Science.gov

Sample records for advanced optical imaging

  1. Advances in optical imaging for pharmacological studies

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Imaging approaches are an essential tool for following up over time representative parameters of in vivo models, providing useful information in pharmacological studies. Main advantages of optical imaging approaches compared to other imaging methods are their safety, straight-forward use and cost-effectiveness. A main drawback, however, is having to deal with the presence of high scattering and high absorption in living tissues. Depending on how these issues are addressed, three different modalities can be differentiated: planar imaging (including fluorescence and bioluminescence in vivo imaging), optical tomography, and optoacoustic approaches. In this review we describe the latest advances in optical in vivo imaging with pharmacological applications, with special focus on the development of new optical imaging probes in order to overcome the strong absorption introduced by different tissue components, especially hemoglobin, and the development of multimodal imaging systems in order to overcome the resolution limitations imposed by scattering. PMID:26441646

  2. Chemical Approaches for Advanced Optical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhixing

    Advances in optical microscopy have been constantly expanding our knowledge of biological systems. The achievements therein are a result of close collaborations between physicists/engineers who build the imaging instruments and chemists/biochemists who design the corresponding probe molecules. In this work I present a number of chemical approaches for the development of advanced optical imaging methods. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the recent advances of novel imaging approaches taking advantage of chemical tag technologies. Chapter 2 describes the second-generation covalent trimethoprim-tag as a viable tool for live cell protein-specific labeling and imaging. In Chapter 3 we present a fluorescence lifetime imaging approach to map protein-specific micro-environment in live cells using TMP-Cy3 as a chemical probe. In Chapter 4, we present a method harnessing photo-activatable fluorophores to extend the fundamental depth limit in multi-photon microscopy. Chapter 5 describes the development of isotopically edited alkyne palette for multi-color live cell vibrational imaging of cellular small molecules. These studies exemplify the impact of modern chemical approaches in the development of advanced optical microscopies.

  3. Advanced Imaging Optics Utilizing Wavefront Coding.

    SciTech Connect

    Scrymgeour, David; Boye, Robert; Adelsberger, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Image processing offers a potential to simplify an optical system by shifting some of the imaging burden from lenses to the more cost effective electronics. Wavefront coding using a cubic phase plate combined with image processing can extend the system's depth of focus, reducing many of the focus-related aberrations as well as material related chromatic aberrations. However, the optimal design process and physical limitations of wavefront coding systems with respect to first-order optical parameters and noise are not well documented. We examined image quality of simulated and experimental wavefront coded images before and after reconstruction in the presence of noise. Challenges in the implementation of cubic phase in an optical system are discussed. In particular, we found that limitations must be placed on system noise, aperture, field of view and bandwidth to develop a robust wavefront coded system.

  4. Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2006-01-03

    A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

  5. Optical design and characterization of an advanced computational imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, R. Hamilton; Fernandez-Cull, Christy; Raskar, Ramesh; Shi, Boxin; Barsi, Christopher; Zhao, Hang

    2014-09-01

    We describe an advanced computational imaging system with an optical architecture that enables simultaneous and dynamic pupil-plane and image-plane coding accommodating several task-specific applications. We assess the optical requirement trades associated with custom and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) optics and converge on the development of two low-cost and robust COTS testbeds. The first is a coded-aperture programmable pixel imager employing a digital micromirror device (DMD) for image plane per-pixel oversampling and spatial super-resolution experiments. The second is a simultaneous pupil-encoded and time-encoded imager employing a DMD for pupil apodization or a deformable mirror for wavefront coding experiments. These two testbeds are built to leverage two MIT Lincoln Laboratory focal plane arrays - an orthogonal transfer CCD with non-uniform pixel sampling and on-chip dithering and a digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) with advanced on-chip per-pixel processing capabilities. This paper discusses the derivation of optical component requirements, optical design metrics, and performance analyses for the two testbeds built.

  6. Advanced optical imaging techniques for neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yicong; Christensen, Ryan; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari

    2013-12-01

    Over the past decade, developmental neuroscience has been transformed by the widespread application of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Even greater progress is imminent, as recent innovations in microscopy now enable imaging with increased depth, speed, and spatial resolution; reduced phototoxicity; and in some cases without external fluorescent probes. We discuss these new techniques and emphasize their dramatic impact on neurobiology, including the ability to image neurons at depths exceeding 1mm, to observe neurodevelopment noninvasively throughout embryogenesis, and to visualize neuronal processes or structures that were previously too small or too difficult to target with conventional microscopy.

  7. Advanced Optical Imaging Techniques for Neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicong; Christensen, Ryan; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, developmental neuroscience has been transformed by the widespread application of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Even greater progress is imminent, as recent innovations in microscopy now enable imaging with increased depth, speed, and spatial resolution; reduced phototoxicity; and in some cases without external fluorescent probes. We discuss these new techniques and emphasize their dramatic impact on neurobiology, including the ability to image neurons at depths exceeding 1 mm, to observe neurodevelopment noninvasively throughout embryogenesis, and to visualize neuronal processes or structures that were previously too small or too difficult to target with conventional microscopy. PMID:23831260

  8. Advanced Sensors Boost Optical Communication, Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Brooklyn, New York-based Amplification Technologies Inc. (ATI), employed Phase I and II SBIR funding from NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory to forward the company's solid-state photomultiplier technology. Under the SBIR, ATI developed a small, energy-efficient, extremely high-gain sensor capable of detecting light down to single photons in the near infrared wavelength range. The company has commercialized this technology in the form of its NIRDAPD photomultiplier, ideal for use in free space optical communications, lidar and ladar, night vision goggles, and other light sensing applications.

  9. Advanced MEMS systems for optical communication and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horenstein, M. N.; Stewart, J. B.; Cornelissen, S.; Sumner, R.; Freedman, D. S.; Datta, M.; Kani, N.; Miller, P.

    2011-06-01

    Optical communication and adaptive optics have emerged as two important uses of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) devices based on electrostatic actuation. Each application uses a mirror whose surface is altered by applying voltages of up to 300 V. Previous generations of adaptive-optic mirrors were large (~1 m) and required the use of piezoelectric transducers. Beginning in the mid-1990s, a new class of small MEMS mirrors (~1 cm) were developed. These mirrors are now a commercially available, mature technology. This paper describes three advanced applications of MEMS mirrors. The first is a mirror used for corona-graphic imaging, whereby an interferometric telescope blocks the direct light from a distant star so that nearby objects such as planets can be seen. We have developed a key component of the system: a 144-channel, fully-scalable, high-voltage multiplexer that reduces power consumption to only a few hundred milliwatts. In a second application, a MEMS mirror comprises part of a two-way optical communication system in which only one node emits a laser beam. The other node is passive, incorporating a retro-reflective, electrostatic MEMS mirror that digitally encodes the reflected beam. In a third application, the short (~100-ns) pulses of a commercially-available laser rangefinder are returned by the MEMS mirror as a digital data stream. Suitable low-power drive systems comprise part of the system design.

  10. A survey of advanced excimer optical imaging and lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Suwa, Kyoichi

    1998-11-01

    The first item discussed in this paper is to estimate the future trend regarding minimum geometry and the optical parameters, such as NA and wavelength. Simulations based on aerial images are performed for the estimation. The resolution limit is defined as a minimum feature size which retains practical depth of focus (DOF). Pattern geometry is classified into two categories, which are dense lines and isolated lines. Available wavelengths are assumed to be KrF excimer laser (λ=248 nm), ArF excimer laser (λ=193 nm) and F2 excimer laser (λ=157 nm). Based upon the simulation results, the resolution limit is estimated for each geometry and each wavelength. The second item is to survey ArF optics. At present, the ArF excimer laser is regarded as one of the most promising candidates as a next-generation light source. Discussions are ranging over some critical issues. The lifetime of ArF optics supposedly limited by the radiation compaction of silica glass is estimated in comparison with KrF optics. Availability of calcium fluoride (CaF2) is also discussed. As a designing issue, a comparative study is made about the optical configuration, dioptric or catadioptric. In the end, our resist-based performance is shown.

  11. Three dimensional optical coherence tomography imaging: advantages and advances.

    PubMed

    Gabriele, Michelle L; Wollstein, Gadi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Xu, Juan; Kim, Jongsick; Kagemann, Larry; Folio, Lindsey S; Schuman, Joel S

    2010-11-01

    Three dimensional (3D) ophthalmic imaging using optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized assessment of the eye, the retina in particular. Recent technological improvements have made the acquisition of 3D-OCT datasets feasible. However, while volumetric data can improve disease diagnosis and follow-up, novel image analysis techniques are now necessary in order to process the dense 3D-OCT dataset. Fundamental software improvements include methods for correcting subject eye motion, segmenting structures or volumes of interest, extracting relevant data post hoc and signal averaging to improve delineation of retinal layers. In addition, innovative methods for image display, such as C-mode sectioning, provide a unique viewing perspective and may improve interpretation of OCT images of pathologic structures. While all of these methods are being developed, most remain in an immature state. This review describes the current status of 3D-OCT scanning and interpretation, and discusses the need for standardization of clinical protocols as well as the potential benefits of 3D-OCT scanning that could come when software methods for fully exploiting these rich datasets are available clinically. The implications of new image analysis approaches include improved reproducibility of measurements garnered from 3D-OCT, which may then help improve disease discrimination and progression detection. In addition, 3D-OCT offers the potential for preoperative surgical planning and intraoperative surgical guidance.

  12. Advanced magneto-optical microscopy: Imaging from picoseconds to centimeters - imaging spin waves and temperature distributions (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urs, Necdet Onur; Mozooni, Babak; Mazalski, Piotr; Kustov, Mikhail; Hayes, Patrick; Deldar, Shayan; Quandt, Eckhard; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in the observation of magnetic domains and domain walls by wide-field optical microscopy based on the magneto-optical Kerr, Faraday, Voigt, and Gradient effect are reviewed. Emphasis is given to the existence of higher order magneto-optical effects for advanced magnetic imaging. Fundamental concepts and advances in methodology are discussed that allow for imaging of magnetic domains on various length and time scales. Time-resolved imaging of electric field induced domain wall rotation is shown. Visualization of magnetization dynamics down to picosecond temporal resolution for the imaging of spin-waves and magneto-optical multi-effect domain imaging techniques for obtaining vectorial information are demonstrated. Beyond conventional domain imaging, the use of a magneto-optical indicator technique for local temperature sensing is shown.

  13. Advances in molecular imaging: targeted optical contrast agents for cancer diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Hellebust, Anne; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Over the last three decades, our understanding of the molecular changes associated with cancer development and progression has advanced greatly. This has led to new cancer therapeutics targeted against specific molecular pathways; such therapies show great promise to reduce mortality, in part by enabling physicians to tailor therapy for patients based on a molecular profile of their tumor. Unfortunately, the tools for definitive cancer diagnosis – light microscopic examination of biopsied tissue stained with nonspecific dyes – remain focused on the analysis of tissue ex vivo. There is an important need for new clinical tools to support the molecular diagnosis of cancer. Optical molecular imaging is emerging as a technique to help meet this need. Targeted, optically active contrast agents can specifically label extra-and intracellular biomarkers of cancer. Optical images can be acquired in real time with high spatial resolution to image-specific molecular targets, while still providing morphologic context. This article reviews recent advances in optical molecular imaging, highlighting the advances in technology required to improve early cancer detection, guide selection of targeted therapy and rapidly evaluate therapeutic efficacy. PMID:22385200

  14. Smaller, faster, brighter: advances in optical imaging of living plant cells.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Sidney L; Ehrhardt, David W

    2013-01-01

    The advent of fluorescent proteins and access to modern imaging technologies have dramatically accelerated the pace of discovery in plant cell biology. Remarkable new insights into such diverse areas as plant pathogenesis, cytoskeletal dynamics, sugar transport, cell wall synthesis, secretory control, and hormone signaling have come from careful examination of living cells using advanced optical probes. New technologies, both commercially available and on the horizon, promise a continued march toward more quantitative methods for imaging and for extending the optical exploration of biological structure and activity to molecular scales. In this review, we lay out fundamental issues in imaging plant specimens and look ahead to several technological innovations in molecular tools, instrumentation, imaging methods, and specimen handling that show promise for shaping the coming era of plant cell biology.

  15. Advances in Bio-Optical Imaging for the Diagnosis of Early Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olivo, Malini; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Keogh, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is among the most common malignancies worldwide, therefore early detection and treatment is imperative. The 5-year survival rate has remained at a dismal 50% for the past several decades. The main reason for the poor survival rate is the fact that most of the oral cancers, despite the general accessibility of the oral cavity, are not diagnosed until the advanced stage. Early detection of the oral tumors and its precursor lesions may be the most effective means to improve clinical outcome and cure most patients. One of the emerging technologies is the use of non-invasive in vivo tissue imaging to capture the molecular changes at high-resolution to improve the detection capability of early stage disease. This review will discuss the use of optical probes and highlight the role of optical imaging such as autofluorescence, fluorescence diagnosis (FD), laser confocal endomicroscopy (LCE), surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) in early oral cancer detection. FD is a promising method to differentiate cancerous lesions from benign, thus helping in the determination of adequate resolution of surgical resection margin. LCE offers in vivo cellular imaging of tissue structures from surface to subsurface layers and has demonstrated the potential to be used as a minimally invasive optical biopsy technique for early diagnosis of oral cancer lesions. SERS was able to differentiate between normal and oral cancer patients based on the spectra acquired from saliva of patients. OCT has been used to visualize the detailed histological features of the oral lesions with an imaging depth down to 2–3 mm. CRM is an optical tool to noninvasively image tissue with near histological resolution. These comprehensive diagnostic modalities can also be used to define surgical margin and to provide a direct assessment of the therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:24310585

  16. Advances in bio-optical imaging for the diagnosis of early oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Olivo, Malini; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Keogh, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is among the most common malignancies worldwide, therefore early detection and treatment is imperative. The 5-year survival rate has remained at a dismal 50% for the past several decades. The main reason for the poor survival rate is the fact that most of the oral cancers, despite the general accessibility of the oral cavity, are not diagnosed until the advanced stage. Early detection of the oral tumors and its precursor lesions may be the most effective means to improve clinical outcome and cure most patients. One of the emerging technologies is the use of non-invasive in vivo tissue imaging to capture the molecular changes at high-resolution to improve the detection capability of early stage disease. This review will discuss the use of optical probes and highlight the role of optical imaging such as autofluorescence, fluorescence diagnosis (FD), laser confocal endomicroscopy (LCE), surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) in early oral cancer detection. FD is a promising method to differentiate cancerous lesions from benign, thus helping in the determination of adequate resolution of surgical resection margin. LCE offers in vivo cellular imaging of tissue structures from surface to subsurface layers and has demonstrated the potential to be used as a minimally invasive optical biopsy technique for early diagnosis of oral cancer lesions. SERS was able to differentiate between normal and oral cancer patients based on the spectra acquired from saliva of patients. OCT has been used to visualize the detailed histological features of the oral lesions with an imaging depth down to 2-3 mm. CRM is an optical tool to noninvasively image tissue with near histological resolution. These comprehensive diagnostic modalities can also be used to define surgical margin and to provide a direct assessment of the therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:24310585

  17. What advances in microscopy are required for combined MRI and optical functional brain imaging? (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinfeld, David

    2016-03-01

    This overview talk will focus on forward-looking scientific needs and physical limits to images of neuronal processes. The challenge in nervous systems is that the basic unit for "switching" events in the nervous system occurs on the one micrometer scale of synaptic spines, while computations involve communication between individual neurons across the full expanse of cortex, which is ten millimeters for mouse cortex. I will address hoped-for advances in optical microscopy, within the context of existing and proposed contrast mechanisms of neuronal function, that span the four orders of magnitude of length scales for neuronal processing

  18. Advanced multi-contrast Jones matrix optical coherence tomography for Doppler and polarization sensitive imaging.

    PubMed

    Ju, Myeong Jin; Hong, Young-Joo; Makita, Shuichi; Lim, Yiheng; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Duan, Lian; Miura, Masahiro; Tang, Shuo; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2013-08-12

    An advanced version of Jones matrix optical coherence tomography (JMT) is demonstrated for Doppler and polarization sensitive imaging of the posterior eye. JMT is capable of providing localized flow tomography by Doppler detection and investigating the birefringence property of tissue through a three-dimensional (3-D) Jones matrix measurement. Owing to an incident polarization multiplexing scheme based on passive optical components, this system is stable, safe in a clinical environment, and cost effective. Since the properties of this version of JMT provide intrinsic compensation for system imperfection, the system is easy to calibrate. Compared with the previous version of JMT, this advanced JMT achieves a sufficiently long depth measurement range for clinical cases of posterior eye disease. Furthermore, a fine spectral shift compensation method based on the cross-correlation of calibration signals was devised for stabilizing the phase of OCT, which enables a high sensitivity Doppler OCT measurement. In addition, a new theory of JMT which integrates the Jones matrix measurement, Doppler measurement, and scattering measurement is presented. This theory enables a sensitivity-enhanced scattering OCT and high-sensitivity Doppler OCT. These new features enable the application of this system to clinical cases. A healthy subject and a geographic atrophy patient were measured in vivo, and simultaneous imaging of choroidal vasculature and birefringence structures are demonstrated.

  19. Advanced multi-contrast Jones matrix optical coherence tomography for Doppler and polarization sensitive imaging.

    PubMed

    Ju, Myeong Jin; Hong, Young-Joo; Makita, Shuichi; Lim, Yiheng; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Duan, Lian; Miura, Masahiro; Tang, Shuo; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2013-08-12

    An advanced version of Jones matrix optical coherence tomography (JMT) is demonstrated for Doppler and polarization sensitive imaging of the posterior eye. JMT is capable of providing localized flow tomography by Doppler detection and investigating the birefringence property of tissue through a three-dimensional (3-D) Jones matrix measurement. Owing to an incident polarization multiplexing scheme based on passive optical components, this system is stable, safe in a clinical environment, and cost effective. Since the properties of this version of JMT provide intrinsic compensation for system imperfection, the system is easy to calibrate. Compared with the previous version of JMT, this advanced JMT achieves a sufficiently long depth measurement range for clinical cases of posterior eye disease. Furthermore, a fine spectral shift compensation method based on the cross-correlation of calibration signals was devised for stabilizing the phase of OCT, which enables a high sensitivity Doppler OCT measurement. In addition, a new theory of JMT which integrates the Jones matrix measurement, Doppler measurement, and scattering measurement is presented. This theory enables a sensitivity-enhanced scattering OCT and high-sensitivity Doppler OCT. These new features enable the application of this system to clinical cases. A healthy subject and a geographic atrophy patient were measured in vivo, and simultaneous imaging of choroidal vasculature and birefringence structures are demonstrated. PMID:23938857

  20. Multimodal optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Cindy; Suk, William A; Pitt, Bruce R; Croix, Claudette M St; Watkins, Simon C

    2003-08-01

    The recent resurgence of interest in the use of intravital microscopy in lung research is a manifestation of extraordinary progress in visual imaging and optical microscopy. This review evaluates the tools and instrumentation available for a number of imaging modalities, with particular attention to recent technological advances, and addresses recent progress in use of optical imaging techniques in basic pulmonary research.1 Limitations of existing methods and anticipated future developments are also identified. Although there have also been major advances made in the use of magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and X-ray and computed tomography to image intact lungs and while these technologies have been instrumental in advancing the diagnosis and treatment of patients, the purpose of this review is to outline developing optical methods that can be evaluated for use in basic research in pulmonary biology.

  1. Utilization of optical image data from the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA)

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F.W.; Kallman, J.S.; Slominski, M.E.; Chong, Y.P.; Donnelly, D.; Cornish, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive use is made of optical diagnostics to obtain information on the 50-MeV, 10-kA, 70-ns pulsed-electron beam produced by the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA). Light is generated by the beam striking a foil inserted in the beamline or through excitation of the gas when the beamline is filled with air. The emitted light is collected and digitized. Two-dimensional images are recorded by either a gated framing camera or a streak camera. Extraction of relevant beam parameters, such as current density, current, and beam size, requires an understanding of the physics of the light-generation mechanism and an ability to handle and properly exploit a large digital database of image data. We will present a brief overview of the present understanding of the light-generation mechanisms in foil and gas, with emphasis on experimental observations and trends. We will review our data management and analysis techniques and indicate successful approaches for extracting beam parameters.

  2. Advanced endoscopic imaging for gastric cancer assessment: new insights with new optics?

    PubMed

    Serrano, M; Kikuste, I; Dinis-Ribeiro, M

    2014-12-01

    The most immediate strategy for improving survival of gastric cancer patients is secondary prevention through diagnosis of early gastric cancer either through screening or follow-up of individuals at high risk. Endoscopy examination is therefore of paramount importance and two general steps are to be known in assessing gastric mucosa - detection and characterization. Over the past decade, the advent of advanced endoscopic imaging technology led to diverse descriptions of these modalities reporting them to be useful in this setting. In this review, we aim at summarizing the current evidence on the use of advance imaging in individuals at high-risk (i.e., advance stages of gastric atrophy/intestinal metaplasia) and in those harbouring neoplastic lesions, and address its potential usefulness providing the readers a framework to use in daily practice. Further research is also suggested.

  3. Final Report for The University of Texas at Arlington Optical Medical Imaging Section of Advanced Imaging Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Khosrow Behbehani

    2013-02-26

    The goal of this project was to create state-of-the-art optical medical imaging laboratories for the Biomedical Engineering faculty and student researchers of the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) on the campus of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW). This has been successfully achieved. These laboratories provide an unprecedented opportunity for the bioengineers (from UTA) to bring about new breakthroughs in medical imaging using optics. Specifically, three major laboratories have been successfully established and state-of-the-art scientific instruments have been placed in the labs. As a result of this grant, numerous journal and conference publications have been generated, patents for new inventions have been filed and received, and many additional grants for the continuation of the research has been received.

  4. Advanced Optical Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Steve; Michael, Xuejun

    The following article describes an advanced dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) Optical Network developed by L-3 Photonics. The network, configured as an amplified optical bus, carries traffic simultaneously in both directions, using multiple wavelengths. As a result, data distribution is of the form peer-to-multi-peer, it is protocol independent, and it is scalable. The network leverages the rapid growth in commercial optical technologies, including wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), and when applied to military and commercial platforms such as aircraft, ships, unmanned and other vehicles, provides a cost-effective, low-weight, high-speed, and high noise-immune data distribution system.

  5. Advanced optical instruments technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William

    1992-01-01

    The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

  6. Advanced fluorescence imaging endoscopy using an acousto-optic tuneable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Maurice P.; Bouhifd, Mounir; Aprahamian, Marc

    2004-07-01

    Two novel prototype instruments for in vivo fluorescence-based medical diagnostics are described. The devices are based on an acousto-optic tuneable filter (AOTF) and can be easily attached to the eyepiece of most commercially available endoscopes. The instruments developed offer significant advantages over typical fixed-filter or filter-wheel fluorescence imaging systems in terms of flexibility, performance and diagnostic potential. Any filtering center-wavelength in the range from 450 to 700 nm can be rapidly selected either by random access or sequential tuning using simple commands delivered over a PC serial interface. In addition, both filtered and unfiltered light can be imaged to facilitate the direct association of fluorescence signals with specific anatomical sites. To demonstrate the system in vivo, a study of the diagnostic potential of fluorescence imaging for pancreatitis was conducted on rats. The aim was to detect extremely low-levels of endogenous protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) that has been shown to accumulate in early-stage diseased tissue undergoing an inflammatory response. Results show clearly that the device is effective in diagnosing mild pancreatitis in rats without the necessity of administering PpIX promoting agents such as ALA. Planning of human clinical trials is currently underway to demonstrate its potential as a tool for non-invasive early diagnosis of gastroenterological diseases.

  7. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) Telescope Optical System Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, V.; Buckley, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Diegel, S.; Romani, R.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Vassiliev, V.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Ramsey, B.; Weekes, T.

    2008-12-24

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory operating in the energy range 25 GeV-100 TeV, which is based on an array of {approx}20-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The desired improvement in sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation of AGIS imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. We are considering several options for the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes, which include the traditional Davies-Cotton design as well as novel two-mirror design. Emerging mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost-effective solutions for the design of the OS.

  8. Advancement of Optical Component Control for an Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Cook, William B.; Flood, Michael A.; Campbell, Joel F.; Boyer, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    Risk mitigation activities associated with a prototype imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) system are continuing at the NASA Langley Research Center. The system concept and technology center about enabling and improving future space-based atmospheric composition missions, with a current focus on observing tropospheric ozone around 9.6 micron, while having applicability toward measurement in different spectral regions and other applications. Recent activities have focused on improving an optical element control subsystem to enable precise and accurate positioning and control of etalon plates; this is needed to provide high system spectral fidelity critical for enabling the required ability to spectrally-resolve atmospheric line structure. The latest results pertaining to methodology enhancements, system implementation, and laboratory characterization testing will be reported

  9. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, David S.; Buckley, J. H.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Kaaret, P.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Konopelko, A.; Romani, R.; Vassilliev, V.; Optical System Working Group; AGIS Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    The concept of a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory, AGIS, in the energy range 20 GeV-200 TeV is based on an array of 50-200 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of IACTs. In this submission we will focus on the optical system (OS) of AGIS telescopes and consider options which include traditional Davies-Cotton and the other prime-focus telescope designs, as well as the novel two-mirror aplanatic OS originally proposed by Schwarzschild. The emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes, such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming, provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the OS. We initially evaluate capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project.

  10. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, V.; Buckley, J.; Diegel, S.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Ramsey, B.; Romani, R.; Vassiliev, V.; Weekes, T.

    2008-12-01

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory operating in the energy range 25 GeV-100 TeV, which is based on an array of ~20-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The desired improvement in sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation of AGIS imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. We are considering several options for the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes, which include the traditional Davies-Cotton design as well as novel two-mirror design. Emerging mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost-effective solutions for the design of the OS.

  11. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliev, Vladimir; Buckley, Jim; Falcone, Abe; Fegan, Steven; Finley, John; Gaurino, Victor; Hanna, David; Kaaret, Philip; Konopelko, Alex; Krawczynski, Henric; Romani, Roger; Weekes, Trevor

    2008-04-01

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory based on an array of ˜100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) with a sensitivity to gamma-rays in the energy range 40 GeV-100 TeV. The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. In this submission we focus on the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes and consider options which include traditional Davies-Cotton and the other prime- focus telescope designs, as well as a novel two-mirror aplanatic OS originally proposed by Schwarzschild. Emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the OS. We evaluate the capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project.

  12. Comparison of advanced optical imaging techniques with current otolaryngology diagnostics for improved middle ear assessment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Ryan M.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Spillman, Darold R.; Novak, Michael A.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otolaryngologists utilize a variety of diagnostic techniques to assess middle ear health. Tympanometry, audiometry, and otoacoustic emissions examine the mobility of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) and ossicles using ear canal pressure and auditory tone delivery and detection. Laser Doppler vibrometry provides non-contact vibrational measurement, and acoustic reflectometry is used to assess middle ear effusion using sonar. These technologies and techniques have advanced the field beyond the use of the standard otoscope, a simple tissue magnifier, yet the need for direct visualization of middle ear disease for superior detection, assessment, and management remains. In this study, we evaluated the use of portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) and pneumatic low-coherence interferometry (LCI) systems with handheld probe delivery to standard tympanometry, audiometry, otoacoustic emissions, laser Doppler vibrometry, and acoustic reflectometry. Comparison of these advanced optical imaging techniques and current diagnostics was conducted with a case study subject with a history of unilateral eardrum trauma. OCT and pneumatic LCI provide novel dynamic spatiotemporal structural data of the middle ear, such as the thickness of the eardrum and quantitative detection of underlying disease pathology, which could allow for more accurate diagnosis and more appropriate management than currently possible.

  13. Optical image encryption topology.

    PubMed

    Yong-Liang, Xiao; Xin, Zhou; Qiong-Hua, Wang; Sheng, Yuan; Yao-Yao, Chen

    2009-10-15

    Optical image encryption topology is proposed based on the principle of random-phase encoding. Various encryption topological units, involving peer-to-peer, ring, star, and tree topologies, can be realized by an optical 6f system. These topological units can be interconnected to constitute an optical image encryption network. The encryption and decryption can be performed in both digital and optical methods.

  14. What Is Optical Imaging?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hespos, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a promising new methodology called optical imaging. Optical imaging is used for measuring changes in cortical blood flow due to functional activation. The article outlines the pros and cons of using optical imaging for studying the brain correlates of perceptual, cognitive, and language development in infants and young…

  15. Compressive Optical Image Encryption

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Sheng Li, Jiao; Yang Pan, Yang; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    An optical image encryption technique based on compressive sensing using fully optical means has been proposed. An object image is first encrypted to a white-sense stationary noise pattern using a double random phase encoding (DRPE) method in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Then, the encrypted image is highly compressed to a signal using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in the optical domain. At the receiving terminal, the encrypted image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory, and the original image can be decrypted with three reconstructed holograms and the correct keys. The numerical simulations show that the method is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in future all-optical networks because of the ability of completely optical implementation and substantially smaller hologram data volume. PMID:25992946

  16. Compressive Optical Image Encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Sheng Li, Jiao; Yang Pan, Yang; Li, Rong

    2015-05-01

    An optical image encryption technique based on compressive sensing using fully optical means has been proposed. An object image is first encrypted to a white-sense stationary noise pattern using a double random phase encoding (DRPE) method in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Then, the encrypted image is highly compressed to a signal using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in the optical domain. At the receiving terminal, the encrypted image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory, and the original image can be decrypted with three reconstructed holograms and the correct keys. The numerical simulations show that the method is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in future all-optical networks because of the ability of completely optical implementation and substantially smaller hologram data volume.

  17. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2007-05-29

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  18. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2005-05-31

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  19. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  20. Advanced Pointing Imaging Camera (APIC) Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, R. S.; Bills, B. G.; Jorgensen, J.; Jun, I.; Maki, J. N.; McEwen, A. S.; Riedel, E.; Walch, M.; Watkins, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    The Advanced Pointing Imaging Camera (APIC) concept is envisioned as an integrated system, with optical bench and flight-proven components, designed for deep-space planetary missions with 2-DOF control capability.

  1. Advancing biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Imaging reveals complex structures and dynamic interactive processes, located deep inside the body, that are otherwise difficult to decipher. Numerous imaging modalities harness every last inch of the energy spectrum. Clinical modalities include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and light-based methods [endoscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT)]. Research modalities include various light microscopy techniques (confocal, multiphoton, total internal reflection, superresolution fluorescence microscopy), electron microscopy, mass spectrometry imaging, fluorescence tomography, bioluminescence, variations of OCT, and optoacoustic imaging, among a few others. Although clinical imaging and research microscopy are often isolated from one another, we argue that their combination and integration is not only informative but also essential to discovering new biology and interpreting clinical datasets in which signals invariably originate from hundreds to thousands of cells per voxel. PMID:26598657

  2. Wide swath and high resolution optical imaging satellite of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Haruyoshi; Kato, Eri; Imai, Hiroko; Sagisaka, Masakazu

    2016-05-01

    The "Advanced optical satellite" (tentative name) is a follow-on mission from ALOS. Mission objectives of the advanced optical satellite is to build upon the existing advanced techniques for global land observation using optical sensors, as well as to promote data utilization for social needs. Wide swath and high resolution optical imager onboard the advanced optical satellite will extend the capabilities of earlier ALOS missions. The optical imager will be able to collect high-resolution (< 1 m) and wide-swath (70 km) images with high geo-location accuracy. This paper introduces a conceptual design of the advanced optical satellite.

  3. Progress in Evaluating Quantitative Optical Gas Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of advanced fugitive emission detection and assessment technologies that facilitate cost effective leak and malfunction mitigation strategies is an ongoing goal shared by industry, regulators, and environmental groups. Optical gas imaging (OGI) represents an importan...

  4. Advanced imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the Advanced Imaging System CCD based camera. The AIS1 camera system was developed at Photometric Ltd. in Tucson, Arizona as part of a Phase 2 SBIR contract No. NAS5-30171 from the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The camera project was undertaken as a part of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) project. This document is intended to serve as a complete manual for the use and maintenance of the camera system. All the different parts of the camera hardware and software are discussed and complete schematics and source code listings are provided.

  5. Advanced fiber-optic acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, João G. V.; Leite, Ivo T.; Silva, Susana; Frazão, Orlando

    2014-09-01

    Acoustic sensing is nowadays a very demanding field which plays an important role in modern society, with applications spanning from structural health monitoring to medical imaging. Fiber-optics can bring many advantages to this field, and fiber-optic acoustic sensors show already performance levels capable of competing with the standard sensors based on piezoelectric transducers. This review presents the recent advances in the field of fiber-optic dynamic strain sensing, particularly for acoustic detection. Three dominant technologies are identified — fiber Bragg gratings, interferometric Mach-Zehnder, and Fabry-Pérot configurations — and their recent developments are summarized.

  6. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Land, Cecil E.; Martin, Stephen J.; Pfeifer, Kent B.

    1993-01-01

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image.

  7. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

    1993-11-30

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

  8. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  9. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) Telescope Mechanical and Optical System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarino, V.; Vassiliev, V.; Buckley, J.; Byrum, K.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Finley, J.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Romani, R.; Wagner, R.; Woods, M.

    2009-05-01

    The concept of a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory, AGIS, in the energy range 20 GeV to 200 TeV is based on an array of 50-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of IACTs. In this submission, we focus on the optical and mechanical systems for a novel Schwarzschild-Couder two-mirror aplanatic optical system originally proposed by Schwarzschild. Emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes, such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming, provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the optical system. We explore capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project and alignment methods for optical systems. We also study a mechanical structure which will provide support points for mirrors and camera design driven by the requirement of minimizing the deflections of the mirror support structures.

  10. Live-cell analysis of plant reproduction: live-cell imaging, optical manipulation, and advanced microscopy technologies.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Daisuke; Hamamura, Yuki; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2013-05-01

    Sexual reproduction ensures propagation of species and enhances genetic diversity within populations. In flowering plants, sexual reproduction requires complicated and multi-step cell-to-cell communications among male and female cells. However, the confined nature of plant reproduction processes, which occur in the female reproductive organs and several cell layers of the pistil, limits our ability to observe these events in vivo. In this review, we discuss recent live-cell imaging in in vitro systems and the optical manipulation techniques that are used to capture the dynamic mechanisms representing molecular and cellular communications in sexual plant reproduction. PMID:23438900

  11. Live-cell analysis of plant reproduction: live-cell imaging, optical manipulation, and advanced microscopy technologies.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Daisuke; Hamamura, Yuki; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2013-05-01

    Sexual reproduction ensures propagation of species and enhances genetic diversity within populations. In flowering plants, sexual reproduction requires complicated and multi-step cell-to-cell communications among male and female cells. However, the confined nature of plant reproduction processes, which occur in the female reproductive organs and several cell layers of the pistil, limits our ability to observe these events in vivo. In this review, we discuss recent live-cell imaging in in vitro systems and the optical manipulation techniques that are used to capture the dynamic mechanisms representing molecular and cellular communications in sexual plant reproduction.

  12. Imaging of the pancreas: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of anomalies of pancreas and the pancreatic duct system are commonly encountered at radiological evaluation. Diagnosing pancreatic lesions generally requires a multimodality approach. This review highlights the new advances in pancreatic imaging and their applications in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic pathologies. The mainstay techniques include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), radionuclide imaging (RNI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). PMID:21847450

  13. Optical imaging. Expansion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W; Boyden, Edward S

    2015-01-30

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. We discovered that by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable superresolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with apparent ~70-nanometer lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color superresolution imaging of ~10(7) cubic micrometers of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope.

  14. Optical Imaging in Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, P. M.

    2001-04-11

    This research was focused on developing morphology-dependent stimulated raman scattering (MDSRS) spectroscopy as an analytic optical imaging technique. MDSRS uses the cavity modes (called morphology dependent resonances, MDRs) associated with axisymmetric dielectric microstructures to generate nonlinear optical signals. Since different cavity modes span different regions inside the microstructure, it becomes possible to generate location-specific spectra. The information gotten from MDSRS imaging experiments is analogous with that generated from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in that spatial variations in chemical composition and molecular configuration within a structure can be mapped out. The authors demonstrated that MDSRS imaging is feasible and is free from nonlinear artifact. They did this by measuring the molecular structure variations that are present in the interfaces of 180 {micro}m dia. charged water droplets. The 4 publications that resulted from these studies are attached. From a chemical perspective a water droplet is, however, a simple thing. Will it be possible to use MDSRS imaging to study more complex systems such as combusting fuel droplets, layered polymer or glass fibers, or biological cells? The long-term goal of the research was to answer this question. The answer they have come up with is yes and no. The results on nitrate aerosols show that it is possible to do imaging studies on optically non-absorbing, ion containing systems, but that the ultimate sensitivity is dictated by ion concentration. hence systems containing large quantities of mobile ions will be difficult to look at, so this essentially eliminates being able to look at biological samples in situ. But on the positive side, organic systems, such as layered polymer and glass fibers, and combusting organic fuel droplets can be looked at with MDSRS imaging.

  15. Advanced laser image recorder.

    PubMed

    Gramenopoulos, N; Hartfield, E D

    1972-12-01

    A laser image recorder is described, which is unique because of its advanced design and the state-of-the-art components employed to achieve high performance and versatility. The critical components are the pyramidal mirror scanner and the beam focusing lens. The scanner has a six-facet, beryllium mirror accurate to 0.33 sec of arc and rotating at 0-50,000 rpm on air bearings. A rapid change in speed is an important feature of this scanner. The focusing lens is diffraction limited with a flat field of 54 degrees , allowing a 90% duty cycle and the use of photographic film transported by a cylindrical drum. The lens converts the constant angular velocity of the reflected beam to a constant scanning velocity of the focused spot with a linearity of 0.05%. Maximum number of picture elements per line is 36,800 over a format of 228.6 mm. PMID:20119408

  16. Physics and Advanced Technologies LDRD Final Report:Adaptive Optics Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Solar System

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbard, S; Max, C; Macintosh, B; Grossman, A

    2004-01-21

    This focus of this project was the investigation of the planets Uranus and Neptune and Saturn's moon Titan using adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy at the 10-meter W.M. Keck Telescopes. These bodies share a common type of atmosphere, one that is rich in methane and has a hydrocarbon haze layer produced by methane photolysis. Neptune and Uranus have atmospheric features which change on short timescales; we have investigated their altitude, composition, and connection to events occurring deeper in the planets' tropospheres. Titan has a solid surface located under its atmosphere, the composition of which is still quite uncertain. With spectra that sample the vertical structure of the atmosphere and narrowband observations that selectively probe Titan's surface we have determined the surface reflectivity of Titan at near-infrared wavelengths.

  17. Dynamic optically multiplexed imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachlin, Yaron; Shah, Vinay; Shepard, R. Hamilton; Shih, Tina

    2015-09-01

    Optically multiplexed imagers overcome the tradeoff between field of view and resolution by superimposing images from multiple fields of view onto a single focal plane. In this paper, we consider the implications of independently shifting each field of view at a rate exceeding the frame rate of the focal plane array and with a precision that can exceed the pixel pitch. A sequence of shifts enables the reconstruction of the underlying scene, with the number of frames required growing inversely with the number of multiplexed images. As a result, measurements from a sufficiently fast sampling sensor can be processed to yield a low distortion image with more pixels than the original focal plane array, a wider field of view than the original optical design, and an aspect ratio different than the original lens. This technique can also enable the collection of low-distortion, wide field of view videos. A sequence of sub-pixel spatial shifts extends this capability to allow the recovery of a wide field of view scene at sub-pixel resolution. To realize this sensor concept, a novel and compact divided aperture multiplexed sensor, capable of rapidly and precisely shifting its fields of view, was prototyped. Using this sensor, we recover twenty-four megapixel images from a four-megapixel focal plane and show the feasibility of simultaneous de-multiplexing and super-resolution.

  18. Stitching Techniques Advance Optics Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Because NASA depends on the fabrication and testing of large, high-quality aspheric (nonspherical) optics for applications like the James Webb Space Telescope, it sought an improved method for measuring large aspheres. Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Goddard Space Flight Center, QED Technologies, of Rochester, New York, upgraded and enhanced its stitching technology for aspheres. QED developed the SSI-A, which earned the company an R&D 100 award, and also developed a breakthrough machine tool called the aspheric stitching interferometer. The equipment is applied to advanced optics in telescopes, microscopes, cameras, medical scopes, binoculars, and photolithography."

  19. Advances in endoscopic imaging in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Pastorelli, Luca; Ishaq, Sauid; Neumann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Modern strategies for the treatment of ulcerative colitis require more accurate tools for gastrointestinal imaging to better assess mucosal disease activity and long-term prognostic clinical outcomes. Recent advances in gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy are radically changing the role of endoscopy in every-day clinical practice and research trials. Advanced endoscopic imaging techniques including high-definition endoscopes, optical magnification endoscopy, and various chromoendoscopy techniques have remarkably improved endoscopic assessment of ulcerative colitis. More recently, optical biopsy techniques with either endocytoscopy or confocal laser endomicroscopy have shown great potential in predicting several histological changes in real time during ongoing endoscopy. Here, we review current applications of advanced endoscopic imaging techniques in ulcerative colitis and present the most promising upcoming headways in this field. PMID:26365308

  20. Advanced optical manufacturing digital integrated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Li, Wei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    It is necessarily to adapt development of advanced optical manufacturing technology with modern science technology development. To solved these problems which low of ration, ratio of finished product, repetition, consistent in big size and high precision in advanced optical component manufacturing. Applied business driven and method of Rational Unified Process, this paper has researched advanced optical manufacturing process flow, requirement of Advanced Optical Manufacturing integrated System, and put forward architecture and key technology of it. Designed Optical component core and Manufacturing process driven of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Digital Integrated System. the result displayed effective well, realized dynamic planning Manufacturing process, information integration improved ratio of production manufactory.

  1. Instrumentation in Diffuse Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse optical imaging is highly versatile and has a very broad range of applications in biology and medicine. It covers diffuse optical tomography, fluorescence diffuse optical tomography, bioluminescence, and a number of other new imaging methods. These methods of diffuse optical imaging have diversified instrument configurations but share the same core physical principle – light propagation in highly diffusive media, i.e., the biological tissue. In this review, the author summarizes the latest development in instrumentation and methodology available to diffuse optical imaging in terms of system architecture, light source, photo-detection, spectral separation, signal modulation, and lastly imaging contrast. PMID:24860804

  2. Integrin Targeting for Tumor Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yunpeng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Optical imaging has emerged as a powerful modality for studying molecular recognitions and molecular imaging in a noninvasive, sensitive, and real-time way. Some advantages of optical imaging include cost-effectiveness, convenience, and non-ionization safety as well as complementation with other imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Over the past decade, considerable advances have been made in tumor optical imaging by targeting integrin receptors in preclinical studies. This review has emphasized the construction and evaluation of diverse integrin targeting agents for optical imaging of tumors in mouse models. They mainly include some near-infrared fluorescent dye-RGD peptide conjugates, their multivalent analogs, and nanoparticle conjugates for targeting integrin αvβ3. Some compounds targeting other integrin subtypes such as α4β1 and α3 for tumor optical imaging have also been included. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have revealed some promising integrin-targeting optical agents which have further enhanced our understanding of integrin expression and targeting in cancer biology as well as related anticancer drug discovery. Especially, some integrin-targeted multifunctional optical agents including nanoparticle-based optical agents can multiplex optical imaging with other imaging modalities and targeted therapy, serving as an attractive type of theranostics for simultaneous imaging and targeted therapy. Continued efforts to discover and develop novel, innovative integrin-based optical agents with improved targeting specificity and imaging sensitivity hold great promises for improving cancer early detection, diagnosis, and targeted therapy in clinic. PMID:21546996

  3. Optical Imaging, Photodynamic Therapy and Optically-Triggered Combination Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    Optical imaging is becoming increasingly promising for real-time image-guided resections and combined with photodynamic therapy (PDT), a photochemistry-based treatment modality, optical approaches can be intrinsically “theranostic”. Challenges in PDT include precise light delivery, dosimetry and photosensitizer tumor localization to establish tumor selectivity, and like all other modalities, incomplete treatment and subsequent activation of molecular escape pathways are often attributable to tumor heterogeneity. Key advances in molecular imaging, target-activatable photosensitizers and optically active nanoparticles that provide both cytotoxicity and a drug release mechanism, have opened exciting avenues to meet these challenges. The focus of the review is optical imaging in the context of PDT but the general principles presented are applicable to many of the conventional approaches to cancer management. We highlight the role of optical imaging in providing structural, functional and molecular information regarding photodynamic mechanisms of action, thereby advancing PDT and PDT-based combination therapies of cancer. These advances represent a PDT renaissance with increasing applications of clinical PDT as a frontline cancer therapy working in concert with fluorescence-guided surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. PMID:26049699

  4. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  5. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2016-10-25

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  6. Image stabilization for SWIR advanced optoelectronic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru; Granciu, Dana

    2015-02-01

    At long ranges and under low visibility conditions, Advanced Optoelectronic Device provides the signal-to-noise ratio and image quality in the Short-wave Infra-red - SWIR (wavelengths between 1,1 ÷2,5 μm), significantly better than in the near wave infrared - NWIR and visible spectral bands [1,2]. The quality of image is nearly independent of the polarization in the incoming light, but it is influenced by the relative movement between the optical system and the observer (the operators' handshake), and the movement towards the support system (land and air vehicles). All these make it difficult to detect objectives observation in real time. This paper presents some systems enhance which the ability of observation and sighting through the optical systems without the use of the stands, tripods or other means. We have to eliminate the effect of "tremors of the hands" and the vibration in order to allow the use of optical devices by operators on the moving vehicles on land, on aircraft, or on boats, and to provide additional comfort for the user to track the moving object through the optical system, without losing the control in the process of detection and tracking. The practical applications of stabilization image process, in SWIR, are the most advanced part of the optical observation systems available worldwide [3,4,5]. This application has a didactic nature, because it ensures understanding by the students about image stabilization and their participation in research.

  7. The advanced LIGO input optics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Chris L; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan T; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Martin, Rodica M; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Tanner, David B; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design. PMID:26827334

  8. The advanced LIGO input optics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Chris L; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan T; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Martin, Rodica M; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Tanner, David B; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  9. Optical image encryption based on diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2010-11-15

    In this Letter, we propose a method for optical image encryption based on diffractive imaging. An optical multiple random phase mask encoding system is applied, and one of the phase-only masks is selected and laterally translated along a preset direction during the encryption process. For image decryption, a phase retrieval algorithm is proposed to extract a high-quality plaintext. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical results. The proposed method can provide a new strategy instead of conventional interference methods, and it may open up a new research perspective for optical image encryption.

  10. Advances in retinal ganglion cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Balendra, S I; Normando, E M; Bloom, P A; Cordeiro, M F

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide and will affect 79.6 million people worldwide by 2020. It is caused by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), predominantly via apoptosis, within the retinal nerve fibre layer and the corresponding loss of axons of the optic nerve head. One of its most devastating features is its late diagnosis and the resulting irreversible visual loss that is often predictable. Current diagnostic tools require significant RGC or functional visual field loss before the threshold for detection of glaucoma may be reached. To propel the efficacy of therapeutics in glaucoma, an earlier diagnostic tool is required. Recent advances in retinal imaging, including optical coherence tomography, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and adaptive optics, have propelled both glaucoma research and clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. However, an ideal imaging technique to diagnose and monitor glaucoma would image RGCs non-invasively with high specificity and sensitivity in vivo. It may confirm the presence of healthy RGCs, such as in transgenic models or retrograde labelling, or detect subtle changes in the number of unhealthy or apoptotic RGCs, such as detection of apoptosing retinal cells (DARC). Although many of these advances have not yet been introduced to the clinical arena, their successes in animal studies are enthralling. This review will illustrate the challenges of imaging RGCs, the main retinal imaging modalities, the in vivo techniques to augment these as specific RGC-imaging tools and their potential for translation to the glaucoma clinic. PMID:26293138

  11. Advanced image memory architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercillo, Richard; McNeill, Kevin M.

    1994-05-01

    A workstation for radiographic images, known as the Arizona Viewing Console (AVC), was developed at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in the Department of Radiology. This workstation has been in use as a research tool to aid us in investigating how a radiologist interacts with a workstation, to determine which image processing features are required to aid the radiologist, to develop user interfaces and to support psychophysical and clinical studies. Results from these studies have show a need to increase the current image memory's available storage in order to accommodate high resolution images. The current triple-ported image memory can be allocated to store any number of images up to a combined total of 4 million pixels. Over the past couple of years, higher resolution images have become easier to generate with the advent of laser digitizers and computed radiology systems. As part of our research, a larger 32 million pixel image memory for AVC has been designed to replace the existing image memory.

  12. Advanced centering of mounted optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Christian; Winkelmann, Ralf; Klar, Rainer; Philippen, Peter; Garden, Ron; Pearlman, Sasha; Pearlman, Guy

    2016-03-01

    Camera objectives or laser focusing units consist of complex lens systems with multiple lenses. The optical performance of such complex lens systems is dependent on the correct positioning of lenses in the system. Deviations in location or angle within the system directly affect the achievable image quality. To optimize the achievable performance of lens systems, these errors can be corrected by machining the mount of the lens with respect to the optical axis. The Innolite GmbH and Opto Alignment Technology have developed a novel machine for such center turning operation. A confocal laser reflection measurement sensor determines the absolute position of the optical axis with reference to the spindle axis. As a strong advantage compared to autocollimator measurements the utilized Opto Alignment sensor is capable of performing centration and tilt measurements without changing objectives on any radius surface from 2 mm to infinity and lens diameters from 0.5 mm to 300 mm, including cylinder, aspheric, and parabolic surfaces. In addition, it performs significantly better on coated lenses. The optical axis is skewed and offset in reference to the spindle axis as determined by the measurement. Using the information about the mount and all reference surfaces, a machine program for an untrue turning process is calculated from this data in a fully automated manner. Since the optical axis is not collinear with the spindle axis, the diamond tool compensates for these linear and tilt deviations with small correction movements. This results in a simple machine setup where the control system works as an electronic alignment chuck. Remaining eccentricity of <1 μm and angular errors of < 10 sec are typical alignment results.

  13. Advanced NDE research in electromagnetic, thermal, and coherent optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, S. Ballou

    1992-01-01

    A new inspection technology called magneto-optic/eddy current imaging was investigated. The magneto-optic imager makes readily visible irregularities and inconsistencies in airframe components. Other research observed in electromagnetics included (1) disbond detection via resonant modal analysis; (2) AC magnetic field frequency dependence of magnetoacoustic emission; and (3) multi-view magneto-optic imaging. Research observed in the thermal group included (1) thermographic detection and characterization of corrosion in aircraft aluminum; (2) a multipurpose infrared imaging system for thermoelastic stress detection; (3) thermal diffusivity imaging of stress induced damage in composites; and (4) detection and measurement of ice formation on the space shuttle main fuel tank. Research observed in the optics group included advancements in optical nondestructive evaluation (NDE).

  14. Modern Imaging Technology: Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Michael J.; Eckelman, William C.

    2004-06-18

    This 2-day conference is designed to bring scientist working in nuclear medicine, as well as nuclear medicine practitioners together to discuss the advances in four selected areas of imaging: Biochemical Parameters using Small Animal Imaging, Developments in Small Animal PET Imaging, Cell Labeling, and Imaging Angiogenesis Using Multiple Modality. The presentations will be on molecular imaging applications at the forefront of research, up to date on the status of molecular imaging in nuclear medicine as well as in related imaging areas. Experts will discuss the basic science of imaging techniques, and scheduled participants will engage in an exciting program that emphasizes the current status of molecular imaging as well as the role of DOE funded research in this area.

  15. Session: CSP Advanced Systems: Optical Materials (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.

    2008-04-01

    The Optical Materials project description is to characterize advanced reflector, perform accelerated and outdoor testing of commercial and experimental reflector materials, and provide industry support.

  16. Enhanced neutron imaging detector using optical processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1992-08-01

    Existing neutron imaging detectors have limited count rates due to inherent property and electronic limitations. The popular multiwire proportional counter is qualified by gas recombination to a count rate of less than 10{sup 5} n/s over the entire array and the neutron Anger camera, even though improved with new fiber optic encoding methods, can only achieve 10{sup 6} cps over a limited array. We present a preliminary design for a new type of neutron imaging detector with a resolution of 2--5 mm and a count rate capability of 10{sup 6} cps pixel element. We propose to combine optical and electronic processing to economically increase the throughput of advanced detector systems while simplifying computing requirements. By placing a scintillator screen ahead of an optical image processor followed by a detector array, a high throughput imaging detector may be constructed.

  17. Advanced imaging communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.; Rice, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    Key elements of system are imaging and nonimaging sensors, data compressor/decompressor, interleaved Reed-Solomon block coder, convolutional-encoded/Viterbi-decoded telemetry channel, and Reed-Solomon decoding. Data compression provides efficient representation of sensor data, and channel coding improves reliability of data transmission.

  18. Acousto-Optical Imaging Spectropolarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saif, Babak; Glenar, David; Zimmerman, Robert; Seery, Bernard

    1992-01-01

    Imaging spectropolarimeter designed around acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF) takes polarization-specific spectral images of solid surfaces, aerosols, and absorption and emission phenomena in gas phase, at wavelengths from 500 to 1,000 nm. Produces side-by-side spectral images in two mutually perpendicular polarizations, one corresponding to ordinary, other corresponding to extraordinary waves in acousto-optical material. Offers large aperture, high resolving power, and rapid tunability, with no moving parts.

  19. Advanced endoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Helmut; Nägel, Andreas; Buda, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Advanced endoscopic imaging is revolutionizing our way on how to diagnose and treat colorectal lesions. Within recent years a variety of modern endoscopic imaging techniques was introduced to improve adenoma detection rates. Those include high-definition imaging, dye-less chromoendoscopy techniques and novel, highly flexible endoscopes, some of them equipped with balloons or multiple lenses in order to improve adenoma detection rates. In this review we will focus on the newest developments in the field of colonoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection rates. Described techniques include high-definition imaging, optical chromoendoscopy techniques, virtual chromoendoscopy techniques, the Third Eye Retroscope and other retroviewing devices, the G-EYE endoscope and the Full Spectrum Endoscopy-system. PMID:25789092

  20. Advances in fluorescence labeling strategies for dynamic cellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M; Palmer, Amy E

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic advances in optical physics, probe design, molecular biology, labeling techniques and computational analysis have propelled fluorescence imaging into new realms of spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity. This review aims to discuss advances in fluorescent probes and live-cell labeling strategies, two areas that remain pivotal for future advances in imaging technology. Fluorescent protein– and bio-orthogonal–based methods for protein and RNA imaging are discussed as well as emerging bioengineering techniques that enable their expression at specific genomic loci (for example, CRISPR and TALENs). Important attributes that contribute to the success of each technique are emphasized, providing a guideline for future advances in dynamic live-cell imaging. PMID:24937069

  1. Advanced electro-optical imaging techniques. [conference papers on sensor technology applicable to Large Space Telescope program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieski, S. (Editor); Wampler, E. J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The papers presented at the symposium are given which deal with the present state of sensors, as may be applicable to the Large Space Telescope (LST) program. Several aspects of sensors are covered including a discussion of the properties of photocathodes and the operational imaging camera tubes.

  2. Adaptive optics retinal imaging: emerging clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Godara, Pooja; Dubis, Adam M; Roorda, Austin; Duncan, Jacque L; Carroll, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    The human retina is a uniquely accessible tissue. Tools like scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and spectral domain-optical coherence tomography provide clinicians with remarkably clear pictures of the living retina. Although the anterior optics of the eye permit such non-invasive visualization of the retina and associated pathology, the same optics induce significant aberrations that obviate cellular-resolution imaging in most cases. Adaptive optics (AO) imaging systems use active optical elements to compensate for aberrations in the optical path between the object and the camera. When applied to the human eye, AO allows direct visualization of individual rod and cone photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, and white blood cells. AO imaging has changed the way vision scientists and ophthalmologists see the retina, helping to clarify our understanding of retinal structure, function, and the etiology of various retinal pathologies. Here, we review some of the advances that were made possible with AO imaging of the human retina and discuss applications and future prospects for clinical imaging.

  3. Advanced Land Imager Assessment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chander, Gyanesh; Choate, Mike; Christopherson, Jon; Hollaren, Doug; Morfitt, Ron; Nelson, Jim; Nelson, Shar; Storey, James; Helder, Dennis; Ruggles, Tim; Kaita, Ed; Levy, Raviv; Ong, Lawrence; Markham, Brian; Schweiss, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager Assessment System (ALIAS) supports radiometric and geometric image processing for the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) instrument onboard NASA s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. ALIAS consists of two processing subsystems for radiometric and geometric processing of the ALI s multispectral imagery. The radiometric processing subsystem characterizes and corrects, where possible, radiometric qualities including: coherent, impulse; and random noise; signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs); detector operability; gain; bias; saturation levels; striping and banding; and the stability of detector performance. The geometric processing subsystem and analysis capabilities support sensor alignment calibrations, sensor chip assembly (SCA)-to-SCA alignments and band-to-band alignment; and perform geodetic accuracy assessments, modulation transfer function (MTF) characterizations, and image-to-image characterizations. ALIAS also characterizes and corrects band-toband registration, and performs systematic precision and terrain correction of ALI images. This system can geometrically correct, and automatically mosaic, the SCA image strips into a seamless, map-projected image. This system provides a large database, which enables bulk trending for all ALI image data and significant instrument telemetry. Bulk trending consists of two functions: Housekeeping Processing and Bulk Radiometric Processing. The Housekeeping function pulls telemetry and temperature information from the instrument housekeeping files and writes this information to a database for trending. The Bulk Radiometric Processing function writes statistical information from the dark data acquired before and after the Earth imagery and the lamp data to the database for trending. This allows for multi-scene statistical analyses.

  4. Advanced electro-optical tracker/ranger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, R. A.; Defoe, D. N.

    1980-06-01

    The preliminary engineering design study of an Advanced Electro-Optical Tracker/Ranger (AEOTR) to provide passive target tracking and rangefinding for air to air gun fire control is described. Area correlation processing is used in the comparison of stereo image pairs for stereometric ranging and in the comparison of successive images for tracking. The application of these techniques to the AEOTR, the limitations imposed by packaging, environmental and state-of-the-art sensor and processing hardware constraints, and the projected performance are evaluated. Principal emphasis is given to the use of AEOTR in the gun director engagement mode in which target track and range data is provided to a gun fire control computer. The feasibility of use of the AEOTR to provide target video as an aid to visual target identification, and to provide automatic airborne target detection, is also evaluated. The necessary functions and subsystems are defined and integrated into a preliminary design, whose performance is estimated and compared with the program goals. In addition, a preliminary mounting location study for the F-15, F-16 and F-18 advanced fighters is included. CAI-built hardware was used to successfully demonstrate the feasibility of the ranging and tracking concepts employed in the AEOTR.

  5. Retinal Imaging: Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. S.; Iroshnikov, N. G.; Larichev, Andrey V.

    This chapter describes several factors influencing the performance of ophthalmic diagnostic systems with adaptive optics compensation of human eye aberration. Particular attention is paid to speckle modulation, temporal behavior of aberrations, and anisoplanatic effects. The implementation of a fundus camera with adaptive optics is considered.

  6. Inspirations from biological optics for advanced photonic systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Luke P; Szema, Robert

    2005-11-18

    Observing systems in nature has inspired humans to create technological tools that allow us to better understand and imitate biology. Biomimetics, in particular, owes much of its current development to advances in materials science and creative optical system designs. New investigational tools, such as those for microscopic imaging and chemical analyses, have added to our understanding of biological optics. Biologically inspired optical science has become the emerging topic among researchers and scientists. This is in part due to the availability of polymers with customizable optical properties and the ability to rapidly fabricate complex designs using soft lithography and three-dimensional microscale processing techniques.

  7. An extensible imaging platform for optical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, Gianluca; Azar, Fred S.

    2009-02-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has recently developed an extensible imaging platform (XIP), a new open-source software development platform. XIP can be used to rapidly develop imaging applications designed to meet the needs of the optical imaging community. XIP is a state-of-the-art set of visual 'drag and drop' programming tools and associated libraries for rapid prototyping and application development. The tools include modules tailored for medical imaging, many of which are GPU hardware accelerated. They also provide a friendlier environment for utilizing popular toolkits such as ITK and VTK, and enable the visualization and processing of optical imaging data and standard DICOM data. XIP has built-in functionality for multidimensional data visualization and processing, and enables the development of independently optimized and re-usable software modules, which can be seamlessly added and interconnected to build advanced applications. XIP applications can run "stand alone", including in client/server mode for remote access. XIP also supports the DICOM WG23 "Application Hosting" standard, which will enable plug-in XIP applications to run on any DICOM host workstation. Such interoperability will enable the optical imaging community to develop and deploy modular applications across all academic/clinical/industry partners with WG23 compliant imaging workstations.

  8. Advances in multimodality molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Habib; Prasad, Rameshwar

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality molecular imaging using high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) combined with other modalities is now playing a pivotal role in basic and clinical research. The introduction of combined PET/CT systems in clinical setting has revolutionized the practice of diagnostic imaging. The complementarity between the intrinsically aligned anatomic (CT) and functional or metabolic (PET) information provided in a “one-stop shop” and the possibility to use CT images for attenuation correction of the PET data has been the driving force behind the success of this technology. On the other hand, combining PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in a single gantry is technically more challenging owing to the strong magnetic fields. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made resulting in the design of few preclinical PET systems and one human prototype dedicated for simultaneous PET/MR brain imaging. This paper discusses recent advances in PET instrumentation and the advantages and challenges of multimodality imaging systems. Future opportunities and the challenges facing the adoption of multimodality imaging instrumentation will also be addressed. PMID:20098557

  9. Ultrafast acousto-optic imaging with ultrasonic plane waves.

    PubMed

    Laudereau, Jean-Baptiste; Grabar, Alexander A; Tanter, Mickaël; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Ramaz, François

    2016-02-22

    Due to multiple light scattering inside biological tissues, deep non-invasive optical medical imaging is very challenging. Acousto-optic imaging is a technique coupling ultrasound and light that allows recovering optical contrast at depths of few centimeters with a millimeter resolution. Recent advances in acousto-optic imaging are using short focused ultrasound pulses often averaged over several hundred or thousand pulses. As the pulsing rate of commercial probes is limited to about few ultrasound cycles every 100 μs, acquiring an acousto-optic image usually takes several tens of seconds due to the high number of acoustic pulses excitation. We propose here a new acousto-optic imaging technique based on the use of ultrasound plane waves instead of focused ones that allows increasing drastically the imaging rate. PMID:26907033

  10. Micro-optics for imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Boye, Robert R.

    2010-09-01

    This project investigates the fundamental imaging capability of an optic with a physical thickness substantially less than 1 mm. The analysis assumes that post-processing can overcome certain restrictions such as detector pixel size and image degradation due to aberrations. A first order optical analysis quickly reveals the limitations of even an ideal thin lens to provide sufficient image resolution and provides the justification for pursuing an annular design. Some straightforward examples clearly show the potential of this approach. The tradeoffs associated with annular designs, specifically field of view limitations and reduced mid-level spatial frequencies, are discussed and their impact on the imaging performance evaluated using several imaging examples. Additionally, issues such as detector acceptance angle and the need to balance aberrations with resolution are included in the analysis. With these restrictions, the final results present an excellent approximation of the expected performance of the lens designs presented.

  11. Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Watterson, C.E.

    1997-05-01

    The Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices project was initiated in march 1991 to support design laboratory guidance on electro-optic device packaging and evaluation. Sandia National Laboratory requested AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), to prepare for future packaging efforts in electro-optic integrated circuits. Los Alamos National Laboratory requested the evaluation of electro-optic waveguide devices for nuclear surety applications. New packaging techniques involving multiple fiber optic alignment and attachment, binary lens array development, silicon V-groove etching, and flip chip bonding were requested. Hermetic sealing of the electro-optic hybrid and submicron alignment of optical components present new challenges to be resolved. A 10-channel electro-optic modulator and laser amplifier were evaluated for potential surety applications.

  12. Diffuse Optical Tomography for Brain Imaging: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive, nonionizing, and inexpensive imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to probe tissue optical properties. Regional variations in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations as well as blood flow and oxygen consumption can be imaged by monitoring spatiotemporal variations in the absorption spectra. For brain imaging, this provides DOT unique abilities to directly measure the hemodynamic, metabolic, and neuronal responses to cells (neurons), and tissue and organ activations with high temporal resolution and good tissue penetration. DOT can be used as a stand-alone modality or can be integrated with other imaging modalities such as fMRI/MRI, PET/CT, and EEG/MEG in studying neurophysiology and pathology. This book chapter serves as an introduction to the basic theory and principles of DOT for neuroimaging. It covers the major aspects of advances in neural optical imaging including mathematics, physics, chemistry, reconstruction algorithm, instrumentation, image-guided spectroscopy, neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling, and clinical applications.

  13. State-space models for optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kary L; Brockwell, Anthony E; Eddy, William F

    2007-09-20

    Measurement of stimulus-induced changes in activity in the brain is critical to the advancement of neuroscience. Scientists use a range of methods, including electrode implantation, surface (scalp) electrode placement, and optical imaging of intrinsic signals, to gather data capturing underlying signals of interest in the brain. These data are usually corrupted by artifacts, complicating interpretation of the signal; in the context of optical imaging, two primary sources of corruption are the heartbeat and respiration cycles. We introduce a new linear state-space framework that uses the Kalman filter to remove these artifacts from optical imaging data. The method relies on a likelihood-based analysis under the specification of a formal statistical model, and allows for corrections to the signal based on auxiliary measurements of quantities closely related to the sources of contamination, such as physiological processes. Furthermore, the likelihood-based modeling framework allows us to perform both goodness-of-fit testing and formal hypothesis testing on parameters of interest. Working with data collected by our collaborators, we demonstrate the method of data collection in an optical imaging study of a cat's brain.

  14. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  15. Recent advances in computer image generation simulation.

    PubMed

    Geltmacher, H E

    1988-11-01

    An explosion in flight simulator technology over the past 10 years is revolutionizing U.S. Air Force (USAF) operational training. The single, most important development has been in computer image generation. However, other significant advances are being made in simulator handling qualities, real-time computation systems, and electro-optical displays. These developments hold great promise for achieving high fidelity combat mission simulation. This article reviews the progress to date and predicts its impact, along with that of new computer science advances such as very high speed integrated circuits (VHSIC), on future USAF aircrew simulator training. Some exciting possibilities are multiship, full-mission simulators at replacement training units, miniaturized unit level mission rehearsal training simulators, onboard embedded training capability, and national scale simulator networking.

  16. Programmable Iterative Optical Image And Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah J.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed method of iterative optical image and data processing overcomes limitations imposed by loss of optical power after repeated passes through many optical elements - especially, beam splitters. Involves selective, timed combination of optical wavefront phase conjugation and amplification to regenerate images in real time to compensate for losses in optical iteration loops; timing such that amplification turned on to regenerate desired image, then turned off so as not to regenerate other, undesired images or spurious light propagating through loops from unwanted reflections.

  17. Optical and opto-acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2013-01-01

     Since the inception of the microscope, optical imaging is serving the biological discovery for more than four centuries. With the recent emergence of methods appropriate for in vivo staining, such as bioluminescence, fluorescent molecular probes, and proteins, as well as nanoparticle-based targeted agents, significant attention has been shifted toward in vivo interrogations of different dynamic biological processes at the molecular level. This progress has been largely supported by the development of advanced optical tomographic imaging technologies suitable for obtaining volumetric visualization of biomarker distributions in small animals at a whole-body or whole-organ scale, an imaging frontier that is not accessible by the existing tissue-sectioning microscopic techniques due to intensive light scattering beyond the depth of a few hundred microns. Biomedical optoacoustics has also emerged in the recent decade as a powerful tool for high-resolution visualization of optical contrast, overcoming a variety of longstanding limitations imposed by light scattering in deep tissues. By detecting tiny sound vibrations, resulting from selective absorption of light at multiple wavelengths, multispectral optoacoustic tomography methods can now "hear color" in three dimensions, i.e., deliver volumetric spectrally enriched (color) images from deep living tissues at high spatial resolution and in real time. These new-found imaging abilities directly relate to preclinical screening applications in animal models and are foreseen to significantly impact clinical decision making as well.

  18. Hadamard multimode optical imaging transceiver

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Bradly J; Guenther, David C; Tiee, Joe J; Kellum, Mervyn J; Olivas, Nicholas L; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Judd, Stephen L; Braun, Thomas R

    2012-10-30

    Disclosed is a method and system for simultaneously acquiring and producing results for multiple image modes using a common sensor without optical filtering, scanning, or other moving parts. The system and method utilize the Walsh-Hadamard correlation detection process (e.g., functions/matrix) to provide an all-binary structure that permits seamless bridging between analog and digital domains. An embodiment may capture an incoming optical signal at an optical aperture, convert the optical signal to an electrical signal, pass the electrical signal through a Low-Noise Amplifier (LNA) to create an LNA signal, pass the LNA signal through one or more correlators where each correlator has a corresponding Walsh-Hadamard (WH) binary basis function, calculate a correlation output coefficient for each correlator as a function of the corresponding WH binary basis function in accordance with Walsh-Hadamard mathematical principles, digitize each of the correlation output coefficient by passing each correlation output coefficient through an Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC), and performing image mode processing on the digitized correlation output coefficients as desired to produce one or more image modes. Some, but not all, potential image modes include: multi-channel access, temporal, range, three-dimensional, and synthetic aperture.

  19. Recent advances in digital camera optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Keizo

    2012-10-01

    The digital camera market has extremely expanded in the last ten years. The zoom lens for digital camera is especially the key determining factor of the camera body size and image quality. Its technologies have been based on several analog technological progresses including the method of aspherical lens manufacturing and the mechanism of image stabilization. Panasonic is one of the pioneers of both technologies. I will introduce the previous trend in optics of zoom lens as well as original optical technologies of Panasonic digital camera "LUMIX", and in addition optics in 3D camera system. Besides, I would like to suppose the future trend in digital cameras.

  20. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-10-21

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations is disclosed, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components. 2 figs.

  1. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, Jr., David N.; Simpson, Marc L.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components.

  2. Optical Analysis of Microscope Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biles, Jonathan R.

    Microscope images were analyzed with coherent and incoherent light using analog optical techniques. These techniques were found to be useful for analyzing large numbers of nonsymbolic, statistical microscope images. In the first part phase coherent transparencies having 20-100 human multiple myeloma nuclei were simultaneously photographed at 100 power magnification using high resolution holographic film developed to high contrast. An optical transform was obtained by focussing the laser onto each nuclear image and allowing the diffracted light to propagate onto a one dimensional photosensor array. This method reduced the data to the position of the first two intensity minima and the intensity of successive maxima. These values were utilized to estimate the four most important cancer detection clues of nuclear size, shape, darkness, and chromatin texture. In the second part, the geometric and holographic methods of phase incoherent optical processing were investigated for pattern recognition of real-time, diffuse microscope images. The theory and implementation of these processors was discussed in view of their mutual problems of dimness, image bias, and detector resolution. The dimness problem was solved by either using a holographic correlator or a speckle free laser microscope. The latter was built using a spinning tilted mirror which caused the speckle to change so quickly that it averaged out during the exposure. To solve the bias problem low image bias templates were generated by four techniques: microphotography of samples, creation of typical shapes by computer graphics editor, transmission holography of photoplates of samples, and by spatially coherent color image bias removal. The first of these templates was used to perform correlations with bacteria images. The aperture bias was successfully removed from the correlation with a video frame subtractor. To overcome the limited detector resolution it is necessary to discover some analog nonlinear intensity

  3. Image Resolution in Optical Nanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuizen, Robert P.J.; Lidke, Keith A.; Bates, Mark; Puig, Daniela Leyton; Grünwald, David; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Rieger, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Resolution in optical nanoscopy depends on the localization uncertainty of single fluorescent labels, the density of labels covering the sample, and the sample’s spatial structure. Currently there is no integral, practical resolution measure that takes all factors into account. Here we introduce such a measure that can be computed directly from the image. We demonstrate its validity and benefits on 2D and 3D localization microscopy images of tubulin and actin filaments. Our approach makes it possible to compare achieved resolutions in images taken with different nanoscopy methods, optimize and rank different emitter localization and labeling strategies, define a stopping criterion for data acquisition, describe image anisotropy and heterogeneity, and, surprisingly, estimate the average number of localizations per emitter. Our findings challenge the current focus on obtaining the best localization precision, but instead show how the best image resolution can be achieved as fast as possible. PMID:23624665

  4. Advanced rotorcraft helmet display sighting system optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynal, Francois; Chen, Muh-Fa

    2002-08-01

    Kaiser Electronics' Advanced Rotorcraft Helmet Display Sighting System is a Biocular Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) for Rotary Wing Aviators. Advanced Rotorcraft HMDs requires low head supported weight, low center of mass offsets, low peripheral obstructions of the visual field, large exit pupils, large eye relief, wide field of view (FOV), high resolution, low luning, sun light readability with high contrast and low prismatic deviations. Compliance with these safety, user acceptance and optical performance requirements is challenging. The optical design presented in this paper provides an excellent balance of these different and conflicting requirements. The Advanced Rotorcraft HMD optical design is a pupil forming off axis catadioptric system that incorporates a transmissive SXGA Active Matrix liquid Crystal Display (AMLCD), an LED array backlight and a diopter adjustment mechanism.

  5. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager: Radiometric Response Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, J. A.; Lencioni, D. E.; Evans, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) is one of three instruments to be flown on the first Earth Observing mission (EO-1) under NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP). ALI contains a number of innovative features, including a wide field of view optical design, compact multispectral focal plane arrays, non-cryogenic HgCdTe detectors for the short wave infrared bands, and silicon carbide optics. This document outlines the techniques adopted during ground calibration of the radiometric response of the Advanced Land Imager. Results from system level measurements of the instrument response, signal-to-noise ratio, saturation radiance, and dynamic range for all detectors of every spectral band are also presented.

  6. Advanced micromoulding of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Hans-Dieter; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Paatzsch, Thomas; Smaglinski, Ingo; Weber, Lutz

    1999-09-01

    There is a growing need for micro-optical components in the field of tele- and datacom applications. Such components have to be very precise and should be available in reasonable numbers. Microtechnology provides manufacturing techniques that fulfill both requirements. Using micro electro discharge machining, laser micromachining, ultra precision milling and deep lithography with subsequent electroforming methods, complex tools for the replication of highly precise plastic parts have been manufactured. In many cases a combination of methods enumerated above gives a tool which shows both functionality and cost-efficiency. As examples we present the realization of integrated-optical components with passive fiber-waveguide coupling used as components in optical networks and as velocity sensors for two-phase flows, like liquids containing small gas bubbles or particles. In the first case multimode 4 X 4 star couplers have been manufactured in a pilot series that show excess loss values below 3 dB and a uniformity better than 3 dB at 830 nm. This performance becomes possible by using a compression molding process. By stamping the microstructured mold into a semifinished PMMA plate exact replication of the molds as well as very low surface roughness of the waveguide side walls could be observed. In the second case the waveguide channels of the flow sensors show dimensions of between 20 micrometer and 100 micrometer and an aspect ratio of about 20. These structures have been replicated by injection molding of PMMA using variotherm process treatment with a cycle time of about 2 - 3 min.

  7. New multiband IR imaging optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayya, Shyam; Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Gibson, Daniel; Fleet, Erin; Shaw, Brandon; Hunt, Michael; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2013-06-01

    We report new multispectral materials that transmit from 0.9 to < 12 µm in wavelength. These materials fill up the glass map for multispectral optics and vary in refractive index from 2.38 to 3.17. They show a large spread in dispersion (Abbe number) and offer some unique solutions for multispectral optics designs. One of the glasses developed is a very good candidate to replace Ge, as it has a combination of excellent properties, including high Abbe number in the LWIR, high index of 3.2, 60% lower dn/dT, and better thermal stability at working temperatures. Our results also provide a wider selection of optical materials to enable simpler achromat designs. For example, we have developed other glasses that have relatively high Abbe number in both the MWIR and LWIR regions, while our MILTRAN ceramic has low Abbe number in both regions. This makes for a very good combination of glasses and MILTRAN ceramic (analogous to crown and flint glasses in the visible) for MWIR + LWIR dual band imaging. We have designed preliminary optics for one such imager with f/2.5, 51 mm focal length and 22 degrees FOV using a spaced doublet of NRL's glass and MILTRAN ceramic. NRL's approach reduces the number of elements, weight, complexity and cost compared with the approach using traditional optics. Another important advantage of using NRL glasses in optics design is their negative or very low positive dn/dT, that makes it easier to athermalize the optical system.

  8. Optical molecular imaging in PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Soumya; Snyder, John W.; Foster, Thomas H.

    2007-02-01

    Motivated by recent successes in fluorescence imaging of whole mount tissue preparations and by rapid progress in the fields of molecular imaging and molecular biology, we are exploring a number of applications of optical fluorescence imaging in superficial murine tumor models in vivo. Imaging the PDT-induced expression of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in cells and in vivo is accomplished using stably transfected EMT6 cells in which the gene for GFP is under the control of the HSP70 promoter. These cells readily form solid tumors in BALB/c mice, enabling the direct imaging of the extent and time course of the activation of this promoter, with each mouse serving as its own control. Imaging of similarly transfected EMT6 cells with a HIF-1α/GFP fusion protein vector enables visualization of HIF-1α translocation to the nucleus. Recently, we have accomplished fluorescent labeling of surface antigens in vivo using intratumor and intravenous injection of fluorophore-conjugated antibodies. Injection of deep-red fluorophore-conjugated-anti-CD31 enables confocal fluorescence imaging of the tumor vasculature to depths of at least 100 microns. With the vessels rendered fluorescent in this way, a number of interesting studies become possible in the living mouse, including the direct visualization of photosensitizer distribution from perfused vessels. Using the appropriate fluorophore-conjugated antibodies, we have also been able to image infiltrating granulocytes in EMT6 tumors in response to PDT in vivo.

  9. Critical Review of Noninvasive Optical Technologies for Wound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Maanasa; Rodriguez, Suset; Solis, Elizabeth; Lei, Jiali; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Noninvasive imaging approaches can provide greater information about a wound than visual inspection during the wound healing and treatment process. This review article focuses on various optical imaging techniques developed to image different wound types (more specifically ulcers). Recent Advances: The noninvasive optical imaging approaches in this review include hyperspectral imaging, multispectral imaging, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser Doppler imaging, laser speckle imaging, spatial frequency domain imaging, and fluorescence imaging. The various wounds imaged using these techniques include open wounds, chronic wounds, diabetic foot ulcers, decubitus ulcers, venous leg ulcers, and burns. Preliminary work in the development and implementation of a near-infrared optical scanner for wound imaging as a noncontact hand-held device is briefly described. The technology is based on NIRS and has demonstrated its potential to differentiate a healing from nonhealing wound region. Critical Issues: While most of the optical imaging techniques can penetrate few hundred microns to a 1–2 mm from the wound surface, NIRS has the potential to penetrate deeper, demonstrating the potential to image internal wounds. Future Directions: All the technologies are currently at various stages of translational efforts to the clinic, with NIRS holding a greater promise for physiological assessment of the wounds internal, beyond the gold-standard visual assessment. PMID:27602254

  10. Critical Review of Noninvasive Optical Technologies for Wound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Maanasa; Rodriguez, Suset; Solis, Elizabeth; Lei, Jiali; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Noninvasive imaging approaches can provide greater information about a wound than visual inspection during the wound healing and treatment process. This review article focuses on various optical imaging techniques developed to image different wound types (more specifically ulcers). Recent Advances: The noninvasive optical imaging approaches in this review include hyperspectral imaging, multispectral imaging, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser Doppler imaging, laser speckle imaging, spatial frequency domain imaging, and fluorescence imaging. The various wounds imaged using these techniques include open wounds, chronic wounds, diabetic foot ulcers, decubitus ulcers, venous leg ulcers, and burns. Preliminary work in the development and implementation of a near-infrared optical scanner for wound imaging as a noncontact hand-held device is briefly described. The technology is based on NIRS and has demonstrated its potential to differentiate a healing from nonhealing wound region. Critical Issues: While most of the optical imaging techniques can penetrate few hundred microns to a 1–2 mm from the wound surface, NIRS has the potential to penetrate deeper, demonstrating the potential to image internal wounds. Future Directions: All the technologies are currently at various stages of translational efforts to the clinic, with NIRS holding a greater promise for physiological assessment of the wounds internal, beyond the gold-standard visual assessment.

  11. Ultrafast optics: Imaging and manipulating biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheetz, Kraig E.; Squier, Jeff

    2009-03-01

    The rapid evolution of ultrafast optics technology over the past two decades has opened the window to a broad range of applications in biology and medicine. Compact, reliable, and turn-key ultrafast laser systems are enabling cutting-edge science to take place in everyday laboratories and clinics. Led by the discovery of two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy nearly 20 years ago, the biological imaging community is exploring unique image contrast mechanisms and pushing spatial and temporal resolution to new limits. Concurrent with advancements in imaging are developments in the precision application of extremely high peak intensities available in ultrashort pulses for disrupting or manipulating targeted locations in biological systems on the submicron scale while leaving surrounding tissue healthy. The ability for scientists to selectively discriminate structures of interest at the cellular and subcellular levels under relevant physiological conditions shows tremendous promise for accelerating the path to understanding biological functions at the most fundamental level.

  12. Pioneer imaging photopolarimeter optical system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellicori, S. F.; Russell, E. E.; Watts, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    The imaging photopolarimeter aboard the Pioneer 10 spacecraft en route to the vicinity of Jupiter is described. This instrument is capable of moderate resolution spin-scan imaging and high precision polarimetric and photometric mapping of Jupiter in red and blue light. The field of view can be selectively changed from 0.50 mrad square to 40 mrad square to accommodate resolution and radiance combinations ranging from the zodiacal background to that of Jupiter. Optical materials were chosen to survive, with minimum degradation, the rigors of a nearly 2-year journey to Jupiter including transit through the Jovian trapped radiation belts. The optics are described in detail, and the operational system is outlined. The procedures for preflight and in-flight calibration are described, and some performance characteristics and preliminary flight results are presented.

  13. Pioneer imaging photopolarimeter optical system.

    PubMed

    Pellicori, S F; Russell, E E; Watts, L A

    1973-06-01

    The imaging photopolarimeter aboard the Pioneer 10 spacecraft en route to the vicinity of Jupiter is described. This instrument is capable of moderate resolution spin-scan imaging and high precision polarimetric and photometric mapping of Jupiter in red and blue light. The field of view can be selectively changed from 0.50 mrad square to 40 mrad square to accommodate resolution and radiance combinations ranging from the zodiacal background to that of Jupiter. The dynamic range (radiance) of the instrument is greater than 10(8). Optical materials were chosen to survive, with minimum degradation, the rigors of a nearly 2-year journey to Jupiter including transit through the Jovian trapped radiation belts. The optics are described in detail, and the operational system is outlined. The procedures for preflight and in-flight calibration are described, and some performance characteristics and preliminary flight results are presented. PMID:20125507

  14. Fluorescence imaging spectrometer optical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taiti, A.; Coppo, P.; Battistelli, E.

    2015-09-01

    The optical design of the FLuORescence Imaging Spectrometer (FLORIS) studied for the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission is discussed. FLEX is a candidate for the ESA's 8th Earth Explorer opportunity mission. FLORIS is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager foreseen to be embarked on board of a medium size satellite, flying in tandem with Sentinel-3 in a Sun synchronous orbit at a height of about 815 km. FLORIS will observe the vegetation fluorescence and reflectance within a spectral range between 500 and 780 nm. Multi-frames acquisitions on matrix detectors during the satellite movement will allow the production of 2D Earth scene images in two different spectral channels, called HR and LR with spectral resolution of 0.3 and 2 nm respectively. A common fore optics is foreseen to enhance by design the spatial co-registration between the two spectral channels, which have the same ground spatial sampling (300 m) and swath (150 km). An overlapped spectral range between the two channels is also introduced to simplify the spectral coregistration. A compact opto-mechanical solution with all spherical and plane optical elements is proposed, and the most significant design rationales are described. The instrument optical architecture foresees a dual Babinet scrambler, a dioptric telescope and two grating spectrometers (HR and LR), each consisting of a modified Offner configuration. The developed design is robust, stable vs temperature, easy to align, showing very high optical quality along the whole field of view. The system gives also excellent correction for transverse chromatic aberration and distortions (keystone and smile).

  15. Advanced Geothermal Optical Transducer (AGOT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-01

    Today's geothermal pressure-temperature measuring tools are short endurance, high value instruments, used sparingly because their loss is a major expense. In this project LEL offered to build and test a rugged, affordable, downhole sensor capable ofretuming an uninterrupted data stream at pressures and of 10,000 psi and temperatures up to 250 C, thus permitting continuous deep-well logging. It was proposed to meet the need by specializing LEL's patented 'Twin Column Transducer' technology to satisfy the demands of geothermal pressure/temperature measurements. TCT transducers have very few parts, none of which are moving parts, and all of which can be fabricated from high-temperature super alloys or from ceramics; the result is an extremely rugged device, essentially impervious to chemical attack and readily modified to operate at high pressure and temperature. To measure pressure and temperature they capitalize on the relative expansion of optical elements subjected to thermal or mechanical stresses; if one element is maintained at a reference pressure while the other is opened to ambient, the differential displacement then serves as a measure of pressure. A transducer responding to temperature rather than pressure is neatly created by 'inverting' the pressure-measuring design so that both deflecting structures see identical temperatures and temperature gradients, but whose thermal expansion coefficients are deliberately mismatched to give differential expansion. The starting point for development of a PT Tool was the company's model DPT feedback-stabilized 5,000 psi sensor (U.S. Patent 5,311,014, 'Optical Transducer for Measuring Downhole Pressure', claiming a pressure transducer capable of measuring static, dynamic, and true bi-directional differential pressure at high temperatures), shown in the upper portion of Figure 1. The DPT occupies a 1 x 2 x 4-inch volume, weighs 14 ounces, and is accurate to 1 percent of full scale. Employing a pair of identical, low

  16. Center for Advanced Signal and Imaging Sciences Workshop 2004

    SciTech Connect

    McClellan, J H; Carrano, C; Poyneer, L; Palmer, D; Baker, K; Chen, D; London, R; Weinert, G; Brase, J; Paglieroni, D; Lopez, A; Grant, C W; Wright, W; Burke, M; Miller, W O; DeTeresa, S; White, D; Toeppen, J; Haugen, P; Kamath, C; Nguyen, T; Manay, S; Newsam, S; Cantu-Paz, E; Pao, H; Chang, J; Chambers, D; Leach, R; Paulson, C; Romero, C E; Spiridon, A; Vigars, M; Welsh, P; Zumstein, J; Romero, K; Oppenheim, A; Harris, D B; Dowla, F; Brown, C G; Clark, G A; Ong, M M; Clance, T J; Kegelmeyer, l M; Benzuijen, M; Bliss, E; Burkhart, S; Conder, A; Daveler, S; Ferguson, W; Glenn, S; Liebman, J; Norton, M; Prasad, R; Salmon, T; Kegelmeyer, L M; Hafiz, O; Cheung, S; Fodor, I; Aufderheide, M B; Bary, A; Martz, Jr., H E; Burke, M W; Benson, S; Fisher, K A; Quarry, M J

    2004-11-15

    Welcome to the Eleventh Annual C.A.S.I.S. Workshop, a yearly event at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, presented by the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences, or CASIS, and sponsored by the LLNL Engineering Directorate. Every November for the last 10 years we have convened a diverse set of engineering and scientific talent to share their work in signal processing, imaging, communications, controls, along with associated fields of mathematics, statistics, and computing sciences. This year is no exception, with sessions in Adaptive Optics, Applied Imaging, Scientific Data Mining, Electromagnetic Image and Signal Processing, Applied Signal Processing, National Ignition Facility (NIF) Imaging, and Nondestructive Characterization.

  17. Advanced optics in an interdisciplinary graduate program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nic Chormaic, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, established in November 2011, provides a 5- year interdisciplinary PhD program, through English, within Japan. International and Japanese students entering the program undertake coursework and laboratory rotations across a range of topics, including neuroscience, molecular science, physics, chemistry, marine science and mathematics, regardless of previous educational background. To facilitate interdisciplinarity, the university has no departments, ensuring seamless interactions between researchers from all sectors. As part of the PhD program a course in Advanced Optics has been developed to provide PhD students with the practical and theoretical skills to enable them to use optics tools in any research environment. The theoretical aspect of the course introduces students to procedures for complex beam generation (e.g. Laguerre-Gaussian), optical trapping, beam analysis and photon optics, and is supported through a practical program covering introductory interference/diffraction experiments through to more applied fiber optics. It is hoped that, through early exposure to optics handling and measurement techniques, students will be able to develop and utilize optics tools regardless of research field. In addition to the formal course in Advanced Optics, a selection of students also undertakes 13 week laboratory rotations in the Light-Matter Interactions research laboratory, where they work side-by-side with physicists in developing optics tools for laser cooling, photonics or bio-applications. While currently in the first year, conclusive results about the success of such an interdisciplinary PhD training are speculative. However, initial observations indicate a rich cross-fertilization of ideas stemming from the diverse backgrounds of all participants.

  18. Applications of advanced diffractive optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, W. Hudson; Morris, James E.; Feldman, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Digital Optics Corporation is a UNC-Charlotte spin-off company, established to transfer technology developed at UNC-Charlotte for the design and manufacture Computer Generated Holograms (CGH's) and to market products based on CGH technology. DOC acquired core technologies from UNC-Charlotte including: (1) a CGH encoding process that can provide holograms with extremely high diffraction efficiency; (2) a low cost, high precision CGH manufacturing process; and (3) extensive holographic and refractive element design capabilities for design and evaluation of complex optical systems. These technologies have been used to design and/or manufacture optical components for a variety of applications including: (1) generation of Spot arrays; (2) fiber optic coupling elements; (3) optical interconnects between VLSI chips within and between multichip modules; and (4) imaging systems for head-mounted displays (HMD's).

  19. Recent advances in imaging subcellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kenneth A.; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology came about with the ability to first visualize cells. As microscopy techniques advanced, the early microscopists became the first cell biologists to observe the inner workings and subcellular structures that control life. This ability to see organelles within a cell provided scientists with the first understanding of how cells function. The visualization of the dynamic architecture of subcellular structures now often drives questions as researchers seek to understand the intricacies of the cell. With the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques, better and new optical techniques, and more sensitive and faster cameras, a whole array of questions can now be asked. There has been an explosion of new light microscopic techniques, and the race is on to build better and more powerful imaging systems so that we can further our understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms controlling molecular cell biology. PMID:27408708

  20. Recent advances in imaging subcellular processes.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kenneth A; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology came about with the ability to first visualize cells. As microscopy techniques advanced, the early microscopists became the first cell biologists to observe the inner workings and subcellular structures that control life. This ability to see organelles within a cell provided scientists with the first understanding of how cells function. The visualization of the dynamic architecture of subcellular structures now often drives questions as researchers seek to understand the intricacies of the cell. With the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques, better and new optical techniques, and more sensitive and faster cameras, a whole array of questions can now be asked. There has been an explosion of new light microscopic techniques, and the race is on to build better and more powerful imaging systems so that we can further our understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms controlling molecular cell biology. PMID:27408708

  1. Imaging spectrometer technologies for advanced Earth remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellman, J. B.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Kuperfman, P.; Salazar, R. P.; Sigurdson, K. B.

    1982-01-01

    A major requirement of multispectral imaging systems for advanced Earth remote sensing is the provision for greater spectral resolution and more versatile spectral band selection. The imaging spectrometer instrument concept provides this versatility by the combination of pushbroom imaging and spectrally dispersing optics using area array detectors in the focal plane. The shuttle imaging spectrometer concept achieves 10- and 20-meter ground instantaneous fields of view with 20-nanometer spectral resolution from Earth Orbit. Onboard processing allows the selection of spectral bands during flight; this, in turn, permits the sensor parameters to be tailored to the experiment objectives. Advances in optical design, infrared detector arrays, and focal plane cooling indicate the feasibility of the instrument concept and support the practicability of a validation flight experiment for the shuttle in the late 1980s.

  2. Optical Fiber Sensors for Advanced Civil Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Marten Johannes Cornelius

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation is to develop, analyze, and implement optical fiber-based sensors for the nondestructive quantitative evaluation of advanced civil structures. Based on a comparative evaluation of optical fiber sensors that may be used to obtain quantitative information related to physical perturbations in the civil structure, the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) optical fiber sensor is selected as the most attractive sensor. The operation of the EFPI sensor is explained using the Kirchhoff diffraction approach. As is shown in this dissertation, this approach better predicts the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of gap length than methods employed previously. The performance of the optical fiber sensor is demonstrated in three different implementations. In the first implementation, performed with researchers in the Civil Engineering Department at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, optical fiber sensors were used to obtain quantitative strain information from reinforced concrete interior and exterior column-to-beam connections. The second implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the United States Bureau of Mines in Spokane, Washington, used optical fiber sensors to monitor the performance of roof bolts used in mines. The last implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the Turner-Fairbanks Federal Highway Administration Research Center in McLean, Virginia, used optical fiber sensors, attached to composite prestressing strands used for reinforcing concrete, to obtain absolute strain information. Multiplexing techniques including time, frequency and wavelength division multiplexing are briefly discussed, whereas the principles of operation of spread spectrum and optical time domain reflectometery (OTDR) are discussed in greater detail. Results demonstrating that spread spectrum and OTDR techniques can be used to multiplex optical fiber sensors are presented. Finally, practical

  3. Recent advances in imaging technologies in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Naseem; Bansal, Nikhil; Logani, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Dentistry has witnessed tremendous advances in all its branches over the past three decades. With these advances, the need for more precise diagnostic tools, specially imaging methods, have become mandatory. From the simple intra-oral periapical X-rays, advanced imaging techniques like computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have also found place in modern dentistry. Changing from analogue to digital radiography has not only made the process simpler and faster but also made image storage, manipulation (brightness/contrast, image cropping, etc.) and retrieval easier. The three-dimensional imaging has made the complex cranio-facial structures more accessible for examination and early and accurate diagnosis of deep seated lesions. This paper is to review current advances in imaging technology and their uses in different disciplines of dentistry. PMID:25349663

  4. Advanced optical blade tip clearance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, M. J.; Honeycutt, R. E.; Nordlund, R. E.; Robinson, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced electro-optical system was developed to measure single blade tip clearances and average blade tip clearances between a rotor and its gas path seal in an operating gas turbine engine. This system is applicable to fan, compressor, and turbine blade tip clearance measurement requirements, and the system probe is particularly suitable for operation in the extreme turbine environment. A study of optical properties of blade tips was conducted to establish measurement system application limitations. A series of laboratory tests was conducted to determine the measurement system's operational performance characteristics and to demonstrate system capability under simulated operating gas turbine environmental conditions. Operational and environmental performance test data are presented.

  5. Advance lightpath provisioning in interdomain optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafid, A.; Maach, A.; Khair, M. G.; Drissi, J.

    2005-11-01

    In interconnected optical networks, users submit lightpath requests at the time they wish to establish the lightpath. The service provider consults the information gathered by the interdomain routing protocols for available resources. For each request, the network must decide immediately whether to accept or reject the request. In this model, there is always the uncertainty of whether the user will be able to establish the desired lightpath at the desired time or not. Furthermore, in the context of a number of applications, e.g., grid applications, users need to set up lightpaths in advance to perform their activities that are planned in advance. We propose a new interdomain routing protocol called Advance Optical Routing Border Gateway Protocol (AORBGP) and a scheme that allows the setup of interdomain lightpaths in advance. AORBGP allows gathering information about interdomain paths and availability of wavelengths in the future. The proposed advance lightpath setup scheme makes use of AORBGP to get information about available resources (i.e., wavelengths) required to process lightpath setup requests. One of the key innovations of the scheme is that it provides the user with alternatives, carefully selected, when his or her request cannot be accommodated because of resource shortages. Indeed, the scheme provides the user with options to set up a lightpath later than the requested start time or with shorter duration than the requested duration. We performed a set of simulations to evaluate the benefits of the proposed scheme and the effect of a number of parameters on the performance of AORBGP.

  6. Advancements in metro optical network architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschis, Loukas

    2005-02-01

    This paper discusses the innovation in network architectures, and optical transport, that enables metropolitan networks to cost-effectively scale to hundreds Gb/s of capacity, and to hundreds km of reach, and to also meet the diverse service needs of enterprise and residential applications. A converged metro network, where Ethernet/IP services, and traditional TDM traffic operate over an intelligent WDM transport layer is increasingly becoming the most attractive architecture addressing the primary need of network operators for significantly improved capital and operational network cost. At the same time, this converged network has to leverage advanced technology, and introduce intelligence in order to significantly improve the deployment and manageability of WDM transport. The most important system advancements and the associated technology innovations that enhance the cost-effectiveness of metropolitan optical networks are being reviewed.

  7. Wave-Optics Analysis of Pupil Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.; Bos, Brent J.

    2006-01-01

    Pupil imaging performance is analyzed from the perspective of physical optics. A multi-plane diffraction model is constructed by propagating the scalar electromagnetic field, surface by surface, along the optical path comprising the pupil imaging optical system. Modeling results are compared with pupil images collected in the laboratory. The experimental setup, although generic for pupil imaging systems in general, has application to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) optical system characterization where the pupil images are used as a constraint to the wavefront sensing and control process. Practical design considerations follow from the diffraction modeling which are discussed in the context of the JWST Observatory.

  8. Recent advances in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhihua; Wang, Chuan; Shen, Yi; Huang, Liangming; Wu, Lan; Du, Chixin

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports recent advances in spectral domain Doppler optical coherence tomography (SD-DOCT) in our group. A high speed SD-DOCT system is developed and applied to animal study and microchip evaluation. Further improvements concerning SD-DOCT are presented, those including higher-order cross-correlation for phase retrieval, transit-time analysis for velocity quantification, and orthogonal dispersive SD-OCT for depth extension.

  9. Adaptive optical ghost imaging through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dongfeng; Fan, Chengyu; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Jinghui; Shen, Hong; Qiao, Chunhong; Wang, Yingjian

    2012-12-17

    We demonstrate for the first time (to our knowledge) that a high-quality image can still be obtained in atmospheric turbulence by applying adaptive optical ghost imaging (AOGI) system even when conventional ghost imaging system fails to produce an image. The performance of AOGI under different strength of atmospheric turbulence is investigated by simulation. The influence of adaptive optics system with different numbers of adaptive mirror elements on obtained image quality is also studied.

  10. Optical diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma using advanced optical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-02-01

    Clinical imaging techniques for diagnosing breast cancer mainly include X-ray mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which have respective drawbacks. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a potentially attractive optical technique to bridge the current gap in clinical utility. In this paper, MPM was used to image normal and ductal cancerous breast tissues, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Our results showed that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of normal breast tissue, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) lesions at the molecular level comparable to histopathology. These findings indicate that, with integration of MPM into currently accepted clinical imaging system, it has the potential to make a real-time histological diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma in vivo.

  11. Digital polarization holography advancing geometrical phase optics.

    PubMed

    De Sio, Luciano; Roberts, David E; Liao, Zhi; Nersisyan, Sarik; Uskova, Olena; Wickboldt, Lloyd; Tabiryan, Nelson; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    Geometrical phase or the fourth generation (4G) optics enables realization of optical components (lenses, prisms, gratings, spiral phase plates, etc.) by patterning the optical axis orientation in the plane of thin anisotropic films. Such components exhibit near 100% diffraction efficiency over a broadband of wavelengths. The films are obtained by coating liquid crystalline (LC) materials over substrates with patterned alignment conditions. Photo-anisotropic materials are used for producing desired alignment conditions at the substrate surface. We present and discuss here an opportunity of producing the widest variety of "free-form" 4G optical components with arbitrary spatial patterns of the optical anisotropy axis orientation with the aid of a digital spatial light polarization converter (DSLPC). The DSLPC is based on a reflective, high resolution spatial light modulator (SLM) combined with an "ad hoc" optical setup. The most attractive feature of the use of a DSLPC for photoalignment of nanometer thin photo-anisotropic coatings is that the orientation of the alignment layer, and therefore of the fabricated LC or LC polymer (LCP) components can be specified on a pixel-by-pixel basis with high spatial resolution. By varying the optical magnification or de-magnification the spatial resolution of the photoaligned layer can be adjusted to an optimum for each application. With a simple "click" it is possible to record different optical components as well as arbitrary patterns ranging from lenses to invisible labels and other transparent labels that reveal different images depending on the side from which they are viewed. PMID:27505793

  12. Reflective optical imaging system with balanced distortion

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Hudyma, Russell M.; Shafer, David R.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1999-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements comprise, in order from object to image, convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention enables the use of larger slit dimensions associated with ring field scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density. The inventive optical system is characterized by reduced dynamic distortion because the static distortion is balanced across the slit width.

  13. Picosecond Optical MCPI-Based Imagers

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-01

    We present the desired performance specifications for an advanced optical imager, which borrows practical concepts in high-speed microchannel plate (MCP) intensified x-ray stripline imagers and time-dilation techniques. With a four-fold speed improvement in state-of-the-art high-voltage impulse drivers, and novel atomic-layer deposition MCPs, we tender a design capable of 5 ps optical gating without the use of magnetic field confinement of the photoelectrons. We analyze the electron dispersion effects in the MCP and their implications for gating pulses shorter than the MCP transit time. We present a wideband design printed-circuit version of the Series Transmission Line Transformer (STLT) that makes use of 50-ohm coaxial 1.0 mm (110 GHz) and 1.85 mm (65 GHz) hermetically sealed vacuum feedthroughs and low-dispersion Teflon/Kapton circuit materials without the use of any vias. The STLT matches impedance at all interfaces with a 16:1 impedance (4:1 voltage) reduction, and delivers a dispersion-limited sharp impulse to the MCP strip. A comparison of microstrip design calculations is given, showing variances between method of moments, empirical codes, and finite element methods for broad, low-impedance traces. Prototype performance measurements are forthcoming.

  14. The input optics of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, D. B.; Arain, M. A.; Ciani, G.; Feldbaum, D.; Fulda, P.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, R.; Heintze, M.; Martin, R. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Williams, L. F.; Mueller, G.; Quetschke, V.; Korth, W. Z.; Reitze, D. H.; Derosa, R. T.; Effler, A.; Kokeyama, K.; Frolov, V. V.; Mullavey, A.; Poeld, J.

    2016-03-01

    The Input Optics (IO) of advanced LIGO will be described. The IO consists of all the optics between the laser and the power recycling mirror. The scope of the IO includes the following hardware: phase modulators, power control, input mode cleaner, an in-vacuum Faraday isolator, and mode matching telescopes. The IO group has developed and characterized RTP-based phase modulators capable of operation at 180 W cw input power. In addition, the Faraday isolator is compensated for depolarization and thermal lensing effects up to the same power and is capable of achieving greater than 40 dB isolation. This research has been supported by the NSF through Grants PHY-1205512 and PHY-1505598. LIGO-G1600067.

  15. Recent Advancements in Microwave Imaging Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    H. Park; C.C. Chang; B.H. Deng; C.W. Domier; A.J.H. Donni; K. Kawahata; C. Liang; X.P. Liang; H.J. Lu; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; A. Mase; H. Matsuura; E. Mazzucato; A. Miura; K. Mizuno; T. Munsat; K. and Y. Nagayama; M.J. van de Pol; J. Wang; Z.G. Xia; W-K. Zhang

    2002-03-26

    Significant advances in microwave and millimeter wave technology over the past decade have enabled the development of a new generation of imaging diagnostics for current and envisioned magnetic fusion devices. Prominent among these are revolutionary microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI), microwave phase imaging interferometers, imaging microwave scattering and microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) systems for imaging electron temperature and electron density fluctuations (both turbulent and coherent) and profiles (including transport barriers) on toroidal devices such as tokamaks, spherical tori, and stellarators. The diagnostic technology is reviewed, and typical diagnostic systems are analyzed. Representative experimental results obtained with these novel diagnostic systems are also presented.

  16. Coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riza, Nabeel A.

    2016-04-01

    Starting in 2001, we proposed and extensively demonstrated (using a DMD: Digital Micromirror Device) an agile pixel Spatial Light Modulator (SLM)-based optical imager based on single pixel photo-detection (also called a single pixel camera) that is suited for operations with both coherent and incoherent light across broad spectral bands. This imager design operates with the agile pixels programmed in a limited SNR operations starring time-multiplexed mode where acquisition of image irradiance (i.e., intensity) data is done one agile pixel at a time across the SLM plane where the incident image radiation is present. Motivated by modern day advances in RF wireless, optical wired communications and electronic signal processing technologies and using our prior-art SLM-based optical imager design, described using a surprisingly simple approach is a new imager design called Coded Access Optical Sensor (CAOS) that has the ability to alleviate some of the key prior imager fundamental limitations. The agile pixel in the CAOS imager can operate in different time-frequency coding modes like Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA), Code-Division Multiple Access (CDMA), and Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA). Data from a first CAOS camera demonstration is described along with novel designs of CAOS-based optical instruments for various applications.

  17. Optical design of the short pulse x-ray imaging and microscopy time-angle correlated diffraction beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, R.; Dufresne, E. M.; Borland, M.; Beno, M. A.; Young, L.; Kim, K.-J.; Evans, P. G.

    2013-05-15

    The short pulse x-ray imaging and microscopy beamline is one of the two x-ray beamlines that will take full advantage of the short pulse x-ray source in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) upgrade. A horizontally diffracting double crystal monochromator which includes a sagittally focusing second crystal will collect most of the photons generated when the chirped electron beam traverses the undulator. A Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror system after the monochromator will deliver to the sample a beam which has an approximately linear correlation between time and vertical beam angle. The correlation at the sample position has a slope of 0.052 ps/{mu}rad extending over an angular range of 800 {mu}rad for a cavity deflection voltage of 2 MV. The expected time resolution of the whole system is 2.6 ps. The total flux expected at the sample position at 10 keV with a 0.9 eV energy resolution is 5.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} photons/s at a spot having horizontal and vertical full width at half maximum of 33 {mu}m horizontal by 14 {mu}m vertical. This new beamline will enable novel time-dispersed diffraction experiments on small samples using the full repetition rate of the APS.

  18. Adaptive Optics Imaging and Spectroscopy of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Lindley (Technical Monitor); Sromovsky, Lawrence A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We proposed to use high spectral resolution imaging and spectroscopy of Neptune in visible and near-IR spectral ranges to advance our understanding of Neptune s cloud structure. We intended to use the adaptive optics (AO) system at Mt. Wilson at visible wavelengths to try to obtain the first groundbased observations of dark spots on Neptune; we intended to use A 0 observations at the IRTF to obtain near-IR R=2000 spatially resolved spectra and near-IR A0 observations at the Keck observatory to obtain the highest spatial resolution studies of cloud feature dynamics and atmospheric motions. Vertical structure of cloud features was to be inferred from the wavelength dependent absorption of methane and hydrogen,

  19. Desktop supercomputers. Advance medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Frisiello, R S

    1991-02-01

    Medical imaging tools that radiologists as well as a wide range of clinicians and healthcare professionals have come to depend upon are emerging into the next phase of functionality. The strides being made in supercomputing technologies--including reduction of size and price--are pushing medical imaging to a new level of accuracy and functionality.

  20. Advancing optical imaging for breast margin assessment: an analysis of excisional time, cautery, and patent blue dye on underlying sources of contrast.

    PubMed

    Bydlon, Torre M; Barry, William T; Kennedy, Stephanie A; Brown, J Quincy; Gallagher, Jennifer E; Wilke, Lee G; Geradts, Joseph; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2012-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) is a recommended treatment for breast cancer patients where the goal is to remove the tumor and a surrounding rim of normal tissue. Unfortunately, a high percentage of patients return for additional surgeries to remove all of the cancer. Post-operative pathology is the gold standard for evaluating BCS margins but is limited due to the amount of tissue that can be sampled. Frozen section analysis and touch-preparation cytology have been proposed to address the surgical needs but also have sampling limitations. These issues represent an unmet clinical need for guidance in resecting malignant tissue intra-operatively and for pathological sampling. We have developed a quantitative spectral imaging device to examine margins intra-operatively. The context in which this technology is applied (intra-operative or post-operative setting) is influenced by time after excision and surgical factors including cautery and the presence of patent blue dye (specifically Lymphazurin™, used for sentinel lymph node mapping). Optical endpoints of hemoglobin ([THb]), fat ([β-carotene]), and fibroglandular content via light scattering (<µ(s)'>) measurements were quantified from diffuse reflectance spectra of lumpectomy and mastectomy specimens using a Monte Carlo model. A linear longitudinal mixed-effects model was used to fit the optical endpoints for the cautery and kinetics studies. Monte Carlo simulations and tissue mimicking phantoms were used for the patent blue dye experiments. [THb], [β-carotene], and <µ(s)'> were affected by <3.3% error with <80 µM of patent blue dye. The percent change in [β-carotene], <µ(s)'>, and [β-carotene]/<µ(s)'> was <14% in 30 minutes, while percent change in [THb] was >40%. [β-carotene] and [β-carotene]/<µ(s)'> were the only parameters not affected by cautery. This work demonstrates the importance of understanding the post-excision kinetics of ex-vivo tissue and the presence of cautery and patent blue dye for

  1. Advanced Imaging Algorithms for Radiation Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The intent of the proposed work, in collaboration with University of Michigan, is to develop the algorithms that will bring the analysis from qualitative images to quantitative attributes of objects containing SNM. The first step to achieving this is to develop an indepth understanding of the intrinsic errors associated with the deconvolution and MLEM algorithms. A significant new effort will be undertaken to relate the image data to a posited three-dimensional model of geometric primitives that can be adjusted to get the best fit. In this way, parameters of the model such as sizes, shapes, and masses can be extracted for both radioactive and non-radioactive materials. This model-based algorithm will need the integrated response of a hypothesized configuration of material to be calculated many times. As such, both the MLEM and the model-based algorithm require significant increases in calculation speed in order to converge to solutions in practical amounts of time.

  2. The use of optical imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Sabina; Wilson, Ana; Ragunath, Krish

    2016-01-01

    With significant advances in the management of gastrointestinal disease there has been a move from diagnosing advanced pathology, to detecting early lesions that are potentially amenable to curative endoscopic treatment. This has required an improvement in diagnostics, with a focus on identifying and characterising subtle mucosal changes. There is great interest in the use of optical technologies to predict histology and enable the formulation of a real-time in vivo diagnosis, a so-called ‘optical biopsy’. The aim of this review is to explore the evidence for the use of the current commercially available imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27429735

  3. Design architectures for optically multiplexed imaging.

    PubMed

    Shepard, R Hamilton; Rachlin, Yaron; Shah, Vinay; Shih, Tina

    2015-11-30

    Optically multiplexed imaging is the process by which multiple images are overlaid on a single image surface. Uniquely encoding the discrete images allows scene reconstruction from multiplexed images via post processing. We describe a class of optical systems that can achieve high density image multiplexing through a novel division of aperture technique. Fundamental design considerations and performance attributes for this sensor architecture are discussed. A number of spatial and temporal encoding methods are presented including point spread function engineering, amplitude modulation, and image shifting. Results from a prototype five-channel sensor are presented using three different encoding methods in sparse-scene star tracking demonstration. A six-channel optically multiplexed prototype sensor is used to reconstruct imagery from information rich dense scenes through dynamic image shifting. PMID:26698767

  4. Anterior Eye Imaging with Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, David; Li, Yan; Tang, Maolong

    The development of corneal and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology has advanced rapidly in recently years. The scan geometry and imaging wavelength are both important choices to make in designing anterior segment OCT systems. Rectangular scan geometry offers the least image distortion and is now used in most anterior OCT systems. The wavelength of OCT light source affects resolution and penetration. An optimal choice of the OCT imaging wavelength (840, 1,050, or 1,310 nm) depends on the application of interest. Newer generation Fourier-domain OCT technology can provide scan speed 100-1000 times faster than the time-domain technology. Various commercial anterior OCT systems are available on the market. A wide spectrum of diagnostic and surgical applications using anterior segment OCT had been investigated, including mapping of corneal and epithelial thicknesses, keratoconus screening, measuring corneal refractive power, corneal surgery planning and evaluation in LASIK, intracorneal ring implantation, assessment of angle closure glaucoma, anterior chamber biometry and intraocular lens implants, intraocular lens power calculation, and eye bank donor cornea screening.

  5. Advanced optic fabrication using ultrafast laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lauren L.; Qiao, Jun; Qiao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Advanced fabrication and finishing techniques are desired for freeform optics and integrated photonics. Methods including grinding, polishing and magnetorheological finishing used for final figuring and polishing of such optics are time consuming, expensive, and may be unsuitable for complex surface features while common photonics fabrication techniques often limit devices to planar geometries. Laser processing has been investigated as an alternative method for optic forming, surface polishing, structure writing, and welding, as direct tuning of laser parameters and flexible beam delivery are advantageous for complex freeform or photonics elements and material-specific processing. Continuous wave and pulsed laser radiation down to the nanosecond regime have been implemented to achieve nanoscale surface finishes through localized material melting, but the temporal extent of the laser-material interaction often results in the formation of a sub-surface heat affected zone. The temporal brevity of ultrafast laser radiation can allow for the direct vaporization of rough surface asperities with minimal melting, offering the potential for smooth, final surface quality with negligible heat affected material. High intensities achieved in focused ultrafast laser radiation can easily induce phase changes in the bulk of materials for processing applications. We have experimentally tested the effectiveness of ultrafast laser radiation as an alternative laser source for surface processing of monocrystalline silicon. Simulation of material heating associated with ultrafast laser-material interaction has been performed and used to investigate optimized processing parameters including repetition rate. The parameter optimization process and results of experimental processing will be presented.

  6. Recent Advances in Miniaturized Optical Gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Olio, F.; Tatoli, T.; Ciminelli, C.; Armenise, M. N.

    2014-03-01

    Low-cost chip-scale optoelectronic gyroscopes having a resolution ≤ 10 °/h and a good reliability also in harsh environments could have a strong impact on the medium/high performance gyro market, which is currently dominated by well-established bulk optical angular velocity sensors. The R&D activity aiming at the demonstration of those miniaturized sensors is crucial for aerospace/defense industry, and thus it is attracting an increasing research effort and notably funds. In this paper the recent technological advances on the compact optoelectronic gyroscopes with low weight and high energy saving are reviewed. Attention is paid to both the so-called gyroscope-on-a-chip, which is a novel sensor, at the infantile stage, whose optical components are monolithically integrated on a single indium phosphide chip, and to a new ultra-high Q ring resonator for gyro applications with a configuration including a 1D photonic crystal in the resonant path. The emerging field of the gyros based on passive ring cavities, which have already shown performance comparable with that of optical fiber gyros, is also discussed.

  7. Optical imaging of neural activity: from neuron to brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Gong, Hui

    2003-12-01

    This paper introduces the optical imaging approaches at three levels in cognitive neuroscience in the Key Laboratory of Biomedical Photonics of Ministry of Education of China. In molecular and cellular level, the advances in microscopy, molecular optical marker, and sample preparations have made possible studies that characterize the form and function of neurons in unprecedented detail. The development of two-photon excitation has enabled fluorescent imaging of small structures in the midst of highly scattering media with little photodamage. The combination of MPE and multi-electrode array provides a powerful approach for neuronal networks imaging. Intrinsic signal imaging (ISI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI) are effective approaches for intrinsic signal imaging at a given cortical site. No alternative imaging technique for the visualization of functional organization in the living brain provides a comparable spatial resolution. It is this level of resolution that reveals where processing is performed - a necessary step for the understanding of the neural code at the population level. Completely noninvasive optical imaging through the intact human skull, such as functional near infrared imaging may provide an imaging tool offering both the spatial and the temporal resolutions required to expand our knowledge of the principles underlying the remarkable performance of the human cerebral cortex.

  8. Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine and surgery.

    PubMed

    Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Pogue, Brian W; Tearney, Guillermo J; Tunnell, James W; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-02-01

    The guest editors introduce a Biomedical Optics Express feature issue that includes contributions from participants at the 2013 conference on Advances in Optics for Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery XIII.

  9. Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine and surgery.

    PubMed

    Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Pogue, Brian W; Tearney, Guillermo J; Tunnell, James W; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-02-01

    The guest editors introduce a Biomedical Optics Express feature issue that includes contributions from participants at the 2013 conference on Advances in Optics for Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery XIII. PMID:24575348

  10. Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine and surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Pogue, Brian W.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Tunnell, James W.; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    The guest editors introduce a Biomedical Optics Express feature issue that includes contributions from participants at the 2013 conference on Advances in Optics for Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery XIII. PMID:24575348

  11. Optical design for LED dental lighting with imaging optic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young-Hoon; Bae, Seung-Chul; Lim, Hae-Ryong; Jang, Ja-Soon

    2011-10-01

    We did a research as follows. First of all, selected optimum LEDs and mixed it for higher CRI, target CCT and illuminance. The following step is optical module design. Light directional characteristics of dental lighting must be concentrated to illuminate a part. Because This part is oral cavity, The feature of illumination pattern is rectangular. For uniformity of illuminance and clearer pattern boundary at reference distance, we designed it as direct type (no use reflector) by imaging optic technique. First, Image is rectangular feature, so object must be the same feature with magnification in general imaging optics. But the emitting surface feature of LED (1W grade) is square or circular generally. For that reason, made object as rectangular source with rectangular lightguide. This optical component was designed for higher efficiency by illumination optic technique. Next, we designed optical lenses based on imaging optic technique for image object feature using Code V. set to high NA for light efficiency in this design. Fundamentally, Finally, This product is luminaire so illumination simulation and result analysis were executed by LightTools as illumination design software.

  12. Compact optical imaging system for arrays of optical thyristors.

    PubMed

    Kirk, A; Goulet, A; Thienpont, H; McArdle, N; Brenner, K H; Kuijk, M; Heremans, P; Veretennicoff, I

    1997-05-10

    A compact and modular optical system that employs gradient-refractive-index rod lenses to image arrays of Lambertian sources is characterized both experimentally and by ray-tracing simulations. A hybrid optical system that incorporates additional microlens arrays to reduce transmittance losses and aberrations is also modeled, and the two systems are compared.

  13. Advanced noninvasive imaging of spinal vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Eddleman, Christopher S.; Jeong, Hyun; Cashen, Ty A.; Walker, Matthew; Bendok, Bernard R.; Batjer, H. Hunt; Carroll, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal vascular malformations (SVMs) are an uncommon, heterogeneous group of vascular anomalies that can render devastating neurological consequences if they are not diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. Imaging SVMs has always presented a formidable challenge because their clinical and imaging presentations resemble those of neoplasms, demyelination diseases, and infection. Advancements in noninvasive imaging modalities (MR and CT angiography) have increased during the last decade and have improved the ability to accurately diagnose spinal vascular anomalies. In addition, intraoperative imaging techniques have been developed that aid in the intraoperative assessment before, during, and after resection of these lesions with minimal and/or optimal use of spinal digital subtraction angiography. In this report, the authors review recent advancements in the imaging of SVMs that will likely lead to more timely diagnoses and treatment while reducing procedural risk exposure to the patients who harbor these uncommon spinal lesions. PMID:19119895

  14. Pencil beam all-optical ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alles, Erwin J.; Noimark, Sacha; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-01-01

    A miniature, directional fibre-optic acoustic source is presented that employs geometrical focussing to generate a nearly-collimated acoustic pencil beam. When paired with a fibre-optic acoustic detector, an all-optical ultrasound probe with an outer diameter of 2.5 mm is obtained that acquires a pulse-echo image line at each probe position without the need for image reconstruction. B-mode images can be acquired by translating the probe and concatenating the image lines, and artefacts resulting from probe positioning uncertainty are shown to be significantly lower than those observed for conventional synthetic aperture scanning of a non-directional acoustic source. The high image quality obtained for excised vascular tissue suggests that the all-optical ultrasound probe is ideally suited for in vivo, interventional applications. PMID:27699130

  15. Pencil beam all-optical ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alles, Erwin J.; Noimark, Sacha; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-01-01

    A miniature, directional fibre-optic acoustic source is presented that employs geometrical focussing to generate a nearly-collimated acoustic pencil beam. When paired with a fibre-optic acoustic detector, an all-optical ultrasound probe with an outer diameter of 2.5 mm is obtained that acquires a pulse-echo image line at each probe position without the need for image reconstruction. B-mode images can be acquired by translating the probe and concatenating the image lines, and artefacts resulting from probe positioning uncertainty are shown to be significantly lower than those observed for conventional synthetic aperture scanning of a non-directional acoustic source. The high image quality obtained for excised vascular tissue suggests that the all-optical ultrasound probe is ideally suited for in vivo, interventional applications.

  16. Wide field strip-imaging optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Arthur H. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A strip imaging wide angle optical system is provided. The optical system is provided with a 'virtual' material stop to avoid aberrational effects inherent in wide angle optical systems. The optical system includes a spherical mirror section for receiving light from a 180-degree strip or arc of a target image. Light received by the spherical mirror section is reflected to a frusto-conical mirror section for subsequent rereflection to a row of optical fibers. Each optical fiber transmits a portion of the received light to a detector. The optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance associated with optical fibers to substantially eliminate vignetting effects inherent in wide-angle systems. Further, the optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance of the optical fibers to substantially limit spherical aberration. The optical system is ideally suited for any application wherein a 180-degree strip image need be detected, and is particularly well adapted for use in hostile environments such as in planetary exploration.

  17. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D V G L N

    2008-04-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy.

  18. NAOMI: nanoparticle-assisted optical molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Dirk J.; de Bruin, Martijn; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Verbraak, Frank D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2007-02-01

    We present our first steps towards nanoparticle assisted, optical molecular imaging (NAOMI) using biodegradable nanoparticles. Our focus is on using optical coherence tomography(OCT) as the imaging modality. We propose to use nanoparticles based on biodegradable polymers, loaded with carefully selected dyes as contrast agent, and outline a method for establishing their desired optical properties prior to synthesis. Moreover, we perform a qualitative pilot study using these biodegradable nanoparticles, measuring their optical properties which are found to be in line with theoretical predictions.

  19. Coded Access Optical Sensor (CAOS) Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riza, N. A.; Amin, M. J.; La Torre, J. P.

    2015-04-01

    High spatial resolution, low inter-pixel crosstalk, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), adequate application dependent speed, economical and energy efficient design are common goals sought after for optical image sensors. In optical microscopy, overcoming the diffraction limit in spatial resolution has been achieved using materials chemistry, optimal wavelengths, precision optics and nanomotion-mechanics for pixel-by-pixel scanning. Imagers based on pixelated imaging devices such as CCD/CMOS sensors avoid pixel-by-pixel scanning as all sensor pixels operate in parallel, but these imagers are fundamentally limited by inter-pixel crosstalk, in particular with interspersed bright and dim light zones. In this paper, we propose an agile pixel imager sensor design platform called Coded Access Optical Sensor (CAOS) that can greatly alleviate the mentioned fundamental limitations, empowering smart optical imaging for particular environments. Specifically, this novel CAOS imager engages an application dependent electronically programmable agile pixel platform using hybrid space-time-frequency coded multiple-access of the sampled optical irradiance map. We demonstrate the foundational working principles of the first experimental electronically programmable CAOS imager using hybrid time-frequency multiple access sampling of a known high contrast laser beam irradiance test map, with the CAOS instrument based on a Texas Instruments (TI) Digital Micromirror Device (DMD). This CAOS instrument provides imaging data that exhibits 77 dB electrical SNR and the measured laser beam image irradiance specifications closely match (i.e., within 0.75% error) the laser manufacturer provided beam image irradiance radius numbers. The proposed CAOS imager can be deployed in many scientific and non-scientific applications where pixel agility via electronic programmability can pull out desired features in an irradiance map subject to the CAOS imaging operation.

  20. Advanced Microwave/Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zuowei; Yang, Lu; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Domier, C. W.; Ito, N.; Kogi, Y.; Liang, Y.; Mase, A.; Park, H.; Sakata, E.; Tsai, W.; Xia, Z. G.; Zhang, P.

    Millimeter wave technology advances have made possible active and passive millimeter wave imaging for a variety of applications including advanced plasma diagnostics, radio astronomy, atmospheric radiometry, concealed weapon detection, all-weather aircraft landing, contraband goods detection, harbor navigation/surveillance in fog, highway traffic monitoring in fog, helicopter and automotive collision avoidance in fog, and environmental remote sensing data associated with weather, pollution, soil moisture, oil spill detection, and monitoring of forest fires, to name but a few. The primary focus of this paper is on technology advances which have made possible advanced imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations and microturbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis include frequency selective surfaces, planar Schottky diode mixer arrays, electronically controlled beam shaping/steering arrays, and high power millimeter wave local oscillator and probe sources.

  1. Ultrathin Optics for Low-Profile Innocuous Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Boye, Robert R.; Brady, Gregory Robert; Nelson, Cynthia Lee; Briggs, Ronald D.; Jared, Bradley Howell; Warren, Mial E.

    2009-09-01

    This project demonstrates the feasibility of a novel imager with a thickness measured in microns rather than inches. Traditional imaging systems, i.e. cameras, cannot provide both the necessary resolution and innocuous form factor required in many data acquisition applications. Designing an imaging system with an extremely thin form factor (less than 1 mm) immediately presents several technical challenges. For instance, the thickness of the optical lens must be reduced drastically from currently available lenses. Additionally, the image circle is reduced by a factor equal to the reduction in focal length. This translates to fewer detector pixels across the image. To reduce the optical total track requires the use of specialized micro-optics and the required resolution necessitates the use of a new imaging modality. While a single thin imager will not produce the desired output, several thin imagers can be multiplexed and their low resolution (LR) outputs used together in post-processing to produce a high resolution (HR) image. The utility of an Iterative Back Projection (IBP) algorithm has been successfully demonstrated for performing the required post-processing. Advanced fabrication of a thin lens was also demonstrated and experimental results using this lens as well as commercially available lenses are presented.

  2. Advances of optical coherence tomography in myopia and pathologic myopia.

    PubMed

    Ng, D S C; Cheung, C Y L; Luk, F O; Mohamed, S; Brelen, M E; Yam, J C S; Tsang, C W; Lai, T Y Y

    2016-07-01

    The natural course of high-axial myopia is variable and the development of pathologic myopia is not fully understood. Advancements in optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology have revealed peculiar intraocular structures in highly myopic eyes and unprecedented pathologies that cause visual impairment. New OCT findings include posterior precortical vitreous pocket and precursor stages of posterior vitreous detachment; peripapillary intrachoroidal cavitation; morphological patterns of scleral inner curvature and dome-shaped macula. Swept source OCT is capable of imaging deeper layers in the posterior pole for investigation of optic nerve pits, stretched and thinned lamina cribrosa, elongated dural attachment at posterior scleral canal, and enlargement of retrobulbar subarachnoid spaces. This has therefore enabled further evaluation of various visual field defects in high myopia and the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. OCT has many potential clinical uses in managing visual impairing conditions in pathologic myopia. Understanding how retinal nerve fibers are redistributed in axial elongation will allow the development of auto-segmentation software for diagnosis and monitoring progression of glaucoma. OCT is indispensable in the diagnosis of various conditions associated with myopic traction maculopathy and monitoring of post-surgical outcomes. In addition, OCT is commonly used in the multimodal imaging assessment of myopic choroidal neovascularization. Biometry and topography of the retinal layers and choroid will soon be validated for the classification of myopic maculopathy for utilization in epidemiological studies as well as clinical trials. PMID:27055674

  3. Advances in electromagnetic brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2010-02-01

    Non-invasive and dynamic imaging of brain activity in the sub-millisecond time-scale is enabled by measurements on or near the scalp surface using an array of sensors that measure magnetic fields (magnetoencephalography (MEG)) or electric potentials (electroencephalography (EEG)). Algorithmic reconstruction of brain activity from MEG and EEG data is referred to as electromagnetic brain imaging (EBI). Reconstructing the actual brain response to external events and distinguishing unrelated brain activity has been a challenge for many existing algorithms in this field. Furthermore, even under conditions where there is very little interference, accurately determining the spatial locations and timing of brain sources from MEG and EEG data is challenging problem because it involves solving for unknown brain activity across thousands of voxels from just a few sensors (~300). In recent years, my research group has developed a suite of novel and powerful algorithms for EBI that we have shown to be considerably superior to existing benchmark algorithms. Specifically, these algorithms can solve for many brain sources, including sources located far from the sensors, in the presence of large interference from unrelated brain sources. Our algorithms efficiently model interference contributions to sensors, accurately estimate sparse brain source activity using fast and robust probabilistic inference techniques. Here, we review some of these algorithms and illustrate their performance in simulations and real MEG/EEG data.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies. PMID:26752822

  5. Space-based optical image encryption.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2010-12-20

    In this paper, we propose a new method based on a three-dimensional (3D) space-based strategy for the optical image encryption. The two-dimensional (2D) processing of a plaintext in the conventional optical encryption methods is extended to a 3D space-based processing. Each pixel of the plaintext is considered as one particle in the proposed space-based optical image encryption, and the diffraction of all particles forms an object wave in the phase-shifting digital holography. The effectiveness and advantages of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical results. The proposed method can provide a new optical encryption strategy instead of the conventional 2D processing, and may open up a new research perspective for the optical image encryption.

  6. Personnel screening with advanced multistatic imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sherif S.

    2013-05-01

    Personnel screening is demanded nowadays for securing air traffic as well as critical infrastructures. The millimeter-waves are able to penetrate clothes and detect concealed objects, making them an attractive choice for security screening. Imaging methods based on multistatic architecture can ensure high quality imagery in terms of resolution and dynamic range. Following the advances in semiconductor technology, fully electronic solutions delivering real-time imaging are becoming feasible. Furthermore, the continuously increasing capabilities of digital signal processing units allow for the utilization of digital-beamforming techniques for image reconstruction, thus offering new opportunities for imaging systems to use sophisticated operation modes. Based on these modern technologies, an advanced realization addressing personnel screening in E-band with planar multistatic sparse array design is demonstrated.

  7. Advances in Molecular Imaging with Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Ryan; Dayton, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has long demonstrated utility in the study and measurement of anatomic features and noninvasive observation of blood flow. Within the last decade, advances in molecular biology and contrast agents have allowed researchers to use ultrasound to detect changes in the expression of molecular markers on the vascular endothelium and other intravascular targets. This new technology, referred to as ultrasonic molecular imaging, is still in its infancy. However, in preclinical studies, ultrasonic molecular imaging has shown promise in assessing angiogenesis, inflammation, and thrombus. In this review, we discuss recent advances in microbubble-type contrast agent development, ultrasound technology, and signal processing strategies that have the potential to substantially improve the capabilities and utility of ultrasonic molecular imaging. PMID:20487678

  8. Reverse-Time Migration Based Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyong; Ding, Hao; Lu, Guijin; Bi, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrated a new optical imaging technique based on reverse-time migration (RTM) for reconstructing optical structures in homogeneous media for the first time. RTM is a powerful wave-equation-based method to reconstruct the image of the structure by modeling the wave propagation inside the media with both forward modeling and reverse-time extrapolation. While RTM is commonly used with acoustic seismic waves, this paper represents the first effort to develop optical RTM imaging method for biomedical research. To refine the image quality, we further developed new methods to suppress the low-wavenumber artifact (LWA). When compared with the conventional means for LWA suppression such as Laplacian filtering, illumination normalization, and the ratio method, our new derivative-based and power-image methods are able to significantly reduce LWA, resulting in high-quality reconstructed images with sufficient contrasts and spatial resolutions for structure identification. The optical RTM imaging technique may provide a new platform for non-invasive optical imaging of structures in deep layers of tissues for biomedical applications. PMID:26292337

  9. Reverse-Time Migration Based Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyong; Ding, Hao; Lu, Guijin; Bi, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrated a new optical imaging technique based on reverse-time migration (RTM) for reconstructing optical structures in homogeneous media for the first time. RTM is a powerful wave-equation-based method to reconstruct the image of the structure by modeling the wave propagation inside the media with both forward modeling and reverse-time extrapolation. While RTM is commonly used with acoustic seismic waves, this paper represents the first effort to develop optical RTM imaging method for biomedical research. To refine the image quality, we further developed new methods to suppress the low-wavenumber artifact (LWA). When compared with the conventional means for LWA suppression such as Laplacian filtering, illumination normalization, and the ratio method, our new derivative-based and power-image methods are able to significantly reduce LWA, resulting in high-quality reconstructed images with sufficient contrasts and spatial resolutions for structure identification. The optical RTM imaging technique may provide a new platform for non-invasive optical imaging of structures in deep layers of tissues for biomedical applications.

  10. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina.

    PubMed

    Battu, Rajani; Dabir, Supriya; Khanna, Anjani; Kumar, Anupama Kiran; Roy, Abhijit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified.

  11. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Battu, Rajani; Dabir, Supriya; Khanna, Anjani; Kumar, Anupama Kiran; Roy, Abhijit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified. PMID:24492503

  12. Optical image encryption using multilevel Arnold transform and noninterferometric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2011-11-01

    Information security has attracted much current attention due to the rapid development of modern technologies, such as computer and internet. We propose a novel method for optical image encryption using multilevel Arnold transform and rotatable-phase-mask noninterferometric imaging. An optical image encryption scheme is developed in the gyrator transform domain, and one phase-only mask (i.e., phase grating) is rotated and updated during image encryption. For the decryption, an iterative retrieval algorithm is proposed to extract high-quality plaintexts. Conventional encoding methods (such as digital holography) have been proven vulnerably to the attacks, and the proposed optical encoding scheme can effectively eliminate security deficiency and significantly enhance cryptosystem security. The proposed strategy based on the rotatable phase-only mask can provide a new alternative for data/image encryption in the noninterferometric imaging.

  13. Optical magnetic imaging of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Le Sage, D.; Arai, K.; Glenn, D. R.; DeVience, S. J.; Pham, L. M.; Rahn-Lee, L.; Lukin, M. D.; Yacoby, A.; Komeili, A.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological and physical systems. However, existing techniques either have poor spatial resolution compared to optical microscopy and are hence not generally applicable to imaging of sub-cellular structure (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]1), or entail operating conditions that preclude application to living biological samples while providing sub-micron resolution (e.g., scanning superconducting quantum interference device [SQUID] microscopy2, electron holography3, and magnetic resonance force microscopy [MRFM]4). Here we demonstrate magnetic imaging of living cells (magnetotactic bacteria) under ambient laboratory conditions and with sub-cellular spatial resolution (400 nm), using an optically-detected magnetic field imaging array consisting of a nanoscale layer of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres implanted at the surface of a diamond chip. With the bacteria placed on the diamond surface, we optically probe the NV quantum spin states and rapidly reconstruct images of the vector components of the magnetic field created by chains of magnetic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) produced in the bacteria, and spatially correlate these magnetic field maps with optical images acquired in the same apparatus. Wide-field sCMOS acquisition allows parallel optical and magnetic imaging of multiple cells in a population with sub-micron resolution and >100 micron field-of-view. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the bacteria confirm that the correlated optical and magnetic images can be used to locate and characterize the magnetosomes in each bacterium. The results provide a new capability for imaging bio-magnetic structures in living cells under ambient conditions with high spatial resolution, and will enable the mapping of a wide range of magnetic signals within cells and cellular networks5, 6. PMID:23619694

  14. The Use of Optical Coherence Tomography in Intraoperative Ophthalmic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Paul; Migacz, Justin; O’Connell, Rachelle; Maldonado, Ramiro S.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has transformed diagnostic ophthalmic imaging but until recently has been limited to the clinic setting. The development of spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT), with its improved speed and resolution, along with the development of a handheld OCT scanner, enabled portable imaging of patients unable to sit in a conventional tabletop scanner. This handheld SD-OCT unit has proven useful in examinations under anesthesia and, more recently, in intraoperative imaging of preoperative and postoperative manipulations. Recently, several groups have pioneered the development of novel OCT modalities, such as microscope-mounted OCT systems. Although still immature, the development of these systems is directed toward real-time imaging of surgical maneuvers in the intraoperative setting. This article reviews intraoperative imaging of the posterior and anterior segment using the handheld SD-OCT and recent advances toward real-time microscope-mounted intrasurgical imaging. PMID:21790116

  15. MO-C-BRE-01: The WMIS-AAPM Joint Symposium: Advances in Molecular Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Contag, C; Pogue, B; Lewis, J

    2014-06-15

    This joint symposium of the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS) and the AAPM includes three luminary speakers discussing work in new paradigms of molecular imaging in cancer (Contag), applications of optical imaging technologies to radiation therapy (Pogue) and an update on PET imaging as a surrogate biomarker for cancer progression and response to therapy. Learning Objectives: Appreciate the current trends in molecular and systems imaging. Understand how optical imaging technologies, and particularly Cerenkov detectors, can be used in advancing radiation oncology. Stay current on new PET tracers - and targets - of interest in cancer treatment.

  16. Optical imaging of fast, dynamic neurophysiological function.

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D. M.; Carter, K. M.; Yao, X.; George, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Fast evoked responses were imaged from rat dorsal medulla and whisker barrel cortex. To investigate the biophysical mechanisms involved, fast optical responses associated with isolated crustacean nerve stimulation were recorded using birefringence and scattered light. Such studies allow optimization of non-invasive imaging techniques being developed for use in humans.

  17. Optical encryption with selective computational ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafari, Mohammad; kheradmand, Reza; Ahmadi-Kandjani, Sohrab

    2014-10-01

    Selective computational ghost imaging (SCGI) is a technique which enables the reconstruction of an N-pixel image from N measurements or less. In this paper we propose an optical encryption method based on SCGI and experimentally demonstrate that this method has much higher security under eavesdropping and unauthorized accesses compared with previous reported methods.

  18. Glaucoma Diagnosis and Monitoring Using Advanced Imaging Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Sehi, Mitra; Iverson, Shawn M

    2014-01-01

    Advanced ocular imaging technologies facilitate objective and reproducible quantification of change in glaucoma but at the same time, impose new challenges on scientists and clinicians for separating true structural change from imaging noise. This review examines time-domain and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and scanning laser polarimetry technologies and discusses the diagnostic accuracy and the ability of each technique for evaluation of glaucomatous progression. A broad review of the current literature reveals that objective assessment of retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell complex and optic nerve head topography may improve glaucoma monitoring when used as a complementary tool in conjunction with the clinical judgment of an expert. PMID:24470807

  19. Impacts of optical turbulence on underwater imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weilin; Woods, S.; Goode, W.; Jarosz, E.; Weidemann, A.

    2011-06-01

    Optical signal transmission underwater is of vital interests to both civilian and military applications. The range and signal to noise during the transmission, as a function of system and water optical properties determines the effectiveness of EO technology. These applications include diver visibility, search and rescue, mine detection and identification, and optical communications. The impact of optical turbulence on underwater imaging has been postulated and observed by many researchers. However, no quantative studies have been done until recently, in terms of both the environmental conditions, and impacts on image quality as a function of range and spatial frequencies. Image data collected from field measurements during SOTEX (Skaneateles Optical Turbulence Exercise, July 22-31, 2010) using the Image Measurement Assembly for Subsurface Turbulence (IMAST) are presented. Optical properties of the water column in the field were measured using WETLab's ac-9 and Laser In Situ Scattering and Transmissometer (LISST, Sequoia Scientific), in coordination with physical properties including CTD (Seabird), dissipation rate of kinetic energy and heat, using both the Vector velocimeter and CT combo (Nortek and PME), and shear probe based Vertical Microstructure Profiler (VMP, Rockland). The strong stratification structure in the water column provides great opportunity to observe various dissipation strengths throughout the water column, which corresponds directly with image quality as shown. Initial results demonstrate general agreement between data collected and model prediction, while discrepancies between measurements and model suggest higher spatial and temporal observations are needed in the future.

  20. Optical Data Compression in Time Stretch Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Time stretch imaging offers real-time image acquisition at millions of frames per second and subnanosecond shutter speed, and has enabled detection of rare cancer cells in blood with record throughput and specificity. An unintended consequence of high throughput image acquisition is the massive amount of digital data generated by the instrument. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of real-time optical image compression applied to time stretch imaging. By exploiting the sparsity of the image, we reduce the number of samples and the amount of data generated by the time stretch camera in our proof-of-concept experiments by about three times. Optical data compression addresses the big data predicament in such systems. PMID:25906244

  1. Advanced technologies for remote sensing imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.L.

    1993-06-07

    Generating and returning imagery from great distances has been generally associated with national security activities, with emphasis on reliability of system operation. (While the introduction of such capabilities was usually characterized by high levels of innovation, the evolution of such systems has followed the classical track of proliferation of ``standardized items`` expressing ever more incremental technological advances.) Recent focusing of interest on the use of remote imaging systems for commercial and scientific purposes can be expected to induce comparatively rapid advances along the axes of efficiency and technological sophistication, respectively. This paper reviews the most basic reasons for expecting the next decade of advances to dwarf the impressive accomplishments of the past ten years. The impact of these advances clearly will be felt in all major areas of large-scale human endeavor, commercial, military and scientific.

  2. Advanced integrated spectrometer designs for miniaturized optical coherence tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akca, B. I.; Považay, B.; Chang, L.; Alex, A.; Wörhoff, K.; de Ridder, R. M.; Drexler, W.; Pollnau, M.

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has enabled clinical applications that revolutionized in vivo medical diagnostics. Nevertheless, its current limitations owing to cost, size, complexity, and the need for accurate alignment must be overcome by radically novel approaches. Exploiting integrated optics, the central components of a spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) system can be integrated on a chip. Arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) spectrometers with their high spectral resolution and compactness are excellent candidates for on-chip SD-OCT systems. However, specific design-related issues of AWG spectrometers limit the performance of on-chip SD-OCT systems. Here we present advanced AWG designs which could overcome the limitations arising from free spectral range, polarization dependency, and curved focal plane of the AWG spectrometers. Using these advanced AWG designs in an SD-OCT system can provide not only better overall performance but also some unique aspects that a commercial system does not have. Additionally, a partially integrated OCT system comprising an AWG spectrometer and an integrated beam splitter, as well as the in vivo imaging using this system are demonstrated.

  3. NAOMI: nanoparticle assisted optical molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Dirk J.; van Velthoven, Mirjam E. J.; de Bruin, Martijn; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Verbraak, Frank D.; Graf, Christina; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2006-02-01

    Our first steps towards nanoparticle assisted, optical molecular imaging (NAOMI) using OCT as the imaging modality are presented. We derive an expression to estimate the sensitivity of this technique. We propose to use nanoparticles based on biodegradable polymers, loaded with suitable dyes as contrast agent, and outline a method for establishing their desired optical properties prior to synthesis. This report presents preliminary results of our investigation on the use of nanoshells to serve as contrast agents We injected nanoshells with specific contrast features in the 800 nm wavelength region in excised porcine eyes. The nanoshells showed up as bright reflecting structures in the OCT images, which confirm their potential as contrast agents.

  4. Optical Imaging of Voltage and Calcium in Cardiac Cells & Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Todd J.; Lee, Peter; Jalife, José

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac optical mapping has proven to be a powerful technology for studying cardiovascular function and disease. The development and scientific impact of this methodology are well documented. Because of its relevance in cardiac research, this imaging technology advances at a rapid pace. Here we review technological and scientific developments during the past several years and look also towards the future. First we explore key components of a modern optical mapping setup, focusing on 1) new camera technologies, 2) powerful light-emitting-diodes (from ultraviolet to red) for illumination, 3) improved optical filter technology, 4) new synthetic and optogenetic fluorescent probes, 5) optical mapping with motion and contraction, 6) new multi-parametric optical mapping techniques and 7) photon scattering effects in thick tissue preparations. We then look at recent optical mapping studies in single cells, cardiomyocyte monolayers, atria and whole hearts. Finally, we briefly look into the possible future roles of optical mapping in the development of regenerative cardiac research, cardiac cell therapies, and molecular genetic advances. PMID:22343556

  5. Functional imaging of small tissue volumes with diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Alexander D.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2006-03-01

    Imaging of dynamic changes in blood parameters, functional brain imaging, and tumor imaging are the most advanced application areas of diffuse optical tomography (DOT). When dealing with the image reconstruction problem one is faced with the fact that near-infrared photons, unlike X-rays, are highly scattered when they traverse biological tissue. Image reconstruction schemes are required that model the light propagation inside biological tissue and predict measurements on the tissue surface. By iteratively changing the tissue-parameters until the predictions agree with the real measurements, a spatial distribution of optical properties inside the tissue is found. The optical properties can be related to the tissue oxygenation, inflammation, or to the fluorophore concentration of a biochemical marker. If the model of light propagation is inaccurate, the reconstruction process will lead to an inaccurate result as well. Here, we focus on difficulties that are encountered when DOT is employed for functional imaging of small tissue volumes, for example, in cancer studies involving small animals, or human finger joints for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the currently employed image reconstruction methods rely on the diffusion theory that is an approximation to the equation of radiative transfer. But, in the cases of small tissue volumes and tissues that contain low scattering regions diffusion theory has been shown to be of limited applicability Therefore, we employ a light propagation model that is based on the equation of radiative transfer, which promises to overcome the limitations.

  6. Positron emission tomography and optical tissue imaging

    DOEpatents

    Falen, Steven W.; Hoefer, Richard A.; Majewski, Stanislaw; McKisson, John; Kross, Brian; Proffitt, James; Stolin, Alexander; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2012-05-22

    A mobile compact imaging system that combines both PET imaging and optical imaging into a single system which can be located in the operating room (OR) and provides faster feedback to determine if a tumor has been fully resected and if there are adequate surgical margins. While final confirmation is obtained from the pathology lab, such a device can reduce the total time necessary for the procedure and the number of iterations required to achieve satisfactory resection of a tumor with good margins.

  7. Intrinsic optical signal imaging of retinal physiology: a review.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xincheng; Wang, Benquan

    2015-09-01

    Intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging promises to be a noninvasive method for high-resolution examination of retinal physiology, which can advance the study and diagnosis of eye diseases. While specialized optical instruments are desirable for functional IOS imaging of retinal physiology, in depth understanding of multiple IOS sources in the complex retinal neural network is essential for optimizing instrument designs. We provide a brief overview of IOS studies and relationships in rod outer segment suspensions, isolated retinas, and intact eyes. Recent developments of line-scan confocal and functional optical coherence tomography (OCT) instruments have allowed in vivo IOS mapping of photoreceptor physiology. Further improvements of the line-scan confocal and functional OCT systems may provide a feasible solution to pursue functional IOS mapping of human photoreceptors. Some interesting IOSs have already been detected in inner retinal layers, but better development of the IOS instruments and software algorithms is required to achieve optimal physiological assessment of inner retinal neurons.

  8. Intrinsic optical signal imaging of retinal physiology: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xincheng; Wang, Benquan

    2015-09-01

    Intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging promises to be a noninvasive method for high-resolution examination of retinal physiology, which can advance the study and diagnosis of eye diseases. While specialized optical instruments are desirable for functional IOS imaging of retinal physiology, in depth understanding of multiple IOS sources in the complex retinal neural network is essential for optimizing instrument designs. We provide a brief overview of IOS studies and relationships in rod outer segment suspensions, isolated retinas, and intact eyes. Recent developments of line-scan confocal and functional optical coherence tomography (OCT) instruments have allowed in vivo IOS mapping of photoreceptor physiology. Further improvements of the line-scan confocal and functional OCT systems may provide a feasible solution to pursue functional IOS mapping of human photoreceptors. Some interesting IOSs have already been detected in inner retinal layers, but better development of the IOS instruments and software algorithms is required to achieve optimal physiological assessment of inner retinal neurons.

  9. Advanced laser systems for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosner, Marc; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Gross, Daniel; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-03-01

    We describe the ongoing development of laser systems for advanced photoacoustic imaging (PAI). We discuss the characteristics of these laser systems and their particular benefits for soft tissue imaging and next-generation breast cancer diagnostics. We provide an overview of laser performance and compare this with other laser systems that have been used for early-stage development of PAI. These advanced systems feature higher pulse energy output at clinically relevant repetition rates, as well as a novel wavelength-cycling output pulse format. Wavelength cycling provides pulse sequences for which the output repeatedly alternates between two wavelengths that provide differential imaging. This capability improves co-registration of captured differential images. We present imaging results of phantoms obtained with a commercial ultrasound detector system and a wavelength-cycling laser source providing ~500 mJ/pulse at 755 and 797 nm, operating at 25 Hz. The results include photoacoustic images and corresponding pulse-echo data from a tissue mimicking phantom containing inclusions, simulating tumors in the breast. We discuss the application of these systems to the contrast-enhanced detection of various tissue types and tumors.

  10. Optical encryption for large-sized images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpei, Takuho; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Kakue, Takashi; Endo, Yutaka; Hirayama, Ryuji; Hiyama, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Satoki; Nagahama, Yuki; Sano, Marie; Oikawa, Minoru; Sugie, Takashige; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-02-01

    We propose an optical encryption framework that can encrypt and decrypt large-sized images beyond the size of the encrypted image using our two methods: random phase-free method and scaled diffraction. In order to record the entire image information on the encrypted image, the large-sized images require the random phase to widely diffuse the object light over the encrypted image; however, the random phase gives rise to the speckle noise on the decrypted images, and it may be difficult to recognize the decrypted images. In order to reduce the speckle noise, we apply our random phase-free method to the framework. In addition, we employ scaled diffraction that calculates light propagation between planes with different sizes by changing the sampling rates.

  11. Multimodal optical imaging for detecting breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Rakesh; Khan, Ashraf; Wirth, Dennis; Kamionek, Michal; Kandil, Dina; Quinlan, Robert; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2012-06-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate wide-field and high-resolution multimodal optical imaging, including polarization, reflectance, and fluorescence for the intraoperative detection of breast cancer. Lumpectomy specimens were stained with 0.05 mg/ml aqueous solution of methylene blue (MB) and imaged. Wide-field reflectance images were acquired between 390 and 750 nm. Wide-field fluorescence images were excited at 640 nm and registered between 660 and 750 nm. High resolution confocal reflectance and fluorescence images were excited at 642 nm. Confocal fluorescence images were acquired between 670 nm and 710 nm. After imaging, the specimens were processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. Histological slides were compared with wide-field and high-resolution optical images to evaluate correlation of tumor boundaries and cellular morphology, respectively. Fluorescence polarization imaging identified the location, size, and shape of the tumor in all the cases investigated. Averaged fluorescence polarization values of tumor were higher as compared to normal tissue. Statistical analysis confirmed the significance of these differences. Fluorescence confocal imaging enabled cellular-level resolution. Evaluation and statistical analysis of MB fluorescence polarization values registered from single tumor and normal cells demonstrated higher fluorescence polarization from cancer. Wide-field high-resolution fluorescence and fluorescence polarization imaging shows promise for intraoperative delineation of breast cancers.

  12. Foundations of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan; Newbould, Rexford; Liu, Chunlei; Thijs, Vincent; Ropele, Stefan; Clayton, David B.; Krueger, Gunnar; Moseley, Michael E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: During the past decade, major breakthroughs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality were made by means of quantum leaps in scanner hardware and pulse sequences. Some advanced MRI techniques have truly revolutionized the detection of disease states and MRI can now—within a few minutes—acquire important quantitative information noninvasively from an individual in any plane or volume at comparatively high resolution. This article provides an overview of the most common advanced MRI methods including diffusion MRI, perfusion MRI, functional MRI, and the strengths and weaknesses of MRI at high magnetic field strengths. PMID:15897944

  13. Foundations of advanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan; Newbould, Rexford; Liu, Chunlei; Thijs, Vincent; Ropele, Stefan; Clayton, David B; Krueger, Gunnar; Moseley, Michael E; Glover, Gary H

    2005-04-01

    During the past decade, major breakthroughs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality were made by means of quantum leaps in scanner hardware and pulse sequences. Some advanced MRI techniques have truly revolutionized the detection of disease states and MRI can now-within a few minutes-acquire important quantitative information noninvasively from an individual in any plane or volume at comparatively high resolution. This article provides an overview of the most common advanced MRI methods including diffusion MRI, perfusion MRI, functional MRI, and the strengths and weaknesses of MRI at high magnetic field strengths.

  14. Advanced optical position sensors for magnetically suspended wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafleur, S.

    1985-01-01

    A major concern to aerodynamicists has been the corruption of wind tunnel test data by model support structures, such as stings or struts. A technique for magnetically suspending wind tunnel models was considered by Tournier and Laurenceau (1957) in order to overcome this problem. This technique is now implemented with the aid of a Large Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (LMSBS) and advanced position sensors for measuring model attitude and position within the test section. Two different optical position sensors are discussed, taking into account a device based on the use of linear CCD arrays, and a device utilizing area CID cameras. Current techniques in image processing have been employed to develop target tracking algorithms capable of subpixel resolution for the sensors. The algorithms are discussed in detail, and some preliminary test results are reported.

  15. Advanced optical position sensors for magnetically suspended wind tunnel models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, S.

    A major concern to aerodynamicists has been the corruption of wind tunnel test data by model support structures, such as stings or struts. A technique for magnetically suspending wind tunnel models was considered by Tournier and Laurenceau (1957) in order to overcome this problem. This technique is now implemented with the aid of a Large Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (LMSBS) and advanced position sensors for measuring model attitude and position within the test section. Two different optical position sensors are discussed, taking into account a device based on the use of linear CCD arrays, and a device utilizing area CID cameras. Current techniques in image processing have been employed to develop target tracking algorithms capable of subpixel resolution for the sensors. The algorithms are discussed in detail, and some preliminary test results are reported.

  16. Longitudinal Imaging of Heart Development With Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has great potential for deciphering the role of mechanics in normal and abnormal heart development. OCT images tissue microstructure and blood flow deep into the tissue (1–2mm) at high spatiotemporal resolutions allowing unprecedented images of the developing heart. Here, we review the advancement of OCT technology to image heart development and report some of our recent findings utilizing OCT imaging under environmental control for longitudinal imaging. Precise control of the environment is absolutely required in longitudinal studies that follow the growth of the embryo or studies comparing normal versus perturbed heart development to obtain meaningful in vivo results. These types of studies are essential to tease out the influence of cardiac dynamics on molecular expression and their role in the progression of congenital heart defects. PMID:26236147

  17. Optical imaging for breast cancer prescreening

    PubMed Central

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Rodriguez, Suset; Jung, Young-Jin; Gonzalez, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer prescreening is carried out prior to the gold standard screening using X-ray mammography and/or ultrasound. Prescreening is typically carried out using clinical breast examination (CBE) or self-breast examinations (SBEs). Since CBE and SBE have high false-positive rates, there is a need for a low-cost, noninvasive, non-radiative, and portable imaging modality that can be used as a prescreening tool to complement CBE/SBE. This review focuses on the various hand-held optical imaging devices that have been developed and applied toward early-stage breast cancer detection or as a prescreening tool via phantom, in vivo, and breast cancer imaging studies. Apart from the various optical devices developed by different research groups, a wide-field fiber-free near-infrared optical scanner has been developed for transillumination-based breast imaging in our Optical Imaging Laboratory. Preliminary in vivo studies on normal breast tissues, with absorption-contrasted targets placed in the intramammary fold, detected targets as deep as 8.8 cm. Future work involves in vivo imaging studies on breast cancer subjects and comparison with the gold standard X-ray mammography approach. PMID:26229503

  18. Terahertz Tools Advance Imaging for Security, Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Picometrix, a wholly owned subsidiary of Advanced Photonix Inc. (API), of Ann Arbor, Michigan, invented the world s first commercial terahertz system. The company improved the portability and capabilities of their systems through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements with Langley Research Center to provide terahertz imaging capabilities for inspecting the space shuttle external tanks and orbiters. Now API s systems make use of the unique imaging capacity of terahertz radiation on manufacturing floors, for thickness measurements of coatings, pharmaceutical tablet production, and even art conservation.

  19. Optical system design for the charge exchange spectroscopy of the Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seungtae; Ko, Won-Ha

    2011-04-01

    The collective optical design is described for the charge exchange spectroscopy (CES) of the Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research (KSTAR) device. The CES diagnostic measures the ion temperature of carbon and other impurities, in conjunction with the neutral heating beam in KSTAR. The visible light from the plasma is concentrated via collection optics and imaged onto quartz fibers. The collection optics in the system is the key component for the CES system. The final design is derived through four steps and its performance is examined in a simulation step. In this paper, the design details of the collective optical system for the KSTAR CES are discussed.

  20. Real-time microstructural and functional imaging and image processing in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Volker

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive optical imaging technique that allows high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of tissue microstructure, achieving a spatial resolution of about 10 mum. OCT is similar to B-mode ultrasound (US) except that it uses infrared light instead of ultrasound. In contrast to US, no coupling gel is needed, simplifying the image acquisition. Furthermore, the fiber optic implementation of OCT is compatible with endoscopes. In recent years, the transition from slow imaging, bench-top systems to real-time clinical systems has been under way. This has lead to a variety of applications, namely in ophthalmology, gastroenterology, dermatology and cardiology. First, this dissertation will demonstrate that OCT is capable of imaging and differentiating clinically relevant tissue structures in the gastrointestinal tract. A careful in vitro correlation study between endoscopic OCT images and corresponding histological slides was performed. Besides structural imaging, OCT systems were further developed for functional imaging, as for example to visualize blood flow. Previously, imaging flow in small vessels in real-time was not possible. For this research, a new processing scheme similar to real-time Doppler in US was introduced. It was implemented in dedicated hardware to allow real-time acquisition and overlayed display of blood flow in vivo. A sensitivity of 0.5mm/s was achieved. Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a variation of OCT, improving the resolution even further to a few micrometers. Advances made in the OCT scan engine for the Doppler setup enabled real-time imaging in vivo with OCM. In order to generate geometrical correct images for all the previous applications in real-time, extensive image processing algorithms were developed. Algorithms for correction of distortions due to non-telecentric scanning, nonlinear scan mirror movements, and refraction were developed and demonstrated. This has led to interesting new

  1. LDA optical setup using holographic imaging configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Nirala, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes one of the possible ways for improving fringe quality at LDA measuring volume using a holographic imaging configuration consisting of a single hololens. For its comparative study with a conventional imaging configuration, a complete characterization of fringes formed at the measurement volume by both the configuration is presented. Results indicate the qualitative as well as quantitative improvement of the fringes formed at measurement volume by the holographic imaging configuration. Hence it is concluded that use of holographic imaging configuration for making LDA optical setup is a better choice than the conventional one.

  2. Nonlinear Optical Image Processing with Bacteriorhodopsin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Deiss, Ron (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The transmission properties of some bacteriorhodopsin film spatial light modulators are uniquely suited to allow nonlinear optical image processing operations to be applied to images with multiplicative noise characteristics. A logarithmic amplitude transmission feature of the film permits the conversion of multiplicative noise to additive noise, which may then be linearly filtered out in the Fourier plane of the transformed image. The bacteriorhodopsin film displays the logarithmic amplitude response for write beam intensities spanning a dynamic range greater than 2.0 orders of magnitude. We present experimental results demonstrating the principle and capability for several different image and noise situations, including deterministic noise and speckle. Using the bacteriorhodopsin film, we successfully filter out image noise from the transformed image that cannot be removed from the original image.

  3. Imaging Tumor Hypoxia to Advance Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Boss, Mary-Keara

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Most solid tumors contain regions of low oxygenation or hypoxia. Tumor hypoxia has been associated with a poor clinical outcome and plays a critical role in tumor radioresistance. Recent Advances: Two main types of hypoxia exist in the tumor microenvironment: chronic and cycling hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia results from the limited diffusion distance of oxygen, and cycling hypoxia primarily results from the variation in microvessel red blood cell flux and temporary disturbances in perfusion. Chronic hypoxia may cause either tumor progression or regressive effects depending on the tumor model. However, there is a general trend toward the development of a more aggressive phenotype after cycling hypoxia. With advanced hypoxia imaging techniques, spatiotemporal characteristics of tumor hypoxia and the changes to the tumor microenvironment can be analyzed. Critical Issues: In this review, we focus on the biological and clinical consequences of chronic and cycling hypoxia on radiation treatment. We also discuss the advanced non-invasive imaging techniques that have been developed to detect and monitor tumor hypoxia in preclinical and clinical studies. Future Directions: A better understanding of the mechanisms of tumor hypoxia with non-invasive imaging will provide a basis for improved radiation therapeutic practices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 313–337. PMID:24329000

  4. Advances in noninvasive imaging of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Menge, Tyler D; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer and its incidence has risen sharply in recent decades. Early detection of disease is critical for improving patient outcomes. Any pigmented lesion that is clinically concerning must be removed by biopsy for morphologic investigation on histology. However, biopsies are invasive and can cause significant morbidity, and their accuracy in detecting melanoma may be limited by sampling error. The advent of noninvasive imaging devices has allowed for assessment of intact skin, thereby minimizing the need for biopsy; and these technologies are increasingly being used in the diagnosis and management of melanoma. Reflectance confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography, ultrasonography, and multispectral imaging are noninvasive imaging techniques that have emerged as diagnostic aids to physical exam and/or conventional dermoscopy. This review summarizes the current knowledge about these techniques and discusses their practical applications and limitations. PMID:26963113

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging of the optic radiations after optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, Scott; Bajraszewski, Clare; Chapman, Caron; Nguyen, Tan; Mitchell, Peter; Paine, Mark; Butzkueven, Helmut; Johnston, Leigh; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Egan, Gary

    2012-09-01

    Trans-synaptic degeneration could exacerbate neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). We aimed to assess whether anterograde trans-synaptic degeneration could be identified in the primary visual pathway in vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to assess the optic radiations in 15 patients with previous optic nerve inflammation and 9 healthy volunteers. A probabilistic atlas of the optic radiations was created from healthy diffusion tractography data. Lengthwise profiles for DTI parameters (axial [λ(||) ], radial [λ(⟂) ] and mean diffusivity [MD], fractional anisotropy [FA] and the angle of deviation of the principal eigenvector [α]) were analyzed for patients and controls. Patients also underwent multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) assessments to characterize the latency and amplitude of cortical potentials. Correlations were performed between mfVEP latency and amplitude in the left and right visual hemi-fields and DTI parameters in the contra-lateral optic radiations. Patients displayed a significant decrease in λ(||) within the body of both optic radiations, which significantly correlated with loss of mfVEP amplitude. Abnormal λ(⟂) and FA were detected bilaterally throughout the optic radiations in patients but the abnormality was not associated with amplitude reduction or latency prolongation of the mfVEP. An abnormal α value was observed in the left optic radiations of patients, and the α value in the body of the optic radiations also correlated with mfVEP amplitude loss. The assocation between bilateral DTI abnormalities within the optic radiations and loss of afferent electrical activity could indicate anterograde trans-synaptic degeneration occurs following optic neuritis.

  6. Optical metabolic imaging of live tissue cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2013-02-01

    The fluorescence properties, both intensity and fluorescence lifetime, of NADH and FAD, two coenzymes of metabolism, are sensitive, high resolution measures of cellular metabolism. However, often in vivo measurements of tissue are not feasible. In this study, we investigate the stability over time of two-photon auto-fluorescence imaging of NADH and FAD in live-cultured tissues. Our results demonstrate that cultured tissues remain viable for at least several days post excision. Furthermore, the optical redox ratio, NADH fluorescence lifetime, and FAD fluorescence lifetime do not significantly change in the cultured tissues over time. With these findings, we demonstrate the potential of sustained tissue culture techniques for optical metabolic imaging.

  7. Evaluation of optical reflectance techniques for imaging of alveolar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglert, Carolin I.; Namati, Eman; Warger, William C.; Liu, Linbo; Yoo, Hongki; Kang, DongKyun; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the fine structures within the lung parenchyma could advance our understanding of alveolar physiology and pathophysiology. Current knowledge has been primarily based on histology, but it is a destructive two-dimensional (2-D) technique that is limited by tissue processing artifacts. Micro-CT provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) imaging within a limited sample size, but is not applicable to intact lungs from larger animals or humans. Optical reflectance techniques offer the promise to visualize alveolar regions of the large animal or human lung with sub-cellular resolution in three dimensions. Here, we present the capabilities of three optical reflectance techniques, namely optical frequency domain imaging, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy, and full field optical coherence microscopy, to visualize both gross architecture as well as cellular detail in fixed, phosphate buffered saline-immersed rat lung tissue. Images from all techniques were correlated to each other and then to corresponding histology. Spatial and temporal resolution, imaging depth, and suitability for in vivo probe development were compared to highlight the merits and limitations of each technology for studying respiratory physiology at the alveolar level.

  8. Advanced acousto-optic signal processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.

    1983-01-01

    The basic acousto-optic signal processing architectures (spectrum analyzer, space-integrating, time-integrating, and triple product processor) systems and algorithms such as the chirp-Z transform are reviewed. New acousto-optic data processing systems and applications that utilze these basic architectures and new ones are described. These include a matched spatial filter acousto-optic processor, two new hybrid time and space-integrating systems, a triple product processor, and four new matrix-vector iterative feedback systems.

  9. Optical imaging module for astigmatic detection system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Min; Cheng, Chung-Hsiang; Molnar, Gabor; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Huang, Kuang-Yuh; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Hwu, En-Te

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an optical imaging module design for an astigmatic detection system (ADS) is presented. The module is based on a commercial optical pickup unit (OPU) and it contains a coaxial illuminant for illuminating a specimen. Furthermore, the imaging module facilitates viewing the specimen and the detection laser spot of the ADS with a lateral resolution of approximately 1 μm without requiring the removal of an element of the OPU. Two polarizers and one infrared filter are used to eliminate stray laser light in the OPU and stray light produced by the illuminant. Imaging modules designed for digital versatile disks (DVDs) and Blu-ray DVDs were demonstrated. Furthermore, the module can be used for imaging a small cantilever with approximate dimensions of 2 μm (width) × 5 μm (length), and therefore, it has the potential to be used in high-speed atomic force microscopy. PMID:27250434

  10. Image Formation in Bio-optical Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Over the past two decades a number of optical sensing methods have emerged with potential to provide complementary information to traditional medical imaging modalities in application areas ranging from basic science to disease diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Though still largely in the research and development stage, modalities including diffuse optical tomography (DOT), fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), photo-acoustic tomography (PAT), and bio-luminescence tomography (BLT) have excited much interest due to their natural functional imaging capability, their relatively low cost, and the fact that none required the use of ionizing radiation. These advantages however are tempered by a number of challenges associated with the processing of these data. Specifically, these data types all rely in one way or another on the interaction of light with tissue. The diffusive nature of this interaction inherently limits the spatial resolution of these modalities. As a result the process of forming an image is a far more delicate task than is the case with more standard imaging modalities such as X-ray computed tomography (CT). Two basic methods have been explored to address the ill-posedness of these problems in order to improve the information content in the resulting images. The optical data may be augmented either through the use of spectral diversity or by attempting to integrate optical data types with information from other modalities such as CT or MRI. Alternatively, a mathematical technique known as regularization can be used to impose physically-based constraints on the reconstruction. In this talk, I shall provide an overview of the work in my group in optical image formation within the contexts of DOT for breast cancer imaging and FMT for small animal imaging. The focus of the talk will be on methods that integrate data augmentation and mathematical regularization. In the case of FMT, we shall discuss our work in combining the optical data with information

  11. Optical protocols for advanced spacecraft networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    Most present day fiber optic networks are in fact extensions of copper wire networks. As a result, their speed is still limited by electronics even though optics is capable of running three orders of magnitude faster. Also, the fact that photons do not interact with one another (as electrons do) provides optical communication systems with some unique properties or new functionality that is not readily taken advantage of with conventional approaches. Some of the motivation for implementing network protocols in the optical domain, a few possible approaches including optical code-division multiple-access (CDMA), and how this class of networks can extend the technology life cycle of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) with increased performance and functionality are described.

  12. Advanced 3D imaging lidar concepts for long range sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, K. J.; Hiskett, P. A.; Lamb, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Recent developments in 3D imaging lidar are presented. Long range 3D imaging using photon counting is now a possibility, offering a low-cost approach to integrated remote sensing with step changing advantages in size, weight and power compared to conventional analogue active imaging technology. We report results using a Geiger-mode array for time-of-flight, single photon counting lidar for depth profiling and determination of the shape and size of tree canopies and distributed surface reflections at a range of 9km, with 4μJ pulses with a frame rate of 100kHz using a low-cost fibre laser operating at a wavelength of λ=1.5 μm. The range resolution is less than 4cm providing very high depth resolution for target identification. This specification opens up several additional functionalities for advanced lidar, for example: absolute rangefinding and depth profiling for long range identification, optical communications, turbulence sensing and time-of-flight spectroscopy. Future concepts for 3D time-of-flight polarimetric and multispectral imaging lidar, with optical communications in a single integrated system are also proposed.

  13. Advances in GaAs bistable optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, J. L.; Tarng, S. S.; Gibbs, H. M.; Tai, K.; Weinberger, D. A.; Gossard, A. C.; McCall, S. L.; Passner, A.; Venkatesan, T. N. C.; Weigmann, W.

    1984-01-01

    Bistable optical devices (BOD's) using GaAs as the nonlinear medium are viable candidators for the achievement of fast ( ns), room temperature, low-power (mw), externally controllable optical switches which are easily fabricated and operated. Advances were made in all of these areas and efforts are in progress to improve performances in ways that are simultaneously compatible.

  14. Brain mapping: new wave optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas; Hübener, Mark; Bonhoeffer, Tobias

    2003-09-30

    Optical imaging of intrinsic signals is widely used for high-resolution brain mapping in various animal species. A new approach using continuous data acquisition and Fourier decomposition of the signal allows for much faster mapping, opening up the possibility of applying this method to new experimental questions. PMID:14521859

  15. A miniature acousto-optic image correlator

    SciTech Connect

    Molley, P.A.; Sweatt, W.C.; Strong, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    An acousto-optic (AO) image correlator architecture will be presented that minimizes the overall system size while maintaining excellent image quality for large input scenes. The correlator can accommodate grayscale input scenes with dimensions of 512 {times} 244 pixels and grayscale reference templates of size 64 {times} 64 pixels. The size of the optical system, however is less than ten cubic inches, 1in. {times} 1in. {times} 9in. This design incorporates a surface emitting laser diode array that has a center-to-center spacing of the laser elements matched to the row spacing on the CCD. Furthermore, the space-bandwidth and center frequency of the AO cell are chosen to match the length of the input image information in the cell to the width of the CCD. These two design decisions allow close to one-to-one imaging through the entire optical system producing the shortest possible path length. The optics were then designed with a goal of producing nearly diffraction-limited quality. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Advanced Optical Burst Switched Network Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejabati, Reza; Aracil, Javier; Castoldi, Piero; de Leenheer, Marc; Simeonidou, Dimitra; Valcarenghi, Luca; Zervas, Georgios; Wu, Jian

    In recent years, as the bandwidth and the speed of networks have increased significantly, a new generation of network-based applications using the concept of distributed computing and collaborative services is emerging (e.g., Grid computing applications). The use of the available fiber and DWDM infrastructure for these applications is a logical choice offering huge amounts of cheap bandwidth and ensuring global reach of computing resources [230]. Currently, there is a great deal of interest in deploying optical circuit (wavelength) switched network infrastructure for distributed computing applications that require long-lived wavelength paths and address the specific needs of a small number of well-known users. Typical users are particle physicists who, due to their international collaborations and experiments, generate enormous amounts of data (Petabytes per year). These users require a network infrastructures that can support processing and analysis of large datasets through globally distributed computing resources [230]. However, providing wavelength granularity bandwidth services is not an efficient and scalable solution for applications and services that address a wider base of user communities with different traffic profiles and connectivity requirements. Examples of such applications may be: scientific collaboration in smaller scale (e.g., bioinformatics, environmental research), distributed virtual laboratories (e.g., remote instrumentation), e-health, national security and defense, personalized learning environments and digital libraries, evolving broadband user services (i.e., high resolution home video editing, real-time rendering, high definition interactive TV). As a specific example, in e-health services and in particular mammography applications due to the size and quantity of images produced by remote mammography, stringent network requirements are necessary. Initial calculations have shown that for 100 patients to be screened remotely, the network

  17. Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology Advancements for Plasma Diagnostics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangyu

    To realize fusion plant, the very first step is to understand the fundamental physics of materials under fusion conditions, i.e. to understand fusion plasmas. Our research group, Plasma Diagnostics Group, focuses on developing advanced tools for physicists to extract as much information as possible from fusion plasmas at millions degrees. The Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostics is a very useful tool invented in this group to study fusion plasma electron temperature and it fluctuations. This dissertation presents millimeter wave imaging technology advances recently developed in this group to improve the ECEI system. New technologies made it more powerful to image and visualize magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) activities and micro-turbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis start from development of miniaturized elliptical substrate lens array. This novel substrate lens array replaces the previous generation substrate lens, hyper-hemispherical substrate lens, in terms of geometry. From the optical performance perspective, this substitution not only significantly simplifies the optical system with improved optical coupling, but also enhances the RF/LO coupling efficiency. By the benefit of the mini lens focusing properties, a wideband dual-dipole antenna array is carefully designed and developed. The new antenna array is optimized simultaneously for receiving both RF and LO, with sharp radiation patterns, low side-lobe levels, and less crosstalk between adjacent antennas. In addition, a high frequency antenna is also developed, which extends the frequency limit from 145 GHz to 220 GHz. This type of antenna will be used on high field operation tokamaks with toroidal fields in excess of 3 Tesla. Another important technology advance is so-called extended bandwidth double down-conversion electronics. This new electronics extends the instantaneous IF coverage from 2 to 9.2 GHz to 2 to 16.4 GHz. From the plasma point of view, it means that the

  18. Imaging without fluorescence: nonlinear optical microscopy for quantitative cellular imaging.

    PubMed

    Streets, Aaron M; Li, Ang; Chen, Tao; Huang, Yanyi

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative single-cell analysis enables the characterization of cellular systems with a level of detail that cannot be achieved with ensemble measurement. In this Feature we explore quantitative cellular imaging applications with nonlinear microscopy techniques. We first offer an introductory tutorial on nonlinear optical processes and then survey a range of techniques that have proven to be useful for quantitative live cell imaging without fluorescent labels.

  19. Exploiting data redundancy in computational optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Munro, Peter R T

    2015-11-30

    We present an algorithm which exploits data redundancy to make computational, coherent, optical imaging more computationally efficient. This algorithm specifically addresses the computation of how light scattered by a sample is collected and coherently detected. It is of greatest benefit in the simulation of broadband optical systems employing coherent detection, such as optical coherence tomography. Although also amenable to time-harmonic data, the algorithm is designed to be embedded within time-domain electromagnetic scattering simulators such as the psuedo-spectral and finite-difference time domain methods. We derive the algorithm in detail as well as criteria which ensure accurate execution of the algorithm. We present simulations that verify the developed algorithm and demonstrate its utility. We expect this algorithm to be important to future developments in computational imaging.

  20. Multi-Scale Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Michael Christopher

    An optical modality capable of quantitative, label-free, high-speed and high-resolution imaging across spatiotemporal scales coupled with sophisticated software for image reconstruction and quantitative analyses would be of great utility to scientists and engineers in the medical and life sciences fields. Currently, a combination of optical imaging techniques and software packages are needed to address the list of capabilities described previously. Optical coherence tomography is an optical imaging technique based on low coherence interferometry capable of measuring light backscattered from the sample at micrometer-level resolutions over millimeter-level penetration depths in biological tissue. Phase-sensitive extensions of OCT enable the functional assessment of biological tissue samples as well as the structural examination of samples down to the single-cell level. This dissertation describes the development and application of high-speed real-time multi-functional spectral-domain OCT (MF-SD-OCT) for structural and functional examination of biological samples across spatiotemporal scales. A discussion of the development of a GPU-accelerated high-speed MF-SD-OCT imaging system accompanied by demonstrations of the performance enhancements due to the GPU are presented initially. Next, the development of MF-SD-OCT-based quantitative methods for the structural and functional assessment and characterization and classification of biological tissue samples is discussed. The utility of these methods is demonstrated through structural, functional and optical characterization and classification of peripheral nerve and muscle tissue. The dissertation concludes with a discussion of the improvements made to spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy (SD-OCPM) to enable dynamic live cell imaging and the application of dynamic live cell SD-OCPM for morphological visualization of cheek epithelial cells and examination of functionally stimulated morphological changes in

  1. Geodesic denoising for optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrian Varnousfaderani, Ehsan; Vogl, Wolf-Dieter; Wu, Jing; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Simader, Christian; Langs, Georg; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical signal acquisition method capturing micrometer resolution, cross-sectional three-dimensional images. OCT images are used widely in ophthalmology to diagnose and monitor retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Glaucoma. While OCT allows the visualization of retinal structures such as vessels and retinal layers, image quality and contrast is reduced by speckle noise, obfuscating small, low intensity structures and structural boundaries. Existing denoising methods for OCT images may remove clinically significant image features such as texture and boundaries of anomalies. In this paper, we propose a novel patch based denoising method, Geodesic Denoising. The method reduces noise in OCT images while preserving clinically significant, although small, pathological structures, such as fluid-filled cysts in diseased retinas. Our method selects optimal image patch distribution representations based on geodesic patch similarity to noisy samples. Patch distributions are then randomly sampled to build a set of best matching candidates for every noisy sample, and the denoised value is computed based on a geodesic weighted average of the best candidate samples. Our method is evaluated qualitatively on real pathological OCT scans and quantitatively on a proposed set of ground truth, noise free synthetic OCT scans with artificially added noise and pathologies. Experimental results show that performance of our method is comparable with state of the art denoising methods while outperforming them in preserving the critical clinically relevant structures.

  2. Adaptive Optics Imaging in Laser Pointer Maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Sheyman, Alan T; Nesper, Peter L; Fawzi, Amani A; Jampol, Lee M

    2016-08-01

    The authors report multimodal imaging including adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) (Apaeros retinal image system AOSLO prototype; Boston Micromachines Corporation, Boston, MA) in a case of previously diagnosed unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy (UAIM) that demonstrated features of laser pointer maculopathy. The authors also show the adaptive optics images of a laser pointer maculopathy case previously reported. A 15-year-old girl was referred for the evaluation of a maculopathy suspected to be UAIM. The authors reviewed the patient's history and obtained fluorescein angiography, autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, infrared reflectance, and AOSLO. The time course of disease and clinical examination did not fit with UAIM, but the linear pattern of lesions was suspicious for self-inflicted laser pointer injury. This was confirmed on subsequent questioning of the patient. The presence of linear lesions in the macula that are best highlighted with multimodal imaging techniques should alert the physician to the possibility of laser pointer injury. AOSLO further characterizes photoreceptor damage in this condition. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:782-785.]. PMID:27548458

  3. Adaptive Optics Imaging in Laser Pointer Maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Sheyman, Alan T; Nesper, Peter L; Fawzi, Amani A; Jampol, Lee M

    2016-08-01

    The authors report multimodal imaging including adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) (Apaeros retinal image system AOSLO prototype; Boston Micromachines Corporation, Boston, MA) in a case of previously diagnosed unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy (UAIM) that demonstrated features of laser pointer maculopathy. The authors also show the adaptive optics images of a laser pointer maculopathy case previously reported. A 15-year-old girl was referred for the evaluation of a maculopathy suspected to be UAIM. The authors reviewed the patient's history and obtained fluorescein angiography, autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, infrared reflectance, and AOSLO. The time course of disease and clinical examination did not fit with UAIM, but the linear pattern of lesions was suspicious for self-inflicted laser pointer injury. This was confirmed on subsequent questioning of the patient. The presence of linear lesions in the macula that are best highlighted with multimodal imaging techniques should alert the physician to the possibility of laser pointer injury. AOSLO further characterizes photoreceptor damage in this condition. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:782-785.].

  4. Review of optical breast imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grosenick, Dirk; Rinneberg, Herbert; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Taroni, Paola

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy of the female breast is an area of active research. We review the present status of this field and discuss the broad range of methodologies and applications. Starting with a brief overview on breast physiology, the remodeling of vasculature and extracellular matrix caused by solid tumors is highlighted that is relevant for contrast in optical imaging. Then, the various instrumental techniques and the related methods of data analysis and image generation are described and compared including multimodality instrumentation, fluorescence mammography, broadband spectroscopy, and diffuse correlation spectroscopy. We review the clinical results on functional properties of malignant and benign breast lesions compared to host tissue and discuss the various methods to improve contrast between healthy and diseased tissue, such as enhanced spectroscopic information, dynamic variations of functional properties, pharmacokinetics of extrinsic contrast agents, including the enhanced permeability and retention effect. We discuss research on monitoring neoadjuvant chemotherapy and on breast cancer risk assessment as potential clinical applications of optical breast imaging and spectroscopy. Moreover, we consider new experimental approaches, such as photoacoustic imaging and long-wavelength tissue spectroscopy. PMID:27403837

  5. Coherent Nonlinear Optical Imaging: Beyond Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W.; Lu, Sijia; Xie, X. Sunney

    2012-01-01

    The quest for ultrahigh detection sensitivity with spectroscopic contrasts other than fluorescence has led to various novel approaches to optical microscopy of biological systems. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging, especially the recently developed nonlinear dissipation microscopy, including stimulated Raman scattering and two photon absorption, and pump-probe microscopy, including stimulated emission, excited state absorption and ground state depletion, provide distinct and powerful image contrasts for non-fluorescent species. Thanks to high-frequency modulation transfer scheme, they exhibit superb detection sensitivity. By directly interrogating vibrational and/or electronic energy levels of molecules, they offer high molecular specificity. Here we review the underlying principles, excitation and detection schemes, as well as exemplary biomedical applications of this emerging class of molecular imaging techniques. PMID:21453061

  6. Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging on ITER with Rowland Circle Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jason; Lee, Woochang; Leem, June-Eok; Bitter, Manfred; Park, Hyeon; Yun, Gunsu

    2015-11-01

    The implementation of advanced electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems on the major tokamaks TEXTOR1, DIII-D2,3, KSTAR4, EAST5, and ASDEX Upgrade6 has revolutionized the diagnosis of MHD activities and improved our understanding of various instabilities. However, the conventional ECEI systems cannot be applied to ITER because of the space constraints and excessive radiation that would be encountered in the diagnostic port plugs. This paper describes an alternative optical concept that employs the Rowland circle imaging geometry to implement an advanced ECEI system on ITER that is suitable for the tight space and harsh environments of the diagnostic port plugs. Such a system would match the capabilities of conventional ECEI diagnostics and would be capable of simultaneous core and edge measurements.

  7. Recent advances in reaction bonded silicon carbide optics and optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, Joseph; Schwartz, Jay; Landry, David; Glenn, William; Rider, Brian; Chung, Michael

    2005-08-01

    SSG Precision Optronics, Inc. (SSG) has recently developed a number of Reaction Bonded (RB) Silicon Carbide (SiC) optical systems for space-based remote sensing and astronomical observing applications. RB SiC's superior material properties make it uniquely well suited to meet the image quality and long term dimensional stability requirements associated with these applications. An overview of the RB SiC manufacturing process is presented, along with a summary description of recently delivered RB SiC flight hardware. This hardware includes an RB SiC telescope and Pointing Mirror Assembly (PMA) for the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) mission and an imaging telescope for the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) mission. SSG continues to advance the state-of-the-technology with SiC materials and systems. A summary of development activities related to a low-cost, fracture tough, fiber reinforced RB SiC material formulation, novel tooling to produce monolithic, partially closed back mirror geometries, and extension of the technology to large aspheric mirrors is also provided.

  8. Optical imaging of individual biomolecules in densely packed clusters.

    PubMed

    Dai, Mingjie; Jungmann, Ralf; Yin, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence super-resolution microscopy have allowed subcellular features and synthetic nanostructures down to 10-20 nm in size to be imaged. However, the direct optical observation of individual molecular targets (∼5 nm) in a densely packed biomolecular cluster remains a challenge. Here, we show that such discrete molecular imaging is possible using DNA-PAINT (points accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography)-a super-resolution fluorescence microscopy technique that exploits programmable transient oligonucleotide hybridization-on synthetic DNA nanostructures. We examined the effects of a high photon count, high blinking statistics and an appropriate blinking duty cycle on imaging quality, and developed a software-based drift correction method that achieves <1 nm residual drift (root mean squared) over hours. This allowed us to image a densely packed triangular lattice pattern with ∼5 nm point-to-point distance and to analyse the DNA origami structural offset with ångström-level precision (2 Å) from single-molecule studies. By combining the approach with multiplexed exchange-PAINT imaging, we further demonstrated an optical nanodisplay with 5 × 5 nm pixel size and three distinct colours with <1 nm cross-channel registration accuracy. PMID:27376244

  9. Optical imaging of individual biomolecules in densely packed clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mingjie; Jungmann, Ralf; Yin, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence super-resolution microscopy have allowed subcellular features and synthetic nanostructures down to 10-20 nm in size to be imaged. However, the direct optical observation of individual molecular targets (∼5 nm) in a densely packed biomolecular cluster remains a challenge. Here, we show that such discrete molecular imaging is possible using DNA-PAINT (points accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography)—a super-resolution fluorescence microscopy technique that exploits programmable transient oligonucleotide hybridization—on synthetic DNA nanostructures. We examined the effects of a high photon count, high blinking statistics and an appropriate blinking duty cycle on imaging quality, and developed a software-based drift correction method that achieves <1 nm residual drift (root mean squared) over hours. This allowed us to image a densely packed triangular lattice pattern with ∼5 nm point-to-point distance and to analyse the DNA origami structural offset with ångström-level precision (2 Å) from single-molecule studies. By combining the approach with multiplexed exchange-PAINT imaging, we further demonstrated an optical nanodisplay with 5 × 5 nm pixel size and three distinct colours with <1 nm cross-channel registration accuracy.

  10. Advances in computed tomography imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Gupta, Rajiv

    2014-07-11

    Computed tomography (CT) is an essential tool in diagnostic imaging for evaluating many clinical conditions. In recent years, there have been several notable advances in CT technology that already have had or are expected to have a significant clinical impact, including extreme multidetector CT, iterative reconstruction algorithms, dual-energy CT, cone-beam CT, portable CT, and phase-contrast CT. These techniques and their clinical applications are reviewed and illustrated in this article. In addition, emerging technologies that address deficiencies in these modalities are discussed.

  11. Special issue on high-resolution optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter J. S.; Davis, Ilan; Galbraith, Catherine G.; Stemmer, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    The pace of development in the field of advanced microscopy is truly breath-taking, and is leading to major breakthroughs in our understanding of molecular machines and cell function. This special issue of Journal of Optics draws attention to a number of interesting approaches, ranging from fluorescence and imaging of unlabelled cells, to computational methods, all of which are describing the ever increasing detail of the dynamic behaviour of molecules in the living cell. This is a field which traditionally, and currently, demonstrates a marvellous interplay between the disciplines of physics, chemistry and biology, where apparent boundaries to resolution dissolve and living cells are viewed in ever more clarity. It is fertile ground for those interested in optics and non-conventional imaging to contribute high-impact outputs in the fields of cell biology and biomedicine. The series of articles presented here has been selected to demonstrate this interdisciplinarity and to encourage all those with a background in the physical sciences to 'dip their toes' into the exciting and dynamic discoveries surrounding cell function. Although single molecule super-resolution microscopy is commercially available, specimen preparation and interpretation of single molecule data remain a major challenge for scientists wanting to adopt the techniques. The paper by Allen and Davidson [1] provides a much needed detailed introduction to the practical aspects of stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, including sample preparation, image acquisition and image analysis, as well as a brief description of the different variants of single molecule localization microscopy. Since super-resolution microscopy is no longer restricted to three-dimensional imaging of fixed samples, the review by Fiolka [2] is a timely introduction to techniques that have been successfully applied to four-dimensional live cell super-resolution microscopy. The combination of multiple high-resolution techniques

  12. Atherosclerosis diagnostic imaging by optical spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewko, M. D.; Choo-Smith, L. P.; Ko, A. C. T.; Smith, M. S. D.; Kohlenberg, E. M.; Bock, E. R.; Leonardi, L.; Sowa, M. G.

    2006-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is traditionally viewed as a disease of uncontrolled plaque growth leading to arterial occlusion. More recently, however, occlusion of the arterial lumen is being viewed as an acute event triggered by plaque rupture and thrombosis. An atheromatous plaque becomes vulnerable to sudden activation and/or rupture when a constellation of processes are activated by various trigger mechanisms. There is growing evidence that the vulnerability (i.e. susceptibility to rupture) and thrombogenic nature of the plaque need to be taken into account in the planning and treatment of the disease. X-ray fluoroscopy and intravascular ultrasound, the current clinical diagnostic tools are not capable of the providing a complete histological picture of the plaque region. Intravascular diagnostic imaging of coronary atherosclerotic plaques by optical means to assess plaque, patient risk and assist in planning treatment strategies represents the future in angioplasty treatment by interventional cardiologists. The techniques which will enable a clinically acceptable and reliable intravascular diagnostic platform are currently being investigated and compared to the clinical standard of histology. Currently, we are investigating the use of a number of optical and imaging techniques for biochemical analysis of arterial tissue including Raman, near infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies. Biochemical imaging will provide compositional information on collagen, elastin, lipid and thrombogenic by-products as well as gauging inflammation and tissue remodeling activity levels. To complement the functional biochemical imaging, optical coherence tomography will be provide structural morphological imaging. The synergistic combination of functional and structural imagery will provide the interventional cardiologist with a complete clinical picture of the atherosclerotic plaque region. The clinician can use this diagnostic information to plan a personalized treatment procedure based on

  13. Optical-CT imaging of complex 3D dose distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark; Kim, Leonard; Hugo, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    The limitations of conventional dosimeters restrict the comprehensiveness of verification that can be performed for advanced radiation treatments presenting an immediate and substantial problem for clinics attempting to implement these techniques. In essence, the rapid advances in the technology of radiation delivery have not been paralleled by corresponding advances in the ability to verify these treatments. Optical-CT gel-dosimetry is a relatively new technique with potential to address this imbalance by providing high resolution 3D dose maps in polymer and radiochromic gel dosimeters. We have constructed a 1st generation optical-CT scanner capable of high resolution 3D dosimetry and applied it to a number of simple and increasingly complex dose distributions including intensity-modulated-radiation-therapy (IMRT). Prior to application to IMRT, the robustness of optical-CT gel dosimetry was investigated on geometry and variable attenuation phantoms. Physical techniques and image processing methods were developed to minimize deleterious effects of refraction, reflection, and scattered laser light. Here we present results of investigations into achieving accurate high-resolution 3D dosimetry with optical-CT, and show clinical examples of 3D IMRT dosimetry verification. In conclusion, optical-CT gel dosimetry can provide high resolution 3D dose maps that greatly facilitate comprehensive verification of complex 3D radiation treatments. Good agreement was observed at high dose levels (>50%) between planned and measured dose distributions. Some systematic discrepancies were observed however (rms discrepancy 3% at high dose levels) indicating further work is required to eliminate confounding factors presently compromising the accuracy of optical-CT 3D gel-dosimetry.

  14. Advanced imaging of the scapholunate ligamentous complex.

    PubMed

    Shahabpour, Maryam; Staelens, Barbara; Van Overstraeten, Luc; De Maeseneer, Michel; Boulet, Cedric; De Mey, Johan; Scheerlinck, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    The scapholunate joint is one of the most involved in wrist injuries. Its stability depends on primary and secondary stabilisers forming together the scapholunate complex. This ligamentous complex is often evaluated by wrist arthroscopy. To avoid surgery as diagnostic procedure, optimization of MR imaging parameters as use of three-dimensional (3D) sequences with very thin slices and high spatial resolution, is needed to detect lesions of the intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the scapholunate complex. The paper reviews the literature on imaging of radial-sided carpal ligaments with advanced computed tomographic arthrography (CTA) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) to evaluate the scapholunate complex. Anatomy and pathology of the ligamentous complex are described and illustrated with CTA, MRA and corresponding arthroscopy. Sprains, mid-substance tears, avulsions and fibrous infiltrations of carpal ligaments could be identified on CTA and MRA images using 3D fat-saturated PD and 3D DESS (dual echo with steady-state precession) sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices. Imaging signs of scapholunate complex pathology include: discontinuity, nonvisualization, changes in signal intensity, contrast extravasation (MRA), contour irregularity and waviness and periligamentous infiltration by edema, granulation tissue or fibrosis. Based on this preliminary experience, we believe that 3 T MRA using 3D sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices and multiplanar reconstructions is capable to evaluate the scapholunate complex and could help to reduce the number of diagnostic arthroscopies.

  15. Horizontal Shear Wave Imaging of Large Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J

    2007-09-05

    When complete the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be the world's largest and most energetic laser and will be capable of achieving for the first time fusion ignition in the laboratory. Detecting optics features within the laser beamlines and sizing them at diameters of 0.1 mm to 10 mm allows timely decisions concerning refurbishment and will help with the routine operation of the system. Horizontally polarized shear waves at 10 MHz were shown to accurately detect, locate, and size features created by laser operations from 0.5 mm to 8 mm by placing sensors at the edge of the optic. The shear wave technique utilizes highly directed beams. The outer edge of an optic can be covered with shear wave transducers on four sides. Each transducer sends a pulse into the optic and any damage reflects the pulse back to the transmitter. The transducers are multiplexed, and the collected time waveforms are enveloped and replicated across the width of the element. Multiplying the data sets from four directions produces a map of reflected amplitude to the fourth power, which images the surface of the optic. Surface area can be measured directly from the image, and maximum depth was shown to be correlated to maximum amplitude of the reflected waveform.

  16. Phase Imaging using Focusing Polycapillary Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Sajid

    The interaction of X rays in diagnostic energy range with soft tissues can be described by Compton scattering and by the complex refractive index, which together characterize the attenuation properties of the tissue and the phase imparted to X rays passing through it. Many soft tissues exhibit extremely similar attenuation, so that their discrimination using conventional radiography, which generates contrast in an image through differential attenuation, is challenging. However, these tissues will impart phase differences significantly greater than attenuation differences to the X rays passing through them, so that phase-contrast imaging techniques can enable their discrimination. A major limitation to the widespread adoption of phase-contrast techniques is that phase contrast requires significant spatial coherence of the X-ray beam, which in turn requires specialized sources. For tabletop sources, this often requires a small (usually in the range of 10-50 micron) X-ray source. In this work, polycapillary optics were employed to create a small secondary source from a large spot rotating anode. Polycapillary optics consist of arrays of small hollow glass tubes through which X rays can be guided by total internal reflection from the tube walls. By tapering the tubes to guide the X rays to a point, they can be focused to a small spot which can be used as a secondary source. The polycapillary optic was first aligned with the X-ray source. The spot size was measured using a computed radiography image plate. Images were taken at a variety of optic-to-object and object-to-detector distances and phase-contrast edge enhancement was observed. Conventional absorption images were also acquired at a small object-to detector distances for comparison. Background division was performed to remove strong non-uniformity due to the optics. Differential phase contrast reconstruction demonstrates promising preliminary results. This manuscript is divided into six chapters. The second

  17. Optical coherence tomography for endodontic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, G.; Shemesh, H.; Wu, M.-K.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Wesselink, P. R.

    2008-02-01

    In root canal therapy, complications frequently arise as a result of root fracture or imperfect cleaning of fins and invaginations. To date, there is no imaging method for nondestructive in vivo evaluation of the condition of the root canal, during or after treatment. There is a clinical need for a technique to detect defects before they give rise to complications. In this study we evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to image root canal walls, and its capacity to identify complicating factors in root canal treatment. While the potential of OCT to identify caries has been explored before, endodontic imaging has not been reported. We imaged extracted lower front teeth after endodontic preparation and correlated these images to histological sections. A 3D OCT pullback scan was made with an endoscopic rotating optical fiber probe inside the root canal. All oval canals, uncleaned fins, risk zones, and one perforation that were detected by histology were also imaged by OCT. As an example of an area where OCT has clinical potential, we present a study of vertical root fracture identification with OCT.

  18. Approach for reconstructing anisoplanatic adaptive optics images.

    PubMed

    Aubailly, Mathieu; Roggemann, Michael C; Schulz, Timothy J

    2007-08-20

    Atmospheric turbulence corrupts astronomical images formed by ground-based telescopes. Adaptive optics systems allow the effects of turbulence-induced aberrations to be reduced for a narrow field of view corresponding approximately to the isoplanatic angle theta(0). For field angles larger than theta(0), the point spread function (PSF) gradually degrades as the field angle increases. We present a technique to estimate the PSF of an adaptive optics telescope as function of the field angle, and use this information in a space-varying image reconstruction technique. Simulated anisoplanatic intensity images of a star field are reconstructed by means of a block-processing method using the predicted local PSF. Two methods for image recovery are used: matrix inversion with Tikhonov regularization, and the Lucy-Richardson algorithm. Image reconstruction results obtained using the space-varying predicted PSF are compared to space invariant deconvolution results obtained using the on-axis PSF. The anisoplanatic reconstruction technique using the predicted PSF provides a significant improvement of the mean squared error between the reconstructed image and the object compared to the deconvolution performed using the on-axis PSF. PMID:17712366

  19. Advanced magneto-optical materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Shaoying

    The magneto-optical materials with both high Faraday rotation and high transmittance capabilities are greatly desired in high speed switches, isolators, and visible imaging systems. In this thesis work, new magneto-optical materials that possess both high Faraday effect and high transmittance in the visible range of the spectrum were studied and synthesized. New Bismuth iron gallium garnet thin-films (Bi3Fe4Ga 1O12, BIGG) have been successfully deposited on gadolinium gallium garnet substrates with a pulsed laser deposition technique in our lab. X-ray diffraction analyses have proven that the BIGG films are of good epitaxial quality with a lattice constant close to 12.61+/-0.01Á. The bandwidth of BIGG's transmittance spectrum has been extended and its left edge has been shifted about 50nm towards the shorter wavelengths relative to those of Bi3Fe5O12 (BIG) films. The BIGG film is more transparent than a BIG film although BIGG's Faraday rotation angle is slightly less than that of a BIG film. The figure of merit of the BIGG garnet film has reached 16.5°, which is about 1.8 times that of a typical BIG film. Currently, the switches using BIGG films were tested and a 2.4 ns response time had been reached with a phi1 mm circular aperture at the wavelength of 532 nm. Iron Borate (FeBO3) is another material that is far superior in terms of the transmittance in the visible spectrum at room temperature to most garnet materials. The FeBO3 is one of the orthoferrites with a large natural birefringence for the light propagated along the magnetization direction. The effect of birefringence on Faraday rotation reduced the maximum obtainable rotation. In order to eliminate the birefringence and further improve the transmittance, a high energy ball-milling technique was used to synthesize FeBO3 nanoparticles. Our numerical simulation shows the nanoparticles could eliminate the birefringence, and concurrently keep the intrinsic Faraday rotation. After milling and centrifuging

  20. Physical Optics Based Computational Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivas, Stephen Joseph

    There is an ongoing demand on behalf of the consumer, medical and military industries to make lighter weight, higher resolution, wider field-of-view and extended depth-of-focus cameras. This leads to design trade-offs between performance and cost, be it size, weight, power, or expense. This has brought attention to finding new ways to extend the design space while adhering to cost constraints. Extending the functionality of an imager in order to achieve extraordinary performance is a common theme of computational imaging, a field of study which uses additional hardware along with tailored algorithms to formulate and solve inverse problems in imaging. This dissertation details four specific systems within this emerging field: a Fiber Bundle Relayed Imaging System, an Extended Depth-of-Focus Imaging System, a Platform Motion Blur Image Restoration System, and a Compressive Imaging System. The Fiber Bundle Relayed Imaging System is part of a larger project, where the work presented in this thesis was to use image processing techniques to mitigate problems inherent to fiber bundle image relay and then, form high-resolution wide field-of-view panoramas captured from multiple sensors within a custom state-of-the-art imager. The Extended Depth-of-Focus System goals were to characterize the angular and depth dependence of the PSF of a focal swept imager in order to increase the acceptably focused imaged scene depth. The goal of the Platform Motion Blur Image Restoration System was to build a system that can capture a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), long-exposure image which is inherently blurred while at the same time capturing motion data using additional optical sensors in order to deblur the degraded images. Lastly, the objective of the Compressive Imager was to design and build a system functionally similar to the Single Pixel Camera and use it to test new sampling methods for image generation and to characterize it against a traditional camera. These computational

  1. CMOS Imaging Device for Optical Imaging of Biological Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishido, Sanshiro; Oguro, Yasuhiro; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    In this paper, we propose a CMOS image sensor device placed on the brain surface or cerebral sulcus (Fig. 1). The device has a photo detector array where a single optical detector is usually used. The proposed imaging device enables the analysis which reflects a surface blood pattern in the observed area. It is also possible to improve effective sensitivity by image processing and to simplify the measurement system by the CMOS sensor device with on-chip light source. We describe the design details and characterization of proposed device. We also demonstrate detection of hemoglobin oxygenation level with external light source, imaging capability of biological activities, and image processing for sensitivity improvement is also realized.

  2. Retinal imaging using adaptive optics technology☆

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effect of wave front distortions. Retinal imaging using AO aims to compensate for higher order aberrations originating from the cornea and the lens by using deformable mirror. The main application of AO retinal imaging has been to assess photoreceptor cell density, spacing, and mosaic regularity in normal and diseased eyes. Apart from photoreceptors, the retinal pigment epithelium, retinal nerve fiber layer, retinal vessel wall and lamina cribrosa can also be visualized with AO technology. Recent interest in AO technology in eye research has resulted in growing number of reports and publications utilizing this technology in both animals and humans. With the availability of first commercially available instruments we are making transformation of AO technology from a research tool to diagnostic instrument. The current challenges include imaging eyes with less than perfect optical media, formation of normative databases for acquired images such as cone mosaics, and the cost of the technology. The opportunities for AO will include more detailed diagnosis with description of some new findings in retinal diseases and glaucoma as well as expansion of AO into clinical trials which has already started. PMID:24843304

  3. Retinal imaging using adaptive optics technology.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Igor

    2014-04-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effect of wave front distortions. Retinal imaging using AO aims to compensate for higher order aberrations originating from the cornea and the lens by using deformable mirror. The main application of AO retinal imaging has been to assess photoreceptor cell density, spacing, and mosaic regularity in normal and diseased eyes. Apart from photoreceptors, the retinal pigment epithelium, retinal nerve fiber layer, retinal vessel wall and lamina cribrosa can also be visualized with AO technology. Recent interest in AO technology in eye research has resulted in growing number of reports and publications utilizing this technology in both animals and humans. With the availability of first commercially available instruments we are making transformation of AO technology from a research tool to diagnostic instrument. The current challenges include imaging eyes with less than perfect optical media, formation of normative databases for acquired images such as cone mosaics, and the cost of the technology. The opportunities for AO will include more detailed diagnosis with description of some new findings in retinal diseases and glaucoma as well as expansion of AO into clinical trials which has already started. PMID:24843304

  4. Neurolight -astonishing advances in brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Rojczyk-Gołębiewska, Ewa; Pałasz, Artur; Worthington, John J; Markowski, Grzegorz; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, significant advances in basic neuroanatomical studies have taken place. Moreover, such classical, clinically-oriented human brain imaging methods such as MRI, PET and DTI have been applied to small laboratory animals allowing improvement in current experimental neuroscience. Contemporary structural neurobiology also uses various technologies based on fluorescent proteins. One of these is optogenetics, which integrates physics, genetics and bioengineering to enable temporal precise control of electrical activity of specific neurons. Another important challenge in the field is the accurate imaging of complicated neural networks. To address this problem, three-dimensional reconstruction techniques and retrograde labeling with modified viruses has been developed. However, a revolutionary step was the invention of the "Brainbow" system, utilizing gene constructs including the sequences of fluorescent proteins and the usage of Cre recombinase to create dozens of colour combinations, enabling visualization of neurons and their connections in extremely high resolution. Furthermore, the newly- introduced CLARITY method should make it possible to visualize three-dimensionally the structure of translucent brain tissue using the hydrogel polymeric network. This original technique is a big advance in neuroscience creating novel viewpoints completely different than standard glass slide immunostaining. PMID:24730999

  5. Neurolight -astonishing advances in brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Rojczyk-Gołębiewska, Ewa; Pałasz, Artur; Worthington, John J; Markowski, Grzegorz; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, significant advances in basic neuroanatomical studies have taken place. Moreover, such classical, clinically-oriented human brain imaging methods such as MRI, PET and DTI have been applied to small laboratory animals allowing improvement in current experimental neuroscience. Contemporary structural neurobiology also uses various technologies based on fluorescent proteins. One of these is optogenetics, which integrates physics, genetics and bioengineering to enable temporal precise control of electrical activity of specific neurons. Another important challenge in the field is the accurate imaging of complicated neural networks. To address this problem, three-dimensional reconstruction techniques and retrograde labeling with modified viruses has been developed. However, a revolutionary step was the invention of the "Brainbow" system, utilizing gene constructs including the sequences of fluorescent proteins and the usage of Cre recombinase to create dozens of colour combinations, enabling visualization of neurons and their connections in extremely high resolution. Furthermore, the newly- introduced CLARITY method should make it possible to visualize three-dimensionally the structure of translucent brain tissue using the hydrogel polymeric network. This original technique is a big advance in neuroscience creating novel viewpoints completely different than standard glass slide immunostaining.

  6. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D.V.G.L.N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy. PMID:18458764

  7. Optical coherence tomography for embryonic imaging: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Raksha; Singh, Manmohan; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-05-01

    Embryogenesis is a highly complex and dynamic process, and its visualization is crucial for understanding basic physiological processes during development and for identifying and assessing possible defects, malformations, and diseases. While traditional imaging modalities, such as ultrasound biomicroscopy, micro-magnetic resonance imaging, and micro-computed tomography, have long been adapted for embryonic imaging, these techniques generally have limitations in their speed, spatial resolution, and contrast to capture processes such as cardiodynamics during embryogenesis. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging modality with micrometer-scale spatial resolution and imaging depth up to a few millimeters in tissue. OCT has bridged the gap between ultrahigh resolution imaging techniques with limited imaging depth like confocal microscopy and modalities, such as ultrasound sonography, which have deeper penetration but poorer spatial resolution. Moreover, the noninvasive nature of OCT has enabled live imaging of embryos without any external contrast agents. We review how OCT has been utilized to study developing embryos and also discuss advances in techniques used in conjunction with OCT to understand embryonic development.

  8. Conventional and advanced imaging in neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Y; Sutton, I J; Ghadiri, M; Masters, L; Zivadinov, R; Barnett, M H

    2014-08-01

    Myelitis and optic neuritis are prototypic clinical presentations of both multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Once considered a subtype of multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica, is now known to have a discrete pathogenesis in which antibodies to the water channel, aquaporin 4, play a critical role. Timely differentiation of neuromyelitis optica from MS is imperative, determining both prognosis and treatment strategy. Early, aggressive immunosuppression is required to prevent the accrual of severe disability in neuromyelitis optica; conversely, MS-specific therapies may exacerbate the disease. The diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica requires the integration of clinical, MR imaging, and laboratory data, but current criteria are insensitive and exclude patients with limited clinical syndromes. Failure to recognize the expanding spectrum of cerebral MR imaging patterns associated with aquaporin 4 antibody seropositivity adds to diagnostic uncertainty in some patients. We present the state of the art in conventional and nonconventional MR imaging in neuromyelitis optica and review the place of neuroimaging in the diagnosis, management, and research of the condition.

  9. Variable Shadow Screens for Imaging Optical Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ed; Chretien, Jean L.

    2004-01-01

    Variable shadow screens have been proposed for reducing the apparent brightnesses of very bright light sources relative to other sources within the fields of view of diverse imaging optical devices, including video and film cameras and optical devices for imaging directly into the human eye. In other words, variable shadow screens would increase the effective dynamic ranges of such devices. Traditionally, imaging sensors are protected against excessive brightness by use of dark filters and/or reduction of iris diameters. These traditional means do not increase dynamic range; they reduce the ability to view or image dimmer features of an image because they reduce the brightness of all parts of an image by the same factor. On the other hand, a variable shadow screen would darken only the excessively bright parts of an image. For example, dim objects in a field of view that included the setting Sun or bright headlights could be seen more readily in a picture taken through a variable shadow screen than in a picture of the same scene taken through a dark filter or a narrowed iris. The figure depicts one of many potential variations of the basic concept of the variable shadow screen. The shadow screen would be a normally transparent liquid-crystal matrix placed in front of a focal-plane array of photodetectors in a charge-coupled-device video camera. The shadow screen would be placed far enough from the focal plane so as not to disrupt the focal-plane image to an unacceptable degree, yet close enough so that the out-of-focus shadows cast by the screen would still be effective in darkening the brightest parts of the image. The image detected by the photodetector array itself would be used as feedback to drive the variable shadow screen: The video output of the camera would be processed by suitable analog and/or digital electronic circuitry to generate a negative partial version of the image to be impressed on the shadow screen. The parts of the shadow screen in front of

  10. Optical Imaging of Flow Pattern and Phantom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galland, Pierre A.; Liang, X.; Wang, L.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, R. R.; Breisacher, K.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved optical imaging technique has been used to image the spatial distribution of small droplets and jet sprays in a highly scattering environment. The snake and ballistic components of the transmitted pulse are less scattered, and contain direct information about the sample to facilitate image formation as opposed to the diffusive components which are due to multiple collisions as a light pulse propagates through a scattering medium. In a time-gated imaging scheme, these early-arriving, image-bearing components of the incident pulse are selected by opening a gate for an ultrashort period of time and a shadowgram image is detected. Using a single shot cooled CCD camera system, the formation of water droplets is monitored as a function of time. Picosecond time-gated image of drop in scattering cells, spray droplets as a function of let speed and gas pressure, and model calcification samples consisted of calcium carbonate particles of irregular shapes ranging in size from 0. 1 to 1.5 mm affixed to a microscope slide have been measured. Formation produced by an impinging jet will be further monitored using a CCD with 1 kHz framing illuminated with pulsed light. The desired image resolution of the fuel droplets is on the 20 pm scale using early light through a highly scattering medium. A 10(exp -6)m displacement from a jet spray with a flow speed of 100 m/sec introduced by the ns grating pulse used in the imaging is negligible. Early ballistic/snake light imaging offers nondestructive and noninvasive method to observe the spatial distribution of hidden objects inside a highly scattering environment for space, biomedical, and materials applications. In this paper, the techniques we will present are time-resolved K-F transillumination imaging and time-gated scattered light imaging. With a large dynamic range and high resolution, time-gated early light imaging has the potential for improving rocket/aircraft design by determining jets shape and particle sizes

  11. Optical diagnostics for turbulent and multiphase flows: Particle image velocimetry and photorefractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.; Shagam, R.N.; Blanchat, T.K.; Chu, T.Y.; Tassin-Leger, A.L.; Henderson, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project ``Optical Diagnostics for Turbulent and Multiphase Flows.`` Advanced optical diagnostics have been investigated and developed for flow field measurements, including capabilities for measurement in turbulent, multiphase, and heated flows. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) includes several techniques for measurement of instantaneous flow field velocities and associated turbulence quantities. Nonlinear photorefractive optical materials have been investigated for the possibility of measuring turbulence quantities (turbulent spectrum) more directly. The two-dimensional PIV techniques developed under this LDRD were shown to work well, and were compared with more traditional laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Three-dimensional PIV techniques were developed and tested, but due to several experimental difficulties were not as successful. The photorefractive techniques were tested, and both potential capabilities and possible problem areas were elucidated.

  12. Optical evaluation methods in particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, P. V.

    Application of particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques for measurement of fluid velocities typically requires two steps. The first of these is the photography step, in which two exposures of a particle field, displaced between the exposures, are taken. The second step is the evaluation of the double-exposure particle pattern and production of appropriate particle velocities. Each of these steps involves optimization, which is usually specific to the experiment being conducted, and there is significant interaction between photographic parameters and evaluation characteristics. This paper will focus on the latter step, that of evaluation of the double-exposure photograph. In several parts of a PIV system, some performance advantage may be obtained by increasing use of optical processing over conventional digital image processing. Among the processes for which a performance advantage may be obtained are parallel or multiplex image interrogation and the evaluation of the Young's fringe pattern obtained from the scattered pattern from the double-exposure photograph. This paper will discuss parallel image interrogation and compare the performance of optical and numerical Fourier transform analysis of Young's fringes using speckle images.

  13. Real-time optical image processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1988-01-01

    Nonlinear real-time optical processing on spatial pulse frequency modulation has been pursued through the analysis, design, and fabrication of pulse frequency modulated halftone screens and the modification of micro-channel spatial light modulators (MSLMs). Micro-channel spatial light modulators are modified via the Fabry-Perot method to achieve the high gamma operation required for non-linear operation. Real-time nonlinear processing was performed using the halftone screen and MSLM. The experiments showed the effectiveness of the thresholding and also showed the needs of higher SBP for image processing. The Hughes LCLV has been characterized and found to yield high gamma (about 1.7) when operated in low frequency and low bias mode. Cascading of two LCLVs should also provide enough gamma for nonlinear processing. In this case, the SBP of the LCLV is sufficient but the uniformity of the LCLV needs improvement. These include image correlation, computer generation of holograms, pseudo-color image encoding for image enhancement, and associative-retrieval in neural processing. The discovery of the only known optical method for dynamic range compression of an input image in real-time by using GaAs photorefractive crystals is reported. Finally, a new architecture for non-linear multiple sensory, neural processing has been suggested.

  14. Electro-optic imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Znod, Hanying (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (EOIFTS) for Hyperspectral Imaging is described. The EOIFTS includes an input polarizer, an output polarizer, and a plurality of birefringent phase elements. The relative orientations of the polarizers and birefringent phase elements can be changed mechanically or via a controller, using ferroelectric liquid crystals, to substantially measure the spectral Fourier components of light propagating through the EIOFTS. When achromatic switches are used as an integral part of the birefringent phase elements, the EIOFTS becomes suitable for broadband applications, with over 1 micron infrared bandwidth.

  15. Novel optical system for neonatal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Shuoming; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton; Anday, Endla; Ravishankar, Sudha; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria

    1999-03-01

    A highly portable, fast, safe and affordable imaging system that provides interpretable images of brain function in full- and pre-term neonates within a few seconds has been applied to neonates with normal and pathological states. We have used a uniquely sensitive optical tomography system, termed phased array, which has revealed significant functional responses, particularly to parietal stimulation in neonate brain. This system can indicate the blood concentration and oxygenation change during the parietal brain activation in full- and pre-term neonates. The preliminary clinical results, especially a longitudinal study of a cardiac arrest neonate, suggest a variety of future applications.

  16. Adaptive optics OCT using 1060nm swept source and dual deformable lenses for human retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Cua, Michelle; Miao, Dongkai; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics concepts have been applied to the advancement of biological imaging and microscopy. In particular, AO has also been very successfully applied to cellular resolution imaging of the retina, enabling visualization of the characteristic mosaic patterns of the outer retinal layers using flood illumination fundus photography, Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO), and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Despite the high quality of the in vivo images, there has been a limited uptake of AO imaging into the clinical environment. The high resolution afforded by AO comes at the price of limited field of view and specialized equipment. The implementation of a typical adaptive optics imaging system results in a relatively large and complex optical setup. The wavefront measurement is commonly performed using a Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor (HS-WFS) placed at an image plane that is optically conjugated to the eye's pupil. The deformable mirror is also placed at a conjugate plane, relaying the wavefront corrections to the pupil. Due to the sensitivity of the HS-WFS to back-reflections, the imaging system is commonly constructed from spherical mirrors. In this project, we present a novel adaptive optics OCT retinal imaging system with significant potential to overcome many of the barriers to integration with a clinical environment. We describe in detail the implementation of a compact lens based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) 1060nm swept source OCT human retinal imaging system with dual deformable lenses, and present retinal images acquired in vivo from research volunteers.

  17. Intraoperative Optical Imaging and Tissue Interrogation During Urologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Mark; Gupta, Mohit; Su, Li-Ming; Liao, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To review optical imaging technologies in urologic surgery aimed to facilitate intraoperative imaging and tissue interrogation. Recent findings Emerging new optical imaging technologies can be integrated in the operating room environment during minimally invasive and open surgery. These technologies include macroscopic fluorescence imaging that provides contrast enhancement between normal and diseased tissue and microscopic imaging that provides tissue characterization. Summary Optical imaging technologies that have reached the clinical arena in urologic surgery are reviewed, including photodynamic diagnosis, near infrared fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. PMID:24240512

  18. IOT Overview: Optical Spectro-Imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patat, F.

    Taking the FORS instruments as a representative case, I review the Calibration Plan for optical spectro-imagers currently offered at ESO, discussing various aspects related both to the scientific outcome and the instrument/site monitoring. I also describe ongoing and future calibration projects planned by the Instrument Operations Teams, trying to give an objective view on the limitations of the Calibration Plans currently implemented at ESO for this class of instruments.

  19. Optical imaging of objects in turbid media using heterodyned optical Kerr gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Pingping; Tan, Wenjiang; Si, Jinhai; Xu, Shichao; Tong, Junyi; Hou, Xun

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated optical imaging of objects hidden behind highly turbid media with a femtosecond heterodyned optical Kerr gate (HOKG). The experimental results showed that when compared with traditional optical Kerr gated (OKG) imaging, the HOKG imaging system provided higher image sharpness and higher spatial resolution. In traditional OKG imaging system, low pass filtering due to a photoinduced soft aperture decreased the image sharpness. When the HOKG was used, the high spatial frequency components of the object could be effectively compensated.

  20. Advanced fiber optic seismic sensors (geophone) research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan

    The systematical research on the fiber optic seismic sensors based on optical Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology is presented in this thesis. Optical fiber sensors using fiber Bragg gratings have a number of advantages such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, lightweight, low power consumption. The FBG sensor is intrinsically sensitive to dynamic strain signals and the strain sensitivity can approach sub micro-strain. Furthermore, FBG sensors are inherently suited for multiplexing, which makes possible networked/arrayed deployment on a large scale. The basic principle of the FBG geophone is that it transforms the acceleration of ground motion into the strain signal of the FBG sensor through mechanical design, and after the optical demodulation generates the analog voltage output proportional to the strain changes. The customized eight-channel FBG seismic sensor prototype is described here which consists of FBG sensor/demodulation grating pairs attached on the spring-mass mechanical system. The sensor performance is evaluated systematically in the laboratory using the conventional accelerometer and geophone as the benchmark, Two major applications of FBG seismic sensor are demonstrated. One is in the battlefield remote monitoring system to detect the presence of personnel, wheeled vehicles, and tracked vehicles. The other application is in the seismic reflection survey of oilfield exploration to collect the seismic waves from the earth. The field tests were carried out in the air force base and the oilfield respectively. It is shown that the FBG geophone has higher frequency response bandwidth and sensitivity than conventional moving-coil electromagnetic geophone and the military Rembass-II S/A sensor. Our objective is to develop a distributed FBG seismic sensor network to recognize and locate the presence of seismic sources with high inherent detection capability and a low false alarm rate in an integrated system.

  1. Speckle image reconstruction of the adaptive optics solar images.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Libo; Tian, Yu; Rao, Changhui

    2014-11-17

    Speckle image reconstruction, in which the speckle transfer function (STF) is modeled as annular distribution according to the angular dependence of adaptive optics (AO) compensation and the individual STF in each annulus is obtained by the corresponding Fried parameter calculated from the traditional spectral ratio method, is used to restore the solar images corrected by AO system in this paper. The reconstructions of the solar images acquired by a 37-element AO system validate this method and the image quality is improved evidently. Moreover, we found the photometric accuracy of the reconstruction is field dependent due to the influence of AO correction. With the increase of angular separation of the object from the AO lockpoint, the relative improvement becomes approximately more and more effective and tends to identical in the regions far away the central field of view. The simulation results show this phenomenon is mainly due to the disparity of the calculated STF from the real AO STF with the angular dependence.

  2. Mono- and multimodal registration of optical breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Paul C.; Adams, Arthur; Elias, Sjoerd G.; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Viergever, Max A.; Pluim, Josien P. W.

    2012-08-01

    Optical breast imaging offers the possibility of noninvasive, low cost, and high sensitivity imaging of breast cancers. Poor spatial resolution and a lack of anatomical landmarks in optical images of the breast make interpretation difficult and motivate registration and fusion of these data with subsequent optical images and other breast imaging modalities. Methods used for registration and fusion of optical breast images are reviewed. Imaging concerns relevant to the registration problem are first highlighted, followed by a focus on both monomodal and multimodal registration of optical breast imaging. Where relevant, methods pertaining to other imaging modalities or imaged anatomies are presented. The multimodal registration discussion concerns digital x-ray mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography.

  3. Recent advances in optical measurement methods in physics and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gerardo, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Progress being made in the development of new scientific measurement tools based on optics and the scientific advances made possible by these new tools is impressive. In some instances, new optical-based measurement methods have made new scientific studies possible, while in other instances they have offered an improved method for performing these studies, e.g., better signal-to-noise ratio, increased data acquisition rate, remote analysis, reduced perturbation to the physical or chemical system being studied, etc. Many of these advances were made possible by advances in laser technology - spectral purity, spectral brightness, tunability, ultrashort pulse width, amplitude stability, etc. - while others were made possible by improved optical components - single-made fibers, modulators, detectors, wavelength multiplexes, etc. Attention is limited to just a few of many such accomplishments made recently at Sandia. 17 references, 16 figures.

  4. Retroreflective imaging systems for enhanced optical biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergen, Mark H.; Nichols, Jacqueline; Collier, Christopher M.; Jin, Xian; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2014-05-01

    Biosensing is important for detection and characterization of microorganisms. When the detection and characterization of targeted microorganisms require micron-scale resolutions, optical biosensing techniques are especially beneficial. Optical biosensing can be applied through direct or indirect optical sensing techniques. The latter have demonstrated especially high sensitivities for the detection of targeted microorganisms with labeling. Unfortunately, such systems rely on high-resolution microscopy with microscopic sampling areas to image the labeled target microorganisms. This leads to long characterization times for applications such as pathogen detection in water quality monitoring where users must scan the micron-scale sampling areas across millimeter- or even centimeter-scale samples. This work introduces retroreflector labels for the detection and characterization of microorganisms for macroscopic sample sizes. The demonstrated retroreflective imaging system uses a laser source to illuminate the sample, in lieu of the fluorescent excitation source, and micron-scale retroreflector labels, in lieu of fluorescent stains/proteins. Antibodies are used to bind retroreflectors to targeted microorganisms. The presence of these microscopic retroreflector-microorganism pairs is monitored in a retroreflected image that is captured by a distant image sensor which shows a well-localized retroreflected beamspot for each pair. Characteristics of an appropriately-designed retroreflective imaging system which provide a quantifiable record of microorganism-coupled retroreflectors across macroscopic sample sizes are presented. Retroreflection directionality, collimation, and contrast are investigated for both corner-cube retroreflectors and spherical retroreflectors (of varying refractive indices). It is ultimately found that such a system is an effective tool for the detection and characterization of microorganism targets, down to a single-target detection limit.

  5. In vivo intrinsic optical signal imaging of mouse retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Benquan; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-03-01

    Intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging is a promising noninvasive method for advanced study and diagnosis of eye diseases. Before pursuing clinical applications, more IOS studies employing animal models are necessary to establish the relationship between IOS distortions and eye diseases. Ample mouse models are available for investigating the relationship between IOS distortions and eye diseases. However, in vivo IOS imaging of mouse retinas is challenging due to the small ocular lens (compared to frog eyes) and inevitable eye movements. We report here in vivo IOS imaging of mouse retinas using a custom-designed functional OCT. The OCT system provided high resolution (3 μm) and high speed (up to 500 frames/s) imaging of mouse retinas. An animal holder equipped with a custom designed ear bar and bite bar was used to minimize eye movement due to breathing and heartbeats. Residual eye movement in OCT images was further compensated by accurate image registration. Dynamic OCT imaging revealed rapid IOSs from photoreceptor outer segments immediately (<10 ms) after the stimulation delivery, and unambiguous IOS changes were also observed from inner retinal layers with delayed time courses compared to that of photoreceptor IOSs.

  6. Biophotonic Modelling of Cardiac Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Martin J; Plank, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    Computational models have been recently applied to simulate and better understand the nature of fluorescent photon scattering and optical signal distortion during cardiac optical imaging. The goal of such models is both to provide a useful post-processing tool to facilitate a more accurate and faithful comparison between computational simulations of electrical activity and experiments, as well as providing essential insight into the mechanisms underlying this distortion, suggesting ways in which it may be controlled or indeed utilised to maximise the information derived from the recorded fluorescent signal. Here, we present different modelling methodologies developed and used in the field to simulate both the explicit processes involved in optical signal synthesis and the resulting consequences of the effects of photon scattering within the myocardium upon the optically-detected signal. We focus our attentions to two main types of modelling approaches used to simulate light transport in cardiac tissue, specifically continuous (reaction-diffusion) and discrete stochastic (Monte Carlo) methods. For each method, we provide both a summary of the necessary methodological details of such models, in addition to brief reviews of relevant application studies which have sought to apply these methods to elucidate important information regarding experimentally-recorded optical signals under different circumstances.

  7. Sulfur copolymers for infrared optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namnabat, S.; Gabriel, J. J.; Pyun, J.; Norwood, R. A.; Dereniak, E. L.; van der Laan, J.

    2014-06-01

    The development of organic polymers with low infrared absorption has been investigated as a possible alternative to inorganic metal oxide, semiconductor, or chalcogenide-based materials for a variety of optical devices and components, such as lenses, goggles, thermal imaging cameras and optical fibers. In principle, organic-based polymers are attractive for these applications because of their low weight, ease of processing, mechanical toughness, and facile chemical variation using commercially available precursors. Herein we report on the optical characterization of a new class of sulfur copolymers that are readily moldable, transparent above 500 nm, possess high refractive index (n > 1.8) and take advantage of the low infrared absorption of S-S bonds for potential use in the mid-infrared at 3-5 microns. These materials are largely made from elemental sulfur by an inverse vulcanization process; in the current study we focus on the properties of a chemically stable, branched copolymer of poly(sulfur-random-1,3-diisopropenylbenzene) (poly(S-r- DIB). Copolymers with elemental sulfur content ranging from 50% to 80% by weight were studied by UV-VIS spectroscopy, FTIR, and prism coupling for refractive index measurement. Clear correlation between material composition and the optical properties was established, confirming that the high polarizability of the sulfur atom leads to high refractive index while also maintaining low optical loss in the infrared.

  8. Hyperspectral image projector for advanced sensor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. W.; Rice, J. P.; Neira, J. E.; Bousquet, R.; Johnson, B. C.

    2006-08-01

    In this work, we describe radiometric platforms able to produce realistic spectral distributions and spatial scenes for the development of application-specific metrics to quantify the performance of sensors and systems. Using these platforms, sensor and system performance may be quantified in terms of the accuracy of measurements of standardized sets of complex source distributions. The same platforms can also serve as a basis for algorithm testing and instrument comparison. The platforms consist of spectrally tunable light sources (STS's) coupled with spatially programmable projection systems. The resultant hyperspectral image projectors (HIP) can generate complex spectral distributions with high spectral fidelity; that is, scenes with realistic spectral content. Using the same fundamental technology, platforms can be developed for the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared regions. These radiometric platforms will facilitate advanced sensor characterization testing, enabling a pre-flight validation of the pre-flight calibration.

  9. Linear semiconductor optical amplifiers for amplification of advanced modulation formats.

    PubMed

    Bonk, R; Huber, G; Vallaitis, T; Koenig, S; Schmogrow, R; Hillerkuss, D; Brenot, R; Lelarge, F; Duan, G-H; Sygletos, S; Koos, C; Freude, W; Leuthold, J

    2012-04-23

    The capability of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) to amplify advanced optical modulation format signals is investigated. The input power dynamic range is studied and especially the impact of the SOA alpha factor is addressed. Our results show that the advantage of a lower alpha-factor SOA decreases for higher-order modulation formats. Experiments at 20 GBd BPSK, QPSK and 16QAM with two SOAs with different alpha factors are performed. Simulations for various modulation formats support the experimental findings.

  10. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  11. Optimizing imaging polarimeters constructed with imperfect optics.

    PubMed

    Tyo, J Scott; Wei, Hua

    2006-08-01

    Imaging polarimeters are often designed and optimized by assuming that the polarization properties of the optics are nearly ideal. For example, we often assume that the linear polarizers have infinite extinction ratios. It is also usually assumed that the retarding elements have retardances that do not vary either spatially or with the angle of incidence. We consider the case where the polarization optics used to develop an imaging polarimeter are imperfect. Specifically, we examine the expected performance of a system as the extinction ratio of the diattenuators degrades, as the retardance varies spatially, and as the retardance varies with incidence angle. It is found that the penalty in the signal-to-noise ratio for using diattenuators with low extinction ratios is not severe, as an extinction ratio of 5 causes only a 2.0 dB increase in the noise in the reconstructed Stokes parameter images compared with an ideal diattenuator. Likewise, we find that a system can be optimized in the presence of spatially varying retardance, but that angular positioning error is far more important in rotating retarder imaging polarimeters. PMID:16855648

  12. Optical brush: Imaging through permuted probes.

    PubMed

    Heshmat, Barmak; Lee, Ik Hyun; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The combination of computational techniques and ultrafast imaging have enabled sensing through unconventional settings such as around corners, and through diffusive media. We exploit time of flight (ToF) measurements to enable a flexible interface for imaging through permuted set of fibers. The fibers are randomly distributed in the scene and are packed on the camera end, thus making a brush-like structure. The scene is illuminated by two off-axis optical pulses. Temporal signatures of fiber tips in the scene are used to localize each fiber. Finally, by combining the position and measured intensity of each fiber, the original input is reconstructed. Unlike conventional fiber bundles with packed set of fibers that are limited by a narrow field of view (FOV), lack of flexibility, and extended coaxial precalibration, the proposed optical brush is flexible and uses off-axis calibration method based on ToF. The enabled brush form can couple to other types of ToF imaging systems. This can impact probe-based applications such as, endoscopy, tomography, and industrial imaging and sensing. PMID:26868954

  13. Optical brush: Imaging through permuted probes

    PubMed Central

    Heshmat, Barmak; Lee, Ik Hyun; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The combination of computational techniques and ultrafast imaging have enabled sensing through unconventional settings such as around corners, and through diffusive media. We exploit time of flight (ToF) measurements to enable a flexible interface for imaging through permuted set of fibers. The fibers are randomly distributed in the scene and are packed on the camera end, thus making a brush-like structure. The scene is illuminated by two off-axis optical pulses. Temporal signatures of fiber tips in the scene are used to localize each fiber. Finally, by combining the position and measured intensity of each fiber, the original input is reconstructed. Unlike conventional fiber bundles with packed set of fibers that are limited by a narrow field of view (FOV), lack of flexibility, and extended coaxial precalibration, the proposed optical brush is flexible and uses off-axis calibration method based on ToF. The enabled brush form can couple to other types of ToF imaging systems. This can impact probe-based applications such as, endoscopy, tomography, and industrial imaging and sensing. PMID:26868954

  14. Recent advances in optically pumped semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilla, Juan; Shu, Qi-Ze; Zhou, Hailong; Weiss, Eli; Reed, Murray; Spinelli, Luis

    2007-02-01

    Optically pumped semiconductor lasers offer significant advantages with respect to all traditional diode-pumped solid state lasers (including fiber lasers) in regards to wavelength flexibility, broad pump tolerance, efficient spectral and spatial brightness conversion and high power scaling. In this talk we will describe our recent progress in the lab and applying this technology to commercial systems. Results include diversified wavelengths from 460 to 570nm, power scaling to >60W of CW 532nm, and the launch of a low cost 5W CW visible source for forensic applications.

  15. Numerical and optical evaluation of particle image velocimetry images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Patrick V.

    1991-12-01

    Applications of particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques for measurement of fluid velocities typically requires two steps. The first of these is the photography step, in which two exposures of a particle field, displaced between the exposures, are taken. The second step of the application is the evaluation of the double exposure particle pattern and production of appropriate particle velocities. Each of these steps involves optimization which is usually specific to the experiment being conducted and there is significant interaction between photographic parameters and evaluation characteristics. This paper will focus on the latter step, that of evaluation of the double exposure photograph. Among the various evaluation techniques suggested for analysis of PIV images is the evaluation of the scattered interference pattern (Young's fringes) by numerical Fourier transform. An alternative to the numerical calculation of the Fourier transform of the Young's fringes has been suggested, using a modified liquid crystal television as an optical correlator to allow the transform to be performed optically, thus speeding up the interrogation process. Both transform techniques are affected by the quality of the input function, specifically the Young's fringes. This paper will compare the performance of optical and numerical Fourier transform analysis of Young's fringes using speckle images. The repeatability and an estimate of the accuracy of the particle displacement will be shown for each method.

  16. Electro-optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2005-01-01

    JPL is developing an innovative compact, low mass, Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (E-O IFTS) for hyperspectral imaging applications. The spectral region of this spectrometer will be 1 - 2.5 micron (1000-4000/cm) to allow high-resolution, high-speed hyperspectral imaging applications. One application will be the remote sensing of the measurement of a large number of different atmospheric gases simultaneously in the same airmass. Due to the use of a combination of birefringent phase retarders and multiple achromatic phase switches to achieve phase delay, this spectrometer is capable of hyperspectral measurements similar to that of the conventional Fourier transform spectrometer but without any moving parts. In this paper, the principle of operations, system architecture and recent experimental progress will be presented.

  17. Electro-optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2005-01-01

    JPL is developing an innovative compact, low mass, Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (E-0IFTS) for hyperspectral imaging applications. The spectral region of this spectrometer will be 1 - 2.5 pm (1000 -4000 cm-') to allow high-resolution, high-speed hyperspectral imaging applications [l-51. One application will be theremote sensing of the measurement of a large number of different atmospheric gases simultaneously in the sameairmass. Due to the use of a combination of birefiingent phase retarders and multiple achromatic phase switches toachieve phase delay, this spectrometer is capable of hyperspectral measurements similar to that of the conventionalFourier transform spectrometer but without any moving parts. In this paper, the principle of operations, systemarchitecture and recent experimental progress will be presen.

  18. Molecular Imaging in Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Scott P.; Kim, Wihan; Park, Jesung; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a medical imaging technique that provides tomographic images at micron scales in three dimensions and high speeds. The addition of molecular contrast to the available morphological image holds great promise for extending OCT’s impact in clinical practice and beyond. Fundamental limitations prevent OCT from directly taking advantage of powerful molecular processes such as fluorescence emission and incoherent Raman scattering. A wide range of approaches is being researched to provide molecular contrast to OCT. Here we review those approaches with particular attention to those that derive their molecular contrast directly from modulation of the OCT signal. We also provide a brief overview of the multimodal approaches to gaining molecular contrast coincident with OCT. PMID:25821718

  19. Integrated modeling of advanced optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Needels, Laura; Levine, B. Martin

    1993-02-01

    This poster session paper describes an integrated modeling and analysis capability being developed at JPL under funding provided by the JPL Director's Discretionary Fund and the JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program (CSI). The posters briefly summarize the program capabilities and illustrate them with an example problem. The computer programs developed under this effort will provide an unprecedented capability for integrated modeling and design of high performance optical spacecraft. The engineering disciplines supported include structural dynamics, controls, optics and thermodynamics. Such tools are needed in order to evaluate the end-to-end system performance of spacecraft such as OSI, POINTS, and SMMM. This paper illustrates the proof-of-concept tools that have been developed to establish the technology requirements and demonstrate the new features of integrated modeling and design. The current program also includes implementation of a prototype tool based upon the CAESY environment being developed under the NASA Guidance and Control Research and Technology Computational Controls Program. This prototype will be available late in FY-92. The development plan proposes a major software production effort to fabricate, deliver, support and maintain a national-class tool from FY-93 through FY-95.

  20. Recent advances in ALON optical ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Joseph M.; Hartnett, Thomas M.; Goldman, Lee M.; Twedt, Richard; Warner, Charles

    2005-05-01

    Aluminum Oxynitride (ALONTM Optical Ceramic) is a transparent ceramic material which combines transparency from the UV to the MWIR with excellent mechanical properties. ALON"s optical and mechanical properties are isotropic by virtue of its cubic crystalline structure. Consequently, ALON is transparent in its polycrystalline form and can be made by conventional powder processing techniques. This combination of properties and manufacturability make ALON suitable for a range of applications from IR windows, domes and lenses to transparent armor. The technology for producing transparent ALON was developed at Raytheon and has been transferred to Surmet Corporation where it is currently in production. Surmet is currently selling ALON into a number of military (e.g., windows and domes) and commercial (e.g., supermarket scanner windows) applications. The capability to manufacture large ALON windows for both sensor window and armor applications is in place. ALON windows up to 20x30 inches have been fabricated. In addition, the capability to shape and polish these large and curved windows is being developed and demonstrated at Surmet. Complex shapes, both hyper-hemispherical and conformal, are also under development and will be described.

  1. Luminescent probes for optical in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Isabelle; Josserand, Veronique; Garanger, Elisabeth; Razkin, Jesus; Jin, Zhaohui; Dumy, Pascal; Favrot, Marie; Boturyn, Didier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2005-04-01

    Going along with instrumental development for small animal fluorescence in vivo imaging, we are developing molecular fluorescent probes, especially for tumor targeting. Several criteria have to be taken into account for the optimization of the luminescent label. It should be adapted to the in vivo imaging optical conditions : red-shifted absorption and emission, limited overlap between absorption and emission for a good signal filtering, optimized luminescence quantum yield, limited photo-bleaching. Moreover, the whole probe should fulfill the biological requirements for in vivo labeling : adapted blood-time circulation, biological conditions compatibility, low toxicity. We here demonstrate the ability of the imaging fluorescence set-up developed in LETI to image the bio-distribution of molecular probes on short times after injection. Targeting with Cy5 labeled holo-transferrin of subcutaneous TS/Apc (angiogenic murine breast carcinoma model) or IGROV1 (human ovarian cancer) tumors was achieved. Differences in the kinetics of the protein uptake by the tumors were evidenced. IGROV1 internal metastatic nodes implanted in the peritoneal cavity could be detected in nude mice. However, targeted metastatic nodes in lung cancer could only be imaged after dissection of the mouse. These results validate our fluorescence imaging set-up and the use of Cy5 as a luminescent label. New fluorescent probes based on this dye and a molecular delivery template (the RAFT molecule) can thus be envisioned.

  2. Functional transcranial brain imaging by optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-07-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is applied to functional brain imaging in living mice. A near-diffraction-limited bright-field optical illumination is employed to achieve micrometer lateral resolution, and a dual-wavelength measurement is utilized to extract the blood oxygenation information. The variation in hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) along vascular branching has been imaged in a precapillary arteriolar tree and a postcapillary venular tree, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on in vivo volumetric imaging of brain microvascular morphology and oxygenation down to single capillaries through intact mouse skulls. It is anticipated that: (i) chronic imaging enabled by this minimally invasive procedure will advance the study of cortical plasticity and neurological diseases; (ii) revealing the neuroactivity-dependent changes in hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation will facilitate the understanding of neurovascular coupling at the capillary level; and (iii) combining functional OR-PAM and high-resolution blood flowmetry will have the potential to explore cellular pathways of brain energy metabolism.

  3. Digital image correlation-based optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties, mapping of soft tissue. We aim to develop a robust speckle tracking OCE technique with improved resolution and accuracy. A digital image correlation (DIC)-based OCE technique was developed by combining an advanced DIC algorithm with optical coherence tomography (OCT). System calibration and measurement error evaluation demonstrated that this DIC-based OCE technique had a resolution of ˜0.6 μm displacement and <0.5% strain measurement in the axial scan direction. The measured displacement ranged from 0.6 to 150 μm, obtained via phantom imaging. The capability of the DIC-based OCE technique, for differentiation of stiffness, was evaluated by imaging a candle gel phantom with an irregularly shaped stiff inclusion. OCE imaging of a chicken breast sample differentiated the fat, membrane, and muscle layers. Strain elastograms of an aneurysm sample showed heterogeneity of the tissue and clear contrast between the adventitia and media. These promising results demonstrated the capability of the DIC-based OCE for the characterization of the various components of the tissue sample. Further improvement of the system will be conducted to make this OCE technique a practical tool for measuring and differentiating material properties of soft tissue.

  4. Digital image correlation-based optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties, mapping of soft tissue. We aim to develop a robust speckle tracking OCE technique with improved resolution and accuracy. A digital image correlation (DIC)-based OCE technique was developed by combining an advanced DIC algorithm with optical coherence tomography (OCT). System calibration and measurement error evaluation demonstrated that this DIC-based OCE technique had a resolution of ~0.6 μm displacement and <0.5% strain measurement in the axial scan direction. The measured displacement ranged from 0.6 to 150 μm, obtained via phantom imaging. The capability of the DIC-based OCE technique, for differentiation of stiffness, was evaluated by imaging a candle gel phantom with an irregularly shaped stiff inclusion. OCE imaging of a chicken breast sample differentiated the fat, membrane, and muscle layers. Strain elastograms of an aneurysm sample showed heterogeneity of the tissue and clear contrast between the adventitia and media. These promising results demonstrated the capability of the DIC-based OCE for the characterization of the various components of the tissue sample. Further improvement of the system will be conducted to make this OCE technique a practical tool for measuring and differentiating material properties of soft tissue. PMID:24346855

  5. RADIANCE AND PHOTON NOISE: Imaging in geometrical optics, physical optics, quantum optics and radiology

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Myers, Kyle J.; Caucci, Luca

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental way of describing a photon-limited imaging system is in terms of a Poisson random process in spatial, angular and wavelength variables. The mean of this random process is the spectral radiance. The principle of conservation of radiance then allows a full characterization of the noise in the image (conditional on viewing a specified object). To elucidate these connections, we first review the definitions and basic properties of radiance as defined in terms of geometrical optics, radiology, physical optics and quantum optics. The propagation and conservation laws for radiance in each of these domains are reviewed. Then we distinguish four categories of imaging detectors that all respond in some way to the incident radiance, including the new category of photon-processing detectors. The relation between the radiance and the statistical properties of the detector output is discussed and related to task-based measures of image quality and the information content of a single detected photon. PMID:27478293

  6. Advanced Optical Technologies for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is involved in the development of photonic devices and systems for space exploration missions. Photonic technologies of particular interest are those that can be utilized for in-space communication, remote sensing, guidance navigation and control, lunar descent and landing, and rendezvous and docking. NASA Langley has recently established a class-100 clean-room which serves as a Photonics Fabrication Facility for development of prototype optoelectronic devices for aerospace applications. In this paper we discuss our design, fabrication, and testing of novel active pixels, deformable mirrors, and liquid crystal spatial light modulators. Successful implementation of these intelligent optical devices and systems in space, requires careful consideration of temperature and space radiation effects in inorganic and electronic materials. Applications including high bandwidth inertial reference units, lightweight, high precision star trackers for guidance, navigation, and control, deformable mirrors, wavefront sensing, and beam steering technologies are discussed. In addition, experimental results are presented which characterize their performance in space exploration systems.

  7. Low cost molded optics for IR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; DiFilippo, Vincent; Li, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Infrared sensors play a critical role in detection, guidance, and targeting in today's military systems and warfighter equipment, ranging from man-portable to space-borne. Although significant progress is being made in the development of IR imagers, another important component of IR sensors has not evolved significantly-the optics. Current IR lenses are primarily made of expensive single-crystal germanium with tedious mechanical fabrication operations that include grinding, polishing, and edging. There is an industry wide need for lower cost and higher performance IR lenses. Agiltron has developed a technology to directly mold IR lenses to net-shape without additional finishing operations. This manufacturing technology produces optics with many-fold reductions in cost, size, weight, and fabrication time. The ability to reproducibly manufacture aspheric optics with complex net-shapes reduces the number of lenses traditionally required for imaging systems, providing aberration correction as well as system weight and size reductions. Additionally, anti-reflective surfaces can be molded into the glass, eliminating the need for expensive AR coatings. This technology utilizes a new chalcogenide glass material that reduces temperature induced index of refraction changes to near zero, and has a thermal expansion coefficient similar to aluminum. The result is a new generation of low cost, high performance and thermally robust IR lens systems.

  8. Photodetectors for the Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert G.; Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System AGIS Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a concept for the next generation very high energy gamma-ray observatory. Design goals include an order of magnitude better sensitivity, better angular resolution, and a lower energy threshold than existing Cherenkov telescopes. Each telescope is equipped with a camera that detects and records the Cherenkov-light flashes from air showers. The camera is comprised of a pixelated focal plane of blue sensitive and fast (nanosecond) photon detectors that detect the photon signal and convert it into an electrical one. Given the scale of AGIS, the camera must be reliable and cost effective. The Schwarzschild-Couder optical design yields a smaller plate scale than present-day Cherenkov telescopes, enabling the use of more compact, multi-pixel devices, including multianode photomultipliers or Geiger avalanche photodiodes. We present the conceptual design of the focal plane for the camera and results from testing candidate! focal plane sensors.

  9. Ultrafast Microfluidic Cellular Imaging by Optical Time-Stretch.

    PubMed

    Lau, Andy K S; Wong, Terence T W; Shum, Ho Cheung; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need in biomedicine for measuring a multitude of parameters of individual cells (i.e., high content) in a large population efficiently (i.e., high throughput). This is particularly driven by the emerging interest in bringing Big-Data analysis into this arena, encompassing pathology, drug discovery, rare cancer cell detection, emulsion microdroplet assays, to name a few. This momentum is particularly evident in recent advancements in flow cytometry. They include scaling of the number of measurable colors from the labeled cells and incorporation of imaging capability to access the morphological information of the cells. However, an unspoken predicament appears in the current technologies: higher content comes at the expense of lower throughput, and vice versa. For example, accessing additional spatial information of individual cells, imaging flow cytometers only achieve an imaging throughput ~1000 cells/s, orders of magnitude slower than the non-imaging flow cytometers. In this chapter, we introduce an entirely new imaging platform, namely optical time-stretch microscopy, for ultrahigh speed and high contrast label-free single-cell (in a ultrafast microfluidic flow up to 10 m/s) imaging and analysis with an ultra-fast imaging line-scan rate as high as tens of MHz. Based on this technique, not only morphological information of the individual cells can be obtained in an ultrafast manner, quantitative evaluation of cellular information (e.g., cell volume, mass, refractive index, stiffness, membrane tension) at nanometer scale based on the optical phase is also possible. The technology can also be integrated with conventional fluorescence measurements widely adopted in the non-imaging flow cytometers. Therefore, these two combinatorial and complementary measurement capabilities in long run is an attractive platform for addressing the pressing need for expanding the "parameter space" in high-throughput single-cell analysis. This chapter provides the

  10. Cancer imaging by optical coherence tomography: preclinical progress and clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Vakoc, Benjamin J; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Bouma, Brett E

    2012-05-01

    The past decade has seen dramatic technological advances in the field of optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. These advances have driven commercialization and clinical adoption in ophthalmology, cardiology and gastrointestinal cancer screening. Recently, an array of OCT-based imaging tools that have been developed for preclinical intravital cancer imaging applications has yielded exciting new capabilities to probe and to monitor cancer progression and response in vivo. Here, we review these results, forecast the future of OCT for preclinical cancer imaging and discuss its exciting potential to translate to the clinic as a tool for monitoring cancer therapy.

  11. An acousto-optical imaging spectrometer for astrophysical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikin, S. P.; Esipov, V. F.; Molchanov, V. Ya.; Tatarnikov, A. M.; Yushkov, K. B.

    2016-07-01

    An optical scheme of an acousto-optical imaging spectrometer for observing extended astrophysical objects with line emission spectra is proposed. The use of an additional prism with a specified angular dispersion makes it possible to separate images of an extended object at different emission lines and images generated by minor maxima of the acousto-optical filter transmission function. A prototype of the imaging spectrometer has been designed.

  12. Hybrid micro-/nanogels for optical sensing and intracellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weitai; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid micro-/nanogels are playing an increasing important part in a diverse range of applications, due to their tunable dimensions, large surface area, stable interior network structure, and a very short response time. We review recent advances and challenges in the developments of hybrid micro-/nanogels toward applications for optical sensing of pH, temperature, glucose, ions, and other species as well as for intracellular imaging. Due to their unique advantages, hybrid micro-/nanogels as optical probes are attracting substantial interests for continuous monitoring of chemical parameters in complex samples such as blood and bioreactor fluids, in chemical research and industry, and in food quality control. In particular, their intracellular probing ability enables the monitoring of the biochemistry and biophysics of live cells over time and space, thus contributing to the explanation of intricate biological processes and the development of novel diagnoses. Unlike most other probes, hybrid micro-/nanogels could also combine other multiple functions into a single probe. The rational design of hybrid micro-/nanogels will not only improve the probing applications as desirable, but also implement their applications in new arenas. With ongoing rapid advances in bionanotechnology, the well-designed hybrid micro-/nanogel probes will be able to provide simultaneous sensing, imaging diagnosis, and therapy toward clinical applications. PMID:22110866

  13. Diffuse optical imaging of the whole head

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Maria Angela; Joseph, Danny K.; Huppert, Theodore J.; Diamond, Solomon G.; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy (NIRS) and Diffuse Optical Imaging (DOI) are increasingly used to detect hemodynamic changes in the cerebral cortex induced by brain activity. Until recently, the small number of optodes in NIRS instruments has hampered measurement of optical signals from diverse brain regions. Our new DOI system has 32 detectors and 32 sources; by arranging them in a specific pattern we can cover most of the adult head. With the increased number of optodes we can collect optical data from prefrontal, sensorimotor, and visual cortices in both hemispheres simultaneously. In this paper, we describe the system, report system characterization measurements on phantoms as well as on human subjects at rest and during visual, motor and cognitive stimulation. Tacking advantage of the system’s larger number of sources and detectors, we explored the spatiotemporal patterns of physiological signals during rest. These physiological signals, arising from cardiac, respiratory, and blood pressure modulations, interfere with measurement of the hemodynamic response to brain stimulation. Whole-head optical measurements, in addition to providing maps of multiple brain regions’ responses to brain activation, will enable better understandings of the physiological signals ultimately leading to better signal processing algorithms to distinguish physiological signal clutter from brain activation signals. PMID:17092156

  14. Multimode-Optical-Fiber Imaging Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Currently, endoscopic surgery uses single-mode fiber-bundles to obtain in vivo image information inside the orifices of the body. This limits their use to the larger natural orifices and to surgical procedures where there is plenty of room for manipulation. The knee joint, for example, can be easily viewed with a fiber optic viewer, but joints in the finger cannot. However, there are a host of smaller orifices where fiber endoscopy would play an important role if a cost effective fiber probe were developed with small enough dimensions (less than or equal to 250 microns). Examples of beneficiaries of micro-endoscopes are the treatment of the Eustatian tube of the middle ear, the breast ducts, tear ducts, coronary arteries, fallopian tubes, as well as the treatment of salivary duct parotid disease, and the neuro endoscopy of the ventricles and spinal canal. This work describes an approach for recovering images from tightly confined spaces using multimode. The concept draws upon earlier works that concentrated on image recovery after two-way transmission through a multimode fiber as well as work that demonstrated the recovery of images after one-way transmission through a multimode fiber. Both relied on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, which was predistorted with the characteristics of the fiber. The approach described here also relies on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, but utilizes two fibers to capture the image at some intermediate point (accessible by the fibers, but which is otherwise visually inaccessible).

  15. Infrared and optical imaging of newborn stars

    SciTech Connect

    Heyer, M.H.; Ladd, E.F.; Myers, P.C.; Campbell, B. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque )

    1990-05-01

    Deep optical and near-infrared imaging observations of five low- to intermediate-luminosity pre-main-sequence stars embedded within dense cores reveal an extended emission component. Four of the five stars were previously identified as outflow sources. Nebulosity is detected with the optical and J and H bandpasses for each source. The large measured polarization values (p = 10 to 70 percent) at H and K identify the nebulosity as scattered light. At K the intensity distribution is generally less extended than at J and H, and is characterized by an additional, unresolved component. The position of this point source likely identifies the location of the newborn star within the field. For all sources, the illuminating star is redder than its associated nebula. The observed correlation of cometary reflection nebulae with newborn stars undergoing mass outflow suggests that the low-opacity paths are cavities associated with energetic stellar winds. 35 refs.

  16. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddier, Francois; Owen, Toby

    1997-01-01

    Most solar system objects have never been observed at wavelengths longer than the R band with an angular resolution better than 1 sec. The Hubble Space Telescope itself has only recently been equipped to observe in the infrared. However, because of its small diameter, the angular resolution is lower than that one can now achieved from the ground with adaptive optics, and time allocated to planetary science is limited. We have been using adaptive optics (AO) on a 4-m class telescope to obtain 0.1 sec resolution images solar system objects at far red and near infrared wavelengths (0.7-2.5 micron) which best discriminate their spectral signatures. Our efforts has been put into areas of research for which high angular resolution is essential, such as the mapping of Titan and of large asteroids, the dynamics and composition of Neptune stratospheric clouds, the infrared photometry of Pluto, Charon, and close satellites previously undetected from the ground.

  17. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddier, Francois; Owen, Toby

    1999-01-01

    Most solar system objects have never been observed at wavelengths longer than the R band with an angular resolution better than 1". The Hubble Space Telescope itself has only recently been equipped to observe in the infrared. However, because of its small diameter, the angular resolution is lower than that one can now achieved from the ground with adaptive optics, and time allocated to planetary science is limited. We have successfully used adaptive optics on a 4-m class telescope to obtain 0.1" resolution images of solar system objects in the far red and near infrared (0.7-2.5 microns), aE wavelengths which best discl"lmlnate their spectral signatures. Our efforts have been put into areas of research for which high angular resolution is essential.

  18. Advanced optical interference filters based on metal and dielectric layers.

    PubMed

    Begou, Thomas; Lemarchand, Fabien; Lumeau, Julien

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the design and the fabrication of an advanced optical interference filter based on metal and dielectric layers. This filter respects the specifications of the 2016 OIC manufacturing problem contest. We study and present all the challenges and solutions that allowed achieving a low deviation between the fabricated prototype and the target. PMID:27607695

  19. Effects of hypersonic vehicle's optical dome on infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenjun; Cao, Zhiguo; Wang, Wenwu

    2011-09-01

    When an optically guided hypersonic vehicle flies in the atmosphere, the scene is viewed through an optical dome. Because of hypersonic friction with the atmosphere, the optical dome is inevitably covered by a serious shock wave, which threatens to alter the dome's physical parameters and further induce wavefront distortion and degradation of images. By studying the physical phenomena occurring within the optical dome in such an adverse environment, this paper identifies the relationship between the variation of the dome's optical characteristics and the infrared image degradation. The research indicates that the image quality degrades sharply as the vehicle's Mach number increases. Simulations also show that while the thermo-optic effect, elastic-optic effect, thermal deformation, and variation of transmittance have little effect on the optical system, the thermal radiation severely degrades images when vehicles fly at hypersonic speeds. Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

  20. Advanced astigmatism-corrected Czerny-Turner imaging spectrometer in spectral broadband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Hai-fang

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports an advanced Czerny-Turner optical structure which is used for the application in imaging spectrometers. To obtain the excellent imaging quality, a cylindrical lens with a wedge angle is used between the focusing mirror and the imaging plane to remove astigmatism in broadband. It makes the advanced optical system presents high resolution over the full bandwidth and decreases the cost. An example of the imaging spectrometer in the waveband of 260nm~520nm has been designed to prove our theory. It yields the excellent modulation transfer functions (MTF) of all fields of view which are more than 0.75 over the broadband under the required Nyquist frequency (20lp/mm).

  1. Intrinsic optical signal imaging of retinal physiology: a review

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xincheng; Wang, Benquan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging promises to be a noninvasive method for high-resolution examination of retinal physiology, which can advance the study and diagnosis of eye diseases. While specialized optical instruments are desirable for functional IOS imaging of retinal physiology, in depth understanding of multiple IOS sources in the complex retinal neural network is essential for optimizing instrument designs. We provide a brief overview of IOS studies and relationships in rod outer segment suspensions, isolated retinas, and intact eyes. Recent developments of line-scan confocal and functional optical coherence tomography (OCT) instruments have allowed in vivo IOS mapping of photoreceptor physiology. Further improvements of the line-scan confocal and functional OCT systems may provide a feasible solution to pursue functional IOS mapping of human photoreceptors. Some interesting IOSs have already been detected in inner retinal layers, but better development of the IOS instruments and software algorithms is required to achieve optimal physiological assessment of inner retinal neurons. PMID:26405819

  2. An image stabilization optical system using deformable freeform mirrors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qun; Cheng, Xuemin; Kang, Jiqiang; Jiang, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    An image stabilization optical system using deformable freeform mirrors is proposed that enables the ray sets to couple dynamically in the object and image space. It aims to correct image blurring and degradation when there is relative movement between the imaging optical axis and the object. In this method, Fermat's principle and matrix methods are used to describe the optical path of the entire optical system with a shift object plane and a fixed corresponding image plane in the carrier coordinate system. A constant optical path length is determined for each ray set, so the correspondence between the object and the shift free image point is used to calculate the solution to the points on the surface profile of the deformable mirrors (DMs). Off-axis three-mirror anastigmats are used to demonstrate the benefits of optical image stabilization with one- and two-deformable mirrors. PMID:25599423

  3. An image stabilization optical system using deformable freeform mirrors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qun; Cheng, Xuemin; Kang, Jiqiang; Jiang, Yuhua

    2015-01-15

    An image stabilization optical system using deformable freeform mirrors is proposed that enables the ray sets to couple dynamically in the object and image space. It aims to correct image blurring and degradation when there is relative movement between the imaging optical axis and the object. In this method, Fermat's principle and matrix methods are used to describe the optical path of the entire optical system with a shift object plane and a fixed corresponding image plane in the carrier coordinate system. A constant optical path length is determined for each ray set, so the correspondence between the object and the shift free image point is used to calculate the solution to the points on the surface profile of the deformable mirrors (DMs). Off-axis three-mirror anastigmats are used to demonstrate the benefits of optical image stabilization with one- and two-deformable mirrors.

  4. An Image Stabilization Optical System Using Deformable Freeform Mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qun; Cheng, Xuemin; Kang, Jiqiang; Jiang, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    An image stabilization optical system using deformable freeform mirrors is proposed that enables the ray sets to couple dynamically in the object and image space. It aims to correct image blurring and degradation when there is relative movement between the imaging optical axis and the object. In this method, Fermat's principle and matrix methods are used to describe the optical path of the entire optical system with a shift object plane and a fixed corresponding image plane in the carrier coordinate system. A constant optical path length is determined for each ray set, so the correspondence between the object and the shift free image point is used to calculate the solution to the points on the surface profile of the deformable mirrors (DMs). Off-axis three-mirror anastigmats are used to demonstrate the benefits of optical image stabilization with one- and two-deformable mirrors. PMID:25599423

  5. Feasibility studies of optical processing of image bandwidth compression schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, B. R.; Strickland, R. N.; Schowengerdt, R. A.

    1983-05-01

    This research focuses on these three areas: (1) formulation of alternative architectural concepts for image bandwidth compression, i.e., the formulation of components and schematic diagrams which differ from conventional digital bandwidth compression schemes by being implemented by various optical computation methods; (2) simulation of optical processing concepts for image bandwidth compression, so as to gain insight into typical performance parameters and elements of system performance sensitivity; and (3) maturation of optical processing for image bandwidth compression until the overall state of optical methods in image compression becomes equal to that of digital image compression.

  6. An advanced optical system for laser ablation propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstue, Grant; Fork, Richard; Reardon, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel space-based ablation driven propulsion engine concept utilizing transmitted energy in the form of a series of ultra-short optical pulses. Key differences are generating the pulses at the transmitting spacecraft and the safe delivery of that energy to the receiving spacecraft for propulsion. By expanding the beam diameter during transmission in space, the energy can propagate at relatively low intensity and then be refocused and redistributed to create an array of ablation sites at the receiver. The ablation array strategy allows greater control over flight dynamics and eases thermal management. Research efforts for this transmission and reception of ultra-short optical pulses include: (1) optical system design; (2) electrical system requirements; (3) thermal management; (4) structured energy transmission safety. Research has also been focused on developing an optical switch concept for the multiplexing of the ultra-short pulses. This optical switch strategy implements multiple reflectors polished into a rotating momentum wheel device to combine the pulses from different laser sources. The optical system design must minimize the thermal load on any one optical element. Initial specifications and modeling for the optical system are being produced using geometrical ray-tracing software to give a better understanding of the optical requirements. In regards to safety, we have advanced the retro-reflective beam locking strategy to include look-ahead capabilities for long propagation distances. Additional applications and missions utilizing multiplexed pulse transmission are also presented. Because the research is in early development, it provides an opportunity for new and valuable advances in the area of transmitted energy for propulsion as well as encourages joint international efforts. Researchers from different countries can cooperate in order to find constructive and safe uses of ordered pulse transmission for propulsion in future space

  7. Optical Imaging and Radiometric Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Kong Q.; Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Moiser, Gary E.; Howard, Joseph M.; Le, Chi M.

    2010-01-01

    OPTOOL software is a general-purpose optical systems analysis tool that was developed to offer a solution to problems associated with computational programs written for the James Webb Space Telescope optical system. It integrates existing routines into coherent processes, and provides a structure with reusable capabilities that allow additional processes to be quickly developed and integrated. It has an extensive graphical user interface, which makes the tool more intuitive and friendly. OPTOOL is implemented using MATLAB with a Fourier optics-based approach for point spread function (PSF) calculations. It features parametric and Monte Carlo simulation capabilities, and uses a direct integration calculation to permit high spatial sampling of the PSF. Exit pupil optical path difference (OPD) maps can be generated using combinations of Zernike polynomials or shaped power spectral densities. The graphical user interface allows rapid creation of arbitrary pupil geometries, and entry of all other modeling parameters to support basic imaging and radiometric analyses. OPTOOL provides the capability to generate wavefront-error (WFE) maps for arbitrary grid sizes. These maps are 2D arrays containing digital sampled versions of functions ranging from Zernike polynomials to combination of sinusoidal wave functions in 2D, to functions generated from a spatial frequency power spectral distribution (PSD). It also can generate optical transfer functions (OTFs), which are incorporated into the PSF calculation. The user can specify radiometrics for the target and sky background, and key performance parameters for the instrument s focal plane array (FPA). This radiometric and detector model setup is fairly extensive, and includes parameters such as zodiacal background, thermal emission noise, read noise, and dark current. The setup also includes target spectral energy distribution as a function of wavelength for polychromatic sources, detector pixel size, and the FPA s charge

  8. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Larusson, Fridrik; Fantini, Sergio; Miller, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the development and performance of algorithms for hyperspectral diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for which data from hundreds of wavelengths are collected and used to determine the concentration distribution of chromophores in the medium under investigation. An efficient method is detailed for forming the images using iterative algorithms applied to a linearized Born approximation model assuming the scattering coefficient is spatially constant and known. The L-surface framework is employed to select optimal regularization parameters for the inverse problem. We report image reconstructions using 126 wavelengths with estimation error in simulations as low as 0.05 and mean square error of experimental data of 0.18 and 0.29 for ink and dye concentrations, respectively, an improvement over reconstructions using fewer specifically chosen wavelengths. PMID:21483616

  9. Optical metabolic imaging for monitoring tracheal health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Gil, Daniel A.; Choma, Michael A.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-04-01

    The health of the tracheal mucosa and submucosa is a vital yet poorly understood component of critical care medicine, and a minimally-invasive method is needed to monitor tracheal health in patients. Of particular interest are the ciliated cells of the tracheal epithelium that move mucus away from the lungs and prevent respiratory infection. Optical metabolic imaging (OMI) allows cellular-level measurement of metabolism, and is a compelling method for assessing tracheal health because ciliary motor proteins require ATP to function. In this pilot study, we apply multiphoton imaging of the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H and FAD to the mucosa and submucosa of ex vivo mouse trachea. We demonstrate the feasibility and potential diagnostic utility of these measurements for assessing tracheal health and pathophysiology at the single-cell level.

  10. A content-based image retrieval method for optical colonoscopy images based on image recognition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosato, Hirokazu; Sakanashi, Hidenori; Takahashi, Eiichi; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a content-based image retrieval method for optical colonoscopy images that can find images similar to ones being diagnosed. Optical colonoscopy is a method of direct observation for colons and rectums to diagnose bowel diseases. It is the most common procedure for screening, surveillance and treatment. However, diagnostic accuracy for intractable inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis (UC), is highly dependent on the experience and knowledge of the medical doctor, because there is considerable variety in the appearances of colonic mucosa within inflammations with UC. In order to solve this issue, this paper proposes a content-based image retrieval method based on image recognition techniques. The proposed retrieval method can find similar images from a database of images diagnosed as UC, and can potentially furnish the medical records associated with the retrieved images to assist the UC diagnosis. Within the proposed method, color histogram features and higher order local auto-correlation (HLAC) features are adopted to represent the color information and geometrical information of optical colonoscopy images, respectively. Moreover, considering various characteristics of UC colonoscopy images, such as vascular patterns and the roughness of the colonic mucosa, we also propose an image enhancement method to highlight the appearances of colonic mucosa in UC. In an experiment using 161 UC images from 32 patients, we demonstrate that our method improves the accuracy of retrieving similar UC images.

  11. Neural imaging in songbirds using fiber optic fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Hearn, Gentry; Lints, Thierry; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-02-01

    The song control system of juvenile songbirds is an important model for studying the developmental acquisition and generation of complex learned vocal motor sequences, two processes that are fundamental to human speech and language. To understand the neural mechanisms underlying song production, it is critical to characterize the activity of identified neurons in the song control system when the bird is singing. Neural imaging in unrestrained singing birds, although technically challenging, will advance our understanding of neural ensemble coding mechanisms in this system. We are exploring the use of a fiber optic microscope for functional imaging in the brain of behaving and singing birds in order to better understand the contribution of a key brain nucleus (high vocal center nucleus; HVC) to temporal aspects of song motor control. We have constructed a fluorescence microscope with LED illumination, a fiber bundle for transmission of fluorescence excitation and emission light, a ~2x GRIN lens, and a CCD for image acquisition. The system has 2 μm resolution, 375 μm field of view, 200 μm working distance, and 1 mm outer diameter. As an initial characterization of this setup, neurons in HVC were imaged using the fiber optic microscope after injection of quantum dots or fluorescent retrograde tracers into different song nuclei. A Lucid Vivascope confocal microscope was used to confirm the imaging results. Long-term imaging of the activity of these neurons in juvenile birds during singing may lead us to a better understanding of the central motor codes for song and the central mechanism by which auditory experience modifies song motor commands to enable vocal learning and imitation.

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography for Brain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    Recently, there has been growing interest in using OCT for brain imaging. A feasibility study of OCT for guiding deep brain probes has found that OCT can differentiate the white matter and gray matter because the white matter tends to have a higher peak reflectivity and steeper attenuation rate compared to gray matter. In vivo 3D visualization of the layered organization of a rat olfactory bulb with OCT has been demonstrated. OCT has been used for single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling. The refractive index in the rat somatosensory cortex has also been measured with OCT. In addition, functional extension of OCT, such as Doppler-OCT (D-OCT), polarization sensitive-OCT (PS-OCT), and phase-resolved-OCT (PR-OCT), can image and quantify physiological parameters in addition to the morphological structure image. Based on the scattering changes during neural activity, OCT has been used to measure the functional activation in neuronal tissues. PS-OCT, which combines polarization sensitive detection with OCT to determine tissue birefringence, has been used for the localization of nerve fiber bundles and the mapping of micrometer-scale fiber pathways in the brain. D-OCT, also named optical Doppler tomography (ODT), combines the Doppler principle with OCT to obtain high resolution tomographic images of moving constituents in highly scattering biological tissues. D-OCT has been successfully used to image cortical blood flow and map the blood vessel network for brain research. In this chapter, the principle and technology of OCT and D-OCT are reviewed and examples of potential applications are described.

  13. Advanced materials and techniques for fibre-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Philip J.

    2014-06-01

    Fibre-optic monitoring systems came of age in about 1999 upon the emergence of the world's first significant commercialising company - a spin-out from the UK's collaborative MAST project. By using embedded fibre-optic technology, the MAST project successfully measured transient strain within high-performance composite yacht masts. Since then, applications have extended from smart composites into civil engineering, energy, military, aerospace, medicine and other sectors. Fibre-optic sensors come in various forms, and may be subject to embedment, retrofitting, and remote interrogation. The unique challenges presented by each implementation require careful scrutiny before widespread adoption can take place. Accordingly, various aspects of design and reliability are discussed spanning a range of representative technologies that include resonant microsilicon structures, MEMS, Bragg gratings, advanced forms of spectroscopy, and modern trends in nanotechnology. Keywords: Fibre-optic sensors, fibre Bragg gratings, MEMS, MOEMS, nanotechnology, plasmon.

  14. Engineering novel infrared glass ceramics for advanced optical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, K.; Buff, A.; Smith, C.; Sisken, L.; Musgraves, J. David; Wachtel, P.; Mayer, T.; Swisher, A.; Pogrebnyakov, A.; Kang, M.; Pantano, C.; Werner, D.; Kirk, A.; Aiken, S.; Rivero-Baleine, C.

    2016-05-01

    Advanced photonic devices require novel optical materials that serve specified optical function but also possess attributes which can be tailored to accommodate specific optical design, manufacturing or component/device integration constraints. Multi-component chalcogenide glass (ChG) materials have been developed which exhibit broad spectral transparency with a range of physical properties that can be tuned to vary with composition, material microstructure and form. Specific tradeoffs that highlight the impact of material morphology and optical properties including transmission, loss and refractive index, are presented. This paper reports property evolution in a representative 20 GeSe2-60 As2Se3-20 PbSe glass material including a demonstration of a 1D GRIN profile through the use of controlled crystallization.

  15. EDITORIAL: Special issue on optical neural engineering: advances in optical stimulation technology Special issue on optical neural engineering: advances in optical stimulation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoham, Shy; Deisseroth, Karl

    2010-08-01

    a single spine, with two-photon uncaging) and in rapid, flexible spatial-temporal patterns [10-14]. Nevertheless, current technology generally requires damaging doses of UV or violet illumination and the continuous re-introduction of the caged compound, which, despite interest, makes for a difficult transition beyond in vitro preparations. Thus, the tremendous progress in the in vivo application of photo-stimulation tools over the past five years has been largely facilitated by two 'exciting' new photo-stimulation technologies: photo-biological stimulation of a rapidly increasing arsenal of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps ('optogenetic' probes[15-18]) and direct photo-thermal stimulation of neural tissue with an IR laser [19-21]. The Journal of Neural Engineering has dedicated a special section in this issue to highlight advances in optical stimulation technology, which includes original peer-reviewed contributions dealing with the design of modern optical systems for spatial-temporal control of optical excitation patterns and with the biophysics of neural-thermal interaction mediated by electromagnetic waves. The paper by Nikolenko, Peterka and Yuste [22] presents a compact design of a microscope-photo-stimulator based on a transmissive phase-modulating spatial-light modulator (SLM). Computer-generated holographic photo-stimulation using SLMs [12-14, 23] allows the efficient parallel projection of intense sparse patterns of light, and the welcome development of compact, user-friendly systems will likely reduce the barrier to its widespread adoption. The paper by Losavio et al [24] presents the design and functional characteristics of their acousto-optical deflector (AOD) systems for studying spatial-temporal dendritic integration in single neurons in vitro. Both single-photon (UV) and two-photon (femtosecond pulsed IR) AOD uncaging systems are described in detail. The paper presents an excellent overview of the current state of the art and limitations of

  16. Optical brain imaging in vivo: techniques and applications from animal to man

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.

    2008-01-01

    Optical brain imaging has seen 30 years of intense development, and has grown into a rich and diverse field. In-vivo imaging using light provides unprecedented sensitivity to functional changes through intrinsic contrast, and is rapidly exploiting the growing availability of exogenous optical contrast agents. Light can be used to image microscopic structure and function in vivo in exposed animal brain, while also allowing noninvasive imaging of hemodynamics and metabolism in a clinical setting. This work presents an overview of the wide range of approaches currently being applied to in-vivo optical brain imaging, from animal to man. Techniques include multispectral optical imaging, voltage sensitive dye imaging and speckle-flow imaging of exposed cortex, in-vivo two-photon microscopy of the living brain, and the broad range of noninvasive topography and tomography approaches to near-infrared imaging of the human brain. The basic principles of each technique are described, followed by examples of current applications to cutting-edge neuroscience research. In summary, it is shown that optical brain imaging continues to grow and evolve, embracing new technologies and advancing to address ever more complex and important neuroscience questions. PMID:17994863

  17. Fiber optic in vivo imaging in the mammalian nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Amit D; Jung, Juergen C; Flusberg, Benjamin A; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    The compact size, mechanical flexibility, and growing functionality of optical fiber and fiber optic devices are enabling several new modalities for imaging the mammalian nervous system in vivo. Fluorescence microendoscopy is a minimally invasive fiber modality that provides cellular resolution in deep brain areas. Diffuse optical tomography is a non-invasive modality that uses assemblies of fiber optic emitters and detectors on the cranium for volumetric imaging of brain activation. Optical coherence tomography is a sensitive interferometric imaging technique that can be implemented in a variety of fiber based formats and that might allow intrinsic optical detection of brain activity at a high resolution. Miniaturized fiber optic microscopy permits cellular level imaging in the brains of behaving animals. Together, these modalities will enable new uses of imaging in the intact nervous system for both research and clinical applications. PMID:15464896

  18. Optical Signal Processing: Poisson Image Restoration and Shearing Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Yie-Ming

    1973-01-01

    Optical signal processing can be performed in either digital or analog systems. Digital computers and coherent optical systems are discussed as they are used in optical signal processing. Topics include: image restoration; phase-object visualization; image contrast reversal; optical computation; image multiplexing; and fabrication of spatial filters. Digital optical data processing deals with restoration of images degraded by signal-dependent noise. When the input data of an image restoration system are the numbers of photoelectrons received from various areas of a photosensitive surface, the data are Poisson distributed with mean values proportional to the illuminance of the incoherently radiating object and background light. Optical signal processing using coherent optical systems is also discussed. Following a brief review of the pertinent details of Ronchi's diffraction grating interferometer, moire effect, carrier-frequency photography, and achromatic holography, two new shearing interferometers based on them are presented. Both interferometers can produce variable shear.

  19. Optical imaging in a variational Bayesian framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhab, S.; Ayasso, H.; Duchêne, B.; Mohammad-Djafari, A.

    2014-10-01

    We are interested in optical imaging of nano-structured man-made objects. Optical imaging is taken as a nonlinear inverse scattering problem where the goal is to retrieve the dielectric parameters of an unknown object. In addition to be nonlinear, such problems are also known to be ill-posed, which means that a regularization is required prior to their resolution. This is done by introducing a priori information which consists in the fact that object is known to be composed of compact homogeneous regions made of a finite number of different materials. This a priori knowledge is appropriately translated in a Bayesian framework by a Gauss-Markov- Potts prior. Hence, a Gauss-Markov random field is used to model the contrast distribution, whereas a hidden Potts-Markov field accounts for the compactness of the regions. The problem is then solved by means of a variational Bayesian approximation, which consists in approximating the joint posterior law of all unknown parameters in the Kullback-Leibler sense with a separable free form distribution. This leads to an implicit parametric optimization scheme which is solved iteratively. This inversion algorithm is applied to laboratory controlled experimental data.

  20. Functional optical imaging at the microscopic level

    PubMed Central

    Salazar Vázquez, Beatriz Y.; Hightower, Ciel Makena; Sapuppo, Francesca; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Functional microscopic imaging of in vivo tissues aims at characterizing parameters at the level of the unitary cellular components under normal conditions, in the presence of blood flow, to understand and monitor phenomena that lead to maintaining homeostatic balance. Of principal interest are the setting of shear stress on the endothelium; formation of the plasma layer, where the balance between nitric oxide production and scavenging is established; and formation of the oxygen gradients that determine the distribution of oxygen from blood into the tissue. Optical techniques that enable the analysis of functional microvascular processes are the measurement of blood vessel dimensions by image shearing, the photometric analysis of the extent of the plasma layer, the dual-slit methodology for measuring blood flow velocity, and the direct measurement of oxygen concentration in blood and tissue. Each of these technologies includes the development of paired, related mathematical approaches that enable characterizing the transport properties of the blood tissue system. While the technology has been successful in analyzing the living tissue in experimental conditions, deployment to clinical settings remains an elusive goal, due to the difficulty of obtaining optical access to the depth of the tissue. PMID:20210428

  1. Extreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager: XAOPI

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B A; Graham, J; Poyneer, L; Sommargren, G; Wilhelmsen, J; Gavel, D; Jones, S; Kalas, P; Lloyd, J; Makidon, R; Olivier, S; Palmer, D; Patience, J; Perrin, M; Severson, S; Sheinis, A; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Troy, M; Wallace, K

    2003-09-17

    Ground based adaptive optics is a potentially powerful technique for direct imaging detection of extrasolar planets. Turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere imposes some fundamental limits, but the large size of ground-based telescopes compared to spacecraft can work to mitigate this. We are carrying out a design study for a dedicated ultra-high-contrast system, the eXtreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager (XAOPI), which could be deployed on an 8-10m telescope in 2007. With a 4096-actuator MEMS deformable mirror it should achieve Strehl >0.9 in the near-IR. Using an innovative spatially filtered wavefront sensor, the system will be optimized to control scattered light over a large radius and suppress artifacts caused by static errors. We predict that it will achieve contrast levels of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} at angular separations of 0.2-0.8 inches around a large sample of stars (R<7-10), sufficient to detect Jupiter-like planets through their near-IR emission over a wide range of ages and masses. We are constructing a high-contrast AO testbed to verify key concepts of our system, and present preliminary results here, showing an RMS wavefront error of <1.3 nm with a flat mirror.

  2. Towards Depth-Resolved Optical Imaging of Cardiac Electrical Activity.

    PubMed

    Walton, Richard D; Bernus, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of arrhythmias are likely to be complex three-dimensional phenomena. Yet, the lack of high-resolution three-dimensional imaging techniques, both in the clinic and the experimental lab, limits our ability to better understand the mechanisms of such arrhythmias. Optical mapping using voltage-sensitive dyes is a widely used tool in experimental electrophysiology. It has been known for decades that even in its most basic application, epi-fluorescence, the optical signal contains information from within a certain intramural volume. Understanding of this fundamental property of optical signals has paved the way towards novel three-dimensional optical imaging techniques. Here, we review our current understanding of the three-dimensional nature of optical signals; how penetration depths of cardiac optical imaging can be improved by using novel imaging modalities and finally, we highlight new techniques inspired from optical tomography and aiming at full depth-resolved optical mapping of cardiac electrical activity. PMID:26238062

  3. Computational methods for optical molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei; Cong, Wen-Xiang; Wang, Ge

    2010-01-01

    Summary A new computational technique, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method, is presented to model the photon propagation in biological tissue for the optical molecular imaging. Optical properties have significant differences in different organs of small animals, resulting in discontinuous coefficients in the diffusion equation model. Complex organ shape of small animal induces singularities of the geometric model as well. The MIB method is designed as a dimension splitting approach to decompose a multidimensional interface problem into one-dimensional ones. The methodology simplifies the topological relation near an interface and is able to handle discontinuous coefficients and complex interfaces with geometric singularities. In the present MIB method, both the interface jump condition and the photon flux jump conditions are rigorously enforced at the interface location by using only the lowest-order jump conditions. This solution near the interface is smoothly extended across the interface so that central finite difference schemes can be employed without the loss of accuracy. A wide range of numerical experiments are carried out to validate the proposed MIB method. The second-order convergence is maintained in all benchmark problems. The fourth-order convergence is also demonstrated for some three-dimensional problems. The robustness of the proposed method over the variable strength of the linear term of the diffusion equation is also examined. The performance of the present approach is compared with that of the standard finite element method. The numerical study indicates that the proposed method is a potentially efficient and robust approach for the optical molecular imaging. PMID:20485461

  4. Depth-resolved imaging of colon tumor using optical coherence tomography and fluorescence laminar optical tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qinggong; Frank, Aaron; Wang, Jianting; Chen, Chao-wei; Jin, Lily; Lin, Jon; Chan, Joanne M.; Chen, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of neoplastic changes remains a critical challenge in clinical cancer diagnosis and treatment. Many cancers arise from epithelial layers such as those of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Current standard endoscopic technology is unable to detect those subsurface lesions. Since cancer development is associated with both morphological and molecular alterations, imaging technologies that can quantitative image tissue's morphological and molecular biomarkers and assess the depth extent of a lesion in real time, without the need for tissue excision, would be a major advance in GI cancer diagnostics and therapy. In this research, we investigated the feasibility of multi-modal optical imaging including high-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and depth-resolved high-sensitivity fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) for structural and molecular imaging. APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) mice model were imaged using OCT and FLOT and the correlated histopathological diagnosis was obtained. Quantitative structural (the scattering coefficient) and molecular imaging parameters (fluorescence intensity) from OCT and FLOT images were developed for multi-parametric analysis. This multi-modal imaging method has demonstrated the feasibility for more accurate diagnosis with 87.4% (87.3%) for sensitivity (specificity) which gives the most optimal diagnosis (the largest area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve). This project results in a new non-invasive multi-modal imaging platform for improved GI cancer detection, which is expected to have a major impact on detection, diagnosis, and characterization of GI cancers, as well as a wide range of epithelial cancers.

  5. Rugged spinel optics for space based imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayya, Shyam; Villalobos, Guillermo; Hunt, Michael; Kim, Woohong; Plunkett, Simon; Sanghera, Jasbinder

    2016-05-01

    Space environment is very harsh for optical systems. Currently available optical materials for space applications are susceptible to surface and bulk damage due to high-speed impacts from dust and debris found in the space environment. Impacts lead to surface pitting and fracturing that may compromise structural integrity and degrade the optical performance of imaging systems. We are developing polycrystalline spinel as a rugged optics material. With its 3x hardness and 5x strength, as compared to BK7 glass, spinel is a very promising optical material for space imaging applications. Spinel's broad transmission from 160 nm to 5000 nm will also enable multispectral imaging from ultraviolet to midwave infrared.

  6. Special issue on high-resolution optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter J. S.; Davis, Ilan; Galbraith, Catherine G.; Stemmer, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    The pace of development in the field of advanced microscopy is truly breath-taking, and is leading to major breakthroughs in our understanding of molecular machines and cell function. This special issue of Journal of Optics draws attention to a number of interesting approaches, ranging from fluorescence and imaging of unlabelled cells, to computational methods, all of which are describing the ever increasing detail of the dynamic behaviour of molecules in the living cell. This is a field which traditionally, and currently, demonstrates a marvellous interplay between the disciplines of physics, chemistry and biology, where apparent boundaries to resolution dissolve and living cells are viewed in ever more clarity. It is fertile ground for those interested in optics and non-conventional imaging to contribute high-impact outputs in the fields of cell biology and biomedicine. The series of articles presented here has been selected to demonstrate this interdisciplinarity and to encourage all those with a background in the physical sciences to 'dip their toes' into the exciting and dynamic discoveries surrounding cell function. Although single molecule super-resolution microscopy is commercially available, specimen preparation and interpretation of single molecule data remain a major challenge for scientists wanting to adopt the techniques. The paper by Allen and Davidson [1] provides a much needed detailed introduction to the practical aspects of stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, including sample preparation, image acquisition and image analysis, as well as a brief description of the different variants of single molecule localization microscopy. Since super-resolution microscopy is no longer restricted to three-dimensional imaging of fixed samples, the review by Fiolka [2] is a timely introduction to techniques that have been successfully applied to four-dimensional live cell super-resolution microscopy. The combination of multiple high-resolution techniques

  7. Optical fibers for high-resolution in vivo microendoscopic fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Gyungseok; Chung, Euiheon; Yun, Seok H.

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber-based high-resolution fluorescence imaging techniques have promising applications in clinical practice and preclinical research using animals. Here we review the instrumentation and applications of microendoscopy based on various types of optical fibers. Single-mode fibers and double-clad fibers have been widely used for delivering light from light sources to tissues and collecting light from tissues to photodetectors. Coherent fiber bundles, cylindrical graded-index lenses, and multi-mode fibers have been employed in both beam-scanning and non-scanning microscopy. With continuing advances of optical fiber technologies, further innovations in optical microendoscopy are expected.

  8. Multimode-Optical-Fiber Imaging Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Currently, endoscopic surgery uses single-mode fiber-bundles to obtain in vivo image information inside orifices of the body. This limits their use to the larger natural bodily orifices and to surgical procedures where there is plenty of room for manipulation. The knee joint, for example can be easily viewed with a fiber optic viewer, but joints in the finger cannot. However, there are a host of smaller orifices where fiber endoscopy would play an important role if a cost effective fiber probe were developed with small enough dimensions (< 250 microns). Examples of beneficiaries of micro-endoscopes are the treatment of the Eustatian tube of the middle ear, the breast ducts, tear ducts, coronary arteries, fallopian tubes, as well as the treatment of salivary duct parotid disease, and the neuro endoscopy of the ventricles and spinal canal. To solve this problem, this work describes an approach for recovering images from. tightly confined spaces using multimode fibers and analytically demonstrates that the concept is sound. The proof of concept draws upon earlier works that concentrated on image recovery after two-way transmission through a multimode fiber as well as work that demonstrated the recovery of images after one-way transmission through a multimode fiber. Both relied on generating a phase conjugated wavefront which was predistorted with the characteristics of the fiber. The described approach also relies on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, but utilizes two fibers to capture the image at some intermediate point (accessible by the fibers, but which is otherwise visually unaccessible).

  9. An integral design strategy combining optical system and image processing to obtain high resolution images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiaoyang; Wang, Lin; Yang, Ying; Gong, Rui; Shao, Xiaopeng; Liang, Chao; Xu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an integral design that combines optical system with image processing is introduced to obtain high resolution images, and the performance is evaluated and demonstrated. Traditional imaging methods often separate the two technical procedures of optical system design and imaging processing, resulting in the failures in efficient cooperation between the optical and digital elements. Therefore, an innovative approach is presented to combine the merit function during optical design together with the constraint conditions of image processing algorithms. Specifically, an optical imaging system with low resolution is designed to collect the image signals which are indispensable for imaging processing, while the ultimate goal is to obtain high resolution images from the final system. In order to optimize the global performance, the optimization function of ZEMAX software is utilized and the number of optimization cycles is controlled. Then Wiener filter algorithm is adopted to process the image simulation and mean squared error (MSE) is taken as evaluation criterion. The results show that, although the optical figures of merit for the optical imaging systems is not the best, it can provide image signals that are more suitable for image processing. In conclusion. The integral design of optical system and image processing can search out the overall optimal solution which is missed by the traditional design methods. Especially, when designing some complex optical system, this integral design strategy has obvious advantages to simplify structure and reduce cost, as well as to gain high resolution images simultaneously, which has a promising perspective of industrial application.

  10. [Automated imaging of the optic nerve and optic nerve fibers is essential to daily clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2004-06-01

    Chronic open-angle glaucoma is a progressive optical neuropathy. Automated imaging of the optic disc and optic nerve fibers provides reliable analysis of the optic nerve as well as long-term follow-up of neuropathy patients. HRT, GDX-VCC, and OCT, which analyze the optic disc and optical fibers, provide indisputable assistance in improving screening techniques and the follow-up of progressive glaucoma. PMID:15319758

  11. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Miranda; Waaler, Mason; Patience, Jennifer; Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Rajan, Abhijith; McCarthy, Don; Kulesa, Craig; Wilson, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    With the Arizona Infrared imager and Echelle Spectrograph (ARIES) instrument on the 6.5m MMT telescope, we obtained high angular resolution adaptive optics images of 12 exoplanet host stars. The targets are all systems with exoplanets in extremely close orbits such that the planets transit the host stars and cause regular brightness changes in the stars. The transit depth of the light curve is used to infer the radius and, in combination with radial velocity measurements, the density of the planet, but the results can be biased if the light from the host star is the combined light of a pair of stars in a binary system or a chance alignment of two stars. Given the high frequency of binary star systems and the increasing number of transit exoplanet discoveries from Kepler, K2, and anticipated discoveries with the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), this is a crucial point to consider when interpreting exoplanet properties. Companions were identified around five of the twelve targets at separations close enough that the brightness measurements of these host stars are in fact the combined brightness of two stars. Images of the resolved stellar systems and reanalysis of the exoplanet properties accounting for the presence of two stars are presented.

  12. Attenuation compensation for optical coherence tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shoude; Flueraru, Costel; Mao, Youxin; Sherif, Sherif

    2009-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive technique that provides micrometer-scale imaging of tissue. As most biological tissues are considered turbid, it causes attenuation of the OCT signal and limits the depth penetration. Although a few algorithms had been developed to compensate the attenuation, almost all of them need to extract the scattering parameters before doing the compensation procedure. Because the real biological samples are anisotropic and multilayer-like structure, it is not time-efficient to model and solve these scattering parameters. This paper introduces a new method to compensate the OCT signal attenuation in depth. By analyzing the input signal, a compensation function is adaptively derived for each A-scan line, which can be used effectively to compensate the energy loss in the large sections and enhance the details in the deep, dark-like areas. Three bio-samples, a piece of onion, a Poecilia Wingei fish and a piece of rabbit abdominal aorta, were used to test our method. OCT images obtained by a swept-source OCT system were processed by the proposed method. Results show the visualization of structures in OCT images has been evidently improved, especially in deep region.

  13. Steganographic optical image encryption system based on reversible data hiding and double random phase encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hung; Chen, Yen-Lin

    2013-02-01

    This study presents a steganographic optical image encryption system based on reversible data hiding and double random phase encoding (DRPE) techniques. Conventional optical image encryption systems can securely transmit valuable images using an encryption method for possible application in optical transmission systems. The steganographic optical image encryption system based on the DRPE technique has been investigated to hide secret data in encrypted images. However, the DRPE techniques vulnerable to attacks and many of the data hiding methods in the DRPE system can distort the decrypted images. The proposed system, based on reversible data hiding, uses a JBIG2 compression scheme to achieve lossless decrypted image quality and perform a prior encryption process. Thus, the DRPE technique enables a more secured optical encryption process. The proposed method extracts and compresses the bit planes of the original image using the lossless JBIG2 technique. The secret data are embedded in the remaining storage space. The RSA algorithm can cipher the compressed binary bits and secret data for advanced security. Experimental results show that the proposed system achieves a high data embedding capacity and lossless reconstruction of the original images.

  14. Advances in hybrid optics physical sensors for extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riza, Nabeel A.

    2010-04-01

    Highlighted are novel innovations in hybrid optical design physical sensors for extreme environments. Various hybrid design compositions are proposed that are suited for a particular sensor application. Examples includes combining freespace (wireless) and fiber-optics (wired) for gas turbine sensing and combining single crystal and sintered Silicon Carbide (SiC) materials for robust extreme environment Coefficent of Thermal Expansion (CTE) matched frontend probe design. Sensor signal processing also includes the hybrid theme where for example Black-Body radiation thermometry (pyrometry) is combined with laser interferometry to provide extreme temperature measurements. The hybrid theme also operates on the optical device level where a digital optical device such as a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is combined with an analog optical device such as an Electronically Controlled Variable Focal Length Lens (ECVFL) to deliver a smart and compressive Three Dimensional (3-D) imaging sensor for remote scene and object shape capture including both ambient light (passive) mode and active laser targeting and receive processing. Within a device level, the hybrid theme also operates via combined analog and digital control such as within a wavelength-coded variable optical delay line. These powerful hybrid design optical sensors have numerous applications in engineering and science applications from the military to the commercial/industrial sectors.

  15. Influence of altitude on aero-optic imaging deviation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Cai, Yuanli

    2011-06-20

    Aero-optic imaging deviation is a kind of aero-optic effect. It characterizes the image position displacement on an imaging plane. This paper studies the influence of altitude on aero-optic imaging deviation. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver provided in FLUENT was used for flow computations. The Runge-Kutta method based ray tracing was adopted for optics calculations. The orthogonal array was brought in for the experiment arrangement. Four representative suites of imaging deviations and imaging deviation slopes were obtained in the altitude range of 10-60 km. The results show that as altitude increases, the imaging deviation decreases, and the imaging deviation slope approaches zero from a negative value. PMID:21691360

  16. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Liao, Yang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy. PMID:24689058

  17. Imaging of Stellar Surfaces with the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A.; Schmitt, H. R.; van Belle, G. T.; Hutter, Clark; Mozurkewich, D.; Armstrong, J. T.; Baines, E. K.; Restaino, S. R.

    The Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) has a unique layout which is particularly well-suited for high-resolution interferometric imaging. By combining the NPOI layout with a new data acquisition and fringe tracking system we are progressing toward a imaging capability which will exceed any other interferometer in operation. The project, funded by the National Science Foundation, combines several existing advances and infrastructure at NPOI with modest enhancements. For optimal imaging there are several requirements that should be fulfilled. The observatory should be capable of measuring visibilities on a wide range of baseline lengths and orientations, providing complete UV coverage in a short period of time. It should measure visibility amplitudes with good SNR on all baselines as critical imaging information is often contained in low-amplitude visibilities. It should measure the visibility phase on all baselines. The technologies which can achieve this are the NPOI Y-shaped array with (nearly) equal spacing between telescopes and an ability for rapid configuration. Placing 6-telescopes in a row makes it possible to measure visibilities into the 4th lobe of the visibility function. By arranging the available telescopes carefully we will be able to switch, every few days, between 3 different 6-station chains which provide symmetric coverage in the UV (Fourier) plane without moving any telescopes, only by moving beam relay mirrors. The 6-station chains are important to achieve the highest imaging resolution, and switching rapidly between station chains provides uniform coverage. Coherent integration techniques can be used to obtain good SNR on very small visibilities. Coherently integrated visibilities can be used for imaging with standard radio imaging packages such as AIPS. The commissioning of one additional station, the use of new data acquisition hardware and fringe tracking algorithms are the enhancements which make this project possible.

  18. Beyond whole-body imaging: advanced imaging techniques of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Barnwell, James; Raptis, Constantine A; McConathy, Jonathan E; Laforest, Richard; Siegel, Barry A; Woodard, Pamela K; Fowler, Kathryn

    2015-02-01

    PET/MRI is a hybrid imaging modality that is gaining clinical interest with the first Food and Drug Administration-approved simultaneous imaging system recently added to the clinical armamentarium. Several advanced PET/MRI applications, such as high-resolution anatomic imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, motion correction, and cardiac imaging, show great potential for clinical use. The purpose of this article is to highlight several advanced PET/MRI applications through case examples and review of the current literature.

  19. Single-molecule imaging by optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebrano, Michele; Kukura, Philipp; Renn, Alois; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2011-02-01

    To date, optical studies of single molecules at room temperature have relied on the use of materials with high fluorescence quantum yield combined with efficient spectral rejection of background light. To extend single-molecule studies to a much larger pallet of substances that absorb but do not fluoresce, scientists have explored the photothermal effect, interferometry, direct attenuation and stimulated emission. Indeed, very recently, three groups have succeeded in achieving single-molecule sensitivity in absorption. Here, we apply modulation-free transmission measurements known from absorption spectrometers to image single molecules under ambient conditions both in the emissive and strongly quenched states. We arrive at quantitative values for the absorption cross-section of single molecules at different wavelengths and thereby set the ground for single-molecule absorption spectroscopy. Our work has important implications for research ranging from absorption and infrared spectroscopy to sensing of unlabelled proteins at the single-molecule level.

  20. 76 FR 12144 - Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... COMMISSION Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading March 2, 2011. It appears to the... securities of Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the... of investors require a suspension of trading in Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc. Therefore, it...

  1. New compact and efficient local oscillator optic system for the KSTAR electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Y. B.; Lee, D. J.; Lee, J.; Kim, C.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.

    2016-11-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic on Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research utilizes quasi-optical heterodyne-detection method to measure 2D (vertical and radial) Te fluctuations from two toroidally separated poloidal cross section of the plasma. A cylindrical lens local oscillator (LO) optics with optical path length (OPL) 2-2.5 m has been used in the current ECEI system to couple the LO source to the 24 vertically aligned array of ECE detectors. For efficient and compact LO optics employing the Powell lens is proposed so that the OPL of the LO source is significantly reduced from ˜2.0 m to 0.4 m with new optics. The coupling efficiency of the LO source is expected to be improved especially at the edge channels. Results from the optical simulation together with the laboratory test of the prototype optics will be discussed in this paper.

  2. Advanced simulations of optical transition and diffraction radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumeyr, T.; Billing, M. G.; Bobb, L. M.; Bolzon, B.; Bravin, E.; Karataev, P.; Kruchinin, K.; Lefevre, T.; Mazzoni, S.

    2015-04-01

    Charged particle beam diagnostics is a key task in modern and future accelerator installations. The diagnostic tools are practically the "eyes" of the operators. The precision and resolution of the diagnostic equipment are crucial to define the performance of the accelerator. Transition and diffraction radiation (TR and DR) are widely used for electron beam parameter monitoring. However, the precision and resolution of those devices are determined by how well the production, transport and detection of these radiation types are understood. This paper reports on simulations of TR and DR spatial-spectral characteristics using the physical optics propagation (POP) mode of the Zemax advanced optics simulation software. A good consistency with theory is demonstrated. Also, realistic optical system alignment issues are discussed.

  3. Recent Advances in Photonic Devices for Optical Computing and the Role of Nonlinear Optics-Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis E.; Paley, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The twentieth century has been the era of semiconductor materials and electronic technology while this millennium is expected to be the age of photonic materials and all-optical technology. Optical technology has led to countless optical devices that have become indispensable in our daily lives in storage area networks, parallel processing, optical switches, all-optical data networks, holographic storage devices, and biometric devices at airports. This chapters intends to bring some awareness to the state-of-the-art of optical technologies, which have potential for optical computing and demonstrate the role of nonlinear optics in many of these components. Our intent, in this Chapter, is to present an overview of the current status of optical computing, and a brief evaluation of the recent advances and performance of the following key components necessary to build an optical computing system: all-optical logic gates, adders, optical processors, optical storage, holographic storage, optical interconnects, spatial light modulators and optical materials.

  4. Novel spirometry based on optical surface imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guang Huang, Hailiang; Li, Diana G.; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Mechalakos, James; Wei, Jie; Sullivan, James; Zatcky, Joan; Rimner, Andreas

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using optical surface imaging (OSI) to measure the dynamic tidal volume (TV) of the human torso during free breathing. Methods: We performed experiments to measure volume or volume change in geometric and deformable phantoms as well as human subjects using OSI. To assess the accuracy of OSI in volume determination, we performed experiments using five geometric phantoms and two deformable body phantoms and compared the values with those derived from geometric calculations and computed tomography (CT) measurements, respectively. To apply this technique to human subjects, an institutional review board protocol was established and three healthy volunteers were studied. In the human experiment, a high-speed image capture mode of OSI was applied to acquire torso images at 4–5 frames per second, which was synchronized with conventional spirometric measurements at 5 Hz. An in-house MATLAB program was developed to interactively define the volume of interest (VOI), separate the thorax and abdomen, and automatically calculate the thoracic and abdominal volumes within the VOIs. The torso volume change (TV C = ΔV{sub torso} = ΔV{sub thorax} + ΔV{sub abdomen}) was automatically calculated using full-exhalation phase as the reference. The volumetric breathing pattern (BP{sub v} = ΔV{sub thorax}/ΔV{sub torso}) quantifying thoracic and abdominal volume variations was also calculated. Under quiet breathing, TVC should equal the tidal volume measured concurrently by a spirometer with a conversion factor (1.08) accounting for internal and external differences of temperature and moisture. Another MATLAB program was implemented to control the conventional spirometer that was used as the standard. Results: The volumes measured from the OSI imaging of geometric phantoms agreed with the calculated volumes with a discrepancy of 0.0% ± 1.6% (range −1.9% to 2.5%). In measurements from the deformable torso/thorax phantoms, the volume

  5. Novel spirometry based on optical surface imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang; Huang, Hailiang; Li, Diana G.; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Sullivan, James; Zatcky, Joan; Rimner, Andreas; Mechalakos, James

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using optical surface imaging (OSI) to measure the dynamic tidal volume (TV) of the human torso during free breathing. Methods: We performed experiments to measure volume or volume change in geometric and deformable phantoms as well as human subjects using OSI. To assess the accuracy of OSI in volume determination, we performed experiments using five geometric phantoms and two deformable body phantoms and compared the values with those derived from geometric calculations and computed tomography (CT) measurements, respectively. To apply this technique to human subjects, an institutional review board protocol was established and three healthy volunteers were studied. In the human experiment, a high-speed image capture mode of OSI was applied to acquire torso images at 4–5 frames per second, which was synchronized with conventional spirometric measurements at 5 Hz. An in-house matlab program was developed to interactively define the volume of interest (VOI), separate the thorax and abdomen, and automatically calculate the thoracic and abdominal volumes within the VOIs. The torso volume change (TV C = ΔVtorso = ΔVthorax + ΔVabdomen) was automatically calculated using full-exhalation phase as the reference. The volumetric breathing pattern (BPv = ΔVthorax/ΔVtorso) quantifying thoracic and abdominal volume variations was also calculated. Under quiet breathing, TVC should equal the tidal volume measured concurrently by a spirometer with a conversion factor (1.08) accounting for internal and external differences of temperature and moisture. Another matlab program was implemented to control the conventional spirometer that was used as the standard. Results: The volumes measured from the OSI imaging of geometric phantoms agreed with the calculated volumes with a discrepancy of 0.0% ± 1.6% (range −1.9% to 2.5%). In measurements from the deformable torso/thorax phantoms, the volume differences measured using OSI imaging and CT

  6. Far-field optical imaging with subdiffraction resolution enabled by nonlinear saturation absorption

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chenliang; Wei, Jingsong

    2016-01-01

    The resolution of far-field optical imaging is required to improve beyond the Abbe limit to the subdiffraction or even the nanoscale. In this work, inspired by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) imaging, in which carbon (or Au) thin films are usually required to be coated on the sample surface before imaging to remove the charging effect while imaging by electrons. We propose a saturation-absorption-induced far-field super-resolution optical imaging method (SAI-SRIM). In the SAI-SRIM, the carbon (or Au) layers in SEM imaging are replaced by nonlinear-saturation-absorption (NSA) thin films, which are directly coated onto the sample surfaces using advanced thin film deposition techniques. The surface fluctuant morphologies are replicated to the NSA thin films, accordingly. The coated sample surfaces are then imaged using conventional laser scanning microscopy. Consequently, the imaging resolution is greatly improved, and subdiffraction-resolved optical images are obtained theoretically and experimentally. The SAI-SRIM provides an effective and easy way to achieve far-field super-resolution optical imaging for sample surfaces with geometric fluctuant morphology characteristics. PMID:26727415

  7. Far-field optical imaging with subdiffraction resolution enabled by nonlinear saturation absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chenliang; Wei, Jingsong

    2016-01-01

    The resolution of far-field optical imaging is required to improve beyond the Abbe limit to the subdiffraction or even the nanoscale. In this work, inspired by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) imaging, in which carbon (or Au) thin films are usually required to be coated on the sample surface before imaging to remove the charging effect while imaging by electrons. We propose a saturation-absorption-induced far-field super-resolution optical imaging method (SAI-SRIM). In the SAI-SRIM, the carbon (or Au) layers in SEM imaging are replaced by nonlinear-saturation-absorption (NSA) thin films, which are directly coated onto the sample surfaces using advanced thin film deposition techniques. The surface fluctuant morphologies are replicated to the NSA thin films, accordingly. The coated sample surfaces are then imaged using conventional laser scanning microscopy. Consequently, the imaging resolution is greatly improved, and subdiffraction-resolved optical images are obtained theoretically and experimentally. The SAI-SRIM provides an effective and easy way to achieve far-field super-resolution optical imaging for sample surfaces with geometric fluctuant morphology characteristics.

  8. Imaging tissue engineered blood vessel mimics with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnema, Garret Thomas

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a technology that enables 2D cross-sectional images of tissue microstructure. This interferometric technique provides resolutions of approximately 10-20 mum with a penetration depth of 1-2 mm in highly scattering tissues. With the use of fiber optics, OCT systems have been developed for intravascular imaging with a demonstrated improvement in both resolution and dynamic range compared to commercial intravascular ultrasound systems. OCT studies of normal, atherosclerotic, and stented arteries indicate the ability of OCT to visualize arterial structures. These results suggest OCT may be a valuable tool for studying luminal structures in tissue engineered constructs. In the present study, new endoscopic OCT systems and analysis techniques were developed to visualize the growth and response of the cellular lining within a tissue engineered blood vessel mimic (BVM). The BVM consists of two primary components. A biocompatible polymeric scaffold is used to form the tubular structure. Human microvessel cells from adipose tissue are sodded on to the inner surface of the scaffold. These constructs are then developed and imaged within a sterile bioreactor. Three specific aims were defined for the present study. First, an OCT longitudinal scanning endoscope was developed. With this endoscope, a study of 16 BVMs was performed comparing images from OCT and corresponding histological sections. The study demonstrated that endoscopic imaging did not visually damage the mimic cellular lining. OCT images showed excellent correlation with corresponding histological sections. Second, a concentric three element endoscope was developed to provide radial cross-sections of the BVM. OCT images using this endoscope monitored lining development on three types of polymeric scaffolds. In the third specific aim, automated algorithms were developed to assess the percent cellular coverage of a stent using volumetric OCT images. The results of the present study

  9. Towards Single Biomolecule Imaging via Optical Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Alberto; Rosa, Lorenzo; Castelletto, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a physical marvel in which electromagnetic radiation is charged and discharged by nuclei in a magnetic field. In conventional NMR, the specific nuclei resonance frequency depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the magnetic properties of the isotope of the atoms. NMR is routinely utilized in clinical tests by converting nuclear spectroscopy in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and providing 3D, noninvasive biological imaging. While this technique has revolutionized biomedical science, measuring the magnetic resonance spectrum of single biomolecules is still an intangible aspiration, due to MRI resolution being limited to tens of micrometers. MRI and NMR have, however, recently greatly advanced, with many breakthroughs in nano-NMR and nano-MRI spurred by using spin sensors based on an atomic impurities in diamond. These techniques rely on magnetic dipole-dipole interactions rather than inductive detection. Here, novel nano-MRI methods based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond are highlighted, that provide a solution to the imaging of single biomolecules with nanoscale resolution in-vivo and in ambient conditions.

  10. Towards Single Biomolecule Imaging via Optical Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Alberto; Rosa, Lorenzo; Castelletto, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a physical marvel in which electromagnetic radiation is charged and discharged by nuclei in a magnetic field. In conventional NMR, the specific nuclei resonance frequency depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the magnetic properties of the isotope of the atoms. NMR is routinely utilized in clinical tests by converting nuclear spectroscopy in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and providing 3D, noninvasive biological imaging. While this technique has revolutionized biomedical science, measuring the magnetic resonance spectrum of single biomolecules is still an intangible aspiration, due to MRI resolution being limited to tens of micrometers. MRI and NMR have, however, recently greatly advanced, with many breakthroughs in nano-NMR and nano-MRI spurred by using spin sensors based on an atomic impurities in diamond. These techniques rely on magnetic dipole-dipole interactions rather than inductive detection. Here, novel nano-MRI methods based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond are highlighted, that provide a solution to the imaging of single biomolecules with nanoscale resolution in-vivo and in ambient conditions. PMID:26113221

  11. Polarimetric optical imaging of scattering surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barter, J D; Lee, P H

    1996-10-20

    A polarimetric optical specular event detector (OSED) has been developed to provide spatially and temporally resolved polarimetric data of backscattering in the visible from water wave surfaces. The OSED acquires simultaneous, two-dimensionally resolved images of the remote target in two orthogonal planes of polarization. With the use of plane-polarized illumination the OSED presently can measure, in an ensemble of breaking waves, the equivalent four-element polarization matrix common to polarimetric radars. Upgrade to full Stokes parameter state of polarization measurements is straightforward with the use of present single-aperture, multi-imager CCD camera technology. The OSED is used in conjunction with a coherent pulse-chirped radar (PCR), which also measures the four-element polarization matrix, to provide direct time-correlated identification of backscattering mechanisms operative during wave-breaking events which heretofore have not been described theoretically. We describe the instrument and its implementation, and examples of spatially resolved polarimetric data are displayed as correlated with the PCR backscatter cross section and polarization ratio records.

  12. The optical-mechanical design of DMD modulation imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianting; Xu, Xiping; Qiao, Yang; Li, Lei; Pan, Yue

    2014-09-01

    In order to avoid the phenomenon of some image information were lost, which is due to the jamming signals, such as incident laser, make the pixels dot on CCD saturated. In this article a device of optical-mechanical structure was designed, which utilized the DMD (Digital Micro mirror Device) to modulate the image. The DMD reflection imaging optical system adopts the telecentric light path. However, because the design is not only required to guarantee a 66° angle between the optical axis of the relay optics and the DMD, but also to ensure that the optical axis of the projection system keeps parallel with the perpendicular bisector of the micro-mirror which is in the "flat" state, so the TIR prism is introduced,and making the relay optics and the DMD satisfy the optical institution's requirements. In this paper, a mechanical structure of the imaging optical system was designed and at the meanwhile the lens assembly has been well connected and fixed and fine-tuned by detailed structural design, which included the tilt decentered lens, wedge flanges, prisms. By optimizing the design, the issues of mutual restraint between the inverting optical system and the projecting system were well resolved, and prevented the blocking of the two systems. In addition, the structure size of the whole DMD reflection imaging optical system was minimized; it reduced the energy loss and ensured the image quality.

  13. Diffractive-optical correlators: chances to make optical image preprocessing as intelligent as human vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauinger, Norbert

    2004-10-01

    The human eye is a good model for the engineering of optical correlators. Three prominent intelligent functionalities in human vision could in the near future become realized by a new diffractive-optical hardware design of optical imaging sensors: (1) Illuminant-adaptive RGB-based color Vision, (2) Monocular 3D Vision based on RGB data processing, (3) Patchwise fourier-optical Object-Classification and Identification. The hardware design of the human eye has specific diffractive-optical elements (DOE's) in aperture and in image space and seems to execute the three jobs at -- or not far behind -- the loci of the images of objects.

  14. Acousto-Optic Imaging Spectrometers for Mars Surface Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenar, D. A.; Blaney, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's long term plan for Mars sample collection and return requires a highly streamlined approach for spectrally characterizing a landing site, documenting the mineralogical make-up of the site and guiding the collections of samples which represent the diversity of the site. Ideally, image data should be acquired at hundreds of VIS and IR wavelengths, in order to separately distinguish numerous anticipated species, using principal component analysis and linear unmixing. Cameras with bore-sighted point spectrometers can acquire spectra of isolated scene elements, but it requires 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 2) successive motions and precise relative pointing knowledge in order to create a single data cube which qualifies as a spectral map. These and other competing science objectives have to be accomplished within very short lander/rover operational lifetime (a few sols). True, 2-D imaging spectroscopy greatly speeds up the data acquisition process, since the spectra of all pixels in the scene are collected at once. This task can be accomplished with cameras that use electronically tunable acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs) as the optical tuning element. AOTFs made from TeO2 are now a mature technology, and operate at wavelengths from near-UV to about 5 microns. Because of incremental improvements in the last few years, present generation devices are rugged, radiation-hard and operate at temperatures down to at least 150K so they can be safely integrated into the ambient temperature optics of in-situ instruments such as planetary or small-body landers. They have been used for ground-based astronomy, and were also baselined for the ST-4 Champollion IR comet lander experiment (CIRCLE), prior to cancellation of the ST-4 mission last year. AIMS (for Acousto-optic Imaging spectrometer), is a prototype lander instrument which is being built at GSFC with support by the NASA OSS Advanced Technologies and Mission Studies, Mars Instrument Definition and Development Program (MIDP

  15. Optical Pseudocolor Encoding Of Gray-Scale Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1990-01-01

    Optical encoding much faster than digital electronic encoding. In optical pseudocolor-encoding apparatus brightness modulation in image from television camera transformed into polarization modulation in LCTV, and then into pseudocolor modulation in image on projection screen. Advantageous for such purposes as thermography, inspection of circuit boards, mammography, and mapping.

  16. Theoretical study of Fourier-transform acousto-optic imaging.

    PubMed

    Barjean, Kinia; Ramaz, François; Tualle, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-01

    We propose a full theoretical study of Fourier-transform acousto-optic imaging, which we recently introduced and experimentally assessed in [Opt. Lett.40, 705-708 (2015)OPLEDP0146-959210.1364/OL.40.000705] as an alternative to achieve axial resolution in acousto-optic imaging with a higher signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:27140883

  17. Analytical model and optical design of distributed aperture optical system for millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Caihua; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.; Samluk, Jesse; Stein, E. Lee, Jr.; MacKrides, Daniel G.; Mirotznik, Mark; Prather, Dennis W.

    2008-10-01

    Millimeter-wave imaging is very interesting due to its unique transmission properties through a broad range of atmospheric obscurants such as cloud, dust, fog, sandstorms, and smoke, which thereby enables all-weather passive imaging. Unfortunately, the usefulness of millimeter-wave imagers is often limited by the large aperture sizes required to obtain images of sufficient resolution, as governed by the diffraction limit. To this end, we previously proposed a distributed aperture system for direct non-scan millimeter-wave imaging using an optical upconversion technique. In this proposed approach, an antenna array is employed to sample image signals in the millimeter-wave domain. The sampled millimeter-wave signals are then upconverted to the optical domain using electro-optic modulation techniques. These optical signals are mapped into a similar array on the entrance pupil of the following optical system for direct imaging. Although distributed aperture imaging is not new in both radio astronomy and conventional optical inteferometric imaging, the proposed approach is different in that it physically samples image in the millimeter-wave domain and directly forms the image in the optical domain. Therefore, specific analysis and evaluation techniques are required for the design and optimization of the proposed system. In this paper, we will address these issues, develop techniques to evaluate and enhance the system imaging performance and present methods to optimize the geometric configuration.

  18. Novel optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Aimin; Sun, Jianfeng; Hu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingtao; Liu, Liren

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new method called modified optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging technique for encryption and decryption of remote objects. An image or object can be optically encrypted on the fly by Fresnel telescope scanning system together with an encryption key. For image decryption, the encrypted signals are received and processed with an optical coherent heterodyne detection system. The proposed method has strong performance through use of secure Fresnel telescope scanning with orthogonal polarized beams and efficient all-optical information processing. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experimental results. PMID:26191901

  19. Novel optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Aimin; Sun, Jianfeng; Hu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingtao; Liu, Liren

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new method called modified optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging technique for encryption and decryption of remote objects. An image or object can be optically encrypted on the fly by Fresnel telescope scanning system together with an encryption key. For image decryption, the encrypted signals are received and processed with an optical coherent heterodyne detection system. The proposed method has strong performance through use of secure Fresnel telescope scanning with orthogonal polarized beams and efficient all-optical information processing. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experimental results.

  20. Optical authentication via photon-synthesized ghost imaging using optical nonlinear correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2015-10-01

    We present a method for optical authentication via photon-synthesized ghost imaging using optical nonlinear correlation. In ghost imaging, multiple series of photons recorded at the object beam arm can be arbitrarily controlled for the generation of synthesized objects. Ghost imaging with sparse reference intensity patterns provides a channel to effectively modulate the noise-like synthesized objects during the recovery, and the reconstructed (noise-like) objects, i.e., added or subtracted information, can be further authenticated by optical nonlinear correlation algorithm. It is expected that the proposed method can provide an effective and promising alternative for ghost-imaging-based optical processing.

  1. Document Indexing for Image-Based Optical Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiel, Thomas J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of image-based information retrieval systems focuses on indexing. Highlights include computerized information retrieval; multimedia optical systems; optical mass storage and personal computers; and a case study that describes an optical disk system which was developed to preserve, access, and disseminate military documents. (19…

  2. Understanding the optics to aid microscopy image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhaozheng; Li, Kang; Kanade, Takeo; Chen, Mei

    2010-01-01

    Image segmentation is essential for many automated microscopy image analysis systems. Rather than treating microscopy images as general natural images and rushing into the image processing warehouse for solutions, we propose to study a microscope's optical properties to model its image formation process first using phase contrast microscopy as an exemplar. It turns out that the phase contrast imaging system can be relatively well explained by a linear imaging model. Using this model, we formulate a quadratic optimization function with sparseness and smoothness regularizations to restore the "authentic" phase contrast images that directly correspond to specimen's optical path length without phase contrast artifacts such as halo and shade-off. With artifacts removed, high quality segmentation can be achieved by simply thresholding the restored images. The imaging model and restoration method are quantitatively evaluated on two sequences with thousands of cells captured over several days. PMID:20879233

  3. Adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mark William; Wick, David Victor

    2004-11-01

    The combination of phase diversity and adaptive optics offers great flexibility. Phase diverse images can be used to diagnose aberrations and then provide feedback control to the optics to correct the aberrations. Alternatively, phase diversity can be used to partially compensate for aberrations during post-detection image processing. The adaptive optic can produce simple defocus or more complex types of phase diversity. This report presents an analysis, based on numerical simulations, of the efficiency of different modes of phase diversity with respect to compensating for specific aberrations during post-processing. It also comments on the efficiency of post-processing versus direct aberration correction. The construction of a bench top optical system that uses a membrane mirror as an active optic is described. The results of characterization tests performed on the bench top optical system are presented. The work described in this report was conducted to explore the use of adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

  4. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light ... location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities ...

  5. Advances in Optical Adjunctive Aids for Visualisation and Detection of Oral Malignant and Potentially Malignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Nirav; Lalla, Yastira; Vu, An N.; Farah, Camile S.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods of screening for oral potentially malignant disorders and oral malignancies involve a conventional oral examination with digital palpation. Evidence indicates that conventional examination is a poor discriminator of oral mucosal lesions. A number of optical aids have been developed to assist the clinician to detect oral mucosal abnormalities and to differentiate benign lesions from sinister pathology. This paper discusses advances in optical technologies designed for the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities. The literature regarding such devices, VELscope and Identafi, is critically analysed, and the novel use of Narrow Band Imaging within the oral cavity is also discussed. Optical aids are effective in assisting with the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities; however, further research is required to evaluate the usefulness of these devices in differentiating benign lesions from potentially malignant and malignant lesions. PMID:24078812

  6. Changing image of correlation optics: introduction.

    PubMed

    Angelsky, Oleg V; Desyatnikov, Anton S; Gbur, Gregory J; Hanson, Steen G; Lee, Tim; Miyamoto, Yoko; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Wyant, James C

    2016-04-20

    This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting recent progress of correlation optics and illustrating current trends in vector singular optics, internal energy flows at light fields, optical science of materials, and new biomedical applications of lasers.

  7. Nonlinear optical microscopy for imaging thin films and surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Smilowitz, L.B.; McBranch, D.W.; Robinson, J.M.

    1995-03-01

    We have used the inherent surface sensitivity of second harmonic generation to develop an instrument for nonlinear optical microscopy of surfaces and interfaces. We have demonstrated the use of several nonlinear optical responses for imaging thin films. The second harmonic response of a thin film of C{sub 60} has been used to image patterned films. Two photon absorption light induced fluorescence has been used to image patterned thin films of Rhodamine 6G. Applications of nonlinear optical microscopy include the imaging of charge injection and photoinduced charge transfer between layers in semiconductor heterojunction devices as well as across membranes in biological systems.

  8. Polarization sensitive optical frequency domain imaging system for endobronchial imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; de Lange, Joop; Daniels, Johannes M A; Grünberg, Katrien; de Boer, Johannes F

    2015-02-01

    A polarization sensitive endoscopic optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) system with a motorized distal scanning catheter is demonstrated. It employs a passive polarization delay unit to multiplex two orthogonal probing polarization states in depth, and a polarization diverse detection unit to detect interference signal in two orthogonal polarization channels. Per depth location four electro-magnetic field components are measured that can be represented in a complex 2x2 field matrix. A Jones matrix of the sample is derived and the sample birefringence is extracted by eigenvalue decomposition. The condition of balanced detection and the polarization mode dispersion are quantified. A complex field averaging method based on the alignment of randomly pointing field phasors is developed to reduce speckle noise. The variation of the polarization states incident on the tissue due to the circular scanning and catheter sheath birefringence is investigated. With this system we demonstrated imaging of ex vivo chicken muscle, in vivo pig lung and ex vivo human lung specimens. PMID:25836196

  9. Optical-thermal light-tissue interactions during photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Taylor; Wang, Quanzeng; Pfefer, T. Joshua

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has grown rapidly as a biomedical imaging technique in recent years, with key applications in cancer diagnosis and oximetry. In spite of these advances, the literature provides little insight into thermal tissue interactions involved in PAI. To elucidate these basic phenomena, we have developed, validated, and implemented a three-dimensional numerical model of tissue photothermal (PT) response to repetitive laser pulses. The model calculates energy deposition, fluence distributions, transient temperature and damage profiles in breast tissue with blood vessels and generalized perfusion. A parametric evaluation of these outputs vs. vessel diameter and depth, optical beam diameter, wavelength, and irradiance, was performed. For a constant radiant exposure level, increasing beam diameter led to a significant increase in subsurface heat generation rate. Increasing vessel diameter resulted in two competing effects - reduced mean energy deposition in the vessel due to light attenuation and greater thermal superpositioning due to reduced thermal relaxation. Maximum temperatures occurred either at the surface or in subsurface regions of the dermis, depending on vessel geometry and position. Results are discussed in terms of established exposure limits and levels used in prior studies. While additional experimental and numerical study is needed, numerical modeling represents a powerful tool for elucidating the effect of PA imaging devices on biological tissue.

  10. Time domain optical molecular imaging of small animals in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David J.

    2006-03-01

    The advent of optical molecular probes has taken optical imaging beyond approaches limited to intrinsic optical contrast mechanisms. Fluorophores are typically used as the source of contrast for optical molecular probes and the field of optical molecular imaging is concerned with measuring and quantifying their in vivo biodistribution and pharmacokinetics. Most optical molecular imaging systems are based on Continuous Wave (CW) approaches which enable rapid, full-body imaging of small animals and readily yield images of probe location, however quantification of probe concentration is challenging. Time Domain (TD) approaches, although more expensive and complicated than CW, provide more information to assist in determining the probe location and concentration. Moreover, the TD approach permits access to measuring the fluorophore lifetime which can be indicative of the probe's environment. The eXplore Optix TM system, developed by ART (Canada; distributed by GE Healthcare, has enabled TD optical molecular imaging of small animals in vivo and preliminary studies conducted with the system will be presented. In addition, the initial research and development of a full-field TD optical molecular imaging system incorporating a high-power laser for area illumination and a gated-intensified CCD camera for area detection will be presented.

  11. Advanced photoacoustic image reconstruction using the k-Wave toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treeby, B. E.; Jaros, J.; Cox, B. T.

    2016-03-01

    Reconstructing images from measured time domain signals is an essential step in tomography-mode photoacoustic imaging. However, in practice, there are many complicating factors that make it difficult to obtain high-resolution images. These include incomplete or undersampled data, filtering effects, acoustic and optical attenuation, and uncertainties in the material parameters. Here, the processing and image reconstruction steps routinely used by the Photoacoustic Imaging Group at University College London are discussed. These include correction for acoustic and optical attenuation, spatial resampling, material parameter selection, image reconstruction, and log compression. The effect of each of these steps is demonstrated using a representative in vivo dataset. All of the algorithms discussed form part of the open-source k-Wave toolbox (available from http://www.k-wave.org).

  12. Advanced ultrasound probes for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildes, Douglas G.; Smith, L. Scott

    2012-05-01

    New medical ultrasound probe architectures and materials build upon established 1D phased array technology and provide improved imaging performance and clinical value. Technologies reviewed include 1.25D and 1.5D arrays for elevation slice thickness control; electro-mechanical and 2D array probes for real-time 3D imaging; catheter probes for imaging during minimally-invasive procedures; single-crystal piezoelectric materials for greater frequency bandwidth; and cMUT arrays using silicon MEMS in place of piezo materials.

  13. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager: Imaging Performance On-Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    This report analyzes the on-orbit imaging performance of the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on the Earth Observing-1 satellite. The pre-flight calibrations are first summarized. The methods used to reconstruct and geometrically correct the image data from this push-broom sensor are described. The method used here does not refer to the position and attitude telemetry from the spacecraft. Rather, it is assumed that the image of the scene moves across the focal plane with a constant velocity, which can be ascertained from the image data itself. Next, an assortment of the images so reconstructed is presented. Color images sharpened with the 10-m panchromatic band data are shown, and the algorithm for producing them from the 30-m multispectral data is described. The approach taken for assessing spatial resolution is to compare the sharpness of features in the on-orbit image data with profiles predicted on the basis of the pre-flight calibrations. A large assortment of bridge profiles is analyzed, and very good fits to the predicted shapes are obtained. Lunar calibration scans are analyzed to examine the sharpness of the edge-spread function at the limb of the moon. The darkness of the space beyond the limb is better for this purpose than anything that could be simulated on the ground. From these scans, we find clear evidence of scattering in the optical system, as well as some weak ghost images. Scans of planets and stars are also analyzed. Stars are useful point sources of light at all wavelengths, and delineate the point-spread functions of the system. From a quarter-speed scan over the Pleiades, we find that the ALI can detect 6th magnitude stars. The quality of the reconstructed images verifies the capability of the ALI to produce Landsat-type multi spectral data. The signal-to-noise and panchromatic spatial resolution are considerably superior to those of the existing Landsat sensors. The spatial resolution is confirmed to be as good as it was designed to be.

  14. Radiance and photon noise: imaging in geometrical optics, physical optics, quantum optics and radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caucci, Luca; Myers, Kyle J.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2016-01-01

    The statistics of detector outputs produced by an imaging system are derived from basic radiometric concepts and definitions. We show that a fundamental way of describing a photon-limited imaging system is in terms of a Poisson random process in spatial, angular, and wavelength variables. We begin the paper by recalling the concept of radiance in geometrical optics, radiology, physical optics, and quantum optics. The propagation and conservation laws for radiance in each of these domains are reviewed. Building upon these concepts, we distinguish four categories of imaging detectors that all respond in some way to the incident radiance, including the new category of photon-processing detectors (capable of measuring radiance on a photon-by-photon basis). This allows us to rigorously show how the concept of radiance is related to the statistical properties of detector outputs and to the information content of a single detected photon. A Monte-Carlo technique, which is derived from the Boltzmann transport equation, is presented as a way to estimate probability density functions to be used in reconstruction from photon-processing data.

  15. Advances in Small Animal Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudos, George K.

    2007-11-01

    The rapid growth in genetics and molecular biology combined with the development of techniques for genetically engineering small animals has led to an increased interest in in vivo laboratory animal imaging during the past few years. For this purpose, new instrumentation, data acquisition strategies, and image processing and reconstruction techniques are being developed, researched and evaluated. The aim of this article is to give a short overview of the state of the art technologies for high resolution and high sensitivity molecular imaging techniques, primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The basic needs of small animal imaging will be described. The evolution in instrumentation in the past two decades, as well as the commercially available systems will be overviewed. Finally, the new trends in detector technology and preliminary results from challenging applications will be presented. For more details a number of references are provided.

  16. Advanced Image Search: A Strategy for Creating Presentation Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Diane K.; Hines, Jean D.; Swinker, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    Finding relevant digital images to create presentation boards requires advanced search skills. This article describes a course assignment involving a technique designed to develop students' literacy skills with respect to locating images of desired quality and content from Internet databases. The assignment was applied in a collegiate apparel…

  17. Clinical Application and Research Advances of CT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    2016-06-10

    Computed tomography (CT)-based myocardial perfusion imaging (CTP)has been widely recognized as a one-station solution for the imaging of myocardial ischemia-related diseases. This article reviews the clinical scanning protocols,analytical methods,and research advances of CTP in recent years and briefly discusses its limitations and future development. PMID:27469926

  18. Advanced automated char image analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Wu; Edward Lester; Michael Cloke

    2006-05-15

    Char morphology is an important characteristic when attempting to understand coal behavior and coal burnout. In this study, an augmented algorithm has been proposed to identify char types using image analysis. On the basis of a series of image processing steps, a char image is singled out from the whole image, which then allows the important major features of the char particle to be measured, including size, porosity, and wall thickness. The techniques for automated char image analysis have been tested against char images taken from ICCP Char Atlas as well as actual char particles derived from pyrolyzed char samples. Thirty different chars were prepared in a drop tube furnace operating at 1300{sup o}C, 1% oxygen, and 100 ms from 15 different world coals sieved into two size fractions (53-75 and 106-125 {mu}m). The results from this automated technique are comparable with those from manual analysis, and the additional detail from the automated sytem has potential use in applications such as combustion modeling systems. Obtaining highly detailed char information with automated methods has traditionally been hampered by the difficulty of automatic recognition of individual char particles. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Optical Processing of Speckle Images with Bacteriorhodopsin for Pattern Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Tucker, Deanne (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Logarithmic processing of images with multiplicative noise characteristics can be utilized to transform the image into one with an additive noise distribution. This simplifies subsequent image processing steps for applications such as image restoration or correlation for pattern recognition. One particularly common form of multiplicative noise is speckle, for which the logarithmic operation not only produces additive noise, but also makes it of constant variance (signal-independent). We examine the optical transmission properties of some bacteriorhodopsin films here and find them well suited to implement such a pointwise logarithmic transformation optically in a parallel fashion. We present experimental results of the optical conversion of speckle images into transformed images with additive, signal-independent noise statistics using the real-time photochromic properties of bacteriorhodopsin. We provide an example of improved correlation performance in terms of correlation peak signal-to-noise for such a transformed speckle image.

  20. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging.

    PubMed

    Heide, Felix; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Yifan; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics. PMID:27633055

  1. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging.

    PubMed

    Heide, Felix; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Yifan; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  2. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heide, Felix; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Yifan; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics. PMID:27633055

  3. Acousto-optic image processing in coherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Balakshy, V I; Voloshinov, V B

    2005-01-31

    The results of recent studies on coherent acousto-optic image processing performed at the chair of physics of oscillations at the Department of Physics of Moscow State University are reported. It is shown that this processing method is based on the filtration of the spatial spectrum of an optical signal in an acousto-optic cell. The main attention is paid to the analysis of the dependence of the transfer function of the cell on the crystal cut, geometry of acousto-optic interaction, and acoustic-wave parameters. It is shown that an acousto-optic cell allows the image differentiation and integration as well as the visualisation of phase objects. The results of experiments and computer simulation are presented which illustrate the possibilities of acousto-optic image processing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heide, Felix; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Yifan; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  5. Optical microscopic imaging based on VRML language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuedian; Zhang, Zhenyi; Sun, Jun

    2009-11-01

    As so-called VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language), is a kind of language used to establish a model of the real world or a colorful world made by people. As in international standard, VRML is the main kind of program language based on the "www" net building, which is defined by ISO, the kind of MIME is x-world or x-VRML. The most important is that it has no relationship with the operating system. Otherwise, because of the birth of VRML 2.0, its ability of describing the dynamic condition gets better, and the interaction of the internet evolved too. The use of VRML will bring a revolutionary change of confocal microscope. For example, we could send different kinds of swatch in virtual 3D style to the net. On the other hand, scientists in different countries could use the same microscope in the same time to watch the same samples by the internet. The mode of sending original data in the model of text has many advantages, such as: the faster transporting, the fewer data, the more convenient updating and fewer errors. In the following words we shall discuss the basic elements of using VRML in the field of Optical Microscopic imaging.

  6. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yifan; Fu, Qiang; Amata, Hadi; Su, Shuochen; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2015-11-30

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  7. A simple multipurpose double-beam optical image analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popowicz, A.; Blachowicz, T.

    2016-07-01

    In the paper we present a low cost optical device which splits the light in the focal plane into two separate optical paths and collimates it back into a single image plane, and where a selective information processing can be carried out. The optical system is straightforward and easily implementable as it consists of only three lenses and two mirrors. The system is dedicated for imaging in low-light-level conditions in which widely used optical devices, based on beam splitters or dichroic mirrors, suffer from light loss. We expose examples of applications of our device, using a prototype model. The proposed optical system may be employed for: monitoring the objects located at different distances from observer (1), creating regions of different magnification within a single image plane (2), high dynamic range photometry (3), or imaging in two wavelength bands simultaneously (4).

  8. A simple multipurpose double-beam optical image analyzer.

    PubMed

    Popowicz, A; Blachowicz, T

    2016-07-01

    In the paper we present a low cost optical device which splits the light in the focal plane into two separate optical paths and collimates it back into a single image plane, and where a selective information processing can be carried out. The optical system is straightforward and easily implementable as it consists of only three lenses and two mirrors. The system is dedicated for imaging in low-light-level conditions in which widely used optical devices, based on beam splitters or dichroic mirrors, suffer from light loss. We expose examples of applications of our device, using a prototype model. The proposed optical system may be employed for: monitoring the objects located at different distances from observer (1), creating regions of different magnification within a single image plane (2), high dynamic range photometry (3), or imaging in two wavelength bands simultaneously (4). PMID:27475546

  9. Computer-aided detection of polyps in optical colonoscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    We present a computer-aided detection algorithm for polyps in optical colonoscopy images. Polyps are the precursors to colon cancer. In the US alone, 14 million optical colonoscopies are performed every year, mostly to screen for polyps. Optical colonoscopy has been shown to have an approximately 25% polyp miss rate due to the convoluted folds and bends present in the colon. In this work, we present an automatic detection algorithm to detect these polyps in the optical colonoscopy images. We use a machine learning algorithm to infer a depth map for a given optical colonoscopy image and then use a detailed pre-built polyp profile to detect and delineate the boundaries of polyps in this given image. We have achieved the best recall of 84.0% and the best specificity value of 83.4%.

  10. A simple multipurpose double-beam optical image analyzer.

    PubMed

    Popowicz, A; Blachowicz, T

    2016-07-01

    In the paper we present a low cost optical device which splits the light in the focal plane into two separate optical paths and collimates it back into a single image plane, and where a selective information processing can be carried out. The optical system is straightforward and easily implementable as it consists of only three lenses and two mirrors. The system is dedicated for imaging in low-light-level conditions in which widely used optical devices, based on beam splitters or dichroic mirrors, suffer from light loss. We expose examples of applications of our device, using a prototype model. The proposed optical system may be employed for: monitoring the objects located at different distances from observer (1), creating regions of different magnification within a single image plane (2), high dynamic range photometry (3), or imaging in two wavelength bands simultaneously (4).

  11. UWGSP7: a real-time optical imaging workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John E.; Kim, Yongmin; Pennington, Stan D.; Alleman, Andrew P.

    1995-04-01

    With the development of UWGSP7, the University of Washington Image Computing Systems Laboratory has a real-time workstation for continuous-wave (cw) optical reflectance imaging. Recent discoveries in optical science and imaging research have suggested potential practical use of the technology as a medical imaging modality and identified the need for a machine to support these applications in real time. The UWGSP7 system was developed to provide researchers with a high-performance, versatile tool for use in optical imaging experiments with the eventual goal of bringing the technology into clinical use. One of several major applications of cw optical reflectance imaging is tumor imaging which uses a light-absorbing dye that preferentially sequesters in tumor tissue. This property could be used to locate tumors and to identify tumor margins intraoperatively. Cw optical reflectance imaging consists of illumination of a target with a band-limited light source and monitoring the light transmitted by or reflected from the target. While continuously illuminating the target, a control image is acquired and stored. A dye is injected into a subject and a sequence of data images are acquired and processed. The data images are aligned with the control image and then subtracted to obtain a signal representing the change in optical reflectance over time. This signal can be enhanced by digital image processing and displayed in pseudo-color. This type of emerging imaging technique requires a computer system that is versatile and adaptable. The UWGSP7 utilizes a VESA local bus PC as a host computer running the Windows NT operating system and includes ICSL developed add-on boards for image acquisition and processing. The image acquisition board is used to digitize and format the analog signal from the input device into digital frames and to the average frames into images. To accommodate different input devices, the camera interface circuitry is designed in a small mezzanine board

  12. Advanced Motion Compensation Methods for Intravital Optical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-03-01

    Intravital microscopy has emerged in the recent decade as an indispensible imaging modality for the study of the micro-dynamics of biological processes in live animals. Technical advancements in imaging techniques and hardware components, combined with the development of novel targeted probes and new mice models, have enabled us to address long-standing questions in several biology areas such as oncology, cell biology, immunology and neuroscience. As the instrument resolution has increased, physiological motion activities have become a major obstacle that prevents imaging live animals at resolutions analogue to the ones obtained in vitro. Motion compensation techniques aim at reducing this gap and can effectively increase the in vivo resolution. This paper provides a technical review of some of the latest developments in motion compensation methods, providing organ specific solutions.

  13. Advanced Motion Compensation Methods for Intravital Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has emerged in the recent decade as an indispensible imaging modality for the study of the micro-dynamics of biological processes in live animals. Technical advancements in imaging techniques and hardware components, combined with the development of novel targeted probes and new mice models, have enabled us to address long-standing questions in several biology areas such as oncology, cell biology, immunology and neuroscience. As the instrument resolution has increased, physiological motion activities have become a major obstacle that prevents imaging live animals at resolutions analogue to the ones obtained in vitro. Motion compensation techniques aim at reducing this gap and can effectively increase the in vivo resolution. This paper provides a technical review of some of the latest developments in motion compensation methods, providing organ specific solutions. PMID:24273405

  14. Optical-disk-based imaging system to be used as an optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Takayuki; Fujimaki, Makoto; Awazu, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    An optical disk surface is scanned spirally by laser light, as in the case of digital versatile discs, and a reflectance image is formed by rearranging the scanned intensity results. A prototype system is developed for imaging with a rotary encoder equipped to precisely control the disk rotation angle. We measured Escherichia coli dispersed on an optical disk sample surface and successfully obtained an image that is identical to that obtained using an optical microscope. The system is advantageous as an optical sensor for detecting sub-micrometer- to micrometer-order substances on a large-area surface.

  15. Advanced Image Intensifier: a 60°field-of-view night vision system with integral electroluminescent display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, David A.; Branigan, Robert G.

    1996-06-01

    The Advanced Image Intensifier Advanced Technology Demonstrator is an Army program to develop and demonstrate the next generation of night vision goggle using revolutionary new technologies to improve system performance and expand the capability of currently fielded image intensifier devices. The Advanced Image Intensifier is a helmet mounted imaging and display system that exploits recent advances in diffractive optics, miniature flat panel displays, image intensifier tube technology and manufacturing processes. The system will demonstrate significantly enhanced operational performance by increasing low-light resolution by greater than 25 percent; increasing field of view from 40 degrees to 60 degrees; improving high light performance; and integrating a display for viewing thermal imagery, computer graphics, and symbology. The results of these improvements will increase the night fighting capability, operational effectiveness, mobilty, versatility, and survivability of the dismounted soldier and aviator.

  16. [Design and analysis of a novel light visible spectrum imaging spectrograph optical system].

    PubMed

    Shen, Man-de; Li, Fei; Zhou, Li-bing; Li, Cheng; Ren, Huan-huan; Jiang, Qing-xiu

    2015-02-01

    A novel visible spectrum imaging spectrograph optical system was proposed based on the negative dispersion, the arbitrary phase modulation characteristics of diffractive optical element and the aberration correction characteristics of freeform optical element. The double agglutination lens was substituted by a hybrid refractive/diffractive lens based on the negative dispersion of diffractive optical element. Two freeform optical elements were used in order to correct some aberration based on the aberration correction characteristics of freeform optical element. An example and frondose design process were presented. When the design parameters were uniform, compared with the traditional system, the novel visible spectrum imaging spectrograph optical system's weight was reduced by 22.9%, the total length was reduced by 26.6%, the maximal diameter was reduced by 30.6%, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) in 1.0 field-of-view was improved by 0.35 with field-of-view improved maximally. The maximal distortion was reduced by 1.6%, the maximal longitudinal aberration was reduced by 56.4%, and the lateral color aberration was reduced by 59. 3%. From these data, we know that the performance of the novel system was advanced quickly and it could be used to put forward a new idea for modern visible spectrum imaging spectrograph optical system design.

  17. The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Bookbinder, Jay; Petre, Robert; Smith, Randall; Ptak, Andrew; Tananbaum, Harvey; Garcia, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Following recommendations from the 2010 "New Worlds, New Horizons" (NWNH) report, the Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) concept streamlines the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission to concentrate on the science objectives that are enabled by high-resolution spectroscopic capabilities. AXSIO will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin for tens of supermassive black holes (SMBH), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN during their peak activity, observe 5MBH out to redshift z=6, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, find the missing baryons in the cosmic web using background quasars, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes and supernovae inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. These measurements are enabled by a 0.9 sq m collecting area at 1.25 keV, a micro calorimeter array providing high-resolution spectroscopic imaging and a deployable high efficiency grating spectrometer. AXSIO delivers a 30-fold increase in effective area for high resolution spectroscopy. The key simplifications are guided by recommendations in the NWNH panel report include a reduction in focal length from 20m to 10m, eliminating the extendable optical bench, and a reduction in the instrument complement from six to two, avoiding a movable instrument platform. A focus on spectroscopic science allows the spatial resolution requirement to be relaxed to 10 arc sec (with a 5 arc sec goal). These simplifications decrease the total mission cost to under the $2B cost to NASA recommended by NWNH. AXSIO will be available to the entire astronomical community with observing allocations based on peer-review.

  18. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging.

  19. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging. PMID:25985096

  20. Advanced optical network architecture for integrated digital avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, D. Reed

    1996-12-01

    For the first time in the history of avionics, the network designer now has a choice in selecting the media that interconnects the sources and sinks of digital data on aircraft. Electrical designs are already giving way to photonics in application areas where the data rate times distance product is large or where special design requirements such as low weight or EMI considerations are critical. Future digital avionic architectures will increasingly favor the use of photonic interconnects as network data rates of one gigabit/second and higher are needed to support real-time operation of high-speed integrated digital processing. As the cost of optical network building blocks is reduced and as temperature-rugged laser sources are matured, metal interconnects will be forced to retreat to applications spanning shorter and shorter distances. Although the trend is already underway, the widespread use of digital optics will first occur at the system level, where gigabit/second, real-time interconnects between sensors, processors, mass memories and displays separated by a least of few meters will be required. The application of photonic interconnects for inter-printed wiring board signalling across the backplane will eventually find application for gigabit/second applications since signal degradation over copper traces occurs before one gigabit/second and 0.5 meters are reached. For the foreseeable future however, metal interconnects will continue to be used to interconnect devices on printed wiring boards since 5 gigabit/second signals can be sent over metal up to around 15 centimeters. Current-day applications of optical interconnects at the system level are described and a projection of how advanced optical interconnect technology will be driven by the use of high speed integrated digital processing on future aircraft is presented. The recommended advanced network for application in the 2010 time frame is a fiber-based system with a signalling speed of around 2

  1. Imaging morphogenesis: technological advances and biological insights.

    PubMed

    Keller, Philipp J

    2013-06-01

    Morphogenesis, the development of the shape of an organism, is a dynamic process on a multitude of scales, from fast subcellular rearrangements and cell movements to slow structural changes at the whole-organism level. Live-imaging approaches based on light microscopy reveal the intricate dynamics of this process and are thus indispensable for investigating the underlying mechanisms. This Review discusses emerging imaging techniques that can record morphogenesis at temporal scales from seconds to days and at spatial scales from hundreds of nanometers to several millimeters. To unlock their full potential, these methods need to be matched with new computational approaches and physical models that help convert highly complex image data sets into biological insights.

  2. Advanced enhancement techniques for digitized images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, V. T.; Merenyi, R. C.; Carlotto, M. J.; Heller, W. G.

    Computer image enhancement of digitized X-ray and conventional photographs has been employed to reveal anomalies in aerospace hardware. Signal processing of these images included use of specially-developed filters to sharpen detail without sacrificing radiographic information, application of local contrast stretch and histogram equalization algorithms to display structure in low-contrast areas and employment of other unique digital processing methods. Edge detection, normally complicated by poor spatial resolution, limited contrast and recording media noise, was performed as a post-processing operation via a difference-of-Gaussians method and a least squares fitting procedures. In this manner, multi-image signal processing allowed for the precise measurement (to within 0.02 inches, rms) of the Inertial Upper Stage nozzle nosecap motion during a static test firing as well as identifying potential problems in the Solid Rocket Booster parachute deployment.

  3. Advanced imaging of osseous maxillary clefts.

    PubMed

    Boyne, P J; Christiansen, E L; Thompson, J R

    1993-01-01

    A computed tomographic (CT) technique to establish precise two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) images of the osseous defects of cleft palates is presented and illustrated by two case studies. Prospective soft tissue algorithms and bone detail imaging was made possible by a retrospective program, a specific software program and vertical reformatting technique leading to 3-D image reconstruction. The two cases illustrate the flexibility of the CT program in accurately providing morphometric and bone density data on the location and size of the osseous defects involved in the cleft. Not every cleft palate patient is a candidate for the procedures outlined; however, the diagnosis of and treatment planning for patients presenting with bilateral or extensive osseous clefting can be more accurate.

  4. Calibration and imaging algorithms for full-Stokes optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Nicholas M.; Mozurkewich, David; Schmidt, Luke M.; Jurgenson, Colby A.; Edel, Stanislav S.; Jones, Carol E.; Halonen, Robert J.; Schmitt, Henrique R.; Jorgensen, Anders M.; Hutter, Donald J.

    2012-07-01

    Optical interferometry and polarimetry have separately provided new insights into stellar astronomy, especially in the fields of fundamental parameters and atmospheric models. Optical interferometers will eventually add full-Stokes polarization measuring capabilities, thus combining both techniques. In this paper, we: 1) list the observables, calibration quantities, and data acquisition strategies for both limited and full optical interferometric polarimetry (OIP); 2) describe the masking interferometer AMASING and its polarization measuring enhancement called AMASING-POL; 3) show how a radio interferometry imaging package, CASA, can be used for optical interferometry data reduction; and 4) present imaging simulations for Be stars.

  5. Optical-digital hybrid image search system in cloud environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kanami; Kodate, Kashiko; Watanabe, Eriko

    2016-09-01

    To improve the versatility and usability of optical correlators, we developed an optical-digital hybrid image search system consisting of digital servers and an optical correlator that can be used to perform image searches in the cloud environment via a web browser. This hybrid system employs a simple method to obtain correlation signals and has a distributed network design. The correlation signals are acquired by using an encoder timing signal generated by a rotating disk, and the distributed network design facilitates the replacement and combination of the digital correlation server and the optical correlator.

  6. Advances in Pediatric Small Bowel Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tom K

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances for visualizing the small bowel have significantly grown over the past few decades. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy has come to the forefront of these innovations, and has been found to be safe and effective in children with small bowel ailments. The expanding body of research into balloon-assisted enteroscopy will continue to refine the current knowledge base of this technique, along with a growing assessment of the long-term benefits of such interventions. PMID:26616902

  7. Dynamic differential imaging of intrinsic optical responses in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Li, Yang-Guo; Liu, Lei; Amthor, Frank

    2010-02-01

    High resolution monitoring of stimulus-evoked retinal neural activities is important for understanding retinal neural mechanisms, and for diagnosis of retinal disease and evaluation of treatment. Fast intrinsic optical signals (IOSs), which have the time courses comparable to retinal electrophysiological responses, hold the promise for high resolution imaging of retinal neural activities. However, application of fast IOS imaging has been hindered by contamination of slow, high magnitude, optical responses associated with transient hemodynamic and metabolic changes. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of separating fast IOSs from slow optical responses by combined dynamic differential imaging and high frequency flicker stimulation.

  8. Optical Logarithmic Transformation of Speckle Images with Bacteriorhodopsin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1995-01-01

    The application of logarithmic transformations to speckle images is sometimes desirable in converting the speckle noise distribution into an additive, constant-variance noise distribution. The optical transmission properties of some bacteriorhodopsin films are well suited to implement such a transformation optically in a parallel fashion. I present experimental results of the optical conversion of a speckle image into a transformed image with signal-independent noise statistics, using the real-time photochromic properties of bacteriorhodopsin. The original and transformed noise statistics are confirmed by histogram analysis.

  9. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-03-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

  10. [Study on the Advanced Czerny-Turner Imaging Spectrometer with High Resolution in Broadband].

    PubMed

    Yan, Ling-wei

    2015-06-01

    This paper studies the Czerny-Turner optical structure which is used for the application in imaging spectrometers. To obtain the perfect astigmatism-corrected condition, the Czerny-Turner system has been analyzed and advanced. The basic structure of optical system is still as the traditional form which is composed by the spherical collimating mirror, the plane grating and the spherical focusing mirror. However, an off-the-shelf cylindrical lens is added after the focusing mirror to remove astigmatism differences between the tangential direction and the sagittaI direction. It makes the advanced optical system presents high resolution over the full bandwidth and decreases the cost. An example of the imaging spectrum system in the waveband of 380-760 nm has been designed to prove our theory. A system owns that NA equals to 0.05, and the modulation transfer functions (MTF) of all fields of view are more than 0.59 over the broadband under the required Nyquist frequency (20 lp x mm(-1)). It certificates that the optical system theory can be applied to the small scale imaging spectrometer with high resolution in spectral broadband.

  11. [Study on the Advanced Czerny-Turner Imaging Spectrometer with High Resolution in Broadband].

    PubMed

    Yan, Ling-wei

    2015-06-01

    This paper studies the Czerny-Turner optical structure which is used for the application in imaging spectrometers. To obtain the perfect astigmatism-corrected condition, the Czerny-Turner system has been analyzed and advanced. The basic structure of optical system is still as the traditional form which is composed by the spherical collimating mirror, the plane grating and the spherical focusing mirror. However, an off-the-shelf cylindrical lens is added after the focusing mirror to remove astigmatism differences between the tangential direction and the sagittaI direction. It makes the advanced optical system presents high resolution over the full bandwidth and decreases the cost. An example of the imaging spectrum system in the waveband of 380-760 nm has been designed to prove our theory. A system owns that NA equals to 0.05, and the modulation transfer functions (MTF) of all fields of view are more than 0.59 over the broadband under the required Nyquist frequency (20 lp x mm(-1)). It certificates that the optical system theory can be applied to the small scale imaging spectrometer with high resolution in spectral broadband. PMID:26601404

  12. Recent advances in breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Newman, J

    1999-01-01

    Mammography is the best technique currently available for early detection of breast cancer, but it has limitations. Several new techniques are under investigation that may provide valuable complementary images. This article discusses some of the most promising adjuncts to film-screen mammography, including digital mammography, ultrasound of the breast, breast MR, scintimammography and sentinel node lymphoscintigraphy.

  13. Advances in Lymphatic Imaging and Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Gunda, Padmaja; Majeti, Bharat K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Laird, Forrest M.

    2011-09-10

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death after heart disease in the US. While metastasized cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon are incurable, before their distant spread, these diseases will have invaded the lymphatic system as a first step in their progression. Hence, proper evaluation of the disease state of the lymphatics which drain a tumor site is crucial to staging and the formation of a treatment plan. Current lymphatic imaging modalities with visible dyes and radionucleotide tracers offer limited sensitivity and poor resolution; however, newer tools using nanocarriers, quantum dots, and magnetic resonance imaging promise to vastly improve the staging of lymphatic spread without needless biopsies. Concurrent with the improvement of lymphatic imaging agents, has been the development of drug carriers that can localize chemotherapy to the lymphatic system, thus improving the treatment of localized disease while minimizing the exposure of healthy organs to cytotoxic drugs. This review will focus on polymeric systems that have been developed for imaging and drug delivery to the lymph system, how these new devices improve upon current technologies, and where further improvement is needed.

  14. Multispectral laser imaging for advanced food analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senni, L.; Burrascano, P.; Ricci, M.

    2016-07-01

    A hardware-software apparatus for food inspection capable of realizing multispectral NIR laser imaging at four different wavelengths is herein discussed. The system was designed to operate in a through-transmission configuration to detect the presence of unwanted foreign bodies inside samples, whether packed or unpacked. A modified Lock-In technique was employed to counterbalance the significant signal intensity attenuation due to transmission across the sample and to extract the multispectral information more efficiently. The NIR laser wavelengths used to acquire the multispectral images can be varied to deal with different materials and to focus on specific aspects. In the present work the wavelengths were selected after a preliminary analysis to enhance the image contrast between foreign bodies and food in the sample, thus identifying the location and nature of the defects. Experimental results obtained from several specimens, with and without packaging, are presented and the multispectral image processing as well as the achievable spatial resolution of the system are discussed.

  15. Advanced synchronous luminescence imaging for chemical and medical diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2006-09-05

    A diagnostic method and associated system includes the steps of exposing at least one sample location with excitation radiation through a single optical waveguide or a single optical waveguide bundle, wherein the sample emits emission radiation in response to the excitation radiation. The same single optical waveguide or the single optical waveguide bundle receives at least a portion of the emission radiation from the sample, thus providing co-registration of the excitation radiation and the emission radiation. The wavelength of the excitation radiation and emission radiation is synchronously scanned to produce a spectrum upon which an image can be formed. An increased emission signal is generated by the enhanced overlap of the excitation and emission focal volumes provided by co-registration of the excitation and emission signals thus increasing the sensitivity as well as decreasing the exposure time necessary to obtain an image.

  16. Applications of all optical signal processing for advanced optical modulation formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuccio, Scott R.

    Increased data traffic demands, along with a continual push to minimize cost per bit, have recently motivated a paradigm shift away from traditional on-off keying (OOK) fiber transmission links towards systems utilizing more advanced modulation formats. In particular, modulation formats that utilize the phase of the optical signal, including differential phase shift keying (DPSK) and differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK) along with polarization multiplexing (Pol-MUX), have recently emerged as the most popular means for transmitting information over long-haul and ultra-long haul fiber transmission systems. DPSK is motivated by an increase in receiver sensitivity compared to traditional OOK. DQPSK is motivated by a doubling of the spectral efficiency, along with increased tolerance to dispersion and nonlinear distortions. Coherent communications has also emerged as a primary means of transmitting and receiving optical data due to its support of formats that utilize both phase and amplitude to further increase the spectral efficiency (bits/sec/Hz) of the optical channel, including quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM). Polarization multiplexing of channels is a straight forward method to allow two channels to share the same wavelength by propagating on orthogonal polarization axis and is easily supported in coherent systems where the polarization tracking can be performed in the digital domain. Furthermore, the forthcoming IEEE 100 Gbit/s Ethernet Standard, 802.3ba, provides greater bandwidth, higher data rates, and supports a mixture of modulation formats. In particular, Pol-MUX (D)QPSK has grown in interest as the high spectral efficiency allows for 100 Gbit/s transmission while still occupying the current 50 GHz/channel allocation of current 10 Gbit/s OOK fiber systems. In this manner, 100 Gbit/s transfer speeds using current fiber links, amplifiers, and filters may be possible. In addition to advanced modulation formats, it is expected that optical

  17. Advances in optics in the medieval Islamic world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2015-04-01

    This paper reviews the state of knowledge in the field of optics, mainly in catoptrics and dioptrics, before the birth of modern science and the well-documented contributions of men such as Kepler and Newton. The paper is not intended to be a comprehensive survey of the subject such as one might find in history of science journals; instead, it is aimed at the curious physicist who has probably been taught that nothing much of note was understood about the behaviour of light, beyond outdated philosophical musings, prior to the seventeenth century. The paper will focus on advances during the medieval period between the ninth and fourteenth centuries, in both the east and the west, when the theories of the Ancient Greeks were tested, advanced, corrected and mathematised. In particular, it concentrates on a multivolume treatise on optics written one thousand years ago by the Arab scholar, Ibn al-Haytham, and examines how it influenced our understanding of the nature of reflection and refraction of light. Even the well-informed physicist should find a few surprises here, which will alter his or her view of the debt we owe to these forgotten scholars.

  18. Design of a multimodal fibers optic system for small animal optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Antonello E; Pagliazzi, Marco; Boschi, Federico

    2015-02-01

    Small animals optical imaging systems are widely used in pre-clinical research to image in vivo the bio-distribution of light emitting probes using fluorescence or bioluminescence modalities. In this work we presented a set of simulated results of a novel small animal optical imaging module based on a fibers optics matrix, coupled with a position sensitive detector, devoted to acquire bioluminescence and Cerenkov images. Simulations were performed using GEANT 4 code with the GAMOS architecture using the tissue optics plugin. Results showed that it is possible to image a 30 × 30 mm region of interest using a fiber optics array containing 100 optical fibers without compromising the quality of the reconstruction. The number of fibers necessary to cover an adequate portion of a small animal is thus quite modest. This design allows integrating the module with magnetic resonance (MR) in order to acquire optical and MR images at the same time. A detailed model of the mouse anatomy, obtained by segmentation of 3D MRI images, will improve the quality of optical 3D reconstruction.

  19. Advances in Clinical and Biomedical Applications of Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jimmy L.; Wang, Bo; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Bayer, Carolyn L.; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Kim, Seungsoo; Homan, Kimberly A.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Photoacoustic imaging is an imaging modality that derives image contrast from the optical absorption coefficient of the tissue being imaged. The imaging technique is able to differentiate between healthy and diseased tissue with either deeper penetration or higher resolution than other functional imaging modalities currently available. From a clinical standpoint, photoacoustic imaging has demonstrated safety and effectiveness in diagnosing diseased tissue regions using either endogenous tissue contrast or exogenous contrast agents. Furthermore, the potential of photoacoustic imaging has been demonstrated in various therapeutic interventions ranging from drug delivery and release to image-guided therapy and monitoring. Areas covered in this review This article reviews the current state of photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine from a technological perspective, highlights various biomedical and clinical applications of photoacoustic imaging, and gives insights on future directions. What the reader will gain Readers will learn about the various applications of photoacoustic imaging, as well as the various contrast agents that can be used to assist photoacoustic imaging. This review will highlight both pre-clinical and clinical uses for photoacoustic imaging, as well as discuss some of the challenges that must be addressed to move photoacoustic imaging into the clinical realm. Take home message Photoacoustic imaging offers unique advantages over existing imaging modalities. The imaging field is broad with many exciting applications for detecting and diagnosing diseased tissue or processes. Photoacoustics is also used in therapeutic applications to identify and characterize the pathology and then to monitor the treatment. Although the technology is still in its infancy, much work has been done in the pre-clinical arena, and photoacoustic imaging is fast approaching the clinical setting. PMID:21344060

  20. Advances in retinal imaging for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Tan, Colin Siang Hui; Chew, Milton Cher Yong; Lim, Louis Wei Yi; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema (DME) are leading causes of blindness throughout the world, and cause significant visual morbidity. Ocular imaging has played a significant role in the management of diabetic eye disease, and the advent of advanced imaging modalities will be of great value as our understanding of diabetic eye diseases increase, and the management options become increasingly varied and complex. Color fundus photography has established roles in screening for diabetic eye disease, early detection of progression, and monitoring of treatment response. Fluorescein angiography (FA) detects areas of capillary nonperfusion, as well as leakage from both microaneurysms and neovascularization. Recent advances in retinal imaging modalities complement traditional fundus photography and provide invaluable new information for clinicians. Ultra-widefield imaging, which can be used to produce both color fundus photographs and FAs, now allows unprecedented views of the posterior pole. The pathologies that are detected in the periphery of the retina have the potential to change the grading of disease severity, and may be of prognostic significance to disease progression. Studies have shown that peripheral ischemia may be related to the presence and severity of DME. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides structural detail of the retina, and the quantitative and qualitative features are useful in the monitoring of diabetic eye disease. A relatively recent innovation, OCT angiography, produces images of the fine blood vessels at the macula and optic disc, without the need for contrast agents. This paper will review the roles of each of these imaging modalities for diabetic eye disease.

  1. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea.

  2. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea. PMID:26140334

  3. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea. PMID:26140334

  4. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-11-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea.

  5. Optical color-image encryption and synthesis using coherent diffractive imaging in the Fresnel domain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2012-02-13

    We propose a new method using coherent diffractive imaging for optical color-image encryption and synthesis in the Fresnel domain. An optical multiple-random-phase-mask encryption system is applied, and a strategy based on lateral translations of a phase-only mask is employed during image encryption. For the decryption, an iterative phase retrieval algorithm is applied to extract high-quality decrypted color images from diffraction intensity maps (i.e., ciphertexts). In addition, optical color-image synthesis is also investigated based on coherent diffractive imaging. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. Compared with conventional interference methods, coherent diffractive imaging approach may open up a new research perspective or can provide an effective alternative for optical color-image encryption and synthesis.

  6. Innovations in optical coupling of the KSTAR electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, T.; Tobias, B.; Kong, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Lee, W.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.

    2010-10-15

    The installation of a new electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) is underway, making use of a unique optical port cassette design, which allows placement of refractive elements inside the cryostat region without adverse effects. The result is unprecedented window access for the implementation of a state of the art imaging diagnostic. A dual-array optical design has been developed, capable of simultaneously imaging the high and low field sides of the plasma with independent features of focal plane translation, vertical zoom, and radial channel spacing. The number of translating optics has been minimized by making use of a zoom lens triplet and parabolic plasma facing lens for maximum channel uniformity over a continuous vertical zoom range of 3:1. The simulated performance of this design is presented along with preliminary laboratory characterization data.

  7. Innovations in optical coupling of the KSTAR electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Liang, T; Tobias, B; Kong, X; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Lee, W; Yun, G S; Park, H K

    2010-10-01

    The installation of a new electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) is underway, making use of a unique optical port cassette design, which allows placement of refractive elements inside the cryostat region without adverse effects. The result is unprecedented window access for the implementation of a state of the art imaging diagnostic. A dual-array optical design has been developed, capable of simultaneously imaging the high and low field sides of the plasma with independent features of focal plane translation, vertical zoom, and radial channel spacing. The number of translating optics has been minimized by making use of a zoom lens triplet and parabolic plasma facing lens for maximum channel uniformity over a continuous vertical zoom range of 3:1. The simulated performance of this design is presented along with preliminary laboratory characterization data.

  8. Integrated intravascular optical coherence tomography ultrasound imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiechen; Yang, Hao-Chung; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Qifa; Hu, Changhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    We report on a dual-modality optical coherence tomography (OCT) ultrasound (US) system for intravascular imaging. To the best of our knowledge, we have developed the first integrated OCT-US probe that combines OCT optical components with an US transducer. The OCT optical components mainly consist of a single-mode fiber, a gradient index lens for light-beam focusing, and a right-angled prism for reflecting light into biological tissue. A 40-MHz piezoelectric transducer (PZT-5H) side-viewing US transducer was fabricated to obtain the US image. These components were integrated into a single probe, enabling both OCT and US imaging at the same time. In vitro OCT and ultrasound images of a rabbit aorta were obtained using this dual-modality imaging system. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an OCT-US system for intravascular imaging, which is expected to have a prominent impact on early detection and characterization of atherosclerosis.

  9. Sub-millimeter resolution 3D optical imaging of living tissue using laminar optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Burgess, Sean A.

    2009-01-01

    In-vivo imaging of optical contrast in living tissues can allow measurement of functional parameters such as blood oxygenation and detection of targeted and active fluorescent contrast agents. However, optical imaging must overcome the effects of light scattering, which limit the penetration depth and can affect quantitation and sensitivity. This article focuses on a technique for high-resolution, high-speed depth-resolved optical imaging of superficial living tissues called laminar optical tomography (LOT), which is capable of imaging absorbing and fluorescent contrast in living tissues to depths of 2–3 mm with 100–200 micron resolution. An overview of the advantages and challenges of in-vivo optical imaging is followed by a review of currently available techniques for high-resolution optical imaging of tissues. LOT is then described, including a description of the imaging system design and discussion of data analysis and image reconstruction approaches. Examples of recent applications of LOT are then provided and compared to other existing technologies. By measuring multiply-scattered light, Laminar Optical Tomography can probe beneath the surface of living tissues such as the skin and brain. PMID:19844595

  10. Adaptive optics retinal imaging in the living mouse eye.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ying; Dubra, Alfredo; Yin, Lu; Merigan, William H; Sharma, Robin; Libby, Richard T; Williams, David R

    2012-04-01

    Correction of the eye's monochromatic aberrations using adaptive optics (AO) can improve the resolution of in vivo mouse retinal images [Biss et al., Opt. Lett. 32(6), 659 (2007) and Alt et al., Proc. SPIE 7550, 755019 (2010)], but previous attempts have been limited by poor spot quality in the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS). Recent advances in mouse eye wavefront sensing using an adjustable focus beacon with an annular beam profile have improved the wavefront sensor spot quality [Geng et al., Biomed. Opt. Express 2(4), 717 (2011)], and we have incorporated them into a fluorescence adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). The performance of the instrument was tested on the living mouse eye, and images of multiple retinal structures, including the photoreceptor mosaic, nerve fiber bundles, fine capillaries and fluorescently labeled ganglion cells were obtained. The in vivo transverse and axial resolutions of the fluorescence channel of the AOSLO were estimated from the full width half maximum (FWHM) of the line and point spread functions (LSF and PSF), and were found to be better than 0.79 μm ± 0.03 μm (STD)(45% wider than the diffraction limit) and 10.8 μm ± 0.7 μm (STD)(two times the diffraction limit), respectively. The axial positional accuracy was estimated to be 0.36 μm. This resolution and positional accuracy has allowed us to classify many ganglion cell types, such as bistratified ganglion cells, in vivo.

  11. Adaptive optics retinal imaging in the living mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ying; Dubra, Alfredo; Yin, Lu; Merigan, William H.; Sharma, Robin; Libby, Richard T.; Williams, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Correction of the eye’s monochromatic aberrations using adaptive optics (AO) can improve the resolution of in vivo mouse retinal images [Biss et al., Opt. Lett. 32(6), 659 (2007) and Alt et al., Proc. SPIE 7550, 755019 (2010)], but previous attempts have been limited by poor spot quality in the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS). Recent advances in mouse eye wavefront sensing using an adjustable focus beacon with an annular beam profile have improved the wavefront sensor spot quality [Geng et al., Biomed. Opt. Express 2(4), 717 (2011)], and we have incorporated them into a fluorescence adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). The performance of the instrument was tested on the living mouse eye, and images of multiple retinal structures, including the photoreceptor mosaic, nerve fiber bundles, fine capillaries and fluorescently labeled ganglion cells were obtained. The in vivo transverse and axial resolutions of the fluorescence channel of the AOSLO were estimated from the full width half maximum (FWHM) of the line and point spread functions (LSF and PSF), and were found to be better than 0.79 μm ± 0.03 μm (STD)(45% wider than the diffraction limit) and 10.8 μm ± 0.7 μm (STD)(two times the diffraction limit), respectively. The axial positional accuracy was estimated to be 0.36 μm. This resolution and positional accuracy has allowed us to classify many ganglion cell types, such as bistratified ganglion cells, in vivo. PMID:22574260

  12. An adaptive optics imaging system designed for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Qiang; Saito, Kenichi; Nozato, Koji; Williams, David R; Rossi, Ethan A

    2015-06-01

    Here we demonstrate a new imaging system that addresses several major problems limiting the clinical utility of conventional adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), including its small field of view (FOV), reliance on patient fixation for targeting imaging, and substantial post-processing time. We previously showed an efficient image based eye tracking method for real-time optical stabilization and image registration in AOSLO. However, in patients with poor fixation, eye motion causes the FOV to drift substantially, causing this approach to fail. We solve that problem here by tracking eye motion at multiple spatial scales simultaneously by optically and electronically integrating a wide FOV SLO (WFSLO) with an AOSLO. This multi-scale approach, implemented with fast tip/tilt mirrors, has a large stabilization range of ± 5.6°. Our method consists of three stages implemented in parallel: 1) coarse optical stabilization driven by a WFSLO image, 2) fine optical stabilization driven by an AOSLO image, and 3) sub-pixel digital registration of the AOSLO image. We evaluated system performance in normal eyes and diseased eyes with poor fixation. Residual image motion with incremental compensation after each stage was: 1) ~2-3 arc minutes, (arcmin) 2) ~0.5-0.8 arcmin and, 3) ~0.05-0.07 arcmin, for normal eyes. Performance in eyes with poor fixation was: 1) ~3-5 arcmin, 2) ~0.7-1.1 arcmin and 3) ~0.07-0.14 arcmin. We demonstrate that this system is capable of reducing image motion by a factor of ~400, on average. This new optical design provides additional benefits for clinical imaging, including a steering subsystem for AOSLO that can be guided by the WFSLO to target specific regions of interest such as retinal pathology and real-time averaging of registered images to eliminate image post-processing.

  13. An adaptive optics imaging system designed for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Qiang; Saito, Kenichi; Nozato, Koji; Williams, David R; Rossi, Ethan A

    2015-06-01

    Here we demonstrate a new imaging system that addresses several major problems limiting the clinical utility of conventional adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), including its small field of view (FOV), reliance on patient fixation for targeting imaging, and substantial post-processing time. We previously showed an efficient image based eye tracking method for real-time optical stabilization and image registration in AOSLO. However, in patients with poor fixation, eye motion causes the FOV to drift substantially, causing this approach to fail. We solve that problem here by tracking eye motion at multiple spatial scales simultaneously by optically and electronically integrating a wide FOV SLO (WFSLO) with an AOSLO. This multi-scale approach, implemented with fast tip/tilt mirrors, has a large stabilization range of ± 5.6°. Our method consists of three stages implemented in parallel: 1) coarse optical stabilization driven by a WFSLO image, 2) fine optical stabilization driven by an AOSLO image, and 3) sub-pixel digital registration of the AOSLO image. We evaluated system performance in normal eyes and diseased eyes with poor fixation. Residual image motion with incremental compensation after each stage was: 1) ~2-3 arc minutes, (arcmin) 2) ~0.5-0.8 arcmin and, 3) ~0.05-0.07 arcmin, for normal eyes. Performance in eyes with poor fixation was: 1) ~3-5 arcmin, 2) ~0.7-1.1 arcmin and 3) ~0.07-0.14 arcmin. We demonstrate that this system is capable of reducing image motion by a factor of ~400, on average. This new optical design provides additional benefits for clinical imaging, including a steering subsystem for AOSLO that can be guided by the WFSLO to target specific regions of interest such as retinal pathology and real-time averaging of registered images to eliminate image post-processing. PMID:26114033

  14. Advanced optical fiber communication simulations in electrotechnical engineering education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervaeke, Michael; Nguyen Thi, Cac; Thienpont, Hugo

    2004-10-01

    We present our efforts in education to apply advanced optical communication simulation software into our Electrical Engineering curriculum by implementing examples from theoretical courses with commercially available simulation software. Photonic design software is an interesting tool for the education of Engineers: these tools are able to simulate a huge variety of photonic components without major investments in student lab hardware. Moreover: some exotic phenomena ,which would usually involve specialty hardware, can be taught. We chose to implement VPItransmissionMaker from VPIsystems in the lab exercises for graduating Electrotechnical Engineers with majors in Photonics. The guideline we develop starts with basic examples provided by VPIsystems. The simplified simulation schemes serve as an introduction to the simulation techniques. Next, we highlight examples from the theoretical courses on Optical Telecommunications. A last part is an assignment where students have to design and simulate a system using real life component datasheets. The aim is to train them to interpret datasheets, to make design choices for their optical fiber system and to enhance their management skills. We detail our approach, highlight the educational aspects, the insight gained by the students, and illustrate our method with different examples.

  15. Advanced image analysis for the preservation of cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Fenella G.; Christens-Barry, William; Toth, Michael B.; Boydston, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    The Library of Congress' Preservation Research and Testing Division has established an advanced preservation studies scientific program for research and analysis of the diverse range of cultural heritage objects in its collection. Using this system, the Library is currently developing specialized integrated research methodologies for extending preservation analytical capacities through non-destructive hyperspectral imaging of cultural objects. The research program has revealed key information to support preservation specialists, scholars and other institutions. The approach requires close and ongoing collaboration between a range of scientific and cultural heritage personnel - imaging and preservation scientists, art historians, curators, conservators and technology analysts. A research project of the Pierre L'Enfant Plan of Washington DC, 1791 had been undertaken to implement and advance the image analysis capabilities of the imaging system. Innovative imaging options and analysis techniques allow greater processing and analysis capacities to establish the imaging technique as the first initial non-invasive analysis and documentation step in all cultural heritage analyses. Mapping spectral responses, organic and inorganic data, topography semi-microscopic imaging, and creating full spectrum images have greatly extended this capacity from a simple image capture technique. Linking hyperspectral data with other non-destructive analyses has further enhanced the research potential of this image analysis technique.

  16. Optical image hiding with a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Li, Jiaosheng; Pan, Yangyang; Li, Rong

    2014-04-01

    A method for optical image hiding in a Fresnel domain is proposed. In our modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) architecture, an object beam is inserted into the object image to be hidden; the reference beam is produced by laser illumination through the phase plates and the host image. Afterwards, the reference beam is not only restricted to providing phase shifts in the hologram-recording process, but it can also add host image to engage the image hiding function. After two images experience Fresnel diffraction, the diffraction waves are registered as interference patterns on a CCD plane, which resembles a Fresnel diffraction pattern of the host image. The object image is embedded in the host image inside the Fresnel domain. Here, we present a theoretical analysis and preliminary experimental results for this method. It can be widely applied to secure image transmissions at a high speed over the internet and for image watermarking.

  17. Advanced astigmatism-corrected tandem Wadsworth mounting for small-scale spectral broadband imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Lin, Guan-yu

    2013-01-01

    Tandem gratings of double-dispersion mount make it possible to design an imaging spectrometer for the weak light observation with high spatial resolution, high spectral resolution, and high optical transmission efficiency. The traditional tandem Wadsworth mounting is originally designed to match the coaxial telescope and large-scale imaging spectrometer. When it is used to connect the off-axis telescope such as off-axis parabolic mirror, it presents lower imaging quality than to connect the coaxial telescope. It may also introduce interference among the detector and the optical elements as it is applied to the short focal length and small-scale spectrometer in a close volume by satellite. An advanced tandem Wadsworth mounting has been investigated to deal with the situation. The Wadsworth astigmatism-corrected mounting condition for which is expressed as the distance between the second concave grating and the imaging plane is calculated. Then the optimum arrangement for the first plane grating and the second concave grating, which make the anterior Wadsworth condition fulfilling each wavelength, is analyzed by the geometric and first order differential calculation. These two arrangements comprise the advanced Wadsworth mounting condition. The spectral resolution has also been calculated by these conditions. An example designed by the optimum theory proves that the advanced tandem Wadsworth mounting performs excellently in spectral broadband. PMID:23292378

  18. Trends in optical coherence tomography applied to medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-01-01

    The number of publications on optical coherence tomography (OCT) continues to double every three years. Traditionally applied to imaging the eye, OCT is now being extended to fields outside ophthalmology and optometry. Widening its applicability, progress in the core engine of the technology, and impact on development of novel optical sources, make OCT a very active and rapidly evolving field. Trends in the developments of different specific devices, such as optical sources, optical configurations and signal processing will be presented. Encompassing studies on both the configurations as well as on signal processing themes, current research in Kent looks at combining spectral domain with time domain imaging for long axial range and simultaneous imaging at several depths. Results of the collaborative work of the Applied Optics Group in Kent with organisers of this conference will be presented, with reference to 3D monitoring of abfraction.

  19. Advances in passive imaging elements with micromirror array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Satoshi; Nitta, Kouichi; Matoba, Osamu

    2008-02-01

    We have proposed a new passive imaging optics which consists of a grid array of micro roof mirrors working as dihedral corner reflectors. Although this element forms mirror-like images at opposite side of objects, the images are real. Because the imaging principle of the proposed element is based on accumulation of rays, the design of each light path makes many kinds of devices possible. So, we propose two variations of such a device. One device consists of an array of micro retroreflectors and a half mirror, and it can also form real mirror-like images. The advantage of this device is wide range of view, because the displacement of each retororeflector is not limited on a plane unlike the roof mirror grid array. The other consists of an array of long dihedral corner reflectors. Although this structure has been already known as a roof mirror array, it can be used for imaging. This device forms two heterogeneous images. One is real at the same side of an object, and the other is virtual at the opposite side. This is a conjugate imaging optics of a slit mirror array whose mirror surface is perpendicular to the device surface. The advantage of a roor mirror array is that the real image has horizontal parallax and can be seen in air naturally.

  20. Recent advances in echocardiography: strain and strain rate imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mirea, Oana; Duchenne, Jurgen; Voigt, Jens-Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Deformation imaging by echocardiography is a well-established research tool which has been gaining interest from clinical cardiologists since the introduction of speckle tracking. Post-processing of echo images to analyze deformation has become readily available at the fingertips of the user. New parameters such as global longitudinal strain have been shown to provide added diagnostic value, and ongoing efforts of the imaging societies and industry aimed at harmonizing methods will improve the technique further. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of echocardiographic strain and strain rate imaging, and provides an overview on its current and potential future clinical applications. PMID:27158476

  1. PAINTER: a spatiospectral image reconstruction algorithm for optical interferometry.

    PubMed

    Schutz, Antony; Ferrari, André; Mary, David; Soulez, Ferréol; Thiébaut, Éric; Vannier, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Astronomical optical interferometers sample the Fourier transform of the intensity distribution of a source at the observation wavelength. Because of rapid perturbations caused by atmospheric turbulence, the phases of the complex Fourier samples (visibilities) cannot be directly exploited. Consequently, specific image reconstruction methods have been devised in the last few decades. Modern polychromatic optical interferometric instruments are now paving the way to multiwavelength imaging. This paper is devoted to the derivation of a spatiospectral (3D) image reconstruction algorithm, coined Polychromatic opticAl INTErferometric Reconstruction software (PAINTER). The algorithm relies on an iterative process, which alternates estimation of polychromatic images and complex visibilities. The complex visibilities are not only estimated from squared moduli and closure phases, but also differential phases, which helps to better constrain the polychromatic reconstruction. Simulations on synthetic data illustrate the efficiency of the algorithm and, in particular, the relevance of injecting a differential phases model in the reconstruction.

  2. Adaptive optics technology for high-resolution retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Marco; Serrao, Sebastiano; Devaney, Nicholas; Parravano, Mariacristina; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2012-12-27

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effects of optical aberrations. The direct visualization of the photoreceptor cells, capillaries and nerve fiber bundles represents the major benefit of adding AO to retinal imaging. Adaptive optics is opening a new frontier for clinical research in ophthalmology, providing new information on the early pathological changes of the retinal microstructures in various retinal diseases. We have reviewed AO technology for retinal imaging, providing information on the core components of an AO retinal camera. The most commonly used wavefront sensing and correcting elements are discussed. Furthermore, we discuss current applications of AO imaging to a population of healthy adults and to the most frequent causes of blindness, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. We conclude our work with a discussion on future clinical prospects for AO retinal imaging.

  3. Adaptive Optics Technology for High-Resolution Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Marco; Serrao, Sebastiano; Devaney, Nicholas; Parravano, Mariacristina; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effects of optical aberrations. The direct visualization of the photoreceptor cells, capillaries and nerve fiber bundles represents the major benefit of adding AO to retinal imaging. Adaptive optics is opening a new frontier for clinical research in ophthalmology, providing new information on the early pathological changes of the retinal microstructures in various retinal diseases. We have reviewed AO technology for retinal imaging, providing information on the core components of an AO retinal camera. The most commonly used wavefront sensing and correcting elements are discussed. Furthermore, we discuss current applications of AO imaging to a population of healthy adults and to the most frequent causes of blindness, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. We conclude our work with a discussion on future clinical prospects for AO retinal imaging. PMID:23271600

  4. Advanced endoscopic imaging of indeterminate biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Tabibian, James H; Visrodia, Kavel H; Levy, Michael J; Gostout, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic evaluation of indeterminate biliary strictures (IDBSs) has evolved considerably since the development of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography pancreatography (ERCP) was introduced nearly a decade later and has since become the mainstay of therapy for relieving obstruction of the biliary tract. However, longstanding methods of ERCP-guided tissue acquisition (i.e., biliary brushings for cytology and intraductal forceps biopsy for histology) have demonstrated disappointing performance characteristics in distinguishing malignant from benign etiologies of IDBSs. The limitations of these methods have thus helped drive the search for novel techniques to enhance the evaluation of IDBSs and thereby improve diagnosis and clinical care. These modalities include, but are not limited to, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, cholangioscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography. In this review, we discuss established and emerging options in the evaluation of IDBSs. PMID:26675379

  5. Optical modeling of the wide-field imaging interferometry testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Anita K.; Martino, Anthony J.; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Leisawitz, David T.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Frey, Bradley J.

    2006-06-01

    The technique of wide field imaging for optical/IR interferometers for missions like Space Infrared Interferometric (SPIRIT), Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS), and the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF-I)/DARWIN has been demonstrated through the Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT). In this paper, we present an optical model of the WIIT testbed using the commercially available optical modeling and analysis software FRED. Interferometric results for some simple source targets are presented for a model with ideal surfaces and compared with theoretical closed form solutions. Measured surface deformation data of all mirror surfaces in the form of Zernike coefficients are then added to the optical model compared with results of some simple source targets to laboratory test data. We discuss the sources of error and approximations in the current FRED optical model. Future plans to refine the optical model are also be discussed.

  6. Characterization of low cost optical imaging system based on optical holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwiesh, M.; El Sherif, Ashraf F.

    2013-03-01

    Optical imaging systems are widely used in different applications including tracking for portable scanners; input pointing devices for laptop computers, cell phones, and cameras; and fingerprint-identification scanners. Also in optical navigation (military target tracking where tracking sensors follow airplanes, missiles, and other targets [1-4]. Since the two main parameters affecting the performance of the optical imaging systems are the optical source and the surface nature. So; The aim of the paper is to study how the optical source affects the performance of the optical imaging systems by exchange the operating surface of the optical imaging system with a standard diffuse object (Gabbor holograms) to study and analyze laser speckle pattern and Circular interference fringes produced by illuminating these standard diffusers using different optical sources [coherent (3mW diode laser, and 10mW He-Ne laser) or partially coherent light (LEDs)]. The Circular interference fringes were used to display the relations between the fringes order and its radii. From these relations we found that the electronic sensor can deliver the same accuracy of laser diodes when replacing it by commercial LEDs. So, we can design a new cheaper, high performance optical imaging system using commercial LED sources.

  7. Research of infrared image optimization algorithm in optical read-out IR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianxiong; Cheng, Teng; Zhang, Qingchuan; Gao, Jie; Wu, Xiaoping

    2014-09-01

    Different from traditional electrical readout infrared imaging, optical readout infrared imaging system readout the thermo-mechanical response of focal plane array via visible light. Due to the different parameters of the optical system, usually,the infrared thermal image pixel corresponding to the thermal element of focal plane array is not consistent. And the substrate-free focal plane array brings thermal crosstalk, the image blur. This manuscript analyzes the optical readout infrared imaging principle, proposes an one to one correspondence method between the infrared thermal image pixel and the thermal element of focal plane array, optimizes the digital infrared image by the thermal crosstalk on substrate-free focal plane array. Simulation and experiments show that the algorithm can effectively enhance the contours of the infrared image detail, enhancing image quality.

  8. Advanced Breast Imaging Availability by Screening Facility Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christoph I.; Bogart, Andy; Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Obadina, Eniola T.; Hill, Deirdre A.; Haas, Jennifer S.; Tosteson, Anna N.A.; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer A.; Sprague, Brian L.; DeMartini, Wendy B.; Lehman, Constance D.; Onega, Tracy L.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objective To determine the relationship between screening mammography facility characteristics and on-site availability of advanced breast imaging services required for supplemental screening and the diagnostic evaluation of abnormal screening findings. Materials and Methods We analyzed data from all active imaging facilities across six regional registries of the National Cancer Institute-funded Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium offering screening mammography in calendar years 2011–2012 (n=105). We used generalized estimating equations regression models to identify associations between facility characteristics (e.g., academic affiliation, practice type) and availability of on-site advanced breast imaging (e.g., ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) and image-guided biopsy services. Results Breast MRI was not available at any non-radiology or breast imaging only facilities. A combination of breast US, breast MRI, and imaging-guided breast biopsy services was available at 76.0% of multi-specialty breast centers compared to 22.2% of full diagnostic radiology practices (p=0.0047) and 75.0% of facilities with academic affiliations compared to 29.0% of those without academic affiliations (p=0.04). Both supplemental screening breast ultrasound and screening breast MRI were available at 28.0% of multi-specialty breast centers compared to 4.7% of full diagnostic radiology practices (p<0.01) and 25.0% of academic facilities compared to 8.5% of non-academic facilities (p=0.02). Conclusion Screening facility characteristics are strongly associated with the availability of on-site advanced breast imaging and image-guided biopsy service. Therefore, the type of imaging facility a woman attends for screening may have important implications on her timely access to supplemental screening and diagnostic breast imaging services. PMID:25851643

  9. Advanced and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Lupus.

    PubMed

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Bargalló, Núria; Cervera, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus is a major diagnostic challenge, and a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is, by far, the main tool for assessing the brain in this disease. Conventional and advanced MRI techniques are used to help establishing the diagnosis, to rule out alternative diagnoses, and recently, to monitor the evolution of the disease. This review explores the neuroimaging findings in SLE, including the recent advances in new MRI methods. PMID:26236469

  10. Advanced and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Bargalló, Núria; Cervera, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus is a major diagnostic challenge, and a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is, by far, the main tool for assessing the brain in this disease. Conventional and advanced MRI techniques are used to help establishing the diagnosis, to rule out alternative diagnoses, and recently, to monitor the evolution of the disease. This review explores the neuroimaging findings in SLE, including the recent advances in new MRI methods. PMID:26236469

  11. Photons across medicine: relating optical and nuclear imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nordstrom, Robert; Cherry, Simon; Azhdarinia, Ali; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; VanBrocklin, Henry

    2013-01-01

    The Optics in the Life Sciences conference sponsored by the Optical Society of America was held in Waikoloa Beach, HI on April 14 – 18, 2013. Papers were presented in the areas of Bio-Optics: Design & Application, Novel Techniques in Microscopy, Optical Molecular Probes, Imaging & Drug Delivery, and Optical Trapping Applications. A focal point of the meeting was a special symposium entitled “Photons Across Medicine”, organized by Adam Wax, Duke University, highlighting activities of joint interest between the Optical Society of America (OSA) and the Society for Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI). This paper is a synopsis of the presentations made at this joint symposium. Central to the special symposium presentations was the fact that the optical and nuclear imaging communities share common interests and challenges. These are highlighted in this article. Also discussed was the fact that the nuclear technologies in imaging have found their way into general clinical utility, a feat that has yet to be achieved by optical methods. Because of the common ground shared by the two technologies, coordination between the two societies should be planned. PMID:24409377

  12. Direct optical imaging of structural inhomogeneities in crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Grigorev, A M

    2016-05-10

    A method for optical imaging of structural inhomogeneities in crystalline materials is proposed, based on the differences in the optical properties of the structural inhomogeneity and the homogeneous material near the fundamental absorption edge of the crystalline material. The method can be used to detect defects in both semiconductors and insulators.

  13. Quantitative optical tomographic imaging of a supersonic jet.

    PubMed

    Faris, G W; Byer, R L

    1986-07-01

    Two-dimensional quantitative images of the density of chlorine in a supersonic expansion are produced with an absolute accuracy of 5% in 150-microm pixels by using optical absorption tomography. An incoherent arc-lamp source provides ample ultraviolet radiation for high-resolution optical absorption tomographic measurements. A measurement of the chlorine absorption coefficient is reported.

  14. Imaging spectrometer based on a acousto-optic tunable filter

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, M.E.; Harrison, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    Characterization of an Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter (AOTF) is performed by measuring the filter`s laser line response, tuning relationship, and diffraction efficiency. An imaging spectrometer that utilizes the filter is described. The system is comprised of an optical system, AOTF filter, dual focal plane CCD camera, and a control computer. Data from the system are presented.

  15. Graphene-Based Optical Biosensors and Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhiwen; He, Shijiang; Pei, Hao; Du, Dan; Fan, Chunhai; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-01-13

    This chapter focuses on the design, fabrication and application of graphene based optical nanobiosensors. The emerging graphene based optical nanobiosensors demonstrated the promising bioassay and biomedical applications thanking to the unique optical features of graphene. According to the different applications, the graphene can be tailored to form either fluorescent emitter or efficient fluorescence quencher. The exceptional electronic feature of graphene makes it a powerful platform for fabricating the SPR and SERS biosensors. Today the graphene based optical biosensors have been constructed to detect various targets including ions, small biomolecules, DNA/RNA and proteins. This chapter reviews the recent progress in graphene-based optical biosensors and discusses the opportunities and challenges in this field.

  16. Hemodynamic responses to functional activation accessed by optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Songlin; Li, Pengcheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Xiaohua; Luo, Qingming

    2006-01-01

    A multi-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) and laser diode (LD) based optical imaging system was developed to visualize the changes in cerebral blood flow, oxygenation following functional activation simultaneously in rodent cortex. The 2-D blood flow image was accessed by laser speckle contrast imaging, and the spectroscopic imaging of intrinsic signal was used for the calculation of oxyhemoglobin (HbO), deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) and total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration. The combination of spectroscopic imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging provides the capability to simultaneously investigate the spatial and temporal blood flow and hemoglobin concentration changes with high resolution, which may lead to a better understanding of the coupling between neuronal activation and vascular responses. The optical imaging system been built is compact and convenient to investigators. And it is reliable to acquire raw data. In present study, the hemodynamic responses to cortical spreading depression (CSD) in parietal cortex of ~-chloralose/urethan anesthetized rats were demonstrated.

  17. Limitations to adaptive optics image quality in rodent eyes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Metha, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal image quality of rodent eyes is inferior to that of human eyes, despite the promise of greater numerical aperture. This paradox challenges several assumptions commonly made in AO imaging, assumptions which may be invalidated by the very high power and dioptric thickness of the rodent retina. We used optical modeling to compare the performance of rat and human eyes under conditions that tested the validity of these assumptions. Results showed that AO image quality in the human eye is robust to positioning errors of the AO corrector and to differences in imaging depth and wavelength compared to the wavefront beacon. In contrast, image quality in the rat eye declines sharply with each of these manipulations, especially when imaging off-axis. However, some latitude does exist to offset these manipulations against each other to produce good image quality.

  18. Imaging of dental implant osseointegration using optical coherent tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, I.; Reisen, P.

    2009-02-01

    Investigation of initial implant stability with different dental implant designs is an important task to obtain good quality dental implants. Failure of a dental implant is often related to failure to osseointegrate correctly. Optical Coherent Tomography is a competitive non-invasive method of osseointegration investigation. FD-OCT with Swept Source was used to obtain 3-D image of the peri-implant tissue (soft and hard) in the case of mandible fixed screw. 1350 nm centered laser source give better images than 850 nm laser source for hard tissue imaging. Present work suggests that Optical Coherent Tomography is a proper technique to obtain the image of the contact tissue-metal screw. OCT images are useful to evaluate optical properties of bone tissues.

  19. Optical Synchrotron Radiation Beam Imaging with a Digital Mask

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorito, R. B.; Zhang, H. D.; Corbett, W. J.; Fisher, A. S.; Mok, W. Y.; Tian, K.; Douglas, D.; Wilson, F. G.; Zhang, S.; Mitsuhashi, T. M.; Shkvarunets, A. G.

    2012-11-01

    We have applied a new imaging/optical masking technique, which employs a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) and optical synchrotron radiation (OSR), to perform high dynamic range (DR) beam imaging at the JLAB Energy Recovery Linac and the SLAC/SPEAR3 Synchrotron Light Source. The OSR from the beam is first focused onto the DMD to produce a primary image; selected areas of this image are spatially filtered by controlling the state of individual micro-mirrors; and finally, the filtered image is refocused onto a CCD camera. At JLAB this technique has been used successfully to view the beam halo with a DR ~ 105. At SPEAR3 the DMD was used to filter out the bright core of the stored beam to study the turn-by-turn dynamics of the 10-3 weaker injected beam. We describe the optical performance, present limitations and our plans to improve the DR of both experimental systems.

  20. Optical analysis of miniature lenses with curved imaging surfaces.

    PubMed

    Reshidko, Dmitry; Sasian, Jose

    2015-10-01

    Miniature cameras for consumer electronics and mobile phones have been, and continue to be, in fast development. The system level requirements, such as manufacturing cost, packaging, and sensor characteristics, impose unique challenges for optical designers. In this paper, we discuss the potential optical benefits of having a curved image surface rather than a flat one. We show that curved sensor technology allows for optically faster lens solutions. We discuss trade-offs of several relevant characteristics, such as packaging, chief ray angle, image quality, and tolerance sensitivity. A comparison of a benchmark flat field lens, and an evaluation design imaging on a curved surface and working at f/1.6, provides useful specific insights. For a given image quality, departing from a flat imaging surface does not allow significantly reducing the total length of a lens. PMID:26479656

  1. Integrated intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) - ultrasound (US) imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiechen; Yang, Hao-Chung; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Hu, Changhong; Zhang, Jun; Shung, K. Kirk; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) are considered two complementary imaging techniques in the detection and diagnosis of atherosclerosis. OCT permits visualization of micron-scale features of atherosclerosis plaque, and IVUS offers full imaging depth of vessel wall. Under the guidance of IVUS, minimal amount of flushing agent will be needed to obtain OCT imaging of the interested area. We report on a dual-modality optical coherence tomography (OCT) - ultrasound (US) system for intravascular imaging. To the best of our knowledge, we have developed the first integrated OCT-US probe that combines OCT optical components with an ultrasound transducer. The OCT optical components mainly consist of a single mode fiber, a gradient index (GRIN) lens for light beam focusing, and a right-angled prism for reflecting light into biological tissue. A 40MHz PZT-5H side-viewing ultrasound transducer was fabricated to obtain the ultrasound image. These components were integrated into a single probe, enabling both OCT and ultrasound imaging at the same time. In vitro OCT and ultrasound images of a rabbit aorta were obtained using this dual-modality imaging system. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an OCT-US system for intravascular imaging which is expected to have a prominent impact on early detection and characterization of atherosclerosis.

  2. Accuracy requirements of optical linear algebra processors in adaptive optics imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Downie, J D; Goodman, J W

    1989-10-15

    A ground-based adaptive optics imaging telescope system attempts to improve image quality by measuring and correcting for atmospherically induced wavefront aberrations. The necessary control computations during each cycle will take a finite amount of time, which adds to the residual error variance since the atmosphere continues to change during that time. Thus an optical processor may be well-suited for this task. This paper investigates this possibility by studying the accuracy requirements in a general optical processor that will make it competitive with, or superior to, a conventional digital computer for adaptive optics use.

  3. Design and fabrication of a fingerprint imager with compact LED illumination and compact imaging optics.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jae Young; Woo, Do-Kyun; Park, Soon Sub; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2010-08-30

    In this study, we presented a light-emitting diode-based (LED) miniaturized optical pattern imager for slim mobile phone application. To meet volume constraints, we designed a miniaturized compact illuminating and imaging optical component. The objective was to minimize optical loss using several nano- and micro-fabrication methods. After integration into a single optical body, the prototype imager-with dimensions of 6.8 × 2.2 × 2.5 mm and a weight of 0.4 g-demonstrated clear feasibility in measuring 2D micropatterns with widths of 50 and 10 μm.

  4. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  5. New variational image decomposition model for simultaneously denoising and segmenting optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jinming; Tench, Christopher; Gottlob, Irene; Proudlock, Frank; Bai, Li

    2015-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of diseases of the human retina. Automated analysis of optical coherence tomography images is a challenging task as the images are inherently noisy. In this paper, a novel variational image decomposition model is proposed to decompose an OCT image into three components: the first component is the original image but with the noise completely removed; the second contains the set of edges representing the retinal layer boundaries present in the image; and the third is an image of noise, or in image decomposition terms, the texture, or oscillatory patterns of the original image. In addition, a fast Fourier transform based split Bregman algorithm is developed to improve computational efficiency of solving the proposed model. Extensive experiments are conducted on both synthesised and real OCT images to demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the state-of-the-art speckle noise reduction methods and leads to accurate retinal layer segmentation.

  6. Advanced digital detectors for neutron imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Neutron interrogation provides unique information valuable for Nonproliferation & Materials Control and other important applications including medicine, airport security, protein crystallography, and corrosion detection. Neutrons probe deep inside massive objects to detect small defects and chemical composition, even through high atomic number materials such as lead. However, current detectors are bulky gas-filled tubes or scintillator/PM tubes, which severely limit many applications. Therefore this project was undertaken to develop new semiconductor radiation detection materials to develop the first direct digital imaging detectors for neutrons. The approach relied on new discovery and characterization of new solid-state sensor materials which convert neutrons directly to electronic signals via reactions BlO(n,a)Li7 and Li6(n,a)T.

  7. Dental imaging using laminar optical tomography and micro CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Feixiao; Ozturk, Mehmet S.; Intes, Xavier; Kotha, Shiva

    2014-02-01

    Dental lesions located in the pulp are quite difficult to identify based on anatomical contrast, and, hence, to diagnose using traditional imaging methods such as dental CT. However, such lesions could lead to functional and/or molecular optical contrast. Herein, we report on the preliminary investigation of using Laminar Optical Tomography (LOT) to image the pulp and root canals in teeth. LOT is a non-contact, high resolution, molecular and functional mesoscopic optical imaging modality. To investigate the potential of LOT for dental imaging, we injected an optical dye into ex vivo teeth samples and imaged them using LOT and micro-CT simultaneously. A rigid image registration between the LOT and micro-CT reconstruction was obtained, validating the potential of LOT to image molecular optical contrast deep in the teeth with accuracy, non-invasively. We demonstrate that LOT can retrieve the 3D bio-distribution of molecular probes at depths up to 2mm with a resolution of several hundred microns in teeth.

  8. Acousto-optic tunable filter imaging spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Yu, Jeffrey; Reyes, George; Rider, David; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1991-01-01

    A remote sensing multispectral imaging instrument is being developed that uses a high resolution, fast programmable acoustooptic tunable filter (AOTF) as the spectral bandpass filter. A compact and fully computer controllable AOTF-based imaging spectrometer that operates in the visible wavelength range (0.5-0.8 microns) has been built and tested with success. A second imaging spectrometer operating in the near-infrared wavelength range (1.2-2.4 microns) is also under experimental investigation. The design criteria meeting various system issues, such as imaging quality, spectral response, and field of view (FOV), are discussed. An experiment using this AOTF imaging spectrometer breadboard is described.

  9. Advanced digital image archival system using MPEG technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wo

    2009-08-01

    Digital information and records are vital to the human race regardless of the nationalities and eras in which they were produced. Digital image contents are produced at a rapid pace from cultural heritages via digitalization, scientific and experimental data via high speed imaging sensors, national defense satellite images from governments, medical and healthcare imaging records from hospitals, personal collection of photos from digital cameras. With these mass amounts of precious and irreplaceable data and knowledge, what standards technologies can be applied to preserve and yet provide an interoperable framework for accessing the data across varieties of systems and devices? This paper presents an advanced digital image archival system by applying the international standard of MPEG technologies to preserve digital image content.

  10. Advanced rotorcraft helmet-mounted display sighting system (HMDSS) optical distortion correction methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebson, Robert T.; Lee, Louie

    2002-08-01

    Helmet Mounted Displays (HMDs) typically utilize off axis optical systems that result in distorted images. In order to minimize the weight on the pilot's head, a pixilated display, such as an Active Matrix liquid Crystal Display (AMLCD), is utilized as the imaging source. Pixelated displays based on AMLCDs cannot correct distortions or perform spatial transformations as easily as an analog CRT-based systems using electron beam deflection. An advanced rotorcraft HMDSS is a digital system where correcting the distortion within the digital domain is desired to eliminate the inaccuracies of converting to analog, correcting the distortion and converting back to digital. Other system requirements necessitate that the input video be rescaled to provide the proper image to the optical system in order to have the FLIR imagery overlay the real world as the pilot looks through the canopy. To optimize image resolution with minimum sensor size, the FLIR system scans in column mode. As this is not compatible with conventional AMLCD scanning, the FLIR video data must be converted to a row scan. This function, which normally results in additional frame delay, will also be described, together with methods for reducing the latency. The physical constrains of the helmet and the desire to use identical AMLCD devices meant that the devices are rotated between sides of the helmet. This rotation requires that the video image be scanned horizontally and vertically flipped creating another complexity in the design. Requirements for a helmet mounted image intensified television camera to be displayed as an image by itself or overlaid with symbology provided from external video creates additional complexity for distortion correction within the optical chain and will be discussed in this paper. All of these modes require that the video be manipulated in varying degrees of complexity. The enabling technology described in this paper is a complex integrated circuit that allows the user to

  11. Imaging and steering an optical wireless nanoantenna link.

    PubMed

    Dregely, Daniel; Lindfors, Klas; Lippitz, Markus; Engheta, Nader; Totzeck, Michael; Giessen, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Optical nanoantennas tailor the transmission and reception of optical signals. Owing to their capacity to control the direction and angular distribution of optical radiation over a broad spectral range, nanoantennas are promising components for optical communication in nanocircuits. Here we measure wireless optical power transfer between plasmonic nanoantennas in the far-field and demonstrate changeable signal routing to different nanoscopic receivers via beamsteering. We image the radiation pattern of single-optical nanoantennas using a photoluminescence technique, which allows mapping of the unperturbed intensity distribution around plasmonic structures. We quantify the distance dependence of the power transmission between transmitter and receiver by deterministically positioning nanoscopic fluorescent receivers around the transmitting nanoantenna. By adjusting the wavefront of the optical field incident on the transmitter, we achieve directional control of the transmitted radiation over a broad range of 29°. This enables wireless power transfer from one transmitter to different receivers. PMID:24993946

  12. Imaging and steering an optical wireless nanoantenna link

    PubMed Central

    Dregely, Daniel; Lindfors, Klas; Lippitz, Markus; Engheta, Nader; Totzeck, Michael; Giessen, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Optical nanoantennas tailor the transmission and reception of optical signals. Owing to their capacity to control the direction and angular distribution of optical radiation over a broad spectral range, nanoantennas are promising components for optical communication in nanocircuits. Here we measure wireless optical power transfer between plasmonic nanoantennas in the far-field and demonstrate changeable signal routing to different nanoscopic receivers via beamsteering. We image the radiation pattern of single-optical nanoantennas using a photoluminescence technique, which allows mapping of the unperturbed intensity distribution around plasmonic structures. We quantify the distance dependence of the power transmission between transmitter and receiver by deterministically positioning nanoscopic fluorescent receivers around the transmitting nanoantenna. By adjusting the wavefront of the optical field incident on the transmitter, we achieve directional control of the transmitted radiation over a broad range of 29°. This enables wireless power transfer from one transmitter to different receivers. PMID:24993946

  13. Beam Optics Analysis - An Advanced 3D Trajectory Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Neilson, Jeff; Read, Mike; Shephard, Mark; Bauer, Andrew; Datta, Dibyendu; Beal, Mark

    2006-01-03

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. has completed initial development of an advanced, 3D program for modeling electron trajectories in electromagnetic fields. The code is being used to design complex guns and collectors. Beam Optics Analysis (BOA) is a fully relativistic, charged particle code using adaptive, finite element meshing. Geometrical input is imported from CAD programs generating ACIS-formatted files. Parametric data is inputted using an intuitive, graphical user interface (GUI), which also provides control of convergence, accuracy, and post processing. The program includes a magnetic field solver, and magnetic information can be imported from Maxwell 2D/3D and other programs. The program supports thermionic emission and injected beams. Secondary electron emission is also supported, including multiple generations. Work on field emission is in progress as well as implementation of computer optimization of both the geometry and operating parameters. The principle features of the program and its capabilities are presented.

  14. Beam Optics Analysis — An Advanced 3D Trajectory Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Neilson, Jeff; Read, Mike; Shephard, Mark; Bauer, Andrew; Datta, Dibyendu; Beal, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. has completed initial development of an advanced, 3D program for modeling electron trajectories in electromagnetic fields. The code is being used to design complex guns and collectors. Beam Optics Analysis (BOA) is a fully relativistic, charged particle code using adaptive, finite element meshing. Geometrical input is imported from CAD programs generating ACIS-formatted files. Parametric data is inputted using an intuitive, graphical user interface (GUI), which also provides control of convergence, accuracy, and post processing. The program includes a magnetic field solver, and magnetic information can be imported from Maxwell 2D/3D and other programs. The program supports thermionic emission and injected beams. Secondary electron emission is also supported, including multiple generations. Work on field emission is in progress as well as implementation of computer optimization of both the geometry and operating parameters. The principle features of the program and its capabilities are presented.

  15. Advances in measuring ocean salinity with an optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Menn, M.; de Bougrenet de la Tocnaye, J. L.; Grosso, P.; Delauney, L.; Podeur, C.; Brault, P.; Guillerme, O.

    2011-11-01

    Absolute salinity measurement of seawater has become a key issue in thermodynamic models of the oceans. One of the most direct ways is to measure the seawater refractive index which is related to density and can therefore be related to the absolute salinity. Recent advances in high resolution position sensitive devices enable us to take advantage of small beam deviation measurements using refractometers. This paper assesses the advantages of such technology with respect to the current state-of-the-art technology. In particular, we present the resolution dependence on refractive index variations and derive the limits of such a solution for designing seawater sensors well suited for coastal and deep-sea applications. Particular attention has been paid to investigate the impact of environmental parameters, such as temperature and pressure, on an optical sensor, and ways to mitigate or compensate them have been suggested here. The sensor has been successfully tested in a pressure tank and in open oceans 2000 m deep.

  16. Perceived Image Quality Improvements from the Application of Image Deconvolution to Retinal Images from an Adaptive Optics Fundus Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliz, P.; Nemeth, S. C.; Erry, G. R. G.; Otten, L. J.; Yang, S. Y.

    Aim: The objective of this project was to apply an image restoration methodology based on wavefront measurements obtained with a Shack-Hartmann sensor and evaluating the restored image quality based on medical criteria.Methods: Implementing an adaptive optics (AO) technique, a fundus imager was used to achieve low-order correction to images of the retina. The high-order correction was provided by deconvolution. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measures aberrations. The wavefront measurement is the basis for activating a deformable mirror. Image restoration to remove remaining aberrations is achieved by direct deconvolution using the point spread function (PSF) or a blind deconvolution. The PSF is estimated using measured wavefront aberrations. Direct application of classical deconvolution methods such as inverse filtering, Wiener filtering or iterative blind deconvolution (IBD) to the AO retinal images obtained from the adaptive optical imaging system is not satisfactory because of the very large image size, dificulty in modeling the system noise, and inaccuracy in PSF estimation. Our approach combines direct and blind deconvolution to exploit available system information, avoid non-convergence, and time-consuming iterative processes. Results: The deconvolution was applied to human subject data and resulting restored images compared by a trained ophthalmic researcher. Qualitative analysis showed significant improvements. Neovascularization can be visualized with the adaptive optics device that cannot be resolved with the standard fundus camera. The individual nerve fiber bundles are easily resolved as are melanin structures in the choroid. Conclusion: This project demonstrated that computer-enhanced, adaptive optic images have greater detail of anatomical and pathological structures.

  17. Ghost imaging for three-dimensional optical security

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wen Chen, Xudong

    2013-11-25

    Ghost imaging has become increasingly popular in quantum and optical application fields. Here, we report three-dimensional (3D) optical security using ghost imaging. The series of random phase-only masks are sparsified, which are further converted into particle-like distributions placed in 3D space. We show that either an optical or digital approach can be employed for the encoding. The results illustrate that a larger key space can be generated due to the application of 3D space compared with previous works.

  18. Magneto-optical system for high speed real time imaging.

    PubMed

    Baziljevich, M; Barness, D; Sinvani, M; Perel, E; Shaulov, A; Yeshurun, Y

    2012-08-01

    A new magneto-optical system has been developed to expand the range of high speed real time magneto-optical imaging. A special source for the external magnetic field has also been designed, using a pump solenoid to rapidly excite the field coil. Together with careful modifications of the cryostat, to reduce eddy currents, ramping rates reaching 3000 T/s have been achieved. Using a powerful laser as the light source, a custom designed optical assembly, and a high speed digital camera, real time imaging rates up to 30 000 frames per seconds have been demonstrated.

  19. Magneto-optical system for high speed real time imaging.

    PubMed

    Baziljevich, M; Barness, D; Sinvani, M; Perel, E; Shaulov, A; Yeshurun, Y

    2012-08-01

    A new magneto-optical system has been developed to expand the range of high speed real time magneto-optical imaging. A special source for the external magnetic field has also been designed, using a pump solenoid to rapidly excite the field coil. Together with careful modifications of the cryostat, to reduce eddy currents, ramping rates reaching 3000 T/s have been achieved. Using a powerful laser as the light source, a custom designed optical assembly, and a high speed digital camera, real time imaging rates up to 30 000 frames per seconds have been demonstrated. PMID:22938303

  20. A comprehensive review of diagnostic imaging technologies to evaluate the retina and the optic disk.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Asima; Aman, Rabia; Reddy, Ashvini K

    2015-10-01

    Ophthalmic imaging has undergone a revolution over the past 20 years with increasingly efficient and high-definition modalities now available. The use of wide-field retinal angiography, fundus autofluorescence, state-of-the-art spectral domain, and enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography has proven to be effective in this field. This comprehensive review is devoted to retinal and optic disk imaging modalities and their clinical implications. It is based on the published literature in the field of ophthalmic imaging with a focus on recent advances. Ophthalmic imaging plays a crucial role in the management of patients with both isolated retinal disease and systemic diseases with ocular manifestations. Evolving technology enables imaging of ocular disease in vivo, facilitating objective assessment of disease progression and response to treatment. These latest technical improvements in ophthalmic imaging are now a part of standard ophthalmic assessment in academic centers and most private practices. In the coming years, further advances may improve diagnostic sensitivity and enable cost-effective screening of large populations. PMID:26043677

  1. From Imaging the Brain to Imaging the Retina: Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos; Kregel, Thomas; Schmidt, Arno; Pinkhardt, Elmar H; Lauda, Florian; Kassubek, Jan; Connemann, Bernhard J; Freudenmann, Roland W; Gahr, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging method, which provides an in vivo image of the retina. It allows for quantitative measurements of retinal and macular thickness, including single-layer analysis. Because the retinal nerve fibre layer comprises the first axons of the visual pathway and is unmyelinated, it can be considered a unique anatomical model, which may provide insight into the pathophysiological processes of diseases with a neurodegenerative character. In fact, past OCT studies have emphasized the role of the visual pathway as an ideal structure for exploring neurodegeneration and have demonstrated the potential of the method as an instrument for longitudinally monitoring structural changes in neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Progress in signal processing and advancements to the OCT technique enables the illustration of structural changes in the retinal layers in a quick, reproducible, and objective manner with a spatial resolution comparable to those of histological slices.Findings from computer-based magnetic resonance imaging analyses and neuropathological studies support the hypothesis of a degenerative component of certain psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Studies in schizophrenia incorporating OCT are currently rare and have yielded further heterogeneous results. This article elucidates the method of OCT and the retina's role as a "window to the brain". Furthermore, in delineating the degenerative components of schizophrenia, we discuss the possible applications of OCT in the schizophrenia population. PMID:26048298

  2. The image registration of multi-band images by geometrical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yung-Jhe; Chiang, Hou-Chi; Tsai, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Ting-Wei; Mang, Ou-Yang

    2015-09-01

    The image fusion is combination of two or more images into one image. The fusion of multi-band spectral images has been in many applications, such as thermal system, remote sensing, medical treatment, etc. Images are taken with the different imaging sensors. If the sensors take images through the different optical paths in the same time, it will be in the different positions. The task of the image registration will be more difficult. Because the images are in the different field of views (F.O.V.), the different resolutions and the different view angles. It is important to build the relationship of the viewpoints in one image to the other image. In this paper, we focus on the problem of image registration for two non-pinhole sensors. The affine transformation between the 2-D image and the 3-D real world can be derived from the geometrical optics of the sensors. In the other word, the geometrical affine transformation function of two images are derived from the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of two sensors. According to the affine transformation function, the overlap of the F.O.V. in two images can be calculated and resample two images in the same resolution. Finally, we construct the image registration model by the mapping function. It merges images for different imaging sensors. And, imaging sensors absorb different wavebands of electromagnetic spectrum at the different position in the same time.

  3. Near-Infrared Optical Imaging Noninvasively Detects Acutely Damaged Muscle.

    PubMed

    Chrzanowski, Stephen M; Batra, Abhinandan; Lee-McMullen, Brittany; Vohra, Ravneet S; Forbes, Sean C; Jiang, Huabei; Vandenborne, Krista; Walter, Glenn A

    2016-10-01

    Muscle damage is currently assessed through methods such as muscle biopsy, serum biomarkers, functional testing, and imaging procedures, each with its own inherent limitations, and a pressing need for a safe, repeatable, inexpensive, and noninvasive modality to assess the state of muscle health remains. Our aim was to develop and assess near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging as a novel noninvasive method of detecting and quantifying muscle damage. An immobilization-reambulation model was used for inducing muscle damage and recovery in the lower hindlimbs in mice. Confirmation of muscle damage was obtained using in vivo indocyanine green-enhanced NIR optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and ex vivo tissue analysis. The soleus of the immobilized-reambulated hindlimb was found to have a greater amount of muscle damage compared to that in the contralateral nonimmobilized limb, confirmed by in vivo indocyanine green-enhanced NIR optical imaging (3.86-fold increase in radiant efficiency), magnetic resonance imaging (1.41-fold increase in T2), and an ex vivo spectrophotometric assay of indocyanine green uptake (1.87-fold increase in normalized absorbance). Contrast-enhanced NIR optical imaging provides a sensitive, rapid, and noninvasive screening method that can be used for imaging and quantifying muscle damage and recovery in vivo. PMID:27565039

  4. Neurovascular coupling: in vivo optical techniques for functional brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optical imaging techniques reflect different biochemical processes in the brain, which is closely related with neural activity. Scientists and clinicians employ a variety of optical imaging technologies to visualize and study the relationship between neurons, glial cells and blood vessels. In this paper, we present an overview of the current optical approaches used for the in vivo imaging of neurovascular coupling events in small animal models. These techniques include 2-photon microscopy, laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi), functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM), functional near-infrared spectroscopy imaging (fNIRS) and multimodal imaging techniques. The basic principles of each technique are described in detail, followed by examples of current applications from cutting-edge studies of cerebral neurovascular coupling functions and metabolic. Moreover, we provide a glimpse of the possible ways in which these techniques might be translated to human studies for clinical investigations of pathophysiology and disease. In vivo optical imaging techniques continue to expand and evolve, allowing us to discover fundamental basis of neurovascular coupling roles in cerebral physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:23631798

  5. Neurovascular coupling: in vivo optical techniques for functional brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lun-De; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Delgado-Martínez, Ignacio; Li, Meng-Lin; Erzurumlu, Reha; Vipin, Ashwati; Orellana, Josue; Lin, Yan-Ren; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin; Thakor, Nitish V

    2013-04-30

    Optical imaging techniques reflect different biochemical processes in the brain, which is closely related with neural activity. Scientists and clinicians employ a variety of optical imaging technologies to visualize and study the relationship between neurons, glial cells and blood vessels. In this paper, we present an overview of the current optical approaches used for the in vivo imaging of neurovascular coupling events in small animal models. These techniques include 2-photon microscopy, laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi), functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM), functional near-infrared spectroscopy imaging (fNIRS) and multimodal imaging techniques. The basic principles of each technique are described in detail, followed by examples of current applications from cutting-edge studies of cerebral neurovascular coupling functions and metabolic. Moreover, we provide a glimpse of the possible ways in which these techniques might be translated to human studies for clinical investigations of pathophysiology and disease. In vivo optical imaging techniques continue to expand and evolve, allowing us to discover fundamental basis of neurovascular coupling roles in cerebral physiology and pathophysiology.

  6. Wave-Based Inversion & Imaging for the Optical Quadrature Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K

    2005-10-27

    The Center for Subsurface Sensing & Imaging System's (CenSSIS) Optical Quadrature Microscope (OQM) is a narrow band visible light microscope capable of measuring both amplitude and phase of a scattered field. We develop a diffraction tomography, that is, wave-based, scattered field inversion and imaging algorithm, for reconstructing the refractive index of the scattering object.

  7. Compact low-cost detection electronics for optical coherence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akcay, A. C.; Lee, K. S.; Furenlid, L. R.; Costa, M. A.; Rolland, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    A compact and low-cost detection electronics scheme for optical coherence imaging is demonstrated. The performance of the designed electronics is analyzed in comparison to a commercial lock-in amplifier of equal bandwidth. Images of a fresh-onion sample are presented for each detection configuration. PMID:26617422

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging of occult injury of optic radiation following optic neuritis in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiafeng; Zhu, Lijun; Li, He; Lu, Ziwen; Chen, Xin; Fang, Shaokuan

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is easily detected by routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it is not possible to detect early or occult lesions in MS by routine MRI, and this may explain the inconsistency between the severity of the lesions found by MRI and the degree of clinical disability of patients with MS. The present study included 10 patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 10 healthy volunteers. Each patient underwent routine 3.0 T MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Optic nerve and optic radiation were analyzed by DTI and DTT. The fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), λ//, and λ┴ values were measured. In the 10 patients with MS, 7 optic nerves were affected, and 13 optic nerves were not affected. Cranial MRI showed that optic nerve thickening and hyperintensity occurred in 2 patients with MS. In the directionally encoded color maps, a hypointensive green signal in the optic nerve was observed in 3 patients with MS. The FA values were significantly lower and the MD, λ//, and λ┴ values were significantly higher in the affected and unaffected optic nerves and optic radiations in patients with MS in comparison with controls (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in these values between the affected and unaffected optic nerves and optic radiation in patients with MS (P>0.05). Diffusion tensor imaging is sensitive in the detection of occult injury of the optic nerve and optic radiation following optic neuritis. Diffusion tensor imaging may be a useful tool for the early diagnosis, treatment and management of MS. PMID:27703508

  9. Analysis for simplified optics coma effection on spectral image inversion of coded aperture spectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lv, Qunbo; Li, Weiyan; Xiangli, Bin

    2015-09-01

    As a novel spectrum imaging technology was developed recent years, push-broom coded aperture spectral imaging (PCASI) has the advantages of high throughput, high SNR, high stability etc. This coded aperture spectral imaging utilizes fixed code templates and push-broom mode, which can realize the high-precision reconstruction of spatial and spectral information. But during optical lens designing, manufacturing and debugging, it is inevitably exist some minor coma errors. Even minor coma errors can reduce image quality. In this paper, we simulated the system optical coma error's influence to the quality of reconstructed image, analyzed the variant of the coded aperture in different optical coma effect, then proposed an accurate curve of image quality and optical coma quality in 255×255 size code template, which provide important references for design and development of push-broom coded aperture spectrometer.

  10. Technical advances of interventional fluoroscopy and flat panel image receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul

    2008-11-01

    In the past decade, various radiation reducing devices and control circuits have been implemented on fluoroscopic imaging equipment. Because of the potential for lengthy fluoroscopic procedures in interventional cardiovascular angiography, these devices and control circuits have been developed for the cardiac catheterization laboratories and interventional angiography suites. Additionally, fluoroscopic systems equipped with image intensifiers have benefited from technological advances in x-ray tube, x-ray generator, and spectral shaping filter technologies. The high heat capacity x-ray tube, the medium frequency inverter generator with high performance switching capability, and the patient dose reduction spectral shaping filter had already been implemented on the image intensified fluoroscopy systems. These three underlying technologies together with the automatic dose rate and image quality (ADRIQ) control logic allow patients undergoing cardiovascular angiography procedures to benefit from "lower patient dose" with "high image quality." While photoconductor (or phosphor plate) x-ray detectors and signal capture thin film transistor (TFT) and charge coupled device (CCD) arrays are analog in nature, the advent of the flat panel image receptor allowed for fluoroscopy procedures to become more streamlined. With the analog-to-digital converter built into the data lines, the flat panel image receptor appears to become a digital device. While the transition from image intensified fluoroscopy systems to flat panel image receptor fluoroscopy systems is part of the on-going "digitization of imaging," the value of a flat panel image receptor may have to be evaluated with respect to patient dose, image quality, and clinical application capabilities. The advantage of flat panel image receptors has yet to be fully explored. For instance, the flat panel image receptor has its disadvantages as compared to the image intensifiers; the cost of the equipment is probably the most

  11. Optical control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Upton, Robert

    2006-08-10

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) is an off-axis Gregorian astronomical telescope design. The ATST is expected to be subject to thermal and gravitational effects that result in misalignments of its mirrors and warping of its primary mirror. These effects require active, closed-loop correction to maintain its as-designed diffraction-limited optical performance. The simulation and modeling of the ATST with a closed-loop correction strategy are presented. The correction strategy is derived from the linear mathematical properties of two Jacobian, or influence, matrices that map the ATST rigid-body (RB) misalignments and primary mirror figure errors to wavefront sensor (WFS) measurements. The two Jacobian matrices also quantify the sensitivities of the ATST to RB and primary mirror figure perturbations. The modeled active correction strategy results in a decrease of the rms wavefront error averaged over the field of view (FOV) from 500 to 19 nm, subject to 10 nm rms WFS noise. This result is obtained utilizing nine WFSs distributed in the FOV with a 300 nm rms astigmatism figure error on the primary mirror. Correction of the ATST RB perturbations is demonstrated for an optimum subset of three WFSs with corrections improving the ATST rms wavefront error from 340 to 17.8 nm. In addition to the active correction of the ATST, an analytically robust sensitivity analysis that can be generally extended to a wider class of optical systems is presented. PMID:16926876

  12. Optical control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Upton, Robert

    2006-08-10

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) is an off-axis Gregorian astronomical telescope design. The ATST is expected to be subject to thermal and gravitational effects that result in misalignments of its mirrors and warping of its primary mirror. These effects require active, closed-loop correction to maintain its as-designed diffraction-limited optical performance. The simulation and modeling of the ATST with a closed-loop correction strategy are presented. The correction strategy is derived from the linear mathematical properties of two Jacobian, or influence, matrices that map the ATST rigid-body (RB) misalignments and primary mirror figure errors to wavefront sensor (WFS) measurements. The two Jacobian matrices also quantify the sensitivities of the ATST to RB and primary mirror figure perturbations. The modeled active correction strategy results in a decrease of the rms wavefront error averaged over the field of view (FOV) from 500 to 19 nm, subject to 10 nm rms WFS noise. This result is obtained utilizing nine WFSs distributed in the FOV with a 300 nm rms astigmatism figure error on the primary mirror. Correction of the ATST RB perturbations is demonstrated for an optimum subset of three WFSs with corrections improving the ATST rms wavefront error from 340 to 17.8 nm. In addition to the active correction of the ATST, an analytically robust sensitivity analysis that can be generally extended to a wider class of optical systems is presented.

  13. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-09-07

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems.

  14. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J.; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems.

  15. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems. PMID:27599635

  16. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J.; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems. PMID:27599635

  17. Afocal viewport optics for underwater imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Dan

    2014-09-01

    A conventional camera can be adapted for underwater use by enclosing it in a sealed waterproof pressure housing with a viewport. The viewport, as an optical interface between water and air needs to consider both the camera and water optical characteristics while also providing a high pressure water seal. Limited hydrospace visibility drives a need for wide angle viewports. Practical optical interfaces between seawater and air vary from simple flat plate windows to complex water contact lenses. This paper first provides a brief overview of the physical and optical properties of the ocean environment along with suitable optical materials. This is followed by a discussion of the characteristics of various afocal underwater viewport types including flat windows, domes and the Ivanoff corrector lens, a derivative of a Galilean wide angle camera adapter. Several new and interesting optical designs derived from the Ivanoff corrector lens are presented including a pair of very compact afocal viewport lenses that are compatible with both in water and in air environments and an afocal underwater hyper-hemispherical fisheye lens.

  18. Scalar wave-optical reconstruction of plenoptic camera images.

    PubMed

    Junker, André; Stenau, Tim; Brenner, Karl-Heinz

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the reconstruction of plenoptic camera images in a scalar wave-optical framework. Previous publications relating to this topic numerically simulate light propagation on the basis of ray tracing. However, due to continuing miniaturization of hardware components it can be assumed that in combination with low-aperture optical systems this technique may not be generally valid. Therefore, we study the differences between ray- and wave-optical object reconstructions of true plenoptic camera images. For this purpose we present a wave-optical reconstruction algorithm, which can be run on a regular computer. Our findings show that a wave-optical treatment is capable of increasing the detail resolution of reconstructed objects.

  19. Integration of optical imaging with a small animal irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Weersink, Robert A.; Ansell, Steve; Wang, An; Wilson, Graham; Shah, Duoaud; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The authors describe the integration of optical imaging with a targeted small animal irradiator device, focusing on design, instrumentation, 2D to 3D image registration, 2D targeting, and the accuracy of recovering and mapping the optical signal to a 3D surface generated from the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The integration of optical imaging will improve targeting of the radiation treatment and offer longitudinal tracking of tumor response of small animal models treated using the system. Methods: The existing image-guided small animal irradiator consists of a variable kilovolt (peak) x-ray tube mounted opposite an aSi flat panel detector, both mounted on a c-arm gantry. The tube is used for both CBCT imaging and targeted irradiation. The optical component employs a CCD camera perpendicular to the x-ray treatment/imaging axis with a computer controlled filter for spectral decomposition. Multiple optical images can be acquired at any angle as the gantry rotates. The optical to CBCT registration, which uses a standard pinhole camera model, was modeled and tested using phantoms with markers visible in both optical and CBCT images. Optically guided 2D targeting in the anterior/posterior direction was tested on an anthropomorphic mouse phantom with embedded light sources. The accuracy of the mapping of optical signal to the CBCT surface was tested using the same mouse phantom. A surface mesh of the phantom was generated based on the CBCT image and optical intensities projected onto the surface. The measured surface intensity was compared to calculated surface for a point source at the actual source position. The point-source position was also optimized to provide the closest match between measured and calculated intensities, and the distance between the optimized and actual source positions was then calculated. This process was repeated for multiple wavelengths and sources. Results: The optical to CBCT registration error was 0.8 mm. Two

  20. Novel non-imaging optic design for uniform illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadi, S.; Ramirez-Iniguez, R.; Boutaleb, T.; Mallick, T.

    2016-03-01

    The Dielectric Totally Internally Reflecting Concentrator (DTIRC) has been developed in the past for wireless infrared communications and solar energy applications. This paper proposes a novel non-imaging optic design based on the DTIRC family of concentrators for use in illumination applications. The novel optic can be integrated with a light emitting diode (LED) and can be tailored to meet specific requirements. The proposed optic can be used as a first or secondary optic to provide uniform illumination within a circular footprint with a desired radius. The results from this work show that, with the optimised DTIRC, it is possible to achieve a uniformity of illuminance of over 95%.