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Sample records for advanced optical telescope

  1. Advanced Technology Lunar Telescopes I. Overview and Progress Report On Ultra-Lightweight Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. C.; Pitts, R. E.; Oliversen, R. J.; Stolarik, J. D.; Segal, K.; Wilson, T. L.; Lin, E. I.; Hull, J. R.; Romeo, R.; Hojaji, H.; Ma, K. B.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.; Chu, C. W.

    1993-12-01

    The materials and technology already exist to build fully functional steerable telescopes for use on the moon, telescopes that are cost effective, that can be deployed using existing launchers, and that can function for extended periods without human maintenance. We describe our concept of advanced technology telescopes (ATT) which combines the elements of i) ultra-lightweight precision optics and structures, ii) non-contact, electronically controlled superconductor bearings and drive mechanisms, and iii) high dynamic range radiation resistant sensors. Unlike previous transit telescope designs, the ATTs can point and track objects anywhere in the sky over the entire lunar night (or day), can be deployed in multiple unit arrays, and can be equipped with standard astronomical instruments including spectrographs, imagers, or even interferometers. We first describe the optics. Lightweight optics are crucial because they minimize the mass of the telescope assembly and its support structure and ultimately the entire payload. By using materials and fabrication technology similar to that already refined by ESA and proven for space applications, we show that it is possible to produce precision optical elements of very low areal density (< 2 kg per sq. m). The process also has much lower per unit cost compared to traditional mirror fabrication techniques. By supporting the optical elements with a class of very lightweight but stiff material already developed by NASA, a telescope assembly can be made that has essentially the minimum possible mass. Such ultra-lightweight construction makes possible astronomical payloads that can be sent to the moon using existing small and medium size rockets. The very low per unit cost permits the production and deployment of multiple units, thereby increasing the versatility and productivity of a lunar observatory while providing good redundancy. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept optical telescope assembly that has a 31 cm diameter primary

  2. Adaptive optics real time processing design for the advanced technology solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Kit

    2012-07-01

    The four meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) adaptive optics (AO) system will require at least twenty-four times the real time processing power as the Dunn Solar Telescope AO system. An FPGA solution for ATST AO real time processing is being pursued instead of the parallel DSP approach used for the Dunn AO76 system. An analysis shows FPGAs will have lower latency and lower hardware cost than an equivalent DSP solution. Interfacing to the proposed high speed camera and the deformable mirror will be simpler and have lower latency than with DSPs. This paper will discuss the current design and progress toward implementing the FPGA solution.

  3. CASTOR: the Cosmological Advanced Survey Telescope for Optical and Ultraviolet Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côte, Patrick; Scott, Alan; Balogh, Michael; Buckingham, Ron; Aldridge, David; Carlberg, Ray; Chen, Weiguo; Dupuis, Jean; Evans, Clinton; Drissen, Laurent; Fraser, Wes; Grandmont, Frederic; Harrison, Paul; Hutchings, John; Kavelaars, JJ; Landry, John-Thomas; Lange, Christian; Laurin, Denis; Patel, Tarun; Pillay, Venka; Piche, Louis; Rader, Andres; Robert, Carmelle; Sawicki, Marchin; Sorba, Robert; Theriault, Guillaume; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic

    2012-09-01

    The Cosmological Advanced Survey Telescope for Optical and UV Research (CASTOR) is a proposed CSA mission that would make a unique, powerful, and lasting contribution to astrophysics by providing panoramic, high-resolution imaging in the UV/optical (0.15 - 0.55 μm) spectral region. This versatile `smallSAT'-class mission would far surpass any ground-based optical telescope in terms of angular resolution, and would provide ultra-deep imaging in three broad lters to supplement longer-wavelength data from planned international dark energy missions (Euclid, WFIRST) as well as from the ground-based Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Combining the largest focal plane ever own in space, with an innovative optical design that delivers HST-quality images over a eld two orders of magnitude larger than Hubble Space Telescope (HST), CASTOR would image about 1/8th of the sky to a (u-band) depth ~1 magnitude fainter than will be possible with LSST even after a decade of operations. No planned or proposed astronomical facility would exceed CASTOR in its potential for discovery at these wavelengths.

  4. Optical design of a near-infrared imaging spectropolarimeter for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Vincenzo; Cavallini, Fabio

    2013-06-01

    In designing the optics of an imaging multi-etalon spectropolarimeter as a post-focus instrument for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), many constraints must be considered. Among these are the large entrance pupil diameter of the telescope (4 m), the demanded large field of view (≥90 arc sec), high spectral resolving power (≥200,000), and limited field-dependent blue-shift of the instrumental profile [≤3 full width at half maximum (FWHM)], which require Fabry-Perot interferometers of large diameter (≥200 mm), lighted by highly collimated beams. This implies large optical elements and long optical paths. Moreover, to use interference pre-filters with a relatively small diameter (≤70 mm) and placed between the interferometers to reduce the inter-reflections in axial-mount, a "pupil adapter" must be included with a further increase of the optical path length. Although a multi-etalon spectropolarimeter works in quasi-monochromatic light, the Fraunhofer lines of interest cover a wide range of wavelengths (850 to 1650 nm), which demands a good chromatic aberration control. A low instrumental polarization (≤0.5%) is also required to allow a high polarimetric precision. Finally, some secondary optical paths are required to perform the initial instrumental setup and to secure the best instrumental performances. A diffraction-limited optical solution for ATST is described that fulfills all the above requirements in a relative small volume.

  5. Advanced technology optical telescopes IV; Proceedings of the Meeting, Tucson, AZ, Feb. 12-16, 1990. Parts 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Lawrence D. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on the current status of large, advanced-technology optical telescope development and construction projects discusses topics on such factors as their novel optical system designs, the use of phased arrays, seeing and site performance factors, mirror fabrication and testing, pointing and tracking techniques, mirror thermal control, structural design strategies, mirror supports and coatings, and the control of segmented mirrors. Attention is given to the proposed implementation of the VLT Interferometer, the first diffraction-limited astronomical images with adaptive optics, a fiber-optic telescope using a large cross-section image-transmitting bundle, the design of wide-field arrays, Hartmann test data reductions, liquid mirrors, inertial drives for telescope pointing, temperature control of large honeycomb mirrors, evaporative coatings for very large telescope mirrors, and the W. M. Keck telescope's primary mirror active control system software.

  6. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D.

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The default parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST

  7. The solar optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Objectives of the Solar Optical Telescope are to study the physics of the Sun on the scale at which many of the important physical processes occur and to attain a resolution of 73km on the Sun or 0.1 arc seconds of angular resolution. Topics discussed in this overview of the Solar Optical Telescope include: why is the Solar Optical Telescope needed; current picture of the Sun's atmosphere and convection zone; scientific problems for the Solar Optical Telescope; a description of the telescope; the facility - science management, contamination control, and accessibility to the instruments; the scientific instruments - a coordinated instrument package for unlocking the Sun's secrets; parameters of the coordinated instrument package; science operations from the Space Shuttle; and the dynamic solar atmosphere.

  8. Networked Automatic Optical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, J. R.

    2000-05-01

    Many groups around the world are developing automated or robotic optical observatories. The coordinated operation of automated optical telescopes at diverse sites could provide observing prospects which are not otherwise available, e.g., continuous optical photometry without diurnal interruption. Computer control and scheduling also offers the prospect of effective response to transient events such as γ -ray bursts. These telescopes could also serve science education by providing high-quality CCD data for educators and students. The Automatic Telescope Network (ATN) project has been undertaken to promote networking of automated telescopes. A web site is maintained at http://gamma.bu.edu/atn/. The development of such networks will be facilitated by the existence of standards. A set of standard commands for instrument and telescope control systems will allow for the creation of software for an ``observatory control system'' which can be used at any facility which complies with the TCS and ICS standards. Also, there is a strong need for standards for the specification of observations to be done, and reports on the results and status of observations. A proposed standard for this is the Remote Telescope Markup Language (RTML), which is expected to be described in another poster in this session. It may thus be feasible for amateur-astronomers to soon buy all necessary equipment and software to field an automatic telescope. The owner/operator could make otherwise unused telescope time available to the network in exchange for the utilization of other telescopes in the network --- including occasional utilization of meter-class telescopes with research-grade CCD detectors at good sites.

  9. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) Telescope Optical System Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, V.; Buckley, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Diegel, S.; Romani, R.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Vassiliev, V.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Ramsey, B.; Weekes, T.

    2008-12-24

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory operating in the energy range 25 GeV-100 TeV, which is based on an array of {approx}20-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The desired improvement in sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation of AGIS imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. We are considering several options for the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes, which include the traditional Davies-Cotton design as well as novel two-mirror design. Emerging mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost-effective solutions for the design of the OS.

  10. Optical Metrology for the Filter Set for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Content, David A.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Krebs, Carolyn A.; Miner, Linda A.; Norton, Todd A.; Mehalick, Kimberly; Petrone, Peter; Bush, Frank D.; Puc, Bernard; Standley, Clive; Tsvetanov, Zlatan; Kral, Catherine

    1998-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) will employ a wide variety of spectral filtration components including narrow band, medium band, wide band, and far ultraviolet (FUV) long pass filters, spatially- variable filters (ramp filters), VIS/IR polarizers, NUV polarizers, FUV prisms, and a grism. These components are spread across ACS's Wide Field, High Resolution, and Solar Blind channels which provide diffraction-limited imaging of astronomical targets using aberration-correcting optics which remove most aberrations from HST's Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA). In order for ACS to be truly advanced, these filters must push the state-of-the-art in performance in a number of key areas at the same time. Important requirements which these filters must meet include outstanding transmitted wavefront, high transmittance, uniform transmittance across each filter, spectrally structure-free bandpasses, exceptionally high out of band rejection, and a high degree of parfocality. These constitute a very stringent set of requirements indeed, especially for filters which are up to 90 mm in diameter. The development of optical metrology stations used to demonstrate that each ACS filter will meet its design specifications is discussed. Of particular note are specially-designed spectral transmissometers and interferometers.

  11. Design and Specification of Optical Bandpass Filters for Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Tsevetanov, Zlatan; Woodruff, Bob; Mooney, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced optical bandpass filters for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) have been developed on a filter-by-filter basis through detailed studies which take into account the instrument's science goals, available optical filter fabrication technology, and developments in ACS's charge-coupled-device (CCD) detector technology. These filters include a subset of filters for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are optimized for astronomical photometry using today's charge-coupled-devices (CCD's). In order for ACS to be truly advanced, these filters must push the state-of-the-art in performance in a number of key areas at the same time. Important requirements for these filters include outstanding transmitted wavefront, high transmittance, uniform transmittance across each filter, spectrally structure-free bandpasses, exceptionally high out of band rejection, a high degree of parfocality, and immunity to environmental degradation. These constitute a very stringent set of requirements indeed, especially for filters which are up to 90 mm in diameter. The highly successful paradigm in which final specifications for flight filters were derived through interaction amongst the ACS Science Team, the instrument designer, the lead optical engineer, and the filter designer and vendor is described. Examples of iterative design trade studies carried out in the context of science needs and budgetary and schedule constraints are presented. An overview of the final design specifications for the ACS bandpass and ramp filters is also presented.

  12. NASA capabilities roadmap: advanced telescopes and observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescopes and Observatories (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories collecting all electromagnetic bands, ranging from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It has derived capability priorities from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps and, where appropriate, has ensured their consistency with other NASA Strategic and Capability Roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Optical Telescope Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This image illustrates the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA). One of the three major elements of the HST, the OTA consists of two mirrors (a primary mirror and a secondary mirror), support trusses, and the focal plane structure. The mirrors collect and focus light from selected celestial objects and are housed near the center of the telescope. The primary mirror captures light from objects in space and focuses it toward the secondary mirror. The secondary mirror redirects the light to a focal plane where the Scientific Instruments are located. The primary mirror is 94.5 inches (2.4 meters) in diameter and the secondary mirror is 12.2 inches (0.3 meters) in diameter. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth Orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from the Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The spacecraft is 42.5 feet (13 meters) long and weighs 25,000 pounds (11,600 kilograms). The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company of Sunnyvale, California produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  14. Demonstration Telescopes Using "Dollar Optics"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Paul

    2008-05-01

    I propose a poster that illustrates the use of "dollar optics” for experimentation and for the creation of demonstration telescopes. Handling a variety of lenses and mirrors provides an opportunity for discovering practical optics. Some part of this path of exploration must have been traveled by Galileo as he experimented with spectacle lenses. "Dollar optics” include reading glasses (positive meniscus lenses), convex and concave mirrors, Fresnel sheets, magnifying lenses, and eye loupes. Unwanted distance spectacles (negative meniscus lenses) are available at second-hand stores. Galileo telescopes, "long” 17th century telescopes, and useful demonstration models of Newtonian reflectors can be made with "dollar” optics. The poster will illustrate practical information about "dollar optics” and telescopes: magnification, focal length, and "diopters” disassembling spectacles; creating cheap mounts for spectacle lenses; the importance of optical axes and alignment; eyepieces; and focusing. (A table would be useful with the poster to set out a hands-on display of "dollar optic” telescopes.) Educators, experimenters, and those concerned with astronomy outreach might be interested in this poster. Working with "dollar optics” requires facility with simple tools, interest in planning projects, patience, imagination, and the willingness to invest some time and effort. "Dollar optics” may help to foster creativity and hands-on enthusiasm - as did Galileo's work with simple lenses 400 years ago. "Oh! When will there be an end put to the new observations and discoveries of this admirable instrument?” - Galileo Galilei as quoted by Henry C. King, The History of the Telescope.

  15. BCK Network of Optical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGruder, Charles H.; Antoniuk, Krill; Carini, Michael T.; Gelderman, Richard; Hammond, Benjamin; Hicks, Stacy; Laney, David; Shakhovskoy, David; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Williams, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The BCK network consists of three research grade telescopes: 0.6m (B) at the Bell Observatory near Western Kentucky University (WKU), 1.3m (C) at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and a 1.3m (K) at Kitt Peak National Observatory. The Bell Telescope is operated remotely from WKU while the Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT) at Kitt Peak possesses an autonomous scheduler. The BCK telescopes are distributed longitudinally over 145º and can be used to observe continuously up to 21.2 hours/day. The network will be chiefly employed to observe variable stars, blazars and unpredictable celestial events.Because celestial objects with ground-based telescopes cannot be observed optically during the daytime, continuous ground-based astronomical observations are only possible via a network of longitudinally distributed telescopes. When the sun rises in Crimea after it sets at Bell, continuous observations are possible. This occurs for about six and ½ months per year - mid September to early April. A network is highly desirable for events that are not predictable for instance the appearance of supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, or undiscovered exoplanetsVariable stars are really only known in significant numbers to about 14 mag. But, as the magnitude increases the number of stars in any field increases very sharply, so there are many variable stars to discover at faint magnitude (m > 14). Discovering new variables makes great undergraduate student projects, a major component of astronomical research at WKU. In addition, pinning down the periods of variable stars is greatly facilitated with a network of telescopes.The BCK telescope network will also be used for monitoring the optical variability of blazars. The network provides increased coverage on daily variability timescales by minimizing interruptions due to weather and or mechanical problems at any one observatory and is used for obtaining continuous (12+ hours) of observations of rapid variability in blazars which would

  16. Advanced optical instruments technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William

    1992-01-01

    The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

  17. Construction of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, T. R.; Keil, S.; McMullin, J.; Knölker, M.; Kuhn, J. R.; Goode, P. R.; Rosner, R.; Casini, R.; Lin, H.; Tritschler, A.; Wöger, F.; ATST Team

    2012-12-01

    The 4m Advance Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope and the world's leading ground-based resource for studying solar magnetism that controls the solar wind, flares, coronal mass ejections and variability in the Sun's output. The project has entered its construction phase. Major subsystems have been contracted. As its highest priority science driver ATST shall provide high resolution and high sensitivity observations of the dynamic solar magnetic fields throughout the solar atmosphere, including the corona at infrared wavelengths. With its 4m aperture, ATST will resolve features at 0.″03 at visible wavelengths and obtain 0.″1 resolution at the magnetically highly sensitive near infrared wavelengths. A high order adaptive optics system delivers a corrected beam to the initial set of state-of-the-art, facility class instrumentation located in the Coudé laboratory facility. The initial set of first generation instruments consists of five facility class instruments, including imagers and spectro-polarimeters. The high polarimetric sensitivity and accuracy required for measurements of the illusive solar magnetic fields place strong constraints on the polarization analysis and calibration. Development and construction of a four-meter solar telescope presents many technical challenges, including thermal control of the enclosure, telescope structure and optics and wavefront control. A brief overview of the science goals and observational requirements of the ATST will be given, followed by a summary of the design status of the telescope and its instrumentation, including design status of major subsystems, such as the telescope mount assembly, enclosure, mirror assemblies, and wavefront correction

  18. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 3: Optical telescope assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the optical telescope assembly for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The systems considerations are based on mission-related parameters and optical equipment requirements. Information is included on: (1) structural design and analysis, (2) thermal design, (3) stabilization and control, (4) alignment, focus, and figure control, (5) electronic subsystem, and (6) scientific instrument design.

  19. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  20. Advanced manufacturing technologies for the BeCOAT telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Michael N.; Rajic, Slobodan; Seals, Roland D.

    1994-02-01

    The beryllium cryogenic off-axis telescope (BeCOAT) uses a two-mirror, non re-imaging, off- axis, Ritchey Chretian design with all-beryllium optics, structures and baffles. The purpose of this telescope is the system level demonstration of advanced manufacturing technologies for optics, optical benches, and baffle assemblies. The key issues that are addressed are single point diamond turning of beryllium optics, survivable fastening techniques, minimum beryllium utilization, and technologies leading to self-aligning, all-beryllium optical systems.

  1. Technology Development for the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) as a Candidate Large UV-Optical-Infrared (LUVOIR) Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatha; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Postman, Marc; Quijada, Manuel; Rauscher, Bernard; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Shaklan, Stuart; Stahl, H. Philip; Stahle, Carl; Thronson, Harley

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) team has identified five key technologies to enable candidate architectures for the future large-aperture ultraviolet/optical/infrared (LUVOIR) space observatory envisioned by the NASA Astrophysics 30-year roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions. The science goals of ATLAST address a broad range of astrophysical questions from early galaxy and star formation to the processes that contributed to the formation of life on Earth, combining general astrophysics with direct-imaging and spectroscopy of habitable exoplanets. The key technologies are: internal coronagraphs, starshades (or external occulters), ultra-stable large-aperture telescopes, detectors, and mirror coatings. Selected technology performance goals include: 1x10?10 raw contrast at an inner working angle of 35 milli-arcseconds, wavefront error stability on the order of 10 pm RMS per wavefront control step, autonomous on-board sensing & control, and zero-read-noise single-photon detectors spanning the exoplanet science bandpass between 400 nm and 1.8 µm. Development of these technologies will provide significant advances over current and planned observatories in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution, stability, and high-contrast imaging. The science goals of ATLAST are presented and flowed down to top-level telescope and instrument performance requirements in the context of a reference architecture: a 10-meter-class, segmented aperture telescope operating at room temperature (290 K) at the sun-Earth Lagrange-2 point. For each technology area, we define best estimates of required capabilities, current state-of-the-art performance, and current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) - thus identifying the current technology gap. We report on current, planned, or recommended efforts to develop each technology to TRL 5.

  2. Technology development for the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) as a candidate large UV-Optical-Infrared (LUVOIR) surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Postman, Marc; Quijada, Manuel; Rauscher, Bernard; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Shaklan, Stuart; Stahl, H. Philip; Stahle, Carl; Thronson, Harley

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) team has identified five key technologies to enable candidate architectures for the future large-aperture ultraviolet/optical/infrared (LUVOIR) space observatory envisioned by the NASA Astrophysics 30-year roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions. The science goals of ATLAST address a broad range of astrophysical questions from early galaxy and star formation to the processes that contributed to the formation of life on Earth, combining general astrophysics with direct-imaging and spectroscopy of habitable exoplanets. The key technologies are: internal coronagraphs, starshades (or external occulters), ultra-stable large-aperture telescopes, detectors, and mirror coatings. Selected technology performance goals include: 1x10-10 raw contrast at an inner working angle of 35 milli-arcseconds, wavefront error stability on the order of 10 pm RMS per wavefront control step, autonomous on-board sensing and control, and zero-read-noise single-photon detectors spanning the exoplanet science bandpass between 400 nm and 1.8 μm. Development of these technologies will provide significant advances over current and planned observatories in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution, stability, and high-contrast imaging. The science goals of ATLAST are presented and flowed down to top-level telescope and instrument performance requirements in the context of a reference architecture: a 10-meter-class, segmented aperture telescope operating at room temperature (~290 K) at the sun-Earth Lagrange-2 point. For each technology area, we define best estimates of required capabilities, current state-of-the-art performance, and current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) - thus identifying the current technology gap. We report on current, planned, or recommended efforts to develop each technology to TRL 5.

  3. Advanced Telescopes and Observatories Capability Roadmap Presentation to the NRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the NASA Advanced Planning and Integration Office (APIO) roadmap for developing technological capabilities for telescopes and observatories in the following areas: Optics; Wavefront Sensing and Control and Interferometry; Distributed and Advanced Spacecraft; Large Precision Structures; Cryogenic and Thermal Control Systems; Infrastructure.

  4. Summary of NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory Capability Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Phil; Feinberg, Lee

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories operating in all electromagnetic bands, from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It lists capability priorities derived from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  5. Summary of NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory Capability Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Feinberg, Lee

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories operating in all electromagnetic bands, from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It lists capability priorities derived from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  6. CMB Telescopes and Optical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Shaul; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman

    The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) is now firmly establishedas a fundamental and essential probe of the geometry, constituents, and birth ofthe observable universe. The CMB is a potent observable because it can bemeasured with precision and accuracy. Just as importantly, theoretical models ofthe universe can predict the characteristics of the CMB to high accuracy, andthose predictions can be directly compared to observations. There are multipleaspects associated with making a precise measurement. In this chapter, we focuson optical components for the instrumentation used to measure the CMBpolarization and temperature anisotropy. We begin with an overview of generalconsiderations for CMB observations and discuss common concepts used inthe community. We next consider a variety of alternatives available for adesigner of a CMB telescope. Our discussion is guided by the ground- andballoon-based instruments that have been implemented over the years. In thesame vein, we compare the arc-minute resolution Atacama CosmologyTelescope (ACT) and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). CMB interferometersare presented briefly. We conclude with a comparison of the four CMBsatellites, Relikt, COBE, WMAP, and Planck, to demonstrate a remarkableevolution in design, sensitivity, resolution, and complexity over the past30 years.

  7. Optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected telescopes.

    PubMed

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D

    2015-04-16

    Highest resolution imaging in astronomy is achieved by interferometry, connecting telescopes over increasingly longer distances and at successively shorter wavelengths. Here, we present the first diffraction-limited images in visual light, produced by an array of independent optical telescopes, connected electronically only, with no optical links between them. With an array of small telescopes, second-order optical coherence of the sources is measured through intensity interferometry over 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, and two-dimensional images reconstructed. The technique aims at diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometre-long baselines to reach resolutions showing details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets. Intensity interferometry circumvents problems of atmospheric turbulence that constrain ordinary interferometry. Since the electronic signal can be copied, many baselines can be built up between dispersed telescopes, and over long distances. Using arrays of air Cherenkov telescopes, this should enable the optical equivalent of interferometric arrays currently operating at radio wavelengths.

  8. World atlas of large optical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    By 1980 there will be approximately 100 large optical telescopes in the world with mirror or lens diameters of one meter (39 inches) and larger. This atlas gives information on these telescopes and shows their locations on continent-sized maps. Observatory locations considered suitable for the construction of future large telescopes are also shown.

  9. Adaptive Optics at the World's Biggest Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, M.; Esposito, S.; Rabien, S.

    2010-09-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona, comprises two 8.4 m primary mirrors on a common mount. The two apertures will be co-phased to create a single telescope with 110 m2 of collecting area and 22.7 m baseline. From the outset, adaptive optics (AO) was incorporated into the design through two adaptive secondary mirrors (ASM), each 91 cm in diameter with 672 actuators, which feed all of the instruments mounted at the telescope's four pairs of Gregorian foci. The first ASM has now seen first light on sky with natural guide stars. Strehl ratios at 1.6 μm under average seeing are estimated to be ~80%, and diffraction-limited performance is maintained for stars down to magnitude 15. At the same time, pioneering work at the 6.5 m MMT telescope has for the first time shown the compelling benefits of ground-layer AO compensation. This technique relies on the signals from multiple laser beacons to sense and correct aberration arising close to the telescope with the result that near IR seeing is reduced by a factor of 2-3 over a field of many arc minutes. Building on these efforts at both telescopes, a project is underway to enhance the LBT's AO capability by the addition of wavefront sensing with multiple laser guide stars. The Advanced Rayleigh Ground-layer adaptive Optics System (ARGOS) is now in the construction phase. We provide an overview of ARGOS and how it foreshadows AO systems destined for the 30 m class telescopes of tomorrow.

  10. Advanced electro-optical imaging techniques. [conference papers on sensor technology applicable to Large Space Telescope program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieski, S. (Editor); Wampler, E. J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The papers presented at the symposium are given which deal with the present state of sensors, as may be applicable to the Large Space Telescope (LST) program. Several aspects of sensors are covered including a discussion of the properties of photocathodes and the operational imaging camera tubes.

  11. Optical synoptic telescopes: new science frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, J. Anthony

    2010-07-01

    Over the past decade, sky surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) have proven the power of large data sets for answering fundamental astrophysical questions. This observational progress, based on a synergy of advances in telescope construction, detectors, and information technology, has had a dramatic impact on nearly all fields of astronomy, and areas of fundamental physics. The next-generation instruments, and the surveys that will be made with them, will maintain this revolutionary progress. The hardware and computational technical challenges and the exciting science opportunities are attracting scientists and engineers from astronomy, optics, low-light-level detectors, high-energy physics, statistics, and computer science. The history of astronomy has taught us repeatedly that there are surprises whenever we view the sky in a new way. This will be particularly true of discoveries emerging from a new generation of sky surveys. Imaging data from large ground-based active optics telescopes with sufficient étendue can address many scientific missions simultaneously. These new investigations will rely on the statistical precision obtainable with billions of objects. For the first time, the full sky will be surveyed deep and fast, opening a new window on a universe of faint moving and distant exploding objects as well as unraveling the mystery of dark energy.

  12. LOITA: Lunar Optical/Infrared Telescope Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    LOITA (Lunar Optical/Infrared Telescope Array) is a lunar-based interferometer composed of 18 alt-azimuth telescopes arranged in a circular geometry. This geometry results in excellent uv coverage and allows baselines up to 5 km long. The angular resolution will be 25 micro-arcsec at 500 nm and the main spectral range of the array will be 200 to 1100 nm. For infrared planet detection, the spectral range may be extended to nearly 10 mu m. The telescope mirrors have a Cassegrain configuration using a 1.75 m diameter primary mirror and a 0.24 m diameter secondary mirror. A three-stage (coarse, intermediate, and fine) optical delay system, controlled by laser metrology, is used to equalize path lengths from different telescopes to within a few wavelengths. All instruments and the fine delay system are located within the instrument room. Upon exiting the fine delay system, all beams enter the beam combiner and are then directed to the various scientific instruments and detectors. The array instrumentation will consist of CCD detectors optimized for both the visible and infrared as well as specially designed cameras and spectrographs. For direct planet detection, a beam combiner employing achromatic nulling interferometry will be used to reduce star light (by several orders of magnitude) while passing the planet light. A single telescope will be capable of autonomous operation. This telescope will be equipped with four instruments: wide field and planetary camera, faint object camera, high resolution spectrograph, and faint object spectrograph. These instruments will be housed beneath the telescope. The array pointing and control system is designed to meet the fine pointing requirement of one micro-arcsec stability and to allow precise tracking of celestial objects for up to 12 days. During the lunar night, the optics and the detectors will be passively cooled to 70-80 K temperature. To maintain a continuous communication with the earth a relay satellite placed at the L4

  13. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Mirror Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Bowers, Charles W.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Heaney, James B.; Gallagher, Benjamin; McKay, Andrew; Stevenson, Ian

    2012-01-01

    James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) mirror coating program has been completed. The science goals of the JWST mission require a uniform, low stress, durable optical coating with high reflectivity over the JWST spectral region. The coating has to be environmentally stable, radiation resistant and compatible with the cryogenic operating environment. The large size, 1.52 m point to point, light weight, beryllium primary mirror (PM) segments and flawless coating process during the flight mirror coating program that consisted coating of 21 flight mirrors were among many technical challenges. This paper provides an overview of the JWST telescope mirror coating program. The paper summarizes the coating development program and performance of the flight mirrors.

  14. Stitching Techniques Advance Optics Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Because NASA depends on the fabrication and testing of large, high-quality aspheric (nonspherical) optics for applications like the James Webb Space Telescope, it sought an improved method for measuring large aspheres. Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Goddard Space Flight Center, QED Technologies, of Rochester, New York, upgraded and enhanced its stitching technology for aspheres. QED developed the SSI-A, which earned the company an R&D 100 award, and also developed a breakthrough machine tool called the aspheric stitching interferometer. The equipment is applied to advanced optics in telescopes, microscopes, cameras, medical scopes, binoculars, and photolithography."

  15. Adaptive-optics performance of Antarctic telescopes.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Jon S

    2004-02-20

    The performance of natural guide star adaptive-optics systems for telescopes located on the Antarctic plateau is evaluated and compared with adaptive-optics systems operated with the characteristic mid-latitude atmosphere found at Mauna Kea. A 2-m telescope with tip-tilt correction and an 8-m telescope equipped with a high-order adaptive-optics system are considered. Because of the large isoplanatic angle of the South Pole atmosphere, the anisoplanatic error associated with an adaptive-optics correction is negligible, and the achievable resolution is determined only by the fitting error associated with the number of corrected wave-front modes, which depends on the number of actuators on the deformable mirror. The usable field of view of an adaptive-optics equipped Antarctic telescope is thus orders of magnitude larger than for a similar telescope located at a mid-latitude site; this large field of view obviates the necessity for multiconjugate adaptive-optics systems that use multiple laser guide stars. These results, combined with the low infrared sky backgrounds, indicate that the Antarctic plateau is the best site on Earth at which to perform high-resolution imaging with large telescopes, either over large fields of view or with appreciable sky coverage. Preliminary site-testing results obtained recently from the Dome Concordia station indicate that this site is far superior to even the South Pole.

  16. Holographic optical elements as scanning lidar telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2006-09-01

    We have developed and investigated the use of holographic optical elements (HOEs) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. Rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis makes a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope. We developed transmission and reflection HOEs for use at the first three harmonic wavelengths of Nd:YAG lasers. The diffraction efficiency, diffraction angle, focal length, focal spot size and optical losses were measured for several HOEs and holographic gratings, and found to be suitable for use as lidar receiver telescopes, and in many cases could also serve as the final collimating and beam steering optic for the laser transmitter. Two lidar systems based on this technology have been designed, built, and successfully tested in atmospheric science applications. This technology will enable future spaceborne lidar missions by significantly lowering the size, weight, power requirement and cost of a large aperture, narrow field of view scanning telescope.

  17. Optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Highest resolution imaging in astronomy is achieved by interferometry, connecting telescopes over increasingly longer distances and at successively shorter wavelengths. Here, we present the first diffraction-limited images in visual light, produced by an array of independent optical telescopes, connected electronically only, with no optical links between them. With an array of small telescopes, second-order optical coherence of the sources is measured through intensity interferometry over 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, and two-dimensional images reconstructed. The technique aims at diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometre-long baselines to reach resolutions showing details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets. Intensity interferometry circumvents problems of atmospheric turbulence that constrain ordinary interferometry. Since the electronic signal can be copied, many baselines can be built up between dispersed telescopes, and over long distances. Using arrays of air Cherenkov telescopes, this should enable the optical equivalent of interferometric arrays currently operating at radio wavelengths. PMID:25880705

  18. Development of a clean optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Particulate contamination on astronomical mirrors degrades performance in two ways: by information loss by extinction of light; and background and noise from scattering, especially forward or Fraunhofer scattering. These effects were not generally understood, and an ambitious pilot program was outlined to measure particulate effects on telescope optical performance; develop prophylactic and cleaning procedures suitable for groundbased observatories; investigate by computational modelling the effects on telescopes in space; and communicate the results and concerns within the astronomical community.

  19. Holographic Optical Elements as Scanning Lidar Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated and developed the use of holographic optical elements (HOE) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. By rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis, a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope is possible. We developed and tested transmission and reflection HOES for use with the first three harmonics of Nd:YAG lasers, and designed, built, and tested two lidar systems based on this technology.

  20. New technology for large optical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jonge, M. J.

    1983-05-01

    A recurrent topic arising in the discussions about new generation large optical telescopes is related to the economic advantages of lightweight reflector surfaces. A description is given of new technologies which might be suited for the construction of lightweight telescopes of low cost. One technology involves the use of sandwich structures, which include aluminum layers, separated by aluminum honeycomb layers. The availability of these structures, which have been developed for aircraft manufacture, has led various groups to study the feasibility of a use of sandwich materials for the manufacture of highly accurate reflecting surfaces, as required for millimeter and submillimeter wave telescopes. The results of these studies are discussed.

  1. The Faulkes Telescope Optical Spectrographs and Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul

    The Faulkes Telescope project funded primarily by the Dill Faulkes Educational Trust is currently constructing two 2-m robotic telescopes to be located in Hawaii and Australia. These will be the largest and most powerful telescopes ever built dedicated for use by schools and colleges. We have been awarded funding to build two optical spectrographs to be permanently mounted on these telescopes by the end of 2003. At this time an astronomical satellite called Swift will be launched by NASA. Swift is dedicated to the study of gamma-ray bursts the most powerful explosive events in the Universe. The Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leicester has provided the X-ray camera for Swift and is a partner in the Faulkes Telescopes project. To enhance both projects we intend to use the Faulkes Telescope optical spectrographs to study the gamma-ray bursts identified by Swift. These data will also be made available to schools thereby raising the profile of physics and astronomy in the educational community.

  2. Limits on Lyot coronagraphy with AEOS adaptive optics telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Makidon, R. B.; Lloyd, J. P.; Oppenheimer, B. R.; Graham, J. R.; Kalas, P. G.; Macintosh, B. A.; Max, C. E.; Baudoz, P.; Kuhn, J.; Potter, D.

    2001-05-01

    The 3.6m Air Force Electo-Optical System telescope is the most advanced adaptive optics (AO) system available to the astronomical community. Its 941-channel AO system feeds several stable instrument platforms at a very slow Cassegrain focus. Its small secondary obscuration makes it ideal for AO coronagraphy. We present estimates of current and theoretical limits on dynamic range using a diffraction-limited Lyot coronagraph optimized for the 3.6m AEOS telescope. We incorporate both the effects of imperfect AO correction of the wavefront and telescope guiding errors in our simulations. We calculate limits on faint companion detection (in the H-band) for this system at separations between 0.36 and 1.3 arcseconds.

  3. Cherenkov telescopes as optical telescopes for bright sources: today's specialized 30-m telescopes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Brian C.

    2011-10-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) use large-aperture (3-30 m) optical telescopes with arcminute angular resolution to detect TeV gamma-rays in the atmosphere. I show that IACTs are well suited for optical observations of bright sources (V≲ 8-10), because these sources are brighter than the sky background. Their advantages are especially great on rapid time-scales. Thus, IACTs might study many phenomena optically, including transiting exoplanets and the brightest gamma-ray bursts. In principle, an IACT could achieve millimagnitude photometry of these objects with second-long exposures. I also consider the potential for optical spectroscopy with IACTs, finding that their poor angular resolution limits their usefulness for high spectral resolutions, unless complex instruments are developed. The high photon collection rate of IACTs is potentially useful for precise polarimetry. Finally, I briefly discuss the broader possibilities of extremely large, low-resolution telescopes, including a 10 arcsec resolution telescope and space-borne telescopes.

  4. Freeform Optical Design of Two Mirror Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph; West, Garrett; Trumper, Isaac; Anderson, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Two Mirror telescopes composed of freeform optical surfaces are investigated and surveyed to explore the usable design space. F-number and field of view are evaluated and plotted. A case study is presented to show the benefits of volume reduction using freeform surfaces.

  5. Solar optical telescope primary mirror controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. J.; Liu, D.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a technique to control the articulated primary mirror (APM) of the solar optical telescope (SOT) is discussed. Program results indicate that a single, all digital controller has sufficient capability to totally handle the computational requirements for control of the SOT APM.

  6. The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope: beginning construction of the world's largest solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, T. R.; Wagner, J.; Keil, S.; Elmore, D.; Hubbard, R.; Hansen, E.; Warner, M.; Jeffers, P.; Phelps, L.; Marshall, H.; Goodrich, B.; Richards, K.; Hegwer, S.; Kneale, R.; Ditsler, J.

    2010-07-01

    The 4m Advance Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope and the world's leading ground-based resource for studying solar magnetism that controls the solar wind, flares, coronal mass ejections and variability in the Sun's output. The project has successfully passed its final design review and the Environmental Impact Study for construction of ATST on Haleakala, Maui, HI has been concluded in December of 2009. The project is now entering its construction phase. As its highest priority science driver ATST shall provide high resolution and high sensitivity observations of the dynamic solar magnetic fields throughout the solar atmosphere, including the corona at infrared wavelengths. With its 4 m aperture, ATST will resolve features at 0."03 at visible wavelengths and obtain 0."1 resolution at the magnetically highly sensitive near infrared wavelengths. A high order adaptive optics system delivers a corrected beam to the initial set of state-of-the-art, facility class instrumentation located in the coudé laboratory facility. The initial set of first generation instruments consists of five facility class instruments, including imagers and spectropolarimeters. The high polarimetric sensitivity and accuracy required for measurements of the illusive solar magnetic fields place strong constraints on the polarization analysis and calibration. Development and construction of a fourmeter solar telescope presents many technical challenges, including thermal control of the enclosure, telescope structure and optics and wavefront control. A brief overview of the science goals and observational requirements of the ATST will be given, followed by a summary of the design status of the telescope and its instrumentation, including design status of major subsystems, such as the telescope mount assembly, enclosure, mirror assemblies, and wavefront correction

  7. Holographic Optical Elements as Scanning Lidar Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed and investigated the use of holographic optical elements (HOEs) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. For example, rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis makes a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope. We developed and tested transmission and reflection HOEs for use at the first three harmonic wavelengths of Nd:YAG lasers. The diffraction efficiency, diffraction angle, focal length, focal spot size and optical losses were measured for several HOEs and holographic gratings, and found to be suitable for use as lidar receiver telescopes, and in many cases could also serve as the final collimating and beam steering optic for the laser transmitter. Two lidar systems based on this technology have been designed, built, and successfully tested in atmospheric science applications. This technology will enable future spaceborne lidar missions by significantly lowering the size, weight, power requirement and cost of a large aperture, narrow field of view scanning telescope.

  8. Integrated optics interferometric four telescopes nuller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errmann, Ronny; Minardi, Stefano; Labadie, Lucas; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Pertsch, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Nulling interferometry has been identified as a competitive technique for the detection of extrasolar planets. The technique consists in combining out-of-phase pairs of telescopes to null effectively the light of a bright star an reveal the dim glow of the companion. We have manufactured and tested with monochromatic light an integrated optics component which combines a linear array of 4 telescopes in the nulling mode envisaged by Angel&Wolf.1 Our testbench simulates the motion of a star in the sky. The tests have demonstrated a nulling scaling as the fourth power of the baseline delay.

  9. Advances in Small-Telescope Speckle Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, David J.

    2016-06-01

    The current revolution in CMOS camera technology has enabled a new generation of small telescope systems targeted at the measurement of close binary systems using the techniques of speckle interferometry and bispectrum analysis. These inexpensive, ultra-sensitive, high resolution cameras are now outperforming CCD technology, and come at a truly affordable price. In addition, dedicated, user-friendly speckle interferometry reduction software has been developed for the amateur, making it easy to perform the otherwise complicated data processing tasks. This talk will address these recent advances in hardware and software, and describe some of the results of the informal amateur-professional collaboration that has formed around them.

  10. Productivity and Impact of Optical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia; Zaich, Paul; Bosler, Tammy

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, about 2100 papers appearing in 18 journals reported and/or analyzed data collected with ground-based optical and infrared telescopes and the Hubble Space Telescope. About 250 telescopes were represented, including 25 with primary mirror diameters of 3 m or larger. The subjects covered in the papers divide reasonably cleanly into 20 areas, from solar system to cosmology. These papers were cited 24,354 times in 2002 and 2003, for a mean rate of 11.56 citations per paper, or 5.78 citations per paper per year (sometimes called impact or impact factor). We analyze here the distributions of the papers, citations, and impact factors among the telescopes and subject areas and compare the results with those of a very similar study of papers published in 1990-1991 and cited in 1993. Some of the results are exactly as expected. Big telescopes produce more papers and more citations per paper than small ones. There are fashionable topics (cosmology and exoplanets) and less fashionable ones (binary stars and planetary nebulae). And the Hubble Space Telescope has changed the landscape a great deal. Some other results surprised us but are explicable in retrospect. Small telescopes on well-supported sites (La Silla and Cerro Tololo, for instance) produce papers with larger impact factors than similar sized telescopes in relative isolation. Not just the fraction of all papers, but the absolute numbers of papers coming out of the most productive 4 m telescopes of a decade ago have gone down. The average number of citations per paper per year resulting from the 38 telescopes (2 m and larger) considered in 1993 has gone up 38%, from 3.48 to 4.81, a form, perhaps, of grade inflation. And 53% of the 2100 papers and 38% of the citations (including 44% of the papers and 31% of the citations from mirrors of 3 m and larger) pertain to topics often not regarded as major drivers for the next generation of still larger ground-based telescopes.

  11. Silicon pore optics for the ATHENA telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collon, Maximilien J.; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Günther, Ramses; Yanson, Alex; Barriere, Nicolas; Landgraf, Boris; Vervest, Mark; Chatbi, Abdelhakim; van der Hoeven, Roy; Beijersbergen, Marco W.; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric; Shortt, Brian; Haneveld, Jeroen; Koelewijn, Arenda; van Baren, Coen; Eigenraam, Alexander; Müller, Peter; Krumrey, Michael; Burwitz, Vadim; Pareschi, Giovanni; Conconi, Paolo; Massahi, Sonny; Christensen, Finn E.; Valsecchi, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Silicon Pore Optics is a high-energy optics technology, invented to enable the next generation of high-resolution, large area X-ray telescopes such as the ATHENA observatory, a European large (L) class mission with a launch date of 2028. The technology development is carried out by a consortium of industrial and academic partners and focuses on building an optics with a focal length of 12 m that shall achieve an angular resolution better than 5". So far we have built optics with a focal length of 50 m and 20 m. This paper presents details of the work carried out to build silicon stacks for a 12 m optics and to integrate them into mirror modules. It will also present results of x-ray tests taking place at PTB's XPBF with synchrotron radiation and the PANTER test facility.

  12. The Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roming, P. W. A.; Hunsberger, S. D.; Nousek, J. A.; Mason, K. O.; Breeveld, A. A.

    2003-05-01

    The Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) aboard the Swift Gamma-ray Burst Observatory provides the Swift mission with the capability of detecting the early UV/optical photons of GRB afterglows. The UVOT is a Ritchey-Chrétien telescope with MCP intensified CCD detectors that can operate in either a photon-timing mode or an imaging mode while providing sub-arcsecond resolution. A filter wheel houses sensitive broadband UV and visual filters for determining photometric redshifts. The filter wheel also accommodates UV and visual grisms for performing low-resolution spectroscopy. We present an overview of the instrument as well as a summary of the calibration results. We also discuss some of the science to be accomplished with the UVOT. This work is sponsored at Penn State by NASA's Office of Space Science through contract NAS5-00136, and at MSSL by funding from PPARC.

  13. Advanced Source Deconvolution Methods for Compton Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoglauer, Andreas

    The next generation of space telescopes utilizing Compton scattering for astrophysical observations is destined to one day unravel the mysteries behind Galactic nucleosynthesis, to determine the origin of the positron annihilation excess near the Galactic center, and to uncover the hidden emission mechanisms behind gamma-ray bursts. Besides astrophysics, Compton telescopes are establishing themselves in heliophysics, planetary sciences, medical imaging, accelerator physics, and environmental monitoring. Since the COMPTEL days, great advances in the achievable energy and position resolution were possible, creating an extremely vast, but also extremely sparsely sampled data space. Unfortunately, the optimum way to analyze the data from the next generation of Compton telescopes has not yet been found, which can retrieve all source parameters (location, spectrum, polarization, flux) and achieves the best possible resolution and sensitivity at the same time. This is especially important for all sciences objectives looking at the inner Galaxy: the large amount of expected sources, the high background (internal and Galactic diffuse emission), and the limited angular resolution, make it the most taxing case for data analysis. In general, two key challenges exist: First, what are the best data space representations to answer the specific science questions? Second, what is the best way to deconvolve the data to fully retrieve the source parameters? For modern Compton telescopes, the existing data space representations can either correctly reconstruct the absolute flux (binned mode) or achieve the best possible resolution (list-mode), both together were not possible up to now. Here we propose to develop a two-stage hybrid reconstruction method which combines the best aspects of both. Using a proof-of-concept implementation we can for the first time show that it is possible to alternate during each deconvolution step between a binned-mode approach to get the flux right and a

  14. The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, L.; Barr, J.; Dalrymple, N.; Fraser, M.; Hubbard, R.; Wagner, J.; Warner, M.

    2006-06-01

    Telescope enclosure design is based on an increasingly standard set of criteria. Enclosures must provide failsafe protection in a harsh environment for an irreplaceable piece of equipment; must allow effective air flushing to minimize local seeing while still attenuating wind-induced vibration of the telescope; must reliably operate so that the dome is never the reason for observatory down time; must provide access to utilities, lifting devices and support facilities; and they must be affordable within the overall project budget. The enclosure for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has to satisfy all these challenging requirements plus one more. To eliminate so-called external dome seeing, the exterior surfaces of the enclosure must be maintained at or just below ambient air temperature while being subjected to the full solar loading of an observing day. Further complicating the design of the ATST enclosure and support facilities are the environmental sensitivities and high construction costs at the selected site - the summit of Haleakala on the island of Maui, Hawaii. Previous development work has determined an appropriate enclosure shape to minimize solar exposure while allowing effective interior flushing, and has demonstrated the feasibility of controlling the exterior skin temperature with an active cooling system. This paper presents the evolution of the design since site selection and how the enclosure and associated thermal systems have been tailored to the particular climatic and terrain conditions of the site. Also discussed are load-reduction strategies that have been identified through thermal modeling, CFD modeling, and other analyses to refine and economize the thermal control systems.

  15. Optical design of the Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, Malcolm J.; Dunham, Edward W.

    2004-10-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) is a joint venture between Discovery Communications and Lowell Observatory. The telescope will have a 4.2-meter clear aperture, active primary mirror working at F/1.9. Two observing stations are presently planned; a Ritchey-Chretien focus some two meters behind the vertex of the primary mirror and a prime focus featuring a wide-field optical corrector (WFOC) with a two-degree field of view. The Ritchey-Chretien focus will be used for a variety of optical and near infrared imaging and spectroscopic instrumentation while the prime focus will be largely used as a survey tool to search for near-earth and Kuiper belt objects, for example. In order to take advantage of sub-arc second seeing at the DCT site, a stringent set of requirements has been placed on the two foci. The requirements are for the full-width, half-maximum (FWHM) image of a point source to be less than 0.20 arc second at the Ritchey-Chretien focus over a 21 arc minute field and less than 0.27 arc second at prime focus in each of six filter bands including a very broad band for survey purposes. This paper describes the optical design of the field correctors at the two foci. Particular attention is paid to the WFOC. This state of the art device poses a number of optical challenges which are discussed here, as well as mechanical challenges which are discussed elsewhere.

  16. The NIRCam Optical Telescope Simulator (NOTES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubalak, David; Hakun, Claef; Greeley, Bradford; Eichorn, William; Leviton, Douglas; Guishard, Corina; Gong, Qian; Warner, Thomas; Bugby, David; Robinson, Frederick; Lansing, Peter; Garza, Mario; Kirk, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    The Near Infra-Red Camera (NIRCam), the 0.6-5.0 micron imager and wavefront sensing instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), will be used on orbit both as a science instrument, and to tune the alignment of the telescope. The NIRCam Optical Telescope Element Simulator (NOTES) will be used during ground testing to provide an external stimulus to verify wavefront error, imaging characteristics, and wavefront sensing performance of this crucial instrument. NOTES is being designed and built by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center with the help of Swales Aerospace and Orbital Sciences Corporation. It is a single-point imaging system that uses an elliptical mirror to form an U20 image of a point source. The point source will be fed via optical fibers from outside the vacuum chamber. A tip/tilt mirror is used to change the chief ray angle of the beam as it passes through the aperture stop and thus steer the image over NIRCam's field of view without moving the pupil or introducing field aberrations. Interchangeable aperture stop elements allow us to simulate perfect JWST wavefronts for wavefront error testing, or introduce transmissive phase plates to simulate a misaligned JWST segmented mirror for wavefront sensing verification. NOTES will be maintained at an operating temperature of 80K during testing using thermal switches, allowing it to operate within the same test chamber as the NIRCam instrument. We discuss NOTES' current design status and on-going development activities.

  17. Advanced X-Ray Telescope Mirrors Provide Sharpest Focus Ever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-03-01

    Performing beyond expectations, the high- resolution mirrors for NASA's most powerful orbiting X-ray telescope have successfully completed initial testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Calibration Facility, Huntsville, AL. "We have the first ground test images ever generated by the telescope's mirror assembly, and they are as good as -- or better than -- expected," said Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Marshall's chief scientist for NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The mirror assembly, four pairs of precisely shaped and aligned cylindrical mirrors, will form the heart of NASA's third great observatory. The X-ray telescope produces an image by directing incoming X-rays to detectors at a focal point some 30 feet beyond the telescope's mirrors. The greater the percentage of X-rays brought to focus and the smaller the size of the focal spot, the sharper the image. Tests show that on orbit, the mirror assembly of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility will be able to focus approximately 70 percent of X-rays from a source to a spot less than one-half arc second in radius. The telescope's resolution is equivalent to being able to read the text of a newspaper from half a mile away. "The telescope's focus is very clear, very sharp," said Weisskopf. "It will be able to show us details of very distant sources that we know are out there, but haven't been able to see clearly." In comparison, previous X-ray telescopes -- Einstein and Rosat -- were only capable of focusing X- rays to five arc seconds. The Advanced X-ray Telescope's resolving power is ten times greater. "Images from the new telescope will allow us to make major advances toward understanding how exploding stars create and disperse many of the elements necessary for new solar systems and for life itself," said Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Advanced X- ray Astrophysics Facility Science Center at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, in Cambridge, MA -- responsible for the telescope

  18. Active optics control of VST telescope secondary mirror.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; D'Orsi, Sergio; Fierro, Davide; Marty, Laurent

    2010-06-01

    In telescopes based on active optics, defocus and coma are usually compensated for by secondary mirror movements. They are performed at the Very Large Telescope Survey Telescope (VST) with a hexapod--a parallel robot with six degrees of freedom positioning capability. We describe the application of the two-mirror telescope theory to the VST case and the solutions adopted for the hexapod control. We present the results of performance and reliability tests performed both in the laboratory and at the telescope.

  19. The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope: design and early construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, Joseph P.; Rimmele, Thomas R.; Keil, Stephen L.; Warner, Mark; Barden, Samuel; Bulau, Scott; Craig, Simon; Goodrich, Bret; Hansen, Eric; Hegwer, Steve; Hubbard, Robert; McBride, William; Shimko, Steve; Wöger, Friedrich; Ditsler, Jennifer

    2012-09-01

    The National Solar Observatory’s (NSO) Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) is the first large U.S. solar telescope accessible to the worldwide solar physics community to be constructed in more than 30 years. The 4-meter diameter facility will operate over a broad wavelength range (0.35 to 28 μm ), employing adaptive optics systems to achieve diffraction limited imaging and resolve features approximately 20 km on the Sun; the key observational parameters (collecting area, spatial resolution, spectral coverage, polarization accuracy, low scattered light) enable resolution of the theoretically-predicted, fine-scale magnetic features and their dynamics which modulate the radiative output of the sun and drive the release of magnetic energy from the Sun’s atmosphere in the form of flares and coronal mass ejections. In 2010, the ATST received a significant fraction of its funding for construction. In the subsequent two years, the project has hired staff and opened an office on Maui. A number of large industrial contracts have been placed throughout the world to complete the detailed designs and begin constructing the major telescope subsystems. These contracts have included the site development, AandE designs, mirrors, polishing, optic support assemblies, telescope mount and coudé rotator structures, enclosure, thermal and mechanical systems, and high-level software and controls. In addition, design development work on the instrument suite has undergone significant progress; this has included the completion of preliminary design reviews (PDR) for all five facility instruments. Permitting required for physically starting construction on the mountaintop of Haleakalā, Maui has also progressed. This paper will review the ATST goals and specifications, describe each of the major subsystems under construction, and review the contracts and lessons learned during the contracting and early construction phases. Schedules for site construction, key factory testing of

  20. Lunar optical telescopes: An historical perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Stewart W.

    1992-01-01

    There is a long history of thought and discussion on the possibilities of astronomical observatories on the Moon. Numerous ideas have been suggested and a variety of concepts have resulted for lunar optical telescopes. This paper reviews some of the ideas and efforts of individuals and working groups including Hershel, Clarke, Malina, Herbig, and Hess; working groups of the 1960s; and recent initiatives of Burke, Burns, and others. The enhanced technologies of the 1980s and 1990s can make past dreams of lunar observatories come to reality in the 21st century.

  1. Optimizing Orbital Debris Monitoring with Optical Telescopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Continued growth in the orbital debris population has renewed concerns over the long-term use of space. Debris poses an increasing risk to manned...in a catalog. Passive optical systems hold great promise to provide a cost-effective means to monitor orbital debris . Recent advances in optical...non-tracking mode for uncued debris detection. The governing radiometric equations for sensing orbital debris are developed, illustrating the

  2. Science with the solar optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, S. D.; Hogan, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) is designed to provide the solar physics community with the data necessary for solving several fundamental problems in the energetics and dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Among these problems are questions on the origin and evolution of the sun's magnetic field, heating of the outer solar atmosphere, and sources of the solar wind in the lower lying regions of the outer atmosphere. The SOT will be built under the management of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, with science instruments provided by teams led by Principal Investigators. The telescope will be built by the Perkin-Elmer Corporation, and the science instruments selected for the first flight will be provided by the Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory (LPARL) and the California Institute of Technology, with actual construction of a combined science instrument taking place at the LPARL. The SOT has a 1.3-meter-diameter primary mirror that will be capable of achieving diffraction-limited viewing in the visible of 0.1 arc-second. This dimension is less than a hydrodynamic scale-height or a mean-free-path of a continuum photon in the solar atmosphere. Image stability will be achieved by a control system in the telescope, which moves both the primary and tertiary mirrors in tandem, and will be further enhanced by a correlation tracker in the combined science instrument. The SOT Facility is currently scheduled for its first flight on Spacelab at the beginning of the 1990's.

  3. Adaptive optics at the Subaru telescope: current capabilities and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Oya, Shin; Minowa, Yosuke; Lai, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Takato, Naruhisa; Kasdin, Jeremy; Groff, Tyler; Hayashi, Masahiko; Arimoto, Nobuo; Takami, Hideki; Bradley, Colin; Sugai, Hajime; Perrin, Guy; Tuthill, Peter; Mazin, Ben

    2014-08-01

    Current AO observations rely heavily on the AO188 instrument, a 188-elements system that can operate in natural or laser guide star (LGS) mode, and delivers diffraction-limited images in near-IR. In its LGS mode, laser light is transported from the solid state laser to the launch telescope by a single mode fiber. AO188 can feed several instruments: the infrared camera and spectrograph (IRCS), a high contrast imaging instrument (HiCIAO) or an optical integral field spectrograph (Kyoto-3DII). Adaptive optics development in support of exoplanet observations has been and continues to be very active. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme-AO (SCExAO) system, which combines extreme-AO correction with advanced coronagraphy, is in the commissioning phase, and will greatly increase Subaru Telescope's ability to image and study exoplanets. SCExAO currently feeds light to HiCIAO, and will soon be combined with the CHARIS integral field spectrograph and the fast frame MKIDs exoplanet camera, which have both been specifically designed for high contrast imaging. SCExAO also feeds two visible-light single pupil interferometers: VAMPIRES and FIRST. In parallel to these direct imaging activities, a near-IR high precision spectrograph (IRD) is under development for observing exoplanets with the radial velocity technique. Wide-field adaptive optics techniques are also being pursued. The RAVEN multi-object adaptive optics instrument was installed on Subaru telescope in early 2014. Subaru Telescope is also planning wide field imaging with ground-layer AO with the ULTIMATE-Subaru project.

  4. The Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roming, Peter; Hunsberger, Sally; Nousek, John; Ivanushkina, Mariya; Mason, Keith; Breeveld, Alice; Gehrels, Neil

    2004-05-01

    The Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) is one of three telescopes on board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. It supplies the Swift mission with the ability to detect the early UV and optical photons of GRB afterglows. The UVOT is of a modified Ritchey-Chrétien design with MCP intensified CCD detectors that provide sub-arcsecond resolution while operating in both a photon-timing and an imaging mode. A filter wheel accommodates broadband UV and visual filters for determining photometric redshifts in the range of 1.5 < z < 4.4. The filter wheel also houses UV and visual grisms for low-resolution spectroscopy. The UVOT will help answer questions about GRBs such as: how many times has reionization occurred in the Universe; what is the nature of dark bursts; what is the initial Lorentz factor of the fireball; and are there subclasses or new classes of GRBs? This work is sponsored at Penn State by NASA's Office of Space Science through contract NAS5-00136, and at MSSL by funding from PPARC.

  5. Adaptive Optics at the World’s Biggest Optical Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    bottom up. The reflective, and deformable, component of each of the LBT’s mirrors is a concave Zerodur shell, 1.6 mm in average thickness and 911 mm in...Physik, 85748 Garching, Germany ABSTRACT The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona, comprises two 8.4 m primary mirrors on a...adaptive optics (AO) was incorporated into the design through two adaptive secondary mirrors (ASM), each 91 cm in diameter with 672 actuators, which feed

  6. An optics education program designed around experiments with small telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.; Dokter, Erin F. C.

    2010-08-01

    The National Optical Astronomy Observatory has led the development of a new telescope kit for kids as part of a strategic plan to interest young children in science. This telescope has been assembled by tens of thousands of children nationwide, who are now using this high-quality telescope to conduct optics experiments and to make astronomical observations. The Galileoscope telescope kit and its associated educational program are an outgrowth of the NSF sponsored "Hands-On Optics" (HOO) project, a collaboration of the SPIE, the Optical Society of America, and NOAO. This project developed optics kits and activities for upper elementary students and has reached over 20,000 middle school kids in afterschool programs. HOO is a highly flexible educational program and was featured as an exemplary informal science program by the National Science Teachers Association. Our new "Teaching with Telescopes" program builds on HOO, the Galileoscope and other successful optical education projects.

  7. Optical design study of the Wide Field Survey Telescope (WFST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Zheng; Liang, Ming; Yao, Dazhi; Zheng, Xianzhong; Cheng, Jingquan; Wang, Hairen; Liu, Wei; Qian, Yuan; Zhao, Haibin; Yang, Ji

    2016-10-01

    WFST is a proposed 2.5m wide field survey telescope intended for dedicated wide field sciences. The telescope is to operate at six wavelength bands (u, g, r, i, z, and w), spanning from 320 to 1028 nm. Designed with a field of view diameter of 3 degree and an effective aperture diameter of 2.29 m, the WFST acquires a total optical throughput over 29.3 m2deg2. With such a large throughput, WFST will survey up to 6000deg2 of the northern sky in multiple colors each night, reaching 23th magnitude for high-precision photometry and astrometry. The optical design is based on an advanced primary-focus system made up of a 2.5 m f/2.48 concave primary mirror and a primary-focus assembly (PFA) consisting of five corrector lenses, atmospheric dispersion corrector (ADC), filters, and the focal-plane instrument. For zenith angles from 0 to 60 degrees, 80% of the polychromatic diffracted energy falls within a 0.35 arcsec diameter. The optical design also highlights an enhanced transmission in the UV bands. The total optical transmission reaches 23.5% at 320 nm, allowing unique science goals in the U band. Other features include low distortion and ease of baffling against stray lights, etc. The focal-plane instrument is a 0.9 gigapixel mosaic CCD camera comprising 9 pieces of 10K×10K CCD chips. An active optics system (AOS) is used to maintain runtime image quality. Various design aspects of the WFST including the optical design, active optics, mirror supports, and the focal-plane instrument are discussed in detail.

  8. Advanced Technology Solar Telescope lower enclosure thermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, L.; Warner, M.

    2008-07-01

    The exterior of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope enclosure requires cooling to eliminate so-called external dome seeing caused by solar loading during the observing day. This is achieved by way of coolant circulation through external plate coil panels, thereby maintaining the exterior surfaces of the enclosure at or just below ambient air temperature. As the distance from the optical path increases (e.g., on the surface of the lower enclosure), the stringency of the temperature requirement is diminished, thereby allowing a greater difference between the surface temperature and the ambient air temperature. This paper presents a comparison of the modeled performance of an active thermal control strategy on the lower enclosure to a passive strategy that employs concrete panels. A life-cycle cost analysis of each option is also presented.

  9. An optical technology study on large aperture telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D.

    1985-01-01

    The difficult and crucial problem of selecting a suitable telescope concept for an advanced space observatory was examined. To this end two and four mirror telescopes were analyzed and compared. Both configurations are very practical and structurally similar. Parabolic primary and spherical primary four mirror telescope were compared with respect to their performance and the alignment sensitivities of the three correction mirrors. A 1 meter class afocal telescope system with lag angle compensation, to be used in a LIDAR experiment, was examined.

  10. Telescope simulators for Hubble: an overview of optical designs.

    PubMed

    Davila, P; Wood, H J; Atcheson, P D; Saunders, R; Sullivan, J; Vaughan, A H; Saisse, M

    1993-04-01

    Various optical configurations for Hubble Space Telescope simulators have been proposed, and some are being built for use as verification tools to characterize the performance of second-generation instruments during ground testing. We describe the Hubble Space Telescope, present an overview of three optical designs for simulators, and discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of each configuration.

  11. Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope (ADEPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Charles L. Bennett

    2009-03-26

    In 2006, we proposed to NASA a detailed concept study of ADEPT (the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope), a potential space mission to reliably measure the time-evolution of dark energy by conducting the largest effective volume survey of the universe ever done. A peer-review panel of scientific, management, and technical experts reported back the highest possible 'excellent' rating for ADEPT. We have since made substantial advances in the scientific and technical maturity of the mission design. With this Department of Energy (DOE) award we were granted supplemental funding to support specific extended research items that were not included in the NASA proposal, many of which were intended to broadly advance future dark energy research, as laid out by the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF). The proposed work had three targets: (1) the adaptation of large-format infrared arrays to a 2 micron cut-off; (2) analytical research to improve the understanding of the dark energy figure-of- merit; and (3) extended studies of baryon acoustic oscillation systematic uncertainties. Since the actual award was only for {approx}10% of the proposed amount item (1) was dropped and item (2) work was severely restricted, consistent with the referee reviews of the proposal, although there was considerable contradictions between reviewer comments and several comments that displayed a lack of familiarity with the research. None the less, item (3) was the focus of the work. To characterize the nature of the dark energy, ADEPT is designed to observe baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in a large galaxy redshift survey and to obtain substantial numbers of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The 2003 Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) made a precise determination of the BAO 'standard ruler' scale, as it was imprinted on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at z {approx} 1090. The standard ruler was also imprinted on the pattern of galaxies, and was first detected in 2005 in Sloan

  12. Spherical primary optical telescope (SPOT) segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christopher; Hagopian, John; DeMarco, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The spherical primary optical telescope (SPOT) project is an internal research and development program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The goals of the program are to develop a robust and cost effective way to manufacture spherical mirror segments and demonstrate a new wavefront sensing approach for continuous phasing across the segmented primary. This paper focuses on the fabrication of the mirror segments. Significant cost savings were achieved through the design, since it allowed the mirror segments to be cast rather than machined from a glass blank. Casting was followed by conventional figuring at Goddard Space Flight Center. After polishing, the mirror segments were mounted to their composite assemblies. QED Technologies used magnetorheological finishing (MRF®) for the final figuring. The MRF process polished the mirrors while they were mounted to their composite assemblies. Each assembly included several magnetic invar plugs that extended to within an inch of the face of the mirror. As part of this project, the interaction between the MRF magnetic field and invar plugs was evaluated. By properly selecting the polishing conditions, MRF was able to significantly improve the figure of the mounted segments. The final MRF figuring demonstrates that mirrors, in the mounted configuration, can be polished and tested to specification. There are significant process capability advantes due to polishing and testing the optics in their final, end-use assembled state.

  13. Active optics in Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ming; Krabbendam, Victor; Claver, Charles F.; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Xin, Bo

    2012-09-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) has a 3.5º field of view and F/1.2 focus that makes the performance quite sensitive to the perturbations of misalignments and mirror surface deformations. In order to maintain the image quality, LSST has an active optics system (AOS) to measure and correct those perturbations in a closed loop. The perturbed wavefront errors are measured by the wavefront sensors (WFS) located at the four corners of the focal plane. The perturbations are solved by the non-linear least square algorithm by minimizing the rms variation of the measured and baseline designed wavefront errors. Then the correction is realized by applying the inverse of the perturbations to the optical system. In this paper, we will describe the correction processing in the LSST AOS. We also will discuss the application of the algorithm, the properties of the sensitivity matrix and the stabilities of the correction. A simulation model, using ZEMAX as a ray tracing engine and MATLAB as an analysis platform, is set up to simulate the testing and correction loop of the LSST AOS. Several simulation examples and results are presented.

  14. Simulating x-ray telescopes with McXtrace: a case study of ATHENA's optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Desiree D. M.; Knudsen, Erik B.; Westergaard, Niels J.; Christensen, Finn E.; Massahi, Sonny; Shortt, Brian; Spiga, Daniele; Solstad, Mathias; Lefmann, Kim

    2016-07-01

    We use the X-ray ray-tracing package McXtrace to simulate the performance of X-ray telescopes based on Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) technologies. We use as reference the design of the optics of the planned X-ray mission Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics (ATHENA) which is designed as a single X-ray telescope populated with stacked SPO substrates forming mirror modules to focus X-ray photons. We show that is possible to simulate in detail the SPO pores and qualify the use of McXtrace for in-depth analysis of in-orbit performance and laboratory X-ray test results.

  15. Cost Modeling for Space Optical Telescope Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Luedtke, Alexander; West, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper reviews an on-going effort to develop cost modes for space telescopes. This paper summarizes the methodology used to develop cost models and documents how changes to the database have changed previously published preliminary cost models. While the cost models are evolving, the previously published findings remain valid: it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; technology development as a function of time reduces cost; and lower areal density telescopes cost more than more massive telescopes.

  16. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element/Integrated Science Instrument Module (OTIS) Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Voyton, Mark; Lander, Juli; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Matthews, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) are integrated together to form the OTIS. Once integrated, the OTIS undergoes primary mirror center of curvature optical tests, electrical and operational tests, acoustics and vibration testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center before being shipped to the Johnson Space Center for cryogenic optical testing of the OTIS. In preparation for the cryogenic optical testing, the JWST project has built a Pathfinder telescope and has completed two Optical Ground System Equipment (OGSE) cryogenic optical tests with the Pathfinder. In this paper, we will summarize optical test results to date and status the final Pathfinder test and the OTIS integration and environmental test preparations

  17. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.

    2004-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) is a segmented, cryogenic telescope scheduled for launch in 2011. In September of 2002, NASA selected prime contractor Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST) to build the observatory including management of the OTE. NGST is teamed with subcontractors Ball Aerospace, Alliant Techsystems (ATK). and Kodak. The team has completed several significant design, technology, architecture definition, and manufacturing milestones in the past year that are summarized in this paper.

  18. Active optics system of the VLT Survey Telescope.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; Noethe, Lothar; Magrin, Demetrio; Kuijken, Konrad; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Argomedo, Javier; Capaccioli, Massimo; Dall'Ora, Massimo; D'Orsi, Sergio; Farinato, Jacopo; Fierro, Davide; Holzlöhner, Ronald; Marty, Laurent; Molfese, Cesare; Perrotta, Francesco; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Savarese, Salvatore; Rakich, Andrew; Umbriaco, Gabriele

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the active optics system of the VLT Survey Telescope, the 2.6-m survey telescope designed for visible wavelengths of the European Southern Observatory at Cerro Paranal, in the Atacama desert. The telescope is characterized by a wide field of view (1.42 deg diameter), leading to tighter active optics than in conventional telescopes, in particular for the alignment requirements. We discuss the effects of typical error sources on the image quality and present the specific solutions adopted for wavefront sensing and correction of the aberrations, which are based on the shaping of a monolithic primary mirror and the positioning of the secondary in five degrees of freedom.

  19. Freeform and advanced optics for ELT instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyl, Roland

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we share some recent work performed at REOSC in the domain of advanced optics for space and that is also directly applicable to astronomical instrumentation, e.g. for the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT), the construction of which has already started. We present firstly the results of some design investigations performed on Three Mirror Anastigmat (TMA) imaging optics when using freeform optical surfaces clearly showing gain in performance (WFE, distortion, … ) or compactness of the optics. We separate smart freeform from more aggressive freeform offering increased level of gain in design performances. Secondly we present our development in freeform and direct off-axis high performance optical manufacturing capabilities and the industrialization efforts conducted in the frame of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) primary mirror segments. A third subject is the demonstration of an extreme freeform surface manufacturing with the prototyping of a huge 500 mm aperture, 90° deviation angle, F/2.5 high output NA Off Axis Parabola (OAP), a unique achievement aimed to confirm the viability of potential new design opportunities involving such type of extreme optics. Finally we present in this paper our technology development on polishing layer for SiC material, named R-SiC, a polishing layer that reduces costs, risks and schedule for advanced SiC optics manufacturing for Vis and IR applications.

  20. Dynamics and Control of Separated Optics Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettler, E.; Breckenridge, W. G.; Quadrelli, B. M.

    spacecraft composed of 6 bodies: Primary Mirror Membrane, Free Flying Mirror, Focal Plane Assembly, with secondary &tertiary stages, Primary Figure Sensor, Scanning Electron Beam for shape adjustment of PMM, and Orbiting Sunshade. The refractive telescope under consideration represents an advanced concept currently being studied at JPL. Applications of such concept are envisioned in the areas of astrophysical imaging in optical wavelengths, as well as precision Earth observing imaging. The paper describes the dynamics model in the GEO environment, the formation flying estimator model, the control design, the sensor and actuator models, and the performance analysis of the system during a retargeting maneuver under proportional thruster control at the micro-Newton level. We define an orbiting gossamer telescope formation as an ensemble of orbiting optical modules acting as one virtual structure telescope system. After the formation is in place, one may identify what is known as the virtual truss, i.e. the connection between the elements of the formation which provides structural rigidity on account of the information flow between them. The dynamics model takes into account the orbital and spacecraft dynamics of each vehicle. The formation estimator provides estimates of the inter-spacecraft relative position and velocity vectors, given the measurements of a radio-frequency metrology system known as Autonomous Formation Flying sensor. The spacecraft state measurements are provided by models of star trackers, gyros, and accelerometers, together with their bias and noise models. The spacecraft actuation system consists of proportional micro-Newton level field-emission thrusters for precision station-keeping, as well as Newton level thrusters used for retargeting the entire formation. The control system design consists of a proportional-derivative feedback plus acceleration feedforward. This ensures that modeling errors are compensated appropriately, and that the

  1. New Worlds Observer Telescope and Instrument Optical Design Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph M.; Noecker, Charlie; Kendrick, Steve; Woodgate, Bruce; Kilstron, Steve; Cash, Webster

    2008-01-01

    Optical design concepts for the telescope and instrumentation for NASA s New Worlds Observer program are presented. A four-meter multiple channel telescope is discussed, as well as a suite of science instrument concepts. Wide field instrumentation (imager and spectrograph) would be accommodated by a three-mirror-anastigmat telescope design. Planet finding and characterization, and a UV instrument would use a separate channel that is picked off after the first two mirrors (primary and secondary). Guiding concepts are also discussed.

  2. Design of optical systems for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamed, Evgeny R.; Sokolsky, M. N.

    1995-09-01

    On the basis of long-term experience of LOMO PLC in creating large optical systems for ground and space telescopes, with diameter of primary mirror from 1 to 6 meters, the following issues should be considered: principles of constructing optical systems for space telescopes and selecting their optimum design in respect of dimensions/mass and performance criteria; ensuring the fulfillment of image quality requirements in the process of manufacturing optical systems for controlling ground telescope elements in operating conditions; providing automatic adjustment of telescope secondary mirror, automatic focusing, interferometric control of image quality by means of stellar interferometer with radial shift and internal control with Gartman's test. Description of space telescope equipped with primary mirror of diameter 1.5 m, manufactured in LOMO PLC, is given.

  3. United States Atlas of Optical Telescopes. [2nd Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, Stephen Paul

    1987-01-01

    This atlas shows the locations of and gives information about optical telescopes used for astronomical research in the United States as of late 1986. Those instruments with mirror or lens diameters of 3/4 m (approx. 30 inches) and larger are included. These telescopes are concentrated in the Southwest, on the West Coast and on the island of Hawaii.

  4. Adaptive Optics Educational Outreach and the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Walker, C. E.

    2008-06-01

    One of the limiting factors in telescope performance is atmospheric seeing. Atmospheric seeing limits the resolution of ground based optical telescopes. Even telescopes in good locations on top of mountains cannot achieve diffraction-limited resolution. Until recently, the only way to overcome this limitation was to use space-based telescopes. Adaptive Optics (AO) is a collection of technologies that measure the turbulence of Earth's atmosphere and compensate for the turbulence, resulting in high-resolution images without the expense and complexity of space based telescopes. Our Hands-On Optics program has developed activities that teach students how telescopes form images and make observations about the resolution of a telescope. We are developing materials for high school students to use in the study of adaptive optics. These activities include various ways to illustrate atmospheric distortion by using everyday materials such as bubble wrap and mineral oil. We will also illustrate how to demonstrate the workings of a Shack-Hartman sensor to measure atmospheric distortion through the use of a unique model. We will also show activities illustrating two techniques astronomers use to improve the image: tip-tilt mirrors and deformable mirrors. We are developing an activity where students learn how to use a tip-tilt mirror to keep an image focused at one point on a screen. The culminating activity has students learn to use a deformable mirror to correct a distorted wavefront. These activities are being developed in conjunction with the Education program for the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope (GSMT).

  5. Active optics and x-ray telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gérard R.

    2008-07-01

    For more than 40 years in Marseille Provence observatories active optics concepts have found many fruitful developments in uv, visible and ir telescope optics. For these wavelength ranges, active optics methods are now widely extended by current use of variable curvature mirrors, in situ aspherization processes, stress figuring apsherization processes, replications of stressed diffraction gratings, and in situ control of large telescope optics. X-ray telescope mirrors will also benefit soon from the enhanced performances of active optics. For instance, the 0.5-1 arcsec spatial resolution of Chandra will be followed up by increased resolution space telescopes which will require the effective construction of more strictly aplanatic grazing-incidence two-mirror systems. In view to achieve a high-resolution imaging with two-mirror grazing-incidence telescope, say, 0.1 arcsec, this article briefly reviews the alternative optical concepts. Next, active optics analysis is investigated with the elasticity theory of shells for the active aspherization and in situ control of monolithic and segmented telescope mirrors for x-ray astronomy. An elasticity theory of weakly conical shells is developed for a first approach which uses a monotonic extension (or retraction) of the shell.

  6. Optical Design for Extremely Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, Brian J.

    2003-01-01

    Designing an adaptive optics (AO) system for extremely large telescopes (ELT's) will present new optical engineering challenges. Several of these challenges are addressed in this work, including first-order design of multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems, pyramid wavefront sensors (PWFS's), and laser guide star (LGS) spot elongation. MCAO systems need to be designed in consideration of various constraints, including deformable mirror size and correction height. The y,{bar y} method of first-order optical design is a graphical technique that uses a plot with marginal and chief ray heights as coordinates; the optical system is represented as a segmented line. This method is shown to be a powerful tool in designing MCAO systems. From these analyses, important conclusions about configurations are derived. PWFS's, which offer an alternative to Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensors (WFS's), are envisioned as the workhorse of layer-oriented adaptive optics. Current approaches use a 4-faceted glass pyramid to create a WFS analogous to a quad-cell SH WFS. PWFS's and SH WFS's are compared and some newly-considered similarities and PWFS advantages are presented. Techniques to extend PWFS's are offered: First, PWFS's can be extended to more pixels in the image by tiling pyramids contiguously. Second, pyramids, which are difficult to manufacture, can be replaced by less expensive lenslet arrays. An approach is outlined to convert existing SH WFS's to PWFS's for easy evaluation of PWFS's. Also, a demonstration of PWFS's in sensing varying amounts of an aberration is presented. For ELT's, the finite altitude and finite thickness of LGS's means that the LGS will appear elongated from the viewpoint of subapertures not directly under the telescope. Two techniques for dealing with LGS spot elongation in SH WFS's are presented. One method assumes that the laser will be pulsed and uses a segmented micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) to track the LGS light subaperture by

  7. Development of AN Advanced Dust Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, R.; Srowig, A.; Rachev, M.; Grün, E.; Auer, S.; Conlon, T.; Glasmachers, A.; Harris, D.; Helfert, S.; Kempf, S.; Linnemann, H.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Tschernjawski, V.

    2004-12-01

    There are different types of dust particles in interplanetary space, such as dust from comets and asteroids, and interstellar grains traversing the solar system. Based on experience with current space dust instruments, a novel dust telescope is being developed. A dust telescope is a combination of a dust trajectory sensor for the identification and an analyzer for the elemental composition of the dust. Dust particles’ trajectories are determined by the measurement of the electric signals that are induced when a charged grain flies through a position-sensitive electrode system. The objective of the trajectory sensor is to measure dust charges in the range 10-16 10-13 C and dust speeds in the range 6 100 km/s. First tests with a laboratory setup have been performed. The chemical analyzer will have an impact area of 0.1 m2. It consists of a target with an acceleration grid and a single-stage reflectron for energy focusing, and a central ion detector. Results from SIMION simulations show that a mass resolution of M/Δ M>150 can be obtained.

  8. Optical Testing of the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronstein, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror, working to a 2018 launch date. Ground testing for the JWST will occur in two test campaigns, at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center. The talk describes the JWST and its optical ground testing, highlighting the roles of many of the University of Rochester Institute of Optics' alumni as well as current faculty and students.

  9. Advanced Optical Fiber Communication Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Optical Network with Physical Star Topology," Advanced Fiber Communications Technologies , Leonid G. Kazovsky... advances in the performance and capabilities of optical fiber communication systems. While some of these technologies are interrelated (for example...multi gigabit per second hybrid circuit/packet switched lightwave network ," Proc. SPIE Advanced Fiber Communications Technologies , Boston 󈨟, Sept.

  10. New Worlds Observer Telescope and Instrument Optical Design Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph; Kilston, Steve; Kendrick, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Optical design concepts for the telescope and instrumentation for NASA's New Worlds Observer program are presented. First order parameters are derived from the science requirements, and estimated performance metrics are shown using optical models. A four meter multiple channel telescope is discussed, as well as a suite of science instrument concepts. Wide field instrumentation (imager and spectrograph) would be accommodated by a three-mirror anastigmat telescope design. Planet finding and characterization would use a separate channel which is picked off after the first two mirrors (primary and secondary). Guiding concepts are also discussed.

  11. Optical design for a survey x-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Zhang, William W.; McClelland, Ryan S.

    2014-07-01

    Optical design trades are underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to define a telescope for an x-ray survey mission. Top-level science objectives of the mission include the study of x-ray transients, surveying and long-term monitoring of compact objects in nearby galaxies, as well as both deep and wide-field x-ray surveys. In this paper we consider Wolter, Wolter-Schwarzschild, and modified Wolter-Schwarzschild telescope designs as basic building blocks for the tightly nested survey telescope. Design principles and dominating aberrations of individual telescopes and nested telescopes are discussed and we compare the off-axis optical performance at 1.0 KeV and 4.0 KeV across a 1.0 degree full field-of-view.

  12. Optical Design for a Survey X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Zhang, William W.; McClelland, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    Optical design trades are underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to define a telescope for an x-ray survey mission. Top-level science objectives of the mission include the study of x-ray transients, surveying and long-term monitoring of compact objects in nearby galaxies, as well as both deep and wide-field x-ray surveys. In this paper we consider Wolter, Wolter-Schwarzschild, and modified Wolter-Schwarzschild telescope designs as basic building blocks for the tightly nested survey telescope. Design principles and dominating aberrations of individual telescopes and nested telescopes are discussed and we compare the off-axis optical performance at 1.0 KeV and 4.0 KeV across a 1.0-degree full field-of-view.

  13. Optical Metrology for the Segmented Optics on the Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Content, David; Colella, David; Fleetwood, Charles; Hadjimichael, Theo; Lehan, John; McMann, Joseph; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wright, Geraldine; Zhang, William

    2004-01-01

    We present the metrology requirements and metrology implementation necessary to prove out the reflector technology for the Constellation X(C-X) spectroscopy X-ray telescope (SXT). This segmented, 1.6m diameter highly nested Wolter-1 telescope presents many metrology and alignment challenges. In particular, these mirrors have a stringent imaging error budget as compared to their intrinsic stiffness; This is required for Constellation-X to have sufficient effective area with the weight requirement. This has implications for the metrology that can be used. A variety of contract and noncontact optical profiling and interferometric methods are combined to test the formed glass substrates before replication and the replicated reflector segments.The reflectors are tested both stand-alone and in-situ in an alignment tower.Some of these methods have not been used on prior X-ray telescopes and some are feasible only because of the segmented approach used on the SXT. Methods discussed include high precision coordinate measurement machines using very low force or optical probe axial interferometric profiling azimuthal circularity profiling and use of advanced null optics such as conical computer generated hologram (CGHs).

  14. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Integrated Science Instrument Module (OTIS) Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Voyton, Mark; Lander, Julie; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Matthews, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Integrated ScienceInstrument Module (ISIM)are integrated together to form the OTIS. Once integrated, the OTIS undergoes primary mirrorcenter of curvatureoptical tests, electrical and operational tests, acoustics and vibration testing at the Goddard SpaceFlight Center beforebeing shipped to the Johnson Space Center for cryogenic optical testing of the OTIS. In preparationfor the cryogenicoptical testing, the JWST project has built a Pathfinder telescope and has completed two OpticalGround SystemEquipment (OGSE) cryogenic optical tests with the Pathfinder. In this paper, we will summarize opticaltest results todate and status the final Pathfinder test and the OTIS integration and environmental test preparations

  15. Telescope simulators for Hubble - An overview of optical designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davilla, Pam; Wood, H. J.; Atcheson, Paul D.; Saunders, Renee; Sullivan, Joe; Vaughan, Arthur H.; Saisse, Michel

    1993-01-01

    This paper briefly describes optical design of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and overviews three optical design simulators for HST which have been proposed for use as verification tools to characterize the performance of second-generation instruments during ground testing. These simulators are: the Refractive Aberrated Simulator developed at Ball Aerospace, the Optical Simulator developed at Laboratoire Astronomie Spatiale, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Stimulus. Relative advantages and disadvantages of each optical configuration are discussed.

  16. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  17. Cryogenic optical test planning using the Optical Telescope Element Simulator with the James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, Timothy A.; Bond, Nicholas A.; Greeley, Bradford W.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Melendez, Marcio; Shiri, Ron; Alves de Oliveira, Catarina; Antonille, Scott R.; Birkmann, Stephan; Davis, Clinton; Dixon, William V.; Martel, André R.; Miskey, Cherie L.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Sabatke, Derek; Sullivan, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5 m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic infrared space astronomy ( 40 K). The JWST Observatory architecture includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element that contains four science instruments (SIs), including a guider. The SI and guider units are integrated to the ISIM structure and optically tested at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as an instrument suite using a telescope simulator (Optical Telescope Element SIMulator; OSIM). OSIM is a high-fidelity, cryogenic JWST telescope simulator that features a 1.5m diameter powered mirror. The SIs are aligned to the flight structure's coordinate system under ambient, clean room conditions using optomechanical metrology and customized interfaces. OSIM is aligned to the ISIM mechanical coordinate system at the cryogenic operating temperature via internal mechanisms and feedback from alignment sensors and metrology in six degrees of freedom. SI performance, including focus, pupil shear, pupil roll, boresight, wavefront error, and image quality, is evaluated at the operating temperature using OSIM. The comprehensive optical test plans include drafting OSIM source configurations for thousands of exposures ahead of the start of a cryogenic test campaign. We describe how we predicted the performance of OSIM light sources illuminating the ISIM detectors to aide in drafting these optical tests before a test campaign began. We also discuss the actual challenges and successes of those exposure predictions encountered during a test campaign to fulfill the demands of the ISIM optical performance verification.

  18. Supernova Science with an Advanced Compton Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-04

    Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 ABSTRACT Gamma-ray line emission is a direct probe of the nucleosynthesis that occurs in Type Ia supernovae. In this...suggested to contribute to the optical light (Woosley, Pinto & Hartmann 1989). The study of SN nucleosynthesis has branched into three principle categories...explosive nucleosynthesis , radiation transport, and galactic chemical evolution. The first category of study concentrates upon applying nuclear

  19. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Mirror Development History and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinber, Lee D.; Clampin, Mark; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Atkinson, Charlie; Texter, Scott; Bergeland, Mark; Gallagher, Benjamin B.

    2012-01-01

    In a little under a decade, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program has designed, manufactured, assembled and tested 21 flight beryllium mirrors for the James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element. This paper will summarize the mirror development history starting with the selection of beryllium as the mirror material and ending with the final test results. It will provide an overview of the technological roadmap and schedules and the key challenges that were overcome. It will also provide a summary or the key tests that were performed and the results of these tests.

  20. Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) Support of Space to Ground Link Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Wright, Malcolm W.; Roberts, William T.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA/JPL Optical Communication Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) was built for dedicated research and development toward supporting free-space laser communications from space. Recently, the OCTL telescope was used to support the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) from the Lunar Atmospheric Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft and is planned for use with the upcoming Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) demonstration from the International Space Station (ISS). The use of OCTL to support these demonstrations is discussed in this report. The discussion will feed forward to ongoing and future space-to-ground laser communications as it advances toward becoming an operational capability.

  1. Telescope with a wide field of view internal optical scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, III, John James (Inventor); Zheng, Yunhui (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A telescope with internal scanner utilizing either a single optical wedge scanner or a dual optical wedge scanner and a controller arranged to control a synchronous rotation of the first and/or second optical wedges, the wedges constructed and arranged to scan light redirected by topological surfaces and/or volumetric scatterers. The telescope with internal scanner further incorporates a first converging optical element that receives the redirected light and transmits the redirected light to the scanner, and a second converging optical element within the light path between the first optical element and the scanner arranged to reduce an area of impact on the scanner of the beam collected by the first optical element.

  2. 8-Meter UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation proposes using the unprecedented capability of the planned Ares V launch vehicle, to place a 8 meter monolithic space telescope at the Earth-Sun L2 point. This new capability enables a new design pardigm -- simplicity. The six to eight meter class telescope with a massive high Technical Readiness Level ground observatory class monolithic primary mirror has been determined feasible. The proposed design, structural analysis, spacecraft design and shroud integration, thermal analysis, propulsion system, guidance navigation and pointing control assumptions about the avionics, and power systems, operational lifetime, and the idea of in-space servicing are reviewed.

  3. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  4. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-18

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  5. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  6. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Phillip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsecond angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions. Keywords: Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST); ultraviolet/optical space telescopes; astrophysics; astrobiology; technology development.

  7. Telescopes in education: the great optical astronomy experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Gilbert A.

    2000-10-01

    The idea for developing the Telescopes In Education (TIE) program began around 1990. While working with Boy Scouts, it became apparent that optical astronomy captivated the interest of more boys and their parents than any other Merit Badge that I had worked with in the past. That was the beginning of the learning curve in astronomy and optical instruments.

  8. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT): Optical System Design Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Mark E.; Leisawitz, David; Martino, Anthony J.; Budinoff, Jason; Quijada, Manuel; Hyde, Tupper

    2007-01-01

    SPIRIT is a candidate NASA Origins Probe mission. It is a spatial and spectral interferometer operating at 4 K with an operating wavelength range 25 - 400 microns. This paper describes the various components of the candidate optical system, including telescopes, pointing and tracking optics, along with their functions. Some of the tradeoffs involved in selecting various components, with their particular characteristics, are described.

  9. Main optical system of China's 2.16-m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ding-Qiang; Zhou, Bi-Fang; Yu, Xin-Mu

    1990-04-01

    This paper introduces configuration of the main optical system of China's 2.16-m telescope and the results of its optical design. There are three foci in this telescope: the Cassegrain, the coude, and the prime foci. Ritchey-Chretien (R-C) system is used as the Cassegrain system. The 2-lens and 3-lens correctors are prepared for the Cassegrain and the prime foci, respectively. The most significant characteristic of this optical system is that the coude and Cassegrain systems share one secondary mirror. A relay mirror is added to the coude system. Some other coude configurations and a special configuration for setting the focal reducer are also discussed.

  10. Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope optical alignment plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekulic, Predrag; Liang, Chen; Gonzales, Kerry; Hubbard, Robert P.; Craig, Simon C.

    2016-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) is a 4-meter solar telescope under construction at Haleakala, Hawaii. The challenge of the DKIST optical alignment is the off-axis Gregorian configuration based on an Altitude-Azimuth mount, the independently-rotating Coudé platform and the large number of relay mirrors. This paper describes the optical alignment plan of the complete telescope, including the primary 4.24-m diameter off-axis secondary mirror, the secondary 620 mm diameter off-axis mirror, the transfer optics and the Coudé optics feeding the wavefront correction system and the science instruments. A number of accurate metrology instruments will be used to align the telescope and to reach the performances, including a laser tracker for initial positioning, a theodolite for accurate tilt alignment, a Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) arm for local alignment in the Coudé laboratory, and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor to characterize the aberrations by measuring selected target stars. The wavefront will be characterized at the primary focus, the Gregorian focus, the intermediate focus and at the telescope focal plane. The laser tracker will serve also to measure the mirrors positions as function of Altitude angle due to the Telescope Mount Assembly (TMA) structure deflection. This paper describes also the method that will be used to compute the compensating mirrors shift and tilt needed to correct the residual aberrations and position of the focal plane.

  11. Development of an Advanced Dust Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, E.; Srama, R.; Rachev, M.; Srowig, A.; Harris, D.; Conlon, T.; Auer, S.; Horanyi, M.; Sternovsky, Z.; Amyx, K.

    2004-11-01

    A dust telescope is a combination of a dust trajectory sensor together with an analyzer for the chemical composition of dust particles in space. Dust particles' trajectories are determined by the measurement of the electric signals that are induced when a charged grain flies through a position sensitive electrode system. The objective of the trajectory sensor is to measure dust charges in the range 10-16 to 10-13 C and dust speeds in the range 6 to 100 km/s. The trajectory sensor has four sensor planes consisting of about 30 wire electrodes each. Two adjacent planes have orthogonal wire direction. The distance between planes is about 40 mm and the distance between electrodes in one plane is about 20 mm. An ASIC charge sensitive amplifier has been developed with a RMS noise of about 1.5 10-17 C. Signals from 32 electrodes are digitized and sampled at 20 MHz rate by an ASIC transient recorder. First tests with a laboratory set-up are being performed. The dust chemical analyzers will have a sufficient mass resolution in order to resolve ions with atomic mass number up to 100. The annular impact area of the mass analyzer will be > 0.1 m2. We have constructed numerical (SIMION) models of the mass spectrometer consisting of the target area with an acceleration grid and the single-stage reflectron consisting of two grids and the central ion detector. Ions of varying starting positions at the target, emission angles 0 to 90 degrees and energies 0 to 50 eV are flown through the spectrometer. A first result is that ions with different perpendicular (to the target normal) energies will arrive at the ion detector at different radial positions, with zero perpendicular energy in the center. A mass resolution of M/Δ M > 150 can be obtained for impacts onto the annular target between 100 and 240 mm from the center. An Ion Detector of 50 to 110 mm radius is necessary to collect all generated ions. A lab model is under construction.

  12. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Smith, W. Scott; Mosier, Gary; Abplanalp, Laura; Arnold, William

    2014-01-01

    ASTRO2010 Decadal stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. AMTD builds on the state of art (SOA) defined by over 30 years of monolithic & segmented ground & space-telescope mirror technology to mature six key technologies. AMTD is deliberately pursuing multiple design paths to provide the science community with op-tions to enable either large aperture monolithic or segmented mirrors with clear engineering metrics traceable to science requirements.

  13. The first aluminum coating of the 3700mm primary mirror of the Devasthal Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bheemireddy, Krishna Reddy; Gopinathan, Maheswar; Pant, Jayshreekar; Omar, Amitesh; Kumar, Brijesh; Uddin, Wahab; Kumar, Nirmal

    2016-07-01

    Initially the primary mirror of the 3.6m Devasthal Optical Telescope is uncoated polished zerodur glass supplied by Lytkarino Optical Glass Factory, Russia/Advanced Mechanical and Optical Systems, Belgium. In order to do the aluminium coating on the primary mirror the coating plant including washing unit is installed near the telescope (extension building of telescope) by Hind High Vacuum (HHV) Bangalore, India. Magnetron sputtering technique is used for the coating. Several coating trials are done before the primary mirror coating; samples are tested for reflectivity, uniformity, adhesivity and finally commissioned. The primary mirror is cleaned, coated by ARIES. We present here a brief description of the coating plant installation, Mirror cleaning and coating procedures and the testing results of the samples.

  14. World Atlas of large optical telescopes (second edition)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    By early 1986 there will be over 120 large optical telescopes in the world engaged in astronomical research with mirror or lens diameters of one meter (39-inches) and larger. This atlas gives information on these telescopes and shows their observatory sites on continent sized maps. Also shown are observatory locations considered suitable for the construction of future large telescopes. Of the 126 major telescopes listed in this atlas, 101 are situated in the Northern Hemisphere and 25 are located in the Southern Hemisphere. The totals by regions are as follows: Europe (excluding the USSR), 30; Soviet Union, 9; Asia (excluding the USSR), 5; Africa, 9; Australia, 6; The Pacific, 4 (all on Hawaii); South America, 17; North America, 46 (the continental US has 38 of these). In all, the United States has 42 of the world's major telescopes on its territory (continental US plus Hawaii) making it by far the leading nation in astronomical instrumentation.

  15. Lightweight optical barrel assembly structures for large deployable space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Peter A.; Silver, Mark J.; Dobson, Benjamin J.

    2009-08-01

    Future space based telescopes will need apertures and focal lengths that exceed the dimensions of the launch vehicle shroud. In addition to deploying the primary mirror and secondary mirror support structure, these large telescopes must also deploy the stray light and thermal barriers needed to ensure proper telescope performance. The authors present a deployable light and thermal optical barrel assembly approach for a very large telescope with a variable sun angle and fast slew rate. The Strain Energy Deployable Optical Barrel Assembly (SEDOBA) uses elastic composite hinges to power the deployment of a hierarchical truss structure that supports the thermal and stray light shroud material that form the overall system. The paper describes the overall design approach, the key component technologies, and the design and preliminary testing of a self deploying scale model prototype.

  16. Feasibility study of an optically coherent telescope array in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical methods of image construction which can be used to produce very high angular resolution images at optical wavelengths of astronomical objects from an orbiting array of telescopes are discussed and a concept is presented for a phase-coherent optical telescope array which may be deployed by space shuttle in the 1990's. The system would start as a four-element linear array with a 12 m baseline. The initial module is a minimum redundant array with a photon-counting collecting area three times larger than space telescope and a one dimensional resolution of better than 0.01 arc seconds in the visible range. Later additions to the array would build up facility capability. The advantages of a VLBI observatory in space are considered as well as apertures for the telescopes.

  17. The Optical Telescope Element Simulator for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Pamela S.; Bos, Brent J.; Cheng, Edward S.; Chang, Bill; Eichhorn, William L.; Frey, Bradley J.; Garza, Mario; Gong, Qian; Greeley, Bradford W.; Guzek, Jeff; Hakun, Claef F.; Hovmand, Lars; Kirk, Jeff; Kubalak, David A.; Leviton, Douglas; Nagle, Adrian; Nyquist, Rich; Pham, Thai; Robinson, F. David; Sabatke, Derek; Sullivan, Joseph F.; Volmer, Paul; VonHandorf, Rob; Youngworth, Richard N.

    2008-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Observatory will consist of three flight elements: (1) the Optical Telescope Element (OTE), (2) the Integrated Science Instrument Module Element (ISIM), and (3) the Spacecraft Element. The ISIM element consists of a composite bench structure that uses kinematic mounts to interface to each of the optical benches of the three science instruments and the guider. The ISIM is also kinematically mounted to the telescope primary mirror structure. An enclosure surrounds the ISIM structure, isolates the ISIM region thermally from the other thermal regions of the Observatory, and serves as a radiator for the science instruments and guider. Cryogenic optical testing of the ISIM Structure and the Science Instruments will be conducted at Goddard Space Flight Center using an optical telescope simulator that is being developed by a team from Ball Aerospace and Goddard Space Flight Center, and other local contractors. This simulator will be used to verify the performance of the ISIM element before delivery to the Northup Grumman team for integration with the OTE. In this paper, we describe the O OTE Sim TE Simulator (OSIM) and provide a brief overview of the optical test program. ulator

  18. A suggested 12-m telescope optical system configuration for China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ding-qiang; Liang, Ming; Yuan, Xiangyan; Bai, Hua; Cui, Xiangqun

    2016-08-01

    This is an optical/infrared telescope. It is a general purpose telescope. A segmented primary mirror is adopted with diameter 12 m and f-ratio 1.6. This telescope has prime focus, Cassegrain, Nasmyth and coudé systems. The prime focus system has a 1.5° field-of-view corrector with excellent image quality. It will be used for multi-object fibre spectroscopic observation and CCD photography. In this 12-m telescope, all systems except the prime focus system share the same secondary mirror; the Nasmyth and coudé systems are formed by adding relay mirrors; and the method of moving a secondary mirror is used to enhance image quality. All these features originate from the innovative optical system of the Chinese 2.16-m telescope. At the Cassegrain focus, a dark object spectrograph, for example, can be installed without any corrector; and in case a field of view is needed, a corrector may be added. Both the Nasmyth and coudé systems have exceptionally excellent image quality and the exchange between them occurs very conveniently. Many instruments in visible and infrared wavebands, some with an adaptive optics system, will be installed at the Nasmyth platform. Coudé system will be used for interferometry and for those instruments which require high stability. This configuration has a nearly full range of systems but it is not complex, and it can even be adopted by 20-40-m class telescopes.

  19. MeerLICHT and BlackGEM: custom-built telescopes to detect faint optical transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, Steven; Groot, Paul; Woudt, Patrick; Klein Wolt, Marc; McBride, Vanessa; Nelemans, Gijs; Körding, Elmar; Pretorius, Margaretha L.; Roelfsema, Ronald; Bettonvil, Felix; Balster, Harry; Bakker, Roy; Dolron, Peter; van Elteren, Arjen; Elswijk, Eddy; Engels, Arno; Fender, Rob; Fokker, Marc; de Haan, Menno; Hagoort, Klaas; de Hoog, Jasper; ter Horst, Rik; van der Kevie, Giel; Kozłowski, Stanisław; Kragt, Jan; Lech, Grzegorz; Le Poole, Rudolf; Lesman, Dirk; Morren, Johan; Navarro, Ramon; Paalberends, Willem-Jelle; Paterson, Kerry; Pawłaszek, Rafal; Pessemier, Wim; Raskin, Gert; Rutten, Harrie; Scheers, Bart; Schuil, Menno; Sybilski, Piotr W.

    2016-07-01

    We present the MeerLICHT and BlackGEM telescopes, which are wide-field optical telescopes that are currently being built to study transient phenomena, gravitational wave counterparts and variable stars. The telescopes have 65 cm primary mirrors and a 2.7 square degree field-of-view. The MeerLICHT and BlackGEM projects have different science goals, but will use identical telescopes. The first telescope, MeerLICHT, will be commissioned at Sutherland (South Africa) in the first quarter of 2017. It will co-point with MeerKAT to collect optical data commensurate with the radio observations. After careful analysis of MeerLICHT's performance, three telescopes of the same type will be commissioned in La Silla (Chile) in 2018 to form phase I of the BlackGEM array. BlackGEM aims at detecting and characterizing optical counterparts of gravitational wave events detected by Advanced LIGO and Virgo. In this contribution we present an overview of the science goals, the design and the status of the two projects.

  20. The Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roming, Peter W. A.; Hunsberger, S. D.; Nousek, John A.; Ivanushkina, Mariya; Mason, Keith O.; Breeveld, Alice A.

    2004-09-01

    The Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT), one of three telescopes to fly on the Swift Gamma-ray Burst Observatory, is capable of detecting the early UV/optical photons and performing long-term UV/optical observations of GRB afterglows. The UVOT is a Ritchey-Chretien telescope with MCP intensified CCD detectors which operate in either a photon-timing or an imaging mode while providing sub-arcsecond resolution. A filter wheel accommodates broadband UV and visual filters for photometric studies including determination of photometric redshifts. UV and visual grisms for low-resolution spectroscopy are also housed in the filter wheel. We present a brief overview of the UVOT, calibration results, and science to be carried out.

  1. Design of infrared diffractive telescope imaging optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, ZhouFeng; Hu, BingLiang; Yin, QinYe; Xie, YongJun; Kang, FuZeng; Wang, YanJun

    2015-10-01

    Diffractive telescope is an updated imaging technology, it differs from conventional refractive and reflective imaging system, which is based on the principle of diffraction image. It has great potential for developing the larger aperture and lightweight telescope. However, one of the great challenges of design this optical system is that the diffractive optical element focuses on different wavelengths of light at different point in space, thereby distorting the color characteristics of image. In this paper, we designs a long-wavelength infrared diffractive telescope imaging system with flat surface Fresnel lens and cancels the infrared optical system chromatic aberration by another flat surface Fresnel lens, achieving broadband light(from 8μm-12μm) to a common focus with 4.6° field of view. At last, the diffuse spot size and MTF function provide diffractive-limited performance.

  2. Multiple-etalon systems for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Sigwarth, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Multiple etalon systems are discussed that meet the science requirements for a narrow-passband imaging system for the 4-meter National Solar Observatory (NSO)/Advance Technology Solar Telescope (ATST). A multiple etalon system can provide an imaging interferometer that works in four distinct modes: as a spectro-polarimeter, a filter-vector magnetograph, an intermediate-band imager, and broadband high-resolution imager. Specific dual and triple etalon configurations are described that provide a spectrographic passband of 2.0-3.5 micron and reduce parasitic light levels to 10(exp -4) as required for precise polarization measurement, e.g., Zeeman measurements of magnetic sensitive lines. A TESOS-like (Telecentric Etalon SOlar Spectrometer) triple etalon system provides a spectral purity of 10(exp -5). The triple designs have the advantage of reducing the finesse requirement on each etalon; allow the use of more stable blocking filters, and have very high spectral purity. A dual-etalon double-pass (Cavallini-like) system can provide a competing configuration. Such a dual-etalon design can provide high contrast. The selection of the final focal plane instrument will depend on a trade-off between an ideal instrument and practical reality. The trade study will include the number of etalons, their aperture sizes, complexities of the optical train, number of blocking filters, configuration of the electronic control system, computer interfaces, temperature controllers, etalon controllers, and their associated feedback electronics. The heritage of single and multiple etalon systems comes from their use in several observatories, including the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak Observatory (NSO), and Kiepenheuer-Institut fur Sonnenphysik (KIS, Germany), Mees Solar Observatory (University of Hawaii), and Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory (Italy). The design of the ATST multiple etalon system will benefit from the experience gained at these

  3. Coating Procedure of Subaru Telescope Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Saeko S.; Kamata, Yukiko; Kanzawa, Tomio; Miyashiti, Akihiko; Nakagiri, Masao; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Noguchi, Takeshi; Okita, Kiichi; Oshima, Norio; Sasaki, Goro; Torii, Yasuo; Yutani, Masami; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi

    For coating large mirrors of Subaru Telescope, we employ conventional evaporation scheme because it is known for uniform coverage. We will report installation and the performance verification of the coating facility of Subaru telescope. The coating facility consists of a washing tower for stripping the old coating from the primary mirror, a large evaporation coating chamber, two trolleys for the primary mirror, and a scissors-like primary mirror lifter. Tests with large coating chamber at Mauna Kea, as well as with smaller chamber at Mitaka, will be discussed. To supply a large number of filaments with uniform quality, our practical solution is to pre-wet the filaments and keep them in a controlled environment before the evaporation. In the initial test, aluminum film over the large area exceeded the number targeted for the thickness and yet the uniformity turned out to be better than the specification. Reflectivity of the fresh surface was over 90% at visible wavelength. In September 1997, we re-aluminized 1.6m infrared simulator at Mitaka for the first time using pre-wetted filaments. The result verified our coating procedures for the secondary mirror in late 1997 and the 8.3m primary mirror in early in 1998.

  4. Wavefront Reconstruction Methods for a Natural Guide Star Adaptive Optics Application to the Keck Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, M.; Needels, L.; Redding, D.

    1994-01-01

    Keck telescope is planning to utilize adaptive optics technology to improve the resolution of the instrument. Telescopes operating in the atmosphere are limited by the seeing conditions at the telescope observational site.

  5. An 8 Meter Monolithic UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The planned Ares V launch vehicle with its 10 meter fairing and at least 55,600 kg capacity to Earth Sun L2 enables entirely new classes of space telescopes. A consortium from NASA, Space Telescope Science Institute, and aerospace industry are studying an 8-meter monolithic primary mirror UV/optical/NIR space telescope to enable new astrophysical research that is not feasible with existing or near-term missions, either space or ground. This paper briefly reviews the science case for such a mission and presents the results of an on-going technical feasibility study, including: optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; launch vehicle performance and trajectory; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN&C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; operations & servicing; mass budget and cost.

  6. High-performance quantitative robust switching control for optical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounsbury, William P.; Garcia-Sanz, Mario

    2014-07-01

    This paper introduces an innovative robust and nonlinear control design methodology for high-performance servosystems in optical telescopes. The dynamics of optical telescopes typically vary according to azimuth and altitude angles, temperature, friction, speed and acceleration, leading to nonlinearities and plant parameter uncertainty. The methodology proposed in this paper combines robust Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) techniques with nonlinear switching strategies that achieve simultaneously the best characteristics of a set of very active (fast) robust QFT controllers and very stable (slow) robust QFT controllers. A general dynamic model and a variety of specifications from several different commercially available amateur Newtonian telescopes are used for the controller design as well as the simulation and validation. It is also proven that the nonlinear/switching controller is stable for any switching strategy and switching velocity, according to described frequency conditions based on common quadratic Lyapunov functions (CQLF) and the circle criterion.

  7. Spectral classification of optical transients with du Pont telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrell, Nidia; Shappee, Ben; Drout, Maria; Dong, Subo

    2017-04-01

    We obtained optical spectroscopy (range 370-920 nm) of 11 transients with the 2.5-m du Pont telescope (+WFCCD) at Las Campanas Observatory between March 26 and 29 UT. The data were cross-correlated with a library of supernova spectra via the Supernova Identification tool (Blondin and Tonry, 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024).

  8. Wavefront Control for Space Telescope Applications Using Adaptive Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    SPACE TELESCOPE APPLICATIONS USING ADAPTIVE OPTICS by Matthew R. Allen December 2007 Thesis Advisor: Brij Agrawal Second Reader...ASTRONAUTICAL ENGINEERING from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL December 2007 Author: Matthew R. Allen Approved by: Dr, Brij Agrawal...34 3. Direct Iterative Zonal Feedback Control ........................................ 35 4. Direct Iterative

  9. Novel optical designs for consumer astronomical telescopes and their application to professional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Peter; Hodgson, Alan

    2006-06-01

    Since the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope there has been widespread popular interest in astronomy. A further series of events, most notably the recent Deep Impact mission and Mars oppositions have served to fuel further interest. As a result more and more amateurs are coming into astronomy as a practical hobby. At the same time more sophisticated optical equipment is becoming available as the price to performance ratio become more favourable. As a result larger and better optical telescopes are now in use by amateurs. We also have the explosive growth in digital imaging technologies. In addition to displacing photographic film as the preferred image capture modality it has made the capture of high quality astronomical imagery more accessible to a wider segment of the astronomy community. However, this customer requirement has also had an impact on telescope design. There has become a greater imperative for wide flat image fields in these telescopes to take advantage of the ongoing advances in CCD imaging technology. As a result of these market drivers designers of consumer astronomical telescopes are now producing state of the art designs that result in wide, flat fields with optimal spatial and chromatic aberrations. Whilst some of these designs are not scalable to the larger apertures required for professional ground and airborne telescope use there are some that are eminently suited to make this transition.

  10. Active Correction of Aberrations of Low-Quality Telescope Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Chen, Yijian

    2007-01-01

    A system of active optics that includes a wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror has been demonstrated to be an effective means of partly correcting wavefront aberrations introduced by fixed optics (lenses and mirrors) in telescopes. It is envisioned that after further development, active optics would be used to reduce wavefront aberrations of about one wave or less in telescopes having aperture diameters of the order of meters or tens of meters. Although this remaining amount of aberration would be considered excessive in scientific applications in which diffraction-limited performance is required, it would be acceptable for free-space optical- communication applications at wavelengths of the order of 1 m. To prevent misunderstanding, it is important to state the following: The technological discipline of active optics, in which the primary or secondary mirror of a telescope is directly and dynamically tilted, distorted, and/or otherwise varied to reduce wavefront aberrations, has existed for decades. The term active optics does not necessarily mean the same thing as does adaptive optics, even though active optics and adaptive optics are related. The term "adaptive optics" is often used to refer to wavefront correction at speeds characterized by frequencies ranging up to between hundreds of hertz and several kilohertz high enough to enable mitigation of adverse effects of fluctuations in atmospheric refraction upon propagation of light beams. The term active optics usually appears in reference to wavefront correction at significantly lower speeds, characterized by times ranging from about 1 second to as long as minutes. Hence, the novelty of the present development lies, not in the basic concept of active or adaptive optics, but in the envisioned application of active optics in conjunction with a deformable mirror to achieve acceptably small wavefront errors in free-space optical communication systems that include multi-meter-diameter telescope mirrors that are

  11. Fiber optics for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The increased use of composites makes the digital control more susceptible to electromagnetic effects. In order to provide the protection to the digital control additional shielding will be required as well as protective circuitry for the electronics. This results in increased weight and reduced reliability. The advantages that fiber optic technology provides for advanced aircraft applications is recognized. The use of optical signals to carry information between the aircraft and the control module provides immunity from contamination by electromagnetic sources as well as other important benefits such as reduced weight and volume resulting from the elimination of the shielding and the replacement of metal conductors with low weight glass fibers. In 1975 NASA began work to develop passive optical sensors for use with fiber optics in aircraft control systems. The problem now is to choose the best optical sensor concepts and evaluate them for use. In 1985 NASA and DOD entered into a joint program, Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI), to look at optical technology specifically for use in advanced aircraft systems. The results of this program are discussed. The conclusion of the study indicated that the use of fiber optic technology in advanced aircraft systems is feasible and desirable. The study pointed to a lack of available sensors from vendors capable of operating in the adverse environments of advanced aircraft.

  12. Fiber optics for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    The increased use of composites makes the digital control more susceptible to electromagnetic effects. In order to provide the protection to the digital control additional shielding will be required as well as protective circuitry for the electronics. This results in increased weight and reduced reliability. The advantages that fiber optic technology provides for advanced aircraft applications is recognized. The use of optical signals to carry information between the aircraft and the control module provides immunity from contamination by electromagnetic sources as well as other important benefits such as reduced weight and volume resulting from the elimination of the shielding and the replacement of metal conductors with low weight glass fibers. In 1975 NASA began work to develop passive optical sensors for use with fiber optics in aircraft control systems. The problem now is to choose the best optical sensor concepts and evaluate them for use. In 1985 NASA and DOD entered into a joint program, Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI), to look at optical technology specifically for use in advanced aircraft systems. The results of this program are discussed. The conclusion of the study indicated that the use of fiber optic technology in advanced aircraft systems is feasible and desirable. The study pointed to a lack of available sensors from vendors capable of operating in the adverse environments of advanced aircraft.

  13. Simulating the optical performance of a small-sized telescope with secondary optics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulten, Cameron; Zech, Andreas; Okumura, Akira; Laporte, Philippe; Schmoll, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope (GCT) is a small-sized telescope (SST) that represents one of three novel designs that are based on Schwarzschild-Couder optics and are proposed for use within the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The GAmma-ray Telescope Elements (GATE) program has led an effort to build a prototype of the GCT at the Paris Observatory in Meudon, France. The mechanical structure of the prototype, known as the SST-GATE prototype telescope, is now complete along with the successful installation of the camera. We present the results of extensive simulation work to determine the optical performance of the SST-GATE prototype telescope. Using the ROBAST software and assuming an ideal optical system, we find the radius of the encircled point spread function (θ80) of the SST-GATE to be ∼1.3 arcmin (∼0.02°) for an on-axis (θfield =0∘) observation and ∼3.6 arcmin (∼0.06°) for an observation at the edge of the field of view (θfield = 4 .4∘). In addition, this research highlights the shadowing that results from the stopping of light rays by various telescope components such as the support masts and trusses. It is shown that for on-axis observations the effective collection area decreases by approximately 1 m2 as a result of shadowing components other than the secondary mirror. This is a similar loss (∼11%) to that seen with the current generation of conventional Davies-Cotton (DC) Cherenkov telescopes. An extensive random tolerance analysis was also performed and it was found that certain parameters, especially the secondary mirror z-position and the tip and tilt rotations of the mirrors, are critical in order to contain θ80 within the pixel limit radius for all field angles. In addition, we have studied the impact upon the optical performance of introducing a hole in the center of the secondary mirror for use with pointing and alignment instruments. We find that a small circular area (radius < 150 mm) at the center of the secondary mirror

  14. Optical Communications Study for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceniceros, Juan M.

    2000-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), part of NASA's Origins program, is a follow on to the Hubble Space Telescope expected to provide timely new science along with answering fundamental questions. NGST is a large diameter, infrared optimized telescope with imaging and spectrographic detectors which will be used to help study the origin of galaxies. Due to the large data NGST will collect, Goddard Space Flight Center has considered the use of optical communications for data downlink. The Optical Communications Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has performed a study on optical communications systems for NGST. The objective of the study was to evaluate the benefits gained through the use of optical communication technologies. Studies were performed for each of four proposed NGST orbits. The orbits considered were an elliptical orbit about the semi stable second Lagrangian point, a 1 by 3 AU elliptic orbit around the sun, a 1 AU drift orbit, and a 1 AU drift orbit at a 15 degree incline to the ecliptic plane. An appropriate optical communications system was determined for each orbit. Systems were evaluated in terms of mass, power consumption, size, and cost for each of the four proposed orbits.

  15. Multispectral optical telescope alignment testing for a cryogenic space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newswander, Trent; Hooser, Preston; Champagne, James

    2016-09-01

    Multispectral space telescopes with visible to long wave infrared spectral bands provide difficult alignment challenges. The visible channels require precision in alignment and stability to provide good image quality in short wavelengths. This is most often accomplished by choosing materials with near zero thermal expansion glass or ceramic mirrors metered with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) that are designed to have a matching thermal expansion. The IR channels are less sensitive to alignment but they often require cryogenic cooling for improved sensitivity with the reduced radiometric background. Finding efficient solutions to this difficult problem of maintaining good visible image quality at cryogenic temperatures has been explored with the building and testing of a telescope simulator. The telescope simulator is an onaxis ZERODUR® mirror, CFRP metered set of optics. Testing has been completed to accurately measure telescope optical element alignment and mirror figure changes in a cryogenic space simulated environment. Measured alignment error and mirror figure error test results are reported with a discussion of their impact on system optical performance.

  16. Holographically corrected telescope for high-bandwidth optical communications.

    PubMed

    Andersen, G; Knize, R J

    1999-11-20

    We present a design for an optical data communications receiver-transmitter pair based on the holographic correction of a large diameter, poor-quality, reflecting primary mirror. The telescope has a narrow bandwidth (<0.1 nm) with good signal frequency isolation (>60 dB) and is scalable to meter-class apertures. We demonstrate the correction of a reflector telescope with over 2000 waves of aberration to diffraction-limited operation, capable of handling data transmission rates up to 100 GHz.

  17. Adaptive optics operations at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas L.; Taylor, Gregory; Christou, Julian C.; Zhang, Xianyu; Brusa Zappellini, Guido; Rahmer, Gustavo; Lefebvre, Michael; Puglisi, Alfio; Pinna, Enrico; Esposito, Simone

    2016-07-01

    The goal for the adaptive optics systems at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBTO) is for them to operate fully automatically, without the need for an AO Scientist, and to be run by the observers and/or the telescope operator. This has been built into their design. Initially, the AO systems would close the loop using optimal parameters based on the observing conditions and guide star brightness, without adapting to changing conditions. We present the current status of AO operations as well as recent updates that improve the operational efficiency and minimize downtime. Onsky efficiency and performance will also be presented, along with calibrations required for AO closed loop operation.

  18. Optical Performance Modeling of FUSE Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Friedman, Scott D.; Moos, H. Warren

    2000-01-01

    We describe the Metrology Data Processor (METDAT), the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC), and their application to the image evaluation of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) mirrors. The FUSE instrument - designed and developed by the Johns Hopkins University and launched in June 1999 is an astrophysics satellite which provides high resolution spectra (lambda/Delta(lambda) = 20,000 - 25,000) in the wavelength region from 90.5 to 118.7 nm The FUSE instrument is comprised of four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors, four Rowland circle spectrograph channels with holographic gratings, and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The OSAC code provides a comprehensive analysis of optical system performance, including the effects of optical surface misalignments, low spatial frequency deformations described by discrete polynomial terms, mid- and high-spatial frequency deformations (surface roughness), and diffraction due to the finite size of the aperture. Both normal incidence (traditionally infrared, visible, and near ultraviolet mirror systems) and grazing incidence (x-ray mirror systems) systems can be analyzed. The code also properly accounts for reflectance losses on the mirror surfaces. Low frequency surface errors are described in OSAC by using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence mirrors and Legendre-Fourier polynomials for grazing incidence mirrors. The scatter analysis of the mirror is based on scalar scatter theory. The program accepts simple autocovariance (ACV) function models or power spectral density (PSD) models derived from mirror surface metrology data as input to the scatter calculation. The end product of the program is a user-defined pixel array containing the system Point Spread Function (PSF). The METDAT routine is used in conjunction with the OSAC program. This code reads in laboratory metrology data in a normalized format. The code then fits the data using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence

  19. Optical Design of Telescopes and other Reflective Systems using SLIDERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph M.

    2007-01-01

    Optical design tools are presented to provide automatic generation of reflective optical systems for design studies and educational use. The tools are graphical in nature and use an interactive slider interface with freely available optical design software, OSLO EDU. Operation of the sliders provides input to adjust first-order and other system parameters (e.g. focal length), while appropriate system construction parameters are automatically updated to correct aberrations. Graphical output is also presented in real-time (e.g. a lens drawing) to provide the opportunity for a truly visual approach to optical design. Available systems include two- three- and four-mirror telescopes, relays, and afocal systems, either rotationally symmetric or having just a plane of symmetry. Demonstrations are presented, including a brief discussion of interfacing optical design software to MATLAB, and general research opportunities at NASA.

  20. The Advanced Patricle-astrophysics Telescope (APT) Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, James

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced Pair Telescope (APT) is a concept for a probe-class gamma-ray mission aimed at two primary science objects: (1) providing sensitivity to thermal-WIMP dark matter over the entire natural range of annihilation cross-sections and masses and (2) identifying short GRBs or gravity wave sources by detecting and localizing MeV gamma-ray transients. The instrument combines a pair tracker and Compton telescope in one simple monolithic design. By using scintillating fibers for the tracker and wavelength-shifting fibers to readout CsI detectors, the instrument could achieve an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity compared with Fermi at GeV energies, and several orders of magnitude improvement in MeV sensitivity compared to Comptel. The instrument would have roughly the same number of electronic channels as Fermi, but would provide an effective area of 12m2, and a geometry factor of 100 m2 str. The same CsI detectors used in the tracker/Compton telescope could be used for detection of high-energy transition radiation for measurements of light cosmic-ray abundances, making this a multi-purpose astro-particle physics observatory. The instantaneous all-sky sensitivity would provide a capability almost unique over the entire electromagnetic spectrum, providing a critical component of multi-messenger studies of the universe. We acknowledge support from the Washington University McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences.

  1. Far-Infrared Interferometric Telescope Experiment : I. Interferometer Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Eri; Shibai, Hiroshi; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Narita, Masanao; Matsuo, Taro; Ohkubo, Atsushi; Suzuki, Miki; Kanoh, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Koudai; Fite Team

    We have developed a far-infrared interferometer (Far-Infrared Interferometric Telescope Experiment: FITE). It will be the first astronomical infrared interferometer working in space. FITE is a balloon-borne telescope, and operated in the stratosphere (the altitude of 35 km). The aim of the FITE project is to achieve a high spatial resolution of 1 arcsecond at the wavelength of 100 micrometers. FITE is a Michelson stellar interferometer, and is able to realize a long base line beyond the size of the collecting mirror by using four plane mirrors. The first flight is scheduled for November 2008 in Brazil, and the aim is to measure the interference fringes with a spatial resolution of 2.5 arcseconds. In order to achieve this, the two beams must be focused within 2.5 arcsecond accuracy in the imaging quality, within 10 arcsecond accuracy in the beam alignment and within 30 micrometers accuracy in the optical path length between the two beams. In order to archive these accuracies, the structural parts of the telescope were made of carbon-fiber reinforced plastics, which have very low thermal expansion coefficient and large Young's modulus. During observation of a target, the optical alignment is actively adjusted and the orientation of the telescope is stabilized by the three-axis control.

  2. Optical antenna of telescope for synthetic aperture ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liren

    2008-08-01

    For synthetic aperture ladar (SAL) imaging, there are difficulties in the space domain because the size of optical antenna of telescope is up to six orders of magnitude larger than the wavelength. In this paper, we suggest a defocused and spatial phase masked telescope for reception to compensate the diffraction aberration from the target to match the directivity of heterodyne detection, a defocused and phase masked transmission telescope to send out a wavefront with an additional and controllable spatial quadratic phase to the phase history, and a circulated duplex to compensate the aberration for reception and to produce spatial phase bias for transmission concurrently in the same telescope. On this basis, the point target radar equation in a full space and time treatment is achieved. Correspondingly, the complete collection equations of 2-D data acquired in the range and azimuth directions for 2-D SAL imaging of the strip-map mode and the spotlight mode are developed. Then the imaging azimuth and range resolutions are redefined in terms of the idea of optical imaging by a lens, and the requirement for azimuth sampling is given. The paper systemically presents the all details.

  3. Advanced optical fuzing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Lippe, Christian M.; Liu, J. Jiang

    2005-09-01

    We are developing a robust and compact photonic proximity sensor for munition applications. Successful implementation of this sensor will provide a new capability for direct fire applications. The photonic component development exploits pioneering work and unique expertise at ARDEC, ARL, and Sandia National Laboratories by combining key optoelectronic technologies to design and demonstrate components for this fuzing application. The technologies employed in the optical fuze design are vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), the p-i-n or metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors, and miniature lenses optics. This work will culminate in a robust, fully integrated, g-hardened component design suitable for proximity fuzing applications. This compact sensor will replace costly assemblies that are based on discrete lasers, photodetectors, and bulk optics. It will be mass manufacturable and impart huge savings for such applications. The specific application under investigation is for gun-fired munitions. Nevertheless, numerous civilian uses exist for this proximity sensor in automotive, robotics and aerospace applications. This technology is also applicable to robotic ladar and short-range 3-D imaging.

  4. Development of a digital zenith telescope for advanced astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Hideo; Araki, Hiroshi; Tazawa, Seiichi; Tsuruta, Seiitsu; Noda, Hirotomo; Asari, Kazuyoshi; Sasaki, Sho; Funazaki, Ken'ichi; Satoh, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Hideo; Kikuchi, Mamoru; Takahashi, Tomoe; Yamazaki, Atsumu; Ping, JinSong; Kawano, Nobuyuki; Petrova, Natalia; Gouda, Naoteru; Yano, Taihei; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Niwa, Yoshito; Kono, Yusuke; Iwata, Takahiro

    2012-04-01

    Like other optical astrometric techniques, the Photographic Zenith Tube (PZT) has played a key role in the past observations of the Earth rotation, and it also has a potential to be applied to several other observations by taking advantage of automatic observations with self compensation of tilt of the tube. We here propose In-situ Lunar Orientation Measurement (ILOM) to study lunar rotational dynamics by direct observations of the lunar rotation from the lunar surface by using a small telescope like PZT with an accuracy of 1 milli-seconds of arc (1 mas) in the post-SELENE mission. Our second application is to obtain local gravity field on the Earth by combining deflection of the vertical measured by PZT and the position measured by Global Positioning System (GPS) or Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). The accuracy required for this purpose is not as strict as ILOM. We have already developed a Bread Board Model (BBM) of the telescope for ILOM and made some experiments in order to know the performance of the driving mechanism under a similar condition to the lunar environment showing high vacuum, large temperature change and dusty condition. We have also shown that it is possible to correct the effects of uniform temperature change upon the optical system by using a simple model with an accuracy of better than 1 mas. This model has the potential to attain the accuracy of 1 mas, based on the results of the experiments and the simulations.

  5. Bimorph mirrors for adaptive optics in space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaluf, D.; Bastaits, R.; Wang, K.; Horodinca, M.; Burda, I.; Martic, G.; Preumont, A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper discusses a concept of bimorph deformable mirror used in adaptive optics to compensate for manufacturing errors, gravity release and thermal distortion affecting large lightweight mirrors in space telescopes. The mirror consists of a single-crystal Silicon wafer (D=75 mm t=500μm) covered with an optical coating on the front side and an array of 25 independent PZT actuators acting in d31 mode on the back side. The mirror is mounted on an isostatic support with three linear PZT actuators controlling the rigid-body motion. The paper presents the experimental results obtained with this design and a new, more compact alternative.

  6. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) Pathfinder status and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Atkinson, Charlie; Booth, Andrew; Whitman, Tony

    2014-08-01

    A JWST OTE Pathfinder telescope that includes two spare primary mirror segments, a spare secondary mirror, and a large composite structure with a deployed secondary support structure is in the assembly stage and will be fully completed this year. This Pathfinder will check out key steps in the ambient mirror integration process and also be used at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to check out the optical Ground Support Equipment (GSE) and associated procedures that will be used to test the full JWST telescope and instruments at JSC. This paper will summarize the Pathfinder integration and testing flow, the critical Ground Support Equipment it will test and the key tests planned with the Pathfinder.

  7. The Hubble Space Telescope optical systems failure report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The findings of the Hubble Space Telescope Optical Systems Board of Investigation are reported. The Board was formed to determine the cause of the flaw in the telescope, how it occurred, and why it was not detected before launch. The Board conducted its investigation to include interviews with personnel involved in the fabrication and test of the telescope, review of documentation, and analysis and test of the equipment used in the fabrication of the telescope's mirrors. The investigation proved that the primary mirror was made in the wrong shape (a 0.4-wave rms wavefront error at 632.8 nm). The primary mirror was manufactured by the Perkin-Elmer Corporation (Hughes Danbury Optical Systems, Inc.). The critical optics used as a template in shaping the mirror, the reflective null corrector (RNC), consisted of two small mirrors and a lens. This unit had been preserved by the manufacturer exactly as it was during the manufacture of the mirror. When the Board measured the RNC, the lens was incorrectly spaced from the mirrors. Calculations of the effect of such displacement on the primary mirror show that the measured amount, 1.3 mm, accounts in detail for the amount and character of the observed image blurring. No verification of the reflective null corrector's dimensions was carried out by Perkin-Elmer after the original assembly. There were, however, clear indications of the problem from auxiliary optical tests made at the time. A special optical unit called an inverse null corrector, designed to mimic the reflection from a perfect primary mirror, was built and used to align the apparatus; when so used, it clearly showed the error in the reflective null corrector. A second null corrector was used to measure the vertex radius of the finished primary mirror. It, too, clearly showed the error in the primary mirror. Both indicators of error were discounted at the time as being themselves flawed. The Perkin-Elmer plan for fabricating the primary mirror placed complete

  8. The Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) balloon project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Sharma, Tejaswita; Legere, Jason S.; Bancroft, Christopher M.; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.; Wright, Alex M.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a project to develop new medium-energy gamma-ray instrumentation by constructing and flying a balloon-borne Compton telescope using advanced scintillator materials combined with silicon photomultiplier readouts. There is a need in high-energy astronomy for a medium-energy gamma-ray mission covering the energy range from approximately 0.4 - 20 MeV to follow the success of the COMPTEL instrument on CGRO. We believe that directly building on the legacy of COMPTEL, using relatively robust, low-cost, off-the-shelf technologies, is the most promising path for such a mission. Fortunately, high-performance scintillators, such as Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), Cerium Bromide (CeBr3), and p-terphenyl, and compact readout devices, such as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), are already commercially available and capable of meeting this need. We have conducted two balloon flights of prototype instruments to test these technologies. The first, in 2011, demonstrated that a Compton telescope consisting of an liquid organic scintillator scattering layer and a LaBr3 calorimeter effectively rejects background under balloon-flight conditions, using time-of-flight (ToF) discrimination. The second, in 2014, showed that a telescope using an organic stilbene crystal scattering element and a LaBr3 calorimeter with SiPM readouts can achieve similar ToF performance. We are now constructing a much larger balloon instrument, an Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) with SiPM readout, with the goal of imaging the Crab Nebula at MeV energies in a one-day flight. We expect a 4σ detection up to 1 MeV in a single transit. We present calibration results of the first detector modules, and updated simulations of the balloon instrument sensitivity. If successful, this project will demonstrate that the energy, timing, and position resolution of this technology are sufficient to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity in the mediumenergy gamma-ray band, were it to be

  9. Feasibility of utilizing Cherenkov Telescope Array gamma-ray telescopes as free-space optical communication ground stations.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Vilera, Mariafernanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Cabrero, Juan Francisco

    2013-04-10

    The signals that will be received on Earth from deep-space probes in future implementations of free-space optical communication will be extremely weak, and new ground stations will have to be developed in order to support these links. This paper addresses the feasibility of using the technology developed in the gamma-ray telescopes that will make up the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory in the implementation of a new kind of ground station. Among the main advantages that these telescopes provide are the much larger apertures needed to overcome the power limitation that ground-based gamma-ray astronomy and optical communication both have. Also, the large number of big telescopes that will be built for CTA will make it possible to reduce costs by economy-scale production, enabling optical communications in the large telescopes that will be needed for future deep-space links.

  10. Lick Observatory's Shane telescope adaptive optics system (ShaneAO): research directions and progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavel, Donald T.; Kupke, Renate; Rudy, Alexander R.; Srinath, Srikar; Dillon, Daren; Poyneer, Lisa A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a review of the ongoing research activity surrounding the adaptive optics system at the Shane telescope (ShaneAO) particularly the R&D efforts on the technology and algorithms for that will advance AO into wider application for astronomy. We are pursuing the AO challenges for whole sky coverage diffraction-limited correction down to visible science wavelengths. This demands high-order wavefront correction and bright artificial laser beacons. We present recent advancements in the development of MEMS based AO correction, woofer-tweeter architecture, wind-predictive wavefront control algorithms, atmospheric characterization, and a pulsed fiber amplifier guide star laser tuned for optical pumping of the sodium layer. We present the latest on-sky results from the new AO system and present status and experimental plans for the optical pumping guide star laser.

  11. Polarization optical components of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueoka, Stacey Ritsuyo

    2016-08-01

    The Daniel K Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST), when completed in 2019 will be the largest solar telescope built to date. DKIST will have a suite of first light polarimetric instrumentation requiring broadband polarization modulation and calibration optical elements. Compound crystalline retarders meet the design requirements for efficient modulators and achromatic calibration retarders. These retarders are the only possible large diameter optic that can survive the high flux, 5 arc minute field, and ultraviolet intense environment of a large aperture solar telescope at Gregorian focus. This dissertation presents work performed for the project. First, I measured birefringence of the candidate materials necessary to complete designs. Then, I modeled the polarization effects with three-dimensional ray-tracing codes as a function of angle of incidence and field of view. Through this analysis I learned that due to the incident converging F/13 beam on the calibration retarders, the previously assumed linear retarder model fails to account for effects above the project polarization specifications. I discuss modeling strategies such as Mueller matrix decompositions and simplifications of those strategies while still meeting fit error requirements. Finally, I present characterization techniques and how these were applied to prototype components.

  12. Advanced optical condition monitoring. [of rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, G.; Barkhoudarian, S.

    1991-01-01

    The application of Advanced Optical Condition Monitoring to optical leak detection and plume spectrometry is discussed. The development of these selected sensors for propulsion system monitoring is addressed.

  13. Low Earth Orbit Satellite Tracking Telescope Network: Collaborative Optical Tracking for Enhanced Space Situational Awareness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-27

    LOW EARTH ORBIT SATELLITE TRACKING TELESCOPE NETWORK: COLLABORATIVE OPTICAL TRACKING FOR ENHANCED...copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENV-MS-15-M-200 LOW EARTH ORBIT SATELLITE TRACKING TELESCOPE NETWORK: COLLABORATIVE OPTICAL...STATEMENT A. APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENV-MS-15-M-200 LOW EARTH ORBIT SATELLITE TRACKING TELESCOPE NETWORK

  14. Improved Optical Design for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

    SciTech Connect

    Seppala, L

    2002-09-24

    This paper presents an improved optical design for the LSST, an fll.25 three-mirror telescope covering 3.0 degrees full field angle, with 6.9 m effective aperture diameter. The telescope operates at five wavelength bands spanning 386.5 nm to 1040 nm (B, V, R, I and Z). For all bands, 80% of the polychromatic diffracted energy is collected within 0.20 arc-seconds diameter. The reflective telescope uses an 8.4 m f/1.06 concave primary, a 3.4 m convex secondary and a 5.2 m concave tertiary in a Paul geometry. The system length is 9.2 m. A refractive corrector near the detector uses three fused silica lenses, rather than the two lenses of previous designs. Earlier designs required that one element be a vacuum barrier, but now the detector sits in an inert gas at ambient pressure. The last lens is the gas barrier. Small adjustments lead to optimal correction at each band. The filters have different axial thicknesses. The primary and tertiary mirrors are repositioned for each wavelength band. The new optical design incorporates features to simplify manufacturing. They include a flat detector, a far less aspheric convex secondary (10 {micro}m from best fit sphere) and reduced aspheric departures on the lenses and tertiary mirror. Five aspheric surfaces, on all three mirrors and on two lenses, are used. The primary is nearly parabolic. The telescope is fully baffled so that no specularly reflected light from any field angle, inside or outside of the full field angle of 3.0 degrees, can reach the detector.

  15. Advanced optical manufacturing digital integrated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Li, Wei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    It is necessarily to adapt development of advanced optical manufacturing technology with modern science technology development. To solved these problems which low of ration, ratio of finished product, repetition, consistent in big size and high precision in advanced optical component manufacturing. Applied business driven and method of Rational Unified Process, this paper has researched advanced optical manufacturing process flow, requirement of Advanced Optical Manufacturing integrated System, and put forward architecture and key technology of it. Designed Optical component core and Manufacturing process driven of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Digital Integrated System. the result displayed effective well, realized dynamic planning Manufacturing process, information integration improved ratio of production manufactory.

  16. Cooperative educational project for optical technicians utilizing amateur telescope making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Ray

    2004-01-01

    In the modern optical shop, technicians are typically skilled machine operators who work on only one phase of the manufacture for each and every component. The product is designed, specified, methodized, scheduled and integrated by people off the shop floor. Even at the component level, the people inside the shop usually see only one stage of completion. In an effort to make the relevance of their work visible; to demonstrate competence to their peers; to gain appreciation for the work of others; and to give them a meaningful connection with the functions of optical systems, I created "The Telescope Project" for my former employer. I invited those interested to participate in an after-hours, partially subsidized project to build telescopes for themselves. The ground-rules included that we would all make the same design (thus practicing consensus and configuration management); that we would all work on every phase (thus learning from each other); and that we would obtain our parts by random lot at the end (thus making quality assurance a personal issue). In the process the participating technicians learned about optical theory, design, tolerancing, negotiation, scheduling, purchasing, fabrication, coating and assembly. They developed an appreciation for each other's contributions and a broader perspective on the consequences of their actions. In the end, each obtained a high-quality telescope for his or her personal use. Several developed an abiding love for astronomy. The project generated much interest from technicians who didn"t initially choose to participate. In this paper I describe the project in detail.

  17. Optical search for extraterrestrial intelligence with Air Cerenkov telescopes.

    PubMed

    Eichler, D; Beskin, G

    2001-01-01

    We propose using large Air Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs) to search for optical, pulsed signals from extraterrestrial intelligence. Such dishes collect tens of photons from a nanosecond-scale pulse of isotropic equivalent power of tens of solar luminosities at a distance of 100 pc. The field of view for giant ACTs can be on the order of 10 square degrees, and they will be able to monitor 10-100 stars simultaneously for nanosecond pulses of about 6th magnitude or brighter. Using the Earth's diameter as a baseline, orbital motion of the planet could be detected by timing the pulse arrivals.

  18. Performance predictions for the Keck telescope adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.T.; Olivier, S.S.

    1995-08-07

    The second Keck ten meter telescope (Keck-11) is slated to have an infrared-optimized adaptive optics system in the 1997--1998 time frame. This system will provide diffraction-limited images in the 1--3 micron region and the ability to use a diffraction-limited spectroscopy slit. The AO system is currently in the preliminary design phase and considerable analysis has been performed in order to predict its performance under various seeing conditions. In particular we have investigated the point-spread function, energy through a spectroscopy slit, crowded field contrast, object limiting magnitude, field of view, and sky coverage with natural and laser guide stars.

  19. Wide-angle Optical Telescope for the EUSO Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillman, L. W.; Takahaski, Y.; Zuccaro, A.; Lamb, D.; Pitalo, K.; Lopado, A.; Keys, A.

    2003-01-01

    Future spacebased air shower experiments, including the planned Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) mission, require a wide-angle telescope in the near-UV wavelengths 330 - 400 nm. Widest possible target aperture of earth's atmosphere, such as greater than 10(exp 5) square kilometers sr, can be viewed within the field-of-view of 30 degrees from space. EUSO's optical design is required to be compact, being constrained by the allocated mass and diameter for use in space. Two doublesided Fresnel lenses with 2.5-m diameter are chosen for the baseline design. It satisfies the imaging resolution of 0.1 degree over the 30-degree field of view.

  20. Advanced topographic laser altimeter system (ATLAS) receiver telescope assembly (RTA) and transmitter alignment and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagopian, John; Bolcar, Matthew; Chambers, John; Crane, Allen; Eegholm, Bente; Evans, Tyler; Hetherington, Samuel; Mentzell, Eric; Thompson, Patrick L.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Vaughnn, David

    2016-09-01

    The sole instrument on NASA's ICESat-2 spacecraft shown in Figure 1 will be the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS)1. The ATLAS is a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instrument; it measures the time of flight of the six transmitted laser beams to the Earth and back to determine altitude for geospatial mapping of global ice. The ATLAS laser beam is split into 6 main beams by a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) that are reflected off of the earth and imaged by an 800 mm diameter Receiver Telescope Assembly (RTA). The RTA is composed of a 2-mirror telescope and Aft Optics Assembly (AOA) that collects and focuses the light from the 6 probe beams into 6 science fibers. Each fiber optic has a field of view on the earth that subtends 83 micro Radians. The light collected by each fiber is detected by a photomultiplier and timing related to a master clock to determine time of flight and therefore distance. The collection of the light from the 6 laser spots projected to the ground allows for dense cross track sampling to provide for slope measurements of ice fields. NASA LIDAR instruments typically utilize telescopes that are not diffraction limited since they function as a light collector rather than imaging function. The more challenging requirements of the ATLAS instrument require better performance of the telescope at the ¼ wave level to provide for improved sampling and signal to noise. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) contracted the build of the telescope to General Dynamics (GD). GD fabricated and tested the flight and flight spare telescope and then integrated the government supplied AOA for testing of the RTA before and after vibration qualification. The RTA was then delivered to GSFC for independent verification and testing over expected thermal vacuum conditions. The testing at GSFC included a measurement of the RTA wavefront error and encircled energy in several orientations to determine the expected zero gravity figure, encircled

  1. Functional safety for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulau, Scott; Williams, Timothy R.

    2012-09-01

    Since inception, the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has planned to implement a facility-wide functional safety system to protect personnel from harm and prevent damage to the facility or environment. The ATST will deploy an integrated safety-related control system (SRCS) to achieve functional safety throughout the facility rather than relying on individual facility subsystems to provide safety functions on an ad hoc basis. The Global Interlock System (GIS) is an independent, distributed, facility-wide, safety-related control system, comprised of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) programmable controllers that monitor, evaluate, and control hazardous energy and conditions throughout the facility that arise during operation and maintenance. The GIS has been designed to utilize recent advances in technology for functional safety plus revised national and international standards that allow for a distributed architecture using programmable controllers over a local area network instead of traditional hard-wired safety functions, while providing an equivalent or even greater level of safety. Programmable controllers provide an ideal platform for controlling the often complex interrelationships between subsystems in a modern astronomical facility, such as the ATST. A large, complex hard-wired relay control system is no longer needed. This type of system also offers greater flexibility during development and integration in addition to providing for expanded capability into the future. The GIS features fault detection, self-diagnostics, and redundant communications that will lead to decreased maintenance time and increased availability of the facility.

  2. Extreme Adaptive Optics for the Thirty Meter Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B; al., e

    2006-05-02

    Direct detection of extrasolar Jovian planets is a major scientific motivation for the construction of future extremely large telescopes such as the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). Such detection will require dedicated high-contrast AO systems. Since the properties of Jovian planets and their parent stars vary enormously between different populations, the instrument must be designed to meet specific scientific needs rather than a simple metric such as maximum Strehl ratio. We present a design for such an instrument, the Planet Formation Imager (PFI) for TMT. It has four key science missions. The first is the study of newly-formed planets on 5-10 AU scales in regions such as Taurus and Ophiucus--this requires very small inner working distances that are only possible with a 30m or larger telescope. The second is a robust census of extrasolar giant planets orbiting mature nearby stars. The third is detailed spectral characterization of the brightest extrasolar planets. The final targets are circumstellar dust disks, including Zodiacal light analogs in the inner parts of other solar systems. To achieve these, PFI combines advanced wavefront sensors, high-order MEMS deformable mirrors, a coronagraph optimized for a finely-segmented primary mirror, and an integral field spectrograph.

  3. Improved optical design for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppala, Lynn G.

    2002-12-01

    This paper presents an improved optical design for the LSST, an f/1.25 three-mirror telescope covering 3.0 degrees full field angle, with 6.9 m effective aperture diameter. The telescope operates at five wavelength bands spanning 386.5 nm to 1040 nm (B, V, R, I and Z). For all bands, 80% of the polychromatic diffracted energy is collected within 0.20 arc-seconds diameter. The reflective telescope uses an 8.4 m f/1.06 concave primary, a 3.4 m convex secondary and a 5.2 m concave tertiary in a Paul geometry. The system length is 9.2 m. A refractive corrector near the detector uses three fused silica lenses, rather than the two lenses of previous designs. Earlier designs required that one element be a vacuum barrier, but now the detector sits in an inert gas at ambient pressure, with the last lens serving as the gas barrier. Small adjustments lead to optimal correction at each band. Each filter has a different axial thickness, and the primary and tertiary mirrors are repositioned for each wavelength band. Features that simplify manufacturing include a flat detector, a far less aspheric convex secondary (10 μm from best fit sphere) and reduced aspheric departures on the lenses and tertiary mirror. Five aspheric surfaces, on all three mirrors and on two lenses, are used. The primary is nearly parabolic. The telescope is fully baffled so that no specularly reflected light from any field angle, inside or outside of the full field angle of 3.0 degrees, can reach the detector.

  4. Neptune and Titan Observed with Keck Telescope Adaptive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Macintosh, B.A.; Gibbard, S.; Gavel, D.T.; Roe, H.; De Pater, I.; Ghez, A.M.; Acton, S.; Wizinowich, P.L.; Lai, O.

    2000-05-05

    The authors report on observations taken during engineering science validation time using the new adaptive optics system at the 10-m Keck II Telescope. They observe Neptune and Titan at near-infrared wavelengths. These objects are ideal for adaptive optics imaging because they are bright and small, yet have many diffraction-limited resolution elements across their disks. In addition Neptune and Titan have prominent physical features, some of which change markedly with time. They have observed infrared-bright storms on Neptune, and very low-albedo surface regions on Titan, Saturn's largest moon, Spatial resolution on Neptune and Titan was 0.05-0.06 and 0.04-0.05 arc sec, respectively.

  5. Neptune and Titan observed with Keck Telescope adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Claire E.; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Gibbard, Seran; Gavel, Donald T.; Roe, Henry; de Pater, Imke; Ghez, Andrea M.; Acton, Scott; Wizinowich, Peter L.; Lai, Olivier

    2000-07-01

    We report on observations taken during engineering science validation time using the new adaptive optics system at the 10-m Keck II Telescope. We observed Neptune and Titan at near- infrared wavelengths. These objects are ideal for adaptive optics imaging because they are bright and small, yet have many diffraction-limited resolution elements across their disks. In addition Neptune and Titan have prominent physical features, some of which change markedly with time. We have observed infrared-bright 'storms' on Neptune, and very low- albedo surface regions on Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Spatial resolution on Neptune and Titan was 0.05 - 0.06 and 0.04 - 0.05 arc sec, respectively.

  6. Low temperature optical testing of CFRP telescope panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, William F.; Woida, Patrick; Tysenn, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Since 1984, low temperature optical tests were made of very lightweight mirror panels for use in balloon and space infrared and submillimeter telescopes. In order to accomplish this testing, an ambient pressure 0.5 meter test chamber operating from 20 to -80 C, developed techniques for measuring non-optical quality mirrors with phase modulation 10.6 micron interferometry, and created the interferogram reduction program. During the course of the program, nineteen mirrors from four manufactures were tested: carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel mirrors, a CFRP sandwich panel with an added glass facesheet, and carbon fiber reinforced glass panels. The results of the panel development and test program are summarized.

  7. Advanced Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. P.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technology project to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. The developed mirror technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. Just as JWST’s architecture was driven by launch vehicle, a future UVOIR mission’s architectures (monolithic, segmented or interferometric) will depend on capacities of future launch vehicles (and budget). Since we cannot predict the future, we must prepare for all potential futures. Therefore, to provide the science community with options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We derived engineering specifications for potential future monolithic or segmented space telescopes based on science needs and implement constraints. And we are maturing six inter-linked critical technologies to enable potential future large aperture UVOIR space telescope: 1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors, 2) Support Systems, 3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error, 4) Segment Edges, 5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing, and 6) Integrated Model Validation Science Advisory Team and a Systems Engineering Team. We are maturing all six technologies simultaneously because all are required to make a primary mirror assembly (PMA); and, it is the PMA’s on-orbit performance which determines science return. PMA stiffness depends on substrate and support stiffness. Ability to cost-effectively eliminate mid/high spatial figure errors and polishing edges depends on substrate stiffness. On-orbit thermal and mechanical performance depends on substrate stiffness, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and thermal mass. And, segment-to-segment phasing depends on substrate & structure stiffness

  8. Technology gap assessment for a future large-aperture ultraviolet-optical-infrared space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Quijada, Manuel; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Shaklan, Stuart; Stahl, H. Philip; Stahle, Carl M.; Thronson, Harley

    2016-10-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) team identified five key technology areas to enable candidate architectures for a future large-aperture ultraviolet/optical/infrared (LUVOIR) space observatory envisioned by the NASA Astrophysics 30-year roadmap, "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions." The science goals of ATLAST address a broad range of astrophysical questions from early galaxy and star formation to the processes that contributed to the formation of life on Earth, combining general astrophysics with direct-imaging and spectroscopy of habitable exoplanets. The key technology areas are internal coronagraphs, starshades (or external occulters), ultra-stable large-aperture telescope systems, detectors, and mirror coatings. For each technology area, we define best estimates of required capabilities, current state-of-the-art performance, and current technology readiness level (TRL), thus identifying the current technology gap. We also report on current, planned, or recommended efforts to develop each technology to TRL 5.

  9. Cryogenic Optical Position Encoders for Mechanisms in the JWST Optical Telescope Element Simulator (OSIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Anderjaska, Thomas; Badger, James (Inventor); Capon, Tom; Davis, CLinton; Dicks, Brent (Inventor); Eichhorn, William; Garza, Mario; Guishard, Corina; Haghani, Shadan; Hakun, Claef; Haney, Paul; Happs, David (Inventor); Hovmand, Lars; Kadari, Madhu; Kirk, Jeffrey; Nyquist, Richard (Inventor); Robinson, F. David; Sullivan, Joseph (Inventor); Wilson, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The JWST Optical Telescope Element Simulator (OSIM) is a configurable, cryogenic, optical stimulus for high fidelity ground characterization and calibration of JWST's flight instruments. OSIM and its associated Beam Image Analyzer (BIA) contain several ultra-precise, cryogenic mechanisms that enable OSIM to project point sources into the instruments according to the same optical prescription as the flight telescope images stars - correct in focal surface position and chief ray angle. OSIM's and BIA's fifteen axes of mechanisms navigate according to redundant, cryogenic, absolute, optical encoders - 32 in all operating at or below 100 K. OSIM's encoder subsystem, the engineering challenges met in its development, and the encoders' sub-micron and sub-arcsecond performance are discussed.

  10. The advanced LIGO input optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Chris L.; Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan. T.; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V.; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J.; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z.; Martin, Rodica M.; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H.; Tanner, David B.; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F.; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  11. The advanced LIGO input optics

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Chris L. Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; Feldbaum, David; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Martin, Rodica M.; Reitze, David H.; Tanner, David B.; Williams, Luke F.; Mueller, Guido; DeRosa, Ryan T.; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Frolov, Valery V.; Mullavey, Adam; Kawabe, Keita; Vorvick, Cheryl; King, Eleanor J.; and others

    2016-01-15

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  12. The Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Spectral Library Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) is a Hubble Large Treasury Project, whose aim is to collect high-quality ultraviolet (1150-3100 Å) spectra of bright stars, utilizing the echelle modes of powerful Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph; with resolution and signal-to-noise rivaling the best that can be achieved at ground-based observatories in the visible. During HST Cycle 18 (2010-2011), ASTRAL was allocated 146 orbits to record eight representative late-type ("cool") stars, including well-known cosmic denizens like Procyon and Betelgeuse. In Cycle 21 (2013-2014), ASTRAL was awarded an additional 230 orbits to extend the project to the hot side of the H-R diagram: 21 targets covering the O-A spectral types, including household favorites Vega and Sirius. The second part of the program was completed in January 2015. I describe the scientific motivations for observing hot and cool stars in the UV; the unique instrumental characteristics of STIS that enabled a broad survey like ASTRAL; progress in the program to date; and prospects for the future.

  13. Image inversion analysis of the HST OTA (Hubble Space Telescope Optical Telescope Assembly), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvak, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Technical work during September-December 1990 consisted of: (1) analyzing HST point source images obtained from JPL; (2) retrieving phase information from the images by a direct (noniterative) technique; and (3) characterizing the wavefront aberration due to the errors in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) mirrors, in a preliminary manner. This work was in support of JPL design of compensating optics for the next generation wide-field planetary camera on HST. This digital technique for phase retrieval from pairs of defocused images, is based on the energy transport equation between these image planes. In addition, an end-to-end wave optics routine, based on the JPL Code 5 prescription of the unaberrated HST and WFPC, was derived for output of the reference phase front when mirror error is absent. Also, the Roddier routine unwrapped the retrieved phase by inserting the required jumps of +/- 2(pi) radians for the sake of smoothness. A least-squares fitting routine, insensitive to phase unwrapping, but nonlinear, was used to obtain estimates of the Zernike polynomial coefficients that describe the aberration. The phase results were close to, but higher than, the expected error in conic constant of the primary mirror suggested by the fossil evidence. The analysis of aberration contributed by the camera itself could be responsible for the small discrepancy, but was not verified by analysis.

  14. Technology Advances at the NRAO Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix James

    2015-08-01

    The 100 meter diameter Green Bank Telescope, with its large frequency coverage, great sensitivity, all-sky tracking, and location at a protected, radio-quiet site, offers a unique platform for technological advances in astronomical instrumentation that can yield an immediate scientific payoff.MUSTANG-1.5 is a feedhorn-coupled bolometer array for 3mm that has recently been installed on the telescope. It has 64 pixels (expandable to 223) and offers sensitivity to angular scales from 9" to more than 3' over a band from 75 GHz to 105 GHz. Its capabilities for science at 3mm are complimentary to, and in some cases superior to, those offered by ALMA. MUSTANG-1.5 is a collaboration between UPenn., NIST, NRAO, and other institutions.ARGUS is a 16-pixel focal plane array for millimeter spectroscopy that will be in use on the GBT in 2015. The array architecture is designed as a scalable technology pathfinder for larger arrays, but by itself it will provide major capabilities for spectroscopy from 75-107 GHz with 8" angular resolution over a wide field-of-view. It is a collaboration between Stanford Univ., Caltech, JPL, Univ. Maryland, Univ. Miami, and NRAO.FLAG is a prototype phased array receiver operating at 21cm wavelength that is under development for the GBT. It will produce multiple beams over a wide field of view with a sensitivity competitive with that of single-pixel receivers, allowing rapid astronomical surveys. FLAG is a collaboration between BYU, WVU, and NRAO.Also under development is a mm-wave phased array receiver for the GBT, designed to operate near 90 GHz as a prototype for very large format phased array receivers in the 3mm band. It is a collaboration between UMass and BYU.VEGAS is the new spectrometer for the GBT, offering multiple configurations well matched to GBT receivers from 1 to 100 GHz and suitable for use with focal plane arrays. It is a collaboration between UCal (Berkeley) and NRAO.The new receivers and spectrometers create extremely big data

  15. The Infrared-Optical Telescope (IRT) of the Exist Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutyrev, Alexander; Bloom, Joshua; Gehrels, Neil; Golisano, Craig; Gong, Quan; Grindlay, Jonathan; Moseley, Samuel; Woodgate, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The IRT is a 1.1m visible and infrared passively cooled telescope, which can locate, identify and obtain spectra of GRB afterglows at redshifts up to z 20. It will also acquire optical-IR, imaging and spectroscopy of AGN and transients discovered by the EXIST (The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope). The IRT imaging and spectroscopic capabilities cover a broad spectral range from 0.32.2m in four bands. The identical fields of view in the four instrument bands are each split in three subfields: imaging, objective prism slitless for the field and objective prism single object slit low resolution spectroscopy, and high resolution long slit on single object. This allows the instrument, to do simultaneous broadband photometry or spectroscopy of the same object over the full spectral range, thus greatly improving the efficiency of the observatory and its detection limits. A prompt follow up (within three minutes) of the transient discovered by the EXIST makes IRT a unique tool for detection and study of these events, which is particularly valuable at wavelengths unavailable to the ground based observatories.

  16. Layer-oriented adaptive optics for solar telescopes.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Aglaé

    2012-08-10

    First multiconjugate adaptive-optical (MCAO) systems are currently being installed on solar telescopes. The aim of these systems is to increase the corrected field of view with respect to conventional adaptive optics. However, this first generation is based on a star-oriented approach, and it is then difficult to increase the size of the field of view beyond 60-80 arc sec in diameter. We propose to implement the layer-oriented approach in solar MCAO systems by use of wide-field Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors conjugated to the strongest turbulent layers. The wavefront distortions are averaged over a wide field: the signal from distant turbulence is attenuated and the tomographic reconstruction is thus done optically. The system consists of independent correction loops, which only need to account for local turbulence: the subapertures can be enlarged and the correction frequency reduced. Most importantly, a star-oriented MCAO system becomes more complex with increasing field size, while the layer-oriented approach benefits from larger fields and will therefore be an attractive solution for the future generation of solar MCAO systems.

  17. Scaling multiconjugate adaptive optics performance estimates to extremely large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbroek, Brent L.; Rigaut, Francois J.

    2000-07-01

    Multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) is a key technology for extremely large, ground-based telescopes (ELT's) because it enables near-uniform atmospheric turbulence compensation over fields-of-view considerably larger than can be corrected with more conventional AO systems. Quantitative performance evaluation using detailed analytical or simulation models is difficult, however, due to the very large number of deformable mirror (DM) actuators, wave front sensors (WFS) subapertures, and guide stars which might comprise an MCAO system for an ELT. This paper employs more restricted minimal variance estimation methods to evaluate the fundamental performance limits imposed by anisoplanatism alone upon MCAO performance for a range of sample cases. Each case is defined by a atmospheric turbulence profile, telescope aperture diameter, field-of-view, guide star constellation, and set of DM conjugate ranges. For a Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum with an infinite outer scale, MCAO performance for a whole range of aperture diameters and proportional fields-of-view can be computed at once using a scaling law analogous to the (D/dO)5/3 formula for the cone effect. For 30 meter telescopes, useful levels of performance are possible across a 1.0 - 2.0 arc minute square field-of-view using 5 laser guide stars (LGS's) and 3 DM's, and somewhat larger fields can be corrected using 9 guide stars and 4 mirrors. 3 or more tip/tilt natural guide stars (NGS's) are necessary to detect modes of tilt anisoplanatism which cannot be detected using LGS's, however. LGS MCAO performance is a quite weak function of aperture diameter for a fixed field-of-view, and it is tempting to scale these results to larger apertures. NGS MCAO performance is moderately superior to LGS MCAO if the NGS constellation is within the compensated field-of-view, but degrades rapidly as the guide stars move away from the field. The penalty relaxes slowly with increasing aperture diameter, but how to extrapolate this trend

  18. Thermal Analysis of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 8 Meter Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Linda; Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) preliminary design concept consists of an 8 meter diameter monolithic primary mirror enclosed in an insulated, optical tube with stray light baffles and a sunshade. ATLAST will be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 and will experience constant exposure to the sun. The insulation on the optical tube and sunshade serve to cold bias the telescope which helps to minimize thermal gradients. The primary mirror will be maintained at 280K with an active thermal control system. The geometric model of the primary mirror, optical tube, sun baffles, and sunshade was developed using Thermal Desktop(R) SINDA/FLUINT(R) was used for the thermal analysis and the radiation environment was analyzed using RADCAD(R). A XX node model was executed in order to characterize the static performance and thermal stability of the mirror during maneuvers. This is important because long exposure observations, such as extra-solar terrestrial planet finding and characterization, require a very stable observatory wave front. Steady state thermal analyses served to predict mirror temperatures for several different sun angles. Transient analyses were performed in order to predict thermal time constant of the primary mirror for a 20 degree slew or 30 degree roll maneuver. This paper describes the thermal model and provides details of the geometry, thermo-optical properties, and the environment which influences the thermal performance. All assumptions that were used in the analysis are also documented. Parametric analyses are summarized for design parameters including primary mirror coatings and sunshade configuration. Estimates of mirror heater power requirements are reported. The thermal model demonstrates results for the primary mirror heated from the back side and edges using a heater system with multiple independently controlled zones.

  19. Multiple Etalon Systems for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Sigwarth, Michael; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Multiple etalons systems are discussed that meet the 4-meter NSO/Advance Technology Solar Telescope (http://www.nso.edu/ATST/index.html) instrument and science requirements for a narrow bandpass imaging system. A multiple etalon system can provide an imaging interferometer working in four distinct modes: as a spectro-polarimeter, a filter-vector magnetograph, and a wide-band and broad-band high-resolution imager. Specific dual and triple etalon configurations will be described that provides spectrographic passband of 2.0-3.5nm and reduces parasitic light levels to 1/10000 as required by precise polarization measurement, e.g., Zeeman measurements of magnetic sensitive lines. A TESOS-like triple etalon system provides for spectral purity of 100 thousandths. The triple designs have the advantage of reducing the finesse requirement on each etalon, allowing much more stable blocking filters, and can have very high spectral purity. A dual-etalon double-pass Cavallini-like configuration can provide a competing configuration. This design can provide high contrast with only a double etalon. The selection of the final focal plan instrument will depend on a trade-off of the ideal instrument versus reality, the number of etalons, the aperture of etalons, the number of blocking filters the electronic control system and computer interfaces, the temperature control and controllers for the etalons and the electronics. The use of existing experience should provide significant cost savings. The heritage of use of etalons and multiple etalon systems in solar physics come from a number of observatories, which includes MSFC Solar Observatory (NASA), Sac Peak Observatory (NSO), and Kiepenheuer Institute for Solar Physics (Germany), Mees Solar Observatory (University of Hawaii), and Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory (Italy). The design of the ATST multiple etalon system will reply on the existing experience from these observatories.

  20. The Protoexist2 Advanced CZT Coded Aperture Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Branden; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.

    2011-09-01

    The ProtoEXIST program was conceived for the development of a scalable detector plane architecture utilizing pixilated CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for eventual deployment in a large scale (1-4 m2 active area) coded aperture X-ray telescope for use as a wide field ( 90° × 70° FOV) all sky monitor and survey instrument for the 5 up to 600 keV energy band. The first phase of the program recently concluded with the successful 6 hour high altitude (39 km) flight of ProtoEXIST1, which utilized a closely tiled 8 × 8 array of 20 mm × 20 mm, 5 mm thick Redlen CZT crystals each bonded to a RadNET asic via an interposer board. Each individual CZT crystal utilized a 8 × 8 pixilated anode for the creation of a position sensitive detector with 2.5 mm spatial resolution. Development of ProtoEXIST2, the second advanced CZT detector plane in this series, is currently under way. ProtoEXIST2 will be composed of a closely tiled 8 × 8 array of 20 mm × 20 mm, 5 mm thick Redlen CZT crystals, similar to ProtoEXIST1, but will now utilize the Nu-ASIC which accommodates the direct bonding of CZT detectors with a 32 × 32 pixilated anode with a 604.8 μm pixel pitch. Characterization and performance of the ProtoEXIST2 detectors is discussed as well as current progress in the integration of the ProtoEXIST2 detector plane.

  1. PEPSI-feed: linking PEPSI to the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope using a 450m long fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablowski, D. P.; Weber, M.; Woche, M.; Ilyin, I.; Järvinen, A.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Gabor, P.

    2016-07-01

    Limited observing time at large telescopes equipped with the most powerful spectrographs makes it almost impossible to gain long and well-sampled time-series observations. Ditto, high-time-resolution observations of bright targets with high signal-to-noise are rare. By pulling an optical fibre of 450m length from the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) to the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) to connect the Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument (PEPSI) to the VATT, allows for ultra-high resolution time-series measurements of bright targets. This article presents the fibre-link in detail from the technical point-of-view, demonstrates its performance from first observations, and sketches current applications.

  2. Aladin transmit-receive optics (TRO): the optical interface between laser, telescope and spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosebach, Herbert; Erhard, Markus; Camus, Fabrice

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents the design and key technologies of the Transmit-Receive Optics (TRO) for the Aladin lidar instrument. The TRO as the central optical interface on the Aladin instrument leading the optical signals from the laser source to the emitting/receiving telescope, and vice versa, the received back scattered signals from the telescope to the spectrometers for Doppler shift evaluation. Additionally, the TRO contains a calibration branch bypassing the telescope and aims at levelling out the received signals in terms of wavelength and signal height changes due to wavelength and intensity variations of the laser. The opto-mechanical concept of the TRO consists of afocal optical groups, which are connected by parallel beams. Extreme requirements have been defined for the TRO on the end-to-end transmission (>=73 %) with an associated effective bandwidth of less than 1 nm over the 200 - 1100 nm spectral range. The achieved solution is presented in this paper. A further feature of the TRO is the use of two so-called aberration generators on the emitting and calibration branch, with which an artificial astigmatism can be realised for eye safety reasons. Its effect on astigmatism is presented. This article also addresses the effort on stray light suppression, which is of extreme importance for the TRO. Special ion plated (IP) optical coatings have been used with superior performance for the TRO, particulary on laser energy resistance and air/vacuum stability. The development of special mounting technologies of optical elements to meet the stringent WFE, stability, and stray light requirements for the TRO are described. Key words : Aeolus Satellite, ALADIN instrument, Lidar, optical design, UV optics manufacturing technologies

  3. Session: CSP Advanced Systems: Optical Materials (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.

    2008-04-01

    The Optical Materials project description is to characterize advanced reflector, perform accelerated and outdoor testing of commercial and experimental reflector materials, and provide industry support.

  4. Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope: Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Glavallsco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8- to 16-m ultraviolet optical near Infrared space observatory for launch in the 2025 to 2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including: Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy? We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8- to 16-marcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 micron wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 sq m, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 to 2.4 micron, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to that of current generation observatory-class space missions.

  5. Cloud Structures on Neptune Observed with Keck Telescope Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, C. E.; Macintosh, B. A.; Gibbard, S. G.; Gavel, D. T.; Roe, H. G.; de Pater, I.; Ghez, A. M.; Acton, D. S.; Lai, O.; Stomski, P.; Wizinowich, P. L.

    2003-01-01

    We report on observations obtained with the adaptive optics system at the 10 m Keck II Telescope during engineering validation and early science observing time for the adaptive optics system. We observed Neptune at near-infrared wavelengths. Angular resolution was 0.05"-0.06", corresponding to a spatial scale of approximately 1000 km at Neptune. We discuss the latitudinal structure of circumferential cloud bands and of compact infrared-bright features seen in the southern hemisphere, as well as their variation with wavelength. We determine the values of I/F (proportional to the ratio of reflected intensity to incident solar flux) in the J and H infrared-wavelength bands, including narrowband filters where there is strong methane absorption. We use the I/F values inside and outside of methane bands to estimate the altitude of clouds responsible for the brightest compact features in the infrared. Our data show that, on two of our four observing dates, the brightest region on Neptune contained highly reflective haze layers located below the tropopause but not deeper than a few bars.

  6. X-ray optical properties of a Wolter telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ondrusch, A.

    1980-01-01

    Physical properties and the fabrication sequence of a Wolter telescope are discussed. Such telescopes are intended to examine the dust scattering halos after being placed in orbit by a booster rocket launched from Australia.

  7. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishments include: Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry and government with expertise in science and space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications for monolithic primary mirror from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Pursuing long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Successfully demonstrated capability to make 0.5 m deep mirror substrate and polish it to UVOIR traceable figure specification.

  8. Satellite Imaging with Adaptive Optics on a 1 M Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennet, F.; Price, I.; Rigaut, F.; Copeland, M.

    2016-09-01

    The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the Mount Stromlo Observatory in Canberra, Australia, have been developing adaptive optic (AO) systems for space situational awareness applications. We report on the development and demonstration of an AO system for satellite imaging using a 1 m telescope. The system uses the orbiting object as a natural guide star to measure atmospheric turbulence, and a deformable mirror to provide an optical correction. The AO system utilised modern, high speed and low noise EMCCD technology on both the wavefront sensor and imaging camera to achieve high performance, achieving a Strehl ratio in excess of 30% at 870 nm. Images are post processed with lucky imaging algorithms to further improve the final image quality. We demonstrate the AO system on stellar targets and Iridium satellites, achieving a near diffraction limited full width at half maximum. A specialised realtime controller allows our system to achieve a bandwidth above 100 Hz, with the wavefront sensor and control loop running at 2 kHz. The AO systems we are developing show how ground-based optical sensors can be used to manage the space environment. AO imaging systems can be used for satellite surveillance, while laser ranging can be used to determine precise orbital data used in the critical conjunction analysis required to maintain a safe space environment. We have focused on making this system compact, expandable, and versatile. We are continuing to develop this platform for other space situational awareness applications such as geosynchronous satellite astrometry, space debris characterisation, satellite imaging, and ground-to-space laser communication.

  9. Mexican Infrared-Optical New Technology Telescope: The TIM project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, L.

    1998-11-01

    The scientific goals for TIM are an image quality of 0.25", consistent with the seeing at our site, optimization for the infrared as many scientific programs are going in that region of the spectrum, a M1 diameter in excess of 6.5 meters and a field of view limited to 10 arc minutes. Practical reasons, such as the limited funding available and the requirement of mexican financial agencies that the telescope should be built and installed in Mexico, lead us to decide for a segmented telescope, with a single secondary mirror, a single cassegrain focus and a light high stifness tubular structure. ALthough we are still working on the conceptual design of the telescope, there are some concepts that we are pursuing. The optical desing (M1+M2) is Ritchey-Cretien type with an hyperbolic primary 7.8 m od F/1.5 and a 0.9 m diameter f/15 secondary mirror. This will give a plate scale of 1.7 "/mm. This is 0.03 "/pix in direct mode, enough for AO goals. As for direct imaging, a factor of 5 reduction with 20 cm diam optical components would be able to produce 5' fields on a 2048, 20 microns type detector with 0.17"/pix. This implies that, with the use of auxiliary optics which is a common need for each particular instrument anyway, a wide variety of needs can be accomodated with a single secondary mirror. Choping for infrared observations would however introduce a additional cost in the secondary mirror. Alternatively the use of cold tertiary choping mirror is currently under study. The M1+M2 design currently aquires d80 of 0.17" in a 5' field without correction and 1" in a 10' field, that would require a field correcting lens. The M1 mirror will be segmented into 19 1.8 m diameter segments. There are 4 kinds of segments, the central, which we have kept to provide a reference for phasing, 6 more segments for the first ring and 12 in the outer ring, of two different kinds. The spacing between the segments is 5 mm, enough to reduce the inter-segment thermal background to half a

  10. Factory verification results and status of 3.6 m Devasthal Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Brijesh

    Considering the need and potential of establishing a moderate size optical telescope with spectroscopic capability at the geographical longitude of India, a 3.6m optical telescope with active optics technology is being installed at Devasthal, Nainital. This telescope will have instruments providing high resolution spectral and seeing-limited imaging capabilities at visible and near-infrared bands. The 3.6m DOT can be used to optical studies of a wide variety of astronomical topics including follow-up studies of sources identified in the radio region by GMRT and UV/X-ray by ASTROSAT. In this contribution, we present telescope performance verification results obtained from the sky tests which were carried out at the Factory in May 2012. The status of telescope will also be presented.

  11. Removing static aberrations from the active optics system of a wide-field telescope.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; Noethe, Lothar; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Argomedo, Javier; Dall'Ora, Massimo; D'Orsi, Sergio; Farinato, Jacopo; Magrin, Demetrio; Marty, Laurent; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Umbriaco, Gabriele

    2012-07-01

    The wavefront sensor in active and adaptive telescopes is usually not in the optical path toward the scientific detector. It may generate additional wavefront aberrations, which have to be separated from the errors due to the telescope optics. The aberrations that are not rotationally symmetric can be disentangled from the telescope aberrations by a series of measurements taken in the center of the field, with the wavefront sensor at different orientation angles with respect to the focal plane. This method has been applied at the VLT Survey Telescope on the ESO Paranal observatory.

  12. Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing Algorithm for Coarse Phasing Segmented Mirror Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spechler, Joshua A.; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.

    2013-01-01

    Segment mirror phasing, a critical step of segment mirror alignment, requires the ability to sense and correct the relative pistons between segments from up to a few hundred microns to a fraction of wavelength in order to bring the mirror system to its full diffraction capability. When sampling the aperture of a telescope, using auto-collimating flats (ACFs) is more economical. The performance of a telescope with a segmented primary mirror strongly depends on how well those primary mirror segments can be phased. One such process to phase primary mirror segments in the axial piston direction is dispersed fringe sensing (DFS). DFS technology can be used to co-phase the ACFs. DFS is essentially a signal fitting and processing operation. It is an elegant method of coarse phasing segmented mirrors. DFS performance accuracy is dependent upon careful calibration of the system as well as other factors such as internal optical alignment, system wavefront errors, and detector quality. Novel improvements to the algorithm have led to substantial enhancements in DFS performance. The Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing (ADFS) Algorithm is designed to reduce the sensitivity to calibration errors by determining the optimal fringe extraction line. Applying an angular extraction line dithering procedure and combining this dithering process with an error function while minimizing the phase term of the fitted signal, defines in essence the ADFS algorithm.

  13. Grazing Incidence Nickel Replicated Optics for Hard X-ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peturzzo, J. J., III; Elsner, R. F.; Joy, M. K.; ODell, S. L.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The requirements for future hard x-ray (up to 50 keV) telescopes are lightweight, high angular resolution optics with large collecting areas. Grazing incidence replicated optics are an excellent candidate for this, type of mission, providing better angular resolution, comparable area/unit mass, and simpler fabrication than multilayer-coated foils. Most importantly, the technology to fabricate the required optics currently exists. A comparison of several hard x-ray telescope designs will be presented.

  14. Analysis of the Optical Design for the SAFIR Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Paul; Khayatian, Behrouz; Bradford, Matt; Dragovan, Mark; Hoppe, Daniel; Imbriale, William; Lee, Roger; Paine, Chris; Turner, Dick; Yorke, Harold; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2006-01-01

    SAFIR, the Single Aperture Far Infra Red Observatory, is a very powerful space mission that will achieve background-limited sensitivity in the far infrared-submillimeter spectral region. Many processes of enormous interest to astronomers can best be studied in this wavelength range, but require the demanding combination of high sensitivity, good angular resolution, and spectroscopic capability. SAFIR is a 10m class telescope to offering good angular resolution, cooled to below 5 K in order to achieve background-limited sensitivity, and equipped with a complement of large-format cameras and broadband spectrometers. Successful operation of such a facility is critically dependent on achieving the level of sensitivity expected, but this is rendered difficult by potential pickup from unwanted sources of radiation. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that the emission from the optical system itself is minimal due to its low temperature, thus emphasizing the importance of minimizing pickup from unwanted astronomical sources of radiation, including the emission from dust in our solar system (analogous to the zodiacal light, hence 'zodi'), and the emission from warm dust in the Milky Way (Galactic 'cirrus').

  15. Effect of the Keck telescope`s segmented primary on the performance on the Keck adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.

    1997-06-01

    The 349 degree of freedom Keck adaptive optics system will be mapped on to the 36 segment Keck primary mirror. Each telescope segment is independently controlled in piston and tilt by an active control system and each segment also has its own set of aberrations. This presents a unique set of problems for the Keck adaptive optics system, not encountered with continuous primaries. To a certain extent the low order segment aberrations, beginning with focus, can be corrected statically by the adaptive optic system. However, the discontinuous surface at the segment edges present special problems in sensing and correcting wavefront with laser guide stars or natural guide stars.

  16. Segmented X-Ray Optics for Future Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClelland, Ryan S.

    2013-01-01

    Lightweight and high resolution mirrors are needed for future space-based X-ray telescopes to achieve advances in high-energy astrophysics. The slumped glass mirror technology in development at NASA GSFC aims to build X-ray mirror modules with an area to mass ratio of approx.17 sq cm/kg at 1 keV and a resolution of 10 arc-sec Half Power Diameter (HPD) or better at an affordable cost. As the technology nears the performance requirements, additional engineering effort is needed to ensure the modules are compatible with space-flight. This paper describes Flight Mirror Assembly (FMA) designs for several X-ray astrophysics missions studied by NASA and defines generic driving requirements and subsequent verification tests necessary to advance technology readiness for mission implementation. The requirement to perform X-ray testing in a horizontal beam, based on the orientation of existing facilities, is particularly burdensome on the mirror technology, necessitating mechanical over-constraint of the mirror segments and stiffening of the modules in order to prevent self-weight deformation errors from dominating the measured performance. This requirement, in turn, drives the mass and complexity of the system while limiting the testable angular resolution. Design options for a vertical X-ray test facility alleviating these issues are explored. An alternate mirror and module design using kinematic constraint of the mirror segments, enabled by a vertical test facility, is proposed. The kinematic mounting concept has significant advantages including potential for higher angular resolution, simplified mirror integration, and relaxed thermal requirements. However, it presents new challenges including low vibration modes and imperfections in kinematic constraint. Implementation concepts overcoming these challenges are described along with preliminary test and analysis results demonstrating the feasibility of kinematically mounting slumped glass mirror segments.

  17. The Focal Plane Package of the Solar Optical telescope on Solar B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2006-06-01

    The Solar-B satellite will be launched into a full-sun low-earth orbit in the fall of 2006 from Japan's Uchinoura Space center. It includes the 50-cm diameter Solar Optical Telescope with its Focal Plane Package (FPP), for near-UV and visible observations of the photosphere and chromosphere at very high (diffraction limited) angular resolution. The FPP has a Spectro-Polarimeter (SP) for precision measurements of photospheric vector magnetic fields over a 160 x 320 arcsecond field of view; a Narrowband Filter Imager (NFI) with a tunable birefringent filter for magnetic, Doppler, and intensity maps over the same field of view; and a Broadband Filter Imager (BFI) for highest resolution images in six wavelengths (G band, Ca II H, continua, etc.) over two-thirds of that field of view. A polarization modulator in the telescope allows measurement of Stokes parameters at all wavelengths in the SP and NFI. The NFI wavelengths include both photospheric and chromospheric lines (Fe I, Mg b, Na D, H-alpha). All images are stabilized by a tip-tilt mirror and correlation tracker. This presentation will include pictures and description of the instrument, results from calibration and sun testing, portions of the draft science plan, and some preliminary JOP's. Solar-B is an international cooperative mission between JAXA/ISAS of Japan, NASA of the United States, and PPARC of the United Kingdom. The Solar Optical Telescope has been developed by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitsubishi Electric Company, and JAXA/ISAS. The FPP has been developed by the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, High Altitude Observatory, and NASA.

  18. Optical design of the atacama cosmology telescope and the millimeter bolometric array camera.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J W; Niemack, M D; Dicker, S R; Aboobaker, A M; Ade, P A R; Battistelli, E S; Devlin, M J; Fisher, R P; Halpern, M; Hargrave, P C; Hincks, A D; Kaul, M; Klein, J; Lau, J M; Limon, M; Marriage, T A; Mauskopf, P D; Page, L; Staggs, S T; Swetz, D S; Switzer, E R; Thornton, R J; Tucker, C E

    2007-06-10

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope is a 6 m telescope designed to map the cosmic microwave background simultaneously at 145, 215, and 280 GHz with arcminute resolution. Each frequency will have a 32 by 32 element focal plane array of transition edge sensor bolometers. The telescope and the cold reimaging optics are optimized for millimeter-wave observations with these sensitive detectors. The design of each is described.

  19. Enclosure design for the ARIES 3.6m optical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. K.; Shukla, Vishal; Bangia, Tarun; Raskar, R. D.; Kulkarni, R. R.; Ghanti, A. S.

    2012-09-01

    A 3.6-m, f/9 optical telescope is planned to be installed at Devasthal, India (Latitude:29° 21' 40'' N, Longitude: 79° 41' 04'' E, Altitude: 2450 m above msl). The telescope has Cassegrain focus and alt-azimuth mount. The design of the telescope enclosure and the auxiliary building includes a fixed base enclosure, a telescope pier, a rotating dome structure, an auxiliary building, ventilation and component handling systems. The design is optimized for thermal, mechanical, structural, as well as for telescope installation and maintenance requirements. The design aims to provide seeing limited images within the telescope enclosure. This paper presents design of the 3.6m telescope enclosure.

  20. Looking Back in Time: Building the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee

    2016-01-01

    When it launches in 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will look back in time at the earliest stars and galaxies forming in the universe. This talk will look back in time at the development of the JWST telescope. This will include a discussion of the design, technology development, mirror development, wave front sensing and control algorithms, lightweight cryogenic deployable structure, pathfinder telescope, and integration and test program evolution and status. The talk will provide the engineering answers on why the mirrors are made of Beryllium, why there are 18 segments, where and how the mirrors were made, how the mirrors get aligned using the main science camera, and how the telescope is being tested. It will also look back in time at the many dedicated people all over the country who helped build it.

  1. Recent performance of the normal incident x-ray telescope with adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamoto, S.; Ishii, R.; Nukamori, S.; Imai, K.; Mochida, A.; Sato, S.; Ohgi, Y.; Yoshida, Y.; Hoshino, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report recent results of the performance measurement of our X-ray telescope with adaptive optics. The telescope is designed to use the 13.5nm EUV with the Mo/Si multilayers, making a normal incident optics. The primary mirror is 80mm in its diameter and the focal length of 2m. The deformable mirror is controlled by measuring a wave-front of an optical laser. Effects of a difference between the light paths from the reference and from an object are examined. The angular resolution is measured with optical light and we confirm almost diffraction limited resolution as well as its appropriate function as adaptive optics.

  2. Paper Productivity of Ground-based Large Optical Telescopes from 2000 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Chul

    2011-08-01

    We present an analysis of the scientific (refereed) paper productivity of the current largest (diameter>8m) ground-based optical (and infrared) telescopes during the ten-year period from 2000 to 2009. The telescopes for which we have gathered and analysed the scientific publication data are the two 10-m Keck telescopes, the four 8.2-m Very Large Telescopes (VLT), the two 8.1-m Gemini telescopes, the 8.2-m Subaru telescope, and the 9.2-m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). We have analysed the numbers of papers published in various astronomical journals produced by using these telescopes. While the total numbers of papers from these observatories are largest for the VLT, followed by Keck, Gemini, Subaru, and HET, the number of papers produced by each component of the telescopes is largest for Keck, followed by VLT, Subaru, Gemini, and HET. In 2009, each telescope of the Keck, VLT, Gemini, Subaru, and HET observatories produced 135, 109, 93, 107, and 5 refereed papers, respectively. We have shown that each telescope of the Keck, VLT, Gemini, and Subaru observatories is producing 2.1+/-0.9 Nature and Science papers annually and these papers make up 1.7+/-0.8% of all refereed papers produced by using each of those telescopes. Extending this relation, we propose that this ratio of the number of Nature and Science papers to the total number of refereed papers that will be produced by future extremely large telescopes (ELTs) will remain similar. From a comparison of the publication trends of the above telescopes, we suggest that (i) having more than one telescope of the same kind at the same location and (ii) increasing the number of instruments available at the telescope are good ways to maximize the paper productivity.

  3. Hubble Space Telescope: Optical telescope assembly handbook. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, Chris

    1990-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope is described along with how its design affects the images produced at the Science Instruments. An overview is presented of the hardware. Details are presented of the focal plane, throughput of the telescope, and the point spread function (image of an unresolved point source). Some detailed simulations are available of this, which might be useful to observers in planning their observations and in reducing their data.

  4. Design and analysis of an active optics system for a 4-m telescope mirror combining hydraulic and pneumatic supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousberg, Gregory P.; Moreau, Vincent; Schumacher, Jean-Marc; Piérard, Maxime; Somja, Aude; Gloesener, Pierre; Flebus, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    AMOS has developed a hybrid active optics system that combines hydraulic and pneumatic properties of actuators to support a 4-m primary mirror. The mirror is intended to be used in the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope) that will be installed by the National Solar Observatory (NSO) atop the Haleakala volcano in Hawaii. The mirror support design is driven by the needs of (1) minimizing the support-induced mirror distortions under telescope operating conditions, (2) shaping the mirror surface to the desired profile, and (3) providing a high stiffness against wind loads. In order to fulfill these requirements, AMOS proposes an innovative support design that consist of 118 axial actuators and 24 lateral actuators. The axial support is based on coupled hydraulic and pneumatic actuators. The hydraulic part is a passive system whose main function is to support the mirror weight with a high stiffness. The pneumatic part is actively controlled so as to compensate for low-order wavefront aberrations that are generated by the mirror support itself or by any other elements in the telescope optical chain. The performances of the support and its adequacy with the requirements are assessed with the help of a comprehensive analysis loop involving finite-element, thermal and optical modellings.

  5. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (e.g., Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate its feasibility.

  6. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid, segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (eg, Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate it s feasibility.

  7. The Development of Advanced-Technology Automated/Robotic Telescope Systems for Astronomy Education and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulherin, J. C.; Williams, R. J.

    2000-12-01

    During the 1990s groups at universities around the world developed small working automated/robotic telescopes that proved the feasibility of using such systems for education and research projects. A few of the more successful projects such as the Bradford Robotic Observatory in the United Kingdom and the University of Iowa's Automated Telescope Facility (AFT) and Iowa Robotic Observatory (IRO) programs proved how useful and powerful these systems can be in practice. This paper describes how one company, Torus Technologies, developed hardware and software technologies to create advanced integrated small automated/robotic telescope systems. These systems were designed from the `bottom up' to be automated/robotic telescopes capable of operating an entire observatory including domes, CCD cameras, and other peripheral equipment. Automated/robotic telescopes can play a major role in enabling small colleges and universities, especially in developing countries, to actively participate in serious `hands on' research and education projects that otherwise would not be practical. A commercially available affordable, high-precision, and proven turnkey automated/robotic small telescope system capable of operating remotely via the Internet is crucial for bringing this technology into widespread use. Today Torus Technologies telescopes are installed at locations world wide as the primary instruments of research programs, discovery and monitoring programs, and education programs. This paper describes some of the current applications for using these telescopes and how these telescope systems will be used in the future in standalone installations and in global networks.

  8. Telescope Scientist on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanSpeybroeck, Leon

    1999-01-01

    The most important activity during this reporting period was the calibration of the AXAF High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) and the analysis of the copious data which were obtained during that project. The calibration was highly successful, and will result in the AXAF being by far the best calibrated X-ray observatory ever flown, and more accurate results by all of its users. This period also included participation in the spacecraft alignment and assembly activities and final flight readiness reviews. The planning of the first year of Telescope Scientist AXAF observations also was accomplished. The Telescope Scientist team also served as a technical resource for various problems which were encountered during this period. Many of these contributions have been documented in memoranda sent to the project.

  9. Telescope Scientist on the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Carl M. (Technical Monitor); VanSpeybroeck, Leon; Tananbaum, Harvey D.

    2004-01-01

    In this period, the Chandra X-ray Observatory continued to perform exceptionally well, with many scientific observations and spectacular results. The HRMA performance continues to be essentially identical to that predicted from ground calibration data. The Telescope Scientist Team has improved the mirror model to provide a more accurate description to the Chandra observers, enabling them to reduce the systematic errors and uncertainties in their data reduction. There also has been good progress in the scientific program. Using the Telescope Scientist GTO time, we carried out an extensive Chandra program to observe distant clusters of galaxies. The goals of this program were to use clusters to derive cosmological constraints and to investigate the physics and evolution of clusters. A total of 71 clusters were observed with ACIS-I; the last observations were completed in December 2003.

  10. GAMCOTE: a prototype for an advanced Compton Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Séréville, N.; Tatischeff, V.; Laurent, P.; Bertoli, W.; Brulin, G.; Dormard, J.-J.; Dosme, N.; Faul, T.; Genolini, B.; Gibelin, L.; Gostojić, A.; Grave, X.; Hamadache, C.; Karkour, N.; Kiener, J.; Lafay, X.; Legay, E.; Limousin, O.; Linget, D.; Maier, D.; Oger, R.; Peyré, J.; Rauly, E.; Rosier, P.; Santos, C.; Torrentó, A.-S.; Le Ven, V.; Wanlin, E.

    2016-07-01

    Astronomy in the MeV gamma-ray band (0.1 - 100 MeV) holds a rich promise for elucidating many fundamental questions concerning the most violent cosmic phenomena. The next generation of gamma-ray space instrument could be a Compton and pair-creation telescope made of two main parts: a silicon tracker optimized for Compton scattering of cosmic gamma rays and a calorimeter that absorbs the scattered photons. We present here the first results of GAMCOTE, a GAMma-ray COmpton TElescope prototype which includes thick double sided silicon strip detectors coupled to a LaBr3:Ce crystal read by a 64 multi-anode photomultiplier tube.

  11. Advanced Adaptive Optics Control Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    Optimal estimation and control methods for high energy laser adaptive optics systems are described. Three system types are examined: Active...the adaptive optics approaches and potential system implementations are recommended.

  12. A view in the mirror - Or through the looking glass. [history of development of optical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    The development of optical telescopes from the age of astrology to those of today and the future is discussed. The rationales for changes in the design of telescopes during this time are explored. The cost drivers, and how to reduce them, are also discussed.

  13. Mechanical design and design processes for the Telescope Optical Assembly of the Optical Communications Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Lossberg, Bryan R.

    1994-08-01

    A mechanical design has been developed for the Telescope Optical Assembly (TOA) of the Optical Communications Demonstrator (OCD). The TOA is the portion of the OCD instrument that integrates all the optical elements of the system with the exception of the Laser Transmitter Assembly (LXA) which is fiber coupled to the TOA. The TOA structure is composed primarily of aluminum components with some use of steel and invar. The assembly is contained within a 16 cm MUL 20 cm X 33 cm envelope and has an estimated mass of 5.5 kg. The mechanical design was developed using Computervision's CADDS 5 computer aided design software. Code V optical design data was used as a primary input and was efficiently and accurately transferred form the optical designer to the mechanical designer through the use of IGES files. In addition to enabling rapid transfer of the initial optical design as well as subsequent optical design refinements, the IGES transfer process was also used to expedite preliminary thermal and dynamic analyses.

  14. AGN Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project II. Ultraviolet and Optical Continuum Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fausnaugh, Michael; Agn Storm Team

    2015-01-01

    The AGN STORM collaboration recently completed an extensive reverberation mapping campaign, targeting NGC 5548 with observations spanning the hard X-rays to mid-infrared. This campaign represents a massive collaborative effort, with far UV continuum spectrophotometry obtained through an intensive HST COS program, and near-UV/optical broad band photometry obtained from Swift and over 25 ground-based telescopes (in BVR and griz). The campaign spanned the entire 2014 observing season with virtually daily cadence, which allows us to compare with unprecedented accuracy the detailed structure of the observed UV and optical continuum emission signals in this archetypal AGN. We find statistically significant time delays between lightcurves from different wavebands, and this result has implications for the temperature, ionization, and geometric configuration of the AGN's sub-parsec scale environment. We will present the UV/optical continuum lightcurves from this campaign, as well as an analysis of the wavelength-dependent structure of the time delays.

  15. The James Webb Telescope Instrument Suite Layout: Optical System Engineering Considerations for a Large, Deployable Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent; Davila, Pam; Jurotich, Matthew; Hobbs, Gurnie; Lightsey, Paul; Contreras, Jim; Whitman, Tony

    2003-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a space-based, infrared observatory designed to study the early stages of galaxy formation in the Universe. The telescope will be launched into an elliptical orbit about the second Lagrange point and passively cooled to 30-50 K to enable astronomical observations from 0.6 to 28 microns. A group from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Northrop Grumman Space Technology prime contractor team has developed an optical and mechanical layout for the science instruments within the JWST field of view that satisfies the telescope s high-level performance requirements. Four instruments required accommodation within the telescope's field of view: a Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) provided by the University of Arizona; a Near-Mared Spectrometer (NIRSpec) provided by the European Space Agency; a Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a European consortium; and a Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) with a tunable filter module provided by the Canadian Space Agency. The size and position of each instrument's field of view allocation were developed through an iterative, concurrent engineering process involving the key observatory stakeholders. While some of the system design considerations were those typically encountered during the development of an infrared observatory, others were unique to the deployable and controllable nature of JWST. This paper describes the optical and mechanical issues considered during the field of view layout development, as well as the supporting modeling and analysis activities.

  16. 8 Meter Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST-8m)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    ATLAST-8m (Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope) is a proposed 8-meter monolithic UV/optical/NIR space observatory (wavelength range 110 to 2500 nm) to be placed in orbit at Sun-Earth L2 by NASA's planned Ares V heavy lift vehicle. Given its very high angular resolution (15 mas @ 500 nm), sensitivity and performance stability, ATLAST-8m is capable of achieving breakthroughs in a broad range of astrophysics including: Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy? An 8-meter UVOIR observatory has the performance required to detect habitability (H2O, atmospheric column density) and biosignatures (O2, O3, CH4) in terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres, to reveal the underlying physics that drives star formation, and to trace the complex interactions between dark matter, galaxies, and intergalactic medium. The ATLAST Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study developed a detailed point design for an 8-m monolithic observatory including optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN&C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; mass and power budgets; and system cost. The results of which were submitted by invitation to NRC's 2010 Astronomy & Astrophysics Decadal Survey.

  17. Development of laser guide stars and adaptive optics for large astronomical telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Avicola, K.; Bissinger, H.; Brase, J.M.; Gavel, D.T.; Friedman, H.; Morris, J.R.; Olivier, S.S.; Rapp, D.; Salmon, J.T.; Waltjen, K.

    1992-06-29

    We describe a feasibility experiment to demonstrate high-order adaptive optics using a sodium-layer laser guide star. We use the copper-vapor-pumped dye lasers developed for LLNL`s atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation program to create the laser guide star. Closed-loop adaptive corrections will be accomplished using a 69-subaperture adaptive optics system on a one-meter telescope at LLNL. The laser bream is projected upwards from a beam director approximately 5 meters away from the main telescope, and is expected to form a spot 1-2 meters in diameter at the atmospheric sodium layer (95 km altitude). We describe the overall system architecture and adaptive optics components, and analyze the expected performance. Our long-term goal is to develop sodium-layer laser guide stars and adaptive optics for large astronomical telescopes. We discuss preliminary design trade-offs for the Keck Telescope at Mauna Kea.

  18. Development of laser guide stars and adaptive optics for large astronomical telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Avicola, K.; Bissinger, H.; Brase, J.M.; Gavel, D.T.; Friedman, H.; Morris, J.R.; Olivier, S.S.; Rapp, D.; Salmon, J.T.; Waltjen, K.

    1992-06-29

    We describe a feasibility experiment to demonstrate high-order adaptive optics using a sodium-layer laser guide star. We use the copper-vapor-pumped dye lasers developed for LLNL's atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation program to create the laser guide star. Closed-loop adaptive corrections will be accomplished using a 69-subaperture adaptive optics system on a one-meter telescope at LLNL. The laser bream is projected upwards from a beam director approximately 5 meters away from the main telescope, and is expected to form a spot 1-2 meters in diameter at the atmospheric sodium layer (95 km altitude). We describe the overall system architecture and adaptive optics components, and analyze the expected performance. Our long-term goal is to develop sodium-layer laser guide stars and adaptive optics for large astronomical telescopes. We discuss preliminary design trade-offs for the Keck Telescope at Mauna Kea.

  19. Daytime Use of Astronomical Telescopes for Deep-Space Optical Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. Thomas; Ortiz, Gerard G.; Boyd, Tim A.

    2006-01-01

    Tests at the 200-inch Hale Telescope on Palomar Mountain have demonstrated this telescope's ability to withstand considerable thermal stress, and subsequently produce remarkably unaffected results. During the day of June 29,2005, the Hale telescope dome was left open, and the telescope was exposed to outside air and direct sunlight for 8 hours. During this time, portions of the telescope structure in the telescope's optical path experienced temperature elevations of 30 C, while the primary mirror experienced unprecedented heating of over 3 C. The telescope's measured blind pointing accuracy after this exposure was not noticeably degraded from the measurements taken before exposure. More remarkably, the telescope consistently produced stellar images which were significantly better after exposure of the telescope (1.2 arcsec) than before (1.6 arcsec), even though the conditions of observation were similar. This data is the first step in co-opting astronomical telescopes for daytime use as astronomical receivers, and supports the contention that deleterious effects from daytime exposure of the telescope can be held to an acceptable level for interleaved communications and astronomy.

  20. Design of the master optical reference for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. S.; Gallagher, Ben; Frazier, Doug; Whitman, Tony L.; Feinberg, Lee D.; Jhabvala, Murzy; Hayden, Bill

    2014-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) requires testing of the full optical system in a cryogenic vacuum environment before launch. Challenges with the telescope architecture and the test environment lead to placing removable optical test sources at the Cassegrain intermediate focus of the Telescope. The optical test sources are used to establish the system alignment and provide test illumination to the Science Instrument suite. The Aft Optics Subsystem (AOS) Source Plate Assembly (ASPA) comprises sources, control electronics, cryogenic optical fiber and a precision mechanical structure. The system provides point source illumination from visible to mid infrared, narrow and broadband, and with an optical power range of 10 orders of magnitude. The precision metering structure holding the sources is mounted temporarily to the flight hardware to be removed after the system test campaign.

  1. Optical integrated modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Joseph M.

    2011-09-01

    This paper summarizes the optical integrated modeling efforts for the James Webb Space Telescope reported from 2003 to 2009. The topics include: 1) development of the linear optical model (or LOM), 2) the extension of the LOM to a field of view, 3) tolerance analysis of figure and alignment modes of the telescope, 4) introduction of math software toolkits, 5) system level modeling and closed loop alignment updates of the observatory on orbit, and 6) primary mirror figure compensation of large figure aberration.

  2. Cryogenic Optical Performance of the Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) Flight Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losch, Patricia; Lyons, James J., III; Hagopian, John

    1998-01-01

    The CIRS half-meter diameter beryllium flight telescope's optical performance was tested at the instrument operating temperature of 170 Kelvin. The telescope components were designed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) but fabricated out of house and then assembled, aligned and tested upon receipt at GSFC. A 24 inch aperture cryogenic test facility utilizing a 1024 x 1024 CCD array was developed at GSFC specifically for this test. The telescope,s image quality (measured as encircled energy), boresight stability and focus stability were measured. The gold coated beryllium design exceeded the cold image performance requirement of 80% encircled energy within a 460 micron diameter circle.

  3. Advances in transmission x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ceglio, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics are reviewed. Specific advances in coded aperture imaging, zone plate lens fabrication, time and space resolved spectroscopy, and CCD x-ray detection are discussed.

  4. Tolerance analysis during the optical design of 4m class optical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. K.; Muthu Marriappan, C.; Kumar, Brijesh; Gupta, K. G.

    The detailed tolerance analysis has been carried out for the proposed 4 m class (RC) Devasthal Optical Telescope (DOT) using ZEMAX - EE to study system performance and meet the image quality criteria. The latter requires encircled energy (E90) to be concentrated within 0.6 arcsec diameter. The spot diagrams and E80 have been studied with various values of tilt, decenter, surface irregularity and temperature, while the polarization studies are under ess. It has been found that after applying the system tolerances the rms change in the system performance is within the range 4 to 6%.

  5. Using the Hands-On Optics Terrific Telescopes Kit in The International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Robert T.; Pompea, S. M.; Walker, C. E.

    2008-05-01

    The Hands-On Optics (HOO) program has developed a kit called Terrific Telescopes for use in educational outreach. Workshop participants will learn how to effectively use the activities in a variety of educational settings and will receive their own Terrific Telescopes kit. The kit focuses on activities involving refraction, lenses, image formation, and telescopes. The kit contains a laser, a variety of lenses, velum screens, and several build- your-own telescope kits. The workshop will impart the skills necessary for participants to lead activities as part of the International Year of Astronomy (IYA). Our workshop will give participants a series of activities they can use at their home institution to lead activities for the public and students where they can learn how a telescope works and build their own small telescopes. The activities we present are suitable for use in a variety of settings including museums, planetariums, schools, university outreach efforts, and astronomy club events. We will also have a variety of small telescopes on hand for participants to test. Workshop participants will evaluate the design and image quality of a variety of telescopes and compare the image quality of different eyepieces. Participants in this workshop will have an opportunity to lead further IYA activities and to receive additional kits and materials. The goal of IYA is to sites around the country to lead optics activities where people learn about light and build their own telescopes.

  6. Using the Hands-On Optics Terrific Telescopes Kit in the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Walker, C. E.

    2008-11-01

    The Hands-On Optics (HOO) program has developed a kit called Terrific Telescopes for use in educational outreach. Workshop participants will learn how to effectively use the activities in a variety of educational settings and will receive their own Terrific Telescopes kit. The kit focuses on activities involving refraction, lenses, image formation, and telescopes. The kit contains a laser, a variety of lenses, velum screens, and several build- your-own telescope kits. The workshop will impart the skills necessary for participants to lead activities as part of the International Year of Astronomy (IYA). Our workshop will give participants a series of activities they can use at their home institution to lead activities for the public and students where they can learn how a telescope works and build their own small telescopes. The activities we present are suitable for use in a variety of settings including museums, planetariums, schools, university outreach efforts, and astronomy club events. We will also have a variety of small telescopes on hand for participants to test. Workshop participants will evaluate the design and image quality of a variety of telescopes and compare the image quality of different eyepieces. Participants in this workshop will have an opportunity to lead further IYA activities and to receive additional kits and materials. The goal of IYA is to sites around the country to lead optics activities where people learn about light and build their own telescopes.

  7. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    Objective of this work is to define and initiate a long-term program to mature six inter-linked critical technologies for future UVOIR space telescope mirrors to TRL6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. (1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors: 4 to 8 m monolithic & 8 to 16 m segmented primary mirrors require larger, thicker, stiffer substrates. (2) Support System:Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch and deploy on orbit in a stress-free and undistorted shape. (3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error:A very smooth mirror is critical for producing a high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high-contrast imaging. (4) Segment Edges:Edges impact PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects the total collecting aperture. (5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing:Segment phasing is critical for producing a high-quality temporally stable PSF. (6) Integrated Model Validation:On-orbit performance is determined by mechanical and thermal stability. Future systems require validated performance models. We are pursuing multiple design paths give the science community the option to enable either a future monolithic or segmented space telescope.

  8. Chinese Large Optic/IR Telescope (LOT): planning for the next decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiang-qun; Zhu, Yong-tian

    2016-08-01

    Chinese astronomical community has suggested to construct a high resolution precision and wide field survey of universal optical / infrared telescope, suitable for a wide range of cutting-edge scientific research subject. The telescope diameter is 12 meters, and it is composed of 84 pieces of hexagonal mirrors. After the completion, it could be a world's largest telescope. Its wide field survey function will be work together with the 30 meters telescope in the near future on the observation of complementary. The telescope optical system adopted innovative design ideas, its multiple focuses can achieve rapid switching; its atmospheric dispersion corrector lens-prism can correct aberration also, and with the advantage of simple structure; two layers of Nasmyth platform can be placed more scientific instruments. LAMOST, a Chinese large spectrum survey telescope has been built and put into operation many years, it has successfully developed the two segmented optical mirrors and one of them is with deformation of thin mirror active optical technology, as well as the batch grinding hexagonal off-axis mirror technology developed in recent years, for construction of the 12 meters telescope laid a good technical foundation.

  9. GSMT Education: Teaching about Adaptive Optics and Site Selection Using Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.

    2010-08-01

    Giant Segmented Mirror Telescopes (GSMT) represents the next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELT). Currently there are three active ELT projects, all established as international partnerships to build telescopes of greater than 20 meters aperture. Two of these have major participation by U.S. institutions: the Giant Magellan Telescope and the Thirty Meter Telescope. The ESO-ELT is under development by the European Southern Observatory and other European institutions. We have developed educational activities to accompany the design phase of these projects. The current activities focus on challenges faced in the design and site selection of a large telescope. The first module is on site selection. This online module is based on the successful Astronomy Village program model. Students evaluate several potential sites to decide where to build the GSMT. They must consider factors such as weather, light pollution, seeing, logistics, and geography. The second project has developed adaptive optics teaching units suitable for high school.

  10. Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Watterson, C.E.

    1997-05-01

    The Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices project was initiated in march 1991 to support design laboratory guidance on electro-optic device packaging and evaluation. Sandia National Laboratory requested AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), to prepare for future packaging efforts in electro-optic integrated circuits. Los Alamos National Laboratory requested the evaluation of electro-optic waveguide devices for nuclear surety applications. New packaging techniques involving multiple fiber optic alignment and attachment, binary lens array development, silicon V-groove etching, and flip chip bonding were requested. Hermetic sealing of the electro-optic hybrid and submicron alignment of optical components present new challenges to be resolved. A 10-channel electro-optic modulator and laser amplifier were evaluated for potential surety applications.

  11. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Soummer, Remi; Sivramakrishnan, Annand; Macintosh, Bruce; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Stahl, H. Philip; Smith, W. Scott; Mosier, Gary; Kirk, Charles; Arnold, William

    2013-01-01

    ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. AMTD is the start of a multiyear effort to develop, demonstrate and mature critical technologies to TRL-6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. AMTD builds on the state of art (SOA) defined by over 30 years of monolithic & segmented ground & space-telescope mirror technology to mature six key technologies: (1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirror Substrates: Both (4 to 8 m) monolithic and (8 to 16 m) segmented primary mirrors require larger, thicker, and stiffer substrates. (2) Support System: Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch and deploy on orbit in a stress-free and undistorted shape. (3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error: Very smooth mirror is critical for producing high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high contrast imaging. (4) Segment Edges: The quality of segment edges impacts PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects total collecting aperture. (5) Segment to Segment Gap Phasing: Segment phasing is critical for producing high-quality temporally-stable PSF. (6) Integrated Model Validation: On-orbit performance is driven by mechanical & thermal stability. Compliance cannot be 100% tested, but relies on modeling. AMTD is pursuing multiple design paths to provide the science community with options to enable either large aperture monolithic or segmented mirrors with clear engineering metrics traceable to science requirements.

  12. Robust determination of optical path difference: fringe tracking at the infrared optical telescope array interferometer.

    PubMed

    Pedretti, Ettore; Traub, Wesley A; Monnier, John D; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Carleton, Nathaniel P; Schloerb, F Peter; Brewer, Michael K; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Lacasse, Marc G; Ragland, Sam

    2005-09-01

    We describe the fringe-packet tracking system used to equalize the optical path lengths at the Infrared Optical Telescope Array interferometer. The measurement of closure phases requires obtaining fringes on three baselines simultaneously. This is accomplished by use of an algorithm based on double Fourier interferometry for obtaining the wavelength-dependent phase of the fringes and a group-delay tracking algorithm for determining the position of the fringe packet. A comparison of data acquired with and without the fringe-packet tracker shows a factor of approximately 3 reduction of the error in the closure-phase measurement. The fringe-packet tracker has been able so far to track fringes with signal-to-noise ratios as low as 1.8 for stars as faint as mH = 7.0.

  13. Wide field/planetary camera optics study. [for the large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Design feasibility of the baseline optical design concept was established for the wide field/planetary camera (WF/PC) and will be used with the space telescope (ST) to obtain high angular resolution astronomical information over a wide field. The design concept employs internal optics to relay the ST image to a CCD detector system. Optical design performance predictions, sensitivity and tolerance analyses, manufacturability of the optical components, and acceptance testing of the two mirror Cassegrain relays are discussed.

  14. Telescope Scientist on the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanSpeybroeck, L.; Smith, Carl M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This period included many scientific observations made with the Chandra Observatory. The results, as is well known, are spectacular. Fortunately, the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) performance continues to be essentially identical to that predicted from ground calibration data. The Telescope Scientist Team has improved the mirror model to provide a more accurate description to the Chandra observers and enable them to reduce the systematic errors and uncertainties in their data reduction. We also have made considerable progress in improving the scattering model. There also has been progress in the scientific program. At this time 58 distant clusters of galaxies have been observed. We are performing a systematic analysis of this rather large data set for the purpose of determining absolute distances utilizing the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect. These observations also have been used to study the evolution of the cluster baryon mass function and the cosmological constraints which result from this evolution.

  15. Telescope Scientist on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanSpeybroeck, L.; Smith, Carl M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This period included many scientific observations made with the Chandra Observatory. The results, as is well known, are spectacular. Fortunately, the HRMA performance continues to be essentially identical to that predicted from ground calibration data. The Telescope Scientist Team has improved the mirror model to provide a more accurate description to the Chandra observers and enable them to reduce the systematic errors and uncertainties in their data reduction. There also has been progress in the scientific program. At this time 47 distant clusters of galaxies have been observed. We are performing a systematic analysis of this rather large data set for the purpose of determining absolute distances utilizing the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect.

  16. Design of differential optical absorption spectroscopy long-path telescopes based on fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Merten, André; Tschritter, Jens; Platt, Ulrich

    2011-02-10

    We present a new design principle of telescopes for use in the spectral investigation of the atmosphere and the detection of atmospheric trace gases with the long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. A combination of emitting and receiving fibers in a single bundle replaces the commonly used coaxial-Newton-type combination of receiving and transmitting telescope. This very simplified setup offers a higher light throughput and simpler adjustment and allows smaller instruments, which are easier to handle and more portable. The higher transmittance was verified by ray-tracing calculations, which result in a theoretical factor threefold improvement in signal intensity compared with the old setup. In practice, due to the easier alignment and higher stability, up to factor of 10 higher signal intensities were found. In addition, the use of a fiber optic light source provides a better spectral characterization of the light source, which results in a lower detection limit for trace gases studied with this instrument. This new design will greatly enhance the usability and the range of applications of active DOAS instruments.

  17. Production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR mirror blank for the Advanced Technology Solar telescope (ATST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Werner, Thomas; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope in the world. It is currently being built by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) in a height of 3000 m above sea level on the mountain Haleakala of Maui, Hawaii. The primary mirror blank of diameter 4.26 m is made of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® of SCHOTT AG Advanced Optics. The DKIST primary mirror design is extremely challenging. With a mirror thickness of only 78 to 85 mm it is the smallest thickness ever machined on a mirror of 4.26 m in diameter. Additionally the glassy ZERODUR® casting is one of the largest in size ever produced for a 4 m class ZERODUR® mirror blank. The off axis aspherical mirror surface required sophisticated grinding procedures to achieve the specified geometrical tolerance. The small thickness of about 80 mm required special measures during processing, lifting and transport. Additionally acid etch treatment was applied to the convex back-surface and the conical shaped outer diameter surface to improve the strength of the blank. This paper reports on the challenging tasks and the achievements on the material property and dimensional specification parameter during the production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR® primary mirror blank for AURA.

  18. Radio and Optical Telescopes for School Students and Professional Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosmer, Laura; Langston, G.; Heatherly, S.; Towner, A. P.; Ford, J.; Simon, R. S.; White, S.; O'Neil, K. L.; Haipslip, J.; Reichart, D.

    2013-01-01

    The NRAO 20m telescope is now on-line as a part of UNC's Skynet worldwide telescope network. The NRAO is completing integration of radio astronomy tools with the Skynet web interface. We present the web interface and astronomy projects that allow students and astronomers from all over the country to become Radio Astronomers. The 20 meter radio telescope at NRAO in Green Bank, WV is dedicated to public education and also is part of an experiment in public funding for astronomy. The telescope has a fantastic new web-based interface, with priority queuing, accommodating priority for paying customers and enabling free use of otherwise unused time. This revival included many software and hardware improvements including automatic calibration and improved time integration resulting in improved data processing, and a new ultra high resolution spectrometer. This new spectrometer is optimized for very narrow spectral lines, which will allow astronomers to study complex molecules and very cold regions of space in remarkable detail. In accordance with focusing on broader impacts, many public outreach and high school education activities have been completed with many confirmed future activities. The 20 meter is now a fully automated, powerful tool capable of professional grade results available to anyone in the world. Drop by our poster and try out real-time telescope control!

  19. Goddard Robotic Telescope - Optical Follow-up of GRBs and Coordinated Observations of AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Wallace, C. A.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Okajima, T.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2010-01-01

    Since it is not possible to predict when a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will occur or when Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) flaring activity starts, follow-up/monitoring ground telescopes must be located as uniformly as possible all over the world in order to collect data simultaneously with Fermi and Swift detections. However, there is a distinct gap in follow-up coverage of telescopes in the eastern U.S. region based on the operations of Swift. Motivated by this fact, we have constructed a 14" fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up Swift/Fermi GRBs and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) AGN. Our telescope system consists of off-the-shelf hardware. With the focal reducer, we are able to match the field of view of Swift narrow instruments (20' x 20'). We started scientific observations in mid-November 2008 and GRT has been fully remotely operated since August 2009. The 3(sigma) upper limit in a 30-second exposure in the R filter is approx.15.4 mag; however, we can reach to approx.18 mag in a 600-second exposures. Due to the weather condition at the telescope site. our observing efficiency is 30-40%, on average.

  20. Integrated Modeling Activities for the James Webb Space Telescope: Structural-Thermal-Optical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Howard, Joseph M.; Mosier, Gary E.; Parrish, Keith A.; McGinnis, Mark A.; Bluth, Marcel; Kim, Kevin; Ha, Kong Q.

    2004-01-01

    The James Web Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space telescope scheduled for launch in 2011. This is a continuation of a series of papers on modeling activities for JWST. The structural-thermal-optical, often referred to as STOP, analysis process is used to predict the effect of thermal distortion on optical performance. The benchmark STOP analysis for JWST assesses the effect of an observatory slew on wavefront error. Temperatures predicted using geometric and thermal math models are mapped to a structural finite element model in order to predict thermally induced deformations. Motions and deformations at optical surfaces are then input to optical models, and optical performance is predicted using either an optical ray trace or a linear optical analysis tool. In addition to baseline performance predictions, a process for performing sensitivity studies to assess modeling uncertainties is described.

  1. Multivariable Parametric Cost Model for Ground Optical Telescope Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Rowell, Ginger Holmes; Reese, Gayle; Byberg, Alicia

    2005-01-01

    A parametric cost model for ground-based telescopes is developed using multivariable statistical analysis of both engineering and performance parameters. While diameter continues to be the dominant cost driver, diffraction-limited wavelength is found to be a secondary driver. Other parameters such as radius of curvature are examined. The model includes an explicit factor for primary mirror segmentation and/or duplication (i.e., multi-telescope phased-array systems). Additionally, single variable models Based on aperture diameter are derived.

  2. Multivariable Parametric Cost Model for Ground Optical: Telescope Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Rowell, Ginger Holmes; Reese, Gayle; Byberg, Alicia

    2004-01-01

    A parametric cost model for ground-based telescopes is developed using multi-variable statistical analysis of both engineering and performance parameters. While diameter continues to be the dominant cost driver, diffraction limited wavelength is found to be a secondary driver. Other parameters such as radius of curvature were examined. The model includes an explicit factor for primary mirror segmentation and/or duplication (i.e. multi-telescope phased-array systems). Additionally, single variable models based on aperture diameter were derived.

  3. Optical Observations of GEO Debris with Two Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Rodriguez, H.; Barker, E.

    2007-01-01

    For several years, the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST), the University of Michigan s 0.6/0.9-m Schmidt telescope on Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile has been used to survey the debris population at GEO in the visible regime. Magnitudes, positions, and angular rates are determined for GEO objects as they move across the telescope s field-of-view (FOV) during a 5-minute window. This short window of time is not long enough to determine a full six parameter orbit so usually a circular orbit is assumed. A longer arc of time is necessary to determine eccentricity and to look for changes in the orbit with time. MODEST can follow objects in real-time, but only at the price of stopping survey operations. A second telescope would allow for longer arcs of orbit to obtain the full six orbital parameters, as well as assess the changes over time. An additional benefit of having a second telescope is the capability of obtaining BVRI colors of the faint targets, aiding efforts to determine the material type of faint debris. For 14 nights in March 2007, two telescopes were used simultaneously to observe the GEO debris field. MODEST was used exclusively in survey mode. As objects were detected, they were handed off in near real-time to the Cerro Tololo 0.9-m telescope for follow-up observations. The goal was to determine orbits and colors for all objects fainter than R = 15th magnitude (corresponds to 1 meter in size assuming a 0.2 albedo) detected by MODEST. The hand-off process was completely functional during the final eight nights and follow-ups for objects from night-to-night were possible. The cutoff magnitude level of 15th was selected on the basis of an abrupt change in the observed angular rate distribution in the MODEST surveys. Objects brighter than 15th magnitude tend to lie on a well defined locus in the angular rate plane (and have orbits in the catalog), while fainter objects fill the plane almost uniformly. We need to determine full

  4. The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope: Science Goals, Design and Project Status. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, T.; Keil, S. L.; Wagner, J.

    2009-12-01

    The 4m Advance Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) on Haleakala will be the most powerful solar telescope and the world’s leading resource for studying solar magnetism that controls the solar wind, flares, coronal mass ejections and variability in the Sun’s output. The project is about to enter the construction phase and is expected to be fully commissioned in 2017. A brief overview of the science goals and observational requirements of the ATST will be given followed by a summary of the design status of the telescope and its instrumentation will during which the technical and engineering challenges the ATST project faces will be discussed. ATST will provide high resolution and high sensitivity observations of the dynamic solar magnetic fields throughout the solar atmosphere, including the corona. With its 4 m aperture, ATST will resolve features at 0.”03 (20km on the sun) at visible wavelengths. The science requirement for polarimetric sensitivity (10-5 relative to intensity) and accuracy (5x10-4 relative to intensity) place strong constraints on the polarization analysis and calibration units. A high order adaptive optics system delivers a corrected beam to the initial set of state-of-the-art, facility class instrumentation located in the Coude lab facility. A few examples of the many unique science capabilities of the 4m ATST will be discussed. The initial set of first generation instruments includes: 1: the Visible Broadband Imager will provide images at the highest possible spatial and temporal resolution at a number of specified wavelengths in the range from 390 nm to 860 nm. 2: the Visible Spectro-Polarimeter will provide precision vector field measurements simultaneously at diverse wavelengths in the visible spectrum and thus deliver quantitative diagnostics of the magnetic field vector as a function of height in the solar atmosphere, along with the associated variation of the thermodynamic properties. 3: the Diffraction-Limited Near-Infrared Spectro

  5. Progress cargo spacecraft observed with the AZT-33IK optical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klunko, Evgeniy; Eselevich, Maksim; Tergoev, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we describe a telescope and measuring equipment used for optical observations of Progress cargo spacecraft (PCS), which were made during Radar-Progress space experiment sessions. We also describe object tracking and measurement techniques. The observations were made with the optical telescope AZT-33IK at Sayan Solar Observatory of ISTP SB RAS. During many of the sessions, we registered optical phenomena that occurred in regions of space surrounding PCS and appeared due to the work of PCS onboard engines. The data we obtained can be used to independently control the geometry of the experiment and to analyze physical conditions in outer space.

  6. The dynamic solar chromosphere: recent advances from high resolution telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, Konstantinos; Tsiropoula, Georgia

    This review focuses on the solar chromosphere, a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer that exhibits phenomena on a large range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution observa-tions from existing telescopes (DST, SST, DOT), as well as long-duration observations with Hinode's SOT employing lines such as the Ca II infrared lines, the Ca II HK and above all the Hα line reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured environment, both in quiet and active regions. The fine-structure chromosphere, is mainly constituted by fibrilar features that connect various parts of active regions or span across network cell interiors. We discuss this highly dynamical solar chromosphere, especially below the magnetic canopy, which is gov-erned by flows reflecting both the complex geometry and dynamics of the magnetic field and the propagation and dissipation of waves in the different atmospheric layers. A comprehensive view of the fine-structure chromosphere requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved, investigation of the intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric lev-els and analysis of its impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through flows resulting from different physical processes such as magnetic reconnection and waves. Furthermore, we assess the challenges facing theory and numerical modelling which require the inclusion of several physical ingredients, such as non-LTE and three-dimensional numerical simulations.

  7. Advanced optical disk storage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haritatos, Fred N.

    1996-01-01

    There is a growing need within the Air Force for more and better data storage solutions. Rome Laboratory, the Air Force's Center of Excellence for C3I technology, has sponsored the development of a number of operational prototypes to deal with this growing problem. This paper will briefly summarize the various prototype developments with examples of full mil-spec and best commercial practice. These prototypes have successfully operated under severe space, airborne and tactical field environments. From a technical perspective these prototypes have included rewritable optical media ranging from a 5.25-inch diameter format up to the 14-inch diameter disk format. Implementations include an airborne sensor recorder, a deployable optical jukebox and a parallel array of optical disk drives. They include stand-alone peripheral devices to centralized, hierarchical storage management systems for distributed data processing applications.

  8. Liquid lens: advances in adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Shawn Patrick

    2010-12-01

    'Liquid lens' technologies promise significant advancements in machine vision and optical communications systems. Adaptations for machine vision, human vision correction, and optical communications are used to exemplify the versatile nature of this technology. Utilization of liquid lens elements allows the cost effective implementation of optical velocity measurement. The project consists of a custom image processor, camera, and interface. The images are passed into customized pattern recognition and optical character recognition algorithms. A single camera would be used for both speed detection and object recognition.

  9. Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine and surgery.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Elson, Daniel S; Bigio, Irving J; Levenson, Richard M; So, Peter T C

    2012-03-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue, "Advances in Optics for Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery," which includes 12 contributions from attendees of the 2011 conference Advances in Optics for Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery XII.

  10. Testing the equipment for the cryogenic optical test of the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Dziak, K. J.; Huguet, Jesse; Knight, J. Scott; Reis, Carl; Wilson, Erin

    2014-08-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the JWST optics are tested at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. Tens of trucks full of custom test equipment are being delivered to the JSC, in addition to the large pieces built at the Center, and the renovation of the chamber itself. The facility is tested for the thermal stability control for optical measurements and contamination control during temperature transitions. The support for the OTIS is also tested for thermal stability control, load tested in the cryogenic environment, and tested for isolation of the background vibration for the optical measurements. The Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) is tested for the phasing and wavefront error (WFE) measurement of an 18 segment mirror and for cryogenic operation. A photogrammetry system is tested for metrology performance and cryogenic operation. Test mirrors for auto-collimation measurements are tested for optical performance and cryogenic operation. An assembly of optical test sources are calibrated and tested in a cryogenic environment. A Pathfinder telescope is used as a surrogate telescope for cryogenic testing of the OTIS optical test configuration. A Beam Image Analyzer (BIA) is used as a surrogate ISIM with the Pathfinder in this test. After briefly describing the OTIS optical test configuration, the paper will overview the list and configuration of significant tests of the equipment leading up to the OTIS test.

  11. Recent developments of advanced structures for space optics at Astrium, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, Thomas; Wulz, Georg; Scheulen, Dietmar

    2003-12-01

    The mechanical division of EADS Astrium GmbH, Friedrichshafen Germany, the former Dornier Satellitensystem GmbH is currently engaged with the development, manufacturing and testing of three different advanced dimensionally stable composite and ceramic material structures for satellite borne optics: -CFRP Camera Structure -Planck Telescope Reflectors -NIRSpec Optical Bench Breadboard for James Web Space Telescope The paper gives an overview over the requirements and the main structural features how these requirements are met. Special production aspects and available test results are reported.

  12. Precision-Deployable, Stable, Optical Benches for Cost-Effective Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Rolf; Pellegrino, S.; Dailey, D.; Marks, G.; Bookbinder, J.

    2012-05-01

    To explore the universe at the arcsecond resolution of Chandra, while increasing collecting area by at least an order of magnitude and maintaining affordability, we will need to make creative use of existing and new technology. Precision-deployable, stable, optical benches that fit inside smaller, lower-cost launch vehicles are a prime example of a technology well within current reach that will yield breakthrough benefits for future astrophysics missions. Deployable optical benches for astrophysical applications have a reputation for complexity; however, we are offering an approach, based on techniques used in space for decades, that reduces overall mission cost. Currently, deployable structures are implemented on JAXA’s Astro-H and NASA’s NuStar high-energy astrophysics missions. We believe it is now time to evolve these structures into precision, stable optical benches that are stiff, lightweight, and suitable for space telescopes with focal lengths of 20 meters or more. Such optical benches are required for advanced observatory class missions and can be scaled to Explorer and medium-class missions. To this end, we have formed a partnership between Space Structures Laboratory (SSL) at the California Institute of Technology, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS), Northrop Grumman Astro Aerospace (Astro), and Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO). Combining the expertise and tools from academia and industry is the most effective approach to take this concept to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6. We plan to perform small sub-scale demonstrations, functional tests, and analytical modeling in the academic environment. Using results from SSL, larger prototypes will be developed at facilities at NGAS in Redondo Beach and Carpinteria, CA.

  13. Optical design for ATHENA X-ray telescope based on slumped mirror segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proserpio, Laura; Breunig, Elias; Friedrich, Peter; Winter, Anita

    2014-07-01

    The Hot and Energetic Universe will be the focus of future ESA missions: in late 2013 the theme was selected for the second large-class mission in the Cosmic Vision science program. Fundamental questions on how and why ordinary matter assemble into galaxies and clusters, and how black holes grow and influence their surroundings can be addressed with an advanced X-ray observatory. The currently proposed ATHENA mission presents all the potentiality to answer the outstanding questions. It is based on the heritage of XMM-Newton and on the previous studies for IXO mission. The scientific payload will require state of the art instrumentations. In particular, the baseline for the X-ray optical system, delivering a combination of large area, high angular resolution, and large field of view, is the Silicon Pore Optics technology (SPO) developed by ESA in conjunction with the Cosine Measurement Systems. The slumping technology is also under development for the manufacturing of future X-ray telescopes: for several years the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial physics (MPE) has been involved in the analysis of the indirect slumping approach, which foresees the manufacturing of segmented X-ray shells by shaping thin glass foils at high temperatures over concave moulds so to avoid any contact of the optical surface with other materials during the process, preserving in this way the original X-ray quality of the glass surface. The paper presents an alternative optical design for ATHENA based on the use of thin glass mirror segments obtained through slumping.

  14. Integrated Modeling Activities for the James Webb Space Telescope: Optical Jitter Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, T. Tupper; Ha, Kong Q.; Johnston, John D.; Howard, Joseph M.; Mosier, Gary E.

    2004-01-01

    This is a continuation of a series of papers on the integrated modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope(JWST). Starting with the linear optical model discussed in part one, and using the optical sensitivities developed in part two, we now assess the optical image motion and wavefront errors from the structural dynamics. This is often referred to as "jitter: analysis. The optical model is combined with the structural model and the control models to create a linear structural/optical/control model. The largest jitter is due to spacecraft reaction wheel assembly disturbances which are harmonic in nature and will excite spacecraft and telescope structural. The structural/optic response causes image quality degradation due to image motion (centroid error) as well as dynamic wavefront error. Jitter analysis results are used to predict imaging performance, improve the structural design, and evaluate the operational impact of the disturbance sources.

  15. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a multi-year effort to systematically mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. This technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. To accomplish our objective, We use a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND result in a high-performance low-cost low-risk system.

  16. The optical design of a visible adaptive optics system for the Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopon, Derek

    The Magellan Adaptive Optics system will achieve first light in November of 2012. This AO system contains several subsystems including the 585-actuator concave adaptive secondary mirror, the Calibration Return Optic (CRO) alignment and calibration system, the CLIO 1-5 microm IR science camera, the movable guider camera and active optics assembly, and the W-Unit, which contains both the Pyramid Wavefront Sensor (PWFS) and the VisAO visible science camera. In this dissertation, we present details of the design, fabrication, assembly, alignment, and laboratory performance of the VisAO camera and its optical components. Many of these components required a custom design, such as the Spectral Differential Imaging Wollaston prisms and filters and the coronagraphic spots. One component, the Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector (ADC), required a unique triplet design that had until now never been fabricated and tested on sky. We present the design, laboratory, and on-sky results for our triplet ADC. We also present details of the CRO test setup and alignment. Because Magellan is a Gregorian telescope, the ASM is a concave ellipsoidal mirror. By simulating a star with a white light point source at the far conjugate, we can create a double-pass test of the whole system without the need for a real on-sky star. This allows us to test the AO system closed loop in the Arcetri test tower at its nominal design focal length and optical conjugates. The CRO test will also allow us to calibrate and verify the system off-sky at the Magellan telescope during commissioning and periodically thereafter. We present a design for a possible future upgrade path for a new visible Integral Field Spectrograph. By integrating a fiber array bundle at the VisAO focal plane, we can send light to a pre-existing facility spectrograph, such as LDSS3, which will allow 20 mas spatial sampling and R˜1,800 spectra over the band 0.6-1.05 microm. This would be the highest spatial resolution IFU to date, either

  17. Optical design of an UV camera for a Ritchey-Chretien space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragazzoni, Roberto; Falomo, R.; Corrain, G.

    1993-11-01

    A study for the optical design of an UV-imaging camera is briefly reported. We emphasize the guidelines that drove the design choices adopted, as trade-off between optical quality and efficiency. Optical solutions for an additional long focal length channel are also given. This study is performed in the framework of the SUV project, a 170 cm Ritchey-Chretian space telescope to be made with the collaboration of Russia, Ukraine, Italy and Germany.

  18. End-to-End Assessment of a Large Aperture Segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Bolcar, Matt; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Olivier; Stark,Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield Exo-Earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an Exo-Earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance.

  19. Femtosecond Optics: Advanced Devices and Ultrafast Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-31

    periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN), which already represents a significant advance . Gain is given by G=0.25(1+ exp(gl)), where for 7 t2 PPLN, g...H. Sotobayashi, J.T. Gopinath, and E.P. Ippen, ൟ cm long Bi20 3-based EDFA for picosecond pulse amplification with 80 nm gain bandwidth," IEEE...will be minimized by keeping the data in the optical domain. Such all- optical networks require advanced photonic technologies for a variety of

  20. Lunar-based optical telescopes: Planning astronomical tools of the twenty-first century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchey, J. D.; Nein, M. E.

    1995-01-01

    A succession of optical telescopes, ranging in aperture from 1 to 16 m or more, can be deployed and operated on the lunar surface over the next half-century. These candidates to succeed NASA's Great Observatories would capitalize on the unique observational advantages offered by the Moon. The Lunar Telescope Working Group and the LUTE Task Team of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have assessed the feasibility of developing and deploying these facilities. Studies include the 16-m Large Lunar Telescope (LLT); the Lunar Cluster Telescope Experiment (LCTE), a 4-m precursor to the LLT; the 2-m Lunar Transit Telescope (LTT); and its precursor, the 1-m Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE). The feasibility of developing and deploying each telescope was assessed and system requirements and options for supporting technologies, subsystems, transportation, and operations were detailed. Influences of lunar environment factors and site selection on telescope design and operation were evaluated, and design approaches and key tradeoffs were established. This paper provides an overview of the study results. Design concepts and brief system descriptions are provided, including subsystem and mission options selected for the concepts.

  1. Advanced flow-polishing and surface metrology of the SO56 X Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The surface finishing of X ray grazing incidence optics is a most demanding area of optical processing, both in terms of metrology and application of optical finishing techniques. An existing optical mirror was processed using a new removal technique that uses a jet of finely dispersed and extremely small particles that impact a surface, which under the correct conditions, produces an ultrasmooth surface, especially on aspheric curvatures. The surfaces of the SO56 mirror are tapered conical shapes that have a continuously changing radius with the primary mirror having a parabolic shape and the secondary mirror a hyperbolic shape. An optical ray trace that was conducted of a telescope used the measured parameters from the existing substrates to set up the prescription for the optical layout. The optimization indicated a wavefront performance of 0.10 A at 0.633 micron.

  2. Polarization modeling for the main optics of Chinese Giant Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shu; Fu, Yu; Jin, Zhenyu

    2016-07-01

    Chinese Giant Solar Telescope, which has a 8m diameter segmented primary mirror, is a plan for the next generation ground-based large solar telescope in China. A major scientific requirement for this telescope is the high accuracy polarimetry. In this paper, the instrumental polarization of the main optics is analyzed by polarization modeling, which is caused by off-axial field of view, spider asymmetry, nonuniform segment gap and segment coating. The result shows that the net polarization is sensitive to the asymmetrical spider leg widening and the uniformity of the segment optical property. For meeting the accuracy requirement, the extinction ratio and retardence error for each segment should be less than 0.3% and 0.8 degree, respectively. Generally, the ring segmented primary mirror have advantage in controlling the instrumental polarization for large main optics.

  3. A Fiber-Optic Coupled Telescope for Water Vapor DIAL Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell J.; Lonn, Frederick

    1998-01-01

    A fiber-optic coupled telescope of low complexity was constructed and tested. The major loss mechanisms of the optical system have been characterized. Light collected by the receiver mirror is focused onto an optical fiber, and the output of the fiber is filtered by an interference filter and then focused onto an APD detector. This system was used in lidar field measurements with a 532-nm Nd:YAG laser beam. The results were encouraging. A numerical model used for calculation of the expected return signal agreed with the lidar return signal obtained. The assembled system was easy to align and operate and weighed about 8 kg for a 30 cm (12") mirror system. This weight is low enough to allow mounting of the fiber-optic telescope receiver system in a UAV. Furthermore, the good agreement between the numerical lidar model and the performance of the actual receiver system, suggests that this model may be used for estimation of the performance of this and other lidar systems in the future. Such telescopes are relatively easy to construct and align. The fiber optic cable allows easy placement of the optical detector in any position. These telescope systems should find widespread use in aircraft and space home DIAL water vapor receiver systems.

  4. The Optical Design of the 40-in. Telescope and of the Irenee DuPont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

    PubMed

    Bowen, I S; Vaughan, A H

    1973-07-01

    The optical specifications of two astronomical telescopes designed to permit wide-field photography with critical definition are presented and compared. The 40-in. (1.016-m) and DuPont 100-in. (2.54-m) telescopes use modifications of the Ritchey-Chretién design with Gascoigne correctors. By avoiding the need for field flatteners through choice of mirrors yielding zero Petzval sum (40-in. telescope) or bending of photographic plates to a moderate field curvature (100-in. telescope), it was possible to achieve monochromatic images of ? to (1/4) sec of arc over fields of 3 degrees and 2.1 degrees , respectively.

  5. Optical testing of a gamma-ray telescope mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udupa, D. V.; Shukla, R. P.; Saksena, G. D.

    1993-09-01

    A large size concave mirror for use in the gamma-ray telescope TACTIC was tested. Focal length of the concave spherical mirror of diameter 600 mm was measured to be 401.2 cm using the Ronchi test. The surface accuracy of the mirror was estimated to be about Lambda/2 by visual observation of the fringes obtained. The spot size of the mirror for a nearly collimated beam was measured to be about 0.5 mm, whereas the computed size of the spot for a spherical mirror is about 0.1 mm. The reflectivity of the mirror was measured to be about 83% in the visible region.

  6. Timing calibration of the optical sensors for undersea neutrino telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppi, M.

    2006-11-01

    This paper describes the timing calibration system for the NEMO underwater neutrino telescope. The NEMO Project aims at the construction of a km3 detector, equipped with a large number of photomultipliers, in the Mediterranean Sea. We foresee a redundant system to perform the time calibration of our apparatus. Such a system can be extended to work for a very large apparatus, even for complex arrangements of widely spaced sensors. The NEMO prototyping activities ongoing at a test site off the coast of Sicily will allow the system described in this work to be operated and tested in situ next year.

  7. Low-cost Large Aperture Telescopes for Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid

    2006-01-01

    Low-cost, large-aperture optical receivers are required to form an affordable optical ground receiver network for laser communications. Among the ground receiver station's multiple subsystems, here, we only discuss the ongoing research activities aimed at reducing the cost of the large-size optics on the receiver. Experimental results of two different approaches for fabricating low-cost mirrors of wavefront quality on the order of 100-200X the diffraction limit are described. Laboratory-level effort are underway to improve the surface figure to better than 20X the diffraction limit.

  8. Advanced Geothermal Optical Transducer (AGOT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-01

    Today's geothermal pressure-temperature measuring tools are short endurance, high value instruments, used sparingly because their loss is a major expense. In this project LEL offered to build and test a rugged, affordable, downhole sensor capable ofretuming an uninterrupted data stream at pressures and of 10,000 psi and temperatures up to 250 C, thus permitting continuous deep-well logging. It was proposed to meet the need by specializing LEL's patented 'Twin Column Transducer' technology to satisfy the demands of geothermal pressure/temperature measurements. TCT transducers have very few parts, none of which are moving parts, and all of which can be fabricated from high-temperature super alloys or from ceramics; the result is an extremely rugged device, essentially impervious to chemical attack and readily modified to operate at high pressure and temperature. To measure pressure and temperature they capitalize on the relative expansion of optical elements subjected to thermal or mechanical stresses; if one element is maintained at a reference pressure while the other is opened to ambient, the differential displacement then serves as a measure of pressure. A transducer responding to temperature rather than pressure is neatly created by 'inverting' the pressure-measuring design so that both deflecting structures see identical temperatures and temperature gradients, but whose thermal expansion coefficients are deliberately mismatched to give differential expansion. The starting point for development of a PT Tool was the company's model DPT feedback-stabilized 5,000 psi sensor (U.S. Patent 5,311,014, 'Optical Transducer for Measuring Downhole Pressure', claiming a pressure transducer capable of measuring static, dynamic, and true bi-directional differential pressure at high temperatures), shown in the upper portion of Figure 1. The DPT occupies a 1 x 2 x 4-inch volume, weighs 14 ounces, and is accurate to 1 percent of full scale. Employing a pair of identical, low

  9. Optical transmission for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightsey, Paul A.; Gallagher, Benjamin B.; Nickles, Neal; Copp, Tracy

    2012-09-01

    The fabrication and coating of the mirrors for the James Webb Space Telescope has been completed. The spectral reflectivity of the protected gold coated beryllium mirrors has been measured. The predicted end-of-life transmission through the telescope builds from these values. The additional phenomena that have been analyzed are contamination effects and effects of the environment for the JWST operation about the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange libration point. The L2 environment analysis has been based on radiation testing of mirror samples and hypervelocity testing to assess the micrometeoroid impact effects. The mirror showed no change in reflectance over the VIS-SWIR wavelengths after exposure to 6-9 Grad (Si) that simulated 6 years orbiting the L2 Lagrange point. The effects of hypervelocity particle impacts on the mirrors from test data has been extrapolated to the to the anticipated flux characteristics for micrometeoroids at the L2 environment. The results show that the micrometeoroid effects are orders of magnitude below the particulate contamination effects. The final end-of-life transmission for the mirrors including all of these phenomena will meet the performance requirements for JWST.

  10. PILOT—a Pathfinder for an International Large Optical Telescope in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, M. C. B.; Burton, M. G.; Lawrence, J. S.; Storey, J. W. V.

    2006-08-01

    PILOT is a proposed 2.4 metre optical/IR telescope, designed to take advantage of the extraordinarily good observing conditions on the high plateau of Antarctica. The superb seeing and low infrared backgrounds will allow PILOT to outperform telescopes of 2-3 times the diameter at a mid-latitude site. PILOT is large enough to undertake important science, while small enough to act as a low-cost low-risk technology demonstrator for the next generation of large optical/IR telescopes in Antarctica. Future facilities could include the proposed 8.4 metre off-axis LAPCAT telescope, that would be competitive with ELTs in its ability to directly image extra-solar planets. PILOT is envisaged as an international collaboration. It is hoped that Australia will fund the telescope, with instruments, logistics and other aspects of the project contributed by international partners. A detailed science case for PILOT has been published, and a number of design studies for the telescope have been completed or are under way.

  11. Optical Observations of Space Debris with a global network of robotic telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laas-Bourez, Myrtille; Coward, David; Klotz, Alain; Boer, Michel

    The two TAROTs (Télescopes a Action Rapide pour les Objets Transitoires; Rapid Response ` Telescopes for Transient Objects) are fully robotic optical observatories with optimized observa-tion scheduling, data processing and archiving. In 2008, a new algorithm based on morpholog-ical mathematic was implemented in the standard pipeline. The method works by correlating measurements of the same object on successive images and provides very imprecise detection and false alarm rates. We have improved the algorithm and present the optimized version in this paper. With show that the efficiency and quality of the geostationary orbit survey is drastically improved. We find false detection and non-detection rates near zero. In this paper, we provide an overview of an international network of robotic optical telescopes that now includes the two TAROTs, a new Australian facility, the 1-m Zadko Telescope, and two other French telescopes. This robotic telescope networks offer simplicity in managing data, facilities and optimizes the potential science output for the individual instruments. In relation to space debris , the network will allow the Zadko Telescope to participate in a satellite and space debris tracking program. The network will potentially access 100% of all geostationary belt objects, provide accurate satellites positions and track low Earth orbit objects.

  12. Astrophysical Research Consortium Telescope Imaging Camera (ARCTIC) facility optical imager for the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Ketzeback, William; Bradley, Alaina; Dembicky, Jack; Doughty, Caitlin; Hawley, Suzanne; Johnson, Courtney; Klaene, Mark; Leon, Ed; McMillan, Russet; Owen, Russell; Sayres, Conor; Sheen, Tyler; Shugart, Alysha

    2016-08-01

    The Astrophysical Research Consortium Telescope Imaging Camera, ARCTIC, is a new optical imaging camera now in use at the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) 3.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory (APO). As a facility instrument, the design criteria broadly encompassed many current and future science opportunities, and the components were built for quick repair or replacement, to minimize down-time. Examples include a quick change shutter, filter drive components accessible from the exterior and redundant amplifiers on the detector. The detector is a Semiconductor Technology Associates (STA) device with several key properties (e.g. high quantum efficiency, low read-noise, quick readout, minimal fringing, operational bandpass 350-950nm). Focal reducing optics (f/10.3 to f/8.0) were built to control aberrations over a 7.8'x7.8' field, with a plate scale of 0.11" per 0.15 micron pixel. The instrument body and dewar were designed to be simple and robust with only two components to the structure forward of the dewar, which in turn has minimal feedthroughs and permeation areas and holds a vacuum <10-8 Torr. A custom shutter was also designed, using pneumatics as the driving force. This device provides exceptional performance and reduces heat near the optical path. Measured performance is repeatable at the 2ms level and offers field uniformity to the same level of precision. The ARCTIC facility imager will provide excellent science capability with robust operation and minimal maintenance for the next decade or more at APO.

  13. Advanced optics in an interdisciplinary graduate program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nic Chormaic, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, established in November 2011, provides a 5- year interdisciplinary PhD program, through English, within Japan. International and Japanese students entering the program undertake coursework and laboratory rotations across a range of topics, including neuroscience, molecular science, physics, chemistry, marine science and mathematics, regardless of previous educational background. To facilitate interdisciplinarity, the university has no departments, ensuring seamless interactions between researchers from all sectors. As part of the PhD program a course in Advanced Optics has been developed to provide PhD students with the practical and theoretical skills to enable them to use optics tools in any research environment. The theoretical aspect of the course introduces students to procedures for complex beam generation (e.g. Laguerre-Gaussian), optical trapping, beam analysis and photon optics, and is supported through a practical program covering introductory interference/diffraction experiments through to more applied fiber optics. It is hoped that, through early exposure to optics handling and measurement techniques, students will be able to develop and utilize optics tools regardless of research field. In addition to the formal course in Advanced Optics, a selection of students also undertakes 13 week laboratory rotations in the Light-Matter Interactions research laboratory, where they work side-by-side with physicists in developing optics tools for laser cooling, photonics or bio-applications. While currently in the first year, conclusive results about the success of such an interdisciplinary PhD training are speculative. However, initial observations indicate a rich cross-fertilization of ideas stemming from the diverse backgrounds of all participants.

  14. SiC lightweight telescopes for advanced space applications. II - Structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anapol, Michael I.; Hadfield, Peter; Tucker, Theodore

    1992-01-01

    A critical technology area for lightweight SiC-based telescope systems is the structural integrity and thermal stability over spaceborne environmental launch and thermal operating conditions. Note, it is highly desirable to have an inherently athermal design of both SiC mirrors and structure. SSG has developed an 8 inch diameter SiC telescope system for brassboard level optical and thermal testing. The brassboard telescope has demonstrated less than 0.2 waves P-V in the visible wavefront change over +50 C to -200 C temperature range. SSG has also fabricated a SiC truss structural assembly and successfully qualified this hardware at environmental levels greater than 3 times higher than normal Delta, Titan, and ARIES launch loads. SSG is currently developing two SiC telescopes; an 20 cm diameter off-axis 3 mirror re-imaging and a 60 cm aperture on-axis 3 mirror re-imager. Both hardware developments will be tested to flight level environmental, optical, and thermal specifications.

  15. System concepts for a large UV/optical/IR telescope on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nein, Max E.; Davis, Billy

    1991-01-01

    To assess the systems and technological requirements for constructing lunar telescopes in conjunction with the buildup of a lunar base for scientific exploration and as a waypoint for travel to Mars, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted concept studies of a 16-m-aperture large lunar telescope (LLT) and a 4-m-aperture precursor telescope, both operating in the UV/visible/IR spectral region. The feasibility of constructing a large telescope on the lunar surface is assessed, and its systems and subsystems are analyzed. Telescope site selection, environmental effects, and launch and assembly scenarios are also evaluated. It is argued that key technical drivers for the LLT must be tested in situ by precursor telescopes to evaluate such areas as the operations and long-term reliability of active optics, radiation protection of instruments, lunar dust mitigation, and thermal shielding of the telescope systems. For a manned lunar outpost or an LLT to become a reality, a low-cost dependable transportation system must be developed.

  16. MITSuME: multicolor optical/NIR telescopes for GRB afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Shimokawabe, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kotani, Taro; Yatsu, Yoichi; Ishimura, Takuto; Vasquez, Nicolas; Mori, Yuki; Kudo, Yusuke; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Nagayama, Shogo; Toda, Hiroyuki; Shimozu, Yasuhiro; Kuroda, Daisuke; Watanabe, Junichi; Fukushima, Hideo; Mori, Masaki

    2008-05-22

    Multicolor Imaging Telescopes for Survey and Monstrous Explosions (MITSuME) is built to perform multi-color photometry of NIR/optical afterglow covering the wavebands from K{sub s} to g' allowing the photometric redshift measurements up to z{approx_equal}10.Two 50 cm optical telescopes are built at Akeno, Yamanashi in eastern Japan, and at OAO, Okayama in western Japan. Each telescope has a Tricolor Camera, which allows us to take simultaneous images in g', R{sub c} and I{sub c} bands. These telescopes respond to GCN alerts and start taking series of tricolor images, which are immediately processed through the analys is pipeline on site. The pipeline consists of source finding, catalog matching, sky coordinates mapping to the image pixels, and photometry of the found sources. In addition, an automated search for an optical counterpart is performed.In addition, a wide-field (1 deg.) 91 cm NIR telescope is being built at OAO with filters in K{sub s}, H, J, and y bands.Summary of early results will be also presented.

  17. Advanced lightweight optics development for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbro, James W.

    1998-01-15

    A considerable amount of effort over the past year has been devoted to exploring ultra-lightweight optics for two specific NASA programs, the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), and the High Throughput X-ray Spectrometer (HTXS). Experimental investigations have been undertaken in a variety of materials including glass, composites, nickel, beryllium, Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (CSiC), Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide, Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide, and Silicon. Overall results of these investigations will be summarized, and specific details will be provided concerning the in-house development of ultra-lightweight nickel replication for both grazing incidence and normal incidence optics. This will include x-ray test results of the grazing incidence optic and cryogenic test results of the normal incidence optic. The status of two 1.5 meter diameter demonstration mirrors for NGST will also be presented. These two demonstrations are aimed at establishing the capability to manufacture and test mirrors that have an areal density of 15 kilograms per square meter. Efforts in thin membrane mirrors and Fresnel lenses will also be briefly discussed.

  18. Summary of studies for a solar optical telescope in space: 1968-1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bremer, J.; Kaul, R.

    1976-01-01

    The primary objective of this review is to tabulate the basic recommendations of several solar telescope studies. A primary matrix, listing some of the basic optical parameters, was compiled and forms the basis for a table. From this table it is apparent that a strong consensus exists on the configuration of the telescope and on its fundamental dimensionless parameters. Other tables presented in this document address the basic approach of each study to the telescope design as well as to the design of critical subsystems. These subsystem problems include the material, coating, configuration, mounting, launch locks, and thermal control of the primary mirror, the structure of the main telescope and the instrument bay, the mechanisms for radiation rejection, thermal control, and meteoroid shielding, and methods of maintaining image quality by proper alignment and by image motion compensation.

  19. Wide field imager instrument for the Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Nandra, Kirpal; Plattner, Markus; Porro, Matteo; Rau, Arne; Santangelo, Andrea; Tenzer, Chris; Wilms, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected for ESA's L2 mission, scheduled for launch in 2028. It will provide the necessary capabilities to achieve the ambitious goals of the science theme "The Hot and Energetic Universe." Athena's x-ray mirrors will be based on silicon pore optics technology with a 12-m focal length. Two complementary focal plane camera systems are foreseen, which can be moved interchangeably to the focus of the mirror system: the actively shielded micro-calorimeter spectrometer X-IFU and the wide field imager (WFI). The WFI camera will provide an unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arc min with a high count-rate capability (˜1 Crab). It permits a state-of-the-art energy resolution in the energy band of 0.1 to 15 keV during the entire mission lifetime (e.g., full width at half maximum ≤150 eV at 6 keV). This performance is accomplished by a set of depleted P-channel field effect transistor (DEPFET) active pixel sensor matrices with a pixel size well suited to the angular resolution of 5 arc sec (on-axis) of the mirror system. Each DEPFET pixel is a combined detector-amplifier structure with a MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450-μm-thick silicon bulk. This manuscript will summarize the current instrument concept and design, the status of the technology development, and the envisaged baseline performance.

  20. Optics ellipticity performance of an unobscured off-axis space telescope.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fei; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jianping; Shi, Guangwei; Wu, Hongbo

    2014-10-20

    With the development of astronomy, more and more attention is paid to the survey of dark matter. Dark matter cannot be seen directly but can be detected by weak gravitational lensing measurement. Ellipticity is an important parameter used to define the shape of a galaxy. Galaxy ellipticity changes with weak gravitational lensing and nonideal optics. With our design of an unobscured off-axis telescope, we implement the simulation and calculation of optics ellipticity. With an accurate model of optics PSF, the characteristic of ellipticity is modeled and analyzed. It is shown that with good optical design, the full field ellipticity can be quite small. The spatial ellipticity change can be modeled by cubic interpolation with very high accuracy. We also modeled the ellipticity variance with time and analyzed the tolerance. It is shown that the unobscured off-axis telescope has good ellipticity performance and fulfills the requirement of dark matter survey.

  1. A multipurpose TIM-based optical telescope for Omega and the Trident laser facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Oertel, J.A.; Murphy, T.J.; Berggren, R.R.

    1998-12-31

    The authors have recently designed and are building a telescope which acts as an imaging light collector relaying the image to an optical table for experiment dependent analysis and recording. The expected primary use of this instrument is a streaked optical pyrometer for witness plate measurements of Hohlraum drive temperature. The telescope is based on University of Rochester`s Ten-Inch Manipulator (TIM) which allows compatibility between Omega, Trident, and the NIF lasers. The optics capture a f/7 cone of light, have a field of view of 6-mm, have a spatial resolution of 5 to 7-{micro}m per line pair at the object plane, and are optimized for operation at 280-nm. The image is at a magnification of 11.7x, which is convenient for many experiments, but can be changed using additional optics that reside outside the TIM.

  2. Supernova and optical transient observations using the three wide-field telescope array of the KMTNet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Dae-Sik; Kim, Sang Chul; Lee, Jae-Joon; Pak, Mina; Park, Hong Soo; He, Matthias Y.; Antoniadis, John; Ni, Yuan Qi; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Park, Byeong-Gon; Kim, Dong-Jin; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Yongseok; Gonzalez, Santiago

    2016-08-01

    The Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) is a network of three new 1.6-m, wide-field telescopes spread over three different sites in Chile, South Africa and Australia. Each telescope is equipped with a four square degree wide-field CCD camera, making the KMTNet an ideal facility for discovering and monitoring early supernovae and other rapidly evolving optical transients by providing 24-hour continuous sky coverage. We describe our inaugurating program of observing supernovae and optical transients using about 20% of the KMTNet time in 2015-2019. Our early results include detection of infant supernovae, novae and peculiar transients as well as numerous variable stars and low surface brightness objects such as dwarf galaxies.

  3. Nearby active galactic nuclei seen via adaptive optics at the Keck Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Claire

    2004-02-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly clear that mergers between galaxies play a critical role in galaxy evolution, in the formation of central black holes, and in the phenomena of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasar activity. The advent of adaptive optics on the new generation of 6-10 m telescopes is making it possible to study nearby AGNs and merging galaxies with spatial resolutions of10 - 100 pc. In this talk I will describe and discuss observations of NGC 6240 and Cygnus A, archetypes of merging disk galaxies and of powerful radiogalaxies respectively. I will make use of infrared observations using the adaptive optics system on the 10-m Keck Telescope, as well as visible-light observations from the Hubble Space Telescope.

  4. The 3.6m Indo-Belgian Devasthal Optical Telescope: performance results on site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninane, Nathalie; Bastin, Christian; Flebus, Carlo; Kumar, Brijesh

    2016-07-01

    AMOS SA has been awarded of the contract for the design, manufacturing, assembly, tests and on site installation (Devasthal, Nainital in central Himalayan region) of the 3.6 m Indo-Belgian Devasthal Optical Telescope (IDOT). The telescope has Ritchey-Chrétien optical configuration with one axial and two side Cassegrain ports. The meniscus primary mirror is active and it is supported by pneumatic actuators. The azimuth axis system is equipped with hydrostatic bearing. After successful factory acceptance at AMOS SA, the telescope has been dismounted, packed, transported, and remounted on site. This paper provides the final performances (i.e. image quality, pointing and tracking) measured during sky tests at Devasthal Observatory.

  5. Advanced high-bandwidth optical fuzing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jony J.; von der Lippe, Christian M.

    2005-10-01

    A robust and compact photonic proximity sensor is developed for optical fuze in munitions applications. The design of the optical fuze employed advanced optoelectronic technologies including high-power vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), the p-i-n or metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors, SiGe ASIC driver, and miniature optics. The development combines pioneering work and unique expertise at ARDEC, ARL, and Sandia National Laboratories and synergizes the key optoelectronic technologies in components and system designs. This compact sensor will replace conventional costly assemblies based on discrete lasers, photodetectors, and bulky optics and provide a new capability for direct fire applications. It will be mass manufacturable in low cost and simplicity. In addition to the specific applications for gun-fired munitions, numerous civilian uses can be realized by this proximity sensor in automotive, robotics, and aerospace applications. This technology is also applicable to robotic ladar and short-range 3-D imaging.

  6. Advancing the Surveillance Capabilities of the Air Force’s Large-Aperature Telescopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-06

    added to these images to simulate the observed data. Since it is not fundamental, we do not include read noise from the detectors , assuming that... blind restorations for simulated data of a target of brightness mv=+2 as would be acquired with telescopes of 1 m (blue line), 1.6 m (magenta line...aperture diversity and blind deconvolution”, OSA topical meeting on Computational Optical Sensing and Imaging, Computational Imaging through Turbulence

  7. Optical Modeling of the Alignment and Test of the NASA James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph M.; Hayden, Bill; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2007-01-01

    Optical modeling challenges of the ground alignment plan and optical test and verification of the NASA James Webb Space Telescope are discussed. Issues such as back-out of the gravity sag of light-weighted mirrors, as well as the use of a sparse-aperture auto-collimating flat system are discussed. A walk-through of the interferometer based alignment procedure is summarized, and sensitivities from the sparse aperture wavefront test are included as examples.'

  8. SIMULATION OF ASTRONOMICAL IMAGES FROM OPTICAL SURVEY TELESCOPES USING A COMPREHENSIVE PHOTON MONTE CARLO APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J. R.; Peng, E.; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Hodge, M.; Lorenz, S.; Lupu, A.; Meert, A.; Nagarajan, S.; Todd, N.; Winans, A.; Young, M.; Jernigan, J. G.; Kahn, S. M.; Rasmussen, A. P.; Chang, C.; Gilmore, D. K.; Claver, C.

    2015-05-15

    We present a comprehensive methodology for the simulation of astronomical images from optical survey telescopes. We use a photon Monte Carlo approach to construct images by sampling photons from models of astronomical source populations, and then simulating those photons through the system as they interact with the atmosphere, telescope, and camera. We demonstrate that all physical effects for optical light that determine the shapes, locations, and brightnesses of individual stars and galaxies can be accurately represented in this formalism. By using large scale grid computing, modern processors, and an efficient implementation that can produce 400,000 photons s{sup −1}, we demonstrate that even very large optical surveys can be now be simulated. We demonstrate that we are able to (1) construct kilometer scale phase screens necessary for wide-field telescopes, (2) reproduce atmospheric point-spread function moments using a fast novel hybrid geometric/Fourier technique for non-diffraction limited telescopes, (3) accurately reproduce the expected spot diagrams for complex aspheric optical designs, and (4) recover system effective area predicted from analytic photometry integrals. This new code, the Photon Simulator (PhoSim), is publicly available. We have implemented the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope design, and it can be extended to other telescopes. We expect that because of the comprehensive physics implemented in PhoSim, it will be used by the community to plan future observations, interpret detailed existing observations, and quantify systematics related to various astronomical measurements. Future development and validation by comparisons with real data will continue to improve the fidelity and usability of the code.

  9. Simulation of Astronomical Images from Optical Survey Telescopes Using a Comprehensive Photon Monte Carlo Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. R.; Jernigan, J. G.; Kahn, S. M.; Rasmussen, A. P.; Peng, E.; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Chang, C.; Claver, C.; Gilmore, D. K.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Hodge, M.; Lorenz, S.; Lupu, A.; Meert, A.; Nagarajan, S.; Todd, N.; Winans, A.; Young, M.

    2015-05-01

    We present a comprehensive methodology for the simulation of astronomical images from optical survey telescopes. We use a photon Monte Carlo approach to construct images by sampling photons from models of astronomical source populations, and then simulating those photons through the system as they interact with the atmosphere, telescope, and camera. We demonstrate that all physical effects for optical light that determine the shapes, locations, and brightnesses of individual stars and galaxies can be accurately represented in this formalism. By using large scale grid computing, modern processors, and an efficient implementation that can produce 400,000 photons s-1, we demonstrate that even very large optical surveys can be now be simulated. We demonstrate that we are able to (1) construct kilometer scale phase screens necessary for wide-field telescopes, (2) reproduce atmospheric point-spread function moments using a fast novel hybrid geometric/Fourier technique for non-diffraction limited telescopes, (3) accurately reproduce the expected spot diagrams for complex aspheric optical designs, and (4) recover system effective area predicted from analytic photometry integrals. This new code, the Photon Simulator (PhoSim), is publicly available. We have implemented the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope design, and it can be extended to other telescopes. We expect that because of the comprehensive physics implemented in PhoSim, it will be used by the community to plan future observations, interpret detailed existing observations, and quantify systematics related to various astronomical measurements. Future development and validation by comparisons with real data will continue to improve the fidelity and usability of the code.

  10. KMTNet: a network of 1.6-m wide field optical telescopes installed at three southern observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Yongseok; Kim, Dong-Jin; Park, Byeong-Gon; Lee, Dong-Joo; Koo, Jae-Rim; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Jae Woo; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Lim, Beomdu; Lim, Jin-Sun; Gho, Seung-Won; Kim, Min-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) have installed three identical 1.6-m telescopes, called Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet), which cover 2 x 2 degree field of view with the plate scale of 0.4 arcsec/pixel at three observatories - CTIO, SSO and SAAO in southern hemisphere. The uniqueness of the system is the uninterupted 24-hour monitoring with a wide field optics in southern hemisphere. The telescope adopts prime focus using a parabolic mirror and four spherical flattening lenses. The structural design and driving systems are modified from the degin of 2MASS telescope. The one piece filter-shutter assembly has a sliding shutter and four 310-mm square filters. Each observation system produces a 680MB size image file at site and the images are transfered to KASI data center using the Global Ring Network for Advanced Application Development (GLORIAD) network with the band width of 50Mbps in average. The main science goal of the KMTNet is to discover Earth like extra solar planet using the microlensing technique during bulge season, and 50% of the total observation time is allocated for the science program solely. The other telescope times are allocated for pre-selected seven science programs during non-bulge season. From the test observation, we verify that the most important two requirements are satisfied: 10 arcsec in RMS for the pointing accuracy and 1 arcsec of delivered image quality in I-band. In this presentation, we introduce finally installed system at each observatory and its observational performance obtained from the test observation.

  11. Advanced optical blade tip clearance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, M. J.; Honeycutt, R. E.; Nordlund, R. E.; Robinson, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced electro-optical system was developed to measure single blade tip clearances and average blade tip clearances between a rotor and its gas path seal in an operating gas turbine engine. This system is applicable to fan, compressor, and turbine blade tip clearance measurement requirements, and the system probe is particularly suitable for operation in the extreme turbine environment. A study of optical properties of blade tips was conducted to establish measurement system application limitations. A series of laboratory tests was conducted to determine the measurement system's operational performance characteristics and to demonstrate system capability under simulated operating gas turbine environmental conditions. Operational and environmental performance test data are presented.

  12. Advanced optics experiments using nonuniform aperture functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Lowell T.

    2013-05-01

    A method to create instructive, nonuniform aperture functions using spatial frequency filtering is described. The diffraction from a single slit in the Fresnel limit and the interference from a double slit in the Fraunhofer limit are spatially filtered to create electric field distributions across an aperture to produce apodization, inverse apodization or super-resolution, and apertures with phase shifts across their widths. The diffraction effects from these aperture functions are measured and calculated. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and the calculated results makes the experiment ideal for use in an advanced undergraduate or graduate optics laboratory to illustrate experimentally several effects in Fourier optics.

  13. Advanced Optical A/D Converter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    before the receiver and separately by reducing the gain in the EDFA . It is important to note that the optical power level was varied while all the...could not exceed roughly 50% of the maximum power available at full gain from the EDFA . 4.2 Baseband-Mode Testing The single-channel system was also...AD-A275 663 Advanced Optical A/D Convert M.C. Hamilton, J.A. Bell, D.A. Leep, J.P. Lin The Boeing Company Boeing Defense and Space Group P.O. Box

  14. Spacecraft Conceptual Design for the 8-Meter Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Randall C.; Capizzo, Peter; Fincher, Sharon; Hornsby, Linda S.; Jones, David

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office at Marshall Space Flight Center completed a brief spacecraft design study for the 8-meter monolithic Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST-8m). This spacecraft concept provides all power, communication, telemetry, avionics, guidance and control, and thermal control for the observatory, and inserts the observatory into a halo orbit about the second Sun-Earth Lagrange point. The multidisciplinary design team created a simple spacecraft design that enables component and science instrument servicing, employs articulating solar panels for help with momentum management, and provides precise pointing control while at the same time fast slewing for the observatory.

  15. High-resolution optical telescope for ultraviolet /UV/ radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karayan, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    Design techniques are discussed for all-reflecting optics from first-order system considerations and applications currently utilized in the field of astronomical optics. The solution of the Dall-Karkham design problem is described, showing the advantage of inexpensive construction as compared with higher order surfaces. The design process reported here is a F/5 collecting system which quickly mates directly with the spectrometer; it is capable of achieving desired high resolution and sensitivity requirements. The theoretical limit of aberration tolerances is achieved with less than 1/8 of a wavelength at final focus (OPD). The design of spectrometer for ultra-violet (UV) radiation and its mechanism is included in this study.

  16. System Design and Implementation of the Virginia Tech Optical Satellite Tracking Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciani, D.; Black, J.

    2016-09-01

    The Virginia Tech Optical Satellite Tracking Telescope (VTOST) aims to test the feasibility of a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) designed tracking system for Space Situational Awareness (SSA) data contribution. A novel approach is considered, combining two COTS systems, a high-powered telescope, built for astronomy purposes, and a larger field of view (FOV) camera. Using only publicly available two-line element sets (TLEs), orbital propagation accuracy degrades quickly with time from epoch and is often not accurate enough to task a high-powered, small FOV telescope. Under this experimental approach, the larger FOV camera is used to acquire and track the resident space object (RSO) and provide a real-time pointing update to allow the high-powered telescope to track the RSO and provide possible resolved imagery. VTOST is designed as a remotely taskable sensor, based on current network architecture, capable of serving as a platform for further SSA studies, including unresolved and resolved imagery analysis, network tasking, and orbit determination. Initial design considerations are based on the latest Raven class and other COTS based telescope research, including research by the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL), ExoAnalytic Solutions, and other university level telescope projects. A holistic system design, including astronomy, image processing, and tracking methods, in a low-budget environment is considered. Method comparisons and results of the system design process are presented.

  17. A Ten-Meter Ground-Station Telescope for Deep-Space Optical Communications: A Preliminary Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcliffe, M.; Hoppe, D.; Roberts, W.; Page, N.

    2001-01-01

    This article describes a telescope design for a 10-m optical ground station for deep-space communications. The design for a direct-detection optical communications telescope differs dramatically from a telescope for imaging applications. In general, the requirements for optical manufacturing and tracking performance are much less stringent for direct detection of optical signals. The technical challenge is providing a design that will operate in the daytime/nighttime conditions required for a Deep Space Network tracking application. The design presented addresses these requirements. The design will provide higher performance at lower cost than existing designs.

  18. Soliton molecules for advanced optical telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitschke, Fedor; Hause, Alexander; Mahnke, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    Recent developments in the technology of optical telecommunications are pushed forward by the rapidly growing demand for data-carrying capacity. Current approaches are discussed; most lines of investigation are limited to the linear (i.e. low power) regime. It is shown how this restriction poses a limit for further evolution. If, on the other hand, the nonlinear regime is entered, recent developments about soliton molecules offer a possibility to advance further.

  19. Research on the Calculation Method of Optical Path Difference of the Shanghai Tian Ma Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J.; Fu, L.; Jiang, Y. B.; Liu, Q. H.; Gou, W.; Yan, F.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the Shanghai Tian Ma Telescope (TM), an optical path difference calculation method of the shaped Cassegrain antenna is presented in the paper. Firstly, the mathematical model of the TM optics is established based on the antenna reciprocity theorem. Secondly, the TM sub-reflector and main reflector are fitted by the Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS). Finally, the method of optical path difference calculation is implemented, and the expanding application of the Ruze optical path difference formulas in the TM is researched. The method can be used to calculate the optical path difference distributions across the aperture field of the TM due to misalignment like the axial and lateral displacements of the feed and sub-reflector, or the tilt of the sub-reflector. When the misalignment quantity is small, the expanding Ruze optical path difference formulas can be used to calculate the optical path difference quickly. The paper supports the real-time measurement and adjustment of the TM structure. The research has universality, and can provide reference for the optical path difference calculation of other radio telescopes with shaped surfaces.

  20. 3kk: the Optical-NIR Multi-Channel Nasmyth Imager for the Wendelstein Fraunhofer Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang-Bardl, Florian; Hodapp, Klaus; Jacobson, Shane; Bender, Ralf; Gössl, Claus; Fabricius, Maximilian; Grupp, Frank; Hopp, Ulrich; Mitsch, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    The Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München operates an astrophysical observatory on the summit of Mt. Wendelstein1 which will be equipped with a modern 2m-class, robotic telescope.2 One Nasmyth port of the new Fraunhofer telescope is designed to deliver the excellent (< 0.8" median) seeing of the site [1, Fig. 1] for a smaller FoV of 60 arcmin2 without any corrector optics at optical and NIR wavebands. Thus, it will be optimized for fast multi-wavelength follow-up observations of targets of opportunities (e.g. Gamma-Ray-bursts) or efficient photometric redshift determinations of huge numbers of galaxy clusters identified in optical (PanSTARRS), SZ (Planck) or X-ray (eROSITA) surveys. We present the design of a compact 3 channel camera which serves these science requirements, built partly from commercially available Fairchild-2k optical CCD3 cameras (Apogee), coupled with small Bonn Shutters,4 and mounted on commercial high precision linear stages for differential focusing. A specially designed beam-splitter system maintains the high optical quality. The NIR camera is built in cooperation with the Institute for Astronomy in Hawaii. The combined operation of this camera with two spectrographs at the same telescope port has already been presented at SPIE 2008.5

  1. Optical and near infrared observations of the blazar 3C 279 with the REM telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impiombato, D.; Tosti, G.; Ciprini, C.; REM Collaboration.

    The Rapid Eye Mount (REM) telescope installed at La Silla (Cile) on June 2003, is a robotic telescope able the capability to observe in optical and infrared bands. Since the late commissioning phase a optical and infrared monitoring program of a sample of blazars, most emitting also in the gamma-ray band, was started. Such program is still on going and it make part of an observational activity aimed to the multiwavelength characterization possible blazars candidate to be observed also in gamma-ray by the instruments on board of AGILE satellites(launched on 23 April 2007) and Glast (that will be launched at the end of the 2007). In this poster we present the optical/near-IR data obtained during the January 2007, outburst of 3C279 (the prototype of the gamma-ray loud).

  2. Development of Infrared Phase Closure Capability in the Infrared-Optical Telescope Array (IOTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, Wesley A.

    2002-01-01

    We completed all major fabrication and testing for the third telescope and phase-closure operation at the Infrared-Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) during this period. In particular we successfully tested the phase-closure operation, using a laboratory light source illuminating the full delay-line optical paths, and using an integrated-optic beam combiner coupled to our Picnic-detector camera. This demonstration is an important and near-final milestone achievement. As of this writing, however, several tasks yet remain, owing to development snags and weather, so the final proof of success, phase-closure observation of a star, is now expected to occur in early 2002, soon after this report has been submitted.

  3. Cryogenic Telescope, Scanner, and Imaging Optics for the Wide-field Imaging Survey Explorer (WISE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalm, Mark; Akerstrom, A.; Barry, M.; Guregian, J.; LaMalva, F.; Laquidara, P.; Perron, G.; Sampath, D.; Ugolini, V.

    2006-12-01

    NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) instrument includes a cryogenic telescope, scanner, and imaging optics module. Component fabrication, mirror polishing, and prototype scanner cryogenic testing are complete for these subassemblies, and assembly is in process. The telescope is a 40 cm aperture reflecting five-mirror imager/collimator relay that provides 8X demagnification, a 47 x 86 arcminute field of regard, and a real exit pupil for scanning. It also provides distortion control to better than one part in a thousand to prevent image blur during internal scanning. A single-axis scan mirror at the exit pupil scans the detectors' field of view across the telescope field of regard, countering the orbital motion and freezing the line of sight during the multi-second exposure period. The imaging optics module is a five-mirror re-imager with dichroic beamsplitters that separate the energy into four infrared channels between 2.8 and 26 microns. All modules operate below 17 Kelvin. The all-reflective system uses aluminum mirrors and metering structures. L-3 Communications SSG-Tinsley is designing and building the telescope, scanner, and imaging optics module under contract to the Space Dynamics Laboratory. WISE is a MIDEX mission within NASA's Explorers Program.

  4. Reliability-centered maintenance for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, G.; Formentin, F.; Rampini, F.

    2014-07-01

    In the last years, EIE GROUP has been more and more involved in large optical telescopes and radio antennas array projects. In this frame, the paper describes a fundamental aspect of the Logistic Support Analysis (LSA) process, that is the application of the Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodology for the generation of maintenance plans for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antennas arrays. This helps maintenance engineers to make sure that the telescopes continue to work properly, doing what their users require them to do in their present operating conditions. The main objective of the RCM process is to establish the complete maintenance regime, with the safe minimum required maintenance, carried out without any risk to personnel, telescope and subsystems. At the same time, a correct application of the RCM allows to increase the cost effectiveness, telescope uptime and items availability, and to provide greater understanding of the level of risk that the organization is managing. At the same time, engineers shall make a great effort since the initial phase of the project to obtain a telescope requiring easy maintenance activities and simple replacement of the major assemblies, taking special care on the accesses design and items location, implementation and design of special lifting equipment and handling devices for the heavy items. This maintenance engineering framework is based on seven points, which lead to the main steps of the RCM program. The initial steps of the RCM process consist of: system selection and data collection (MTBF, MTTR, etc.), definition of system boundaries and operating context, telescope description with the use of functional block diagrams, and the running of a FMECA to address the dominant causes of equipment failure and to lay down the Critical Items List. In the second part of the process the RCM logic is applied, which helps to determine the appropriate maintenance tasks for each identified failure mode. Once

  5. Adaptive optics capabilities at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christou, J. C.; Brusa, G.; Conrad, A.; Esposito, S.; Herbst, T.; Hinz, P.; Hill, J. M.; Miller, D. L.; Rabien, S.; Rahmer, G.; Taylor, G. E.; Veillet, C.; Zhang, X.

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of the current and future adaptive optics systems at the LBTO along with the current and planned science instruments they feed. All the AO systems make use of the two 672 actuator adaptive secondary mirrors. They are (1) FLAO (NGS/SCAO) feeding the LUCI NIR imagers/spectrographs; (2) LBTI/AO (NGS/SCAO) feeding the NIR/MIR imagers and LBTI beam combiner; (3) the ARGOS LGS GLAO system feeding LUCIs; and (4) LINC-NIRVANA - an NGS/MCAO imager and interferometer system. AO performance of the current systems is presented along with proposed performances for the newer systems taking into account the future instrumentation.

  6. Collimator equipment of the Large Optical Test Facility Vertical for testing space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Pavel A.; Gogolev, Yuri A.; Zvonkova, V. V.; Kobozev, I. R.; Ostapenko, S. V.; Malamed, Evgeny R.; Demidov, V. V.

    1995-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the collimator equipment of the large optical test facility (LOTF) 'vertical' designed for testing space telescopes. It is being created in the Research Center 'S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute' in Russia. The optical scheme and special structural features of the vacuum vertical-type double-mirror collimator will be covered here. This paper deals with technical data and potentials of collimator focal equipment. Estimations of the collimator thermal aberrations caused by temperature fields coming from thermal simulators are put forward.

  7. First-order design of off-axis reflective ophthalmic adaptive optics systems using afocal telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vieyra, Armando; Dubra, Alfredo; Malacara-Hernández, Daniel; Williams, David R

    2009-10-12

    Expressions for minimal astigmatism in image and pupil planes in off-axis afocal reflective telescopes formed by pairs of spherical mirrors are presented. These formulae which are derived from the marginal ray fan equation can be used for designing laser cavities, spectrographs and adaptive optics retinal imaging systems. The use, range and validity of these formulae are limited by spherical aberration and coma for small and large angles respectively. This is discussed using examples from adaptive optics retinal imaging systems. The performance of the resulting optical designs are evaluated and compared against the configurations with minimal wavefront RMS, using the defocus-corrected wavefront RMS as a metric.

  8. Optical Testing and Verification Methods for the James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonille, Scott R.; Miskey, Cherie L.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Rohrbach, Scott O.; Aronstein, David L.; Bartoszyk, Andrew E.; Bowers, Charles W.; Cofie, Emmanuel; Collins, Nicholas R.; Comber, Brian J.; Eichhorn, William L.; Glasse, Alistair C.; Gracey, Renee; Hartig, George F.; Howard, Joseph M.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Kimble, Randy A.; Kirk, Jeffrey R.; Kubalak, David A.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Lindler, Don J.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Maszkiewicz, Michael; Rieke, Marcia J.; Rowlands, Neil; Sabatke, Derek S.; Smith, Corbett T.; Smith, J. Scott; Sullivan, Joseph F.; Telfer, Randal C.; Plate, Maurice Te; Vila, M. Begona; Warner, Gerry D.; Wright, Raymond H.; Wright, David; Zhou, Julia; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.6m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy (40K). The JWST Observatory includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) that contains four science instruments (SI) and the fine guider. The SIs are mounted to a composite metering structure. The SI and guider units were integrated to the ISIM structure and optically tested at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a suite using the Optical Telescope Element SIMulator (OSIM). OSIM is a full field, cryogenic JWST telescope simulator. SI performance, including alignment and wave front error, were evaluated using OSIM. We describe test and analysis methods for optical performance verification of the ISIM Element, with an emphasis on the processes used to plan and execute the test. The complexity of ISIM and OSIM drove us to develop a software tool for test planning that allows for configuration control of observations, associated scripts, and management of hardware and software limits and constraints, as well as tools for rapid data evaluation, and flexible re-planning in response to the unexpected. As examples of our test and analysis approach, we discuss how factors such as the ground test thermal environment are compensated in alignment. We describe how these innovative methods for test planning and execution and post-test analysis were instrumental in the verification program for the ISIM element, with enough information to allow the reader to consider these innovations and lessons learned in this successful effort in their future testing for other programs.

  9. Optical testing and verification methods for the James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonille, Scott R.; Miskey, Cherie L.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Rohrbach, Scott O.; Aronstein, David L.; Bartoszyk, Andrew E.; Bowers, Charles W.; Cofie, Emmanuel; Collins, Nicholas R.; Comber, Brian J.; Eichhorn, William L.; Glasse, Alistair C.; Gracey, Renee; Hartig, George F.; Howard, Joseph M.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Kimble, Randy A.; Kirk, Jeffrey R.; Kubalak, David A.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Lindler, Don J.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Maszkiewicz, Michael; Rieke, Marcia J.; Rowlands, Neil; Sabatke, Derek S.; Smith, Corbett T.; Smith, J. Scott; Sullivan, Joseph F.; Telfer, Randal C.; Te Plate, Maurice; Vila, M. Begoña.; Warner, Gerry D.; Wright, David; Wright, Raymond H.; Zhou, Julia; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2016-09-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy. The JWST Observatory includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM), that contains four science instruments (SI) and the Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS). The SIs are mounted to a composite metering structure. The SIs and FGS were integrated to the ISIM structure and optically tested at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center using the Optical Telescope Element SIMulator (OSIM). OSIM is a full-field, cryogenic JWST telescope simulator. SI performance, including alignment and wavefront error, was evaluated using OSIM. We describe test and analysis methods for optical performance verification of the ISIM Element, with an emphasis on the processes used to plan and execute the test. The complexity of ISIM and OSIM drove us to develop a software tool for test planning that allows for configuration control of observations, implementation of associated scripts, and management of hardware and software limits and constraints, as well as tools for rapid data evaluation, and flexible re-planning in response to the unexpected. As examples of our test and analysis approach, we discuss how factors such as the ground test thermal environment are compensated in alignment. We describe how these innovative methods for test planning and execution and post-test analysis were instrumental in the verification program for the ISIM element, with enough information to allow the reader to consider these innovations and lessons learned in this successful effort in their future testing for other programs.

  10. The balloon experimental twin telescope for infrared interferometry (BETTII): optical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veach, Todd J.; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Mentzell, John E.; Silverberg, Robert F.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Rizzo, Maxime J.; Dhabal, Arnab; Gibbons, Caitlin E.; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-07-01

    Here we present the optical and limited cryogenic design for The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII), an 8-meter far-infrared interferometer designed to fly on a high-altitude scientific balloon. The optical design is separated into warm and cold optics with the cold optics further separated into the far-infrared (FIR) (30-90 microns) and near-infrared (NIR) (1-3 microns). The warm optics are comprised of the twin siderostats, twin telescopes, K-mirror, and warm delay line. The cold optics are comprised of the cold delay line and the transfer optics to the FIR science detector array and the NIR steering array. The field of view of the interferometer is 2', with a wavelength range of 30-90 microns, 0.5" spectral resolution at 40 microns, R~200 spectral resolution, and 1.5" pointing stability. We also present the design of the cryogenic system necessary for operation of the NIR and FIR detectors. The cryogenic system consists of a `Buffered He-7' type cryogenic cooler providing a cold stage base temperature of < 280mK and 10 micro-Watts of heat lift and a custom in-house designed dewar that nominally provides sufficient hold time for the duration of the BETTII flight (24 hours).

  11. Advanced wide-field broad-passband refracting field correctors for large telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epps, H. W.; Angel, J. R. P.; Anderson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Design objectives, constraints, and optical data are presented for specific corrector designs under consideration for several large telescope projects. These include a preliminary 30-arcmin prime focus (f/2.0) refracting field corrector system for the University of California Ten-Meter Telescope (UC TMT); a compact 40-arcmin internal Cassegrain (f/1.75 hyperbola to f/5.0) broad-passband (3300 A to 1.0 micron) corrector suitable for imaging and multi-object spectroscopy at the UC TMT; three 60-arcmin Cassegrain correctors for 300-inch f/1.8 and f/2.0 parabolic primary mirrors suitable for a Fifteen-Meter NNTT/MMT; and a 300-inch 40-arcmin external Cassegrain (f/1.0 parabola to f/4.0) broad-passband (3300 A to 1.0 micron) corrector with ADC.

  12. End-to-end assessment of a large aperture segmented ultraviolet optical infrared (UVOIR) telescope architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Rioux, Norman; Bolcar, Matthew; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Olivier; Stark, Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-07-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10^-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield exo-earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an exo-earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance. These efforts are combined through integrated modeling, coronagraph evaluations, and exo-earth yield calculations to assess the potential performance of the selected architecture. In addition, we discusses the scalability of this architecture to larger apertures and the technological tall poles to enabling these missions.

  13. End-to-End Assessment of a Large Aperture Segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Rioux, Norman; Bolcar, Matthew; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Oliver; Stark, Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10^-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield Exo-Earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an Exo-Earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance. These efforts are combined through integrated modeling, coronagraph evaluations, and Exo-Earth yield calculations to assess the potential performance of the selected architecture. In addition, we discusses the scalability of this architecture to larger apertures and the technological tall poles to enabling it.

  14. Normalized Point Source Sensitivity for Off-Axis Optical Performance Evaluation of the Thirty Meter Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seo, Byoung-Joon; Nissly, Carl; Troy, Mitchell; Angeli, George

    2010-01-01

    The Normalized Point Source Sensitivity (PSSN) has previously been defined and analyzed as an On-Axis seeing-limited telescope performance metric. In this paper, we expand the scope of the PSSN definition to include Off-Axis field of view (FoV) points and apply this generalized metric for performance evaluation of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We first propose various possible choices for the PSSN definition and select one as our baseline. We show that our baseline metric has useful properties including the multiplicative feature even when considering Off-Axis FoV points, which has proven to be useful for optimizing the telescope error budget. Various TMT optical errors are considered for the performance evaluation including segment alignment and phasing, segment surface figures, temperature, and gravity, whose On-Axis PSSN values have previously been published by our group.

  15. The field stabilization and adaptive optics mirrors for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernet, Elise; Jochum, Lieselotte; La Penna, Paolo; Hubin, Norbert; Muradore, Riccardo; Casalta, Joan Manel; Kjelberg, Ivar; Sinquin, Jean-Christophe; Locre, Frédéric; Morin, Pierre; Cousty, Raphaël; Lurçon, Jean-Marie; Roland, Jean-Jacques; Crepy, Bruno; Gabriel, Eric; Biasi, Roberto; Andrighettoni, Mario; Angerer, Gerald; Gallieni, Daniele; Mantegazza, Marco; Tintori, Matteo; Molinari, Emilio; Tresoldi, Daniela; Toso, Giorgio; Spanó, Paolo; Riva, Marco; Crimi, Giuseppe; Riccardi, Armando; Marque, Gilles; Carel, Jean-Louis; Ruch, Eric

    2008-07-01

    A 42 meters telescope does require adaptive optics to provide few milli arcseconds resolution images. In the current design of the E-ELT, M4 provides adaptive correction while M5 is the field stabilization mirror. Both mirrors have an essential role in the E-ELT telescope strategy since they do not only correct for atmospheric turbulence but have also to cancel part of telescope wind shaking and static aberrations. Both mirrors specifications have been defined to avoid requesting over constrained requirements in term of stroke, speed and guide stars magnitude. Technical specifications and technological issues are discussed in this article. Critical aspects and roadmap to assess the feasibility of such mirrors are outlined.

  16. DOTIFS: a new multi-IFU optical spectrograph for the 3.6-m Devasthal optical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Haeun; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Omar, Amitesh; Ravindranath, Swara; Chattopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Rajarshi, Chaitanya V.; Khodade, Pravin

    2014-07-01

    Devasthal Optical Telescope Integral Field Spectrograph (DOTIFS) is a new multi-object Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) being designed and fabricated by the Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), Pune, India, for the Cassegrain side port of the 3.6m Devasthal Optical Telescope, (DOT) being constructed by the Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Nainital. It is mainly designed to study the physics and kinematics of the ionized gas, star formation and H II regions in the nearby galaxies. It is a novel instrument in terms of multi-IFU, built in deployment system, and high throughput. It consists of one magnifier, 16 integral field units (IFUs), and 8 spectrographs. Each IFU is comprised of a microlens array and optical fibers and has 7.4" x 8.7" field of view with 144 spaxel elements, each sampling 0.8" hexagonal aperture. The IFUs can be distributed on the telescope side port over an 8' diameter focal plane by the deployment system. Optical fibers deliver light from the IFUs to the spectrographs. Eight identical, all refractive, dedicated spectrographs will produce 2,304 R~1800 spectra over 370-740nm wavelength range with a single exposure. Volume Phase Holographic gratings are chosen to make smaller optics and get high throughput. The total throughput of the instrument including the telescope is predicted as 27.5% on average. Observing techniques, data simulator and reduction software are also under development. Currently, conceptual and baseline design review has been done. Some of the components have already been procured. The instrument is expected to see its first light in 2016.

  17. Comparing optical test methods for a lightweight primary mirror of a space-borne Cassegrain telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Yu, Zong-Ru; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Ho, Cheng-Fong; Huang, Ting-Ming; Chen, Cheng-Huan

    2014-09-01

    A Cassegrain telescope with a 450 mm clear aperture was developed for use in a spaceborne optical remote-sensing instrument. Self-weight deformation and thermal distortion were considered: to this end, Zerodur was used to manufacture the primary mirror. The lightweight scheme adopted a hexagonal cell structure yielding a lightweight ratio of 50%. In general, optical testing on a lightweight mirror is a critical technique during both the manufacturing and assembly processes. To prevent unexpected measurement errors that cause erroneous judgment, this paper proposes a novel and reliable analytical method for optical testing, called the bench test. The proposed algorithm was used to distinguish the manufacturing form error from surface deformation caused by the mounting, supporter and gravity effects for the optical testing. The performance of the proposed bench test was compared with a conventional vertical setup for optical testing during the manufacturing process of the lightweight mirror.

  18. Ray-tracing and physical-optics analysis of the aperture efficiency in a radio telescope.

    PubMed

    Olmi, Luca; Bolli, Pietro

    2007-07-01

    The performance of telescope systems working at microwave or visible-IR wavelengths is typically described in terms of different parameters according to the wavelength range. Most commercial ray-tracing packages have been specifically designed for use with visible-IR systems and thus, though very flexible and sophisticated, do not provide the appropriate parameters to fully describe microwave antennas and to compare with specifications. We demonstrate that the Strehl ratio is equal to the phase efficiency when the apodization factor is taken into account. The phase efficiency is the most critical contribution to the aperture efficiency of an antenna and the most difficult parameter to optimize during the telescope design. The equivalence between the Strehl ratio and the phase efficiency gives the designer/user of the telescope the opportunity to use the faster commercial ray-tracing software to optimize the design. We also discuss the results of several tests performed to check the validity of this relationship that we carried out using a ray-tracing software, ZEMAX, and a full Physical Optics software, GRASP9.3, applied to three different telescope designs that span a factor of approximately 10 in terms of D/lambda. The maximum measured discrepancy between phase efficiency and Strehl ratio varies between approximately 0.4% and 1.9% up to an offset angle of >40 beams, depending on the optical configuration, but it is always less than 0.5% where the Strehl ratio is >0.95.

  19. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Neptune with the W.M. Keck Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, B.; Max, C. E.; Roe, H.; Gibbard, S.; Gavel, D.; Acton, S.; Lai, O.; Wizinowich, P.; de Pater, I.; Ghez, A.; Baines, K.

    1999-09-01

    We present near-IR images of Neptune with a resolution of 0.05 arcseconds obtained with the new adaptive optics (AO) system at the 10-m W.M. Keck II telescope. The resolution and contrast of these images allows us to fit radiative transfer models to Neptune's clear atmosphere, completely uncontaminated by scattered light from bright storms or bands. We can measure for the first time the precise infrared spatial extent of storm features and calculate their reflectance in broad-band and methane-absorption near-IR bandpasses. The images show many bands and cloud features, and detect a bright southern-hemisphere complex that may be associated with a large dark spot similar to that seen by Voyager. These observations demonstrate that AO on an 8-10 meter telescope is a powerful new tool for studying objects in the outer solar system, surpassing the resolution of the NICMOS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope by a factor of 2-4. This research was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-ENG-48. It was supported in part by NASA grant NRA-97-OSS-04-98-053(R3281). The adaptive optics system on the Keck II telescope was funded by the W.M. Keck foundation under a grant to the California Association for Research in Astronomy, and by NASA.

  20. Ray-tracing and physical-optics analysis of the aperture efficiency in a radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, Luca; Bolli, Pietro

    2007-07-01

    The performance of telescope systems working at microwave or visible-IR wavelengths is typically described in terms of different parameters according to the wavelength range. Most commercial ray-tracing packages have been specifically designed for use with visible-IR systems and thus, though very flexible and sophisticated, do not provide the appropriate parameters to fully describe microwave antennas and to compare with specifications. We demonstrate that the Strehl ratio is equal to the phase efficiency when the apodization factor is taken into account. The phase efficiency is the most critical contribution to the aperture efficiency of an antenna and the most difficult parameter to optimize during the telescope design. The equivalence between the Strehl ratio and the phase efficiency gives the designer/user of the telescope the opportunity to use the faster commercial ray-tracing software to optimize the design. We also discuss the results of several tests performed to check the validity of this relationship that we carried out using a ray-tracing software, ZEMAX, and a full Physical Optics software, GRASP9.3, applied to three different telescope designs that span a factor of ≃10 in terms of D/λ. The maximum measured discrepancy between phase efficiency and Strehl ratio varies between ≃0.4% and 1.9% up to an offset angle of >40 beams, depending on the optical configuration, but it is always less than 0.5% where the Strehl ratio is >0.95.

  1. Using the Hands-On Optics ``Terrific Telescopes'' Kit in the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, S. M.; Walker, C. E.; Sparks, R. T.

    2008-06-01

    Hands-On Optics (HOO) is a collaborative four-year program to create and sustain a unique, national, informal science education program to excite students about science by actively engaging them in optics activities. The standards based activities and demonstrations have been successfully used in a variety of settings including formal classrooms, after school clubs, and science centers. One of the themes for the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) is "Looking Through a Telescope". We intend to use HOO activities in conjunction with the IYA to reinforce this important area. In this workshop, participants completed a series of activities involving refraction, lenses, telescopes, and ultraviolet light and took home a kit containing all the materials required to do the activities with a small group of students. Participants explored the basic properties of positive lenses to create images through the use of hands-on activities, exciting experiments, and educator-lead demonstrations, culminating with the building of a small refracting telescope. Several prototype telescopes were examined in the workshop for use in the International Year of Astronomy.

  2. Optical and infrared backgrounds from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolch, Timothy

    The sum total of the energy released by the earliest era of star formation should show up today within the diffuse extragalactic background light (EBL), its signature peaking in the near-infrared. There is considerable controversy over estimates of the average EBL per steradian at optical and infrared wavelengths, over measurements of background fluctuations, and over the interpretation of the measurements. Resolving this controversy is important because the EBL constrains the history of galaxy evolution. The fluctuations and their colors may also contain important information about Population III stars and the earliest era of star formation. We compare number counts from recent galaxy surveys, correcting for their differing passbands. With some assumptions about galaxy sizes and surface-brightness profiles, we account for the light missed in standard photometric estimates, integrating the resulting corrected counts to estimate the total EBL due to resolved galaxies as well as undetected galaxies. We then present an analysis of background fluctuations in observations of the HUDF, the GOODS field, and the CANDELS fields obtained with WFC3. The fluctuation signal provides a constraint on the slope of galaxy counts fainter than the levels of individual detection, as well as their typical angular sizes. The color dependence of the fluctuations provides a constraint on the redshift distribution of these very faint sources. The spatial and spectral information from these anisotropies, even in their non-detection, provide valuable information about the era of reionization, when the first stars and galaxies formed. Via various analysis tools such as power spectra and P(D) fitting, best-fit models to faint sources can be obtained.

  3. Compensating Atmospheric Turbulence Effects at High Zenith Angles with Adaptive Optics Using Advanced Phase Reconstructors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggemann, M.; Soehnel, G.; Archer, G.

    Atmospheric turbulence degrades the resolution of images of space objects far beyond that predicted by diffraction alone. Adaptive optics telescopes have been widely used for compensating these effects, but as users seek to extend the envelopes of operation of adaptive optics telescopes to more demanding conditions, such as daylight operation, and operation at low elevation angles, the level of compensation provided will degrade. We have been investigating the use of advanced wave front reconstructors and post detection image reconstruction to overcome the effects of turbulence on imaging systems in these more demanding scenarios. In this paper we show results comparing the optical performance of the exponential reconstructor, the least squares reconstructor, and two versions of a reconstructor based on the stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm in a closed loop adaptive optics system using a conventional continuous facesheet deformable mirror and a Hartmann sensor. The performance of these reconstructors has been evaluated under a range of source visual magnitudes and zenith angles ranging up to 70 degrees. We have also simulated satellite images, and applied speckle imaging, multi-frame blind deconvolution algorithms, and deconvolution algorithms that presume the average point spread function is known to compute object estimates. Our work thus far indicates that the combination of adaptive optics and post detection image processing will extend the useful envelope of the current generation of adaptive optics telescopes.

  4. Optical performance assessment under environmental and mechanical perturbations in large, deployable telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folley, Christopher; Bronowicki, Allen

    2005-09-01

    Prediction of optical performance for large, deployable telescopes under environmental conditions and mechanical disturbances is a crucial part of the design verification process of such instruments for all phases of design and operation: ground testing, commissioning, and on-orbit operation. A Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) analysis methodology is often created that integrates the output of one analysis with the input of another. The integration of thermal environment predictions with structural models is relatively well understood, while the integration of structural deformation results into optical analysis/design software is less straightforward. A Matlab toolbox has been created that effectively integrates the predictions of mechanical deformations on optical elements generated by, for example, finite element analysis, and computes optical path differences for the distorted prescription. The engine of the toolbox is the real ray-tracing algorithm that allows the optical surfaces to be defined in a single, global coordinate system thereby allowing automatic alignment of the mechanical coordinate system with the optical coordinate system. Therefore, the physical location of the optical surfaces is identical in the optical prescription and the finite element model. The application of rigid body displacements to optical surfaces, however, is more general than for use solely in STOP analysis, such as the analysis of misalignments during the commissioning process. Furthermore, all the functionality of Matlab is available for optimization and control. Since this is a new tool for use on flight programs, it has been verified against CODE V. The toolbox' functionality, to date, is described, verification results are presented, and, as an example of its utility, results of a thermal distortion analysis are presented using the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) prescription.

  5. Slewing Mirror Telescope optics for the early observation of UV/optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S; Nam, J W; Ahn, K B; Park, I H; Kim, S W; Lee, J; Lim, H; Brandt, S; Budtz-Jørgensen, C; Castro-Tirado, A J; Chen, P; Cho, M H; Choi, J N; Grossan, B; Huang, M A; Jung, A; Kim, J E; Kim, M B; Kim, Y W; Linder, E V; Min, K W; Na, G W; Panasyuk, M I; Ripa, J; Reglero, V; Smoot, G F; Suh, J E; Svertilov, S; Vedenkin, N; Yashin, I

    2013-01-28

    We report on design, manufacture, and testing of a Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT), the first of its kind and a part of Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory-pathfinder (UFFO-p) for space-based prompt measurement of early UV/optical light curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Using a fast slewing mirror of 150 mm diameter mounted on a 2 axis gimbal stage, SMT can deliver the images of GRB optical counterparts to the intensified CCD detector within 1.5~1.8 s over ± 35 degrees in the slewing field of view. Its Ritchey-Chrétien telescope of 100 mm diameter provides a 17 × 17 arcmin² instantaneous field of view. Technical details of design, construction, the laboratory performance tests in space environments for this unique SMT are described in conjunction with the plan for in-orbit operation onboard the Lomonosov satellite in 2013.

  6. Fiber Optics at ESO - Part Two - Fiber Optics Multiple Object Spectroscopy at the 3.6-METER Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enard, D.; Lund, G.; Tarenghi, M.

    1983-09-01

    During a 6-day test period late in November 1982, a prototype optical fiber device (nicknamed "Fiber Optopus") was tested at the 3.6 m telescope Cassegrain focus. The principle of this device, described in more detail in the following paragraphs, is such that the light from up to 50 randomly separated points on the sky (within the Cassegrain focus field of view) can be simultaneously guided via separate flexible optical fibers to the entrance slit of the B&C spectrograph. By making use of a two-dimensional detector such as a CCO the individual spectra, corresponding to each sampled point on the field, can be recorded simultaneously. When fully operational, the Fiber Optopus should enable a very strong reduction in telescope time to be achieved in observing programmes involving low resolution spectral mapping of extended fields. This feature will be of great interest to astronomers wishing to observe clusters of faint objects requiring long integration periods.

  7. Optical design of zero-power Hubble Space Telescope wave-front correctors for null testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannan, Paul G.; Davila, Pam; Wood, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    The optical design of the second-generation wide-field/planetary-camera instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope has been modified to compensate for the spherical aberration of the optical telescope assembly (OTA) by introduction of undercorrected spherical aberration into the wave front. This instrument can be tested in a simple manner to ensure that its aberration contribution has the proper sign and magnitude. We present designs for a near-zero power doublet lens that can be used to generate a spherically aberrated wave front that is similar to the OTA wave front. When this lens is used in combination with the instrument, a near-perfect or nulled wave front should be produced, resulting in a high-quality point image on axis. We also present lens designs for a similar test that can be performed on the OTA simulators now being built to verify the other second-generation instruments.

  8. Optical design of zero-power Hubble Space Telescope wave-front correctors for null testing.

    PubMed

    Hannan, P G; Davila, P; Wood, H J

    1993-04-01

    The optical design of the second-generation wide-field/planetary-camera instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope has been modified to compensate for the spherical aberration of the optical telescope assembly (OTA) by introduction of undercorrected spherical aberration into the wave front. This instrument can be tested in a simple manner to ensure that its aberration contribution has the proper sign and magnitude. We present designs for a near-zero power doublet lens that can be used to generate a spherically aberrated wave front that is similar to the OTA wave front. When this lens is used in combination with the instrument, a near-perfect or nulled wave front should be produced, resulting in a high-quality point image on axis. We also present lens designs for a similar test that can be performed on the OTA simulators now being built to verify the other second-generation instruments.

  9. Report of the facility definition team spacelab UV-Optical Telescope Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Scientific requirements for the Spacelab Ultraviolet-Optical Telescope (SUOT) facility are presented. Specific programs involving high angular resolution imagery over wide fields, far ultraviolet spectroscopy, precisely calibrated spectrophotometry and spectropolarimetry over a wide wavelength range, and planetary studies, including high resolution synoptic imagery, are recommended. Specifications for the mounting configuration, instruments for the mounting configuration, instrument mounting system, optical parameters, and the pointing and stabilization system are presented. Concepts for the focal plane instruments are defined. The functional requirements of the direct imaging camera, far ultraviolet spectrograph, and the precisely calibrated spectrophotometer are detailed, and the planetary camera concept is outlined. Operational concepts described in detail are: the makeup and functions of shuttle payload crew, extravehicular activity requirements, telescope control and data management, payload operations control room, orbital constraints, and orbital interfaces (stabilization, maneuvering requirements and attitude control, contamination, utilities, and payload weight considerations).

  10. The Rapidly Moving Telescope: an Instrument for the Precise Study of Optical Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.; Cline, T. L.; Kaipa, R.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a small telescope with a very rapid pointing capability is described whose purpose is to search for and study fast optical transients that may be associated with gamma-ray bursts and other phenomena. The primary motivation for this search is the discovery of the existence of a transient optical event from the known location of a gamma-ray bursts. The telescope has the capability of rapidly acquiring any target in the night sky within 0.7 second and locating the object's position with + or - 1 arcsec accuracy. The initial detection of the event is accomplished by the MIT explosive transient camera or ETC. This provides rough pointing coordinates to the RMT on the average within approximately 1 second after the detection of the event.

  11. A ten-meter optical telescope for deep-space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaik, Kamran; Kerr, Edwin L.

    1990-01-01

    Optical communications using laser light in the visible spectral range is being considered for future deep-space missions. Such a system will require a large telescope in earth vicinity to be used as a receiving station for data return from the spacecraft. A preliminary discussion for a ground-based receiving station consisting of a 10-meter hexagonally segmented primary with high surface tolerance and a unique sunshade is presented.

  12. A Future Generation High Angular Resolution X-ray Telescope Based Upon Physical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Although the highest priority objective for the next major X-ray mission is high resolution spectroscopy we will ultimately want the next generation high angular resolution X-ray observatory. This author believes that the 0.5 arc second angular resolution of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory is likely to be close to the best that can be obtained with grazing incidence optics, especially with larger effective area. Telescopes based upon physical optics, diffraction and refraction that transmit rather than reflect X-rays can have an angular resolution of a mili arc second or better. Combining the diffractive and refractive components into one unit can neutralize the chromatic aberration of each individually over a ~15% bandwidth at 6 keV. The aperture could be divided into several diffractive-refractive pairs to broaden the bandwidth. Furthermore these telescopes would be very low cost, very light weight, and more tolerant of figure errors and surface roughness than grazing incidence telescopes. However, focal lengths are of the order of 1000 km, which requires a new mission architecture consisting of long distance formation-flying between two spacecraft, one hosting the optics, the other, the detector. One of the spacecraft requires propulsion, provided by, for example, ion engines to maintain the optics-detector alignment by counteracting gravity gradient forces, and for changing targets. Although their effective area can be large and their angular resolution very high diffractive-refractive telescopes are not necessarily more sensitive than Chandra because their large focal plane scale (1 mili arc second ~ 1 mm) subjects them to a higher level of cosmic ray background and their opacity results in a lower energy limit of 2 keV. The intrinsic field of view is wide but the large focal length scale and practical limits on the size of the detector array results in a small field of view.

  13. The GEANT low energy Compton scattering (GLECS) package for use in simulating advanced Compton telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kippen, R. Marc

    2004-02-01

    Compton γ-ray imaging is inherently based on the assumption of γ-rays scattering with free electrons. In reality, the non-zero momentum of target electrons bound in atoms blurs this ideal scattering response in a process known as Doppler broadening. The design and understanding of advanced Compton telescopes, thus, depends critically on the ability to accurately account for Doppler broadening effects. For this purpose, a Monte Carlo package that simulates detailed Doppler broadening has been developed for use with the powerful, general-purpose GEANT3 and GEANT4 radiation transport codes. This paper describes the design of this package, and illustrates results of comparison with selected experimental data.

  14. Preparation research on novel dampers used in large optical telescope's noise and vibrations attenuating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiu-ping; Yang, Jian-chun; Zhang, Li

    2010-10-01

    General rubber damping materials used in noise and vibrations attenuating system can not adapt large optical telescope's working temperatures and environments. While Metal Rubber material which has loose, reticulate structures can endure high or low temperatures, rigorous space environments, erosions, aging, volatilization and radiations due to its metallic properties because it is made of stainless steel wires of φ 0.1~0.3 mm. When the MR damping component is uploaded with vibrating force, the displacement will cause intense frictions between wires' surfaces which will dissipate abundant energy and thus it can serve as dampers like natural rubbers. Since Metal Rubber components are prepared by compression moulding, various complex shapes of dampers can be produced conveniently to fulfill large optical telescope's noise and vibrations attenuating tasks. Based on the Metal Rubber component's four preparation approaches, helix-making, planar roughcast-weaving, planar roughcast-rolling and 3D roughcast punching, a ring-shaped 3D parametrical numerical model is founded by CAD technology. Definitely, this modeling research work may support the optimization of the current trial and try preparation of MR component and it will provide necessary foundations for its further application in noise and vibrations attenuating system in large optical telescopes.

  15. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageron, Michel; Al Samarai, Imen; Akerlof, Carl; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Boer, Michel; Brunner, Juergen; Busto, Jose; Dornic, Damien; Klotz, Alain; Schussler, Fabian; Vallage, Bertrand; Vecchi, Manuela; Zheng, Weikang

    2012-11-01

    The ANTARES telescope is well suited to detect neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky at all the times with a duty cycle close to unity and an angular resolution better than 0.5°. Potential sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), core collapse supernovae (SNe), and flaring active galactic nuclei (AGNs). To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a new detection method based on coincident observations of neutrinos and optical signals has been developed. A fast online muon track reconstruction is used to trigger a network of small automatic optical telescopes. Such alerts are generated one or two times per month for special events such as two or more neutrinos coincident in time and direction or single neutrinos of very high energy. Since February 2009, ANTARES has sent 37 alert triggers to the TAROT and ROTSE telescope networks, 27 of them have been followed. First results on the optical images analysis to search for GRBs are presented.

  16. Liverpool Telescope follow-up of candidate electromagnetic counterparts during the first run of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperwheat, C. M.; Steele, I. A.; Piascik, A. S.; Bersier, D.; Bode, M. F.; Collins, C. A.; Darnley, M. J.; Galloway, D. K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Lamb, G. P.; Levan, A. J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Mundell, C. G.; Pian, E.; Pollacco, D.; Steeghs, D.; Tanvir, N. R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2016-11-01

    The first direct detection of gravitational waves was made in 2015 September with the Advanced LIGO detectors. By prior arrangement, a worldwide collaboration of electromagnetic follow-up observers were notified of candidate gravitational wave events during the first science run, and many facilities were engaged in the search for counterparts. Three alerts were issued to the electromagnetic collaboration over the course of the first science run, which lasted from 2015 September to 2016 January. Two of these alerts were associated with the gravitational wave events since named GW150914 and GW151226. In this paper we provide an overview of the Liverpool Telescope contribution to the follow-up campaign over this period. Given the hundreds of square degree uncertainty in the sky position of any gravitational wave event, efficient searching for candidate counterparts required survey telescopes with large (˜degrees) fields of view. The role of the Liverpool Telescope was to provide follow-up classification spectroscopy of any candidates. We followed candidates associated with all three alerts, observing 1, 9 and 17 candidates respectively. We classify the majority of the transients we observed as supernovae. No counterparts were identified, which is in line with expectations given that the events were classified as black hole-black hole mergers. However these searches laid the foundation for similar follow-up campaigns in future gravitational wave detector science runs, in which the detection of neutron star merger events with observable electromagnetic counterparts is much more likely.

  17. Robo-AO: The First Autonomous Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System for Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Baranec, C.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Law, N.; Tendulkar, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Chordia, P.; Das, H.; Dekany, R.; Kasliwal, M.; Ofek, E.; Zolkower, J.

    2011-01-01

    Robo-AO will be the first fully autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics and science system. Specifically designed to take advantage of small (1 to 3 meter) telescopes, Robo-AO will deliver high angular resolution science in the visible and near infrared for up to hundreds of targets per night. This will enable the exploration of science programs not practical for larger aperture adaptive optics systems. This presentation discusses the current status of the Robo-AO project, including the laboratory testbed, laser guide star facility and plans for a demonstration of the fully autonomous system next year.

  18. Use of living technical budgets to manage risk on the James Webb Space Telescope optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porpora, Daniel A.; Barto, Allison A.; Lightsey, Paul A.; Knight, J. Scott

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Primary Mirror (PM) and Secondary Mirror (SM) are deployable relative to the rest of the optics. The PM consists of 18 assemblies which are aligned on-orbit using hexapod actuators. The complexity introduces risk that misalignments of individual components could result in a system with an unexpected optical train. In order to monitor risk throughout the life of the project, a series of interrelated technical budgets and independent cross-checks have been created and are continually updated with as-built data to provide confidence in the state of the system as well as the path to completion.

  19. Fabrication of large-aperture, high efficiency, Fresnel diffractive membrane optic for space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Mengjuan; Yin, Ganghua; Jiao, Jianchao; Liu, Zhengkun; Xu, Xiangdong; Fu, Shaojun

    2016-10-01

    Diffractive optical system can be a favorable choice for large-aperture space telescope to reduce the mass and size of image system. To meet the demand of large-aperture, high efficiency, lightweight diffractive optic for high resolution remote sensing, a 200 mm diameter, 20 μmthick, 4-level diffractive membrane fabricated is shown to have over 62% diffraction efficiency into the +1 order, with 0.051 efficiency RMS. Over 66% diffraction efficiency is achieved for a 100 mm aperture membrane, with 0.023 efficiency RMS. The membrane thickness uniformity control is discussed and 8 nm wave front error RMS is achieved in 100 mm diameter.

  20. Optical design for the Narrow Field InfraRed Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS) Petite on the Thirty Meter Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B; Gavel, D; Dekany, R; Ellerbroek, B

    2005-08-02

    We describe an exploratory optical design for the Narrow Field InfraRed Adaptive Optics (AO) System (NFIRAOS) Petite, a proposed adaptive optics system for the Thirty Meter Telescope Project. NFIRAOS will feed infrared spectrograph and wide-field imaging instruments with a diffraction limited beam. The adaptive optics system will require multi-guidestar tomographic wavefront sensing and multi-conjugate AO correction. The NFIRAOS Petite design specifications include two small 60 mm diameter deformable mirrors (DM's) used in a woofer/tweeter or multiconjugate arrangement. At least one DM would be a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) DM. The AO system would correct a 10 to 30 arcsec diameter science field as well as laser guide stars (LGS's) located within a 60 arcsec diameter field and low-order or tip/tilt natural guide stars (NGS's) within a 60 arcsec diameter field. The WFS's are located downstream of the DM's so that they can be operated in true closed-loop, which is not necessarily a given in extremely large telescope adaptive optics design. The WFS's include adjustable corrector elements which correct the static aberrations of the AO relay due to field position and LGS distance height.

  1. A comparison between using incoherent or coherent sources to align and test an adaptive optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The concept in the initial alignment of the segmented mirror adaptive optics telescope called the phased array mirror extendable large aperture telescope (Pamela) is to produce an optical transfer function (OTF) which closely approximates the diffraction limited value which would correspond to a system pupil function that is unity over the aperture and zero outside. There are differences in the theory of intensity measurements between coherent and incoherent radiation. As a result, some of the classical quantities which describe the performance of an optical system for incoherent radiation can not be defined for a coherent field. The most important quantity describing the quality of an optical system is the OTF and for a coherent source the OTF is not defined. Instead a coherent transfer function (CTF) is defined. The main conclusion of the paper is that an incoherent collimated source and not a collimated laser source is preferred to calibrate the Hartmann wavefront sensor (WFS) of an aligned adaptive optical system. A distant laser source can be used with minimum problems to correct the system for atmospheric turbulence. The collimation of the HeNe laser alignment source can be improved by using a very small pin hole in the spatial filter so only the central portion of the beam is transmitted and the beam from the filter is nearly constant in amplitude. The size of this pin hole will be limited by the sensitivity of the lateral effect diode (LEDD) elements.

  2. Monte Carlo modelling of multiconjugate adaptive optics performance on the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of a wide-field adaptive optics system depends on input design parameters. Here we investigate the performance of a multiconjugate adaptive optics system design for the European Extremely Large Telescope, using an end-to-end Monte Carlo adaptive optics simulation tool, DASP (Durham adaptive optics simulation platform). We consider parameters such as the number of laser guide stars, sodium layer depth, wavefront sensor pixel scale, number of deformable mirrors (DMs), mirror conjugation and actuator pitch. We provide potential areas where costs savings can be made, and investigate trade-offs between performance and cost. We conclude that a six-laser guide star system using three DMs seems to be a sweet spot for performance and cost compromise.

  3. Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark; Flanagan, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    Space telescopes have been a dominant force in astrophysics and astronomy over the last two decades. As Lyman Spitzer predicted in 1946, space telescopes have opened up much of the electromagnetic spectrum to astronomers, and provided the opportunity to exploit the optical performance of telescopes uncompromised by the turbulent atmosphere. This special section of Optical Engineering is devoted to space telescopes. It focuses on the design and implementation of major space observatories from the gamma-ray to far-infrared, and highlights the scientific and technical breakthroughs enabled by these telescopes. The papers accepted for publication include reviews of major space telescopes spanning the last two decades, in-depth discussions of the design considerations for visible and x-ray telescopes, and papers discussing concepts and technical challenges for future space telescopes.

  4. Space telescope optical telescope assembly/scientific instruments. Phase B: -Preliminary design and program definition study; Volume 2A: Planetary camera report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Development of the F/48, F/96 Planetary Camera for the Large Space Telescope is discussed. Instrument characteristics, optical design, and CCD camera submodule thermal design are considered along with structural subsystem and thermal control subsystem. Weight, electrical subsystem, and support equipment requirements are also included.

  5. Recent Advances in Miniaturized Optical Gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Olio, F.; Tatoli, T.; Ciminelli, C.; Armenise, M. N.

    2014-03-01

    Low-cost chip-scale optoelectronic gyroscopes having a resolution ≤ 10 °/h and a good reliability also in harsh environments could have a strong impact on the medium/high performance gyro market, which is currently dominated by well-established bulk optical angular velocity sensors. The R&D activity aiming at the demonstration of those miniaturized sensors is crucial for aerospace/defense industry, and thus it is attracting an increasing research effort and notably funds. In this paper the recent technological advances on the compact optoelectronic gyroscopes with low weight and high energy saving are reviewed. Attention is paid to both the so-called gyroscope-on-a-chip, which is a novel sensor, at the infantile stage, whose optical components are monolithically integrated on a single indium phosphide chip, and to a new ultra-high Q ring resonator for gyro applications with a configuration including a 1D photonic crystal in the resonant path. The emerging field of the gyros based on passive ring cavities, which have already shown performance comparable with that of optical fiber gyros, is also discussed.

  6. CCD Photometer Installed on the Telescope - 600 OF the Shamakhy Astrophysical Observatory: I. Adjustment of CCD Photometer with Optics - 600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyuty, V. M.; Abdullayev, B. I.; Alekberov, I. A.; Gulmaliyev, N. I.; Mikayilov, Kh. M.; Rustamov, B. N.

    2009-12-01

    Short description of optical and electric scheme of CCD photometer with camera U-47 installed on the Cassegrain focus of ZEISS-600 telescope of the ShAO NAS Azerbaijan is provided. The reducer of focus with factor of reduction 1.7 is applied. It is calculated equivalent focal distances of a telescope with a focus reducer. General calculations of optimum distance from focal plane and t sizes of optical filters of photometer are presented.

  7. Sensitivity to differential piston and to adaptive optics errors with the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Esposito, Simone; Puglisi, Alfio; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Hill, John; Hinz, Philip

    2016-08-01

    On-sky adaptive optics wavefront screens have been used and random optical path fluctuations - differential pistons - have been included in numerical simulations for the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer. We characterize the Point Spread Function (PSF) and the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) by computing respectively the interferometric Strehl and the visibility criteria. We study the contribution of the wavefront disturbance induced by each adaptive optics system and by the optical path difference between the arms of the LBTI. To provide an image of quality (Strehl above 70%) suitable with standard science cases , the requirements for a LBTI mode in the visible wavelengths (750nm) must be at least an adaptive optics wavefront RMS fluctuations below λ/18≍40nm (Strehl above 90%) provided by each adaptive optics system, and a differential piston RMS fluctuations below λ/8≍100nm in the overall LBTI system. The adaptive optics wavefront errors - mainly the differential tip-tilt - appear to be more critical than the differential piston.

  8. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Recent advances in X-ray refractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, V. V.; Shabel'nikov, L. G.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray refractive optics has made rapid strides to a large degree due to the work of Russian scientists, and has now become one of the most rapidly advancing areas in modern physical optics. This review outlines the results of investigation of refractive devices and analysis of their properties. The conception of planar lenses made of silicon and other materials is set forth. We discuss the applications of refractive lenses to the transformation of X-ray images, photonic crystal research, and the development of focusing devices in high-energy X-ray telescopes.

  9. Lessons learned with the Active Phasing Experiment: comparison of four optical phasing sensors on a segmented Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonte, F.; Surdej, I.

    The adaptive optics capabilities are strongly limited by the quality of the phasing of the primary mirror of the extremely large telescope. Up to date, the Keck telescopes are the only segmented telescope phased with a quality enabling the application of adaptive optics. The Active Phasing Experiment has been installed at the Namyth focus of the Very Large Telescope Melipal during the last 6 months. Its purpose is to understand and compare different technological concepts for an optical phasing sensor dedicated to the European Extremely Large Telescope. The pupil of the telescope is segmented in 61 hexagonal segments by projecting it on an Active Segmented Mirror. The ASM is controlled by a dual wavenlength interferometer made by Fogale Nanotech with a nanometric precision. The segmented pupil is distributed in parallel to four optical phasing sensors. They are a pyramid sensor, a curvature sensor, a phase filtering sensor and a ShackHartmann sensor. They have been developed respectively by Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Florenze, Instituto Astrofisica Canarias in Tenerife, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille and ESO. The global behaviour of the optical phasing sensors will be described and preliminary results of the Active Phasing Experiments obtained on sky will be explained. The extrapolation of the results to the EELT and the potential consequences for the adaptive optics will be given. The Active Phasing Experiment has been financed by the European Union and the European Southern Observatory via the Sixth European Union Framework Program for Research and Technological Development under the contract number 011863.

  10. NASA SBIR Subtopic S2.04 "Advanced Optical Components"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this subtopic is to develop and demonstrate technologies to manufacture ultra-low-cost precision optical systems for very large x-ray, UV/optical or infrared telescopes. Potential solutions include but are not limited to direct precision machining, rapid optical fabrication, slumping or replication technologies to manufacture 1 to 2 meter (or larger) precision quality mirror or lens segments (either normal incidence for uv/optical/infrared or grazing incidence for x-ray). An additional key enabling technology for UV/optical telescopes is a broadband (from 100 nm to 2500 nm) high-reflectivity mirror coating with extremely uniform amplitude and polarization properties which can be deposited on 1 to 3 meter class mirror.

  11. Enola Gay: an integrated modelling optical toolbox applied to a wide-field telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.; Perrotta, F.

    2008-07-01

    The integrated modelling approach is fundamental in telescopes design where it is necessary to merge different disciplines together. This paper describes the integration of optical ray-tracing capabilities within the Matlab computational environment. This approach allows to write automatic procedures to implement a huge number of computations, that are very unpractical to perform in interactive mode by ray tracing software packages. Data produced by computations are stored and automatically analyzed. One of the main benefits from this approach comes from the traceability of the work, that is intrinsically impossible when the optical designer works in interactive mode. The right procedure is built and tuned just the first time and the computation software is available for inspection and check. Furthermore computations and results are easily reproducible simply re-running Matlab scripts. An automatic approach is especially helpful in wide-field telescope projects where the optical quality has to be studied over a wide field of view. This leads to repeat the same computations many times in a number of fields. In interactive mode this would cause a significant waste of optical designer time to repeat many times the same manual procedures. The solution proposed here allows to save time and prevent occasional mistakes.

  12. Thermal optical path difference analysis of the telescope correct lens assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ying; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2012-12-01

    The effect of correct lens thermal optical path difference (OPD) on the optical performance of the Cassegrain telescope system is presented. The correct lens assembly includes several components such as a set of correct lenses, lens mount, spacer, mount barrel, and retainer. The heat transfer from the surrounding environment to the correct lens barrel will cause optical system aberration. The temperature distribution of the baffle is from 20.546°C to 21.485°C. Meanwhile, the off-axis ray's path of the OPD has taken the lens incidence point and emergence point into consideration. The correct lens temperature distribution is calculated by the lens barrel heat transfer analysis; the thermal distortion and stress are solved by the Finite Element Method (FEM) software. The temperature distribution is weighted to each incidence ray path, and the thermal OPD is calculated. The thermal OPD on the Z direction is transferred to optical aberration by fitting OPD into a rigid body motion and the Zernike polynomial. The aberration results can be used to evaluate the thermal effect on the correct lens assembly in the telescope system.

  13. Telescope Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Renaissance Telescope for high resolution and visual astronomy has five 82-degree Field Tele-Vue Nagler Eyepieces, some of the accessories that contribute to high image quality. Telescopes and eyepieces are representative of a family of optical equipment manufactured by Tele-Vue Optics, Inc.

  14. Planck intermediate results. XXVI. Optical identification and redshifts of Planck clusters with the RTT150 telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present the results of approximately three years of observations of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources with the Russian-Turkish 1.5 m telescope (RTT150), as a part of the optical follow-up programme undertaken by the Planck collaboration. During this time period approximately 20% of all dark and grey clear time available at the telescope was devoted to observations of Planck objects. Some observations of distant clusters were also done at the 6 m Bolshoi Telescope Alt-azimutalnyi (BTA) of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences. In total, deep, direct images of more than one hundred fields were obtained in multiple filters. We identified 47 previously unknown galaxy clusters, 41 of which are included in the Planck catalogue of SZ sources. The redshifts of 65 Planck clusters were measured spectroscopically and 14 more were measured photometrically. We discuss the details of cluster optical identifications and redshift measurements. We also present new spectroscopic redshifts for 39 Planck clusters that were not included in the Planck SZ source catalogue and are published here for the first time.

  15. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Simulation Testbed I: overview and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Soummer, Rémi; Choquet, Élodie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Levecq, Olivier; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Ygouf, Marie; Leboulleux, Lucie; Egron, Sylvain; Anderson, Rachel; Long, Chris; Elliott, Erin; Hartig, George; Pueyo, Laurent; van der Marel, Roeland; Mountain, Matt

    2014-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop workbench to study aspects of wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing optomechanical testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope, TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science & Operations Center. We have developed an optical design that reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat using three aspheric lenses; it provides similar image quality as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at HeNe wavelength. A segmented deformable mirror stands in for the segmented primary mirror and allows control of the 18 segments in piston, tip, and tilt, while the secondary can be controlled in tip, tilt and x, y, z position. This will be sufficient to model many commissioning activities, to investigate field dependence and multiple field point sensing & control, to evaluate alternate sensing algorithms, and develop contingency plans. Testbed data will also be usable for cross-checking of the WFS&C Software Subsystem, and for staff training and development during JWST's five- to ten-year mission.

  16. James Webb Space Telescope optical simulation testbed III: first experimental results with linear-control alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egron, Sylvain; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Leboulleux, Lucie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Élodie; Perrin, Marshall D.; Ygouf, Marie; Michau, Vincent; Bonnefois, Aurélie; Fusco, Thierry; Escolle, Clément; Ferrari, Marc; Hugot, Emmanuel; Soummer, Rémi

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop experiment designed to study wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science and Operations Center. The design of JOST reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) using three custom aspheric lenses. It provides similar quality image as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at 633 nm. An Iris AO segmented mirror stands for the segmented primary mirror of JWST. Actuators allow us to control (1) the 18 segments of the segmented mirror in piston, tip, tilt and (2) the second lens, which stands for the secondary mirror, in tip, tilt and x, y, z positions. We present the full linear control alignment infrastructure developed for JOST, with an emphasis on multi-field wavefront sensing and control. Our implementation of the Wavefront Sensing (WFS) algorithms using phase diversity is experimentally tested. The wavefront control (WFC) algorithms, which rely on a linear model for optical aberrations induced by small misalignments of the three lenses, are tested and validated on simulations.

  17. Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine and surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Pogue, Brian W.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Tunnell, James W.; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    The guest editors introduce a Biomedical Optics Express feature issue that includes contributions from participants at the 2013 conference on Advances in Optics for Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery XIII. PMID:24575348

  18. Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine and surgery.

    PubMed

    Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Pogue, Brian W; Tearney, Guillermo J; Tunnell, James W; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-02-01

    The guest editors introduce a Biomedical Optics Express feature issue that includes contributions from participants at the 2013 conference on Advances in Optics for Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery XIII.

  19. Engineering aspects of the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, Guido; Ashby, Dave; Christou, Julian C.; Kern, Jonathan; Lefebvre, Michael; McMahon, Tom J.; Miller, Douglas; Rahmer, Gustavo; Sosa, Richard; Taylor, Gregory; Vogel, Conrad; Zhang, Xianyu

    2016-07-01

    Vertical profiles of the atmospheric optical turbulence strength and velocity is of critical importance for simulating, designing, and operating the next generation of instruments for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Many of these instruments are already well into the design phase meaning these profies are required immediately to ensure they are optimised for the unique conditions likely to be observed. Stereo-SCIDAR is a generalised SCIDAR instrument which is used to characterise the profile of the atmospheric optical turbulence strength and wind velocity using triangulation between two optical binary stars. Stereo-SCIDAR has demonstrated the capability to resolve turbulent layers with the required vertical resolution to support wide-field ELT instrument designs. These high resolution atmospheric parameters are critical for design studies and statistical evaluation of on-sky performance under real conditions. Here we report on the new Stereo-SCIDAR instrument installed on one of the Auxillary Telescope ports of the Very Large Telescope array at Cerro Paranal. Paranal is located approximately 20 km from Cerro Armazones, the site of the E-ELT. Although the surface layer of the turbulence will be different for the two sites due to local geography, the high-altitude resolution profiles of the free atmosphere from this instrument will be the most accurate available for the E-ELT site. In addition, these unbiased and independent profiles are also used to further characterise the site of the VLT. This enables instrument performance calibration, optimisation and data analysis of, for example, the ESO Adaptive Optics facility and the Next Generation Transit Survey. It will also be used to validate atmospheric models for turbulence forecasting. We show early results from the commissioning and address future implications of the results.

  20. The future of space imaging. Report of a community-based study of an advanced camera for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert A. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The scientific and technical basis for an Advanced Camera (AC) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is discussed. In March 1992, the NASA Program Scientist for HST invited the Space Telescope Science Institute to conduct a community-based study of an AC, which would be installed on a scheduled HST servicing mission in 1999. The study had three phases: a broad community survey of views on candidate science program and required performance of the AC, an analysis of technical issues relating to its implementation, and a panel of experts to formulate conclusions and prioritize recommendations. From the assessment of the imaging tasks astronomers have proposed for or desired from HST, we believe the most valuable 1999 instrument would be a camera with both near ultraviolet/optical (NUVO) and far ultraviolet (FUV) sensitivity, and with both wide field and high resolution options.

  1. Telescope Wavefront Aberration Compensation with a Deformable Mirror in an Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Chen, Yijiang; Crossfield, Ian

    2005-01-01

    With the goal of reducing the surface wavefront error of low-cost multi-meter-diameter mirrors from about 10 waves peak-to-valley (P-V), at lpm wavelength, to approximately 1-wave or less, we describe a method to compensate for slowly varying wavefront aberrations of telescope mirrors. A deformable mirror is utilized in an active optical compensation system. The kMS wavefront error of a 0.3m telescope improved to 0.05 waves (0.26 waves P-V) from the original value of 1.4 waves RMS (6.5 waves P-V), measured at 633nm, and the Strehl ratio improved to 89% from the original value of 0.08%.

  2. Design Study of 8 Meter Monolithic Mirror UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    The planned Ares V launch vehicle with its 10 meter fairing shroud and 55,000 kg capacity to the Sun Earth L2 point enables entirely new classes of space telescopes. NASA MSFC has conducted a preliminary study that demonstrates the feasibility of launching a 6 to 8 meter class monolithic primary mirror telescope to Sun-Earth L2 using an Ares V. Specific technical areas studied included optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; launch vehicle performance and trajectory; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN&C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; operations and servicing; mass and power budgets; and system cost.

  3. A FOSSIL BULGE GLOBULAR CLUSTER REVEALED BY VERY LARGE TELESCOPE MULTI-CONJUGATE ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Ortolani, Sergio; Barbuy, Beatriz; Momany, Yazan; Saviane, Ivo; Jilkova, Lucie; Bica, Eduardo; Salerno, Gustavo M.; Jungwiert, Bruno E-mail: barbuy@astro.iag.usp.br E-mail: isaviane@eso.org E-mail: bica@if.ufrgs.br

    2011-08-10

    The globular cluster HP 1 is projected on the bulge, very close to the Galactic center. The Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator on the Very Large Telescope allowed us to acquire high-resolution deep images that, combined with first epoch New Technology Telescope data, enabled us to derive accurate proper motions. The cluster and bulge fields' stellar contents were disentangled through this process and produced an unprecedented definition in color-magnitude diagrams of this cluster. The metallicity of [Fe/H] {approx} -1.0 from previous spectroscopic analysis is confirmed, which together with an extended blue horizontal branch imply an age older than the halo average. Orbit reconstruction results suggest that HP 1 is spatially confined within the bulge.

  4. Optical and Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectropolarimetry of 3C 273 and PG 1114+445

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul S.; Schmidt, Gary D.; Allen, Richard G.

    1993-01-01

    New optical spectropolarimetry and broad-band measurements, made during periods when the linear polarization of the quasar 3C 273 was no greater than 1 pct, are combined with ultraviolet polarization measurements made with the Faint Object Spectrograph of the Hubble Space Telescope. Very weak UV polarization during the time of observation is seen in the HST measurements, which is consistent with the completely unpolarized UV continuum and emission lines. Optical spectropolarimetry, however, reveals polarized light, the source of which is consistent with a nonthermal component, diluted by other unpolarized emission sources, such as the 'big blue bump'. Optical spectropolarimetry of the radio-quiet quasar PG 1114+445 is also presented. The polarization of this QSO is thought to result from scattering by dust external to the narrow-line region. 3C 273 and PG 1114+445 are useful in illustrating the range of polarizing mechanisms which can operate in low-polarization QSOs.

  5. Optics for X-ray telescopes: analytical treatment of the off-axis effective area of mirrors in optical modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Optical modules for X-ray telescopes comprise several double-reflection mirrors operating in grazing incidence. The concentration power of an optical module, which determines primarily the telescope's sensitivity, is in general expressed by its on-axis effective area as a function of the X-ray energy. Nevertheless, the effective area of X-ray mirrors in general decreases as the source moves off-axis, with a consequent loss of sensitivity. To make matters worse, the dense nesting of mirror shells in an optical module results in a mutual obstruction of their aperture when an astronomical source is off-axis, with a further effective area reduction. Aims: To ensure the performance of X-ray optics for new X-ray telescopes (like NuSTAR, NHXM, ASTRO-H, IXO), their design entails a detailed computation of the effective area over all the telescope's field of view. While the effective area of an X-ray mirror is easy to predict on-axis, the same task becomes more difficult for a source off-axis. It is therefore important to develop an appropriate formalism to reliably compute the off-axis effective area of a Wolter-I mirror, including the effect of obstructions. Methods: Most of collecting area simulation for X-ray optical modules has been so far performed along with numerical codes, involving ray-tracing routines, very effective but in general complex, difficult to handle, time consuming and affected by statistical errors. In contrast, in a previous paper we approached this problem from an analytical viewpoint, to the end of simplifying and speeding up the prediction of the off-axis effective area of unobstructed X-ray mirrors with any reflective coating, including multilayers. Results: In this work we extend the analytical results obtained: we show that the analytical formula for the off-axis effective area can be inverted, and we expose in detail a novel analytical treatment of mutual shell obstruction in densely nested mirror assemblies, which reduces the off

  6. Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project. V. Optical Spectroscopic Campaign and Emission-line Analysis for NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, L.; Fausnaugh, M. M.; Barth, A. J.; Peterson, B. M.; Bentz, M. C.; De Rosa, G.; Denney, K. D.; Goad, M. R.; Kochanek, C. S.; Korista, K. T.; Kriss, G. A.; Pogge, R. W.; Bennert, V. N.; Brotherton, M.; Clubb, K. I.; Dalla Bontà, E.; Filippenko, A. V.; Greene, J. E.; Grier, C. J.; Vestergaard, M.; Zheng, W.; Adams, Scott M.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Bigley, A.; Brown, Jacob E.; Brown, Jonathan S.; Canalizo, G.; Comerford, J. M.; Coker, Carl T.; Corsini, E. M.; Croft, S.; Croxall, K. V.; Deason, A. J.; Eracleous, Michael; Fox, O. D.; Gates, E. L.; Henderson, C. B.; Holmbeck, E.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Jensen, J. J.; Johnson, C. A.; Kelly, P. L.; Kim, S.; King, A.; Lau, M. W.; Li, Miao; Lochhaas, Cassandra; Ma, Zhiyuan; Manne-Nicholas, E. R.; Mauerhan, J. C.; Malkan, M. A.; McGurk, R.; Morelli, L.; Mosquera, Ana; Mudd, Dale; Muller Sanchez, F.; Nguyen, M. L.; Ochner, P.; Ou-Yang, B.; Pancoast, A.; Penny, Matthew T.; Pizzella, A.; Poleski, Radosław; Runnoe, Jessie; Scott, B.; Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Shappee, B. J.; Shivvers, I.; Simonian, Gregory V.; Siviero, A.; Somers, Garrett; Stevens, Daniel J.; Strauss, M. A.; Tayar, Jamie; Tejos, N.; Treu, T.; Van Saders, J.; Vican, L.; Villanueva, S., Jr.; Yuk, H.; Zakamska, N. L.; Zhu, W.; Anderson, M. D.; Arévalo, P.; Bazhaw, C.; Bisogni, S.; Borman, G. A.; Bottorff, M. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Breeveld, A. A.; Cackett, E. M.; Carini, M. T.; Crenshaw, D. M.; De Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Dietrich, M.; Edelson, R.; Efimova, N. V.; Ely, J.; Evans, P. A.; Ferland, G. J.; Flatland, K.; Gehrels, N.; Geier, S.; Gelbord, J. M.; Grupe, D.; Gupta, A.; Hall, P. B.; Hicks, S.; Horenstein, D.; Horne, Keith; Hutchison, T.; Im, M.; Joner, M. D.; Jones, J.; Kaastra, J.; Kaspi, S.; Kelly, B. C.; Kennea, J. A.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. C.; Klimanov, S. A.; Lee, J. C.; Leonard, D. C.; Lira, P.; MacInnis, F.; Mathur, S.; McHardy, I. M.; Montouri, C.; Musso, R.; Nazarov, S. V.; Netzer, H.; Norris, R. P.; Nousek, J. A.; Okhmat, D. N.; Papadakis, I.; Parks, J. R.; Pott, J.-U.; Rafter, S. E.; Rix, H.-W.; Saylor, D. A.; Schnülle, K.; Sergeev, S. G.; Siegel, M.; Skielboe, A.; Spencer, M.; Starkey, D.; Sung, H.-I.; Teems, K. G.; Turner, C. S.; Uttley, P.; Villforth, C.; Weiss, Y.; Woo, J.-H.; Yan, H.; Young, S.; Zu, Y.

    2017-03-01

    We present the results of an optical spectroscopic monitoring program targeting NGC 5548 as part of a larger multiwavelength reverberation mapping campaign. The campaign spanned 6 months and achieved an almost daily cadence with observations from five ground-based telescopes. The Hβ and He ii λ4686 broad emission-line light curves lag that of the 5100 Å optical continuum by {4.17}-0.36+0.36 {days} and {0.79}-0.34+0.35 {days}, respectively. The Hβ lag relative to the 1158 Å ultraviolet continuum light curve measured by the Hubble Space Telescope is ∼50% longer than that measured against the optical continuum, and the lag difference is consistent with the observed lag between the optical and ultraviolet continua. This suggests that the characteristic radius of the broad-line region is ∼50% larger than the value inferred from optical data alone. We also measured velocity-resolved emission-line lags for Hβ and found a complex velocity-lag structure with shorter lags in the line wings, indicative of a broad-line region dominated by Keplerian motion. The responses of both the Hβ and He ii emission lines to the driving continuum changed significantly halfway through the campaign, a phenomenon also observed for C iv, Lyα, He ii(+O iii]), and Si iv(+O iv]) during the same monitoring period. Finally, given the optical luminosity of NGC 5548 during our campaign, the measured Hβ lag is a factor of five shorter than the expected value implied by the R BLR–L AGN relation based on the past behavior of NGC 5548.

  7. Optical telescope system-level design considerations for a space-based gravitational wave mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Sankar, Shannon R.

    2016-07-01

    The study of the Universe through gravitational waves will yield a revolutionary new perspective on the Universe, which has been intensely studied using electromagnetic signals in many wavelength bands. A space-based gravitational wave observatory will enable access to a rich array of astrophysical sources in the measurement band from 0.1 to 100 mHz, and nicely complement observations from ground-based detectors as well as pulsar timing arrays by sampling a different range of compact object masses and astrophysical processes. The observatory measures gravitational radiation by precisely monitoring the tiny change in the proper distance between pairs of freely falling proof masses. These masses are separated by millions of kilometers and, using a laser heterodyne interferometric technique, the change in their proper separation is detected to ~ 10 pm over timescales of 1000 seconds, a fractional precision of better than one part in 1019. Optical telescopes are essential for the implementation of this precision displacement measurement. In this paper we describe some of the key system level design considerations for the telescope subsystem in a mission context. The reference mission for this purpose is taken to be the enhanced Laser Interferometry Space Antenna mission (eLISA), a strong candidate for the European Space Agency's Cosmic Visions L3 launch opportunity in 2034. We will review the flow-down of observatory level requirements to the telescope subsystem, particularly pertaining to the effects of telescope dimensional stability and scattered light suppression, two performance specifications which are somewhat different from the usual requirements for an image forming telescope.

  8. Calculating Statistical Orbit Distributions Using GEO Optical Observations with the Michigan Orbital Debris Survey Telescope (MODEST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, M.; Barker, E.; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K. J.; Rodriquez, H. M.

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Orbital Debris measurements program has a goal to characterize the small debris environment in the geosynchronous Earth-orbit (GEO) region using optical telescopes ("small" refers to objects too small to catalog and track with current systems). Traditionally, observations of GEO and near-GEO objects involve following the object with the telescope long enough to obtain an orbit suitable for tracking purposes. Telescopes operating in survey mode, however, randomly observe objects that pass through their field of view. Typically, these short-arc observation are inadequate to obtain detailed orbits, but can be used to estimate approximate circular orbit elements (semimajor axis, inclination, and ascending node). From this information, it should be possible to make statistical inferences about the orbital distributions of the GEO population bright enough to be observed by the system. The Michigan Orbital Debris Survey Telescope (MODEST) has been making such statistical surveys of the GEO region for four years. During that time, the telescope has made enough observations in enough areas of the GEO belt to have had nearly complete coverage. That means that almost all objects in all possible orbits in the GEO and near- GEO region had a non-zero chance of being observed. Some regions (such as those near zero inclination) have had good coverage, while others are poorly covered. Nevertheless, it is possible to remove these statistical biases and reconstruct the orbit populations within the limits of sampling error. In this paper, these statistical techniques and assumptions are described, and the techniques are applied to the current MODEST data set to arrive at our best estimate of the GEO orbit population distribution.

  9. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun Balloon-Borne Telescope: Astrophysical Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Ramsey, Brian; Apple, Jeff; Kurt, Dietz; Tennant, Allyn; Swartz, Douglas; Christe, Steven D.; Shih, Albert

    2014-01-01

    On September 21, 2013, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun, or HEROES, balloon-borne x-ray telescope launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility's site in Ft. Summer, NM. The flight lasted for approximately 27 hours and the observational targets included the Sun and astrophysical sources GRS 1915+105 and the Crab Nebula. Over the past year, the HEROES team upgraded the existing High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES Project is a multi-NASA Center effort with team members at both Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and is led by Co-PIs (one at each Center). The HEROES payload consists of the hard X-ray telescope HERO, developed at MSFC, combined with several new systems. To allow the HEROES telescope to make observations of the Sun, a new solar aspect system was added to supplement the existing star camera for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter was added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations and two alignment monitoring systems were added for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. This mission was funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands-On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  10. Characterization of optical turbulence at the GREGOR solar telescope: temporal and local behavior and its influence on the solar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, D.; Sucher, E.; Stein, K.; von der Lühe, O.; Berkefeld, Th.

    2016-10-01

    Local atmospheric turbulence at the telescope level is regarded as a major reason for affecting the performance of the adaptive optics systems using wavelengths in the visible and infrared for solar observations. During the day the air masses around the telescope dome are influenced by flow distortions. Additionally heating of the infrastructure close to telescope causes thermal turbulence. Thereby optical turbulence is produced and leads to quality changes in the local seeing throughout the day. Image degradation will be yielded affecting the performance of adaptive optical systems. The spatial resolution of the solar observations will be reduced. For this study measurements of the optical turbulence, represented by the structure function parameter of the refractive index Cn2 were performed on several locations at the GREGOR telescope at the Teide observatory at Tenerife at the Canary Islands / Spain. Since September 2012 measurements of Cn2 were carried out between the towers of the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) and of GREGOR with a laser-scintillometer. The horizontal distance of the measurement path was about 75 m. Additional from May 2015 up to March 2016 the optical turbulence was determined at three additional locations close to the solar telescope GREGOR. The optical turbulence is derived from sonic anemometer measurements. Time series of the sonic temperature are analyzed and compared to the direct measurements of the laser scintillometer. Meteorological conditions are investigated, especially the influence of the wind direction. Turbulence of upper atmospheric layers is not regarded. The measured local turbulence is compared to the system performance of the GREGOR telescopes. It appears that the mountain ridge effects on turbulence are more relevant than any local causes of seeing close to the telescope. Results of these analyses and comparison of nearly one year of measurements are presented and discussed.

  11. Plasma etching for advanced polymer optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitting, Donald S.

    Plasma etching is a common microfabrication technique which can be applied to polymers as well as glasses, metals, and semiconductors. The fabrication of low loss and reliable polymer optical devices commonly makes use of advanced microfabrication processing techniques similar in nature to those utilized in standard semiconductor fabrication technology. Among these techniques, plasma/reactive ion etching is commonly used in the formation of waveguiding core structures. Plasma etching is a powerful processing technique with many potential applications in the emerging field of polymer optical device fabrication. One such promising application explored in this study is in the area of thin film-substrate adhesion enhancement. Two approaches involving plasma processing were evaluated to improve substrate-thin film adhesion in the production of polymer waveguide optical devices. Plasma treatment of polymer substrates such as polycarbonate has been studied to promote the adhesion of fluoropolymer thin film coatings for waveguide device fabrication. The effects of blanket oxygen plasma etchback on substrate, microstructural substrate feature formation, and the long term performance and reliability of these methods were investigated. Use of a blanket oxygen plasma to alter the polycarbonate surface prior to fluoropolymer casting was found to have positive but limited capability to improve the adhesive strength between these polymers. Experiments show a strong correlation between surface roughness and adhesion strength. The formation of small scale surface features using microlithography and plasma etching on the polycarbonate surface proved to provide outstanding adhesion strength when compared to any other known treatment methods. Long term environmental performance testing of these surface treatment methods provided validating data. Test results showed these process approaches to be effective solutions to the problem of adhesion between hydrocarbon based polymer

  12. Characterization benches for neutrino telescope Optical Modules at the APC laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgitas, Theodore; Creusot, Alexandre; Kouchner, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    As has been demonstrated by the first generation of neutrino telescopes Antares and IceCube, precise knowledge of the photon detection efficiency of optical modules is of fundamental importance for the understanding of the instrument and accurate event reconstruction. Dedicated test benches have been developed to measure all related quantities for the Digital Optical Modules of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope being currently deployed in the Mediterranean sea. The first bench is a black box with robotic arms equipped with a calibrated single photon source or laser which enable a precise mapping of the detection efficiency at arbitrary incident angles as well as precise measurements of the time delays induced by the photodetection chain. These measurement can be incorporated and compared to full GEANT MonteCarlo simulations of the optical modules. The second bench is a 2 m×2 m ×2 m water tank equipped with muon hodoscopes on top and bottom. It enables to study and measure the angular dependence of the DOM's detection efficiency of the Cherenkov light produced in water by relativistic muons, thus reproducing in situ detection conditions. We describe these two benches and present their first results and status.

  13. Structural Feasibility Analysis of a Robotically Assembled Very Large Aperture Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William Keats; Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilcox, Brian H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study of robotically constructing a very large aperture optical space telescope on-orbit. Since the largest engineering challenges are likely to reside in the design and assembly of the 150-m diameter primary reflector, this preliminary study focuses on this component. The same technology developed for construction of the primary would then be readily used for the smaller optical structures (secondary, tertiary, etc.). A reasonable set of ground and on-orbit loading scenarios are compiled from the literature and used to define the structural performance requirements and size the primary reflector. A surface precision analysis shows that active adjustment of the primary structure is required in order to meet stringent optical surface requirements. Two potential actuation strategies are discussed along with potential actuation devices at the current state of the art. The finding of this research effort indicate that successful technology development combined with further analysis will likely enable such a telescope to be built in the future.

  14. Study of alternate optical and fine guidance sensor designs for the space infrared telescope facility (SIRTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wissinger, A.; Steir, M.; Mcfarlane, M.; Fuschetto, A.

    1984-01-01

    A unique optical design was developed that compensates for the coma degraded images caused by field chopping in SIRTF. The conic constants of a Cassegrain telescope were altered to compensate for the coma induced by the secondary mirror tilt. The modulation transfer function is essentially independent of secondary mirror tilt, and diffraction limited image quality is maintained over a several arcminute field during chopping. With an untilted secondary mirror, the coma compensated (CC) design has a smaller field than the unchopped Ritchey-Chretien design; but use of relay optics, such as the inverted Cassegrain design developed for the fine guidance sensor (FGS), can increase the CC telescope's field size. A reactionless secondary mirror chopper mechanism that uses superconducting magnets was studied. The heart producing elements are confined to a reaction plate that is not directly viewed by the IR focal plane. A design was also developed for a low moment of inertia, reticulated HIP beryllium secondary mirror consistent with blank fabrication technology and optical finishing requirements.

  15. The Optical Design of CHARIS: An Exoplanet IFS for the Subaru Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters-Limbach, Mary; Groff, Tyler; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Driscoll, Dave; Galvin, Michael; Foster, Allen; Carr, Michael; LeClerc, Dave; Fagan, Rad; McElwain, Michael; Knapp, Gillian; Brandt, Timothy; Janson, Markus; Guyone, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Martinache, Frantz; Hayashi, Masahiko; Takato, Naruhisa

    2013-01-01

    High-contrast imaging techniques now make possible both imaging and spectroscopy of planets around nearby stars. We present the optical design for the Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS), a lenslet-based, cryogenic integral field spectrograph (IFS) for imaging exoplanets on the Subaru telescope. The IFS will provide spectral information for 138×138 spatial elements over a 2.07 arcsec × 2.07 arcsec field of view (FOV). CHARIS will operate in the near infrared (lambda = 1.15 - 2.5 micrometers) and will feature two spectral resolution modes of R is approximately 18 (low-res mode) and R is approximately 73 (high-res mode). Taking advantage of the Subaru telescope adaptive optics systems and coronagraphs (AO188 and SCExAO), CHARIS will provide sufficient contrast to obtain spectra of young self-luminous Jupiter-mass exoplanets. CHARIS will undergo CDR in October 2013 and is projected to have first light by the end of 2015. We report here on the current optical design of CHARIS and its unique innovations.

  16. Software control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope enclosure PLC hardware using COTS software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrowman, Alastair J.; de Bilbao, Lander; Ariño, Javier; Murga, Gaizka; Goodrich, Bret; Hubbard, John R.; Greer, Alan; Mayer, Chris; Taylor, Philip

    2012-09-01

    As PLCs evolve from simple logic controllers into more capable Programmable Automation Controllers (PACs), observatories are increasingly using such devices to control complex mechanisms1, 2. This paper describes use of COTS software to control such hardware using the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) Common Services Framework (CSF). We present the Enclosure Control System (ECS) under development in Spain and the UK. The paper details selection of the commercial PLC communication library PLCIO. Implemented in C and delivered with source code, the library separates the programmer from communication details through a simple API. Capable of communicating with many types of PLCs (including Allen-Bradley and Siemens) the API remains the same irrespective of PLC in use. The ECS is implemented in Java using the observatory's framework that provides common services for software components. We present a design following a connection-based approach where all components access the PLC through a single connection class. The link between Java and PLCIO C library is provided by a thin Java Native Interface (JNI) layer. Also presented is a software simulator of the PLC based upon the PLCIO Virtual PLC. This creates a simulator operating below the library's API and thus requires no change to ECS software. It also provides enhanced software testing capabilities prior to hardware becoming available. Results are presented in the form of communication timing test data, showing that the use of CSF, JNI and PLCIO provide a control system capable of controlling enclosure tracking mechanisms, that would be equally valid for telescope mount control.

  17. ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT CURVES OF SUPERNOVAE WITH THE SWIFT ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Nousek, John; Vanden Berk, Daniel; Holland, Stephen T.; Immler, Stefan; Gehrels, Neil; Panagia, Nino; Still, Martin

    2009-05-15

    We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of supernovae (SNe) obtained with the UltraViolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift spacecraft. This is the largest sample of UV light curves from any single instrument and covers all major SN types and most subtypes. The UV light curves of SNe Ia are fairly homogenous, while SNe Ib/c and IIP show more variety in their light-curve shapes. The UV-optical colors clearly differentiate SNe Ia and IIP, particularly at early times. The color evolution of SNe IIP, however, makes their colors similar to SNe Ia at about 20 days after explosion. SNe Ib/c are shown to have varied UV-optical colors. The use of UV colors to help type SNe will be important for high-redshift SNe discovered in optical observations. These data can be added to ground-based optical and near infrared data to create bolometric light curves of individual objects and as checks on generic bolometric corrections used in the absence of UV data. This sample can also be compared with rest-frame UV observations of high-redshift SNe observed at optical wavelengths.

  18. Customized overhead cranes for installation of India's largest 3.6m optical telescope at Devasthal, Nainital, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangia, Tarun; Yadava, Shobhit; Kumar, Brijesh; Ghanti, A. S.; Hardikar, P. M.

    2016-07-01

    India's largest 3.6 m aperture optical telescope facility has been recently established at Devasthal site by Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observation Sciences (ARIES), an autonomous Institute under Department of Science and Technology, Government of India. The telescope is equipped with active optics and it is designed to be used for seeinglimited observations at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. A steel building with rotating cylindrical steel Dome was erected to house 3.6m telescope and its accessories at hilltop of Devasthal site. Customized cranes were essentially required inside the building as there were space constraints around the telescope building for operating big external heavy duty cranes from outside, transportation constraints in route for bringing heavy weight cranes, altitude of observatory, and sharp bends etc. to site. To meet the challenge of telescope installation from inside the telescope building by lifting components through its hatch, two Single Girder cranes and two Under Slung cranes of 10 MT capacity each were specifically designed and developed. All the four overhead cranes were custom built to achieve the goal of handling telescope mirror and its various components during installation and assembly. Overhead cranes were installed in limited available space inside the building and tested as per IS 3177. Cranes were equipped with many features like VVVFD compatibility, provision for tandem operation, digital load display, anti-collision mechanism, electrical interlocks, radio remote, low hook height and compact carriage etc. for telescope integration at site.

  19. An optical flare of GB6 1310+4844 observed with the Kanata telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, R.; Yamanaka, M.; Sasada, M.; Ikejiri, Y.; Uemura, M.; Kawabata, K. S.; Takahashi, H.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ohsugi, T.; Kuwada, Y.; Tanaka, Y. T.; Kanata Team

    2009-12-01

    Following the Fermi/LAT detection of the gamma-ray flare from GB6 B1310+4844 (ATEL #2316), we performed optical photometric observation with the Kanata 1.5-m telescope at Higashi-Hiroshima Observatory. Our preliminary analysis shows that I and R-band magnitudes of GB6 B1310+4844 were R=20.1+/-0.3 and I=18.8+/-0.2 on 2009 Nov. 28.8(UT). We adopted a nearby star at RA=13:12:54.1 and DEC=+48:27:58.2 (R=16.019,I=15.657 in UCAC3) as the photometric reference.

  20. Wavefront sensing and control architecture for the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Bruce H.; Smith, Jeff S.; Budinoff, Jason G.; Feinberg, Lee

    2006-06-01

    Testbed results are presented demonstrating high-speed image-based wavefront sensing and control for a spherical primary optical telescope (SPOT). The testbed incorporates a phase retrieval camera coupled to a 3-Mirror Vertex testbed (3MV) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Actuator calibration based on the Hough transform is discussed as well as several supercomputing architectures for image-based wavefront sensing. Timing results are also presented based on various algorithm implementations using a cluster of 64 TigerSharc TS101 DSP's (digital-signal processors).

  1. Results of the JOSE site evaluation project for adaptive optics at the William Herschel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R.

    1998-11-01

    Results are presented from a long-term study of the seeing properties at the William Herschel Telescope on La Palma. The measurements have been made over a two-year period using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor equipped with high frame-rate CCD camera. The aim of the campaign is to characterize those aspects of the seeing relevant to the design and performance of astronomical adaptive optical systems for the WHT. Statistical results are presented for the value of Fried's parameter, power spectra of Zernike mode coefficients, isoplanatism and the outer scale of turbulence.

  2. On-orbit performance of the Hubble Space Telescope optical control system.

    PubMed

    Basedow, R; Ftaclas, C; Crout, R; Nonnenmacher, A

    1993-04-01

    On-orbit data are used to examine the performance of the Hubble Space Telescope optical control system. The precision, relative accuracy, and absolute accuracy of the off-axis Wavefront-Sensor measurements are evaluated and compared with design requirements. The internal stability of the sensors is better than 0.006 microm rms over five years, including launch. Random errors are estimated to be within 0.01 microm rms. Systematic errors are present in the estimates of focus, spherical, and coma aberrations, but none has been identified for astigmatism. Primary-mirror spherical aberration is believed to be the probable cause of all subspecification performances.

  3. Adaptive Optics Observations of Arcturus using the Mount Wilson 100 Inch Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Nils H.; ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Mason, Brian D.

    1999-05-01

    Upon inspection of the multiple-star results in the Hipparcos catalog, the flag for entry number 69673 particularly stands out; it is Arcturus, for which no companion has been reported previously. The Hipparcos companion is reported to be at a separation of 0.255"+/-0.039" with a magnitude difference in a broadband filter (peaked near 460 nm) of 3.33+/-0.31. We present recent results using the natural guide star adaptive optics system on the Mount Wilson 100 inch telescope showing Arcturus to be a single star.

  4. Object-oriented software design for the Mt. Wilson 100-inch Hooker telescope adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thomas G.

    2000-06-01

    The object oriented software design paradigm has been instrumented in the development of the Adoptics software used in the Hooker telescope's ADOPT adaptive optics system. The software runs on a Pentium-class PC host and eight DSP processors connected to the host's motherboard bus. C++ classes were created to implement most of the host software's functionality, with the object oriented features of inheritance, encapsulation and abstraction being the most useful. Careful class design at the inception of the project allowed for the rapid addition of features without comprising the integrity of the software. Base class implementations include the DSP system, real-time graphical displays and opto-mechanical actuator control.

  5. The Unique Optical Design of the CTI-II Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Mark R.; McGraw, J. T.; MacFarlane, M.

    2006-12-01

    The CCD/Transit Instrument with Innovative Instrumentation (CTI-II) is being developed for precision ground-based astrometric and photometric astronomical observations. The 1.8m telescope will be stationary, near-zenith pointing and will feature a CCD-mosaic array operated in time-delay and integrate (TDI) mode to image a continuous strip of the sky in five bands. The heart of the telescope is a Nasmyth-like bent-Cassegrain optical system optimized to produce near diffraction-limited images with near zero distortion over a circular1.42 deg field. The optical design includes an f/2.2 parabolic ULE primary with no central hole salvaged from the original CTI telescope and adds the requisite hyperbolic secondary, a folding flat and a highly innovative all-spherical, five lens corrector which includes three plano surfaces. The reflective and refractive portions of the design have been optimized as individual but interdependent systems so that the same reflective system can be used with slightly different refractive correctors. At present, two nearly identical corrector designs are being evaluated, one fabricated from BK-7 glass and the other of fused silica. The five lens corrector consists of an air-spaced triplet separated from follow-on air-spaced doublet. Either design produces 0.25 arcsecond images at 83% encircled energy with a maximum of 0.0005% distortion. The innovative five lens corrector design has been applied to other current and planned Cassegrain, RC and super RC optical systems requiring correctors. The basic five lens approach always results in improved performance compared to the original designs. In some cases, the improvement in image quality is small but includes substantial reductions in distortion. In other cases, the improvement in image quality is substantial. Because the CTI-II corrector is designed for a parabolic primary, it might be especially useful for liquid mirror telescopes. We describe and discuss the CTI-II optical design with respect

  6. Design and Performance Evaluation of Sensors and Actuators for Advanced Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art commercial sensors and actuators do not meet many of NASA s next generation spacecraft and instrument needs. Nor do they satisfy the DoD needs for satellite missions, especially micro/nano satellite missions. In an effort to develop advanced optical devices and instruments that meet mission requirements, NASA Langley recently completed construction of a new cleanroom housing equipment capable of fabricating high performance active optic and adaptive optic technologies including deformable mirrors, reconfigurable lenses (both refractive and diffractive), spectrometers, spectro-polarimeters, tunable filters and many other active optic devices. In addition to performance, these advanced optic technologies offer advantages in speed, size, weight, power consumption, and radiation tolerance. The active optic devices described in this paper rely on birefringent liquid crystal materials to alter either the phase or the polarization of the incoming light. Design considerations and performance evaluation results for various NASA applications are presented. Applications presented will include large space telescopes, optical communications, spacecraft windows, coronagraphs, and star trackers. Keywords: Photonics, Adaptive Optics, Tunable Filters, MEMs., MOEMs, Coronagraph, Star Tracker

  7. Optics of Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII): delay lines and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhabal, Arnab; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Rizzo, Maxime J.; Mundy, Lee

    2016-07-01

    We present the optics of Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) as it gets ready for launch. BETTII is an 8-meter baseline far-infrared (30-90 μm) interferometer mission with capabilities of spatially resolved spectroscopy aimed at studying star formation and galaxy evolution. The instrument collects light from its two arms, makes them interfere, divides them into two science channels (30-50 μm and 60-90 μm), and focuses them onto the detectors. It also separates out the NIR light (1-2.5 μm) and uses it for tip-tilt corrections of the telescope pointing. Currently, all the optical elements have been fabricated, heat treated, coated appropriately and are mounted on their respective assemblies. We are presenting the optical design challenges for such a balloon borne spatio- spectral interferometer, and discuss how they have been mitigated. The warm and cold delay lines are an important part of this optics train. The warm delay line corrects for path length differences between the left and the right arm due to balloon pendulation, while the cold delay line is aimed at introducing a systematic path length difference, thereby generating our interferograms from where we can derive information about the spectra. The details of their design and the results of the testing of these opto-mechanical parts are also discussed. The sensitivities of different optical elements on the interferograms produced have been determined with the help of simulations using FRED software package. Accordingly, an alignment plan is drawn up which makes use of a laser tracker, a CMM, theodolites and a LUPI interferometer.

  8. Vision: A Six-telescope Fiber-fed Visible Light Beam Combiner for the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Eugenio V.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; van Belle, Gerard; Monnier, John D.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Ghasempour, Askari; Clark, James H.; Zavala, R. T.; Benson, James A.; Hutter, Donald J.; Schmitt, Henrique R.; Baines, Ellyn K.; Jorgensen, Anders M.; Strosahl, Susan G.; Sanborn, Jason; Zawicki, Stephen J.; Sakosky, Michael F.; Swihart, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Visible-light long baseline interferometry holds the promise of advancing a number of important applications in fundamental astronomy, including the direct measurement of the angular diameters and oblateness of stars, and the direct measurement of the orbits of binary and multiple star systems. To advance, the field of visible-light interferometry requires development of instruments capable of combining light from 15 baselines (6 telescopes) simultaneously. The Visible Imaging System for Interferometric Observations at NPOI (VISION) is a new visible light beam combiner for the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) that uses single-mode fibers to coherently combine light from up to six telescopes simultaneously with an image-plane combination scheme. It features a photometric camera for calibrations and spatial filtering from single-mode fibers with two Andor Ixon electron multiplying CCDs. This paper presents the VISION system, results of laboratory tests, and results of commissioning on-sky observations. A new set of corrections have been determined for the power spectrum and bispectrum by taking into account non-Gaussian statistics and read noise present in electron-multipying CCDs to enable measurement of visibilities and closure phases in the VISION post-processing pipeline. The post-processing pipeline has been verified via new on-sky observations of the O-type supergiant binary ζ Orionis A, obtaining a flux ratio of 2.18+/- 0.13 with a position angle of 223.°9 ± 1.°0 and separation 40.6+/- 1.8 mas over 570-750 nm, in good agreement with expectations from the previously published orbit.

  9. Aluminum mirror coatings for UVOIR telescope optics including the far UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Hennessy, John; Raouf, Nasrat; Nikzad, Shouleh; Ayala, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Scowen, Paul; Del Hoyo, Javier; Quijada, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    NASA Cosmic Origins (COR) Program identified the development of high reflectivity mirror coatings for large astronomical telescopes particularly for the far ultra violet (FUV) part of the spectrum as a key technology requiring significant materials research and process development. In this paper we describe the challenges and accomplishments in producing stable high reflectance aluminum mirror coatings with conventional evaporation and advanced Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) techniques. We present the current status of process development with reflectance of ~ 55 to 80% in the FUV achieved with little or no degradation over a year.

  10. Mechanical blind gap measurement tool for alignment of the JWST Optical Telescope Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liepmann, Till

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes a novel gap gauge tool that is used to provide an independent check of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) primary mirror alignment. Making accurate measurements of the mechanical gaps between the OTE mirror segments is needed to verify that the segments were properly aligned relative to each other throughout the integration and test of the 6.6 meter telescope. The gap between the Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA) is a sensitive indicator of the relative clocking and decenter. Further, the gap measurements are completely independent of all the other measurements use in the alignment process (e.g. laser trackers and laser radar). The gap measurement is a challenge, however, that required a new approach. Commercial gap measurements tools were investigated; however no suitable solution is available. The challenge of this measurement is due to the required 0.1 mm accuracy, the close spacing of the mirrors segments (approximately 3-9mm), the acute angle between the segment sides (approximately 4 degrees), and the difficult access to the blind gap. Several techniques were considered and tested before selecting the gauge presented here. This paper presents the theory, construction and calibration of the JWST gap gauge that is being used to measure and verify alignment of the OTE primary mirror segments.

  11. The Optical Design of the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Newton; Bersanelli, Marco; Childers, Jeffery; D'Arcangelo, Ocleto; Halevi, Doron; Janssen, Michael; Kedward, Keith; Lemaster, Nicole; Lubin, Philip; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Marvil, Joshua; Meinhold, Peter; Mejía, Jorge; Mennella, Aniello; Natoli, Paolo; O'Neil, Hugh; Pina, Agenor; Pryor, Mark; Sandri, Maura; Simonetto, Alessandro; Sozzi, Carlo; Tello, Camilo; Villa, Fabrizio; Villela, Thyrso; Williams, Brian; Wuensche, Carlos Alexandre

    2005-05-01

    We present the optical design of the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST), an off-axis Gregorian telescope designed to measure the angular distribution of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) at 30 and 41.5 GHz on angular scales ranging from 20' to 10°. The aperture of the telescope is 1.9 m, and our design meets the strict requirements imposed by the scientific goals of the mission: the beam size is 20' at 41.5 GHz and 26' at 30 GHz, while the illumination at the edge of the mirrors is lower than -30 dB for the central horn. The primary mirror is an off-axis section of a paraboloid, and the secondary an off-axis section of an ellipsoid. A spinning flat mirror located between the sky and the primary provides a two-dimensional chop by rotating the beams around an ellipse on the sky. BEAST uses a receiver array of cryogenic low noise InP High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) amplifiers. The baseline array has seven horns matched to one amplifier each and one horn matched to two amplifiers (two polarizations) for a total of nine amplifiers. Two horns operate around 30 GHz, and six operate around 41.5 GHz. Subsequent campaigns will include 90 GHz and higher frequency channels.

  12. Characterization of friction in the 3.6m Devasthal optical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, T. S.; Bastin, Christian; Kumar, Brijesh

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the work on characterization of friction in the 3.6 m Devasthal optical telescope axes. The telescope azimuth axis is supported on a hydrostatic bearing while the altitude and rotator axes are supported on hydrodynamic bearings. Both altitude and azimuth axes are driven directly by high power BLDC motors and the rotator is driven by BLDC motor via a gearbox. This system is designed by AMOS, Belgium and tuned to achieve a tracking accuracy better than 0.1 arcsec RMS. Friction poses control related problems at such low speeds hence it is important to periodically characterize the behaviour at each axes. Compensation is necessary if the friction behaviour changes over the time and starts dominating the overall system response. For identifying friction each axis of telescope is rotated at different constant speeds and speed versus torque maps are generated. The LuGre model for friction is employed and nonlinear optimization is performed to identify the four static parameters of friction. The behaviour of friction for each axis is presented and the results are discussed.

  13. Precision Linear Actuators for the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope Demonstration Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinoff, Jason; Pfenning, David

    2006-01-01

    The Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT) is an ongoing research effort at Goddard Space Flight Center developing wavefront sensing and control architectures for future space telescopes. The 03.5-m SPOT telescope primary mirror is comprise9 of six 0.86-m hexagonal mirror segments arranged in a single ring, with the central segment missing. The mirror segments are designed for laboratory use and are not lightweighted to reduce cost. Each primary mirror segment is actuated and has tip, tilt, and piston rigid-body motions. Additionally, the radius of curvature of each mirror segment may be varied mechanically. To provide these degrees of freedom, the SPOT mirror segment assembly requires linear actuators capable of

  14. A Balloon-Borne, Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope with Silicon Photomultiplier Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter

    We propose to continue our development of new medium-energy gamma-ray instrumentation by constructing and flying a balloon- borne Compton telescope using advanced scintillator materials combined with silicon photomultiplier readouts. There is an urgent need in high-energy astronomy for a medium-energy gamma-ray mission covering the energy range from 0.4 - 20 MeV to follow the success of the COMPTEL instrument on CGRO. Judging by the Astro2010 Decadal Survey and subsequent Physics of the Cosmos technology report, such a mission will have to fit within the Explorer Program, or be realizable using a series of ultra-long duration balloon (ULDB) flights, if it is to become reality in the foreseeable future. This in turn will require the use of relatively robust, low- cost, off-the-shelf technologies that can nonetheless achieve at least an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over COMPTEL. Fortunately, high-performance scintillators, such as Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), Cerium Bromide (CeBr3), and p-terphenyl, and compact readout devices, such as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), are already commercially available and capable of meeting this need. In previous work we have demonstrated that a Compton telescope consisting of an organic scintillator scattering layer and a LaBr3 calorimeter effectively rejects background under balloon-flight conditions, using time-of-flight (ToF) discrimination. In separate work, we have shown that the combination of LaBr3 scintillator with a SiPM readout performs well as a gamma-ray spectrometer, and that SiPM readouts can effectively perform pulseshape discrimination (PSD) using organic scintillators such as stilbene. Finally, through the Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) balloon program we have flightvalidated a balloon gondola suitable for ULDB missions, including rough pointing, aspect determination, and telemetry systems. We now propose to combine these efforts. We will construct an Advanced Scintillator Compton

  15. A method on error analysis for large-aperture optical telescope control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yanrui; Wang, Qiang; Yan, Fabao; Liu, Xiang; Huang, Yongmei

    2016-10-01

    For large-aperture optical telescope, compared with the performance of azimuth in the control system, arc second-level jitters exist in elevation under different speeds' working mode, especially low-speed working mode in the process of its acquisition, tracking and pointing. The jitters are closely related to the working speed of the elevation, resulting in the reduction of accuracy and low-speed stability of the telescope. By collecting a large number of measured data to the elevation, we do analysis on jitters in the time domain, frequency domain and space domain respectively. And the relation between jitter points and the leading speed of elevation and the corresponding space angle is concluded that the jitters perform as periodic disturbance in space domain and the period of the corresponding space angle of the jitter points is 79.1″ approximately. Then we did simulation, analysis and comparison to the influence of the disturbance sources, like PWM power level output disturbance, torque (acceleration) disturbance, speed feedback disturbance and position feedback disturbance on the elevation to find that the space periodic disturbance still exist in the elevation performance. It leads us to infer that the problems maybe exist in angle measurement unit. The telescope employs a 24-bit photoelectric encoder and we can calculate the encoder grating angular resolution as 79.1016'', which is as the corresponding angle value in the whole encoder system of one period of the subdivision signal. The value is approximately equal to the space frequency of the jitters. Therefore, the working elevation of the telescope is affected by subdivision errors and the period of the subdivision error is identical to the period of encoder grating angular. Through comprehensive consideration and mathematical analysis, that DC subdivision error of subdivision error sources causes the jitters is determined, which is verified in the practical engineering. The method that analyze error

  16. X-ray telescope onboard Astro-E: optical design and fabrication of thin foil mirrors.

    PubMed

    Kunieda, H; Ishida, M; Endo, T; Hidaka, Y; Honda, H; Imamura, K; Ishida, J; Maeda, M; Misaki, K; Shibata, R; Furuzawa, A; Haga, K; Ogasaka, Y; Okajima, T; Tawara, Y; Terashima, Y; Watanabe, M; Yamashita, K; Yoshioka, T; Serlemitsos, P J; Soong, Y; Chan, K W

    2001-02-01

    X-ray telescopes (XRT's) of nested thin foil mirrors are developed for Astro-E, the fifth Japanese x-ray astronomy satellite. Although the launch was not successful, the design concept, fabrication, and alignment procedure are summarized. The main purpose of the Astro-E XRT is to collect hard x rays up to 10 keV with high efficiency and to provide medium spatial resolution in limited weight and volume. Compared with the previous mission, Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), a slightly longer focal length of 4.5-4.75 m and a larger diameter of 40 cm yields an effective area of 1750 cm2 at 8 keV with five telescopes. The image quality is also improved to 2-arc min half-power diameter by introduction of a replication process. Platinum is used instead of gold for the reflectors of one of the five telescopes to enhance the high-energy response. The fabrication and alignment procedure is also summarized. Several methods for improvement are suggested for the reflight Astro-E II mission and for other future missions. Preflight calibration results will be described in a forthcoming second paper, and a detailed study of images will be presented in a third paper.

  17. The Laser Guide Star System for Adaptive Optics at Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayano, Y.; Saito, Y.; Ito, M.; Saito, N.; Akagawa, K.; Takazawa, A.; Ito, M.; Wada, S.; Takami, H.; Iye, M.

    We report on the current status of developing the new laser guide star (LGS) system for the Subaru adaptive optics (AO) system. We have three major subsystems: the laser unit, the relay optical fiber and the laser launching telescope. A 4W-class all-solid-state 589nm laser has been developed as a light source for sodium laser guide star. We use two mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers operated at the wavelength of 1064nm and 1319nm to generate sum-frequency conversion into 589nm. The side-LD pumped configuration is used for the mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers. We have carefully considered the thermal lens effect in the cavity to achieve a high beam quality with TEM00; M2 = 1.06. The mode-locked frequency is selected at 143 MHz. We obtained the output powers of 16.5 W and 5.0 W at 1064nm and 1319 nm. Sum frequency generated by mixing two synchronized Nd:YAG mode-locked pulsed beams is precisely tuned to the sodium D2 line by thermal control of the etalon in the 1064nm Nd:YAG laser by observing the maximum fluorescence intensity of heated sodium vapor cell. The maximum output power at 589.159 nm reaches to 4.6 W using a PPMgOSLT crystal as a nonlinear optical crystal. And the output power can be maintained within a stability of +/- 1.2% for more than 3 days without optical damage. We developed a single-mode photonic crystal fiber (PCF) to relay the laser beam from laser clean room, in which the laser unit is located on the Nasmyth platform, to the laser launching telescope mounted behind the secondary mirror of Subaru Telescope. The photonic crystal fiber has solid pure silica core with the mode field diameter of 14 micron, which is relatively larger than that of the conventional step-index type single mode fiber. The length of the PCF is 35m and transmission loss due to the pure silica is 10dB/km at 589nm, which means PCF transmits 92% of the laser beam. We have preliminary achieved 75% throughput in total. Small mode-locked pulse width in time allows us to transmit the high

  18. Advanced Integrated Optical Signal Processing Components.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastani, Kasra

    This research was aimed at the development of advanced integrated optical components suitable for devices capable of processing multi-dimensional inputs. In such processors, densely packed waveguide arrays with low crosstalk are needed to provide dissection of the information that has been partially processed. Waveguide arrays also expand the information in the plane of the processor while maintaining its coherence. Rib waveguide arrays with low loss, high mode confinement and highly uniform surface quality (660 elements, 8 μm wide, 1 μm high, and 1 cm long with 2 mu m separations) were fabricated on LiNbO _3 substrates through the ion beam milling technique. A novel feature of the multi-dimensional IO processor architecture proposed herein is the implementation of large area uniform outcoupling (with low to moderate outcoupling efficiencies) from rib waveguide arrays in order to access the third dimension of the processor structure. As a means of outcoupling, uniform surface gratings (2 μm and 4 μm grating periods, 0.05 μm high and 1 mm long) with low outcoupling efficiencies (of approximately 2-18%/mm) were fabricated on the nonuniform surface of the rib waveguide arrays. As a practical technique of modulating the low outcoupling efficiencies of the surface gratings, it was proposed to alter the period of the grating as a function of position along each waveguide. Large aperture (2.5 mm) integrated lenses with short positive focal lengths (1.2-2.5 cm) were developed through a modification of the titanium-indiffused proton exchanged (TIPE) technique. Such integrated lenses were fabricated by increasing the refractive index of the slab waveguides by the TIPE process while maintaining the refractive index of the lenses at the lower level of Ti:LiNbO _3 waveguide. By means of curvature reversal of the integrated lenses, positive focal length lenses have been fabricated while providing high mode confinement for the slab waveguide. The above elements performed as

  19. Advanced optical diagnostics in hypersonic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattolica, Robert J.

    1988-10-01

    The renewed emphasis on hypersonic research has stimulated a resurgence of interest in experimental methods for the study of high-speed flows. Improvement in the physical and chemical models used in computational fluid dynamic simulation of hypersonic flows requires a modern experimental data base. Optical diagnostics provide the capability to make nonintrusive measurements of density, temperature, velocity, and species concentration in hypersonic flows. The short test time available in hypersonic wind tunnels or flight experiments necessitates spectroscopic methods capable of producing high signal levels. Fluorescence methods based on laser or electron-beam excitation satisfy this requirement. For flight experiments, electron-beam excitation offers a number of advantages over laser excitation that include small device size, high electrical efficiency, and multiple-state and species-selective excitation. Disadvantages of the electron beam fluorescence (EBF) technique included a complex excitation mechanism and some limitations in high-density applications. Laser fluorescence methods (LIF) have been developed extensively in recent years for combustion research, but need further advances in miniaturization of lasers for application to in-flight hypersonic combustion and aerodynamic experiments. Both techniques require a fundamental understanding of the complications introduced by physical effects such as energy transfer and quenching of the fluorescence signal. With modern electro-optic instrumentation it is now possible to examine in detail the influence of these phenomena on EBF and LIF fluorescence spectra in the laboratory and to extend these measurement techniques for use in flight research. To illustrate some of the research required to develop these methods to address issues relevent to hypersonic flight, examples of experiments on the use of EBF and LIF spectroscopy for the measurement of nitric oxide concentration are presented.

  20. Investigation of the 2-m telescope optics and seeing at the Terskol Peak Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butenko, G. Z.; Kuznetsov, V. I.; Snezhko, L. I.; Andruk, V. M.; Parusimov, V. G.; Sergeev, A. V.; Ivanov, Yu. S.

    2000-09-01

    We present the Hartmann images to attestate the Cassegrain focus optics of the 2-m telescope of the Peak Terskol Observatory of the International Center for Astronomical and Medico-Ecological Research of the NASU/RAS. The Cassegrain focus optics is a classical Ritchey-Chretien system with compensated coma and spherical aberration. The astigmatism corrector compensates for the system field astigmatism. Star images formed by the system with the astigmatism corrector are characterized by d0.8=1.''3, which does not meet the present-day requirements. The constant coma followed by the spherical aberration are dominating. The astigmatism is the least distortion of the image. Eliminating the Zeidel aberrations gives d0.8=0.''7, which coincides with manufacturer attestation. An additional adjustment should be made to achieve this image quality. Local wavefront errors including triangular astigmatism are small, which testifies that the unloading and fastening of the mirrors are of a high quality.

  1. Aberrations in square pore micro-channel optics used for x-ray lobster eye telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingale, R.; Pearson, J. F.; Martindale, A.; Feldman, C. H.; Fairbend, R.; Schyns, E.; Petit, S.; Osborne, J. P.; O'Brien, P. T.

    2016-07-01

    We identify all the significant aberrations that limit the performance of square pore micro-channel plate optics (MPOs) used as an X-ray lobster eye. These include aberrations intrinsic to the geometry, intrinsic errors associated with the slumping process used to introduce a spherical form to the plates and imperfections associated with the plate manufacturing process. The aberrations are incorporated into a comprehensive software model of the X-ray response of the optics and the predicted imaging response is compared with the measured X-ray performance obtained from a breadboard lobster eye. The results reveal the manufacturing tolerances which limit the current performance of MPOs and enable us to identify particular intrinsic aberrations which will limit the ultimate performance we can expect from MPO-lobster eye telescopes.

  2. Design of the Polarimeter for the Fibre Arrayed Solar Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dun, Guang-tao; Qu, Zhong-quan

    2013-01-01

    The theoretical design of the polarimeter used for the Fibre Arrayed Solar Optical Telescope (FASOT) is described. It has the following characteris- tics: (1) It is provided with the function of optical polarization switching, which makes the high-effciency polarimetry possible; (2) In the waveband of 750 nm, the polarimetric effciency is higher than 50% for the every Stokes parameter, and higher than 86.6% for the total polarization, thus an observer can make the simultaneous polarization measurements on multiple magnetosensitive lines in such a broad range of wavelength; (3) According to the selected photospheric and chromospheric lines, the measurement can be focused on either linear polarization or circular polarization; (4) The polarimeter has a loose tolerance on the manufacturing technology of polarimetric elements and installation errors. All this makes this polarimeter become a high-performance polarimetric device.

  3. Active hexagonally segmented mirror to investigate new optical phasing technologies for segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gonté, Frédéric; Dupuy, Christophe; Luong, Bruno; Frank, Christoph; Brast, Roland; Sedghi, Baback

    2009-11-10

    The primary mirror of the future European Extremely Large Telescope will be equipped with 984 hexagonal segments. The alignment of the segments in piston, tip, and tilt within a few nanometers requires an optical phasing sensor. A test bench has been designed to study four different optical phasing sensor technologies. The core element of the test bench is an active segmented mirror composed of 61 flat hexagonal segments with a size of 17 mm side to side. Each of them can be controlled in piston, tip, and tilt by three piezoactuators with a precision better than 1 nm. The context of this development, the requirements, the design, and the integration of this system are explained. The first results on the final precision obtained in closed-loop control are also presented.

  4. ATST telescope mount: telescope of machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, Paul; Stolz, Günter; Bonomi, Giovanni; Dreyer, Oliver; Kärcher, Hans

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, and will be able to provide the sharpest views ever taken of the solar surface. The telescope has a 4m aperture primary mirror, however due to the off axis nature of the optical layout, the telescope mount has proportions similar to an 8 meter class telescope. The technology normally used in this class of telescope is well understood in the telescope community and has been successfully implemented in numerous projects. The world of large machine tools has developed in a separate realm with similar levels of performance requirement but different boundary conditions. In addition the competitive nature of private industry has encouraged development and usage of more cost effective solutions both in initial capital cost and thru-life operating cost. Telescope mounts move relatively slowly with requirements for high stability under external environmental influences such as wind buffeting. Large machine tools operate under high speed requirements coupled with high application of force through the machine but with little or no external environmental influences. The benefits of these parallel development paths and the ATST system requirements are being combined in the ATST Telescope Mount Assembly (TMA). The process of balancing the system requirements with new technologies is based on the experience of the ATST project team, Ingersoll Machine Tools who are the main contractor for the TMA and MT Mechatronics who are their design subcontractors. This paper highlights a number of these proven technologies from the commercially driven machine tool world that are being introduced to the TMA design. Also the challenges of integrating and ensuring that the differences in application requirements are accounted for in the design are discussed.

  5. Research study entitled advanced X-ray astrophysical observatory (AXAF). [system engineering for a total X-ray telescope assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasche, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    General background and overview material are presented along with data from studies performed to determine the sensitivity, feasibility, and required performance of systems for a total X-ray telescope assembly. Topics covered include: optical design, mirror support concepts, mirror weight estimates, the effects of l g on mirror elements, mirror assembly resonant frequencies, optical bench considerations, temperature control of the mirror assembly, and the aspect determination system.

  6. Development of a Prototype Nickel Optic for the Constellation-X Hard-X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basso, S.; Bruni, R. J.; Citerio, O.; Engelhaupt, D.; Ghigo, M.; Gorenstien, P.; Mazzoleni, F.; ODell, S. L.; Pareschi, G.; Ramsey, B. D.

    2003-01-01

    The Constellation-X mission, planned for launch in 2011, will feature an array of hard-x ray telescopes with a total collecting area goal of 1500 square centimeters at 40 keV. Various technologies are currently being investigated for the optics of these telescopes including multilayer-coated Eletroformed-Nickel-Replicated (ENR) shells. The attraction of the ENR process is that the resulting full-shell optics are inherently stable and offer the promise of good angular resolution and enhanced instrument sensitivity. The challenge for this process is to meet a relatively tight weight budget with a relatively dense material (rho nickel = 9 grams per cubic centimeters.) To demonstrate the viability of the ENR process we are fabricating a prototype HXT mirror module to be tested against a competing segmented-glass-shell optic. The ENR prototype will consist of 5 shells of diameters from 150 mm to 280 mm and of 426 mm total length. To meet the stringent weight budget for Con-X, the shells will be only 150 micron thick. The innermost of these will be coated with Iridium, while the remainder will be coated with graded-density multilayers. Mandrels for these shells are currently under fabrication (Jan 03), with the first shells scheduled for production in February 03. A tentative date of late Summer has been set for prototype testing. Issues currently being addressed are the control of stresses in the multiplayer coating and ways of mitigating their effects on the figure of the necessarily thin shells. Also, the fabrication, handling and mounting of these shells without inducing permanent figure distortions. A full status report on the prototype optic will be presented along with test results as available.

  7. Development of a safe ground to space laser propagation system for the optical communications telescope laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Janet P.

    2003-01-01

    Furthering pursuits in high bandwidth communications to future NASA deep space and neat-Earth probes, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is building the Optical communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) atop Table Mountain in Southern California. This R&D optical antenna will be used to develop optical communication strategies for future optical ground stations. Initial experiments to be conducted include propagating high-powered, Q-switched laser beams to retro-reflecting satellites. Yet laser beam propagation from the ground to space is under the cognizance of various government agencies, namely: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (ISHA) that is responsible for protecting workforce personnel; the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responsible for protecting pilots and aircraft; and the Laser Clearinghouse of Space Command responsible for protecting space assets. To ensure that laser beam propagation from the OCTL and future autonomously operated ground stations comply with the guidelines of these organizations, JPL is developing a multi-tiered safety system that will meet the coordination, monitoring, and reporting functions required by the agencies. At Tier 0, laser operators will meet OSHA safety standards for protection and access to the high power lasers area will be restricted and interlocked. Tier 1, the area defined from the telescope dome out to a range of 3.4-km, will utilize long wave infrared camera sensors to alert operators of at risk aircraft in the FAA controlled airspace. Tier 2, defined to extend from 3.4-km out to the aircraft service ceiling in FAA airspace, will detect at risk aircraft by radar. Lastly, beam propagation into space, defined as Tier 3, will require coordination with the Laser Clearinghouse. A detailed description of the four tiers is presented along with the design of the integrated monitoring and beam transmission control system.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope observations of the optical counterpart to a ultra-compact high-velocity cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, David J.

    2017-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive archival search for optical counterparts to ultra-compact high-velocity clouds (UCHVCs), our team has uncovered five Local Volume dwarf galaxies, two of which were not previously known. Among these was AGC 226067, also known as ALFALFA-Dw1, which appeared to be made up of several HI and blue optical clumps based on ground-based data, with at least one HII region. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys data of AGC 226067. The data show that AGC 226067 is made up of a ~7-30 Myr old stellar population with a [Fe/H]~-0.6. Further, there is no evidence for an old stellar population associated with the system, down to a limit of MV>-8. Based on this and the position of AGC 226067 in the outskirts of the M86 subgroup of the Virgo cluster we present various arguments for the origin of this strange stellar system.

  9. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Neptune and Titan with the W.M. Keck Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, C.; Macintosh, B.; Gibbard, S.; Roe, H.; de Pater, I.; Ghez, A.; Acton, S.; Wizinowich, P.; Lai, O.

    1999-12-01

    We present near-IR images of Neptune and Titan with a resolution of 0.05 and 0.04 arc seconds respectively, obtained with the new adaptive optics (AO) system at the 10-m Keck II telescope. The resolution and contrast of these images allows us to fit radiative transfer atmospheric models including latitudinal and longitudinal variations. In the case of Neptune the images show both circumferential bands and bright cloud or storm features. We first model Neptune's clear atmosphere, un- contaminated by scattered light from the bright storms and bands. We can measure for the first time the precise infrared spatial extent of storm features and calculate their reflectance in broad-band and methane-absorption near-IR band-passes. These data allow us to model the changed haze distribution within the storm, relative to the clear atmosphere. In the case of Titan we use a radiative transfer model incorporating fractal haze properties, and are able to separate the contributions of Titan's atmosphere and surface to determine the optical depth of Titan's haze layer and to construct surface albedo maps. We find that Titan's trailing hemisphere is overall very dark, with a surface reflectance <0.05 consistent with the presence of solid or liquid hydrocarbons or perhaps very large-grained ice. The leading hemisphere is brighter, but with dark patches of very low albedo similar to the trailing hemisphere. These observations demonstrate that AO on an 8-10 meter telescope is a powerful new tool for the quantitative study of objects in the outer solar system, surpassing the resolution of the NICMOS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope by a factor of 2-4. This research was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-ENG-48.

  10. Current status of the laser guide star adaptive optics system for Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayano, Yutaka; Takami, Hideki; Guyon, Olivier; Oya, Shin; Hattori, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Watanabe, Makoto; Murakami, Naoshi; Minowa, Yosuke; Ito, Meguru; Colley, Stephen; Eldred, Michael; Golota, Taras; Dinkins, Matthew; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iye, Masanori

    2008-07-01

    The current status and recent results, since last SPIE conference at Orlando in 2006, for the laser guide star adaptive optics system for Subaru Telescope is presented. We had a first light using natural guide star and succeed to launch the sodium laser beam in October 2006. The achieved Strehl ratio on the 10th magnitude star was around 0.5 at K band. We confirmed that the full-width-half-maximum of the stellar point spread function is smaller than 0.1 arcsec even at the 0.9 micrometer wavelehgth. The size of the artificial guide star by the laser beam tuned at the wavelength of 589 nm was estimated to be 10 arcsec. The obtained blurred artificial guide star is caused by the wavefront error on the laser launching telescope. After the first light and first launch, we found that we need to modify and to fix the components, which are temporarily finished. Also components, which were postponed to fabricate after the first light, are required to build newly. All components used by the natural guide star adaptive optics system are finalized recently and we are ready to go on the sky. Next engineering observation is scheduled in August, 2008.

  11. Preliminary use of nematic liquid crystal adaptive optics with a 2.16-meter reflecting telescope.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Hu, Lifa; Li, Dayu; Peng, Zenghui; Liu, Yonggang; Xuan, Li

    2009-02-16

    A nematic liquid crystal adaptive optics system (NLC AOS) was assembled for a 2.16-m telescope to correct for atmospheric turbulence. LC AOS was designed and optimized with Zemax optical software. Second, an adaptive correction experiment was performed in the laboratory to test the performance of the NLC AOS. After the correction, the peak to valley (PV) and root mean square (RMS) of the wavefront were down to 0.2 lambda (lambda=633 nm) and 0.05 lambda, respectively. Finally, the star of Pollux (beta Gem) was tracked using the 2.16-m Reflecting Telescope, and real time correction of the atmospheric turbulence was performed with the NLC AOS. After the adaptive correction, the average PV and RMS of the wavefront were reduced from 11 lambda and 2.5 lambda to 2.3 lambda and 0.6 lambda, respectively. Although the intensity distribution of the beta Gem was converged and its peak was sharp, a halo still existed around the peak. These results indicated that the NLC AOS only partially corrected the vertical atmospheric turbulence. The limitations of our NLC AOS are discussed and some proposals are made.

  12. The design, construction and testing of the optics for a 147-cm-aperture telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchroeder, R. A.; Elmore, L. H.; Shack, R. V.; Slater, P. N.

    1972-01-01

    Geodetic optics research for the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories (AFCRL) is described. The work consisted mainly of the fabrication of the optical components for a telescope with a 152-cm-diam (60-in.) primary mirror masked down to 147-cm-diam for use by the AFCRL for a lunar ranging experiment. Among the achievements of this contract were the following: completion of the primary and secondary mirrors for a high-quality 147-cm-diam telescope system in eight months from the start of edging the primary; manufacture and testing of a unique center mount for the primary according to an AFCRL design that allowed for a thin-edged and therefore less-massive mirror; and development of a quantitative analysis of the wire test for calculating the departure of the mirror figure from the design figure quickly and accurately after each polishing step. This analysis method in conjunction with a knowledge of polishing rates for given weights and diameters of tools, mirror, and polishing materials should considerably reduce the polishing time required for future large mirrors.

  13. VISION: A Six-Telescope Fiber-Fed Visible Light Beam Combiner for the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Eugenio; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; van Belle, Gerard; Monnier, John D.; Stassun, Keivan; Ghasempour, Askari; Swihart, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Visible-light long baseline interferometry holds the promise of advancing a number of important applications in fundamental astronomy, including the direct measurement of the angular diameters and oblateness of stars, and the direct measurement of the orbits of binary and multiple star systems. To advance, the field of visible-light interferometry requires development of instruments capable of combining more than just two or three beams at once. The Visible Imaging System for Interferometric Observations at NPOI (VISION) is a new visible light beam combiner for the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) that uses single-mode fibers to coherently combine light from up to six telescopes simultaneously with an image-plane combination scheme. It features a photometric camera for calibrations, and spatial filtering from single-mode fibers with two Andor Ixon electron multiplying CCDs. Here we present the VISION system, results of laboratory tests, and results of commissioning on-sky observations. We determine a new set of corrections to the power spectrum and bispectrum when using an electron-multipying CCD to measure visibility and closure phase, by taking into account non-Gaussian statistics and read noise, as required by our post-processing pipeline. We verify our post-processing pipeline via new on-sky observations of the O-type supergiant binary Zeta Orionis A, obtaining a flux ratio, position angle and separation in good agreement with expectations from the previously published orbit.

  14. Study of advanced InSb arrays for SIRTF (Space Infrared Telescope Facility)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Alan; Feitt, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The Santa Barbara Research Center has completed a study leading to the development of advanced Indium Antimonide detector arrays for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) Focal Plane Array Detector (FPAD) Subsystem of the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Band 1. The overall goal of the study was to perform design tradeoff studies, analysis and research to develop a Direct Readout Integrated Circuit to be hybridized to an advanced, high performance InSb detector array that would satisfy the technical requirements for Band 1 as specified in the IRAC Instrument Requirements Document (IRD), IRAC-202. The overall goal of the study was divided into both a near-term goal and a far-term goal. The near-term goal identifies current technology available that approaches, and in some cases meets the program technological goals as specified in IRAC-202. The far-term goal identifies technology development required to completely achieve SIRTF program goals. Analyses of potential detector materials indicates that InSb presently meets all Band 1 requirements and is considered to be the baseline approach due to technical maturity. The major issue with regard to photovoltaic detectors such as InSb and HgCdTe is to achieve a reduction in detector capacitance.

  15. Mirror coating and cleaning methodology to maintain the optical performance of the GTC telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril-Abril, M.; Nuñez-Castaín, A.; Rodríguez-García, L. A.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the strategy to optimize GTC telescope's optical performance in terms of reflectivity and scattering by means of a suitable combination of mirror coating, CO2 and in-situ cleaning. According to our experience, a monthly CO2 cleaning was established, except during sporadic dust episodes, when a shorter weekly period is much more appropriate. Trends of the main optical parameters were recorded and analyzed to identify possible causes for the variation of the mirrors performance. As the total reflectivity stems from the combination of three optical surfaces, we set thresholds for the individual components and used these to select the mirrors that have to be replaced and cleaned. We also compared historical data about total reflectivity with optical OSIRIS zeropoints evolution and established a nonlinear relation, that is applicable in the periods where direct measurements on the mirror surface are not feasible. In this line, we are working on an innovative method to estimate the reflectivity for a segmented mirror based on the zeropoints measurement for the individual segments obtained by un-stacking the primary mirror under a controlled pattern.

  16. First light for the sodium laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Lijiang 1.8m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kai; Li, Min; Chen, Shan-Qiu; Bo, Yong; Chen, Feng; Zuo, Jun-Wei; Bian, Qi; Yao, Ji; Zhou, Lu-Chun; Wei, Lin; Chen, Dong-Hong; Gao, Yang; Jin, Kai; Dai, Xiao-Lin; Fu, Han-Chu; Xu, Chang; Wang, Zhi-Chao; Xue, Xiang-Hui; Chen, Xue-Wu; Qian, Xian-Mei; Zhou, Yu; Xian, Hao; Peng, Qin-Jun; Rao, Chang-Hui; Xu, Zu-Yan; Zhang, Yu-Dong

    2016-12-01

    A first generation sodium Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System (LGS-AOS) was developed and integrated into the Lijiang 1.8m telescope in 2013. The LGS-AOS has three sub-systems: (1) a 20 W long pulsed sodium laser, (2) a 300-millimeter-diameter laser launch telescope, and (3) a 37-element compact adaptive optics system. On 2014 January 25, we obtained high resolution images of an mV 8.18 star, HIP 43963, during the first light of the LGS-AOS. In this paper, the sodium laser, the laser launch telescope, the compact adaptive optics system and the first light results will be presented.

  17. Towards a Network of Small Aperture Telescopes with Adaptive Optics Correction Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegarra Polo, M.; Lambert, A.

    2016-09-01

    A low cost and compact Adaptive Optics (AO) system for a small aperture telescope (Meade LX200ACF 16") has been developed at UNSW Canberra, where its performance is currently being evaluated. It is based on COTS components, with the exception of a real time control loop implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), populated in a small form factor board which also includes the wavefront image sensor. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) running in an external computer connected to the FPGA imaging board provides the operator with control of different parameters of the AO system; results registration; and log of gradients, Zernike coefficients and deformable mirror voltages for later troubleshooting. The U.S. Air Force Academy Falcon Telescope Network (USAFA FTN) is an international network of moderate aperture telescopes (20 inches) that provides raw imagery to FTN partners [1]. The FTN supports general purpose use, including astronomy, satellite imaging and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) support. Currently 5 nodes are in operation, operated on-site or remotely, and more are to be commissioned over the next few years. One of the network nodes is located at UNSW Canberra (Australia), where the ground-based space surveillance team is currently using it for research in different areas of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). Some current and future SSA goals include geostationary satellite characterization through imaging modalities like polarimetry and real time image processing of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) objects. The fact that all FTN nodes have the same configuration facilitates the collaborative work between international teams of different nodes, so improvements and lessons learned at one site can be extended to the rest of nodes. With respect to this, preliminary studies of the imagery improvement that would be achieved with the AO system developed at UNSW, installed on a second 16 inch Meade LX200ACF telescope and compared to the

  18. Study on power coupling of annular vortex beam propagating through a two-Cassegrain-telescope optical system in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiyun; Sheng, Shen; Huang, Zhisong; Zhao, Siqing; Wang, Hua; Sun, Zhenhai; Xu, Xiegu

    2013-02-25

    As a new attractive application of the vortex beams, power coupling of annular vortex beam propagating through a two- Cassegrain-telescope optical system in turbulent atmosphere has been investigated. A typical model of annular vortex beam propagating through a two-Cassegrain-telescope optical system is established, the general analytical expression of vortex beams with limited apertures and the analytical formulas for the average intensity distribution at the receiver plane are derived. Under the H-V 5/7 turbulence model, the average intensity distribution at the receiver plane and power coupling efficiency of the optical system are numerically calculated, and the influences of the optical topological charge, the laser wavelength, the propagation path and the receiver apertures on the power coupling efficiency are analyzed. These studies reveal that the average intensity distribution at the receiver plane presents a central dark hollow profile, which is suitable for power coupling by the Cassegrain telescope receiver. In the optical system with optimized parameters, power coupling efficiency can keep in high values with the increase of the propagation distance. Under the atmospheric turbulent conditions, great advantages of vortex beam in power coupling of the two-Cassegrain-telescope optical system are shown in comparison with beam without vortex.

  19. Optical characterisation and analysis of multi-mode pixels for use in future far infrared telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Darragh; Trappe, Neil; Murphy, J. Anthony; Doherty, Stephen; Gradziel, Marcin; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Audley, Michael D.; de Lange, Gert; van der Vorst, Maarten

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present the development and verification of feed horn simulation code based on the mode- matching technique to simulate the electromagnetic performance of waveguide based structures of rectangular cross-section. This code is required to model multi-mode pyramidal horns which may be required for future far infrared (far IR) space missions where wavelengths in the range of 30 to 200 µm will be analysed. Multi-mode pyramidal horns can be used effectively to couple radiation to sensitive superconducting devices like Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) or Transition Edge Sensor (TES) detectors. These detectors could be placed in integrating cavities (to further increase the efficiency) with an absorbing layer used to couple to the radiation. The developed code is capable of modelling each of these elements, and so will allow full optical characterisation of such pixels and allow an optical efficiency to be calculated effectively. As the signals being measured at these short wavelengths are at an extremely low level, the throughput of the system must be maximised and so multi-mode systems are proposed. To this end, the focal planes of future far IR missions may consist of an array of multi-mode rectangular feed horns feeding an array of, for example, TES devices contained in individual integrating cavities. Such TES arrays have been fabricated by SRON Groningen and are currently undergoing comprehensive optical, electrical and thermal verification. In order to fully understand and validate the optical performance of the receiver system, it is necessary to develop comprehensive and robust optical models in parallel. We outline the development and verification of this optical modelling software by means of applying it to a representative multi-mode system operating at 150 GHz in order to obtain sufficiently short execution times so as to comprehensively test the code. SAFARI (SPICA FAR infrared Instrument) is a far infrared imaging grating spectrometer

  20. Cryogenic Optical Performance of a Lightweighted Mirror Assembly for Future Space Astronomical Telescopes: Correlating Optical Test Results and Thermal Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Arnold, William R.; Baker, Marcus A.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Burdick, Gregory; Effinger, Michael R.; Gaddy, Darrell E.; Goode, Brian K.; Hanson, Craig; Hogue, William D.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Kirk, Charlie; Maffett, Steven P.; Matthews, Gary W.; Siler, Richard D.; Smith, W. Scott; Stahl, H. Philip; Tucker, John M.; Wright, Ernest R.

    2013-01-01

    A 43cm diameter stacked core mirror demonstrator was interferometrically tested at room temperature down to 250 degrees Kelvin for thermal deformation. The 2.5m radius of curvature spherical mirror assembly was constructed by low temperature fusing three abrasive waterjet core sections between two CNC pocket milled face sheets. The 93% lightweighted Corning ULE® mirror assembly represents the current state of the art for future UV, optical, near IR space telescopes. During the multiple thermal test cycles, test results of interferometric test, thermal IR images of the front face were recorded in order to validate thermal optical model.

  1. Cryogenic Optical Performance of a Light-weight Mirror Assembly for Future Space Astronomical Telescopes: Optical Test Results and Thermal Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Baker, Markus A.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Carpenter, James R.; Effinger, Michael R.; Gaddy, Darrell E.; Goode, Brian K.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Hogue, William D.; Siler, Richard D.; Smith, W. Scott; Stahl. H. Philip; Tucker, John M.; Wright, Ernest R.; Kirk, Charles S.; Hanson, Craig; Burdick, Gregory; Maffett, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A 40 cm diameter mirror assembly was interferometrically tested at room temperature down to 250 degrees Kelvin for thermal deformation. The 2.5 m radius of curvature spherical mirror assembly was constructed by low temperature fusing three abrasive waterjet core sections between two face sheets. The 93% lightweighted Corning ULE mirror assembly represents the current state of the art for future UV, optical, near IR space telescopes. During the multiple thermal test cycles, test results of interferometric test, thermal IR images of the front face were recorded in order to validate thermal optical model.

  2. Q-Spec: a concept for the Giant Magellan Telescope high resolution optical spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, S.; MacQueen, P.

    2008-07-01

    Q-Spec is a concept for the Giant Magellan Telescope High Resolution Optical Spectrograph. It is a seeing limited, four channel spectrograph designed for high efficiency, high resolution spectroscopy from 305 to 1060 nm. Overall instrument dimensions are minimized with anamorphic preslit optics, pupil slicing, and white pupil beam demagnification. Q-spec uses two 300 × 1600mm R4 echelle grating mosaics of either 2 or 4 individual gratings, with 41.6 and 31.6 grooves/mm line densities. Two beam sizes are selectable in the preslit optics. A 450mm beam yields Rφ = 30,000 while a 900mm beam reaches Rφ = 60,000. Both beams are anamorphised before echelle dispersion, and the larger beam is pupil sliced. The post-echelle white pupil transfer optics demagnify the beam by 3. This allows the use of efficient vph grating cross-dispersers, and unvignetted f/1.5-2.0 dioptric cameras with optical element diameters under 250 mm. The bandwidth is split by a dichroic prior to the entrance slit, and by dichroics near the intermediate foci of the two sets of white pupil transfer optics. The four fixed spectral formats have 2-pixel resolving powers of ~200,000 and it is anticipated that resolving powers of R = 150, 000 or greater will be possible. The largest ccd is 6k × 6k with 15 μm pixels, and the minimum order separation is around 10 arcseconds. Q-spec can be fed with fibers in either multiple-object and/or precision radial velocity modes. Excluding the gravity-invariant thermal and vacuum enclosures, the instrument volume is a modest 5 × 2.5 × 2m in size.

  3. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun: Hard X-Ray Balloon-Borne Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Apple, Jeff; StevensonChavis, Katherine; Dietz, Kurt; Holt, Marlon; Koehler, Heather; Lis, Tomasz; O'Connor, Brian; RodriquezOtero, Miguel; Pryor, Jonathan; Ramsey, Brian; Rinehart-Dawson, Maegan; Smith, Leigh; Sobey, Alexander; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Christe, Steven; Cramer, Alexander; Edgerton, Melissa; Rodriquez, Marcello; Shih, Albert; Gregory, Don; Jasper, John; Bohon, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Set to fly in the Fall of 2013 from Ft. Sumner, NM, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) mission is a collaborative effort between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Goddard Space Flight Center to upgrade an existing payload, the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope, to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES science payload consists of 8 mirror modules, housing a total of 109 grazing-incidence optics. These modules are mounted on a carbon-fiber - and Aluminum optical bench 6 m from a matching array of high pressure xenon gas scintillation proportional counters, which serve as the focal-plane detectors. The HERO gondola utilizes a differential GPS system (backed by a magnetometer) for coarse pointing in the azimuth and a shaft angle encoder plus inclinometer provides the coarse elevation. The HEROES payload will incorporate a new solar aspect system to supplement the existing star camera, for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter will be added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations. HEROES will also implement two novel alignment monitoring system that will measure the alignment between the optical bench and the star camera and between the optics and detectors for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. The overall payload will also be discussed. This mission is funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist

  4. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun: Hard X-ray balloon-borne telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, J.; Apple, J.; Chavis, K. S.; Dietz, K.; Holt, M.; Koehler, H.; Lis, T.; O'Connor, B.; Otero, M. R.; Pryor, J.; Ramsey, B.; Rinehart-Dawson, M.; Smith, L.; Sobey, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Christe, S.; Cramer, A.; Edgerton, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Shih, A.; Gregory, D.; Jasper, J.; Bohon, S.

    Set to fly in the Fall of 2013 from Ft. Sumner, NM, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) mission is a collaborative effort between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Goddard Space Flight Center to upgrade an existing payload, the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope, to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES science payload consists of 8 mirror modules, housing a total of 109 grazing-incidence optics. These modules are mounted on a carbon-fiber - and Aluminum optical bench 6 m from a matching array of high pressure xenon gas scintillation proportional counters, which serve as the focal-plane detectors. The HERO gondola utilizes a differential GPS system (backed by a magnetometer) for coarse pointing in the azimuth and a shaft angle encoder plus inclinometer provides the coarse elevation. The HEROES payload will incorporate a new solar aspect system to supplement the existing star camera, for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter will be added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations. HEROES will also implement two novel alignment monitoring system that will measure the alignment between the optical bench and the star camera and between the optics and detectors for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. The overall payload will also be discussed. This mission is funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  5. The GREGOR Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, C.; Lagg, A.; Puschmann, K. G.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Sobotka, M.; Soltau, D.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Volkmer, R.; von der Luehe, O.; Solanki, S. K.; Balthasar, H.; Bello Gonzalez, N.; Berkefeld, T.; Collados Vera, M.; Hofmann, A.; Kneer, F.

    2012-12-01

    The 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope is a new facility for high-resolution observations of the Sun. The telescope is located at the Spanish Observatorio del Teide on Tenerife. The telescope incorporates advanced designs for a foldable-tent dome, an open steel-truss telescope structure, and active and passive means to minimize telescope and mirror seeing. Solar fine structure can be observed with a dedicated suite of instruments: a broad-band imaging system, the "GREGOR Fabry-Perot Interferometer", and the "Grating Infrared Spectrograph". All post-focus instruments benefit from a high-order (multi-conjugate) adaptive optics system, which enables observations close to the diffraction limit of the telescope. The inclusion of a spectrograph for stellar activity studies and the search for solar twins expands the scientific usage of the GREGOR to the nighttime domain. We report on the successful commissioning of the telescope until the end of 2011 and the first steps towards science verification in 2012.

  6. Teaching Telescopes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, John S.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses experience of teaching optical experiments with emphasis upon the student's design and construction of refracting and reflecting telescopes. Concludes that the student's interest and acquired knowledge are greatly enhanced through the use of realistic experiments. (CC)

  7. Development of the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory: A Laser Communications Relay Demonstration Ground Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K. E.; Antsos, D.; Roberts, L. C. Jr.,; Piazzolla, S.; Clare, L. P.; Croonquist, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) project will demonstrate high bandwidth space to ground bi-directional optical communications links between a geosynchronous satellite and two LCRD optical ground stations located in the southwestern United States. The project plans to operate for two years with a possible extension to five. Objectives of the demonstration include the development of operational strategies to prototype optical link and relay services for the next generation tracking and data relay satellites. Key technologies to be demonstrated include adaptive optics to correct for clear air turbulence-induced wave front aberrations on the downlink, and advanced networking concepts for assured and automated data delivery. Expanded link availability will be demonstrated by supporting operations at small sun-Earth-probe angles. Planned optical modulation formats support future concepts of near-Earth satellite user services to a maximum of 1.244 Gb/s differential phase shift keying modulation and pulse position modulations formats for deep space links at data rates up to 311 Mb/s. Atmospheric monitoring instruments that will characterize the optical channel during the link include a sun photometer to measure atmospheric transmittance, a solar scintillometer, and a cloud camera to measure the line of sight cloud cover. This paper describes the planned development of the JPL optical ground station.

  8. Design Study of an 8 Meter Monolithic Mirror UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    This paper will review a recent NASA MSFC preliminary study that demonstrated the feasibility of launching a 6 to 8 meter class monolithic primary mirror telescope to Sun-Earth L2 using an Ares V. The study started with the unique capabilities of the Ares V vehicle and examined the feasibility of launching a large aperture low cost low risk telescope based on a conventional ground based glass primary mirror. Specific technical areas studied included optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; launch vehicle performance and trajectory; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN & C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; operations & servicing, mass budget and system cost. The study telescope was an on-axis three-mirror anastigmatic design with a fine steering mirror. The observatory has a 100 arc-minute (8.4 X 12 arc-minutes) of diffraction limited field of view at a wavelength les than 500 nm. The study assumed that the primary mirror would be fabricated from an existing Schott Zerodur residual VLT blank edged to 6.2 meters, 175 mm thick at the edge with a mass of 11,000 kg. The entire mass budget for the observatory including primary mirror, structure, light baffle tube, instruments, space craft, avionics, etc. is less than 40,000 kg - a 33% mass margin on the Ares V's 60,000 kg Sun-Earth L2 capability. An 8 meter class observatory would have a total mass of less than 60,000 kg of which the primary mirror is the largest contributor.

  9. Data veracity checks for the alignment of the JWST optical telescope element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Josh; Glassman, Tiffany; Farey, Mike; Liepmann, Till

    2016-09-01

    Alignment of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) requires a multitude of demanding and exacting dimensional and positional measurements. Many of the alignment requirements are in the range of hundreds of microns over significant distances (up to 8 m) on a flexible structure, which creates stringent accuracy demands on the alignment measurements. Furthermore, to optimize the performance of the system, the telescope is aligned to a relatively small (<1 m) structure in the center, creating the potential for coordinate system errors. Measurements have been performed using laser trackers (predominantly), photogrammetry, coordinate measurement machine (CMM), and laser radar instruments. Measurements from different instruments/ stations are combined and processed within SpatialAnalyzer (SA) commercial software using the Unified Spatial Metrology Network (USMN) feature. While this approach should yield the best possible accuracies (hopefully in the tens of microns range), our experience has been that there can be significant errors in the data based on the details of how SA is set up and how the measurements are conducted. As a result of our experience, we have developed analytical tools and processes that allow us to test the data veracity in near real time using, for example, Excel spreadsheet calculations. These tools combine measurements made at various levels of assembly, measurements of cross check points, and finite element analysis to determine the correlated and uncorrelated discrepancies in the measured data. This provides a detailed understanding of systematic and random measurement errors and has allowed us to quickly uncover issues with placement, measurement, and modeling, as well as to quantify our measurement performance.

  10. Development of x-ray multilayer telescope optics for XTP mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhengxiang; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Kun; Ma, Bin; Huang, Qiushi; Zhang, Zhong; Wang, Haifeng; Dai, Ying; He, Pengfei; Wang, Zhanshan

    2016-07-01

    The X-ray Timing and Polarization (XTP) satellite is dedicated to study black hole, neutron star and magnetar and then get more information in the physics under extreme gravity, density and magnetism. With an effective area of about 1 square meter and angular resolution of 1 arcminute, XTP is expected to make the most sensitive temporal and polarization observations with good energy resolution in 1-30 keV. Large collecting areas are obtained by tightly nesting layers of grazing incidence mirrors in a conical approximation Wolter-I design. The segmented mirrors that form these layers are formed by thermally slumping glass substrates coated with depth-graded W/Si multilayers for enhanced reflectivity in higher energy region. In order to force the overall shape of the nominally cylindrical substrates to the appropriate conic form, an over-constraint method was used to assemble the mirrors to a telescope. We will present performance on the XTP optics and report the current status of the telescope.

  11. CAMERA: a compact, automated, laser adaptive optics system for small aperture telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, Matthew; Velur, Viswa; Law, Nick; Choi, Philip; Penprase, Bryan E.

    2008-07-01

    CAMERA is an autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics system designed for small aperture telescopes. This system is intended to be mounted permanently on such a telescope to provide large amounts of flexibly scheduled observing time, delivering high angular resolution imagery in the visible and near infrared. The design employs a Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor, a 12x12 actuator MEMS device for high order wavefront compensation, and a solid state 355nm ND:YAG laser to generate a guide star. Commercial CCD and InGaAs detectors provide coverage in the visible and near infrared. CAMERA operates by selecting targets from a queue populated by users and executing these observations autonomously. This robotic system is targeted towards applications that are diffcult to address using classical observing strategies: surveys of very large target lists, recurrently scheduled observations, and rapid response followup of transient objects. This system has been designed and costed, and a lab testbed has been developed to evaluate key components and validate autonomous operations.

  12. James Webb Space Telescope segment phasing using differential optical transfer functions

    PubMed Central

    Codona, Johanan L.; Doble, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Differential optical transfer function (dOTF) is an image-based, noniterative wavefront sensing method that uses two star images with a single small change in the pupil. We describe two possible methods for introducing the required pupil modification to the James Webb Space Telescope, one using a small (<λ/4) displacement of a single segment's actuator and another that uses small misalignments of the NIRCam's filter wheel. While both methods should work with NIRCam, the actuator method will allow both MIRI and NIRISS to be used for segment phasing, which is a new functionality. Since the actuator method requires only small displacements, it should provide a fast and safe phasing alternative that reduces the mission risk and can be performed frequently for alignment monitoring and maintenance. Since a single actuator modification can be seen by all three cameras, it should be possible to calibrate the non-common-path aberrations between them. Large segment discontinuities can be measured using dOTFs in two filter bands. Using two images of a star field, aberrations along multiple lines of sight through the telescope can be measured simultaneously. Also, since dOTF gives the pupil field amplitude as well as the phase, it could provide a first approximation or constraint to the planned iterative phase retrieval algorithms. PMID:27042684

  13. Laser guide star wavefront sensing for ground-layer adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Clare, Richard M; Le Louarn, Miska; Béchet, Clementine

    2011-02-01

    We propose ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO) to improve the seeing on the 42 m European Extremely Large Telescope. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFSs) with laser guide stars (LGSs) will experience significant spot elongation due to off-axis observation. This spot elongation influences the design of the laser launch location, laser power, WFS detector, and centroiding algorithm for LGS GLAO on an extremely large telescope. We show, using end-to-end numerical simulations, that with a noise-weighted matrix-vector-multiply reconstructor, the performance in terms of 50% ensquared energy (EE) of the side and central launch of the lasers is equivalent, the matched filter and weighted center of gravity centroiding algorithms are the most promising, and approximately 10×10 undersampled pixels are optimal. Significant improvement in the 50% EE can be observed with a few tens of photons/subaperture/frame, and no significant gain is seen by adding more than 200 photons/subaperture/frame. The LGS GLAO is not particularly sensitive to the sodium profile present in the mesosphere nor to a short-timescale (less than 100 s) evolution of the sodium profile. The performance of LGS GLAO is, however, sensitive to the atmospheric turbulence profile.

  14. James Webb Space Telescope segment phasing using differential optical transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Codona, Johanan L; Doble, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    Differential optical transfer function (dOTF) is an image-based, noniterative wavefront sensing method that uses two star images with a single small change in the pupil. We describe two possible methods for introducing the required pupil modification to the James Webb Space Telescope, one using a small (<λ/4) displacement of a single segment's actuator and another that uses small misalignments of the NIRCam's filter wheel. While both methods should work with NIRCam, the actuator method will allow both MIRI and NIRISS to be used for segment phasing, which is a new functionality. Since the actuator method requires only small displacements, it should provide a fast and safe phasing alternative that reduces the mission risk and can be performed frequently for alignment monitoring and maintenance. Since a single actuator modification can be seen by all three cameras, it should be possible to calibrate the non-common-path aberrations between them. Large segment discontinuities can be measured using dOTFs in two filter bands. Using two images of a star field, aberrations along multiple lines of sight through the telescope can be measured simultaneously. Also, since dOTF gives the pupil field amplitude as well as the phase, it could provide a first approximation or constraint to the planned iterative phase retrieval algorithms.

  15. Subaru Telescope adaptive optics observations of gravitationally lensed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Cristian E.; Oguri, Masamune; Minowa, Yosuke; Iye, Masanori; Inada, Naohisa; Oya, Shin; Kayo, Issha; Hayano, Yutaka; Hattori, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Ito, Meguru; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Terada, Hiroshi; Takami, Hideki; Watanabe, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of an imaging observation campaign conducted with the Subaru Telescope adaptive optics system (IRCS+AO188) on 28 gravitationally lensed quasars and candidates (23 doubles, 1 quad, 1 possible triple, and 3 candidates) from the SDSS Quasar Lens Search. We develop a novel modelling technique that fits analytical and hybrid point spread functions (PSFs), while simultaneously measuring the relative astrometry, photometry, as well as the lens galaxy morphology. We account for systematics by simulating the observed systems using separately observed PSF stars. The measured relative astrometry is comparable with that typically achieved with the Hubble Space Telescope, even after marginalizing over the PSF uncertainty. We model for the first time the quasar host galaxies in five systems, without a priori knowledge of the PSF, and show that their luminosities follow the known correlation with the mass of the supermassive black hole. For each system, we obtain mass models far more accurate than those previously published from low-resolution data, and we show that in our sample of lensing galaxies the observed light profile is more elliptical than the mass, for ellipticity ≳0.25. We also identify eight doubles for which the sources of external and internal shear are more reliably separated, and should therefore be prioritized in monitoring campaigns aimed at measuring time delays in order to infer the Hubble constant.

  16. Microsecond Time Resolution Optical Photometry using a H.E.S.S. Cherenkov Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Deil, Christoph; Domainko, Wilfried; Hermann, German

    2008-02-22

    We have constructed an optical photometer with microsecond time resolution, which is currently being operated on one of the H.E.S.S. telescopes. H.E.S.S. is an array of four Cherenkov telescopes, each with a 107 m{sup 2} mirror, located in the Khomas highland in Namibia. In its normal mode of operation H.E.S.S. observes Cherenkov light from air showers generated by very high energy gamma-rays in the upper atmosphere. Our detector consists of seven photomultipliers, one in the center to record the lightcurve from the target and six concentric photomultipliers as a veto system to reject disturbing signals e.g. from meteorites or lightning at the horizon. The data acquisition system has been designed to continuously record the signals with zero deadtime. The Crab pulsar has been observed to verify the performance of the instrument and the GPS timing system. Compact galactic targets were observed to search for flares on timescales of a few microseconds to {approx}100 ms. The design and sensitivity of the instrument as well as the data analysis method are presented.

  17. Optical performance of grazing incidence X-ray/EUV telescopes for space science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Patrick Louis

    In order to improve and expand the field of X-ray astronomy, and imaging in general, we find that these days a comprehensive systems engineering approach to X-ray image formation must be undertaken. While some industrial interests have taken steps in this direction, any academic approach is lacking from within the archival literature to date, and there are virtually no established university courses. Indeed, it would seem that top level, optical-systems-engineering is exclusively reserved for those seasoned professionals who have accumulated (though somewhat artistically) the ``know-how'' to efficiently conceive and implement excellent optical designs. Such expert knowledge is not and should not be mysterious. To this end, we attempt to formulate a highly comprehensive approach to X-ray optical systems engineering and implement it within the context of the Wolter Type-I and Type-II (grazing incidence) telescopes currently utilized for practical X-ray/EUV astronomy. In addition, we will transform the classical paraboloid- hyperboloid designs into `aplanatic' and `isoplanatic', hyperboloid-hyperboloid systems, where certain coma conditions are minimized. As will be shown, one gains little improvement in performance when choosing a quasi-aplanatic mirror design over a classical one, owing to scatter and other image degradation effects. Next we will show that a generalized hyperboloid-hyperboloid design can be comprehensively optimized for any imaging requirement, where the operational field-of-view is weighted according to spatial information content. Our H-H design has been optimized for the GOES Solar X-ray Imager mission and adopted by NASA and NOAA. It is currently undergoing fabrication by Raytheon Optical Systems Inc. who is under subcontract to the Lockheed-Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory. Our design is expected to result in an 80% increase in optical system performance over the original SXI baseline design.

  18. Optical design of off-axis Cassegrain telescope using freeform surface at the secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Suryakant; Gupta, Amit; Singh, Ganga Sharan

    2015-02-01

    Freeform surfaces enable imaginative optics by providing abundant degrees of freedom for an optical designer as compared to spherical surfaces. An off-axis two-mirror-based telescope design is presented, in which the primary mirror is a concave prolate spheroid and the secondary mirror is freeform surface-based. The off-axis configuration is employed here for removing the central obscuration problem which otherwise limits the central maxima in the point spread function. In this proposed design, an extended X-Y polynomial is used as a surface descriptor for the off-axis segment of the secondary mirror. The coefficients of this extended polynomial are directly related to the Seidel aberrations, and are thus optimized here for a better control of asymmetric optical aberrations at various field points. For this design, the aperture stop is located 500 mm before the primary mirror and the entrance pupil diameter is kept as 80 mm. The effective focal length is 439 mm and covers a full field of view of 2 deg. The image quality obtained here is near diffraction limited which can be inferred from metrics such as the spot diagram and modulation transfer function.

  19. KAPAO: A Natural Guide Star Adaptive Optics System for Small Aperture Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severson, Scott A.; Choi, P. I.; Spjut, E.; Contreras, D. S.; Gilbreth, B. N.; McGonigle, L. P.; Morrison, W. A.; Rudy, A. R.; Xue, A.; Baranec, C.; Riddle, R.

    2012-05-01

    We describe KAPAO, our project to develop and deploy a low-cost, remote-access, natural guide star adaptive optics system for the Pomona College Table Mountain Observatory (TMO) 1-meter telescope. The system will offer simultaneous dual-band, diffraction-limited imaging at visible and near-infrared wavelengths and will deliver an order-of-magnitude improvement in point source sensitivity and angular resolution relative to the current TMO seeing limits. We have adopted off-the-shelf core hardware components to ensure reliability, minimize costs and encourage replication efforts. These components include a MEMS deformable mirror, a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a piezo-electric tip-tilt mirror. We present: project motivation, goals and milestones; the instrument optical design; the instrument opto-mechanical design and tolerances; and an overview of KAPAO Alpha, our on-the-sky testbed using off-the-shelf optics. Beyond the expanded scientific capabilities enabled by AO-enhanced resolution and sensitivity, the interdisciplinary nature of the instrument development effort provides an exceptional opportunity to train a broad range of undergraduate STEM students in AO technologies and techniques. The breadth of our collaboration, which includes both public (Sonoma State University) and private (Pomona and Harvey Mudd Colleges) undergraduate institutions has enabled us to engage students ranging from physics, astronomy, engineering and computer science in the all stages of this project. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0960343.

  20. 2-micron Adaptive Optics Images of Titan from the W.M. Keck Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, S. G.; Macintosh, B. A.; Max, C. E.; de Pater, I.; Roe, H. G.; Marchis, F.

    2001-12-01

    Saturn's largest moon Titan is the only satellite in the solar system with a substantial atmosphere, which consists mainly of nitrogen and a few percent methane. Photolysis of methane creates a hydrocarbon haze in Titan's atmosphere that is opaque to visible light. However, in the infrared there are `windows' between methane absorption bands in which the surface of Titan can be imaged. We have observed Titan over the period of 1999-2001 using the adaptive optics system on the 10-meter W.M. Keck Telescope. Using adaptive optics allows us to observe Titan with a resolution of 0.04 arcseconds, or approximately 20 resolution elements across the satellite's disk. We will report on adaptive optics images of Titan taken in 1999-2001 at K band (1.95-2.29 microns). The images are enhanced by application of the MISTRAL iterative image deconvolution routine. Using this data combined with atmospheric modeling, we are able to determine Titan's surface albedo at this wavelength and properties of its hydrocarbon haze layer. This research was supported in part by the STC Program of the National Science Foundation under Agreement No. AST-9876783, and in part under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Univ. of Calif. under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  1. Adaptive optics with four laser guide stars: correction of the cone effect in large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Viard, Elise; Le, Louarn Miska; Hubin, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    We study the performance of an adaptive optics (AO) system with four laser guide stars (LGSs) and a natural guide star (NGS). The residual cone effect with four LGSs is obtained by a numerical simulation. This method allows the adaptive optics system to be extended toward the visible part of the spectrum without tomographic reconstruction of three-dimensional atmospheric perturbations, resolving the cone effect in the visible. Diffraction-limited images are obtained with 17-arc ms precision in median atmospheric conditions at wavelengths longer than 600 nm. The gain achievable with such a system operated on an existing AO system is studied. For comparison, performance in terms of achievable Strehl ratio is also computed for a reasonable system composed of a 40 x 40 Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor optimized for the I band. Typical errors of a NGS wave front are computed by use of analytical formulas. With the NGS errors and the cone effect, the Strehl ratio can reach 0.45 at 1.25 microm under good-seeing conditions with the Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS; a 14 x 14 subpupil wave-front sensor) at the Very Large Telescope and 0.8 with a 40 x 40 Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor.

  2. First-order design of off-axis reflective ophthalmic adaptive optics systems using afocal telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Vieyra, Armando; Dubra, Alfredo; Williams, David R.; Malacara-Hernández, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopes (SLOs) and optical coherence tomographs are the state-of-the-art retinal imaging instruments, and are essential for early and reliable diagnosis of eye disease. Recently, with the incorporation of adaptive optics (AO), these instruments have started to deliver near diffraction-limited performance in both humans and animal models, enabling the resolution of the retinal ganglion cell bodies, their processes, the cone photoreceptor and the retinal pigment epithelial cells mosaics. Unfortunately, these novel instruments have not delivered consistent performance across human subjects and animal models. One of the limitations of current instruments is the astigmatism in the pupil and imaging planes, which degrades image quality, by preventing the wavefront sensor from measuring aberrations with high spatial content. This astigmatism is introduced by the sequence of off-axis reflective elements, typically spherical mirrors, used for relaying pupil and imaging planes. Expressions for minimal astigmatism on the image and pupil planes in off-axis reflective afocal telescopes formed by pairs of spherical mirrors are presented. The formulas, derived from the marginal ray fans equation, are valid for small angles of incidence (<=15°), and can be used to design laser cavities, spectrographs and vision adaptive optics systems. An example related to this last application is discussed.

  3. Ultraviolet to optical diffuse sky emission as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawara, Kimiaki; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Sano, Kei; Brandt, Timothy D.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Tsumura, Kohji; Oyabu, Shinki; Ienaka, Nobuyuki

    2017-02-01

    We present an analysis of the blank-sky spectra observed with the Faint Object Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We study the diffuse sky emission from ultraviolet to optical wavelengths, which is composed of zodiacal light (ZL), diffuse Galactic light (DGL), and residual emission. The observations were performed towards 54 fields distributed widely over the sky, with spectral coverage from 0.2 to 0.7 μm. In order to avoid contaminating light from earthshine, we use the data collected only in orbital nighttime. The observed intensity is decomposed into the ZL, DGL, and residual emission, in eight photometric bands spanning our spectral coverage. We found that the derived ZL reflectance spectrum is flat in the optical, which indicates major contribution of C-type asteroids to the interplanetary dust (IPD). In addition, the ZL reflectance spectrum has an absorption feature at ∼0.3 μm. The shape of the DGL spectrum is consistent with those found in earlier measurements and model predictions. While the residual emission contains a contribution from the extragalactic background light, we found that the spectral shape of the residual looks similar to the ZL spectrum. Moreover, its optical intensity is much higher than that measured from beyond the IPD cloud by Pioneer 10/11, and also than that of the integrated galaxy light. These findings may indicate the presence of an isotropic ZL component, which is missed in the conventional ZL models.

  4. Applications of Gas Imaging Micro-Well Detectors to an Advanced Compton Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloser, P. F.; Hunter, S. D.; Ryan, J. M.; McConnell, M. L.; Miller, R. S.; Jackson, T. N.; Bai, B.; Jung, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a concept for an Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) based on the use of pixelized gas micro-well detectors to form a three-dimensional electron track imager. A micro-well detector consists of an array of individual micro-patterned proportional counters opposite a planar drift electrode. When combined with thin film transistor array readouts, large gas volumes may be imaged with very good spatial and energy resolution at reasonable cost. The third dimension is determined by timing the drift of the ionization electrons. The primary advantage of this approach is the excellent tracking of the Compton recoil electron that is possible in a gas volume. Such good electron tracking allows us to reduce the point spread function of a single incident photon dramatically, greatly improving the imaging capability and sensitivity. The polarization sensitivity, which relies on events with large Compton scattering angles, is particularly enhanced. We describe a possible ACT implementation of this technique, in which the gas tracking volume is surrounded by a CsI calorimeter, and present our plans to build and test a small prototype over the next three years.

  5. THE GHOSTS SURVEY. I. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Radburn-Smith, D. J.; Dalcanton, J. J.; De Jong, R. S.; Streich, D.; Vlajic, M.; Seth, A. C.; Bailin, J.; Bell, E. F.; Brown, T. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Goudfrooij, P.; Holfeltz, S.; Bullock, J. S.; Courteau, S.; Sick, J.; Holwerda, B. W.; Purcell, C.; Zucker, D. B.

    2011-08-01

    We present an overview of the GHOSTS survey, the largest study to date of the resolved stellar populations in the outskirts of disk galaxies. The sample consists of 14 disk galaxies within 17 Mpc, whose outer disks and halos are imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). In the first paper of this series, we describe the sample, explore the benefits of using resolved stellar populations, and discuss our ACS F606W and F814W photometry. We use artificial star tests to assess completeness and use overlapping regions to estimate photometric uncertainties. The median depth of the survey at 50% completeness is 2.7 mag below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). We comprehensively explore and parameterize contamination from unresolved background galaxies and foreground stars using archival fields of high-redshift ACS observations. Left uncorrected, these would account for 10{sup 0.65xF814W-19.0} detections per mag per arcsec{sup 2}. We therefore identify several selection criteria that typically remove 95% of the contaminants. Even with these culls, background galaxies are a significant limitation to the surface brightness detection limit which, for this survey, is typically V {approx} 30 mag arcsec{sup -2}. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly available and contain some 3.1 million stars across 76 ACS fields, predominantly of low extinction. The uniform magnitudes of TRGB stars in these fields enable galaxy distance estimates with 2%-7% accuracy.

  6. Electro-Optic Segment-Segment Sensors for Radio and Optical Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramovici, Alex

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses an electro-optic sensor that consists of a collimator, attached to one segment, and a quad diode, attached to an adjacent segment. Relative segment-segment motion causes the beam from the collimator to move across the quad diode, thus generating a measureable electric signal. This sensor type, which is relatively inexpensive, can be configured as an edge sensor, or as a remote segment-segment motion sensor.

  7. Follow-Up Discovery Channel Telescope Observations of Transients and Variables from Optical Time Domain Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, Suvi; Liu, Tingting; Hung, Tiara

    2017-01-01

    We highlight the capabilities of the Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) for follow-up observations of transients and variables discovered by optical time-domain surveys. We present two DCT programs: 1) extended-baseline imaging with the Large Monolithic Imager of periodically variable quasars from the Pan-STARRS1 survey to identify binary supermassive black hole candidates, and 2) spectroscopic classification with the DeVeny spectrograph of nuclear transients from the iPTF survey to identify tidal disruption event candidates. We demonstrate that DCT is well-matched to the magnitude ranges of the transients and variables discovered by these surveys, and has played an important role in their classification and characterization.

  8. COSMIC: A high resolution, large collecting area telescope. [Coherent Optical System of Modular Imaging Collectors (COSMIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, W. A.; Carleton, N. P.

    1985-01-01

    The spaceborne Coherent Optical System of Modular Imaging Collectors (COSMIC) is presented. It has high angular resolution and can produce images of complex, low-surface-brightness objects such as distant galaxies. If configured as a 36 m filled linear array, COSMIC can have 15 times better angular resolution and 10 times greater collecting area than the Space Telescope. Alternatively, if the collecting area is spread out to create an unfilled two-dimensional array, there is the additional advantage of not needing to rotate the array in order to build up a reconstructed image. Considerations which led to the design concept, scientific goals, and the potentially useful role of a space station for assembly are discussed.

  9. OAJ 2.6m survey telescope: optical alignment and on-sky evaluation of IQ performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousberg, Gregory P.; Bastin, Christian; Moreau, Vincent; Pirnay, Olivier; Flebus, Carlo; Chueca, Sergio; Iñiguez, César; Ederoclite, Alessandro; Ramió, Héctor V.; Cenarro, A. Javier

    2016-08-01

    AMOS has recently completed the alignment campaign of the 2.6m telescope for the Observatorio Astrofisico de Javalambre (OAJ). AMOS developed an innovative alignment technique for wide field-of-view telescopes that has been successfully implemented on the OAJ 2.6m telescope with the active support of the team of CEFCA (Centro de Estudios de Física del Cosmos de Aragón). The alignment relies on two fundamental techniques: (1) the wavefront-curvature sensing (WCS) for the evaluation of the telescope aberrations at arbitrary locations in the focal plane, and (2) the comafree point method for the adjustment of the position of the secondary mirror (M2) and of the focal plane (FP). The alignment campaign unfolds in three steps: (a) analysis of the repeatability of the WCS measurements, (b) assessment of the sensitivity of telescope wavefront error to M2 and FP position adjustments, and (c) optical alignment of the telescope. At the end of the campaign, seeing-limited performances are demonstrated in the complete focal plane. With the help of CEFCA team, the image quality of the telescope are investigated with a lucky-imaging method. Image sizes of less than 0.3 arcsec FWHM are obtained, and this excellent image quality is observed over the complete focal plane.

  10. Hobby-Eberly Telescope Optical Transmission Spectroscopy of the Hot Jupiter WASP-12b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Adam G.; Redfield, Seth; Cauley, Paul W.; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.

    2017-01-01

    Transmission spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is an extremely useful tool that can be used for understanding exoplanetary composition as well as potentially revealing star-planet interactions from radiation, magnetic fields, and more. The hot Jupiter planet WASP-12b is interesting in that it is very close to its star (0.02 AU), has a large calculated scale height, has had water and metals detected in its atmosphere, and has had varying observational and theoretical constraints placed on its C/O ratio. Here we present a preliminary analysis of the optical transmission spectrum of WASP-12b taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). Our data covers the optical wavelength range from approximately 4800 to 6850 Angstroms. Most notably this includes two Balmer lines of hydrogen (H-alpha at 6563 Angstroms and H-beta at 4861 Angstroms) and the sodium D doublet (at 5890 and 5896 Angstroms). Due to the relative faintness of the system's central star and different instrumental settings, the analysis involves several challenges that are not present in previous transmission spectroscopy observations with the HET.This work is supported by NASA Exoplanet Research Program grant 14-XRP14_2-0090 to the University of Nebraska-Kearney. The Hobby-Eberly Telescope is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen, and Georg-August-Universitat Gottingen and is named in honor of its principal benefactors, William P. Hobby and Robert E. Eberly.

  11. NEOSTEL: the telescope detail design program for the ESA optical ground network dedicated to NEO discovery and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibin, L.; Chiarini, M.; Bernardi, F.; Ragazzoni, R.; Salinari, P.

    The Fly-Eye architecture applied for a Space Debris and NEO Surveillance and Tracking optical telescope has been originally proposed by CGS and further refined in the framework of the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Preparatory Program studies. The high level architecture of a Telescope based on the Fly-Eye concept has been defined in the TELAD Study. Following TELAD conceptual design, the activities of NEOSTEL aim now at generating the Detailed Design of a NEO Survey Telescope based on the Fly-Eye concept. All components of the telescope are designed at detailed level to satisfy the specific requirements for the Survey and Follow Up of the Near Earth Objects. The NEO Survey Telescope detailed design generated under this Program will be directly utilized for the manufacturing of the first prototype, planned to be launched by the SSA Program in the second half of 2015. In addition, the result of the Detailed Design will produce the documentation necessary to prepare the future site that will host the NEO Survey Telescope prototype as well as the high level architecture of the data processing SW that will be required at the telescope site. The product of the prototypation activity will then constitute a full Italian key Optical Core Technology, dedicated to the NEO thematic but also extendable to the SST Segment, therefore offering possibility of application both at Civil and at Institutional level. Furthermore the Fly-Eye Telescope Technology can actively collaborate with a dedicated Space Segment, opening the way to a complete and autonomous EU System.

  12. Active optics and modified-Rumsey wide-field telescopes: MINITRUST demonstrators with vase- and tulip-form mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Gérard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulié, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires the development of larger aperture telescopes. The optical properties of a three-mirror modified-Rumsey design provide significant advantages when compared to other telescope designs: (i) at any wavelength, the design has a flat field and is anastigmatic; (ii) the system is extremely compact, i.e., it is almost four times shorter than a Schmidt. Compared to the equally compact flat-field Ritchey-Chrétien with a doublet-lens corrector, as developed for the Sloan digital sky survey - and which requires the polishing of six optical surfaces - the proposed modified-Rumsey design requires only a two-surface polishing and provides a better imaging quality. All the mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. Starting from the classical Rumsey design, it is shown that the use of all eight available free parameters allows the simultaneous aspherization of the primary and tertiary mirrors by active optics methods from a single deformable substrate. The continuity conditions between the primary and the tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by an intermediate narrow ring of constant thickness that is not optically used. After the polishing of a double vase form in a spherical shape, the primary-tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by in situ stressing. The tulip-form secondary is hyperbolized by stress polishing. Other active optics alternatives are possible for a space telescope. The modified-Rumsey design is of interest for developing large space- and ground-based survey telescopes in UV, visible, or IR ranges, such as currently demonstrated with the construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° field of view. Double-pass optical tests show diffraction-limited images.

  13. Active optics and modified-Rumsey wide-field telescopes: MINITRUST demonstrators with vase- and tulip-form mirrors.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Gérard R; Montiel, Pierre; Joulié, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires the development of larger aperture telescopes. The optical properties of a three-mirror modified-Rumsey design provide significant advantages when compared to other telescope designs: (i) at any wavelength, the design has a flat field and is anastigmatic; (ii) the system is extremely compact, i.e., it is almost four times shorter than a Schmidt. Compared to the equally compact flat-field Ritchey-Chrétien with a doublet-lens corrector, as developed for the Sloan digital sky survey-and which requires the polishing of six optical surfaces-the proposed modified-Rumsey design requires only a two-surface polishing and provides a better imaging quality. All the mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. Starting from the classical Rumsey design, it is shown that the use of all eight available free parameters allows the simultaneous aspherization of the primary and tertiary mirrors by active optics methods from a single deformable substrate. The continuity conditions between the primary and the tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by an intermediate narrow ring of constant thickness that is not optically used. After the polishing of a double vase form in a spherical shape, the primary-tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by in situ stressing. The tulip-form secondary is hyperbolized by stress polishing. Other active optics alternatives are possible for a space telescope. The modified-Rumsey design is of interest for developing large space- and ground-based survey telescopes in UV, visible, or IR ranges, such as currently demonstrated with the construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5-2 degrees field of view. Double-pass optical tests show diffraction-limited images.

  14. Digital polarization holography advancing geometrical phase optics.

    PubMed

    De Sio, Luciano; Roberts, David E; Liao, Zhi; Nersisyan, Sarik; Uskova, Olena; Wickboldt, Lloyd; Tabiryan, Nelson; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2016-08-08

    Geometrical phase or the fourth generation (4G) optics enables realization of optical components (lenses, prisms, gratings, spiral phase plates, etc.) by patterning the optical axis orientation in the plane of thin anisotropic films. Such components exhibit near 100% diffraction efficiency over a broadband of wavelengths. The films are obtained by coating liquid crystalline (LC) materials over substrates with patterned alignment conditions. Photo-anisotropic materials are used for producing desired alignment conditions at the substrate surface. We present and discuss here an opportunity of producing the widest variety of "free-form" 4G optical components with arbitrary spatial patterns of the optical anisotropy axis orientation with the aid of a digital spatial light polarization converter (DSLPC). The DSLPC is based on a reflective, high resolution spatial light modulator (SLM) combined with an "ad hoc" optical setup. The most attractive feature of the use of a DSLPC for photoalignment of nanometer thin photo-anisotropic coatings is that the orientation of the alignment layer, and therefore of the fabricated LC or LC polymer (LCP) components can be specified on a pixel-by-pixel basis with high spatial resolution. By varying the optical magnification or de-magnification the spatial resolution of the photoaligned layer can be adjusted to an optimum for each application. With a simple "click" it is possible to record different optical components as well as arbitrary patterns ranging from lenses to invisible labels and other transparent labels that reveal different images depending on the side from which they are viewed.

  15. Optical protocols for advanced spacecraft networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    Most present day fiber optic networks are in fact extensions of copper wire networks. As a result, their speed is still limited by electronics even though optics is capable of running three orders of magnitude faster. Also, the fact that photons do not interact with one another (as electrons do) provides optical communication systems with some unique properties or new functionality that is not readily taken advantage of with conventional approaches. Some of the motivation for implementing network protocols in the optical domain, a few possible approaches including optical code-division multiple-access (CDMA), and how this class of networks can extend the technology life cycle of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) with increased performance and functionality are described.

  16. X-ray and optical performance of the flight filters for the JET-X telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Christian M.; Watson, D. J.; Wells, Alan A.; Kent, Barry J.; Barbera, Marco; Collura, Alfonso; Bavdaz, Marcos

    1997-10-01

    The optical filters on board the JET-X telescope comprise thin foils of aluminum coated Lexan. During ground calibration of the filters, narrow spectral regions of high UV leakage, with peak levels of up to a few percent, were observed in broad band optical measurements in the 1000 to 10,000 angstrom range. Furthermore, transmission values were typically up to two orders of magnitude higher than calculated for the aluminum thickness. Investigation showed that these effects were attributed to a combination of aluminum oxidation, which reduces the opacity, and the use of a double sided aluminum layer in the filter design which behaves as a Fabry-Perot interference filter. These effects were verified by a multi- layer model of the filter UV response. Recent redesign of the filters for the flight program eliminated the UV leakage by adopting a single aluminum layer configuration, thus eliminating interference effects, and increasing the thickness by 30% to compensate for oxidation levels. The integrated x- ray transmission below 1 keV was found to be only reduced by 3%. In parallel with the production of the new Lexan flight filters, a set of qualification model filters was produced by the Luxel Corporation in the USA. These filters use polyimide as a substrate material which has the advantage that it is optically opaque to wavelengths below 3000 angstroms, unlike Lexan which is transparent. These new filters were found to have superior mechanical strength, being able to survive extended qualification vibration without any visible degradation in performance, and had a higher cosmetic quality and attenuation levels. As a result, these filters have now been included in the JET-X flight program. We report on the optical tests results from both Lexan and polyimide filters along with high resolution x-ray transmission results carried out at the BESSY synchrotron facility in Germany. Results of the mapping of the filter edge structures, global transmission values and

  17. Advances in telecom and datacom optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.

    2001-07-01

    We review and contrast key technologies developed to address the optical components market for telecom and datacom applications. We first look at different material systems, compare their properties, and describe the functions achieved to date in each of them. The material systems reviewed include glass fiber, silica on silicon, silicon on insulator, silicon oxynitride, sol-gels, polymers, thin film dielectrics, lithium niobate, indium phosphide, gallium arsenide, magneto-optic materials, and birefringent crystals. We then look at the most commonly used classes of technology and present their pros and cons as well as the functions achieved to date in each. The technologies reviewed include passive, actuation, and active technologies. The passive technologies described include fused fibers, dispersion-compensating fiber, beam steering (e.g., AWG), Bragg gratings, diffraction gratings, holographic elements, thin film filters, photonic crystals, microrings, and birefringent elements. The actuation technologies include thermo-optics, electro-optics, acousto- optics, magneto-optics, liquid crystals, total internal reflection technologies (e.g., bubble technology), and mechanical actuation (e.g., moving fibers and MEMS). We finally describe active technologies including heterostructures, quantum wells, rare earth doping, and semiconductor optical amplifiers. We also investigate the use of different material systems and technologies to achieve building block functions including lasers, amplifiers, detectors, modulators, polarization controllers, couplers, filters, switches, attenuators, nonreciprocal elements (Faraday rotators or nonreciprocal phase shifters) for isolators and circulators, wavelength converters, and dispersion compensators.

  18. SNAP Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampton, Michael L.; Akerlof, Carl W.; Aldering, Greg; Amanullah, R.; Astier, Pierre; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, Christopher; Bergstrom, Lars; Bercovitz, John; Bernstein, G.; Bester, Manfred; Bonissent, Alain; Bower, C. R.; Carithers, William C., Jr.; Commins, Eugene D.; Day, C.; Deustua, Susana E.; DiGennaro, Richard S.; Ealet, Anne; Ellis, Richard S.; Eriksson, Mikael; Fruchter, Andrew; Genat, Jean-Francois; Goldhaber, Gerson; Goobar, Ariel; Groom, Donald E.; Harris, Stewart E.; Harvey, Peter R.; Heetderks, Henry D.; Holland, Steven E.; Huterer, Dragan; Karcher, Armin; Kim, Alex G.; Kolbe, William F.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, Michael E.; Levin, Daniel S.; Linder, Eric V.; Loken, Stewart C.; Malina, Roger; Massey, R.; McKay, Timothy; McKee, Shawn P.; Miquel, Ramon; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, Stuart; Musser, J. A.; Nugent, Peter E.; Oluseyi, Hakeem M.; Pain, Reynald; Palaio, Nicholas P.; Pankow, David H.; Perlmutter, Saul; Pratt, R.; Prieto, Eric; Refregier, Alexandre; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, Kem E.; Roe, N.; Sholl, Michael; Schubnell, Michael S.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, George F.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, Gregory; Tomasch, Andrew D.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, Guobin

    2002-12-01

    The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will require a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction limited images spanning a one degree field in the visible and near infrared wavelength regime. This requirement, equivalent to nearly one billion pixel resolution, places stringent demands on its optical system in terms of field flatness, image quality, and freedom from chromatic aberration. We discuss the advantages of annular-field three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) telescopes for applications such as SNAP, and describe the features of the specific optical configuration that we have baselined for the SNAP mission. We discuss the mechanical design and choice of materials for the telescope. Then we present detailed ray traces and diffraction calculations for our baseline optical design. We briefly discuss stray light and tolerance issues, and present a preliminary wavefront error budget for the SNAP Telescope. We conclude by describing some of tasks to be carried out during the upcoming SNAP research and development phase.

  19. SNAP telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis,R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar,A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland,S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kim, A.G.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder, E.V.; Loken,S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi,H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto,E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will require a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction limited images spanning a one degree field in the visible and near infrared wavelength regime. This requirement, equivalent to nearly one billion pixel resolution, places stringent demands on its optical system in terms of field flatness, image quality, and freedom from chromatic aberration. We discuss the advantages of annular-field three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) telescopes for applications such as SNAP, and describe the features of the specific optical configuration that we have baselined for the SNAP mission. We discuss the mechanical design and choice of materials for the telescope. Then we present detailed ray traces and diffraction calculations for our baseline optical design. We briefly discuss stray light and tolerance issues, and present a preliminary wavefront error budget for the SNAP Telescope. We conclude by describing some of tasks to be carried out during the upcoming SNAP research and development phase.

  20. Advances in Telescope and Detector Technologies - Impacts on the Study and Understanding of Binary Star and Exoplanet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott; Devinney, Edward J.

    2012-04-01

    Current and planned telescope systems (both on the ground and in space) as well as new technologies will be discussed with emphasis on their impact on the studies of binary star and exoplanet systems. Although no telescopes or space missions are primarily designed to study binary stars (what a pity!), several are available (or will be shortly) to study exoplanet systems. Nonetheless those telescopes and instruments can also be powerful tools for studying binary and variable stars. For example, early microlensing missions (mid-1990s) such as EROS, MACHO and OGLE were initially designed for probing dark matter in the halos of galaxies but, serendipitously, these programs turned out to be a bonanza for the studies of eclipsing binaries and variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds and in the Galactic Bulge. A more recent example of this kind of serendipity is the Kepler Mission. Although Kepler was designed to discover exoplanet transits (and so far has been very successful, returning many planetary candidates), Kepler is turning out to be a ``stealth'' stellar astrophysics mission returning fundamentally important and new information on eclipsing binaries, variable stars and, in particular, providing a treasure trove of data of all types of pulsating stars suitable for detailed Asteroseismology studies. With this in mind, current and planned telescopes and networks, new instruments and techniques (including interferometers) are discussed that can play important roles in our understanding of both binary star and exoplanet systems. Recent advances in detectors (e.g. laser frequency comb spectrographs), telescope networks (both small and large - e.g. Super-WASP, HAT-net, RoboNet, Las Combres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Network), wide field (panoramic) telescope systems (e.g. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and Pan-Starrs), huge telescopes (e.g. the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), the Overwhelming Large Telescope (OWL) and the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT

  1. The GMT-CFA-CARNEGIE-CATOLICA LARGE EARTH FINDER (G-CLEF): A Fiber-fed, Optical Echelle Spectrograph For The Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Furesz, G.; Frebel, A.; Geary, J.; Evans, I.; Norton, T.; Hertz, E.; DePonte Evans, J.; Jordan, A.; Guzman, D.; Epps, H.; Barnes, S.; Crane, J.

    2011-01-01

    The GMT-CfA-Carnegie-Catolica Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) is a fiber-fed optical echelle spectrograph in concept design study phase for first light at the Giant Magellan Telescope. G-CLEF is designed to be a multipurpose echelle spectrograph that operates in a number of modes so as to enable precision radial velocity (RV) measurements, detailed abundance studies, isotopic abundance measurements and probe the IGM and ISM at high Z. Four resolution modes are implemented with image and pupil slicing. Extremely precise RV will be achieved by vacuum enclosing the spectrograph, with advanced fiber scrambling and state-of-the-art calibrators, especially ultra stabilized etalons and possibly laser frequency combs. The optical design is a asymmetric white pupil design with two camera arms splitting the 350 nm - 950 nm passband into red and blue channels. G-CLEF will have an extremely large, mosaiced echelle grating and volume phase holograph cross dispersers.

  2. Tiling strategies for optical follow-up of gravitational-wave triggers by telescopes with a wide field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shaon; Bloemen, Steven; Nelemans, Gijs; Groot, Paul J.; Price, Larry R.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: Binary neutron stars are among the most promising candidates for joint gravitational-wave and electromagnetic astronomy. The goal of this work is to investigate various observing strategies that telescopes with wide field of view might incorporate while searching for electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave triggers. Methods: We examined various strategies of scanning the gravitational-wave sky localizations on the mock 2015-16 gravitational-wave events. First, we studied the performance of the sky coverage using a naive tiling system that completely covers a given confidence interval contour using a fixed grid. Then we propose the ranked-tiling strategy where we sample the localization in discrete two-dimensional intervals that are equivalent to the telescope's field of view and rank them based on their sample localizations. We then introduce an optimization of the grid by iterative sliding of the tiles. Next, we conducted tests for all the methods on a large sample of sky localizations that are expected in the first two years of operation of the Laser interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo detectors. We investigated the performance of the ranked-tiling strategy for telescope arrays and compared their performance against monolithic telescopes with a giant field of view. Finally, we studied the ability of optical counterpart detection by various types of telescopes. Results: Our analysis reveals that the ranked-tiling strategy improves the localization coverage over the contour-covering method. The improvement is more significant for telescopes with larger fields of view. We also find that while optimizing the position of the tiles significantly improves the coverage compared to contour-covering tiles. For ranked-tiles the same procedure leads to negligible improvement in the coverage of the sky localizations. We observed that distributing the field of view of the telescopes into arrays of multiple telescopes significantly

  3. Adaptive optics imaging of QSO host galaxies with Hokupa'a on the Gemini North telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, O.; Sanders, D. B.; Stockton, A.; Baudoz, P.; Potter, D.

    2001-05-01

    We report the initial results of a new near-infrared imaging survey of quasar hosts using the University of Hawaii Hokupa'a Adaptive Optics system on the 8.2m Gemini-North telescope. J,H,K' images of a complete subsample ( 25) of nearby (z <0.3), "bona-fide" optically selected (MB < -23; Ho = 50, qo=0; Schmidt & Green 1983) QSOs are being taken in order to obtain accurate host galaxy magnitudes and colors and to determine two-dimensional structure. In the initial phase of our observations we found that PSF subtraction residuals were severely limiting our ability to characterize the host galaxy. However we were able to obtain a significant increase in stability of the PSF by turning off the Cassegrain rotator during observations (see Roth et al. contribution at this meeting). Our sample of Palomar-Green Bright QSOs includes both radio quiet and radio loud objects plus objects spanning the full range of observed "infrared excess" continuum emission. One of the most surprising results has been the detection of modest scale (3-5" 5 kpc diameter) "bars" and/or circumnuclear "disks" that were not evident in previous one-dimensional profile analyses. These structures may be related to the reservoir of fuel needed to power the QSO and may provide important clues concerning the origin and evolution of QSO hosts.

  4. Time-resolved Polarimetry of the Superluminous SN 2015bn with the Nordic Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloudas, Giorgos; Maund, Justyn R.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Pursimo, Tapio; Hsiao, Eric; Malesani, Daniele; Patat, Ferdinando; de Ugarte Postigo, Antonio; Sollerman, Jesper; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2017-03-01

    We present imaging polarimetry of the superluminous supernova SN 2015bn, obtained over nine epochs between ‑20 and +46 days with the Nordic Optical Telescope. This was a nearby, slowly evolving Type I superluminous supernova that has been studied extensively and for which two epochs of spectropolarimetry are also available. Based on field stars, we determine the interstellar polarization in the Galaxy to be negligible. The polarization of SN 2015bn shows a statistically significant increase during the last epochs, confirming previous findings. Our well-sampled imaging polarimetry series allows us to determine that this increase (from ∼0.54% to ≳1.10%) coincides in time with rapid changes that took place in the optical spectrum. We conclude that the supernova underwent a “phase transition” at around +20 days, when the photospheric emission shifted from an outer layer, dominated by natal C and O, to a more aspherical inner core, dominated by freshly nucleosynthesized material. This two-layered model might account for the characteristic appearance and properties of Type I superluminous supernovae.

  5. Monte Carlo modelling of multi-object adaptive optics performance on the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.; Morris, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    The performance of a wide-field adaptive optics (AO) system depends on input design parameters. Here we investigate the performance of a multi-object AO system design for the European Extremely Large Telescope, using an end-to-end Monte Carlo AO simulation tool, Durham adaptive optics simulation platform, with relevance for proposed instruments such as MOSAIC. We consider parameters such as the number of laser guide stars, sodium layer depth, wavefront sensor pixel scale, actuator pitch and natural guide star availability. We provide potential areas where costs savings can be made, and investigate trade-offs between performance and cost, and provide solutions that would enable such an instrument to be built with currently available technology. Our key recommendations include a trade-off for laser guide star wavefront sensor pixel scale of about 0.7 arcsec per pixel, and a field of view of at least 7 arcsec, that electron multiplying CCD technology should be used for natural guide star wavefront sensors even if reduced frame rate is necessary, and that sky coverage can be improved by a slight reduction in natural guide star sub-aperture count without significantly affecting tomographic performance. We find that AO correction can be maintained across a wide field of view, up to 7 arcmin in diameter. We also recommend the use of at least four laser guide stars, and include ground-layer and multi-object AO performance estimates.

  6. Light weight optics made by glass thermal forming for future x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Anita; Vongehr, Monika; Friedrich, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Future X-ray observatory missions, such as IXO or Gen-X, require grazing incidence optics of large collecting area in combination with a very good angular resolution. Wolter type I X-ray telescopes made of slumped glass segments could be a possible alternative to silicon pore optics. To achieve these requirements we develop slumping methods for high accuracy segments by experimental means. In particular, we follow the approach of indirect slumping and aim to produce parabola and hyperbola in one piece. In order to avoid internal stress in the glass segments the thermal expansion coefficient of the glass should closely match the thermal expansion of the mould material. Currently we focus on a combination of the alloy KOVAR for the mould and D263 for the glass; additionally a platinum-coated silica as mould material is studied. We investigate the behaviour of both materials during slumping in order to obtain the ideal environment for the slumping process. Additionally we report on the design of different metrology methods to measure the figure and thickness variations of the glass segments in visual light, e.g. interference, and on bearings used for shape measurements and integration.

  7. JIM: a joint integrated module of glass x-ray optics for astronomical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proserpio, Laura; Breunig, Elias; Friedrich, Peter; Winter, Anita; Rohé, Christian; Eder, Josef; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela D.; Menz, Benedikt; Civitani, Marta; Basso, Stefano; Buratti, Enrico

    2015-09-01

    For several years, the Max-Planck-Institute for extraterrestrial Physics in Germany (MPE) and the Astronomical Observatory of Brera in Italy (INAF-OAB) have been studying the slumping technology for the manufacturing of segmented glass X-ray optics for astronomy. Despite some differences in their specific approaches, the synergy of the two institutes has always been good, focusing on the common goal of developing a technology able to meet the outstanding requirements for future X-ray telescopes: i.e. large collecting areas, low mass and good angular resolution. This synergy has in the last year resulted in an active collaboration for the production of a Joint Integrated Module (JIM) that puts together the expertise of the two research groups. In particular, the indirect slumping approach of MPE has been employed for the manufacturing of X-ray mirror segments that have been integrated into a kind of X-ray Optical Unit following the approach developed at INAF-OAB. The module has then been tested in X-ray at the MPE PANTER facility, in Neuried. The several steps and the results of this joint activity are reviewed and discussed in this paper.

  8. OPTICAL PROPER MOTION MEASUREMENTS OF THE M87 JET: NEW RESULTS FROM THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Sparks, W. B.; Biretta, J. A.; Anderson, Jay; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Norman, Colin; Nakamura, Masanori

    2013-09-10

    We report new results from a Hubble Space Telescope archival program to study proper motions in the optical jet of the nearby radio galaxy M87. Using over 13 yr of archival imaging, we reach accuracies below 0.1c in measuring the apparent velocities of individual knots in the jet. We confirm previous findings of speeds up to 4.5c in the inner 6'' of the jet, and report new speeds for optical components in the outer part of the jet. We find evidence of significant motion transverse to the jet axis on the order of 0.6c in the inner jet features, and superluminal velocities parallel and transverse to the jet in the outer knot components, with an apparent ordering of velocity vectors possibly consistent with a helical jet pattern. Previous results suggested a global deceleration over the length of the jet in the form of decreasing maximum speeds of knot components from HST-1 outward, but our results suggest that superluminal speeds persist out to knot C, with large differentials in very nearby features all along the jet. We find significant apparent accelerations in directions parallel and transverse to the jet axis, along with evidence for stationary features in knots D, E, and I. These results are expected to place important constraints on detailed models of kiloparsec-scale relativistic jets.

  9. Adaptive Optics Observations of Titan from the W.M. Keck Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, S. G.; Macintosh, B.; Max, C. E.; Roe, H.; de Pater, I.; Young, E. F.; McKay, C. P.

    2000-10-01

    Saturn's largest moon Titan is the only satellite in the solar system with a substantial atmosphere. Photolysis of methane creates a hydrocarbon haze in Titan's atmosphere that is opaque to visible light. The new adaptive optics system on the 10-meter W.M. Keck Telescope enables us to observe Titan with a resolution of 0.04 arcseconds, or 20 resolution elements across the disk. By observing at near-infrared wavelengths that are methane band windows, we can see through Titan's hydrocarbon haze to the surface beneath. We will report on adaptive optics images of Titan taken in 1999, including broadband engineering images taken in February, August, and September, and broadband K and narrowband J and H band images taken in October. The narrowband filters have been chosen to selectively probe Titan's surface or atmosphere. Using this data combined with atmospheric modeling, we are able to determine surface Titan's surface albedo and properties of its hydrocarbon haze layer. This research was supported in part by the STC Program of the National Science Foundation under Agreement No. AST-9876783, and in part under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Univ. of Calif. under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  10. KAPAO-Alpha: An On-The-Sky Testbed for Adaptive Optics on Small Aperture Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Will; Choi, P. I.; Severson, S. A.; Spjut, E.; Contreras, D. S.; Gilbreth, B. N.; McGonigle, L. P.; Rudy, A. R.; Xue, A.; Baranec, C.; Riddle, R.

    2012-05-01

    We present initial in-lab and on-sky results of a natural guide star adaptive optics instrument, KAPAO-Alpha, being deployed on Pomona College’s 1-meter telescope at Table Mountain Observatory. The instrument is an engineering prototype designed to help us identify and solve design and integration issues before building KAPAO, a low-cost, dual-band, natural guide star AO system currently in active development and scheduled for first light in 2013. The Alpha system operates at visible wavelengths, employs Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing, and is assembled entirely from commercially available components that include: off-the-shelf optics, a 140-actuator BMC deformable mirror, a high speed SciMeasure Lil’ Joe camera, and an EMCCD for science image acquisition. Wavefront reconstruction operating at 1-kHz speeds is handled with a consumer-grade computer running custom software adopted from the Robo-AO project. The assembly and integration of the Alpha instrument has been undertaken as a Pomona College undergraduate thesis. As part of the larger KAPAO project, it is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0960343.

  11. Analysis of advanced optical glass and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry; Feng, Chen

    1991-01-01

    Optical lens systems performance utilizing optical materials comprising reluctant glass forming compositions was studied. Such special glasses are being explored by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) researchers utilizing techniques such as containerless processing in space on the MSFC Acoustic Levitation Furnace and on the High Temperature Acoustic Levitation Furnace in the conceptual design phase for the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML) series of shuttle flights. The application of high refractive index and low dispersive power glasses in optical lens design was investigated. The potential benefits and the impacts to the optical lens design performance were evaluated. The results of the studies revealed that the use of these extraordinary glasses can result in significant optical performance improvements. Recommendations of proposed optical properties for potential new glasses were also made. Applications of these new glasses are discussed, including the impact of high refractive index and low dispersive power, improvements of the system performance by using glasses which are located outside of traditional glass map, and considerations in establishing glass properties beyond conventional glass map limits.

  12. Transverse Oscillations of Loops with Coronal Rain Observed by Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, P.; Verwichte, E.

    2011-08-01

    The condensations composing coronal rain, falling down along loop-like structures observed in cool chromospheric lines such as Hα and Ca II H, have long been a spectacular phenomenon of the solar corona. However, considered a peculiar sporadic phenomenon, it has not received much attention. This picture is rapidly changing due to recent high-resolution observations with instruments such as the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), CRISP of the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Furthermore, numerical simulations have shown that coronal rain is the loss of thermal equilibrium of loops linked to footpoint heating. This result has highlighted the importance that coronal rain can play in the field of coronal heating. In this work, we further stress the importance of coronal rain by showing the role it can play in the understanding of the coronal magnetic field topology. We analyze Hinode/SOT observations in the Ca II H line of a loop in which coronal rain puts in evidence in-phase transverse oscillations of multiple strand-like structures. The periods, amplitudes, transverse velocities, and phase velocities are calculated, allowing an estimation of the energy flux of the wave and the coronal magnetic field inside the loop through means of coronal seismology. We discuss the possible interpretations of the wave as either standing or propagating torsional Alfvén or fast kink waves. An estimate of the plasma beta parameter of the condensations indicates a condition that may allow the often observed separation and elongation processes of the condensations. We also show that the wave pressure from the transverse wave can be responsible for the observed low downward acceleration of coronal rain.

  13. TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS OF LOOPS WITH CORONAL RAIN OBSERVED BY HINODE/SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Antolin, P.; Verwichte, E. E-mail: erwin.verwichte@warwick.ac.uk

    2011-08-01

    The condensations composing coronal rain, falling down along loop-like structures observed in cool chromospheric lines such as H{alpha} and Ca II H, have long been a spectacular phenomenon of the solar corona. However, considered a peculiar sporadic phenomenon, it has not received much attention. This picture is rapidly changing due to recent high-resolution observations with instruments such as the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), CRISP of the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Furthermore, numerical simulations have shown that coronal rain is the loss of thermal equilibrium of loops linked to footpoint heating. This result has highlighted the importance that coronal rain can play in the field of coronal heating. In this work, we further stress the importance of coronal rain by showing the role it can play in the understanding of the coronal magnetic field topology. We analyze Hinode/SOT observations in the Ca II H line of a loop in which coronal rain puts in evidence in-phase transverse oscillations of multiple strand-like structures. The periods, amplitudes, transverse velocities, and phase velocities are calculated, allowing an estimation of the energy flux of the wave and the coronal magnetic field inside the loop through means of coronal seismology. We discuss the possible interpretations of the wave as either standing or propagating torsional Alfven or fast kink waves. An estimate of the plasma beta parameter of the condensations indicates a condition that may allow the often observed separation and elongation processes of the condensations. We also show that the wave pressure from the transverse wave can be responsible for the observed low downward acceleration of coronal rain.

  14. Prime Focus Spectrograph for the Subaru telescope: massively multiplexed optical and near-infrared fiber spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hajime; Tamura, Naoyuki; Karoji, Hiroshi; Shimono, Atsushi; Takato, Naruhisa; Kimura, Masahiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Ueda, Akitoshi; Aghazarian, Hrand; de Arruda, Marcio Vital; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Bennett, Charles L.; Bickerton, Steve; Bozier, Alexandre; Braun, David F.; Bui, Khanh; Capocasale, Christopher M.; Carr, Michael A.; Castilho, Bruno; Chang, Yin-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Dawson, Olivia R.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ek, Eric M.; Ellis, Richard S.; English, Robin J.; Ferrand, Didier; Ferreira, Décio; Fisher, Charles D.; Golebiowski, Mirek; Gunn, James E.; Hart, Murdock; Heckman, Timothy M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hope, Stephen; Hovland, Larry E.; Hsu, Shu-Fu; Hu, Yen-Shan; Huang, Pin Jie; Jaquet, Marc; Karr, Jennifer E.; Kempenaar, Jason G.; King, Matthew E.; Fèvre, Olivier Le; Mignant, David Le; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Loomis, Craig; Lupton, Robert H.; Madec, Fabrice; Mao, Peter; Marrara, Lucas Souza; Ménard, Brice; Morantz, Chaz; Murayama, Hitoshi; Murray, Graham J.; de Oliveira, Antonio Cesar; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; de Oliveira, Ligia Souza; Orndorff, Joe D.; de Paiva Vilaça, Rodrigo; Partos, Eamon J.; Pascal, Sandrine; Pegot-Ogier, Thomas; Reiley, Daniel J.; Riddle, Reed; Santos, Leandro; dos Santos, Jesulino Bispo; Schwochert, Mark A.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Smee, Stephen A.; Smith, Roger M.; Steinkraus, Ronald E.; Sodré, Laerte; Spergel, David N.; Surace, Christian; Tresse, Laurence; Vidal, Clément; Vives, Sebastien; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Wen, Chih-Yi; Wu, Amy C.; Wyse, Rosie; Yan, Chi-Hung

    2015-07-01

    The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is an optical/near-infrared multifiber spectrograph with 2394 science fibers distributed across a 1.3-deg diameter field of view at the Subaru 8.2-m telescope. The wide wavelength coverage from 0.38 μm to 1.26 μm, with a resolving power of 3000, simultaneously strengthens its ability to target three main survey programs: cosmology, galactic archaeology and galaxy/AGN evolution. A medium resolution mode with a resolving power of 5000 for 0.71 μm to 0.89 μm will also be available by simply exchanging dispersers. We highlight some of the technological aspects of the design. To transform the telescope focal ratio, a broad-band coated microlens is glued to each fiber tip. A higher transmission fiber is selected for the longest part of the cable system, optimizing overall throughput; a fiber with low focal ratio degradation is selected for the fiber-positioner and fiber-slit components, minimizing the effects of fiber movements and fiber bending. Fiber positioning will be performed by a positioner consisting of two stages of piezo-electric rotary motors. The positions of these motors are measured by taking an image of artificially back-illuminated fibers with the metrology camera located in the Cassegrain container; the fibers are placed in the proper location by iteratively measuring and then adjusting the positions of the motors. Target light reaches one of the four identical fast-Schmidt spectrograph modules, each with three arms. The PFS project has passed several project-wide design reviews and is now in the construction phase.

  15. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach to define & execute a long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Because we cannot predict the future, we are pursuing multiple technology paths including monolithic & segmented mirrors. Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry & government; experts in science & space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Maturing 6 critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast exoplanet imaging. AMTD achieving all its goals & accomplishing all its milestones.

  16. Multi-PMT optical module for the KM3NeT neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavatsyuk, O.; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q.; Löhner, H.; KM3NeT Consortium

    2012-12-01

    The future cubic kilometre scale neutrino telescope KM3NeT will employ a novel type of a Digital Optical Module (DOM), developed during the recent FP6 Design Study. A pressure-resistant glass sphere hosts 31 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) of 3-in. diameter, together with all the electronics for high-voltage generation and signal readout. The optical module forms a complete stand-alone detector that is connected to the outside world via a single optical fibre and two copper conductors providing electrical power. The advantages of using multiple small PMTs in the same DOM are the higher quantum efficiency (>30% expected), smaller transit time spread, better two-photon separation capability and directional sensitivity. Moreover, a longer operating lifetime is expected than for large PMTs due to the accumulation of less charge on the anode. In addition, small PMTs are insensitive to the Earth's magnetic field and do not require μ-metal shielding. In order to maximise the detector sensitivity, each PMT will be surrounded by an expansion cone collecting photons that would normally miss the photocathode. Such an expansion cone consists of an aluminium ring filled with silicone gel. An increase in the overall sensitivity, integrated over all angles of incidence, was estimated to be about 27%. Monte-Carlo simulations have shown that a detector configuration with multi-PMT DOMs requires three times less OMs to achieve the same performance as conventional OMs hosting 10-in. PMTs. Prototype DOMs are currently being built by the KM3NeT consortium.

  17. Simulation and analysis of laser guide star adaptive optics systems for the eight to ten meter class telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.T.; Olivier, S.S.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses the design and analysis of laser-guided adaptive optic systems for the large, 8--10 meter class telescopes. We describe a technique for calculating the expected modulation transfer function and the point spread function for a closed loop adaptive optics system, parameterized by the degree of correction and the seeing conditions. The results agree closely with simulations and experimental data, and validate well known scaling law models even at low order correction. Scaling law.model analysis of a proposed adaptive optics system at the Keck telescope leads to the conclusion that a single laser guide star beacon will be adequate for diffraction limited imaging at wavelengths between 1 and 3 am with reasonable coverage of the sky. Cone anisoplanatism will dominate wavefront correction error at the visible wavelengths unless multiple laser guide stars are used.

  18. Cats: Optical to Near-Infrared Colors of the Bulge and Disk of Two z = 0.7 Galaxies Using Hubble Space Telescope and Keck Laser Adaptive Optics Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbring, E.; Melbourne, J.; Metevier, A. J.; Koo, D. C.; Chun, M. R.; Simard, L.; Larkin, J. E.; Max, C. E.

    2008-10-01

    We have employed laser guide star (LGS) adaptive optics (AO) on the Keck II telescope to obtain near-infrared (NIR) images in the Extended Groth Strip deep galaxy survey field. This is a continuation of our Center for Adaptive Optics Treasury Survey program of targeting 0.5 < z < 1 galaxies where existing images with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are already in hand. Our AO field has already been imaged by the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Near Infrared Camera and Multiobject Spectrograph (NICMOS). Our AO images at 2.2 μm (K') are comparable in depth to those from the HST, have Strehl ratios up to 0.4, and full width at half-maximum resolutions superior to that from NICMOS. By sampling the field with the LGS at different positions, we obtain better quality AO images than with an immovable natural guide star. As examples of the power of adding LGS AO to HST data, we study the optical to NIR colors and color gradients of the bulge and disk of two galaxies in the field with z = 0.7. All authors except L.S. are affiliated with the Center for Adaptive Optics.

  19. Optical measurement of the pointing stability of the SOFIA Telescope using a fast EM-CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfüller, Enrico; Wolf, Jürgen; Röser, Hans-Peter

    2010-07-01

    The goal of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is to point its airborne telescope at astronomical targets stable within 0.2 arcseconds (rms). However, the pointing stability will be affected in flight by aircraft vibrations and movements and constantly changing aerodynamic conditions within the open telescope compartment. Model calculations indicate that initially the deviations from targets may be at the order of several arcseconds. The plan is to carefully analyse and characterize all disturbances and then gradually fine tune the telescope's attitude control system to improve the pointing stability. To optically measure how star images change their position in the focal plane, an Andor DU-888 electronmultiplying (EM) CCD camera will be mounted to the telescope instead of its standard tracking camera. The new camera, dubbed Fast Diagnostic Camera (FDC) has been extensively tested and characterized in the laboratory and on ground based telescopes. In ground tests on the SOFIA telescope system it proofed its capabilities by sampling star images with frame rates up to 400 frames per second. From this data the star's location (centroid) in the focal plane can be calculated every 1/400th second and by means of a Fourier transformation, the star's movement power spectrum can be derived for frequencies up to 200 Hz. Eigenfrequencies and the overall shape of the measured spectrum confirm the previous model calculations. With known disturbances introduced to the telescope's fine drive system, the FDC data can be used to determine the system's transfer function. These data, when measured in flight will be critical for the refinement of the attitude control system. Another subsystem of the telescope that was characterized using FDC data was the chopping secondary mirror. By monitoring a star centroid at high speed while chopping, the chopping mechanism and its properties could be analyzed. This paper will describe the EM-CCD camera and its

  20. Advanced silicon device technologies for optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosinski, Lech; Wang, Zhechao; Lou, Fei; Dai, Daoxin; Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Thylen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Silicon photonics is an emerging technology offering novel solutions in different areas requiring highly integrated communication systems for optical networking, sensing, bio-applications and computer interconnects. Silicon photonicsbased communication has many advantages over electric wires for multiprocessor and multicore macro-chip architectures including high bandwidth data transmission, high speed and low power consumption. Following the INTEL's concept to "siliconize" photonics, silicon device technologies should be able to solve the fabrication problems for six main building blocks for realization of optical interconnects: light generation, guiding of light including wavelength selectivity, light modulation for signal encoding, detection, low cost assembly including optical connecting of the devices to the real world and finally the electronic control systems.

  1. Advanced Imaging Optics Utilizing Wavefront Coding.

    SciTech Connect

    Scrymgeour, David; Boye, Robert; Adelsberger, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Image processing offers a potential to simplify an optical system by shifting some of the imaging burden from lenses to the more cost effective electronics. Wavefront coding using a cubic phase plate combined with image processing can extend the system's depth of focus, reducing many of the focus-related aberrations as well as material related chromatic aberrations. However, the optimal design process and physical limitations of wavefront coding systems with respect to first-order optical parameters and noise are not well documented. We examined image quality of simulated and experimental wavefront coded images before and after reconstruction in the presence of noise. Challenges in the implementation of cubic phase in an optical system are discussed. In particular, we found that limitations must be placed on system noise, aperture, field of view and bandwidth to develop a robust wavefront coded system.

  2. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-Curvature Optical Metrology System during Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST primary mirror consists of 18 1.5 m hexagonal segments, each with 6-DoF and RoC adjustment. The telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. The testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The performance of these metrology systems, including hardware, software, procedures, was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC, using the JWST Pathfinder telescope. This paper describes the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance.

  3. A Proposal to Localize Fermi GBM GRBs Through Coordinated Scanning of the GBM Error Circle via Optical Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Linnemann, J. T.; Tollefson, K.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Bhat, P. N.; Sonbas, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of implementing a system that will coordinate ground-based optical telescopes to cover the Fermi GBM Error Circle (EC). The aim of the system is to localize GBM detected GRBs and facilitate multi-wavelength follow-up from space and ground. This system will optimize the observing locations in the GBM EC based on individual telescope location, Field of View (FoV) and sensitivity. The proposed system will coordinate GBM EC scanning by professional as well as amateur astronomers around the world. The results of a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the feasibility of the project are presented.

  4. Predicted optical performance of the high-altitude balloon experiment (HABE) telescope in an adverse thermal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Akau, R.L.; Givler, R.C.; Eastman, D.R.

    1994-04-01

    The High-Altitude Balloon Experiment (HABE) telescope was designed to operate at an ambient temperature of {minus}55 C and an altitude of 26 km, using a precooled primary mirror. Although at this altitude the air density is only 1.4 percent of the value at sea level, the temperature gradients within the telescope are high enough to deform the optical wavefront. This problem is considerably lessened by precooling the primary mirror to {minus}35 C. This paper describes the application of several codes to determine the range of wavefront deformation during a mission.

  5. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: RELATION BETWEEN GALAXY CLUSTER OPTICAL RICHNESS AND SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, Neelima; Hlozek, Renee; Addison, Graeme; Dunkley, Joanna; Louis, Thibaut; Battaglia, Nick; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D.; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Duenner, Rolando; Gralla, Megan; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hilton, Matt; Hughes, John P.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; and others

    2013-04-10

    We present the measured Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) flux from 474 optically selected MaxBCG clusters that fall within the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) Equatorial survey region. The ACT Equatorial region used in this analysis covers 510 deg{sup 2} and overlaps Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We also present the measured SZ flux stacked on 52 X-ray-selected MCXC clusters that fall within the ACT Equatorial region and an ACT Southern survey region covering 455 deg{sup 2}. We find that the measured SZ flux from the X-ray-selected clusters is consistent with expectations. However, we find that the measured SZ flux from the optically selected clusters is both significantly lower than expectations and lower than the recovered SZ flux measured by the Planck satellite. Since we find a lower recovered SZ signal than Planck, we investigate the possibility that there is a significant offset between the optically selected brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and the SZ centers, to which ACT is more sensitive due to its finer resolution. Such offsets can arise due to either an intrinsic physical separation between the BCG and the center of the gas concentration or from misidentification of the cluster BCG. We find that the entire discrepancy for both ACT and Planck can be explained by assuming that the BCGs are offset from the SZ maxima with a uniform random distribution between 0 and 1.5 Mpc. Such large offsets between gas peaks and BCGs for optically selected cluster samples seem unlikely given that we find the physical separation between BCGs and X-ray peaks for an X-ray-selected subsample of MaxBCG clusters to have a much narrower distribution that peaks within 0.2 Mpc. It is possible that other effects are lowering the ACT and Planck signals by the same amount, with offsets between BCGs and SZ peaks explaining the remaining difference between ACT and Planck measurements. Several effects that can lower the SZ signal equally for both ACT and Planck, but not explain

  6. Recent advancements in optical microstructure fabrication through glass molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianfeng; Liu, Xiaohua; Liang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yang; Xie, Jiaqing; Wang, Xibin

    2017-02-01

    Optical microstructures are increasingly applied in several fields, such as optical systems, precision measurement, and microfluid chips. Microstructures include microgrooves, microprisms, and microlenses. This paper presents an overview of optical microstructure fabrication through glass molding and highlights the applications of optical microstructures in mold fabrication and glass molding. The glass-mold interface friction and adhesion are also discussed. Moreover, the latest advancements in glass molding technologies are detailed, including new mold materials and their fabrication methods, viscoelastic constitutive modeling of glass, and microstructure molding process, as well as ultrasonic vibrationassisted molding technology.

  7. Micro-optics metrology using advanced interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichelt, Stephan; Bieber, Alexander; Aatz, Bernd; Zappe, Hans

    2005-06-01

    Interferometric testing of micro-optical components involves some challenges due to problems such as Fresnel diffraction artefacts, the non-common path interferometer configuration, coherent noise as well disturbing interferences, and uncertainties in distance measurements. Recently we have developed a versatile Mach-Zehnder / Twyman-Green hybride interferometer for micro-optics testing. The system combines the advantages of both interferometer types and allows full characterization of lens and surface figure errors as well as radius of curvature and focal length measurements. The interferometer system is explained and measurement results of micro-lenses are presented. Furthermore, this paper is concerned with the metrology challenges of interferometric testing on microscopic scales.

  8. The advanced cosmic microwave explorer - A millimeter-wave telescope and stabilized platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinhold, P. R.; Chingcuanco, A. O.; Gundersen, J. O.; Schuster, J. A.; Seiffert, M. D.; Lubin, P. M.; Morris, D.; Villela, T.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed and flown a 1 m diameter Gregorian telescope system for measurements of anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR). The telescope is incorporated in a balloon-borne stabilized platform with arcminute stabilization capability. To date, the system has flown four times and observed from the ground at the South Pole twice. The telescope has used both coherent and incoherent detectors. We describe the development of the telescope, pointing platform, and one of the receivers employed in making measurements of the CBR. Performance of the system during the first flight and operation on the ground at the South Pole are described, and the quality of the South Pole as a millimeter wave observing site is discussed.

  9. The fiber optic system for the advanced topographic laser altimeter system instrument (ATLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Thomes, W. Joe; Onuma, Eleanya; Switzer, Robert; Chuska, Richard; Blair, Diana; Frese, Erich; Matyseck, Marc

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) Instrument has been in integration and testing over the past 18 months in preparation for the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite - 2 (ICESat-2) Mission, scheduled to launch in 2017. ICESat-2 is the follow on to ICESat which launched in 2003 and operated until 2009. ATLAS will measure the elevation of ice sheets, glaciers and sea ice or the "cryosphere" (as well as terrain) to provide data for assessing the earth's global climate changes. Where ICESat's instrument, the Geo-Science Laser Altimeter (GLAS) used a single beam measured with a 70 m spot on the ground and a distance between spots of 170 m, ATLAS will measure a spot size of 10 m with a spacing of 70 cm using six beams to measure terrain height changes as small as 4 mm.[1] The ATLAS pulsed transmission system consists of two lasers operating at 532 nm with transmitter optics for beam steering, a diffractive optical element that splits the signal into 6 separate beams, receivers for start pulse detection and a wavelength tracking system. The optical receiver telescope system consists of optics that focus all six beams into optical fibers that feed a filter system that transmits the signal via fiber assemblies to the detectors. Also included on the instrument is a system that calibrates the alignment of the transmitted pulses to the receiver optics for precise signal capture. The larger electro optical subsystems for transmission, calibration, and signal receive, stay aligned and transmitting sufficiently due to the optical fiber system that links them together. The robust design of the fiber optic system, consisting of a variety of multi fiber arrays and simplex assemblies with multiple fiber core sizes and types, will enable the system to maintain consistent critical alignments for the entire life of the mission. Some of the development approaches used to meet the challenging optical system requirements for ATLAS are discussed here.

  10. The fiber optic system for the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) instrument.

    PubMed

    Ott, Melanie N; Thomes, Joe; Onuma, Eleanya; Switzer, Robert; Chuska, Richard; Blair, Diana; Frese, Erich; Matyseck, Marc

    2016-08-28

    The Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) Instrument has been in integration and testing over the past 18 months in preparation for the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite - 2 (ICESat-2) Mission, scheduled to launch in 2017. ICESat-2 is the follow on to ICESat which launched in 2003 and operated until 2009. ATLAS will measure the elevation of ice sheets, glaciers and sea ice or the "cryosphere" (as well as terrain) to provide data for assessing the earth's global climate changes. Where ICESat's instrument, the Geo-Science Laser Altimeter (GLAS) used a single beam measured with a 70 m spot on the ground and a distance between spots of 170 m, ATLAS will measure a spot size of 10 m with a spacing of 70 cm using six beams to measure terrain height changes as small as 4 mm.[1] The ATLAS pulsed transmission system consists of two lasers operating at 532 nm with transmitter optics for beam steering, a diffractive optical element that splits the signal into 6 separate beams, receivers for start pulse detection and a wavelength tracking system. The optical receiver telescope system consists of optics that focus all six beams into optical fibers that feed a filter system that transmits the signal via fiber assemblies to the detectors. Also included on the instrument is a system that calibrates the alignment of the transmitted pulses to the receiver optics for precise signal capture. The larger electro optical subsystems for transmission, calibration, and signal receive, stay aligned and transmitting sufficiently due to the optical fiber system that links them together. The robust design of the fiber optic system, consisting of a variety of multi fiber arrays and simplex assemblies with multiple fiber core sizes and types, will enable the system to maintain consistent critical alignments for the entire life of the mission. Some of the development approaches used to meet the challenging optical system requirements for ATLAS are discussed here.

  11. Optical focusing and alignment of the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array II payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, David B.; Hadaway, James B.; Hoover, Richard B.; Walker, Arthur B.; Kankelborg, Charles C.

    1995-06-01

    The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA) is a sounding rocket borne observatory designed to image the sun at many spectral lines in soft x-ray, EUV, and FUV wavelengths. Of the nineteen telescopes flown on November 3, 1994 the two Cassegrain telescopes and three of the six Ritchey-Cretien telescopes were focussed at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with a Zygo double-pass interferometer to determine the best positions of back focus. The remaining three Ritchey-Cretien and eleven Herschellian telescopes were focussed in situ at White Sands Missile Range by magnifying the telescopic image through a Gaertner traveling microscope and recording the position of best focus. From the data obtained at visible wavelengths, it is not unreasonable to expect that many of our telescopes did attain the sub-arc second resolution for which they were designed.

  12. Hubble Space Telescope transmission spectroscopy of the exoplanet HD 189733b: high-altitude atmospheric haze in the optical and near-ultraviolet with STIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, D. K.; Pont, F.; Aigrain, S.; Charbonneau, D.; Désert, J.-M.; Gibson, N.; Gilliland, R.; Hayek, W.; Henry, G.; Knutson, H.; Lecavelier Des Etangs, A.; Mazeh, T.; Shporer, A.

    2011-09-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and near-ultraviolet transmission spectra of the transiting hot Jupiter HD 189733b, taken with the repaired Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) instrument. The resulting spectra cover the range 2900-5700 Å and reach per exposure signal-to-noise ratio levels greater than 11 000 within a 500-Å bandwidth. We used time series spectra obtained during two transit events to determine the wavelength dependence of the planetary radius and measure the exoplanet's atmospheric transmission spectrum for the first time over this wavelength range. Our measurements, in conjunction with existing HST spectra, now provide a broad-band transmission spectrum covering the full optical regime. The STIS data also show unambiguous evidence of a large occulted stellar spot during one of our transit events, which we use to place constraints on the characteristics of the K dwarf's stellar spots, estimating spot temperatures around Teff˜ 4250 K. With contemporaneous ground-based photometric monitoring of the stellar variability, we also measure the correlation between the stellar activity level and transit-measured planet-to-star radius contrast, which is in good agreement with predictions. We find a planetary transmission spectrum in good agreement with that of Rayleigh scattering from a high-altitude atmospheric haze as previously found from HST Advanced Camera for Surveys. The high-altitude haze is now found to cover the entire optical regime and is well characterized by Rayleigh scattering. These findings suggest that haze may be a globally dominant atmospheric feature of the planet which would result in a high optical albedo at shorter optical wavelengths.

  13. Optics for Advanced Neutron Imaging and Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Moncton, David E.; Khaykovich, Boris

    2016-03-30

    During the report period, we continued the work as outlined in the original proposal. We have analyzed potential optical designs of Wolter mirrors for the neutron-imaging instrument VENUS, which is under construction at SNS. In parallel, we have conducted the initial polarized imaging experiment at Helmholtz Zentrum, Berlin, one of very few of currently available polarized-imaging facilities worldwide.

  14. Advances in superresolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI)

    PubMed Central

    Dertinger, Thomas; Pallaoro, Alessia; Braun, Gary; Ly, Sonny; Laurence, Ted A.; Weiss, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    We review the concept of superresolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI), discuss its attributes and trade-offs (in comparison with other superresolution methods), and present superresolved images taken on samples stained with quantum dots, organic dyes, and plasmonic metal nanoparticles. We also discuss the prospects of SOFI for live cell superresolution imaging and for imaging with other (non-fluorescent) contrasts. PMID:23672771

  15. Development of the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT) for Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; Bloser, Peter F.; Dion, Michael P.; McConnell, Mark L.; deNolfo, Georgia A.; Son, Seunghee; Ryan, James M.; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2011-01-01

    Progress in high-energy gamma-ray science has been dramatic since the launch of INTEGRAL, AGILE and FERMI. These instruments, however, are not optimized for observations in the medium-energy (approx.0.3< E(sub gamma)< approx.200 MeV) regime where many astrophysical objects exhibit unique, transitory behavior, such as spectral breaks, bursts, and flares. We outline some of the major science goals of a medium-energy mission. These science goals are best achieved with a combination of two telescopes, a Compton telescope and a pair telescope, optimized to provide significant improvements in angular resolution and sensitivity. In this paper we describe the design of the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT) based on the Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) detector. This technology achieves excellent, medium-energy sensitivity, angular resolution near the kinematic limit, and gamma-ray polarization sensitivity, by high resolution 3-D electron tracking. We describe the performance of a 30x30x30 cm3 prototype of the AdEPT instrument.

  16. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Relation Between Galaxy Cluster Optical Richness and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehgal, Neelima; Addison, Graeme; Battaglia, Nick; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Duenner, Rolando; Gralla, Megan; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renee; Hughes, John P.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; Louis, Thibaut; Marriage, Tobias A.; Marsden, Danica; Menateau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Wollack, Ed

    2012-01-01

    We present the measured Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) flux from 474 optically-selected MaxBCG clusters that fall within the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) Equatorial survey region. The ACT Equatorial region used in this analysis covers 510 square degrees and overlaps Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We also present the measured SZ flux stacked on 52 X-ray-selected MCXC clusters that fall within the ACT Equatorial region and an ACT Southern survey region covering 455 square degrees. We find that the measured SZ flux from the X-ray-selected clusters is consistent with expectations. However, we find that the measured SZ flux from the optically-selected clusters is both significantly lower than expectations and lower than the recovered SZ flux measured by the Planck satellite. Since we find a lower recovered SZ signal than Planck, we investigate the possibility that there is a significant offset between the optically-selected brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and the SZ centers, to which ACT is more sensitive due to its finer resolution. Such offsets can arise due to either an intrinsic physical separation between the BCG and the center of the gas concentration or from misidentification of the cluster BCG. We find that the entire discrepancy for both ACT and Planck can be explained by assuming that the BCGs are offset from the SZ maxima with a uniform random distribution between 0 and 1.5 Mpc. In contrast, the physical separation between BCGs and X-ray peaks for an X-ray-selected subsample of MaxBCG clusters shows a much narrower distribution that peaks within 0.2 Mpc. We conclude that while offsets between BCGs and SZ peaks may be an important component in explaining the discrepancy, it is likely that a combination of factors is responsible for the ACT and Planck measurements. Several effects that can lower the SZ signal equally for both ACT and Planck, but not explain the difference in measured signals, include a larger percentage of false detections in the

  17. Wavefront Analysis of Adaptive Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Hillman, Lloyd

    1997-01-01

    The motivation for this work came from a NASA Headquarters interest in investigating design concepts for a large space telescope employing active optics technology. The development of telescope optical requirements and potential optical design configurations is reported.

  18. Design and validation of the mounting structure for BETTII balloon-based telescope with thin-walled optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Stephen; Dow, Tom; Garrard, Ken; Sohn, Alex; Fixsen, Dale; Rinehart, Stephen; Mentzell, Eric; Veach, Todd; Rizzo, Maxime; Dhabal, Arnab

    2016-04-01

    The NASA Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) system is designed to study the infrared emissions from star formation and active galactic nuclei through a double-Fourier Michelson interferometer located on a balloon at an altitude of 37 km. The BETTII external optics include a pair of identical beam-reducing, four-mirror telescopes, each with a 522-mm aperture, nonrotationally symmetric primary mirror. These telescopes were designed and assembled at the North Carolina State University Precision Engineering Consortium and are composed entirely of thin-walled aluminum components. The mounting structure is designed to be light weight and stiff to reduce thermal equilibration time in the rarified air at the edge of space and to maintain robust alignment of the optical elements. The mounts also prevent deformation of the large optical elements via custom-built kinematic Kelvin couplings and fixed-load clamps; the maximum form error of the optical surfaces are 300 nm RMS. This work details the design of the thin mirrors and mounting structure as well as validation of the mount assembly process, mount stiffness, and the kinematic couplings.

  19. Optical Measurements On Advanced Performance Domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, P. C.; Burge, D. K.</