in Lima Peru. This includes works in, precision optics manufacturing, optical testing, and optical design and simulation and also in optical thin film evaporation and its design techniques

  14. Advanced optical and thermal technologies for aperture control

    SciTech Connect

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Lampert, C.M.; Rubin, M.

    1982-09-01

    Control of heat transfer and radiant energy flow through building apertures is essential for maximizing thermal and daylighting benefits and minimizing undesired heating and cooling loads. Architectural solutions based on current technology generally add devices such as louvers, shutters, shades, or blinds to the glazing system. The objectives and initial accomplishments of a research program the goal of which is to identify and evaluate advanced optical and thermal technologies for controlling aperture energy flows, thus reducing building energy requirements are outlined. Activities are described in four program areas: (1) low-conductance, high-transmittance glazing materials (e.g., heat mirrors, aerogels); (2) optical switching materials (e.g., electrochromic, photochromic); (3) selective transmitters; and (4) daylight enhancement techniques.

  15. Advanced optical and thermal technologies for aperture control

    SciTech Connect

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Lampert, C.M.; Rubin, M.

    1983-11-01

    Control of heat transfer and radiant energy flow through building apertures is essential for maximizing thermal and daylighting benefits and minimizing undesired heating and cooling loads. Architectural solutions based on current technology generally add devices such as louvers, shutters, shades, or blinds to the glazing system. The objectives and initial accomplishments of a research program are outlined, the goal of which is to identify and evaluate advanced optical and thermal technologies for controlling aperture energy flows, thus reducing building energy requirements. Activities in four program areas are described: (1) low-conductance, high-transmittance glazing materials (e.g., heat mirrors, aerogels) (2) optical switching materials (e.g., electrochromic, photochromic) (3) selective transmitters and (4) daylight enhancement techniques.

  16. Sampled MTF of fused fiber optic components and bonded assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Fused fiber optic devices are bundles of glass optical fibers that have been successively bundled and drawn to smaller and smaller sizes, effectively creating a "zero optical path window". Due to the nature of fiber's clad and core design, pixelization or sampling of the resulting image occurs; this sampling fundamentally degrades the image. Degradation of a resulting image caused by an optical system can be quantified by way of its Modulation Transfer Function. However, since fused fiber optic devices first sample then effectively project the original image, they do not meet the Fourier transform's prerequisite conditions of being linear and isoplanatic. Current technologies at SCHOTT Lighting and Imaging have initiated a study to determine methodology for measuring the sampled modulation transfer function of bonded assemblies such as bonded Faceplate-to-OLED and Faceplate-tosensor assemblies. The use of randomly generated targets imaged through the bonded assemblies proved to be a useful tactic. This paper discusses the test methods developed and subsequent measurement of the sampled modulation transfer function of fused fiber optic bundles and bonded assemblies.

  17. Optical metrology for advanced process control: full module metrology solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdog, Cornel; Turovets, Igor

    2016-03-01

    Optical metrology is the workhorse metrology in manufacturing and key enabler to patterning process control. Recent advances in device architecture are gradually shifting the need for process control from the lithography module to other patterning processes (etch, trim, clean, LER/LWR treatments, etc..). Complex multi-patterning integration solutions, where the final pattern is the result of multiple process steps require a step-by-step holistic process control and a uniformly accurate holistic metrology solution for pattern transfer for the entire module. For effective process control, more process "knobs" are needed, and a tighter integration of metrology with process architecture.

  18. Low cost, small form factor, and integration as the key features for the optical component industry takeoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiattone, Francesco; Bonino, Stefano; Gobbi, Luigi; Groppi, Angelamaria; Marazzi, Marco; Musio, Maurizio

    2003-04-01

    In the past the optical component market has been mainly driven by performances. Today, as the number of competitors has drastically increased, the system integrators have a wide range of possible suppliers and solutions giving them the possibility to be more focused on cost and also on footprint reduction. So, if performances are still essential, low cost and Small Form Factor issues are becoming more and more crucial in selecting components. Another evolution in the market is the current request of the optical system companies to simplify the supply chain in order to reduce the assembling and testing steps at system level. This corresponds to a growing demand in providing subassemblies, modules or hybrid integrated components: that means also Integration will be an issue in which all the optical component companies will compete to gain market shares. As we can see looking several examples offered by electronic market, to combine low cost and SFF is a very challenging task but Integration can help in achieving both features. In this work we present how these issues could be approached giving examples of some advanced solutions applied to LiNbO3 modulators. In particular we describe the progress made on automation, new materials and low cost fabrication methods for the parts. We also introduce an approach in integrating optical and electrical functionality on LiNbO3 modulators including RF driver, bias control loop, attenuator and photodiode integrated in a single device.

  19. Optical coherence tomography demonstrating macular retinal nerve fiber thinning in advanced optic disc drusen

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ali; Gouws, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Optic disc drusen (ODD) are extracellular proteinaceous excrescences in the optic nerve head. They enlarge over time and can cause damage to nerve fibers with resulting loss of visual field. The authors report a case of advanced ODD in which macular optical coherence tomography demonstrated retinal nerve fiber thinning. A single case report of a 42-year-old woman with known ODD presented to the eye clinic with worsening field of vision which was impacting on her daily life. The patient was subject to full ophthalmic examination as well as Goldmann visual field testing, optic disc photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of both her optic discs and maculae. ODD although rare, can be visually devastating. No treatment is currently available however patients should be counseled about progressive nature of ODD and the potential for visual loss. OCT imaging of the maculae as well as optic discs may serve a role in monitoring the damage disc drusen cause to the eye. PMID:25136235

  20. Optical coherence tomography demonstrating macular retinal nerve fiber thinning in advanced optic disc drusen.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ali; Gouws, Pieter

    2014-05-01

    Optic disc drusen (ODD) are extracellular proteinaceous excrescences in the optic nerve head. They enlarge over time and can cause damage to nerve fibers with resulting loss of visual field. The authors report a case of advanced ODD in which macular optical coherence tomography demonstrated retinal nerve fiber thinning. A single case report of a 42-year-old woman with known ODD presented to the eye clinic with worsening field of vision which was impacting on her daily life. The patient was subject to full ophthalmic examination as well as Goldmann visual field testing, optic disc photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of both her optic discs and maculae. ODD although rare, can be visually devastating. No treatment is currently available however patients should be counseled about progressive nature of ODD and the potential for visual loss. OCT imaging of the maculae as well as optic discs may serve a role in monitoring the damage disc drusen cause to the eye. PMID:25136235

  1. Optical and quasi-optical analysis of system components for a far-infrared space interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, C.; O'Sullivan, C.; Donohoe, A.; Murphy, A.; Savini, G.; Juanola-Parramon, R.; Baccichet, N.; Guisseau, A.; Ade, P.; Pascale, E.; Spencer, L.; Walker, I.; Dohlen, K.; Lightfoot, J.; Holland, W.; Jones, M.; Walker, D. D.; McMillan, A.

    2015-03-01

    Many important astrophysical processes occur at wavelengths that fall within the far-infrared band of the EM spectrum, and over distance scales that require sub-arc second spatial resolution. It is clear that in order to achieve sub-arc second resolution at these relatively long wavelengths (compared to optical/near-IR), which are strongly absorbed by the atmosphere, a space-based far-IR interferometer will be required. We present analysis of the optical system for a proposed spatial-spectral interferometer, discussing the challenges that arise when designing such a system and the simulation techniques employed that aim to resolve these issues. Many of these specific challenges relate to combining the beams from multiple telescopes where the wavelengths involved are relatively short (compared to radio interferometry), meaning that care must be taken with mirror surface quality, where surface form errors not only present potential degradation of the single system beams, but also serve to reduce fringe visibility when multiple telescope beams are combined. Also, the long baselines required for sub-arc second resolution present challenges when considering propagation of the relatively long wavelengths of the signal beam, where beam divergence becomes significant if the beam demagnification of the telescopes is not carefully considered. Furthermore, detection of the extremely weak far-IR signals demands ultra-sensitive detectors and instruments capable of operating at maximum efficiency. Thus, as will be shown, care must be taken when designing each component of such a complex quasioptical system.

  2. Advanced optical network architecture for integrated digital avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, D. Reed

    1996-12-01

    For the first time in the history of avionics, the network designer now has a choice in selecting the media that interconnects the sources and sinks of digital data on aircraft. Electrical designs are already giving way to photonics in application areas where the data rate times distance product is large or where special design requirements such as low weight or EMI considerations are critical. Future digital avionic architectures will increasingly favor the use of photonic interconnects as network data rates of one gigabit/second and higher are needed to support real-time operation of high-speed integrated digital processing. As the cost of optical network building blocks is reduced and as temperature-rugged laser sources are matured, metal interconnects will be forced to retreat to applications spanning shorter and shorter distances. Although the trend is already underway, the widespread use of digital optics will first occur at the system level, where gigabit/second, real-time interconnects between sensors, processors, mass memories and displays separated by a least of few meters will be required. The application of photonic interconnects for inter-printed wiring board signalling across the backplane will eventually find application for gigabit/second applications since signal degradation over copper traces occurs before one gigabit/second and 0.5 meters are reached. For the foreseeable future however, metal interconnects will continue to be used to interconnect devices on printed wiring boards since 5 gigabit/second signals can be sent over metal up to around 15 centimeters. Current-day applications of optical interconnects at the system level are described and a projection of how advanced optical interconnect technology will be driven by the use of high speed integrated digital processing on future aircraft is presented. The recommended advanced network for application in the 2010 time frame is a fiber-based system with a signalling speed of around 2

  3. Arbitrary GRIN component fabrication in optically driven diffusive photopolymers.

    PubMed

    Urness, Adam C; Anderson, Ken; Ye, Chungfang; Wilson, William L; McLeod, Robert R

    2015-01-12

    We introduce a maskless lithography tool and optically-initiated diffusive photopolymer that enable arbitrary two-dimensional gradient index (GRIN) polymer lens profiles. The lithography tool uses a pulse-width modulated deformable mirror device (DMD) to control the 8-bit gray-scale intensity pattern on the material. The custom polymer responds with a self-developing refractive index profile that is non-linear with optical dose. We show that this nonlinear material response can be corrected with pre-compensation of the intensity pattern to yield high fidelity, optically induced index profiles. The process is demonstrated with quadratic, millimeter aperture GRIN lenses, Zernike polynomials and GRIN Fresnel lenses. PMID:25835673

  4. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, Alan

    2014-10-21

    This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

  5. Advances in optics in the medieval Islamic world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2015-04-01

    This paper reviews the state of knowledge in the field of optics, mainly in catoptrics and dioptrics, before the birth of modern science and the well-documented contributions of men such as Kepler and Newton. The paper is not intended to be a comprehensive survey of the subject such as one might find in history of science journals; instead, it is aimed at the curious physicist who has probably been taught that nothing much of note was understood about the behaviour of light, beyond outdated philosophical musings, prior to the seventeenth century. The paper will focus on advances during the medieval period between the ninth and fourteenth centuries, in both the east and the west, when the theories of the Ancient Greeks were tested, advanced, corrected and mathematised. In particular, it concentrates on a multivolume treatise on optics written one thousand years ago by the Arab scholar, Ibn al-Haytham, and examines how it influenced our understanding of the nature of reflection and refraction of light. Even the well-informed physicist should find a few surprises here, which will alter his or her view of the debt we owe to these forgotten scholars.

  6. Updated optical read/write memory system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The fabrication of an updated block data composer and holographic storage array for a breadboard holographic read/write memory system is described. System considerations such as transform optics and controlled aberration lens design are described along with the block data composer, photoplastic recording materials, and material development.

  7. Diamond Machining And Mechanical Inspection Of Optical Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, R. R.; Patterson, S. R.; Thompson, D. C.

    1982-03-01

    Displacement measurement and motion control are discussed for rotary and linear axes of motion, as necessary for the dimensional measurement and diamond-tool machining of grazing incidence x-ray optics. Examples of available performance levels are drawn from measurements made on current developmental hardware, and are coupled with speculation on possible future extensions.

  8. Diamond machining and mechanical inspection of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, R. R.; Patterson, S. R.; Thompson, D. C.

    1981-11-01

    Displacement measurement and motion control are discussed for rotary and linear axes of motion, as necessary for the dimensional measurement and diamond-tool machining of grazing incidence X-ray optics. Examples of available performance levels are drawn from measurements made on current development hardware, and are coupled with speculation on possible future extensions.

  9. Advanced optical sensing and processing technologies for the distributed control of large flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G. M.; Fraser, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to examine state-of-the-art optical sensing and processing technology applied to control the motion of flexible spacecraft. Proposed large flexible space systems, such an optical telescopes and antennas, will require control over vast surfaces. Most likely distributed control will be necessary involving many sensors to accurately measure the surface. A similarly large number of actuators must act upon the system. The used technical approach included reviewing proposed NASA missions to assess system needs and requirements. A candidate mission was chosen as a baseline study spacecraft for comparison of conventional and optical control components. Control system requirements of the baseline system were used for designing both a control system containing current off-the-shelf components and a system utilizing electro-optical devices for sensing and processing. State-of-the-art surveys of conventional sensor, actuator, and processor technologies were performed. A technology development plan is presented that presents a logical, effective way to develop and integrate advancing technologies.

  10. Recent advances toward a fiber optic sensor for nerve agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshay, Manal; Cordero, Steven R.; Mukamal, Harold; Ruiz, David; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2008-04-01

    We report advances made on the development of a fiber optic nerve agent sensor having its entire length as the sensing element. Upon exposure to sarin gas or its simulant, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, the cladding changes color resulting in an alteration of the light intensity throughput. The optical fiber is multimode and consists of a fused-silica core and a nerve agent sensitive cladding. The absorption characteristics of the cladding affect the fiber's spectral attenuation and limit the length of light guiding fiber that can be deployed continuously. The absorption of the cladding is also dependent on the sensor formulation, which in turn influences the sensitivity of the fiber. In this paper, data related to the trade-off of sensitivity, spectral attenuation, and length of fiber challenged will be reported. The fiber is mass produced using a conventional fiber optic draw tower. This technology could be used to protect human resources and buildings from dangerous chemical attacks, particularly when large areas or perimeters must be covered. It may also be used passively to determine how well such areas have been decontaminated.

  11. Thermo-optical pressure difference in one-component gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chermyaninov, I. V.; Chernyak, V. G.

    2014-09-15

    A new phenomenon—thermo-optical pressure difference in the gas (TOPD) is regarded. This effect is the steady state of the second order which arises in the gas located in a closed capillary in the presence of a fixed temperature gradient and a resonant optical radiation. TOPD is the result of imposition thermal transpiration and light-induced drift of gas in a capillary. The problem is solved on the basis of the linearized Boltzmann kinetic equations for excited and unexcited gaseous particles. Expressions for the kinetic coefficients and pressure drop in gas at the ends of the closed capillary are obtained. Possible cases of the steady state are regarded for atoms and molecules. Numerical estimates of this effect for atomic and molecular gases in the whole range of Knudsen numbers are given.

  12. Updated optical read/write memory system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A survey of the building blocks of the electro-optic read/write system was made. Critical areas and alternate paths are discussed. The latest PLZT block data composer is analyzed. Stricter controls in the production and fabrication of PLZT are implied by the performance of the BDC. A reverse charge before erase has eliminated several problems observed in the parallel plane charging process for photoconductor-thermoplastic hologram storage.

  13. Infrared transmission measurements of highly curved optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiszauer, Detlev H.; Morrow, Howard E.

    Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) measurements on flat witness samples are combined with ray trace results of transmission through a 1/8 inch, 12 mill focal length lens to estimate the net transmission of that lens as it is used in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES I) Sounder optical train. The ray trace code uses a 'double random' ray method allowing radiometry to be done with a standard ray propagation algorithm.

  14. Geodesic Components Of Integrated Optics: Seeking For The Perfect Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochacki, Jacek

    1986-11-01

    The most recent formulation of the geodesic lens problem is briefly discussed and proved very useful in developing novel solutions. A new family of perfectly imaging lenses is presented, which lends itself extremely well to the integrated-optical circuits. These lenses possess smooth transition between the cyllindrically-symmetric depression profile and the flat guide. Moreover, the rounded section profile is characterized by non-vanishing local curvature radius. This should minimize radiation and scattering losses by the guided modes.

  15. Large-scale photonic integration for advanced all-optical routing functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholes, Steven C.

    Advanced InP-based photonic integrated circuits are a critical technology to manage the increasing bandwidth demands of next-generation all-optical networks. Integrating many of the discrete functions required in optical networks into a single device provides a reduction in system footprint and optical losses by eliminating the fiber coupling junctions between components. This translates directly into increased system reliability and cost savings. Although many key network components have been realized via InP-based monolithic integration over the years, truly large-scale photonic ICs have only recently emerged in the marketplace. This lag-time has been mostly due to historically low device yields. In all-optical routing applications, large-scale photonic ICs may be able to address two of the key roadblocks associated with scaling modern electronic routers to higher capacities---namely, power and size. If the functions of dynamic wavelength conversion and routing are moved to the optical layer, we can eliminate the need for power-hungry optical-to-electrical (O/E) and electrical-to-optical (E/O) data conversions at each router node. Additionally, large-scale photonic ICs could reduce the footprint of such a system by combining the similar functions of each port onto a single chip. However, robust design and manufacturing techniques that will enable high-yield production of these chips must be developed. In this work, we demonstrate a monolithic tunable optical router (MOTOR) chip consisting of an array of eight 40-Gbps wavelength converters and a passive arrayed-waveguide grating router that functions as the packet-forwarding switch fabric of an all-optical router. The device represents one of the most complex InP photonic ICs ever reported, with more than 200 integrated functional elements in a single chip. Single-channel 40 Gbps wavelength conversion and channel switching using 231-1 PRBS data showed a power penalty as low as 4.5 dB with less than 2 W drive power

  16. NDE of advanced turbine engine components and materials by computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, R. N.; Baaklini, George Y.; Klima, Stanley J.

    1991-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an X-ray technique that provides quantitative 3D density information of materials and components and can accurately detail spatial distributions of cracks, voids, and density variations. CT scans of ceramic materials, composites, and engine components were taken and the resulting images will be discussed. Scans were taken with two CT systems with different spatial resolution capabilities. The scans showed internal damage, density variations, and geometrical arrangement of various features in the materials and components. It was concluded that CT can play an important role in the characterization of advanced turbine engine materials and components. Future applications of this technology will be outlined.

  17. Specification of optical components for a high average-power laser environment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.; Chow, R.; Rinmdahl, K.A.; Willis, J.B.; Wong, J.N.

    1997-06-25

    Optical component specifications for the high-average-power lasers and transport system used in the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) plant must address demanding system performance requirements. The need for high performance optics has to be balanced against the practical desire to reduce the supply risks of cost and schedule. This is addressed in optical system design, careful planning with the optical industry, demonstration of plant quality parts, qualification of optical suppliers and processes, comprehensive procedures for evaluation and test, and a plan for corrective action.

  18. Hard plastic cladding fiber (HPCF) based optical components for high speed short reach optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Ki; Kim, Dong Uk; Kim, Tae Young; Park, Chang Soo; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2006-09-01

    We developed the primary components applicable to HPCF links for short reach (SR) and very short reach (VSR) data communication systems. We fabricated 4x4 HPCF fused taper splitter, HPCF pigtailed VCSEL and PIN photodiode for high speed short reach communications and characterized back to back transmission performance of the link composed of these components by measuring eye diagrams and jitters. Adapting the fusion-tapering technique for glass optical fiber, we successfully fabricated a 4x4 HPCF fused taper coupler. The HPCF with a core diameter of 200μm and an outer diameter of 230μm had step refractive index of 1.45 and 1.40 for the core and the clad. The optimized fusion length and tapering waist which make minimum insertion loss of about 7dB and uniform output power splitting ratio with less than 0.5dB are 13mm and 150µm, respectively. As a light source for VSR networks, we chose a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) and developed a package with a HPCF pigtail. After positioning VCSEL and HPCF that made a minimum coupling loss, we glued the HPCF inside ceramic ferrule housing. In HPCF-PIN PD packaging, we added a micro polymer lens tip onto the HPCF ends to match the mode field area to the sensitive area of GaAs or InGaAs PIN PD. Coupling between a PIN PD chip and the lensed HPCF was optimized with the radius of curvature of 156µm with a low coupling loss of 0.3dB, which is compatible to conventional MMF-PD packaging. For 1.25 Gbps data rate, the eyes adequate to eye mask in gigabit Ethernet were wide open after all HPCF transmission link and no significant power penalty was observed.

  19. Design of a multi-channel free space optical interconnection component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Da-Gong; Zhang, Pei-Song; Jing, Wen-Cai; Tan, Jun; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Yi-Mo

    2008-11-01

    A multi-channel free space optical interconnection component, fiber optic rotary joint, was designed using a Dove prism. When the Dove prism is rotated an angle of α around the longitudinal axis, the image rotates an angle of 2 α. The optical interconnection component consists of the signal transmission system, Dove prim and driving mechanism. The planetary gears are used to achieve the speed ratio of 2:1 between the total optical interconnection component and the Dove prism. The C-lenses are employed to couple different optical signals in the signal transmission system. The coupling loss between the receiving fiber of stationary part and the transmitting fiber of rotary part is measured.

  20. Development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems: Survey and evaluation of measurement techniques for temperature, strain and heat flux for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    The report presents the final results of Tasks 1 and 2, Development of Sensors for Ceramic Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems (NASA program NAS3-25141). During Task 1, an extensive survey was conducted of sensor concepts which have the potential for measuring surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion systems. Each sensor concept was analyzed and evaluated under Task 2; sensor concepts were then recommended for further development. For temperature measurement, both pyrometry and thermographic phosphors are recommended for measurements up to and beyond the melting point of ceramic materials. For lower temperature test programs, the thin-film techniques offer advantages in the installation of temperature sensors. Optical strain measurement techniques are recommended because they offer the possibility of being useful at very high temperature levels. Techniques for the measurement of heat flux are recommended for development based on both a surface mounted sensor and the measurement of the temperature differential across a portion of a ceramic component or metallic substrate.

  1. The optical immersion effect in disperse systems with supercritical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Yuvchenko, S. A.; Ushakova, O. V.; Tyagnibedin, D. A.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2015-04-01

    The method of optical immersion of randomly inhomogeneous media with porous structures into a supercritical fluid (SCF) is considered. Growth in the fluid density upon isothermal increase in the pressure leads to growth in the refractive index and, accordingly, in diffuse transmission of light through a layer of immersed medium. Experimental data on the small-angle diffuse transmission of a model scattering medium (filter paper, PTFE ribbon) are presented for various SCF pressures. Values of the transport length of laser radiation in these media are recovered as dependent on the SCF refractive index.

  2. Advances in lasers and optical micro-nano-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurell, F.; Fazio, E.

    2010-09-01

    Lasers represent a well consolidated technology: nevertheless, research in this field remains very active and productive, in both basic and applied directions. At the moment significant attention is given to those sources that bring together high power and compactness. Such high power lasers find important applications for material treatments and such applications are presented by Ehsani et al and Saiedeh Saghafi et al, in the treatment of dielectric thin films (Alteration of optical and morphological properties of polycarbonate illuminated by visible/IR laser beams) or of biological tissues like pistachio seeds (Investigating the effects of laser beams (532 and 660 nm) in annihilation of pistachio mould fungus using spectrophotometry analysis). In particular the latter paper show how laser sources can find very important applications in new domains, preserving goods and food without the need for preservatives or pesticides by simply sterilizing them using light. Optical Micro and Nano Systems presents a new domain for exploration. In this framework this special issue is very attractive, because it assembles papers reporting new results in three directions: new techniques for monitoring integrated micro- and nano-systems, new integrated systems and novel high performance metamaterial configurations. Integrated micro-components can be monitored and controlled using reflectance measurements as presented by Piombini et al (Toward the reflectance measurement of micro components). Speckle formation during laser beam reflection can also be a very sophisticated tool for detecting ultra-precise displacements, as presented by Filter et al (High resolution displacement detection with speckles : accuracy limits in linear displacement speckle metrology). Three dimensional integrated optical structures is indeed a big challenge and a peculiarity of photonics, they can be formed through traditional holography or using more sophisticated and novel ! technologies. Thus, special

  3. Susceptibility of electro-optic components to degradation in a space environment.

    PubMed

    Blue, M D

    1996-11-01

    Possible causes of degradation of electro-optic systems operating in a space environment include not only the effects of radiation but also the effects of temperature, temperature cycling, atomic oxygen effects (for low-Earth orbits), micrometeoroid impacts, and contamination effects. For the majority of electro-optic components, the radiation environment in space does not present a significant problem. For a few components, or for electro-optic systems that must operate in a high radiation environment, special precautions must be observed. The effects of radiation, as well as other problems of the space environment, on electro-optic components, including recent results from the LDEF satellite experiments and some later measurements, are reviewed. Guidelines for materials and component selection shielding are presented. PMID:11540513

  4. Beam Optics Analysis - An Advanced 3D Trajectory Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Neilson, Jeff; Read, Mike; Shephard, Mark; Bauer, Andrew; Datta, Dibyendu; Beal, Mark

    2006-01-03

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. has completed initial development of an advanced, 3D program for modeling electron trajectories in electromagnetic fields. The code is being used to design complex guns and collectors. Beam Optics Analysis (BOA) is a fully relativistic, charged particle code using adaptive, finite element meshing. Geometrical input is imported from CAD programs generating ACIS-formatted files. Parametric data is inputted using an intuitive, graphical user interface (GUI), which also provides control of convergence, accuracy, and post processing. The program includes a magnetic field solver, and magnetic information can be imported from Maxwell 2D/3D and other programs. The program supports thermionic emission and injected beams. Secondary electron emission is also supported, including multiple generations. Work on field emission is in progress as well as implementation of computer optimization of both the geometry and operating parameters. The principle features of the program and its capabilities are presented.

  5. Beam Optics Analysis — An Advanced 3D Trajectory Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Neilson, Jeff; Read, Mike; Shephard, Mark; Bauer, Andrew; Datta, Dibyendu; Beal, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. has completed initial development of an advanced, 3D program for modeling electron trajectories in electromagnetic fields. The code is being used to design complex guns and collectors. Beam Optics Analysis (BOA) is a fully relativistic, charged particle code using adaptive, finite element meshing. Geometrical input is imported from CAD programs generating ACIS-formatted files. Parametric data is inputted using an intuitive, graphical user interface (GUI), which also provides control of convergence, accuracy, and post processing. The program includes a magnetic field solver, and magnetic information can be imported from Maxwell 2D/3D and other programs. The program supports thermionic emission and injected beams. Secondary electron emission is also supported, including multiple generations. Work on field emission is in progress as well as implementation of computer optimization of both the geometry and operating parameters. The principle features of the program and its capabilities are presented.

  6. Advanced optical position sensors for magnetically suspended wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafleur, S.

    1985-01-01

    A major concern to aerodynamicists has been the corruption of wind tunnel test data by model support structures, such as stings or struts. A technique for magnetically suspending wind tunnel models was considered by Tournier and Laurenceau (1957) in order to overcome this problem. This technique is now implemented with the aid of a Large Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (LMSBS) and advanced position sensors for measuring model attitude and position within the test section. Two different optical position sensors are discussed, taking into account a device based on the use of linear CCD arrays, and a device utilizing area CID cameras. Current techniques in image processing have been employed to develop target tracking algorithms capable of subpixel resolution for the sensors. The algorithms are discussed in detail, and some preliminary test results are reported.

  7. Microelectromechanical system assembled ion optics: An advance to miniaturization and assembly of electron and ion optics

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.; Verbeck, G.; Saini, R.; Tsui, K.

    2009-09-15

    Deep-reactive ion etching of n-doped silicon-on-insulator is utilized to make ion optical components to aid in the miniaturization of mass analyzers. The microelectromechanical system components are bound to aluminum nitride substrates and employed three-dimensional assembly. The assembly methods are tested for breakdown (V{sub b}), durability, and alignment. Demonstration of ion manipulation is shown with a 1 mm Bradbury-Nielsen gate, 500 {mu}m Einzel lens, 500 {mu}m coaxial ring ion trap, and reflectron optics. Data are presented showing the resolution, attenuation, and performance of each of these devices. We demonstrate advantages and disadvantages of this technology and its applications to mass analysis.

  8. The effects of ionizing radiation on fiber optic systems and components for use in mobile platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Mahesh; Krinsky, Jeff

    1991-02-01

    Many applications for fiber optic components and systems exist in mobile platforms. Some of the mobile platforms will be expected to operate through or survive exposure to ionizing radiation. Construction of systems that can survive the required radiation environments requires special design considerations. This paper describes the effects of ionizing radiation on some fiber optic components and systems for use in mobile platforms, and an example of transient radiation test data on a prototype analog two wavelength referenced system is presented.

  9. 76 FR 72722 - Certain Projectors With Controlled-Angle Optical Retarders, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    ... COMMISSION Certain Projectors With Controlled-Angle Optical Retarders, Components Thereof, and Products... within the United States after importation of certain projectors with controlled-angle optical retarders...; Sony Corporation of America, 550 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10022; Sony Electronics Inc., 16530...

  10. Modern trends in industrial technology of production of optical polymeric components for night vision devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goev, A. I.; Knyazeva, N. A.; Potelov, V. V.; Senik, B. N.

    2005-06-01

    The present paper represents in detail the complex approach to creating industrial technology of production of polymeric optical components: information has been given on optical polymeric materials, automatic machines for injection moulding, the possibilities of the Moldflow system (the AB "Universal" company) used for mathematical simulation of the technological process of injection moulding and making the moulds.

  11. Optical control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Upton, Robert

    2006-08-10

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) is an off-axis Gregorian astronomical telescope design. The ATST is expected to be subject to thermal and gravitational effects that result in misalignments of its mirrors and warping of its primary mirror. These effects require active, closed-loop correction to maintain its as-designed diffraction-limited optical performance. The simulation and modeling of the ATST with a closed-loop correction strategy are presented. The correction strategy is derived from the linear mathematical properties of two Jacobian, or influence, matrices that map the ATST rigid-body (RB) misalignments and primary mirror figure errors to wavefront sensor (WFS) measurements. The two Jacobian matrices also quantify the sensitivities of the ATST to RB and primary mirror figure perturbations. The modeled active correction strategy results in a decrease of the rms wavefront error averaged over the field of view (FOV) from 500 to 19 nm, subject to 10 nm rms WFS noise. This result is obtained utilizing nine WFSs distributed in the FOV with a 300 nm rms astigmatism figure error on the primary mirror. Correction of the ATST RB perturbations is demonstrated for an optimum subset of three WFSs with corrections improving the ATST rms wavefront error from 340 to 17.8 nm. In addition to the active correction of the ATST, an analytically robust sensitivity analysis that can be generally extended to a wider class of optical systems is presented. PMID:16926876

  12. Final Report for "Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software"

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlana Shasharina

    2010-12-01

    The goal of the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software is to fundamentally changing the way scientific software is developed and used by bringing component-based software development technologies to high-performance scientific and engineering computing. The role of Tech-X work in TASCS project is to provide an outreach to accelerator physics and fusion applications by introducing TASCS tools into applications, testing tools in the applications and modifying the tools to be more usable.

  13. Method of making an integral window hermetic fiber optic component

    DOEpatents

    Dalton, Rick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.; Massey, Richard T.; Waker, Damon A.

    1996-11-12

    In the fabrication of igniters, actuators, detonators, and other pyrotechnic devices to be activated by a laser beam, an integral optical glass window is formed by placing a preform in the structural member of the device and then melting the glass and sealing it in place by heating at a temperature between the ceramming temperature of the glass and the melting point of the metal, followed by rapid furnace cooling to avoid devitrification. No other sealing material is needed to achieve hermeticity. A preferred embodiment of this type of device is fabricated by allowing the molten glass to flow further and form a plano-convex lens integral with and at the bottom of the window. The lens functions to decrease the beam divergence caused by refraction of the laser light passing through the window when the device is fired by means of a laser beam.

  14. Method of making an integral window hermetic fiber optic component

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, R.D.; Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.; Waker, D.A.

    1996-11-12

    In the fabrication of igniters, actuators, detonators, and other pyrotechnic devices to be activated by a laser beam, an integral optical glass window is formed by placing a preform in the structural member of the device and then melting the glass and sealing it in place by heating at a temperature between the ceramming temperature of the glass and the melting point of the metal, followed by rapid furnace cooling to avoid devitrification. No other sealing material is needed to achieve hermeticity. A preferred embodiment of this type of device is fabricated by allowing the molten glass to flow further and form a plano-convex lens integral with and at the bottom of the window. The lens functions to decrease the beam divergence caused by refraction of the laser light passing through the window when the device is fired by means of a laser beam. 9 figs.

  15. Improvement in the performance of laser based optical rotational sensor by reducing the stress co-efficient of optical component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, I. Abdul; Naidu, V. Atchaiah; Gupta, Mahender Kumar; Chhabra, Inder Mohan; Karthikeyan, B.

    2016-05-01

    Laser based optical rotational sensors are used as an inertial rotation sensor for navigation purpose. The life time of the rotational sensor wholly depend on the type / quality of the optical components that are used. While developing the rotational sensors, based on the total internal reflection techniques, the laser is passing through the glass material. As the glass is having a high verdant constant the laser gets affected and suffers from the rotation of polarization. This phenomenon still gets enhanced if the components which are optically bonded are having a high order of non - uniformity. It creates the stress onto the prism as well on the Optical block and gives rise to a varying amount of stress induced Birefringes. Because of this observation, the performance of the rotational sensor gets deteriorated. This paper will present the techniques used for producing the highly flat surface, which will reduce the stress Birefringes and in turn improve the performance of the rotational sensor.

  16. 24 CFR 242.47 - Insured advances for building components stored off-site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Insured advances for building components stored off-site. 242.47 Section 242.47 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  17. Experimental Set-Up to Evaluate the Degradation of the Optical Components of a CPV Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengoechea, Jaione; Ezquer, Mikel; Petrina, Iñigo; Lagunas, Ana Rosa

    2011-12-01

    The efficiency of CPV modules strongly depends on the characteristics and performance of the optical components. Therefore, the complete characterization of the optical components and their evolution during the module lifetime becomes an important issue to correctly estimate the energy supplied by the CPV systems along the time. Due to the series electrical connection of the multi-junction solar cells, the spectral distribution of the light after the optical components plays a key role in the energy production. A spectrally resolved characterization of the light is hence desirable. In this paper, an indoor set-up to study the degradation of optical components of CPV modules is presented. The first part of the experimental set-up consists of a collimated Xe lamp, a diaphragm, and a spectroradiometer. With this set-up information about the variation of the light spectrum spatial distribution due to the CPV optical component is obtained. The second part of the experimental set-up is based on a combination of Deuterium and Halogen lamps and an integrating sphere. This set-up allows the detection of changes in the optical properties of the material through the measurement of the global spectral transmittance and reflectance.

  18. Advanced Motion Compensation Methods for Intravital Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has emerged in the recent decade as an indispensible imaging modality for the study of the micro-dynamics of biological processes in live animals. Technical advancements in imaging techniques and hardware components, combined with the development of novel targeted probes and new mice models, have enabled us to address long-standing questions in several biology areas such as oncology, cell biology, immunology and neuroscience. As the instrument resolution has increased, physiological motion activities have become a major obstacle that prevents imaging live animals at resolutions analogue to the ones obtained in vitro. Motion compensation techniques aim at reducing this gap and can effectively increase the in vivo resolution. This paper provides a technical review of some of the latest developments in motion compensation methods, providing organ specific solutions. PMID:24273405

  19. Analysis of adaptive laser scanning optical system with focus-tunable components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, P.; Mikš, A.; Novák, J.; Novák, P.

    2015-05-01

    This work presents a primary analysis of an adaptive laser scanner based on two-mirror beam-steering device and focustunable components (lenses with tunable focal length). It is proposed an optical scheme of an adaptive laser scanner, which can focus the laser beam in a continuous way to a required spatial position using the lens with tunable focal length. This work focuses on a detailed analysis of the active optical or opto-mechanical components (e.g. focus-tunable lenses) mounted in the optical systems of laser scanners. The algebraic formulas are derived for ray tracing through different configurations of the scanning optical system and one can calculate angles of scanner mirrors and required focal length of the tunable-focus component provided that the position of the focused beam in 3D space is given with a required tolerance. Computer simulations of the proposed system are performed using MATLAB.

  20. Fiber optic gyroscope using an eight-component LiNbO3 integrated optic circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minford, W. J.; Stone, F. T.; Youmans, B. R.; Bartman, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    A LiNbO3 integrated optic circuit (IOC) containing eight optical functions has been successfully incorporated into an interferometric fiber optic gyroscope. The IOC has the minimum configuration optical functions (a phase modulator, a polarizer, and two beam splitters) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory's novel beat detection circuit (a phase modulator, two optical taps, and a beam splitter) which provides a means of directly reading angular position and rotation rate. The optical subsystem consisting of the fiber-pigtailed IOC and a sensing coil of 945 meters of polarization-maintaining fiber has a loss of 18.7dB, which includes 9dB due to the architecture and unpolarized source. A random walk coefficient was measured using an edge-emitting LED as the source.

  1. Investigation of the effects of long duration space exposure on active optical system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    This experiment was exposed to the space environment for 6 years on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). It investigated quantitatively the effects of the long-duration space exposure on the relevant performance parameters of a representative set of electron-optic system components, including lasers, radiation detectors, filters, modulators, windows, and other related components. It evaluated the results and implications of the measurements indicating real or suspected degradation mechanisms. This information will be used to establish guidelines for the selection and use of components for space-based, electro-optic systems.

  2. Design of pitch conversion component for formation of multibeam optical recording head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Kawamura, Norikazu; Tokumaru, Haruki

    2008-04-01

    We describe a design of a planar lightwave circuit for parallel information processing using visible light. The circuit serves as a pitch conversion component (PCC) that can align multiple beams close together and easily composes a compact optical system that can project optical spots at a narrow pitch on a certain small plane. From the viewpoint of its application to optical recording, a PCC is designed to have over 50 waveguides according to the fabrication of waveguides for a blue-violet beam. It is analytically confirmed that a PCC contributes to the formation of a multibeam optical recording head with numerous beams.

  3. Design of pitch conversion component for formation of multibeam optical recording head.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Kawamura, Norikazu; Tokumaru, Haruki

    2008-04-10

    We describe a design of a planar lightwave circuit for parallel information processing using visible light. The circuit serves as a pitch conversion component (PCC) that can align multiple beams close together and easily composes a compact optical system that can project optical spots at a narrow pitch on a certain small plane. From the viewpoint of its application to optical recording, a PCC is designed to have over 50 waveguides according to the fabrication of waveguides for a blue-violet beam. It is analytically confirmed that a PCC contributes to the formation of a multibeam optical recording head with numerous beams. PMID:18404179

  4. Biochemical component identification by plasmonic improved whispering gallery mode optical resonance based sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Saetchnikov, Anton V.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Experimental data on detection and identification of variety of biochemical agents, such as proteins, microelements, antibiotic of different generation etc. in both single and multi component solutions under varied in wide range concentration analyzed on the light scattering parameters of whispering gallery mode optical resonance based sensor are represented. Multiplexing on parameters and components has been realized using developed fluidic sensor cell with fixed in adhesive layer dielectric microspheres and data processing. Biochemical component identification has been performed by developed network analysis techniques. Developed approach is demonstrated to be applicable both for single agent and for multi component biochemical analysis. Novel technique based on optical resonance on microring structures, plasmon resonance and identification tools has been developed. To improve a sensitivity of microring structures microspheres fixed by adhesive had been treated previously by gold nanoparticle solution. Another technique used thin film gold layers deposited on the substrate below adhesive. Both biomolecule and nanoparticle injections caused considerable changes of optical resonance spectra. Plasmonic gold layers under optimized thickness also improve parameters of optical resonance spectra. Biochemical component identification has been also performed by developed network analysis techniques both for single and for multi component solution. So advantages of plasmon enhancing optical microcavity resonance with multiparameter identification tools is used for development of a new platform for ultra sensitive label-free biomedical sensor.

  5. Railway track component condition monitoring using optical fibre Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buggy, S. J.; James, S. W.; Staines, S.; Carroll, R.; Kitson, P.; Farrington, D.; Drewett, L.; Jaiswal, J.; Tatam, R. P.

    2016-05-01

    The use of optical fibre Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensors to monitor the condition of safety critical rail components is investigated. Fishplates, switchblades and stretcher bars on the Stagecoach Supertram tramway in Sheffield in the UK have been instrumented with arrays of FBG sensors. The dynamic strain signatures induced by the passage of a tram over the instrumented components have been analysed to identify features indicative of changes in the condition of the components.

  6. Advanced component development of MCFC technology at M-C Power

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.S.; Haugh, E.J.; Benjamin, T.G.

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power Corporation (MCP) was founded in 1987 to commercialize Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) stacks. The first generation of active area cell components were successfully scaled-up from the 100-cm{sup 2} area laboratory scale to continuous production of commercial-area (1-m) components. These components have been tested in five commercial-area subscale (20-kW) stacks and one commercial-scale (250-kW) stack. The second 250 kW stack is being installed in the power plant for operation in late 1996 and components have already been manufactured for the third 250-kW stack which is scheduled to go on-line in the middle of 1997. Concurrent with commercial-area (1-m{sup 2}) active component manufacturing has been an ongoing effort to develop and test advanced component technologies that will enable MCP to meet its future cost and performance goals. The primary goal is to lower the total cell package cost, while attaining improvements in cell performance and endurance. This work is being completed through analysis of the cost drivers for raw materials and manufacturing techniques. A program is in place to verify the performance of the lower cost materials through pressurized (3 atm) bench scale (100-cm{sup 2}) cell tests. Bench-scale cell testing of advanced active area components has shown that simultaneous cost reduction and improvements in the performance and endurance are attainable. Following performance verification at the bench scale level, scale-up of the advanced component manufacturing processes to commercial-area has been ongoing in the past year. The following sections discuss some of the performance improvements and reductions in cost that have been realized.

  7. Principal Component Analysis Studies of Turbulence in Optically Thick Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, C.; Lazarian, A.; Burkhart, B.; Pogosyan, D.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    In this work we investigate the sensitivity of principal component analysis (PCA) to the velocity power spectrum in high-opacity regimes of the interstellar medium (ISM). For our analysis we use synthetic position-position-velocity (PPV) cubes of fractional Brownian motion and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations, post-processed to include radiative transfer effects from CO. We find that PCA analysis is very different from the tools based on the traditional power spectrum of PPV data cubes. Our major finding is that PCA is also sensitive to the phase information of PPV cubes and this allows PCA to detect the changes of the underlying velocity and density spectra at high opacities, where the spectral analysis of the maps provides the universal -3 spectrum in accordance with the predictions of the Lazarian & Pogosyan theory. This makes PCA a potentially valuable tool for studies of turbulence at high opacities, provided that proper gauging of the PCA index is made. However, we found the latter to not be easy, as the PCA results change in an irregular way for data with high sonic Mach numbers. This is in contrast to synthetic Brownian noise data used for velocity and density fields that show monotonic PCA behavior. We attribute this difference to the PCA's sensitivity to Fourier phase information.

  8. Final report on LDRD project : advanced optical trigger systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Roose, Lars D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Mar, Alan; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas M.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Montano, Victoria A.

    2008-09-01

    Advanced optically-activated solid-state electrical switch development at Sandia has demonstrated multi-kA/kV switching and the path for scalability to even higher current/power. Realization of this potential requires development of new optical sources/switches based on key Sandia photonic device technologies: vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been used to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. In VCSEL arrays, adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and are lithographically patterned to the required dimensions. We have demonstrated multiple-line filament triggering using VCSEL arrays to approximate line generation. These arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs have fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. Using these arrays, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices. Photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices offer advantages of high voltage operation (multi-kV), optical isolation, triggering with laser pulses that cannot occur accidentally in nature, low cost, high speed, small size, and radiation hardness. PCSS devices are candidates for an assortment of potential applications that require multi-kA switching of current. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been demonstrated to trigger multiple filaments, but they

  9. A Large Aperture, High Energy Laser System for Optics and Optical Component Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Nostrand, M C; Weiland, T L; Luthi, R L; Vickers, J L; Sell, W D; Stanley, J A; Honig, J; Auerbach, J; Hackel, R P; Wegner, P J

    2003-11-01

    A large aperture, kJ-class, multi-wavelength Nd-glass laser system has been constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Lab which has unique capabilities for studying a wide variety of optical phenomena. The master-oscillator, power-amplifier (MOPA) configuration of this ''Optical Sciences Laser'' (OSL) produces 1053 nm radiation with shaped pulse lengths which are variable from 0.1-100 ns. The output can be frequency doubled or tripled with high conversion efficiency with a resultant 100 cm{sup 2} high quality output beam. This facility can accommodate prototype hardware for large-scale inertial confinement fusion lasers allowing for investigation of integrated system issues such as optical lifetime at high fluence, optics contamination, compatibility of non-optical materials, and laser diagnostics.

  10. Summary of the effects of radiation upon the passive optical components of the Versatile Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, B. T.; Weidberg, A.

    2014-01-01

    The LHC luminosity upgrade, known as the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will require high-speed optical links to read out data from its detectors. The ATLAS and CMS experiments in collaboration with CERN have developed the Versatile Link in order to address the technical issues of optical data transmission within the harsh radiation environment experienced by any experiment within the HL-LHC. Passive optical components can suffer damage in the form of reduced optical transparency (radiation induced absorption or RIA), reduced bandwidth, and mechanical damage to the components themselves and their connection hardware. This paper summarizes the results of the optical and mechanical tests that have been performed on the Versatile Link's passive optical components. The authors conclude that two single mode and two multimode fibres, as well as standard connector components, can be qualified for use in the HL-LHC environment. The qualifying fibers are: Corning SMF-28e, DrakaElite® SRH-SMF, Corning Clearcurve® OM4 multimode graded index, and DrakaElite® SRH-MMF.

  11. Advanced multi-contrast Jones matrix optical coherence tomography for Doppler and polarization sensitive imaging.

    PubMed

    Ju, Myeong Jin; Hong, Young-Joo; Makita, Shuichi; Lim, Yiheng; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Duan, Lian; Miura, Masahiro; Tang, Shuo; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2013-08-12

    An advanced version of Jones matrix optical coherence tomography (JMT) is demonstrated for Doppler and polarization sensitive imaging of the posterior eye. JMT is capable of providing localized flow tomography by Doppler detection and investigating the birefringence property of tissue through a three-dimensional (3-D) Jones matrix measurement. Owing to an incident polarization multiplexing scheme based on passive optical components, this system is stable, safe in a clinical environment, and cost effective. Since the properties of this version of JMT provide intrinsic compensation for system imperfection, the system is easy to calibrate. Compared with the previous version of JMT, this advanced JMT achieves a sufficiently long depth measurement range for clinical cases of posterior eye disease. Furthermore, a fine spectral shift compensation method based on the cross-correlation of calibration signals was devised for stabilizing the phase of OCT, which enables a high sensitivity Doppler OCT measurement. In addition, a new theory of JMT which integrates the Jones matrix measurement, Doppler measurement, and scattering measurement is presented. This theory enables a sensitivity-enhanced scattering OCT and high-sensitivity Doppler OCT. These new features enable the application of this system to clinical cases. A healthy subject and a geographic atrophy patient were measured in vivo, and simultaneous imaging of choroidal vasculature and birefringence structures are demonstrated. PMID:23938857

  12. Towards do-it-yourself planar optical components using plasmon-assisted etching

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Bhuiya, Abdul M.; Ding, Qing; Johnson, Harley T.; Toussaint Jr, Kimani C.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the push to foster increased technological innovation and basic scientific and engineering interest from the broadest sectors of society has helped to accelerate the development of do-it-yourself (DIY) components, particularly those related to low-cost microcontroller boards. The attraction with DIY kits is the simplification of the intervening steps going from basic design to fabrication, albeit typically at the expense of quality. We present herein plasmon-assisted etching as an approach to extend the DIY theme to optics, specifically the table-top fabrication of planar optical components. By operating in the design space between metasurfaces and traditional flat optical components, we employ arrays of Au pillar-supported bowtie nanoantennas as a template structure. To demonstrate, we fabricate a Fresnel zone plate, diffraction grating and holographic mode converter—all using the same template. Applications to nanotweezers and fabricating heterogeneous nanoantennas are also shown. PMID:26814026

  13. Towards do-it-yourself planar optical components using plasmon-assisted etching.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Bhuiya, Abdul M; Ding, Qing; Johnson, Harley T; Toussaint, Kimani C

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the push to foster increased technological innovation and basic scientific and engineering interest from the broadest sectors of society has helped to accelerate the development of do-it-yourself (DIY) components, particularly those related to low-cost microcontroller boards. The attraction with DIY kits is the simplification of the intervening steps going from basic design to fabrication, albeit typically at the expense of quality. We present herein plasmon-assisted etching as an approach to extend the DIY theme to optics, specifically the table-top fabrication of planar optical components. By operating in the design space between metasurfaces and traditional flat optical components, we employ arrays of Au pillar-supported bowtie nanoantennas as a template structure. To demonstrate, we fabricate a Fresnel zone plate, diffraction grating and holographic mode converter--all using the same template. Applications to nanotweezers and fabricating heterogeneous nanoantennas are also shown. PMID:26814026

  14. Towards do-it-yourself planar optical components using plasmon-assisted etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Bhuiya, Abdul M.; Ding, Qing; Johnson, Harley T.; Toussaint, Kimani C., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the push to foster increased technological innovation and basic scientific and engineering interest from the broadest sectors of society has helped to accelerate the development of do-it-yourself (DIY) components, particularly those related to low-cost microcontroller boards. The attraction with DIY kits is the simplification of the intervening steps going from basic design to fabrication, albeit typically at the expense of quality. We present herein plasmon-assisted etching as an approach to extend the DIY theme to optics, specifically the table-top fabrication of planar optical components. By operating in the design space between metasurfaces and traditional flat optical components, we employ arrays of Au pillar-supported bowtie nanoantennas as a template structure. To demonstrate, we fabricate a Fresnel zone plate, diffraction grating and holographic mode converter--all using the same template. Applications to nanotweezers and fabricating heterogeneous nanoantennas are also shown.

  15. Fermentation broth components influence droplet coalescence and hinder advanced biofuel recovery during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Heeres, Arjan S; Schroën, Karin; Heijnen, Joseph J; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Cuellar, Maria C

    2015-08-01

    Developments in synthetic biology enabled the microbial production of long chain hydrocarbons, which can be used as advanced biofuels in aviation or transportation. Currently, these fuels are not economically competitive due to their production costs. The current process offers room for improvement: by utilizing lignocellulosic feedstock, increasing microbial yields, and using cheaper process technology. Gravity separation is an example of the latter, for which droplet growth by coalescence is crucial. The aim of this study was to study the effect of fermentation broth components on droplet coalescence. Droplet coalescence was measured using two setups: a microfluidic chip and regular laboratory scale stirred vessel (2 L). Some fermentation broth components had a large impact on droplet coalescence. Especially components present in hydrolysed cellulosic biomass and mannoproteins from the yeast cell wall retard coalescence. To achieve a technically feasible gravity separation that can be integrated with the fermentation, the negative effects of these components on coalescence should be minimized. This could be achieved by redesign of the fermentation medium or adjusting the fermentation conditions, aiming to minimize the release of surface active components by the microorganisms. This way, another step can be made towards economically feasible advanced biofuel production. PMID:26097113

  16. Flexible, non-contact and high-precision measurements of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, A.

    2016-06-01

    A high-accuracy cylindrical coordinate measuring instrument developed for the measurement of optical components is presented. It is equipped with an optical point sensor system including a high aperture probe. This setup allows measurements to be performed with high accuracy in a flexible way. Applications include the measurement of the topography of high-precision aspheric and freeform lenses and diffractive structures. High measuring speeds guarantee the implementation in a closed-loop production process.

  17. Progress Towards Prognostic Health Management of Passive Components in Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Pardini, Allan F.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Prowant, Matthew S.

    2014-08-01

    Sustainable nuclear power to promote energy security and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are two key national energy priorities. The development of deployable small modular reactors (SMRs) is expected to support these objectives by developing technologies that improve the reliability, sustain safety, and improve affordability of new reactors. Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. Prognostic health management (PHM) systems can benefit both the safety and economics of deploying AdvSMRs and can play an essential role in managing the inspection and maintenance of passive components in AdvSMR systems. This paper describes progress on development of a prototypic PHM system for AdvSMR passive components, with thermal creep chosen as the target degradation mechanism.

  18. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Consolidated Progress Report July 2006 - March 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, D E; McInnes, L C; Govindaraju, M; Bramley, R; Epperly, T; Kohl, J A; Nieplocha, J; Armstrong, R; Shasharina, S; Sussman, A L; Sottile, M; Damevski, K

    2009-04-14

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

  19. Development of Sensors for Ceramic Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems. Phase 2; Temperature Sensor Systems Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 'development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems' program is divided into two phases. The objectives of Phase 1 were to analyze, evaluate and recommend sensor concepts for the measurement of surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion systems. The results of this effort were previously published in NASA CR-182111. As a result of Phase 1, three approaches were recommended for further development: pyrometry, thin-film sensors, and thermographic phosphors. The objective of Phase 2 were to fabricate and conduct laboratory demonstration tests of these systems. Six materials, mutually agreed upon by NASA and Pratt & Whitney, were investigated under this program. This report summarizes the Phase 2 effort and provides conclusions and recommendations for each of the categories evaluated.

  20. Study of advanced techniques for determining the long term performance of components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The application of existing and new technology to the problem of determining the long-term performance capability of liquid rocket propulsion feed systems is discussed. The long term performance of metal to metal valve seats in a liquid propellant fuel system is stressed. The approaches taken in conducting the analysis are: (1) advancing the technology of characterizing components through the development of new or more sensitive techniques and (2) improving the understanding of the physical of degradation.

  1. Recent advances in bonded composite repair technology for metallic aircraft components

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A.A.; Chester, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    Advanced fiber composites such as boron/epoxy can be employed as adhesively bonded patches to repair or to reinforce metallic aerospace components. This approach provides many advantages over conventional mechanically fastened metallic patches, including improved fatigue behavior, reduced corrosion and easy conformance to complex aerodynamic contours. Bonded composite repairs have been shown to provide high levels of bond durability under aircraft operating conditions. The recent application of bonded composite repairs to military and civil aircraft is described.

  2. An integrated theory for predicting the hydrothermomechanical response of advanced composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    A theory is developed for predicting the hydrothermomechanical response of advanced composite structural components. The combined hydrothermal effects on the mechanical properties of unidirectional composites loaded along the material axis and off-axis, and of angleplied laminates are also evaluated. The materials investigated consist of neat PR-288 epoxy matrix resin and an AS-type graphite fiber/PR-288 resin unidirectional composite.

  3. Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development Program, final report - tasks 4-14

    SciTech Connect

    Kaushal, T.S.; Weber, K.E.

    1994-11-01

    The Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development (ADECD) Program is a multi-year, multi-phase effort to develop and demonstrate the critical technology needed to advance the heavy-duty low heat rejection (LHR) engine concept for the long-haul, heavy-duty truck market. The ADECD Program has been partitioned into two phases. The first phase, Phase 1, was completed in 1986, resulting in definition of the Advanced Diesel Reference Engine (ADRE)III. The second phase, Phase 11/111, examines the feasibility of the ADRE concepts for application to the on-highway diesel engine. Phase 11/111 is currently underway. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies. The work has been performed by the Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) under Contract DEN3-329 with the NASA Lewis Research Center, who provide project management and technical direction.

  4. Standardization Efforts for Mechanical Testing and Design of Advanced Ceramic Materials and Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Jenkins, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced aerospace systems occasionally require the use of very brittle materials such as sapphire and ultra-high temperature ceramics. Although great progress has been made in the development of methods and standards for machining, testing and design of component from these materials, additional development and dissemination of standard practices is needed. ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics and ISO TC 206 have taken a lead role in the standardization of testing for ceramics, and recent efforts and needs in standards development by Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics will be summarized. In some cases, the engineers, etc. involved are unaware of the latest developments, and traditional approaches applicable to other material systems are applied. Two examples of flight hardware failures that might have been prevented via education and standardization will be presented.

  5. Integrated device with diffractive polarization components for a magneto-optical disk head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggans, Charles W.; Fujita, Teruo; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    1992-01-01

    The optical components in the detection train of a conventional magneto-optical (MO) disk head include a half-wave plate and a polarization beamsplitter. These polarization components are bulky and require specialized mounting hardware. In order to realize a more compact head, we propose that these elements be replaced by an integrated device composed of cascaded volume and surface-relief gratings. Herein, the proposed system is described in detail for the individual elements, theoretical and prototype element performance are compared, and the operational tolerances of these elements are discussed.

  6. Optical Microfibre Based Photonic Components and Their Applications in Label-Free Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Bo, Lin; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Optical microfibre photonic components offer a variety of enabling properties, including large evanescent fields, flexibility, configurability, high confinement, robustness and compactness. These unique features have been exploited in a range of applications such as telecommunication, sensing, optical manipulation and high Q resonators. Optical microfibre biosensors, as a class of fibre optic biosensors which rely on small geometries to expose the evanescent field to interact with samples, have been widely investigated. Due to their unique properties, such as fast response, functionalization, strong confinement, configurability, flexibility, compact size, low cost, robustness, ease of miniaturization, large evanescent field and label-free operation, optical microfibres based biosensors seem a promising alternative to traditional immunological methods for biomolecule measurements. Unlabeled DNA and protein targets can be detected by monitoring the changes of various optical transduction mechanisms, such as refractive index, absorption and surface plasmon resonance, since a target molecule is capable of binding to an immobilized optical microfibre. In this review, we critically summarize accomplishments of past optical microfibre label-free biosensors, identify areas for future research and provide a detailed account of the studies conducted to date for biomolecules detection using optical microfibres. PMID:26287252

  7. Passive component based multifunctional Jones matrix swept source optical coherence tomography for Doppler and polarization imaging.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yiheng; Hong, Young-Joo; Duan, Lian; Yamanari, Masahiro; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2012-06-01

    We present a fiber based multifunctional Jones matrix swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system for Doppler and polarization imaging. Jones matrix measurement without using active components such as electro-optic modulators is realized by incident polarization multiplexing based on independent delay of two orthogonal polarization states and polarization diversity detection. In addition to polarization sensitivity, this system measures Doppler flow without extra hardware for phase stabilized SS-OCT detection. An eighth-wave plate was measured to demonstrate the polarization detection accuracy. The optic nerve head of a retina was measured in vivo. Detailed vasculature and birefringent structures were investigated simultaneously. PMID:22660086

  8. Optical materials for astronomy from SCHOTT: the quality of large components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Hengst, Joachim; Elsmann, Frank; Lemke, Christian; Döhring, Thorsten; Hartmann, Peter

    2008-07-01

    The new generation of survey telescopes and future giant observatories such as E-ELT or TMT do not only require very fast or very large mirrors, but also high sophisticated instruments with the need of large optical materials in outstanding quality. The huge variety of modern optical materials from SCHOTT covers almost all areas of specification needs of optical designers. Even if many interesting optical materials are restricted in size and/or quality, there is a variety of optical materials that can be produced in large sizes, with excellent optical homogeneity, and a low level of stress birefringence. Some actual examples are high homogeneous N-BK7 blanks with a diameter of up to 1000 mm, CaF2 blanks as large as 300 mm which are useable for IR applications, Fused Silica (LITHOSIL®) with dimensions up to 700 mm which are used for visible applications, and other optical glasses like FK5, LLF1 and F2 in large formats. In this presentation the latest inspection results of large optical materials will be presented, showing the advances in production and measurement technology.

  9. Programmable generation of ultrafast optical waveforms: Recent advances in theory and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wefers, M.M.; Nelson, K.A.

    1995-11-01

    Recent advances in the shaping of ultrafast optical waveforms using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulators (SLM) are presented. Two LC SLMs are used in a novel arrangement to produce programmable waveforms with specified time-dependent amplitude and temporal phase profiles with the greatest fidelity and complexity to date. The apparatus is also used to demonstrate the generation of an ultrafast waveform with a programmable time-dependent polarization profile. A general theoretical result that describes the space-time electric field profile of waveforms shaped by the spectral filtering of spatially separated frequency components is also presented. The main result is that diffraction gives rise to a translational spatial shift in the electric field profile that varies linearly with time along the shaped waveform.

  10. Tailoring the Optical Properties of Silicon with Ion Beam Created Nanostructures for Advanced Photonics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Perveen

    In today's fast life, energy consumption has increased more than ever and with that the demand for a renewable and cleaner energy source as a substitute for the fossil fuels has also increased. Solar radiations are the ultimate source of energy but harvesting this energy in a cost effective way is a challenging task. Si is the dominating material for microelectronics and photovoltaics. But owing to its indirect band gap, Si is an inefficient light absorber, thus requiring a thickness of solar cells beyond tens of microns which increases the cost of solar energy. Therefore, techniques to increase light absorption in thin film Si solar cells are of great importance and have been the focus of research for a few decades now. Another big issue of technology in this fast-paced world is the computing rate or data transfer rate between components of a chip in ultra-fast processors. Existing electronic interconnects suffering from the signal delays and heat generation issues are unable to handle high data rates. A possible solution to this problem is in replacing the electronic interconnects with optical interconnects which have large data carrying capacity. However, optical components are limited in size by the fundamental laws of diffraction to about half a wavelength of light and cannot be combined with nanoscale electronic components. Tremendous research efforts have been directed in search of an advanced technology which can bridge the size gap between electronic and photonic worlds. An emerging technology of "plasmonics'' which exploits the extraordinary optical properties of metal nanostructures to tailor the light at nanoscale has been considered a potential solution to both of the above-mentioned problems. Research conducted for this dissertation has an overall goal to investigate the optical properties of silicon with metal nanostructures for photovoltaics and advanced silicon photonics applications. The first part of the research focuses on achieving enhanced

  11. Cleaning Process Versus Laser-Damage Threshold of Coated Optical Components

    SciTech Connect

    Rigatti, A.L.

    2005-03-31

    The cleaning of optical surfaces is important in the manufacture of high-laser-damage-threshold coatings, which are a key component on peak-power laser systems such as OMEGA located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). Since cleaning adds time, labor, and ultimately cost to the final coated component, this experiment was designed to determine the impact of different cleaning protocols on the measured laser-damage performance.

  12. Smart image sensors: an emerging key technology for advanced optical measurement and microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Peter

    1996-08-01

    Optical microsystems typically include photosensitive devices, analog preprocessing circuitry and digital signal processing electronics. The advances in semiconductor technology have made it possible today to integrate all photosensitive and electronical devices on one 'smart image sensor' or photo-ASIC (application-specific integrated circuits containing photosensitive elements). It is even possible to provide each 'smart pixel' with additional photoelectronic functionality, without compromising the fill factor substantially. This technological capability is the basis for advanced cameras and optical microsystems showing novel on-chip functionality: Single-chip cameras with on- chip analog-to-digital converters for less than $10 are advertised; image sensors have been developed including novel functionality such as real-time selectable pixel size and shape, the capability of performing arbitrary convolutions simultaneously with the exposure, as well as variable, programmable offset and sensitivity of the pixels leading to image sensors with a dynamic range exceeding 150 dB. Smart image sensors have been demonstrated offering synchronous detection and demodulation capabilities in each pixel (lock-in CCD), and conventional image sensors are combined with an on-chip digital processor for complete, single-chip image acquisition and processing systems. Technological problems of the monolithic integration of smart image sensors include offset non-uniformities, temperature variations of electronic properties, imperfect matching of circuit parameters, etc. These problems can often be overcome either by designing additional compensation circuitry or by providing digital correction routines. Where necessary for technological or economic reasons, smart image sensors can also be combined with or realized as hybrids, making use of commercially available electronic components. It is concluded that the possibilities offered by custom smart image sensors will influence the design

  13. Deep proton writing: a powerful rapid prototyping technology for various micro-optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Erps, Jürgen; Vervaeke, Michael; Debaes, Christof; Ottevaere, Heidi; Van Overmeire, Sara; Hermanne, Alex; Thienpont, Hugo

    2010-05-01

    One of the important challenges for the deployment of the emerging breed of nanotechnology components is interfacing them with the external world, preferably accomplished with low-cost micro-optical devices. For the fabrication of this kind of micro-optical modules, we make use of deep proton writing (DPW) as a generic rapid prototyping technology. DPW consists of bombarding polymer samples with swift protons, which results after chemical processing steps in high quality micro-optical components. The strength of the DPW micro-machining technology is the ability to fabricate monolithic building blocks that include micro-optical and mechanical functionalities which can be precisely integrated into more complex photonic systems. In this paper we give an overview of the process steps of the technology and we present several examples of micro-optical and micro-mechanical components, fabricated through DPW, targeting applications in optical interconnections and in bio-photonics. These include: high-precision 2-D fiber connectors, out-of-plane coupling structures featuring high-quality 45° and curved micro-mirrors, arrays of high aspect ratio micro-pillars, and fluorescence and absorption detection bio-photonics modules. While DPW is clearly not a mass fabrication technique as such, one of its assets is that once the master component has been prototyped, a metal mould can be generated from the DPW master by applying electroplating. After removal of the plastic master, this metal mould can be used as a shim in a final microinjection moulding or hot embossing step. This way, the master component can be mass-produced at low cost in a wide variety of high-tech plastics.

  14. AGT 101: Ceramic component development: Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Topical report, October 1979-July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Eyck, M.O.; MacBeth, J.W.; Sweeting, T.B.

    1987-11-01

    This topical report summarizes the ceramic component technology development activity conducted by Standard Oil Engineered Materials Company. Standard Oil, acting as a principal subcontractor and supplier of ceramic components, directed its efforts toward the development of ceramic materials in the silicon-carbide family. Various shape forming and fabrication methods, and non-destructive evaluation techniques were explored to produce the static structural components for the ceramic engine. This enabled engine testing to proceed without program slippage, and developed the approaches for producing low-cost, production quantity processes. Standard Oil contributed to the acceptance of ceramics as a viable approach for automotive gas turbine engines and to the advancement of this vital ceramic technology. 174 figs., 33 tabs.

  15. ESTIMATION OF INHERENT OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND THE WATER QUALITY COMPONENTS IN THE NEUSE RIVER-PAMLICO SOUND ESTUARINE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field observations carried out in the Neuse River-Pamlico Sound Estuarine System (NRE-PS), North Carolina, USA were used to develop optical algorithms for assessing inherent optical properties, IOPs (absorption and backscattering) associated with water quality components (WQC).

  16. Demasking the integrated value of discharge - Advanced sensitivity analysis on the components of hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guse, Björn; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Gafurov, Abror; Fohrer, Nicola; Gupta, Hoshin

    2016-04-01

    The hydrologic response variable most often used in sensitivity analysis is discharge which provides an integrated value of all catchment processes. The typical sensitivity analysis evaluates how changes in the model parameters affect the model output. However, due to discharge being the aggregated effect of all hydrological processes, the sensitivity signal of a certain model parameter can be strongly masked. A more advanced form of sensitivity analysis would be achieved if we could investigate how the sensitivity of a certain modelled process variable relates to the changes in a parameter. Based on this, the controlling parameters for different hydrological components could be detected. Towards this end, we apply the approach of temporal dynamics of parameter sensitivity (TEDPAS) to calculate the daily sensitivities for different model outputs with the FAST method. The temporal variations in parameter dominance are then analysed for both the modelled hydrological components themselves, and also for the rates of change (derivatives) in the modelled hydrological components. The daily parameter sensitivities are then compared with the modelled hydrological components using regime curves. Application of this approach shows that when the corresponding modelled process is investigated instead of discharge, we obtain both an increased indication of parameter sensitivity, and also a clear pattern showing how the seasonal patterns of parameter dominance change over time for each hydrological process. By relating these results with the model structure, we can see that the sensitivity of model parameters is influenced by the function of the parameter. While capacity parameters show more sensitivity to the modelled hydrological component, flux parameters tend to have a higher sensitivity to rates of change in the modelled hydrological component. By better disentangling the information hidden in the discharge values, we can use sensitivity analyses to obtain a clearer signal

  17. Fabrication of micro-optical components by high-precision embossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Thomas; Schubert, Andreas; Boehm, Juliana; Gessner, Thomas

    2000-08-01

    Optical components, such as miniature spectrometer gratings working in the infrared range for environmental monitoring or physical analytics, contribute appeciably to the price of Micro Electro Opto Mechanical Systems (MOEMS). These optical components could be a part of a miniature functional package produced with an alternative fabrication technology based on cold forming metals. The cost-efficient fabrication of these components, for example by implementation of forming technology, appears promising. With this technology, high quality embossing of optical structures for high precision requirements in a batch process is possible. In this way the system costs can be reduced. In this paper aluminum forming by cold embossed grating for the fabrication of gratings was investigated. Experiments with different geometries of the embossed grating were carried out. The quality of the embossed structures is primarily determined by the precision and surface quality of the die. Therefore we used a single crystalline silicon tool made by etching as a die. Quality criteria for the review of the formed optical grating were the geometry of surfaces and the surface roughness as well as optical properties of the total structure.

  18. Multiplexing electro-optic architectures for advanced aircraft integrated flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, D. W.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the results of a 10 month program sponsored by NASA. The objective of this program was to evaluate various optical sensor modulation technologies and to design an optimal Electro-Optic Architecture (EOA) for servicing remote clusters of sensors and actuators in advanced aircraft flight control systems. The EOA's supply optical power to remote sensors and actuators, process the modulated optical signals returned from the sensors, and produce conditioned electrical signals acceptable for use by a digital flight control computer or Vehicle Management System (VMS) computer. This study was part of a multi-year initiative under the Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program to design, develop, and test a totally integrated fiber optic flight/propulsion control system for application to advanced aircraft. Unlike earlier FOCSI studies, this program concentrated on the design of the EOA interface rather than the optical transducer technology itself.

  19. Dielectric prisms would improve performance of quasi-optical microwave components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, J. W.

    1967-01-01

    Properties of the Brewster angle and internal reflection in a dielectric prism are proposed as the basis of a new type of element for use in oversize waveguide in quasi-optical microwave components. Waveguide loss is reduced and precision broadband attenuators, phase shifters, and directional couplers can be constructed on the basis of the properties.

  20. 78 FR 77166 - Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products Containing the Same; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International...

  1. Solar cyclic tests of optical fiber components working in ammonia and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidelus, Janusz D.; Stańczyk, Tomasz; Wysokiński, Karol; Lipiński, Stanisław; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Rodriguez Garcia, José; Canadas Martinez, Inmaculada; Nasiłowski, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports on the metal (Cu, Ni, Au)-coated fibers annealed under concentrated solar radiation in ammonia and N2/H2 atmospheres at temperatures up to 580 °C. Tensile strength of the annealed fiber components was studied from the point of view of their possible application as a fiber optic sensors in urea chemical synthesis process control.

  2. A Sensing System for Simultaneous Detection of Urine and its Components Using Plastic Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejaz, Tahseen; Takemae, Tadashi; Egami, Chikara; Tsuboi, Naoyuki

    A sensing system using plastic optical fibers and reagent papers was developed for the detection of urine and abnormal level of its components simultaneously. Among several components of urine the detection of two main components namely, protein and glucose was confirmed experimentally. Three states of the papers namely dry and wet with and without change in color, were taken into consideration. These three states were divided by setting the lower and upper threshold voltages at 2.2 V and 5.5 V, respectively. This system is considered to be simple in construction, easy to operate and cost-efficient.

  3. Testing the large aperture optical components by the sub-aperture stitching interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yong; Wang, Zhao-xuan; Wang, Qing; Ji, Bo

    2008-03-01

    Nowadays many large aperture optical components are widely used in the high-tech area, how to test them become more and more important. Here describes a new method to test the large aperture optical components using the small aperture interferometer, deduce how to get the aperture number and the concrete process of the stitching parameter in a systematic way, finally get the best plan to choose the sub-aperture of the square and circular optical plane. To specify the stability of the method we operate an experiment, the result shows that the stitching accuracy can reach λ/10, it meet the need of the inertia constraint fusion etc, that is good enough to be used in the high-tech area.

  4. Research Studies on Advanced Optical Module/Head Designs for Optical Data Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Preprints are presented from the recent 1992 Optical Data Storage meeting in San Jose. The papers are divided into the following topical areas: Magneto-optical media (Modeling/design and fabrication/characterization/testing); Optical heads (holographic optical elements); and Optical heads (integrated optics). Some representative titles are as follow: Diffraction analysis and evaluation of several focus and track error detection schemes for magneto-optical disk systems; Proposal for massively parallel data storage system; Transfer function characteristics of super resolving systems; Modeling and measurement of a micro-optic beam deflector; Oxidation processes in magneto-optic and related materials; and A modal analysis of lamellar diffraction gratings in conical mountings.

  5. Combined Advanced Finishing and UV-Laser Conditioning for Producing UV-Damage-Resistant Fused Silica Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Penetrante, B; Golini, D; Slomba, A; Miller, P E; Parham, T; Nichols, M; Peterson, J

    2001-11-01

    Laser induced damage initiation on fused silica optics can limit the lifetime of the components when used in high power UV laser environments. Foe example in inertial confinement fusion research applications, the optics can be exposed to temporal laser pulses of about 3-nsec with average fluences of 8 J/cm{sup 2} and peak fluences between 12 and 15 J/cm{sup 2}. During the past year, we have focused on optimizing the damage performance at a wavelength of 355-nm (3{omega}), 3-nsec pulse length, for optics in this category by examining a variety of finishing technologies with a challenge to improve the laser damage initiation density by at least two orders of magnitude. In this paper, we describe recent advances in improving the 3{omega} damage initiation performance of laboratory-scale zirconium oxide and cerium oxide conventionally finished fused silica optics via application of processes incorporating magnetorheological finishing (MRF), wet chemical etching, and UV laser conditioning. Details of the advanced finishing procedures are described and comparisons are made between the procedures based upon large area 3{omega} damage performance, polishing layer contamination, and optical subsurface damage.

  6. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara M.; Steele, John W.; Makinen, Janice; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a recirculating control loop which had no water quality maintenance. Results show that periodic water maintenance can improve performance of the SWME. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage of this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to enhance the robustness of the SWME through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A patented bed design that was developed for a United Technologies Aerospace System military application provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in the SWME recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for the ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  7. Automated packaging platform for low-cost high-performance optical components manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Robert T.

    2004-05-01

    Delivering high performance integrated optical components at low cost is critical to the continuing recovery and growth of the optical communications industry. In today's market, network equipment vendors need to provide their customers with new solutions that reduce operating expenses and enable new revenue generating IP services. They must depend on the availability of highly integrated optical modules exhibiting high performance, small package size, low power consumption, and most importantly, low cost. The cost of typical optical system hardware is dominated by linecards that are in turn cost-dominated by transmitters and receivers or transceivers and transponders. Cost effective packaging of optical components in these small size modules is becoming the biggest challenge to be addressed. For many traditional component suppliers in our industry, the combination of small size, high performance, and low cost appears to be in conflict and not feasible with conventional product design concepts and labor intensive manual assembly and test. With the advent of photonic integration, there are a variety of materials, optics, substrates, active/passive devices, and mechanical/RF piece parts to manage in manufacturing to achieve high performance at low cost. The use of automation has been demonstrated to surpass manual operation in cost (even with very low labor cost) as well as product uniformity and quality. In this paper, we will discuss the value of using an automated packaging platform.for the assembly and test of high performance active components, such as 2.5Gb/s and 10 Gb/s sources and receivers. Low cost, high performance manufacturing can best be achieved by leveraging a flexible packaging platform to address a multitude of laser and detector devices, integration of electronics and handle various package bodies and fiber configurations. This paper describes the operation and results of working robotic assemblers in the manufacture of a Laser Optical Subassembly

  8. Research Studies on Advanced Optical Module/Head Designs for Optical Disk Recording Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James J.; Seery, Bernard D.

    1993-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Optical Data Storage Center of the University of Arizona is presented. Summary reports on continuing projects are presented. Research areas include: magneto-optic media, optical heads, and signal processing.

  9. Diamond optical components for high-power and high-energy laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoikin, Eugene; Muhr, Alexander; Bennett, Andrew; Twitchen, Daniel; de Wit, Henk

    2015-02-01

    High-power and high-energy laser systems have firmly established their industrial presence with applications that span materials processing; high - precision and high - throughput manufacturing; semiconductors, and defense. Along with high average power CO2 lasers operating at wavelengths of ~ 10 microns, solid state lasers and fiber lasers operating at ~ 1 micron wavelength are now increasingly being used, both in the high average power and high energy pulse regimes. In recent years, polycrystalline diamond has become the material of choice when it comes to making optical components for multi-kilowatt CO2 lasers at 10 micron, outperforming ZnSe due to its superior thermo-mechanical characteristics. For 1 micron laser systems, fused silica has to date been the most popular optical material owing to its outstanding optical properties. This paper characterizes high - power / high - energy performance of anti-reflection coated optical windows made of different grades of diamond (single crystal, polycrystalline) and of fused silica. Thermo-optical modeling results are also presented for water cooled mounted optical windows. Laser - induced damage threshold tests are performed and analyzed. It is concluded that diamond is a superior optical material for working with extremely high-power and high-energy laser beams at 1 micron wavelength.

  10. Recent advance in application of acousto-optic tunable filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khansuvarov, Ruslan A.; Shakin, Oleg V.; Vaganov, Mikhail A.; Zhdanov, Arseniy Y.; Prokashev, Vadim N.

    2014-09-01

    This paper aims to inform those interested in the scientific work of a large group of scientists: workers of the Department of Electronics and Optical communications of St. Petersburg State University of Aerospace Instrumentation in collaboration with workers of the Department of Quantum Electronics of St. Petersburg State Technical University in the area of researches and development of acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF). Paper discusses the important features of the AOTF structure and their parameters that affect its work, such as: spectral range of optical radiation, spectral resolution, active aperture of the optical radiation, optical transmission of the working spectral range, optical radiation polarization (linear, circular or arbitrary) , diffraction efficiency, contrast, distortion of the optical radiation's front, frequency range of elastic waves, switching time, maximum electric control power, impedance. Also the AOTF using is considered: AOTF's implications for control of laser radiation, AOTF's application to determine the counterfeit money. The last part of the report focuses on materials that act as antireflection thin films. Spectral characteristics of "clean" and enlightened substrates of ZnSe and Ge are shown. As seen from the examples in the report, antireflection thin films increase transmittance of optical elements.

  11. Advanced Materials and Component Development for Lithium-ion Cells for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2012-01-01

    Human missions to Near Earth Objects, such as asteroids, planets, moons, libration points, and orbiting structures, will require safe, high specific energy, high energy density batteries to provide new or extended capabilities than are possible with today s state-of-the-art aerospace batteries. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing advanced High Energy and Ultra High Energy lithium-ion cells to address these needs. In order to meet the performance goals, advanced, high-performing materials are required to provide improved performance at the component-level that contributes to performance at the integrated cell level. This paper will provide an update on the performance of experimental materials through the completion of two years of development. The progress of materials development, remaining challenges, and an outlook for the future of these materials in near term cell products will be discussed.

  12. Research studies on advanced optical module/head designs for optical devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James J.

    1991-01-01

    A summary is presented of research in optical data storage materials and of research at the center. The first section contains summary reports under the general headings of: (1) Magnetooptic media: modeling, design, fabrication, characterization, and testing; (2) Optical heads: holographic optical elements; and (3) Optical heads: integrated optics. The second section consist of a proposal entitled, Signal Processing Techniques for Optical Data Storage. And section three presents various publications prepared by the center.

  13. Advanced Residuals Analysis for Determining the Number of PARAFAC Components in Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Cuss, Chad W; Guéguen, Céline; Andersson, Per; Porcelli, Don; Maximov, Trofim; Kutscher, Liselott

    2016-02-01

    Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) has facilitated an explosion in research connecting the fluorescence properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to its functions and biogeochemical cycling in natural and engineered systems. However, the validation of robust PARAFAC models using split-half analysis requires an oft unrealistically large number (hundreds to thousands) of excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), and models with too few components may not adequately describe differences between DOM. This study used self-organizing maps (SOM) and comparing changes in residuals with the effects of adding components to estimate the number of PARAFAC components in DOM from two data sets: MS (110 EEMs from nine leaf leachates and headwaters) and LR (64 EEMs from the Lena River). Clustering by SOM demonstrated that peaks clearly persisted in model residuals after validation by split-half analysis. Plotting the changes to residuals was an effective method for visualizing the removal of fluorophore-like fluorescence caused by increasing the number of PARAFAC components. Extracting additional PARAFAC components via residuals analysis increased the proportion of correctly identified size-fractionated leaf leachates from 56.0 ± 0.8 to 75.2 ± 0.9%, and from 51.7 ± 1.4 to 92.9 ± 0.0% for whole leachates. Model overfitting was assessed by considering the correlations between components, and their distributions amongst samples. Advanced residuals analysis improved the ability of PARAFAC to resolve the variation in DOM fluorescence, and presents an enhanced validation approach for assessing the number of components that can be used to supplement the potentially misleading results of split-half analysis. PMID:26783366

  14. Excitations of the quantum phases of a two-component Bose gas in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxat, David L.

    2004-03-01

    We consider the dynamics of a two-component Bose gas in an optical lattice at T=0. As shown recently, the phase diagram has several quantum phase transitions, which arise because of intra-component correlations. We focus on the two-component Mott insulating (2MI) and the xy-ferromagnetic or super-counter-fluid (SCF) phases. Starting from the two-component Bose-Hubbard model, an effective Hamiltonian is used to study the excitations and collective modes of these two quantum phases. The two-particle excitations associated with the intra-component or spin dynamics are markedly different in these two phases, exhibiting a Goldstone mode in the SCF phase. These collective modes are the poles of the intra-component two-particle correlation function or transverse spin susceptibility. We show how this intra-component two-particle correlation function, and thus the two-particle excitation spectrum, may be measured using a two-photon Raman probe that couples the two components. We also show how a Raman probe may be used to study the single-particle excitations when it couples one of the components to another hyperfine state. This could provide a direct measure of the Mott insulating gap.

  15. Boeing Helicopters Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) Program summary of component tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenski, Joseph W., Jr.; Valco, Mark J.

    1992-07-01

    The principal objectives of the ART program are briefly reviewed, and the results of advanced technology component tests are summarized. The tests discussed include noise reduction by active cancellation, hybrid bidirectional tapered roller bearings, improved bearing life theory and friction tests, transmission lube study with hybrid bearings, and precision near-net-shape forged spur gears. Attention is also given to the study of high profile contact ratio noninvolute tooth form spur gears, parallel axis gear noise study, and surface modified titanium accessory spur gears.

  16. ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) ECH (Electron Cyclotron Heating) waveguide component development and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; White, T.L.; Kimrey, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) system presently under construction will consist of two 53.2-GHz, 200-kW continuous-wave (cw) gyrotrons with a mode-controlled waveguide system and polarized launcher optimized for maximum power in the ATF plasma. Several components, such as a waveguide mode-analyzing directional coupler, a TiO/sub 2/ mode absorber, miter bends, and a polarization-selectable beamed launcher, have been developed and tested. Laboratory results and initial high-power operation of the system are presented. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Advanced wavefront correction technology for the next generation of adaptive optics equipped ophthalmic instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doble, Nathan; Helmbrecht, Michael; Hart, Matthew; Juneau, Thor

    2005-04-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is becoming increasingly important in improving system resolution in flood illuminated fundus cameras, confocal laser scanning ophthalmoscopes (cSLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). For the latter two cases, AO also provides an increase in the throughput light levels. The flood and cSLO modalities have allowed for the routine, in-vivo visualization of individual cone photoreceptor cells and real time blood flow measurements of single leukocyte cells. Most recently, evidence of the rod mosaic has also been observed. A key component in all of these systems is the deformable mirror (DM) that provides the correction of the high order aberrations. The majority of these systems to-date have utilized large, expensive DMs originally designed for astronomy. This paper details ongoing work at Iris AO, Inc in which advanced fabrication techniques based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are being leveraged. This approach yields extremely compact DMs that offer higher performance and lower cost, coupled with the ability for batch fabrication. The Iris AO design uses an array of individually addressable hexagonal segments than can each be moved in three orthogonal directions. Such a design allows for superior ocular wavefront fitting performance and very high stroke (>10 microns). Additionally, our DMs can be fabricated with diameters that are an order of magnitude smaller than conventional non-MEMS techniques.

  18. Advances in Transient Modeling of Loop Heat Pipe Systems with Multiple Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrustalev, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    Modeling of transient thermal-fluid phenomena, temperature control, and gravity effects for conventional and upgraded loop heat pipe (LHP) systems with complex radiators, multiple components, and varying environmental conditions, can be effectively accomplished using Thermal Desktop™. This paper outlines some recent advances in transient modeling of LHP systems with multiple components, such as a) one LHP with two parallel condensers on two orthogonal radiators with varying environmental heating loads, b) two LHPs sharing one radiator under heat loading and sink conditions changing in time, and c) a hybrid LHP with two main and one secondary evaporators undergoing transients due to the heat loads variation. Cleared for open publication, Oct. 29, 2009, OSR, DOD, 10-S-0170.

  19. Recent advances on multi-component hybrid nanostructures for electrochemical capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Pan; Zhu, Junwu; Wang, Xin

    2015-10-01

    With the continuously growing energy demand and ever-escalating environmental problems, the great energy transition from conventional fossil fuels to renewable sources of energy is under way, and requires more efficient and reliable electrochemical energy storage devices, such as electrochemical capacitors (also called as supercapacitors). In order to achieve high energy and power densities of supercapacitors, numerous efforts are devoted to the development of advanced multi-component hybrid electrode materials for realizing high-performance. This review summarizes the most recent progress in the development of nanostructured electrode materials for energy storage, with a particular focus on these nanostructures that integrate carbon materials, metal oxides/hydroxides and conducting polymers for enhancing energy storage performances via taking advantage of each component's unique functionality and their synergetic effects. Finally, we give some perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this intriguing field.

  20. Advances in optical CT scanning for gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K.

    2004-01-01

    Optical computed tomography (CT) is physically similar to x-ray CT but is more versatile since many powerful light sources exist and optical elements such as mirrors, lenses, polarizers and efficient detectors are available. There are many potential forms of optical CT. Attenuation, fluorescence or scatter, polarization and refractive index spatial changes are all examples of optical CT. To date, optical CT for gel dosimetry has been limited to attenuation measurements that are the sum of scatter and absorption along defined lines. Polymerization gels turn white with absorbed dose and attenuation is due to scatter. Radiochromic gels also form a dose image due to changes in visible absorption. This short review concentrates on the papers published since the DOSGEL 2001 meeting and highlights experimental results and issues that are important for obtaining good quality input data for reconstruction. The format involves selected highlights from the papers and associated points from our experience with optical CT experimentation. The comments are intended to assist researchers unfamiliar with optical measurements to obtain high quality transmission data, a necessary step in quantitative gel dosimetry.

  1. Testing of optical components to assure performance in a high acerage power environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Taylor, J.R.; Eickelberg, W.K.; Primdahl, K.A.

    1997-06-24

    Evaluation and testing of the optical components used in the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) plant is critical for qualification of suppliers, development of new optical multilayer designs and monufacturing processes, and assurance of performance in the production cycle. The range of specifications requires development of specialized test equipment and methods which are not routine or readily available in industry. Specifications are given on material characteristics such as index homogeneity, subsurface damage left after polishing, microscopic surface defects and contamination, coating absorption, and high average power laser damage. The approach to testing these performance characteristics and assuring the quality throughout the production cycle is described.

  2. Advanced BWR core component designs and the implications for SFD analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1997-02-01

    Prior to the DF-4 boiling water reactor (BWR) severe fuel damage (SFD) experiment conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories in 1986, no experimental data base existed for guidance in modeling core component behavior under postulated severe accident conditions in commercial BWRs. This paper will present the lessons learned from the DF-4 experiment (and subsequent German CORA BWR SFD tests) and the impact on core models in the current generation of SFD codes. The DF-4 and CORA BWR test assemblies were modeled on the core component designs circa 1985; that is, the 8 x 8 fuel assembly with two water rods and a cruciform control blade constructed of B{sub 4}C-filled tubelets. Within the past ten years, the state-of-the-art with respect to BWR core component development has out-distanced the current SFD experimental data base and SFD code capabilities. For example, modern BWR control blade design includes hafnium at the tips and top of each control blade wing for longer blade operating lifetimes; also water rods have been replaced by larger water channels for better neutronics economy; and fuel assemblies now contain partial-length fuel rods, again for better neutronics economy. This paper will also discuss the implications of these advanced fuel assembly and core component designs on severe accident progression and on the current SFD code capabilities.

  3. Advances in fiber optic sensors for in-vivo monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, Francesco; Mignani, Anna G.

    1995-09-01

    Biomedical fiber-optic sensors are attractive for the measurement of both physical and chemical parameters as well as for spectral measurements directly performed on the patient. An overview of fiber-optic sensors for in vivo monitoring is given, with particular attention to the advantages that these sensors are able to offer in different fields of application such as cardiovascular and intensive care, angiology, gastroenterology, ophthalmology, oncology, neurology, dermatology, and dentistry.

  4. Advances and problems in plasma-optical mass-separation

    SciTech Connect

    Bardakov, V. M.; Ivanov, S. D.; Strokin, N. A.

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents a short review of plasma-optical mass-separation and defines the fields for its possible application. During theoretical studies, numerical simulations, and experiments, the effect of the azimuthator finite size and of the vacuum conditions on the mass separator characteristics was revealed, as well as the quality of different-mass ion separation. The problems, solving which may lead to a successful end of the mass-separation plasma-optical technique implementation, were specified.

  5. Recent advances in reaction bonded silicon carbide optics and optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, Joseph; Schwartz, Jay; Landry, David; Glenn, William; Rider, Brian; Chung, Michael

    2005-08-01

    SSG Precision Optronics, Inc. (SSG) has recently developed a number of Reaction Bonded (RB) Silicon Carbide (SiC) optical systems for space-based remote sensing and astronomical observing applications. RB SiC's superior material properties make it uniquely well suited to meet the image quality and long term dimensional stability requirements associated with these applications. An overview of the RB SiC manufacturing process is presented, along with a summary description of recently delivered RB SiC flight hardware. This hardware includes an RB SiC telescope and Pointing Mirror Assembly (PMA) for the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) mission and an imaging telescope for the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) mission. SSG continues to advance the state-of-the-technology with SiC materials and systems. A summary of development activities related to a low-cost, fracture tough, fiber reinforced RB SiC material formulation, novel tooling to produce monolithic, partially closed back mirror geometries, and extension of the technology to large aspheric mirrors is also provided.

  6. Optical Metrology for the Filter Set for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Content, David A.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Krebs, Carolyn A.; Miner, Linda A.; Norton, Todd A.; Mehalick, Kimberly; Petrone, Peter; Bush, Frank D.; Puc, Bernard; Standley, Clive; Tsvetanov, Zlatan; Kral, Catherine

    1998-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) will employ a wide variety of spectral filtration components including narrow band, medium band, wide band, and far ultraviolet (FUV) long pass filters, spatially- variable filters (ramp filters), VIS/IR polarizers, NUV polarizers, FUV prisms, and a grism. These components are spread across ACS's Wide Field, High Resolution, and Solar Blind channels which provide diffraction-limited imaging of astronomical targets using aberration-correcting optics which remove most aberrations from HST's Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA). In order for ACS to be truly advanced, these filters must push the state-of-the-art in performance in a number of key areas at the same time. Important requirements which these filters must meet include outstanding transmitted wavefront, high transmittance, uniform transmittance across each filter, spectrally structure-free bandpasses, exceptionally high out of band rejection, and a high degree of parfocality. These constitute a very stringent set of requirements indeed, especially for filters which are up to 90 mm in diameter. The development of optical metrology stations used to demonstrate that each ACS filter will meet its design specifications is discussed. Of particular note are specially-designed spectral transmissometers and interferometers.

  7. Optical Multiple Access Network (OMAN) for advanced processing satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendez, Antonio J.; Gagliardi, Robert M.; Park, Eugene; Ivancic, William D.; Sherman, Bradley D.

    1991-01-01

    An OMAN breadboard for exploring advanced processing satellite circuit switch applications is introduced. Network architecture, hardware trade offs, and multiple user interference issues are presented. The breadboard test set up and experimental results are discussed.

  8. Progress in Materials and Component Development for Advanced Lithium-ion Cells for NASA's Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha, M.; Reid, Concha M.

    2011-01-01

    Vehicles and stand-alone power systems that enable the next generation of human missions to the Moon will require energy storage systems that are safer, lighter, and more compact than current state-of-the- art (SOA) aerospace quality lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries. NASA is developing advanced Li-ion cells to enable or enhance the power systems for the Altair Lunar Lander, Extravehicular Activities spacesuit, and rovers and portable utility pallets for Lunar Surface Systems. Advanced, high-performing materials are required to provide component-level performance that can offer the required gains at the integrated cell level. Although there is still a significant amount of work yet to be done, the present state of development activities has resulted in the synthesis of promising materials that approach the ultimate performance goals. This report on interim progress of the development efforts will elaborate on the challenges of the development activities, proposed strategies to overcome technical issues, and present performance of materials and cell components.

  9. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra-efficient and low-emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttria based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  10. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra efficient and low emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttna based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  11. Advanced Materials and Component Development for Lithium-Ion Cells for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2012-01-01

    Human missions to Near Earth Objects, such as asteroids, planets, moons, liberation points, and orbiting structures, will require safe, high specific energy, high energy density batteries to provide new or extended capabilities than are possible with today s state-of-the-art aerospace batteries. The Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration Program, High Efficiency Space Power Systems Project battery development effort at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is continuing advanced lithium-ion cell development efforts begun under the Exploration Technology Development Program Energy Storage Project. Advanced, high-performing materials are required to provide improved performance at the component-level that contributes to performance at the integrated cell level in order to meet the performance goals for NASA s High Energy and Ultra High Energy cells. NASA s overall approach to advanced cell development and interim progress on materials performance for the High Energy and Ultra High Energy cells after approximately 1 year of development has been summarized in a previous paper. This paper will provide an update on these materials through the completion of 2 years of development. The progress of materials development, remaining challenges, and an outlook for the future of these materials in near term cell products will be discussed.

  12. The whispering gallery as an optical component in the X-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    The whispering gallery phenomenon in acoustics has been known and studied for more than a century, and the same effect has been observed to take place with waves other than sound waves. In this paper we review the theoretical basis and attractive features of the whispering gallery as a soft x-ray optical component and indicate some of its potential applications. We then describe what may be its most unique capability which, in favorable cases, is to provide a way. to manipulate the phase difference between the s and p polarization components and thus to generate circularly or elliptically polarized soft x-rays.

  13. Technical Readiness and Gaps Analysis of Commercial Optical Materials and Measurement Systems for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Qiao, Hong; Andersen, Eric S.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bliss, Mary; Cannon, Bret D.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Mendoza, Albert; Sheen, David M.

    2013-08-06

    This report intends to support Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap and industry stakeholders by evaluating optical-based instrumentation and control (I&C) concepts for advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) applications. These advanced designs will require innovative thinking in terms of engineering approaches, materials integration, and I&C concepts to realize their eventual viability and deployability. The primary goals of this report include: 1. Establish preliminary I&C needs, performance requirements, and possible gaps for AdvSMR designs based on best available published design data. 2. Document commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) optical sensors, components, and materials in terms of their technical readiness to support essential AdvSMR in-vessel I&C systems. 3. Identify technology gaps by comparing the in-vessel monitoring requirements and environmental constraints to COTS optical sensor and materials performance specifications. 4. Outline a future research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program plan that addresses these gaps and develops optical-based I&C systems that enhance the viability of future AdvSMR designs. The development of clean, affordable, safe, and proliferation-resistant nuclear power is a key goal that is documented in the Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. This roadmap outlines RD&D activities intended to overcome technical, economic, and other barriers, which currently limit advances in nuclear energy. These activities will ensure that nuclear energy remains a viable component to this nation’s energy security.

  14. Characterization of the optical components fabricated by femtosecond pulses in transparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazule, Lina; Liukaityte, Simona; Sabonis, Vytautas; Gertus, Titas; Mikutis, Mindaugas; Paipulas, Domas; Puodziunas, Tomas; Sirutkaitis, Valdas

    2013-09-01

    We report optical characterization of the different optical components fabricated in transparent materials by bulk refractive index modification or surface ablation by femtosecond pulses. The methods used for characterization of the components with refractive index modification fabricated in fused silica by high repetition rate femtosecond KGW:Yb laser were transmission and diffraction measurements at 532 and 632.8 nm wavelengths, and total integrated scattering (TIS) at 532 mn wavelength. The combined characterization methods were sufficient for modification process optimization and allowed creation of the Bragg gratings with diffraction efficiency in range from 55 to 90% and low scattering losses. The forward and backward TIS measurements of the radial polarization converter showed that forward scattering is more than five times as high as backward scattering. Solar cells with modified surface by femtosecond pulse ablation were investigated by TIS and Volt-Ampere measurements. The current increase is registered with growth of the scattering loses in the solar cells.

  15. Three dimensional measurement of micro-optical components using digital holography and pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do-Hyung; Jeon, Sungbin; Cho, Janghyun; Lim, Geon; Park, No-Cheol; Park, Young-Pil

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a method for inspecting transparent micro-optical components that combines digital holography and pattern recognition. As many micro-optical components have array structures with numerous elements, the uniformity of each element is important. Consequently, an effective inspection requires simultaneous measurement of these elements. Pattern recognition is used to solve this issue and can be adopted effectively using the unique characteristics of digital holography to obtain both amplitude and phase information on the object. To verify this approach, an experimental demonstration was performed with a micro-lens array using a circle-detection algorithm based on the Hough Transform. As an experimental results 30 micro-lenses are detected and measured simultaneously by using proposed inspection method.

  16. Sub-picosecond laser induced damage test facility for petawatt reflective optical components characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozet, Martin; Néauport, Jérôme; Lavastre, Eric; Roquin, Nadja; Gallais, Laurent; Lamaignère, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    While considering long pulse or short pulse high power laser facilities, optical components performances and in particular laser damage resistance are always factors limiting the overall system performances. Consequently, getting a detailed knowledge of the behavior of these optical components under irradiations with large beam in short pulse range is of major importance. In this context, a Laser Induced Damage Threshold test facility called DERIC has been developed at the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Bordeaux. It uses an Amplitude Systemes laser source which delivers Gaussian pulses of 500 fs at 1053 nm. 1-on-1, S-on-1 and RasterScan test procedures are implemented to study the behavior of monolayer and multilayer dielectric coatings.

  17. A database of wavefront measurements for laser system modeling, optical component development and fabrication process qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Lawson, J.K.; Aikens, D.M.; English, R.E.

    1995-04-12

    In the second half of the 1990`s, LLNL and others anticipate designing and beginning construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF will be capable of producing the worlds first laboratory scale fusion ignition and bum reaction by imploding a small target. The NIF will utilize approximately 192 simultaneous laser beams for this purpose. The laser will be capable of producing a shaped energy pulse of at least 1.8 million joules (MJ) with peak power of at least 500 trillion watts (TV). In total, the facility will require more than 7,000 large optical components. The performance of a high power laser of this kind can be seriously degraded by the presence of low amplitude, periodic modulations in the surface and transmitted wavefronts of the optics used. At high peak power, these phase modulations can convert into large intensity modulations by non-linear optical processes. This in turn can lead to loss in energy on target via many well known mechanisms. In some cases laser damage to the optics downstream of the source of the phase modulation can occur. The database described here contains wavefront phase maps of early prototype optical components for the NIF. It has only recently become possible to map the wavefront of these large aperture components with high spatial resolution. Modem large aperture static fringe and phase shifting interferometers equipped with large area solid state detectors have made this possible. In a series of measurements with these instruments, wide spatial bandwidth can be detected in the wavefront.

  18. Achromatic flat optical components via compensation between structure and material dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhao, Zeyu; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Chromatism causes great quality degradation of the imaging system, especially for diffraction imaging. The most commonly method to overcome chromatism is refractive/diffractive hybrid optical system which, however, sacrifices the light weight and integration property of diffraction elements. A method through compensation between the structure dispersion and material dispersion is proposed to overcome the chromatism in flat integrated optical components. This method is demonstrated by making use of silver nano-slits waveguides to supply structure dispersion of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide to compensate the material dispersion of metal. A broadband deflector and lens are designed to prove the achromatic property of this method. The method demonstrated here may serve as a solution of broadband light manipulation in flat integrated optical systems.

  19. Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of mineral dust components measured by a multi wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. These values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. These results are expected to have considerable importance in global radiative forcing calculations. They can also serve as reference for validating calculated wavelength dependent imaginary parts (κ) of complex refractive indices which up to now have been typically deduced from bulk phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk phase measurements.

  20. High-stability optical components for semiconductor laser intersatellite link experiment (SILEX) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepretre, Francois

    1994-09-01

    Within the framework of a MATRA MARCONI SPACE FRANC contract for the European Space Agency, MATRA DEFENSE - DOD/UAO have developed, produced and tested 9 laser diode collimators, 52 optical components (anamorphoser, mirrors, dichroic splitters, redundancy module) and 9 interferential filters. All these space equipments must be integrated into the optical head of the SILEX (Semi-conductor Laser Intersatellite Link Experiment) bench. The SILEX experiment consists in transferring data from a low altitude satellite (SPOT 4) to a satellite in geostationary orbit (ARTEMIS) via beam generated by a laser diode (60 mW Cw). Very low emitted flux and long distance between the two satellites gives rise to the following technical difficulties: high angular (1 (mu) rad) and transverse stability requirements, requirement for high transmission and high rejection narrow band filters, in order to differentiate the transmit and receive channels, necessity of a very good optical wavefront, wavelength range 815-825 nm, 843-853 nm.

  1. Analysis of Photosynthetic Rate and Bio-Optical Components from Ocean Color Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Dale A.; Stramski, Dariusz

    1997-01-01

    Our research over the last 5 years indicates that the successful transformation of ocean color imagery into maps of bio-optical properties will require continued development and testing of algorithms. In particular improvements in the accuracy of predicting from ocean color imagery the concentration of the bio-optical components of sea as well as the rate of photosynthesis will require progress in at least three areas: (1) we must improve mathematical models of the growth and physiological acclimation of phytoplankton; (2) we must better understand the sources of variability in the absorption and backscattering properties of phytoplankton and associated microparticles; and (3) we must better understand how the radiance distribution just below the sea surface varies as a function sun and sky conditions and inherent optical properties.

  2. Relations between ac-dc components and optical path length in photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chungkeun; Sik Shin, Hang; Lee, Myoungho

    2011-07-01

    Photoplethysmography is used in various areas such as vital sign measurement, vascular characteristics analysis, and autonomic nervous system assessment. Photoplethysmographic signals are composed of ac and dc, but it is difficult to find research about the interaction of photoplethysmographic components. This study suggested a model equation combining two Lambert-Beer equations at the onset and peak points of photoplethysmography to evaluate ac characteristics, and verified the model equation through simulation and experiment. In the suggested equation, ac was dependent on dc and optical path length. In the simulation, dc was inversely proportionate to ac sensitivity (slope), and ac and optical path length were proportionate. When dc increased from 10% to 90%, stabilized ac decreased from 1 to 0.89 +/- 0.21, and when optical path length increased from 10% to 90%, stabilized ac increased from 1 to 1.53 +/- 0.40.

  3. Achromatic flat optical components via compensation between structure and material dispersions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhao, Zeyu; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Chromatism causes great quality degradation of the imaging system, especially for diffraction imaging. The most commonly method to overcome chromatism is refractive/diffractive hybrid optical system which, however, sacrifices the light weight and integration property of diffraction elements. A method through compensation between the structure dispersion and material dispersion is proposed to overcome the chromatism in flat integrated optical components. This method is demonstrated by making use of silver nano-slits waveguides to supply structure dispersion of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide to compensate the material dispersion of metal. A broadband deflector and lens are designed to prove the achromatic property of this method. The method demonstrated here may serve as a solution of broadband light manipulation in flat integrated optical systems. PMID:26794855

  4. Achromatic flat optical components via compensation between structure and material dispersions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhao, Zeyu; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Chromatism causes great quality degradation of the imaging system, especially for diffraction imaging. The most commonly method to overcome chromatism is refractive/diffractive hybrid optical system which, however, sacrifices the light weight and integration property of diffraction elements. A method through compensation between the structure dispersion and material dispersion is proposed to overcome the chromatism in flat integrated optical components. This method is demonstrated by making use of silver nano-slits waveguides to supply structure dispersion of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide to compensate the material dispersion of metal. A broadband deflector and lens are designed to prove the achromatic property of this method. The method demonstrated here may serve as a solution of broadband light manipulation in flat integrated optical systems. PMID:26794855

  5. Optical and electrical properties of composites based on functional components of an electroluminescent layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanesyan, V. T.; Rakina, A. V.; Sychov, M. M.; Vasina, E. S.

    2016-07-01

    Optical and electrical properties of cyanoethyl ether of polyvinyl alcohol with filling of barium titanate BaTiO3 modified by shungite carbon nanoparticles are studied. It is found that the modification affects the diffuse reflectance spectra and dispersion characteristics of the impedance components due to a change in the nature of interfacial interactions in the system. The values of the forbidden band width for various modifier and filler concentrations are determined.

  6. Beyond the Alphabet Soup: Molecular Properties of Aerosol Components Influence Optics. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Components within atmospheric aerosols exhibit almost every imaginable model of chemical bonding and physical diversity. The materials run the spectrum from crystalline to amorphous, covalent to ionic, and have varying viscosities, phase, and hygroscopicity. This seminar will focus on the molecular properties of materials that influence the optical behavior of aerosols. Special focus will be placed on the polarizability of materials, hygroscopic growth, and particle phase.

  7. A survey of advanced excimer optical imaging and lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Suwa, Kyoichi

    1998-11-01

    The first item discussed in this paper is to estimate the future trend regarding minimum geometry and the optical parameters, such as NA and wavelength. Simulations based on aerial images are performed for the estimation. The resolution limit is defined as a minimum feature size which retains practical depth of focus (DOF). Pattern geometry is classified into two categories, which are dense lines and isolated lines. Available wavelengths are assumed to be KrF excimer laser (λ=248 nm), ArF excimer laser (λ=193 nm) and F2 excimer laser (λ=157 nm). Based upon the simulation results, the resolution limit is estimated for each geometry and each wavelength. The second item is to survey ArF optics. At present, the ArF excimer laser is regarded as one of the most promising candidates as a next-generation light source. Discussions are ranging over some critical issues. The lifetime of ArF optics supposedly limited by the radiation compaction of silica glass is estimated in comparison with KrF optics. Availability of calcium fluoride (CaF2) is also discussed. As a designing issue, a comparative study is made about the optical configuration, dioptric or catadioptric. In the end, our resist-based performance is shown.

  8. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara M.; Steele, John W.; Makinen, Janice; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  9. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintentance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessonslearned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  10. Last Advances in Silicon-Based Optical Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fernández Gavela, Adrián; Grajales García, Daniel; Ramirez, Jhonattan C; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-01-01

    We review the most important achievements published in the last five years in the field of silicon-based optical biosensors. We focus specially on label-free optical biosensors and their implementation into lab-on-a-chip platforms, with an emphasis on developments demonstrating the capability of the devices for real bioanalytical applications. We report on novel transducers and materials, improvements of existing transducers, new and improved biofunctionalization procedures as well as the prospects for near future commercialization of these technologies. PMID:26927105

  11. Last Advances in Silicon-Based Optical Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Gavela, Adrián; Grajales García, Daniel; Ramirez, Jhonattan C.; Lechuga, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    We review the most important achievements published in the last five years in the field of silicon-based optical biosensors. We focus specially on label-free optical biosensors and their implementation into lab-on-a-chip platforms, with an emphasis on developments demonstrating the capability of the devices for real bioanalytical applications. We report on novel transducers and materials, improvements of existing transducers, new and improved biofunctionalization procedures as well as the prospects for near future commercialization of these technologies. PMID:26927105

  12. Sub-wavelength grating components for integrated optics applications on SOI chips.

    PubMed

    Donzella, Valentina; Sherwali, Ahmed; Flueckiger, Jonas; Talebi Fard, Sahba; Grist, Samantha M; Chrostowski, Lukas

    2014-08-25

    In this paper we demonstrate silicon on insulator (SOI) sub-wavelength grating (SWG) optical components for integrated optics and sensing. Light propagation in SWG devices is studied and realized with no cladding on top of the waveguide. In particular, we focused on SWG bends, tapers and directional couplers, all realized with compatible geometries in order to be used as building blocks for more complex integrated optics devices (interferometers, switches, resonators, etc.). Fabricated SWG tapers for TE and TM polarizations are described; they allow for connecting SWG devices to regular strip waveguides with loss lower than 1 dB per taper. Our SWG directional coupler presents a very compact design and a negligible wavelength dependence of its crossover length (and as a consequence of its coupling coefficient, κ), over a 40 nm bandwidth. This wavelength flatten response represents a bandwidth enhancement with respect to standard directional couplers (made using strip or rib waveguides), in particular for the TE mode. SWG bends are demonstrated, their loss dependence on radius is analyzed, and fabricated bends have a loss in the range 0.8-1.6 dB per 90 degrees bend. Simulated and measured results show promise for large-scale fabrication of complex optical devices and high sensitivity sensors based on SWG waveguides with engineered optical properties, tailored to specific applications. PMID:25321304

  13. Advances in white-light optical signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, F. T. S.

    1984-01-01

    A technique that permits signal processing operations which can be carried out by white light source is described. The method performs signal processing that obeys the concept of coherent light rather than incoherent optics. Since the white light source contains all the color wavelengths of the visible light, the technique is very suitable for color signal processing.

  14. Advanced Geometric Optics on a Programmable Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussbaum, Allen

    1979-01-01

    Presents a ray-tracing procedure based on some ideas of Herzberger and the matrix approach to geometrical optics. This method, which can be implemented on a programmable pocket calculator, applies to any conic surface, including paraboloids, spheres, and planes. (Author/GA)

  15. Advanced optical modelling of dynamically deposited silicon nitride layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borojevic, N.; Hameiri, Z.; Winderbaum, S.

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic deposition of silicon nitrides using in-line plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition systems results in non-uniform structure of the dielectric layer. Appropriate analysis of such layers requires the optical characterization to be performed as a function of the layer's depth. This work presents a method to characterize dynamically deposited silicon nitride layers. The method is based on the fitting of experimental spectroscopic ellipsometry data via grading of Tauc-Lorentz optical parameters through the depth of the layer. When compared with the standard Tauc-Lorentz fitting procedure, used in previous studies, the improved method is demonstrating better quality fits to the experimental data and revealing more accurate optical properties of the dielectric layers. The most significant advantage of the method is the ability to extract the depth profile of the optical properties along the direction of the layer normal. This is enabling a better understanding of layers deposited using dynamic plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition systems frequently used in the photovoltaic industry.

  16. Biochemical component identification by light scattering techniques in whispering gallery mode optical resonance based sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Saetchnikov, Anton V.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Experimental data on detection and identification of variety of biochemical agents, such as proteins (albumin, interferon, C reactive protein), microelements (Na+, Ca+), antibiotic of different generations, in both single and multi component solutions under varied in wide range concentration are represented. Analysis has been performed on the light scattering parameters of whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonance based sensor with dielectric microspheres from glass and PMMA as sensitive elements fixed by spin - coating techniques in adhesive layer on the surface of substrate or directly on the coupling element. Sensitive layer was integrated into developed fluidic cell with a digital syringe. Light from tuneable laser strict focusing on and scattered by the single microsphere was detected by a CMOS camera. The image was filtered for noise reduction and integrated on two coordinates for evaluation of integrated energy of a measured signal. As the entrance data following signal parameters were used: relative (to a free spectral range) spectral shift of frequency of WGM optical resonance in microsphere and relative efficiency of WGM excitation obtained within a free spectral range which depended on both type and concentration of investigated agents. Multiplexing on parameters and components has been realized using spatial and spectral parameters of scattered by microsphere light with developed data processing. Biochemical component classification and identification of agents under investigation has been performed by network analysis techniques based on probabilistic network and multilayer perceptron. Developed approach is demonstrated to be applicable both for single agent and for multi component biochemical analysis.

  17. Optical coupling of bare optoelectronic components and flexographically printed polymer waveguides in planar optronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yixiao; Wolfer, Tim; Lange, Alex; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2016-05-01

    Large scale, planar optronic systems allowing spatially distributed functionalities can be well used in diverse sensor networks, such as for monitoring the environment by measuring various physical quantities in medicine or aeronautics. In these systems, mechanically flexible and optically transparent polymeric foils, e.g. polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), are employed as carrier materials. A benefit of using these materials is their low cost. The optical interconnections from light sources to light transmission structures in planar optronic systems occupy a pivotal position for the sensing functions. As light sources, we employ the optoelectronic components, such as edgeemitting laser diodes, in form of bare chips, since their extremely small structures facilitate a high integration compactness and ensure sufficient system flexibility. Flexographically printed polymer optical waveguides are deployed as light guiding structures for short-distance communication in planar optronic systems. Printing processes are utilized for this generation of waveguides to achieve a cost-efficient large scale and high-throughput production. In order to attain a high-functional optronic system for sensing applications, one of the most essential prerequisites is the high coupling efficiency between the light sources and the waveguides. Therefore, in this work, we focus on the multimode polymer waveguide with a parabolic cross-section and investigate its optical coupling with the bare laser diode. We establish the geometrical model of the alignment based on the previous works on the optodic bonding of bare laser diodes and the fabrication process of polymer waveguides with consideration of various parameters, such as the beam profile of the laser diode, the employed polymer properties of the waveguides as well as the carrier substrates etc. Accordingly, the optical coupling of the bare laser diodes and the polymer waveguides was simulated

  18. Radiation studies of optical and electronic components used in astronomical satellite studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becher, J.; Kernell, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The synchronous orbit of the IUE carries the satellite through Earth's outer electron belt. A 40 mCi Sr90 source was used to simulate these electrons. A 5 mCi source of Co60 was used to simulate bremmstrahlung. A 10 MeV electron Linac and a 1.7 MeV electron Van de Graaf wer used to investigate the energy dependence of radiation effects and to perform radiations at a high flux rate. A 100 MeV proton cyclotron was used to simulate cosmic rays. Results are presented for three instrument systems of the IUE and measurements for specific components are reported. The three instrument systems were the ultraviolet converter, the fine error sensor (FES), and the SEC vidicon camera tube. The components were optical glasses, electronic components, silicon photodiodes, and UV window materials.

  19. Degradation of electro-optic components aboard LDEF. [long duration exposure facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Re-measurement of the properties of a set of electro-optic components exposed to the low earth orbital environment aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) indicates that most components survived quite well. Typical components showed some effects related to the space environment unless well protected. The effects were often small but significant. Results for semiconductor infrared detectors, lasers, LED's, filter, mirrors, and black paints will be presented. Semiconductor detectors and emitters were scarred but reproduced their original characteristics. Spectral characteristics of multi-layer dielectric filters and mirrors were found to be altered and degraded. Increased absorption in black paints indicates an increase in absorption sites, giving rise to enhanced performance as coatings for baffles and sunscreens. We find plastics and multi-layer dielectric coatings to be potentially unstable. Semiconductor devices, metal, and glass are more likely to be stable.

  20. Technical Needs for Prototypic Prognostic Technique Demonstration for Advanced Small Modular Reactor Passive Components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-05-17

    This report identifies a number of requirements for prognostics health management of passive systems in AdvSMRs, documents technical gaps in establishing a prototypical prognostic methodology for this purpose, and describes a preliminary research plan for addressing these technical gaps. AdvSMRs span multiple concepts; therefore a technology- and design-neutral approach is taken, with the focus being on characteristics that are likely to be common to all or several AdvSMR concepts. An evaluation of available literature is used to identify proposed concepts for AdvSMRs along with likely operational characteristics. Available operating experience of advanced reactors is used in identifying passive components that may be subject to degradation, materials likely to be used for these components, and potential modes of degradation of these components. This information helps in assessing measurement needs for PHM systems, as well as defining functional requirements of PHM systems. An assessment of current state-of-the-art approaches to measurements, sensors and instrumentation, diagnostics and prognostics is also documented. This state-of-the-art evaluation, combined with the requirements, may be used to identify technical gaps and research needs in the development, evaluation, and deployment of PHM systems for AdvSMRs. A preliminary research plan to address high-priority research needs for the deployment of PHM systems to AdvSMRs is described, with the objective being the demonstration of prototypic prognostics technology for passive components in AdvSMRs. Greater efficiency in achieving this objective can be gained through judicious selection of materials and degradation modes that are relevant to proposed AdvSMR concepts, and for which significant knowledge already exists. These selections were made based on multiple constraints including the analysis performed in this document, ready access to laboratory-scale facilities for materials testing and measurement, and

  1. Assessment of Crack Detection in Cast Austenitic Piping Components Using Advanced Ultrasonic Methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific N¬orthwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, have focused on developing and evaluating the reliability of nondestructive examination (NDE) approaches for inspecting coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the utility, effec¬tiveness and limitations of ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection techniques as related to the in-service inspec¬tion of primary system piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Cast stainless steel pipe specimens were examined that contain thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks located close to the weld roots and have inside/outside surface geometrical conditions that simulate several PWR primary piping configurations. In addition, segments of vintage centrifugally cast piping were also examined to understand inherent acoustic noise and scattering due to grain structures and determine consistency of UT responses from different locations. The advanced UT methods were applied from the outside surface of these specimens using automated scanning devices and water coupling. The low-frequency ultrasonic method employed a zone-focused, multi-incident angle inspection protocol (operating at 250-450 kHz) coupled with a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) for improved signal-to-noise and advanced imaging capabilities. The phased array approach was implemented with a modified instrument operating at 500 kHz and composite volumetric images of the specimens were generated. Re¬sults from laboratory studies for assessing detection, localization and sizing effectiveness are discussed in this paper.

  2. Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) Technology: Earth Observing-1 PPT Operational and Advanced Components Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.; Benson, Scott W.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Frus, John; Hoskins, W. Andrew; Burton, Rodney

    2003-01-01

    In 2002 the pulsed plasma thruster (PPT) mounted on the Earth Observing-1 spacecraft was operated successfully in orbit. The two-axis thruster system is fully incorporated in the attitude determination and control system and is being used to automatically counteract disturbances in the pitch axis of the spacecraft. The first tests conducted in space demonstrated the full range of PPT operation, followed by calibration of control torques from the PPT in the attitude control system. Then the spacecraft was placed in PPT control mode. To date, it has operated for about 30 hr. The PPT successfully controlled pitch momentum during wheel de-spin, solar array acceleration and deceleration during array rewind, and environmental torques in nominal operating conditions. Images collected with the Advanced Landsat Imager during PPT operation have demonstrated that there was no degradation in comparison to full momentum wheel control. In addition, other experiments have been performed to interrogate the effects of PPT operation on communication packages and light reflection from spacecraft surfaces. Future experiments will investigate the possibility of orbit-raising maneuvers, spacecraft roll, and concurrent operation with the Hyperion imager. Future applications envisioned for pulsed plasma thrusters include longer life, higher precision, multiaxis thruster configurations for three-axis attitude control systems or high-precision, formationflying systems. Advanced components, such as a "dry" mica-foil capacitor, a wear-resistant spark plug, and a multichannel power processing unit have been developed under contract with Unison Industries, General Dynamics, and C.U. Aerospace. Over the last year, evaluation tests have been conducted to determine power processing unit efficiency, atmospheric functionality, vacuum functionality, thruster performance evaluation, thermal performance, and component life.

  3. An overview of micro-optical components and system technology: bulk, planar, and thin-film for laser initiated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd

    2010-08-01

    There are a number of attractive micro optical elements or combinations of elements that are currently used or could be employed in optically initiated ordnance systems. When taking a broad-spectrum examination of optically initiated devices, the required key parameters become obviously straightforward for micro optics. Plainly stated, micro optics need to be simple, inexpensive, reliable, robust and compatible within their operational environment. This presentation focuses on the variety of optical elements and components available in the market place today that could be used to realize micro-optical beam shaping and delivery systems for optically initiated devices. A number of micro optical elements will be presented with specific bulk, planar optical and thin film optical devices, such as diffractive optics, micro prisms, axicons, waveguides, micro lenses, beam splitters and gratings. Further descriptions will be presented on the subject of coupling light from a laser beam into a multimode optical fiber. The use of micro optics for collimation of the laser source and conditioning of the laser beam to achieve the highest efficiency and matching the optical fiber NA will be explained. An emphasis on making these optical assemblies compact and rugged will be highlighted.

  4. Advances in optical materials for large aperture lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stokowski, S.E.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Marchi, F.T.; Swain, J.E.; Wallerstein, E.P.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1981-12-15

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is using large aperture Nd: glass lasers to investigate the feasibility of inertial confinement fusion. In our experiments high power laser light is focussed onto a small (100 to 500 micron) target containing a deuterium-tritium fuel mixture. During the short (1 to 5 ns) laser pulse the fuel is compressed and heated, resulting in fusion reactions. The generation and control of the powerful laser pulses for these experiments is a challenging scientific and engineering task, which requires the development of new optical materials, fabrication techniques, and coatings. LLNL with the considerable cooperation and support from the optical industry, where most of the research and development and almost all the manufacturing is done, has successfully applied several new developments in these areas.

  5. Continued advancement of laser damage resistant optically functional microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Douglas S.; MacLeod, Bruce D.; Sabatino, Ernest

    2012-11-01

    Micro- and nano-structured optically functional surface textures continue to exhibit higher performance and longer term survivability than thin-film coatings for an increasing number of materials used within high energy laser (HEL) systems. Anti-reflection (AR) microstructures (ARMs) produce a graded refractive index yielding high transmission over wide spectral ranges along with a chemical, mechanical and laser damage resistance inherited from the bulk optic material. In this study, ARMs were fabricated in the relevant HEL materials sapphire, neodymium-doped YAG, fused silica, BK7 glass, and the magnesium aluminate known as SPINEL. Standardized pulsed laser induced damage threshold (LiDT) measurements were made using commercial testing services to directly compare the damage resistance of ARMs-treated optics to uncoated and thin-film-AR-coated (TFARC) optics at wavelengths of 532nm, 694nm, 800nm, 1064nm, and 1538nm. As found with prior work, the LiDT of ARMs etched in fused silica was typically in the range of 35 J/cm2 at a wavelength of 1064nm and a pulse width of 10ns, a level that is comparable to uncoated samples and 3.5 times greater than the level specified by six prominent TFARC providers. The Army Research Laboratory measured the pulsed LiDT at 532nm (10ns) of ARMs in fused silica to be up to 5 times the level of the ion beam sputtered TFARC previously employed in their HEL system, and 2 times higher than a low performance single layer MgF2 TFARC. This result was repeated and expanded using a commercial LiDT testing service for ARMs in two types of fused silica and for Schott N-BK7 glass. An average damage threshold of 26.5 J/cm2 was recorded for the ARMs-treated glass materials, a level 4 times higher than the commercial IBS TFARCs tested.

  6. Requirements for Prognostic Health Management of Passive Components in Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2013-08-01

    Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts, may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors and near term small modular reactors (SMRs), which are based on integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) concepts. aSMRs are conceived for applications in remote locations and for diverse missions that include providing process or district heating, water desalination, and hydrogen production. Several challenges exist with respect to cost-effective operations and maintenance (O&M) of aSMRs, including the impacts of aggressive operating environments and modularity, and limiting these costs and staffing needs will be essential to ensuring the economic feasibility of aSMR deployment. In this regard, prognostic health management (PHM) systems have the potential to play a vital role in supporting the deployment of aSMR systems. This paper identifies requirements and technical gaps associated with implementation of PHM systems for passive aSMR components.

  7. Flight service evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component on commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development and flight evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component is presented. The recommended concept for the covers is graphite-epoxy hats bonded to a graphite-epoxy skin. The hat flare-out has been eliminated, instead the hat is continuous into the joint. The recommended concept for the spars is graphite-epoxy caps and a hybrid of Kevlar-49 and graphite-epoxy in the spar web. The spar cap, spar web stiffeners for attaching the ribs, and intermediate stiffeners are planned to be fabricated as a unit. Access hole in the web will be reinforced with a donut type, zero degree graphite-epoxy wound reinforcement. The miniwich design concept in the upper three ribs originally proposed is changed to a graphite-epoxy stiffened solid laminate design concept. The recommended configuration for the lower seven ribs remains as graphite-epoxy caps with aluminum cruciform diagonals. The indicated weight saving for the current advanced composite vertical fin configuration is 20.2% including a 24 lb growth allowance. The project production cost saving is approximately 1% based on a cumulative average of 250 aircraft and including only material, production labor, and quality assurance costs.

  8. Advanced Optics for the Remote Steering ITER ECRH Upper Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Moro, A.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.

    2005-01-01

    The optics of the ECRH Upper Launcher in ITER based on the Remote Steering concept needs special attention, since any focussing element in front of the waveguide has combined effects on the range of steering angles achievable and the beam width in the plasma region. The effects are studied in detail for a setup composed by 8 beams per port (three ports), for a spherical and a hyperbolic mirror surface. Gaussian beam analysis is compared to beam pattern calculations with the optical physics code GRASP, in order to verify the validity of gaussian optics approximation. The standard description with simply astigmatic beams, not adequate in more complex systems as the proposed two-mirror set-up, requires approximations, which are compared with the generalized astigmatic beam description. The ohmic losses at the end mirrors and the related localized heating due to the very large power density cause deformations that depends on the design of the cooling circuit. The distortion of the beam shape has been evaluated in a realistic case of mirror cooling with a small-channel system. The quantification of the effect depends on the precise evaluation ohmic losses and their enhancement in the long term due to the surface deterioration.

  9. Optical component performance for the Ocean Radiometer for Carbon Assessment (ORCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Wilson, Mark; Waluschka, Eugene; McClain, Charles R.

    2011-10-01

    The Ocean Radiometer for Carbon Assessment (ORCA) is a new design for the next generation remote sensing of ocean biology and biogeochemistry. ORCA is configured to meet all the measurement requirements of the Decadal Survey Aerosol, Cloud, and Ecology (ACE ), the Ocean Ecosystem (OES) radiometer and the Pre-ACE climate data continuity mission (PACE). Under the auspices of a 2007 grant from NASA Research Opportunity in Space and Earth Science (ROSES) and the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) , a team at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been working on a functional prototype with flightlike fore and aft optics and scan mechanisms. As part of the development efforts to bring ORCA closer to a flight configuration, we have conducted component-level optical testing using standard spectrophometers and system-level characterizations using nonflight commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) focal plane array detectors. Although these arrays would not be able to handle flight data rates, they are adequate for optical alignment and performance testing. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the results of this testing performed at GSFC and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) at the component and system level. Specifically, we show results for ORCA's spectral calibration ranging from the near UV, visible, and near-infrared spectral regions.

  10. Imaging heterogeneous absorption distribution of advanced breast cancer by optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2010-11-01

    Tumor vascular patterns of advanced breast cancers are complex and heterogeneous. Two typical light absorption patterns of periphery enhancement and posterior shadowing have been observed when imaging these advanced cancers using optical tomography guided by ultrasound. We perform a series simulation and phantom experiments to systemically evaluate the effects of target parameters, target locations, and target optical properties on imaging periphery enhancement absorption distribution using reflection geometry. Large tumors are modeled as concentric semiellipsoidal targets of different outer shell and inner core optical properties. We show that larger targets of more than 3 to 4 cm diameter with outer shell thicknesses less than 1 cm can be resolved at a depth less than 3 cm. A clinical example is given to show the complex vasculature distributions seen from an advanced cancer.

  11. Advanced manufacturing development of a composite empennage component for L-1011 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alva, T.; Henkel, J.; Johnson, R.; Carll, B.; Jackson, A.; Mosesian, B.; Brozovic, R.; Obrien, R.; Eudaily, R.

    1982-01-01

    This is the final report of technical work conducted during the fourth phase of a multiphase program having the objective of the design, development and flight evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component manufactured in a production environment at a cost competitive with those of its metal counterpart, and at a weight savings of at least 20 percent. The empennage component selected for this program is the vertical fin box of the L-1011 aircraft. The box structure extends from the fuselage production joint to the tip rib and includes front and rear spars. During Phase 4 of the program, production quality tooling was designed and manufactured to produce three sets of covers, ribs, spars, miscellaneous parts, and subassemblies to assemble three complete ACVF units. Recurring and nonrecurring cost data were compiled and documented in the updated producibility/design to cost plan. Nondestruct inspections, quality control tests, and quality acceptance tests were performed in accordance with the quality assurance plan and the structural integrity control plan. Records were maintained to provide traceability of material and parts throughout the manufacturing development phase. It was also determined that additional tooling would not be required to support the current and projected L-1011 production rate.

  12. Morphology evolution of fused silica surface during ion beam figuring of high-slope optical components.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wenlin; Dai, Yifan; Xie, Xuhui; Zhou, Lin

    2013-06-01

    Ultra-precision and ultra-smooth surfaces are vitally important for some high performance optical systems. Ion beam figuring (IBF) is a well-established, highly deterministic method for the final precision figuring of extremely high quality optical surfaces, whereas ion sputtering induced smoothing, or roughening for nanoscale surface morphology, strongly depends on the processing conditions. Usually, an improper machining method would arouse the production of nanoscale patterns leading to the coarsening of the optical surface. In this paper, the morphology evolution mechanism on a fused silica surface during IBF of high-slope optical components has been investigated by means of atomic force microscopy. Figuring experiments are implemented on two convex spherical surfaces by using different IBF methods. Both of their surface errors are rapidly reduced to 1.2 nm root mean square (RMS) after removing similar deep material, but their surfaces are characterized with obviously different nanoscale morphologies. The experimental results indicate that the ion incidence angle dominates the microscopic morphology during the IBF process. At near-normal incidence, fused silica achieves an ultra-smooth surface with an RMS roughness value R(q) down to 0.1 nm, whereas nanoscale ripple patterns are observed at a large incidence angle with an R(q) value increasing to more than 0.9 nm. Additionally, the difference of incidence angles on various machined areas would influence the uniformity of surface quality, resulting from the interplay between the smoothing and roughening effects induced by ion sputtering. PMID:23736325

  13. Design and Performance Evaluation of Sensors and Actuators for Advanced Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art commercial sensors and actuators do not meet many of NASA s next generation spacecraft and instrument needs. Nor do they satisfy the DoD needs for satellite missions, especially micro/nano satellite missions. In an effort to develop advanced optical devices and instruments that meet mission requirements, NASA Langley recently completed construction of a new cleanroom housing equipment capable of fabricating high performance active optic and adaptive optic technologies including deformable mirrors, reconfigurable lenses (both refractive and diffractive), spectrometers, spectro-polarimeters, tunable filters and many other active optic devices. In addition to performance, these advanced optic technologies offer advantages in speed, size, weight, power consumption, and radiation tolerance. The active optic devices described in this paper rely on birefringent liquid crystal materials to alter either the phase or the polarization of the incoming light. Design considerations and performance evaluation results for various NASA applications are presented. Applications presented will include large space telescopes, optical communications, spacecraft windows, coronagraphs, and star trackers. Keywords: Photonics, Adaptive Optics, Tunable Filters, MEMs., MOEMs, Coronagraph, Star Tracker

  14. Fabrication of the helical field coil components for the advanced toroidal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, M.J.; Whitson, J.C.; Banks, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    The fabrication techniques used to manufacture the major components of the helical field (HF) coil segments for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) are described. The major components of an HF coil segment are 14 water-cooled, copper conductors and a T-shaped stainless steel support member (or ''tee''). Twenty-four of these segments were used in the fabrication of two coils for the ATF experiment. The helical shape, accurate position requirements, large size, and potential for high cost required unique approaches to the fabrication of these components. One method of fabrication was to use 44-mm-thick (standard size) plate to form the base and leg of the tee and to join the sections by welding. Because of the tolerance requirements, a thicker plate (70 mm) was used and then contour machined to the final shape. The second approach, conducted in parallel with the first, was to cast the tee as a single piece. The first attempts were to make the casting larger than required, then machine it to final size and shape. The cost of machining either the welded tee or the cast tee was extremely high, so several prototypes were fabricated until a cast tee that required no contour machining was produced. The shape and positional requirements were also the major problems in fabricating the copper conductors, or turns. The approach taken was to make an accurate fixture and position the turns in the fixture, then anneal to remove residual stresses and form the copper turns to the shape of the fixture. The lessons learned in pursuing these fabrication methods are presented. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Advanced one-dimensional optical strain measurement system, phase 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lant, Christian T.

    1992-01-01

    An improved version of the speckle-shift strain measurement system was developed. The system uses a two-dimensional sensor array to maintain speckle correlation in the presence of large off-axis rigid body motions. A digital signal processor (DSP) is used to calculate strains at a rate near the RS-170 camera frame rate. Strain measurements were demonstrated on small diameter wires and fibers used in composite materials research. Accurate values of Young's modulus were measured on tungsten wires, and silicon carbide and sapphire fibers. This optical technique has measured surface strains at specimen temperatures above 750 C and has shown the potential for measurements at much higher temperatures.

  16. Advances in optical property measurements of spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles A.; Dever, Joyce A.; Jaworske, Donald A.

    1997-01-01

    Some of the instruments and experimental approaches, used for measuring the optical properties of thermal control systems, are presented. The instruments' use in studies concerning the effects of combined contaminants and space environment on these materials, and in the qualification of hardware for spacecraft, are described. Instruments for measuring the solar absorptance and infrared emittance offer improved speed, accuracy and data handling. A transient method for directly measuring material infrared emittance is described. It is shown that oxygen exposure before measuring the solar absorptance should be avoided.

  17. Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography: recent advances toward clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Bouma, Brett E; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Vakoc, Benjamin J; Suter, Melissa J; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of Fourier-domain techniques, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has advanced from high-resolution ‘point’ imaging over small fields-of-view to comprehensive microscopic imaging over three-dimensional volumes that are comparable to the dimensions of luminal internal organs. This advance has required the development of new lasers, improved spectrometers, minimally invasive catheters and endoscopes, and novel optical and signal processing strategies. In recent cardiovascular, ophthalmic, and gastrointestinal clinical studies, the capabilities of Fourier-domain OCT have enabled a new paradigm for diagnostic screening of large tissue areas, which addresses the shortcomings of existing technologies and focal biopsy. PMID:19264475

  18. Comparison of Materials for Use in the Precision Grinding of Optical Components

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Boyd M. III; Miller, Arthur C. Jr.; Egert, Charles M.

    1997-12-31

    Precision grinding of optical components is becoming an accepted practice for rapidly and deterministically fabrication optical surfaces to final or near-final surface finish and figure. In this paper, a comparison of grinding techniques and materials is performed. Flat and spherical surfaces were ground in three different substrate materials: BK7 glass, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide ceramic, and sapphire. Spherical surfaces were used to determine the contouring capacity of the process, and flat surfaces were used for surface finish measurements. The recently developed Precitech Optimum 2800 diamond turning and grinding platform was used to grind surfaces in 40mm diameter substrates sapphire and silicon carbide substrates and 200 mm BK7 glass substrates using diamond grinding wheels. The results of this study compare the surface finish and figure for the three materials.

  19. On-line monitoring of one-step laser fabrication of micro-optical components.

    PubMed

    Juliá, J E; Soriano, J C

    2001-07-01

    The use of an on-line monitoring method based on photoelasticity techniques for the fabrication of micro-optical components by means of controlled laser heating is described. From this description it is possible to show in real time the mechanical stresses that form the microelement. A new parameter, stressed area, is introduced that quantifies the stresses of a microelement during its fabrication, facilitating a deeper understanding of the physical phenomena involved in the process as well as being a useful test of quality. It also permits the stress produced in the manufacturing process and the optical properties of the final microelement to be correlated. The results for several microlenses monitored with this technique are presented. PMID:11958263

  20. Three-component all polarization-maintaining optical fiber vector hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianfei; Luo, Hong; Meng, Zhou; Hu, Yongming

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports a new-style all polarization maintaining optical fiber vector hydrophone which is orthogonal and unitized in three components. The signal fading caused by random phase-shift in the interferometer is eliminated by phase generated carrier (PGC) technology. The sensitivity and frequency band of the sensor is increased by optimizing the structure. Experimental results indicate that the acceleration sensitivity reaches 33dB and the fluctuation is less than 1dB over the frequency range of 20~2000Hz. The phase sensitivity is -155dB at 1000Hz. The optical vector hydrophone has an excellent directivity. The maximum asymmetric index is less than 0.4dB, while the directivity index is greater than 45dB.