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Sample records for advanced optical telescope

  1. Optical control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Upton, Robert

    2006-08-10

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) is an off-axis Gregorian astronomical telescope design. The ATST is expected to be subject to thermal and gravitational effects that result in misalignments of its mirrors and warping of its primary mirror. These effects require active, closed-loop correction to maintain its as-designed diffraction-limited optical performance. The simulation and modeling of the ATST with a closed-loop correction strategy are presented. The correction strategy is derived from the linear mathematical properties of two Jacobian, or influence, matrices that map the ATST rigid-body (RB) misalignments and primary mirror figure errors to wavefront sensor (WFS) measurements. The two Jacobian matrices also quantify the sensitivities of the ATST to RB and primary mirror figure perturbations. The modeled active correction strategy results in a decrease of the rms wavefront error averaged over the field of view (FOV) from 500 to 19 nm, subject to 10 nm rms WFS noise. This result is obtained utilizing nine WFSs distributed in the FOV with a 300 nm rms astigmatism figure error on the primary mirror. Correction of the ATST RB perturbations is demonstrated for an optimum subset of three WFSs with corrections improving the ATST rms wavefront error from 340 to 17.8 nm. In addition to the active correction of the ATST, an analytically robust sensitivity analysis that can be generally extended to a wider class of optical systems is presented. PMID:16926876

  2. Optical control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Upton, Robert

    2006-08-10

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) is an off-axis Gregorian astronomical telescope design. The ATST is expected to be subject to thermal and gravitational effects that result in misalignments of its mirrors and warping of its primary mirror. These effects require active, closed-loop correction to maintain its as-designed diffraction-limited optical performance. The simulation and modeling of the ATST with a closed-loop correction strategy are presented. The correction strategy is derived from the linear mathematical properties of two Jacobian, or influence, matrices that map the ATST rigid-body (RB) misalignments and primary mirror figure errors to wavefront sensor (WFS) measurements. The two Jacobian matrices also quantify the sensitivities of the ATST to RB and primary mirror figure perturbations. The modeled active correction strategy results in a decrease of the rms wavefront error averaged over the field of view (FOV) from 500 to 19 nm, subject to 10 nm rms WFS noise. This result is obtained utilizing nine WFSs distributed in the FOV with a 300 nm rms astigmatism figure error on the primary mirror. Correction of the ATST RB perturbations is demonstrated for an optimum subset of three WFSs with corrections improving the ATST rms wavefront error from 340 to 17.8 nm. In addition to the active correction of the ATST, an analytically robust sensitivity analysis that can be generally extended to a wider class of optical systems is presented.

  3. Advanced Technology Lunar Telescopes I. Overview and Progress Report On Ultra-Lightweight Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. C.; Pitts, R. E.; Oliversen, R. J.; Stolarik, J. D.; Segal, K.; Wilson, T. L.; Lin, E. I.; Hull, J. R.; Romeo, R.; Hojaji, H.; Ma, K. B.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.; Chu, C. W.

    1993-12-01

    The materials and technology already exist to build fully functional steerable telescopes for use on the moon, telescopes that are cost effective, that can be deployed using existing launchers, and that can function for extended periods without human maintenance. We describe our concept of advanced technology telescopes (ATT) which combines the elements of i) ultra-lightweight precision optics and structures, ii) non-contact, electronically controlled superconductor bearings and drive mechanisms, and iii) high dynamic range radiation resistant sensors. Unlike previous transit telescope designs, the ATTs can point and track objects anywhere in the sky over the entire lunar night (or day), can be deployed in multiple unit arrays, and can be equipped with standard astronomical instruments including spectrographs, imagers, or even interferometers. We first describe the optics. Lightweight optics are crucial because they minimize the mass of the telescope assembly and its support structure and ultimately the entire payload. By using materials and fabrication technology similar to that already refined by ESA and proven for space applications, we show that it is possible to produce precision optical elements of very low areal density (< 2 kg per sq. m). The process also has much lower per unit cost compared to traditional mirror fabrication techniques. By supporting the optical elements with a class of very lightweight but stiff material already developed by NASA, a telescope assembly can be made that has essentially the minimum possible mass. Such ultra-lightweight construction makes possible astronomical payloads that can be sent to the moon using existing small and medium size rockets. The very low per unit cost permits the production and deployment of multiple units, thereby increasing the versatility and productivity of a lunar observatory while providing good redundancy. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept optical telescope assembly that has a 31 cm diameter primary

  4. South Pole Telescope optics.

    PubMed

    Padin, S; Staniszewski, Z; Keisler, R; Joy, M; Stark, A A; Ade, P A R; Aird, K A; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Dobbs, M A; Halverson, N W; Heimsath, S; Hills, R E; Holzapfel, W L; Lawrie, C; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leong, J; Lu, W; Lueker, M; McMahon, J J; Meyer, S S; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Vieira, J D

    2008-08-20

    The South Pole Telescope is a 10 m diameter, wide-field, offset Gregorian telescope with a 966-pixel, millimeter-wave, bolometer array receiver. The telescope has an unusual optical system with a cold stop around the secondary. The design emphasizes low scattering and low background loading. All the optical components except the primary are cold, and the entire beam from prime focus to the detectors is surrounded by cold absorber. PMID:18716649

  5. South Pole Telescope optics.

    PubMed

    Padin, S; Staniszewski, Z; Keisler, R; Joy, M; Stark, A A; Ade, P A R; Aird, K A; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Dobbs, M A; Halverson, N W; Heimsath, S; Hills, R E; Holzapfel, W L; Lawrie, C; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leong, J; Lu, W; Lueker, M; McMahon, J J; Meyer, S S; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Vieira, J D

    2008-08-20

    The South Pole Telescope is a 10 m diameter, wide-field, offset Gregorian telescope with a 966-pixel, millimeter-wave, bolometer array receiver. The telescope has an unusual optical system with a cold stop around the secondary. The design emphasizes low scattering and low background loading. All the optical components except the primary are cold, and the entire beam from prime focus to the detectors is surrounded by cold absorber.

  6. Slumped glass optics for x-ray telescopes: advances in the hot slumping assisted by pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmaso, B.; Brizzolari, C.; Basso, S.; Civitani, M.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vecchi, G.

    2015-09-01

    Slumped Glass Optics is a viable solution to build future X-ray telescopes. In our laboratories we use a direct hot slumping approach assisted by pressure, in which the glass optical surface is in contact with the mould, and a pressure is applied to enforce the replication of the mould shape on the glass optical surface. Several prototypes have been already produced and tested in X-rays, showing a continuous improvement in our technology. In this paper, we present the advances in our technology, in terms of slumped glass foils quality and expected performances upon an ideal integration. By using Eagle XG glass foils and Zerodur K20 for the slumping mould, we have fine tuned several process parameters: we present a critical analysis correlating the changes in the process to the improvements in different spatial frequency ranges encompassing the profile and roughness measurements. The use of a re-polished K20 mould, together with the optimized process parameters, lead to the latest result of glass foils with expected performance of less than 3 arcsec in single reflection at 1 keV X-ray energy. This work presents all the relevant steps forward in the hot slumping technology assisted by pressure, aimed at reaching angular resolutions of 5 arcsec for the whole mirror assembly.

  7. Progress making the top end optical assembly (TEOA) for the 4-meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canzian, Blaise; Barentine, J.; Arendt, J.; Bader, S.; Danyo, G.; Heller, C.

    2012-09-01

    L-3 Integrated Optical Systems (IOS) Division has been selected by the National Solar Observatory (NSO) to design and produce the Top End Optical Assembly (TEOA) for the 4-meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) to operate at Haleakal', Maui. ATST will perform to a very high optical performance level in a difficult thermal environment. The TEOA, containing the 0.65-meter silicon carbide secondary mirror and support, mirror thermal management system, mirror positioning and fast tip-tilt system, field stop with thermally managed heat dump, thermally managed Lyot stop, safety interlock and control system, and support frame, operates in the "hot spot" at the prime focus of the ATST and so presents special challenges. In this paper, we describe progress in the L-3 technical approach to meeting these challenges, including silicon carbide off-axis mirror design, fabrication, and high accuracy figuring and polishing all within L-3; mirror support design; the design for stray light control; subsystems for opto-mechanical positioning and high accuracy absolute mirror orientation sensing; Lyot stop design; and thermal management of all design elements to remain close to ambient temperature despite the imposed solar irradiance load.

  8. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The defaultmore » parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST« less

  9. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, David S.; Buckley, J. H.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Kaaret, P.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Konopelko, A.; Romani, R.; Vassilliev, V.; Optical System Working Group; AGIS Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    The concept of a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory, AGIS, in the energy range 20 GeV-200 TeV is based on an array of 50-200 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of IACTs. In this submission we will focus on the optical system (OS) of AGIS telescopes and consider options which include traditional Davies-Cotton and the other prime-focus telescope designs, as well as the novel two-mirror aplanatic OS originally proposed by Schwarzschild. The emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes, such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming, provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the OS. We initially evaluate capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project.

  10. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliev, Vladimir; Buckley, Jim; Falcone, Abe; Fegan, Steven; Finley, John; Gaurino, Victor; Hanna, David; Kaaret, Philip; Konopelko, Alex; Krawczynski, Henric; Romani, Roger; Weekes, Trevor

    2008-04-01

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory based on an array of ˜100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) with a sensitivity to gamma-rays in the energy range 40 GeV-100 TeV. The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. In this submission we focus on the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes and consider options which include traditional Davies-Cotton and the other prime- focus telescope designs, as well as a novel two-mirror aplanatic OS originally proposed by Schwarzschild. Emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the OS. We evaluate the capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project.

  11. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) Telescope Optical System Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, V.; Buckley, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Diegel, S.; Romani, R.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Vassiliev, V.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Ramsey, B.; Weekes, T.

    2008-12-24

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory operating in the energy range 25 GeV-100 TeV, which is based on an array of {approx}20-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The desired improvement in sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation of AGIS imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. We are considering several options for the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes, which include the traditional Davies-Cotton design as well as novel two-mirror design. Emerging mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost-effective solutions for the design of the OS.

  12. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, V.; Buckley, J.; Diegel, S.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Ramsey, B.; Romani, R.; Vassiliev, V.; Weekes, T.

    2008-12-01

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory operating in the energy range 25 GeV-100 TeV, which is based on an array of ~20-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The desired improvement in sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation of AGIS imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. We are considering several options for the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes, which include the traditional Davies-Cotton design as well as novel two-mirror design. Emerging mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost-effective solutions for the design of the OS.

  13. Optical Metrology for the Filter Set for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Content, David A.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Krebs, Carolyn A.; Miner, Linda A.; Norton, Todd A.; Mehalick, Kimberly; Petrone, Peter; Bush, Frank D.; Puc, Bernard; Standley, Clive; Tsvetanov, Zlatan; Kral, Catherine

    1998-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) will employ a wide variety of spectral filtration components including narrow band, medium band, wide band, and far ultraviolet (FUV) long pass filters, spatially- variable filters (ramp filters), VIS/IR polarizers, NUV polarizers, FUV prisms, and a grism. These components are spread across ACS's Wide Field, High Resolution, and Solar Blind channels which provide diffraction-limited imaging of astronomical targets using aberration-correcting optics which remove most aberrations from HST's Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA). In order for ACS to be truly advanced, these filters must push the state-of-the-art in performance in a number of key areas at the same time. Important requirements which these filters must meet include outstanding transmitted wavefront, high transmittance, uniform transmittance across each filter, spectrally structure-free bandpasses, exceptionally high out of band rejection, and a high degree of parfocality. These constitute a very stringent set of requirements indeed, especially for filters which are up to 90 mm in diameter. The development of optical metrology stations used to demonstrate that each ACS filter will meet its design specifications is discussed. Of particular note are specially-designed spectral transmissometers and interferometers.

  14. Design and Specification of Optical Bandpass Filters for Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Tsevetanov, Zlatan; Woodruff, Bob; Mooney, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced optical bandpass filters for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) have been developed on a filter-by-filter basis through detailed studies which take into account the instrument's science goals, available optical filter fabrication technology, and developments in ACS's charge-coupled-device (CCD) detector technology. These filters include a subset of filters for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are optimized for astronomical photometry using today's charge-coupled-devices (CCD's). In order for ACS to be truly advanced, these filters must push the state-of-the-art in performance in a number of key areas at the same time. Important requirements for these filters include outstanding transmitted wavefront, high transmittance, uniform transmittance across each filter, spectrally structure-free bandpasses, exceptionally high out of band rejection, a high degree of parfocality, and immunity to environmental degradation. These constitute a very stringent set of requirements indeed, especially for filters which are up to 90 mm in diameter. The highly successful paradigm in which final specifications for flight filters were derived through interaction amongst the ACS Science Team, the instrument designer, the lead optical engineer, and the filter designer and vendor is described. Examples of iterative design trade studies carried out in the context of science needs and budgetary and schedule constraints are presented. An overview of the final design specifications for the ACS bandpass and ramp filters is also presented.

  15. NASA capabilities roadmap: advanced telescopes and observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescopes and Observatories (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories collecting all electromagnetic bands, ranging from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It has derived capability priorities from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps and, where appropriate, has ensured their consistency with other NASA Strategic and Capability Roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  16. Telescope optical systems program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschbein, Murray S.; Key, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    Telescope Optical Systems is a new focused program of technology development that will shape and enable the new 'telescope' missions being studied and planned by NASA. The program structure contains six major elements: systems, optics, materials, structures, controls, and integration and test. Activities in each element will address key technology issues that support a wide range of user needs. Program goals, technology needs, and technology performance objectives are summarized in outline form.

  17. Alignment of the James Webb Space Telescope optical telescope element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassman, Tiffany; Levi, Joshua; Liepmann, Till; Hahn, Walter; Bisson, Gary; Porpora, Dan; Hadjimichael, Theo

    2016-07-01

    The optical telescope element (OTE) of the James Webb Space Telescope has now been integrated and aligned. The OTE comprises the flight mirrors and the structure that supports them - 18 primary mirror segments, the secondary mirror, and the tertiary and fine steering mirrors (both housed in the aft optics subsystem). The primary mirror segments and the secondary mirror have actuators to actively control their positions during operations. This allows the requirements for aligning the OTE subsystems to be in the range of microns rather than nanometers. During OTE integration, the alignment of the major subsystems of the OTE structure and optics were controlled to ensure that, when the telescope is on orbit and at cryogenic temperatures, the active mirrors will be within the adjustment range of the actuators. Though the alignment of this flagship mission was complex and intricate, the key to a successful integration process turned out to be very basic: a clear, concise series of steps employing advanced planning, backup measurements, and cross checks that this multi-organizational team executed with a careful and methodical approach. This approach was not only critical to our own success but has implications for future space observatories.

  18. Optical Telescope Assembly Concept for Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, N.; Krim, M.; Horner, G.

    1996-12-01

    A recent study by a TRW/HDOS/GSFC/LaRC/Swales team produced a conceptual design for an eight-meter diameter Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). This space telescope would have a deployed primary mirror with active figure control of the mirror petals to give diffraction limited performance at one micron wavelength. The High Accuracy Reflector Development (HARD) scheme, utilizing special translation-rotation mechanisms and precision latches, would deploy and lock the primary mirror segments into place. Thin mirror faceplates on stiff, lightweight backing structure would allow the extremely low weight at moderate cost. The telescope would produce images and spectra from radiation in the 0.5 micron to 10 micron spectral interval, have a 10 arc-minute circular field of view, weigh about 1000 kg, and fit within the shroud of an Atlas II AS launch vehicle. A deployable sunshield and an L2 Lissajous orbit would give passive cooling to 30 K. This paper describes the baseline optics, structures, and control systems of the Optical Telescope Assembly design produced in the study. The associated technologies are discussed, with emphasis on the optics and mechanisms for the primary mirror. For the optics, different mirror materials, fabrication processes, structural configurations, controls configurations, and verification techniques were studied, and a preliminary wavefront error budget was produced. For mechanisms, concepts were produced for high resolution actuators with a large operating range and for active vibration suppression. The state-of-the-art of all these technologies is presented, the technological advances needed, and some preliminary plans for their development.

  19. Optical Telescope Design Study Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, J.; Sankar, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the results of a study conducted from Nov 2012-Apr 2013 to develop a telescope design for a space-based gravitational wave detector. The telescope is needed for efficient power delivery but since it is directly in the beam path, the design is driven by the requirements for the overall displacement sensitivity of the gravitational wave observatory. Two requirements in particular, optical pathlength stability and scattered light performance, are beyond the usual specifications for good image quality encountered in traditional telescopic systems. An important element of the study was to tap industrial expertise to develop an optimized design that can be reliably manufactured. Key engineering and design trade-offs and the sometimes surprising results will be presented.

  20. Advanced optical instruments technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William

    1992-01-01

    The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

  1. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 3: Optical telescope assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the optical telescope assembly for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The systems considerations are based on mission-related parameters and optical equipment requirements. Information is included on: (1) structural design and analysis, (2) thermal design, (3) stabilization and control, (4) alignment, focus, and figure control, (5) electronic subsystem, and (6) scientific instrument design.

  2. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) Telescope Mechanical and Optical System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarino, V.; Vassiliev, V.; Buckley, J.; Byrum, K.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Finley, J.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Romani, R.; Wagner, R.; Woods, M.

    2009-05-01

    The concept of a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory, AGIS, in the energy range 20 GeV to 200 TeV is based on an array of 50-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of IACTs. In this submission, we focus on the optical and mechanical systems for a novel Schwarzschild-Couder two-mirror aplanatic optical system originally proposed by Schwarzschild. Emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes, such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming, provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the optical system. We explore capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project and alignment methods for optical systems. We also study a mechanical structure which will provide support points for mirrors and camera design driven by the requirement of minimizing the deflections of the mirror support structures.

  3. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  4. Coherent array telescopes as a fifteen meter optical telescope equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odgers, G. J.

    1982-10-01

    The potential benefits of using a mirror array to form a large optical telescope equivalent to a 15 m monolithic mirror telescope are discussed. The concept comprises 25 three meter telescopes in a circular array or 13 double unit telescopes, also in a circular array. The double-units would have individual 4.2 m instruments. Meniscus-shaped mirrors with F/2 aperture ratios would allow lightweight construction. A smaller, four double unit telescope would be equivalent to an 8.4 m telescope, larger than any existing in the world. The viewing capabilities could also be extended to the IR. Each sector of the compound telescopes, if built with 3 m apertures, could be controlled with 1/20th arsec acccuracy. Finally, the inherent long baseline of an array telescope would permit enhanced interferometric viewing.

  5. Polarization Calibration of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, D. F.

    2014-10-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the World's largest solar polarimeter with a number of polarimetric instruments simultaneously sharing the ATST light beam. Polarization calibration requires determination of the polarization properties of the telescope optics that are shared by all instruments and the polarization response of each instrument. Hundreds of parameters are required to fully specify the telescope optics but by grouping successive optical elements separated at the Gregorian focus, the elevation rotation, and the Coudé - azimuth rotation and performing calibrations over the course of a day, it is possible to infer the polarization properties of each of the groups, and the instruments themselves with many fewer parameters.

  6. Advanced manufacturing technologies for the BeCOAT telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Michael N.; Rajic, Slobodan; Seals, Roland D.

    1994-02-01

    The beryllium cryogenic off-axis telescope (BeCOAT) uses a two-mirror, non re-imaging, off- axis, Ritchey Chretian design with all-beryllium optics, structures and baffles. The purpose of this telescope is the system level demonstration of advanced manufacturing technologies for optics, optical benches, and baffle assemblies. The key issues that are addressed are single point diamond turning of beryllium optics, survivable fastening techniques, minimum beryllium utilization, and technologies leading to self-aligning, all-beryllium optical systems.

  7. Technology Development for the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) as a Candidate Large UV-Optical-Infrared (LUVOIR) Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatha; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Postman, Marc; Quijada, Manuel; Rauscher, Bernard; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Shaklan, Stuart; Stahl, H. Philip; Stahle, Carl; Thronson, Harley

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) team has identified five key technologies to enable candidate architectures for the future large-aperture ultraviolet/optical/infrared (LUVOIR) space observatory envisioned by the NASA Astrophysics 30-year roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions. The science goals of ATLAST address a broad range of astrophysical questions from early galaxy and star formation to the processes that contributed to the formation of life on Earth, combining general astrophysics with direct-imaging and spectroscopy of habitable exoplanets. The key technologies are: internal coronagraphs, starshades (or external occulters), ultra-stable large-aperture telescopes, detectors, and mirror coatings. Selected technology performance goals include: 1x10?10 raw contrast at an inner working angle of 35 milli-arcseconds, wavefront error stability on the order of 10 pm RMS per wavefront control step, autonomous on-board sensing & control, and zero-read-noise single-photon detectors spanning the exoplanet science bandpass between 400 nm and 1.8 µm. Development of these technologies will provide significant advances over current and planned observatories in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution, stability, and high-contrast imaging. The science goals of ATLAST are presented and flowed down to top-level telescope and instrument performance requirements in the context of a reference architecture: a 10-meter-class, segmented aperture telescope operating at room temperature (290 K) at the sun-Earth Lagrange-2 point. For each technology area, we define best estimates of required capabilities, current state-of-the-art performance, and current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) - thus identifying the current technology gap. We report on current, planned, or recommended efforts to develop each technology to TRL 5.

  8. Technology development for the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) as a candidate large UV-Optical-Infrared (LUVOIR) surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Postman, Marc; Quijada, Manuel; Rauscher, Bernard; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Shaklan, Stuart; Stahl, H. Philip; Stahle, Carl; Thronson, Harley

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) team has identified five key technologies to enable candidate architectures for the future large-aperture ultraviolet/optical/infrared (LUVOIR) space observatory envisioned by the NASA Astrophysics 30-year roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions. The science goals of ATLAST address a broad range of astrophysical questions from early galaxy and star formation to the processes that contributed to the formation of life on Earth, combining general astrophysics with direct-imaging and spectroscopy of habitable exoplanets. The key technologies are: internal coronagraphs, starshades (or external occulters), ultra-stable large-aperture telescopes, detectors, and mirror coatings. Selected technology performance goals include: 1x10-10 raw contrast at an inner working angle of 35 milli-arcseconds, wavefront error stability on the order of 10 pm RMS per wavefront control step, autonomous on-board sensing and control, and zero-read-noise single-photon detectors spanning the exoplanet science bandpass between 400 nm and 1.8 μm. Development of these technologies will provide significant advances over current and planned observatories in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution, stability, and high-contrast imaging. The science goals of ATLAST are presented and flowed down to top-level telescope and instrument performance requirements in the context of a reference architecture: a 10-meter-class, segmented aperture telescope operating at room temperature (~290 K) at the sun-Earth Lagrange-2 point. For each technology area, we define best estimates of required capabilities, current state-of-the-art performance, and current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) - thus identifying the current technology gap. We report on current, planned, or recommended efforts to develop each technology to TRL 5.

  9. Advanced Telescopes and Observatories Capability Roadmap Presentation to the NRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the NASA Advanced Planning and Integration Office (APIO) roadmap for developing technological capabilities for telescopes and observatories in the following areas: Optics; Wavefront Sensing and Control and Interferometry; Distributed and Advanced Spacecraft; Large Precision Structures; Cryogenic and Thermal Control Systems; Infrastructure.

  10. Summary of NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory Capability Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Feinberg, Lee

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories operating in all electromagnetic bands, from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It lists capability priorities derived from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  11. Summary of NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory Capability Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Phil; Feinberg, Lee

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories operating in all electromagnetic bands, from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It lists capability priorities derived from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  12. Optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected telescopes.

    PubMed

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D

    2015-04-16

    Highest resolution imaging in astronomy is achieved by interferometry, connecting telescopes over increasingly longer distances and at successively shorter wavelengths. Here, we present the first diffraction-limited images in visual light, produced by an array of independent optical telescopes, connected electronically only, with no optical links between them. With an array of small telescopes, second-order optical coherence of the sources is measured through intensity interferometry over 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, and two-dimensional images reconstructed. The technique aims at diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometre-long baselines to reach resolutions showing details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets. Intensity interferometry circumvents problems of atmospheric turbulence that constrain ordinary interferometry. Since the electronic signal can be copied, many baselines can be built up between dispersed telescopes, and over long distances. Using arrays of air Cherenkov telescopes, this should enable the optical equivalent of interferometric arrays currently operating at radio wavelengths.

  13. World atlas of large optical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    By 1980 there will be approximately 100 large optical telescopes in the world with mirror or lens diameters of one meter (39 inches) and larger. This atlas gives information on these telescopes and shows their locations on continent-sized maps. Observatory locations considered suitable for the construction of future large telescopes are also shown.

  14. Advanced Technology Solar Telescope Construction: Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, Thomas R.; McMullin, J.; Keil, S.; Goode, P.; Knoelker, M.; Kuhn, J.; Rosner, R.; ATST Team

    2012-05-01

    The 4m Advance Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) on Haleakala will be the most powerful solar telescope and the world’s leading ground-based resource for studying solar magnetism that controls the solar wind, flares, coronal mass ejections and variability in the Sun’s output. The ATST will provide high resolution and high sensitivity observations of the dynamic solar magnetic fields throughout the solar atmosphere, including the corona at infrared wavelengths. With its 4 m aperture, ATST will resolve magnetic features at their intrinsic scales. A high order adaptive optics system delivers a corrected beam to the initial set of five state-of-the-art, facility class instrumentation located in the coude laboratory facility. Photopheric and chromospheric magnetometry is part of the key mission of four of these instruments. Coronal magnetometry and spectroscopy will be performed by two of these instruments at infrared wavelengths. The ATST project has transitioned from design and development to its construction phase. Site construction is expected to begin in April 2012. The project has awarded design and fabrication contracts for major telescope subsystems. A robust instrument program has been established and all instruments have passed preliminary design reviews or critical design reviews. A brief overview of the science goals and observational requirements of the ATST will be given, followed by a summary of the project status of the telescope and discussion of the approach to integrating instruments into the facility. The National Science Foundation (NSF) through the National Solar Observatory (NSO) funds the ATST Project. The NSO is operated under a cooperative agreement between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) and NSF.

  15. Advanced electro-optical imaging techniques. [conference papers on sensor technology applicable to Large Space Telescope program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieski, S. (Editor); Wampler, E. J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The papers presented at the symposium are given which deal with the present state of sensors, as may be applicable to the Large Space Telescope (LST) program. Several aspects of sensors are covered including a discussion of the properties of photocathodes and the operational imaging camera tubes.

  16. Characterization of the optical sub-system in an advanced prototype of a new acousto-optical spectrometer for the Mexican Large Millimeter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Alexandre S.; Sanchez Lucero, Daniel; Laskin, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    A few optically matched by each other sub-systems related to an advanced prototype of acousto-optical spectrometer for radio-astronomy are analyzed jointly. Rather precise control over the incident light polarization should be assured in the scheme together with a required expanding of the incident light beam. Moreover, the needed light-beam apodization, suppressing side lobes within registration of each individual resolvable spot and increasing the dynamic range of spectrometer, has to be taken into account as well. The current stage of analysis related to afore-mentioned problems as well as the results of trial experiments are presented.

  17. Optical synoptic telescopes: new science frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, J. Anthony

    2010-07-01

    Over the past decade, sky surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) have proven the power of large data sets for answering fundamental astrophysical questions. This observational progress, based on a synergy of advances in telescope construction, detectors, and information technology, has had a dramatic impact on nearly all fields of astronomy, and areas of fundamental physics. The next-generation instruments, and the surveys that will be made with them, will maintain this revolutionary progress. The hardware and computational technical challenges and the exciting science opportunities are attracting scientists and engineers from astronomy, optics, low-light-level detectors, high-energy physics, statistics, and computer science. The history of astronomy has taught us repeatedly that there are surprises whenever we view the sky in a new way. This will be particularly true of discoveries emerging from a new generation of sky surveys. Imaging data from large ground-based active optics telescopes with sufficient étendue can address many scientific missions simultaneously. These new investigations will rely on the statistical precision obtainable with billions of objects. For the first time, the full sky will be surveyed deep and fast, opening a new window on a universe of faint moving and distant exploding objects as well as unraveling the mystery of dark energy.

  18. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Mirror Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Bowers, Charles W.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Heaney, James B.; Gallagher, Benjamin; McKay, Andrew; Stevenson, Ian

    2012-01-01

    James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) mirror coating program has been completed. The science goals of the JWST mission require a uniform, low stress, durable optical coating with high reflectivity over the JWST spectral region. The coating has to be environmentally stable, radiation resistant and compatible with the cryogenic operating environment. The large size, 1.52 m point to point, light weight, beryllium primary mirror (PM) segments and flawless coating process during the flight mirror coating program that consisted coating of 21 flight mirrors were among many technical challenges. This paper provides an overview of the JWST telescope mirror coating program. The paper summarizes the coating development program and performance of the flight mirrors.

  19. LOITA: Lunar Optical/Infrared Telescope Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    LOITA (Lunar Optical/Infrared Telescope Array) is a lunar-based interferometer composed of 18 alt-azimuth telescopes arranged in a circular geometry. This geometry results in excellent uv coverage and allows baselines up to 5 km long. The angular resolution will be 25 micro-arcsec at 500 nm and the main spectral range of the array will be 200 to 1100 nm. For infrared planet detection, the spectral range may be extended to nearly 10 mu m. The telescope mirrors have a Cassegrain configuration using a 1.75 m diameter primary mirror and a 0.24 m diameter secondary mirror. A three-stage (coarse, intermediate, and fine) optical delay system, controlled by laser metrology, is used to equalize path lengths from different telescopes to within a few wavelengths. All instruments and the fine delay system are located within the instrument room. Upon exiting the fine delay system, all beams enter the beam combiner and are then directed to the various scientific instruments and detectors. The array instrumentation will consist of CCD detectors optimized for both the visible and infrared as well as specially designed cameras and spectrographs. For direct planet detection, a beam combiner employing achromatic nulling interferometry will be used to reduce star light (by several orders of magnitude) while passing the planet light. A single telescope will be capable of autonomous operation. This telescope will be equipped with four instruments: wide field and planetary camera, faint object camera, high resolution spectrograph, and faint object spectrograph. These instruments will be housed beneath the telescope. The array pointing and control system is designed to meet the fine pointing requirement of one micro-arcsec stability and to allow precise tracking of celestial objects for up to 12 days. During the lunar night, the optics and the detectors will be passively cooled to 70-80 K temperature. To maintain a continuous communication with the earth a relay satellite placed at the L4

  20. Optical photometry using Bradford robotic telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal Braun, P.; Baruch, J. E. F.

    2009-06-01

    The Bradford Robotic Telescope (BRT) is located on Mount Teide at Tenerife and is working, taking observations since 2003. It is a fully automated telescope. The hardware and software used for the working of the telescope are described here. Twenty four BL Lac objects are observed since 2005 and magnitudes of the objects are calculated. We describe in this paper the working of BRT and optical BVR photometry of BL Lac objects, observed during 2005-2007.

  1. Optical design of a rotating eyepiece telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, M.; Nasim, F.; Khan, A. N.; Gul, A.

    2016-08-01

    Flexible eyepiece telescope has been designed and verified. The rotating eyepiece of telescope will facilitate viewing of objects in a remote or out of sight target. Eyepiece arm of telescope can be rotated upto 360o keeping objective and reticule unchanged and ensuring zero deviation in reticule inclination. Main application of this scope is off axis viewing of objects. Image inversion has been carried out by using pair of mirrors and length of telescope is controlled by using relay lenses. The optical design, simulation and image analysis has been carried out by using ZEMAX®. Magnification of telescope is between 10∼⃒12 times with FOV of 60. Experiment has been carried out using uncoated Edmund Optics and optical tool box of Micro Series Kit, NEWPORT.

  2. Extremely large telescopes' optical design and wavefront correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Alexander Vladimirovich

    An overview of the state of art within optical design of large astronomical telescopes is given. Recent advances within the field are presented. The importance of new computer-controlled mirror-polishing methods is emphasized. Some important aspects of atmospheric optics are presented together with current compensation methods using adaptive optics, with or without laser guide stars. An overview of wavefront sensing, wavefront reconstruction and techniques for compensation is given. Methods for optical design of large, optical telescopes with fast primary mirrors are presented in a systematic way. Three different approaches are outlined and commented. They include an algebraic method, a method based on optimization through ray tracing and an analytical method based on Fermat's principle and the Abbe sine condition. Studies of optical designs for large telescopes with fast, spherical primary mirrors are examined and discussed. For two-mirror designs, an analytical method has been derived using aberration control based on Fermat's principle. Intrinsic apodization for design of extremely fast primary mirrors is analyzed. For four- mirror designs with spherical primary minors, a ray tracing approach has been chosen. A total of fifteen different four-mirror designs have been analyzed and discussed. For the 50 m optical telescope. Euro50, a two-mirror design was chosen. This optical design is presented in detail, together with the optical layout of an adaptive optical system that forms an integrated part of the telescope. An analysis of essential components of the Euro50 is given. Finally, an analytical approach is presented for control of two or more deformable mirrors for adaptive optics in extremely large telescopes for optical wavelengths. The same algorithms are used to evaluate and predict the performance of the adaptive optics for the Euro50.

  3. Adaptive compensation for an optical tracking telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbart, J. W.; Winston, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    The application of model referenced adaptive control theory to an optical tracking telescope is discussed. The capability of the adaptive technique to compensate for mount irregularities such as inertial variations and bearing friction is demonstrated via field test results on a large tracking telescope. Results are presented which show a 6 to 1 improvement in tracking accuracy for a worst-case satellite trajectory.

  4. Adaptive-optics performance of Antarctic telescopes.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Jon S

    2004-02-20

    The performance of natural guide star adaptive-optics systems for telescopes located on the Antarctic plateau is evaluated and compared with adaptive-optics systems operated with the characteristic mid-latitude atmosphere found at Mauna Kea. A 2-m telescope with tip-tilt correction and an 8-m telescope equipped with a high-order adaptive-optics system are considered. Because of the large isoplanatic angle of the South Pole atmosphere, the anisoplanatic error associated with an adaptive-optics correction is negligible, and the achievable resolution is determined only by the fitting error associated with the number of corrected wave-front modes, which depends on the number of actuators on the deformable mirror. The usable field of view of an adaptive-optics equipped Antarctic telescope is thus orders of magnitude larger than for a similar telescope located at a mid-latitude site; this large field of view obviates the necessity for multiconjugate adaptive-optics systems that use multiple laser guide stars. These results, combined with the low infrared sky backgrounds, indicate that the Antarctic plateau is the best site on Earth at which to perform high-resolution imaging with large telescopes, either over large fields of view or with appreciable sky coverage. Preliminary site-testing results obtained recently from the Dome Concordia station indicate that this site is far superior to even the South Pole. PMID:15008551

  5. Stitching Techniques Advance Optics Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Because NASA depends on the fabrication and testing of large, high-quality aspheric (nonspherical) optics for applications like the James Webb Space Telescope, it sought an improved method for measuring large aspheres. Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Goddard Space Flight Center, QED Technologies, of Rochester, New York, upgraded and enhanced its stitching technology for aspheres. QED developed the SSI-A, which earned the company an R&D 100 award, and also developed a breakthrough machine tool called the aspheric stitching interferometer. The equipment is applied to advanced optics in telescopes, microscopes, cameras, medical scopes, binoculars, and photolithography."

  6. Optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Highest resolution imaging in astronomy is achieved by interferometry, connecting telescopes over increasingly longer distances and at successively shorter wavelengths. Here, we present the first diffraction-limited images in visual light, produced by an array of independent optical telescopes, connected electronically only, with no optical links between them. With an array of small telescopes, second-order optical coherence of the sources is measured through intensity interferometry over 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, and two-dimensional images reconstructed. The technique aims at diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometre-long baselines to reach resolutions showing details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets. Intensity interferometry circumvents problems of atmospheric turbulence that constrain ordinary interferometry. Since the electronic signal can be copied, many baselines can be built up between dispersed telescopes, and over long distances. Using arrays of air Cherenkov telescopes, this should enable the optical equivalent of interferometric arrays currently operating at radio wavelengths. PMID:25880705

  7. Optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected telescopes.

    PubMed

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Highest resolution imaging in astronomy is achieved by interferometry, connecting telescopes over increasingly longer distances and at successively shorter wavelengths. Here, we present the first diffraction-limited images in visual light, produced by an array of independent optical telescopes, connected electronically only, with no optical links between them. With an array of small telescopes, second-order optical coherence of the sources is measured through intensity interferometry over 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, and two-dimensional images reconstructed. The technique aims at diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometre-long baselines to reach resolutions showing details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets. Intensity interferometry circumvents problems of atmospheric turbulence that constrain ordinary interferometry. Since the electronic signal can be copied, many baselines can be built up between dispersed telescopes, and over long distances. Using arrays of air Cherenkov telescopes, this should enable the optical equivalent of interferometric arrays currently operating at radio wavelengths. PMID:25880705

  8. New optical telescope projects at Devasthal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagar, Ram; Kumar, Brijesh; Omar, Amitesh; Pandey, A. K.

    2012-09-01

    Devasthal, located in the Kumaun region of Himalayas is emerging as one of the best optical astronomy site in the continent. The minimum recorded ground level atmospheric seeing at the site is 0.006 with median value at 1.001. Currently, a 1.3-m fast (f/4) wide field-of-view (660) optical telescope is operating at the site. In near future, a 4-m liquid mirror telescope in collaboration with Belgium and Canada, and a 3.6-m optical telescope in collaboration with Belgium are expected to be installed in 2013. The telescopes will be operated by Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences. The first instruments on the 3.6-m telescope will be in-house designed and assembled faint object spectrograph and camera. The second generation instruments will be including a large field-of-view optical imager, high resolution optical spectrograph, integral field unit and an optical near-infrared spectrograph. The 1.3-m telescope is primarily used for wide field photometry imaging while the liquid mirror telescope will see a time bound operation to image half a degree wide strip in the galactic plane. There will be an aluminizing plant at the site to coat mirrors of sizes up to 3.7 m. The Devasthal Observatory and its geographical importance in between major astronomical observatories makes it important for time critical observations requiring continuous monitoring of variable and transient objects from ground based observatories. The site characteristics, its expansions plans and first results from the existing telescope are presented.

  9. Development of a clean optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Particulate contamination on astronomical mirrors degrades performance in two ways: by information loss by extinction of light; and background and noise from scattering, especially forward or Fraunhofer scattering. These effects were not generally understood, and an ambitious pilot program was outlined to measure particulate effects on telescope optical performance; develop prophylactic and cleaning procedures suitable for groundbased observatories; investigate by computational modelling the effects on telescopes in space; and communicate the results and concerns within the astronomical community.

  10. Holographic Optical Elements as Scanning Lidar Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated and developed the use of holographic optical elements (HOE) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. By rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis, a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope is possible. We developed and tested transmission and reflection HOES for use with the first three harmonics of Nd:YAG lasers, and designed, built, and tested two lidar systems based on this technology.

  11. The Faulkes Telescope Optical Spectrographs and Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul

    The Faulkes Telescope project funded primarily by the Dill Faulkes Educational Trust is currently constructing two 2-m robotic telescopes to be located in Hawaii and Australia. These will be the largest and most powerful telescopes ever built dedicated for use by schools and colleges. We have been awarded funding to build two optical spectrographs to be permanently mounted on these telescopes by the end of 2003. At this time an astronomical satellite called Swift will be launched by NASA. Swift is dedicated to the study of gamma-ray bursts the most powerful explosive events in the Universe. The Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leicester has provided the X-ray camera for Swift and is a partner in the Faulkes Telescopes project. To enhance both projects we intend to use the Faulkes Telescope optical spectrographs to study the gamma-ray bursts identified by Swift. These data will also be made available to schools thereby raising the profile of physics and astronomy in the educational community.

  12. Solar optical telescope primary mirror controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. J.; Liu, D.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a technique to control the articulated primary mirror (APM) of the solar optical telescope (SOT) is discussed. Program results indicate that a single, all digital controller has sufficient capability to totally handle the computational requirements for control of the SOT APM.

  13. Freeform Optical Design of Two Mirror Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph; West, Garrett; Trumper, Isaac; Anderson, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Two Mirror telescopes composed of freeform optical surfaces are investigated and surveyed to explore the usable design space. F-number and field of view are evaluated and plotted. A case study is presented to show the benefits of volume reduction using freeform surfaces.

  14. Holographic Optical Elements as Scanning Lidar Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed and investigated the use of holographic optical elements (HOEs) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. For example, rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis makes a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope. We developed and tested transmission and reflection HOEs for use at the first three harmonic wavelengths of Nd:YAG lasers. The diffraction efficiency, diffraction angle, focal length, focal spot size and optical losses were measured for several HOEs and holographic gratings, and found to be suitable for use as lidar receiver telescopes, and in many cases could also serve as the final collimating and beam steering optic for the laser transmitter. Two lidar systems based on this technology have been designed, built, and successfully tested in atmospheric science applications. This technology will enable future spaceborne lidar missions by significantly lowering the size, weight, power requirement and cost of a large aperture, narrow field of view scanning telescope.

  15. Integrated optics interferometric four telescopes nuller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errmann, Ronny; Minardi, Stefano; Labadie, Lucas; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Pertsch, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Nulling interferometry has been identified as a competitive technique for the detection of extrasolar planets. The technique consists in combining out-of-phase pairs of telescopes to null effectively the light of a bright star an reveal the dim glow of the companion. We have manufactured and tested with monochromatic light an integrated optics component which combines a linear array of 4 telescopes in the nulling mode envisaged by Angel&Wolf.1 Our testbench simulates the motion of a star in the sky. The tests have demonstrated a nulling scaling as the fourth power of the baseline delay.

  16. Productivity and Impact of Optical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia; Zaich, Paul; Bosler, Tammy

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, about 2100 papers appearing in 18 journals reported and/or analyzed data collected with ground-based optical and infrared telescopes and the Hubble Space Telescope. About 250 telescopes were represented, including 25 with primary mirror diameters of 3 m or larger. The subjects covered in the papers divide reasonably cleanly into 20 areas, from solar system to cosmology. These papers were cited 24,354 times in 2002 and 2003, for a mean rate of 11.56 citations per paper, or 5.78 citations per paper per year (sometimes called impact or impact factor). We analyze here the distributions of the papers, citations, and impact factors among the telescopes and subject areas and compare the results with those of a very similar study of papers published in 1990-1991 and cited in 1993. Some of the results are exactly as expected. Big telescopes produce more papers and more citations per paper than small ones. There are fashionable topics (cosmology and exoplanets) and less fashionable ones (binary stars and planetary nebulae). And the Hubble Space Telescope has changed the landscape a great deal. Some other results surprised us but are explicable in retrospect. Small telescopes on well-supported sites (La Silla and Cerro Tololo, for instance) produce papers with larger impact factors than similar sized telescopes in relative isolation. Not just the fraction of all papers, but the absolute numbers of papers coming out of the most productive 4 m telescopes of a decade ago have gone down. The average number of citations per paper per year resulting from the 38 telescopes (2 m and larger) considered in 1993 has gone up 38%, from 3.48 to 4.81, a form, perhaps, of grade inflation. And 53% of the 2100 papers and 38% of the citations (including 44% of the papers and 31% of the citations from mirrors of 3 m and larger) pertain to topics often not regarded as major drivers for the next generation of still larger ground-based telescopes.

  17. Optical design study for NASA's spherical primary optical telescope (SPOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Joseph M.

    2004-10-01

    Several of NASA's future space telescopes project teams have chosen or are considering segmented primary mirrors as a part of their architecture. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) design employs a 6.5-meter conic primary mirror constructed of 18 hexagonal segments, where each hex is one of three off-axis surface profiles corresponding to its radial distance to the parent mirror axis. Other future mission concepts such as SAFIR (Single Aperture Far-Infra Red) and SUVO (Space Ultra Violet Optical telescope) are considering even larger segmented primary mirrors. The goal of the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT) project discussed in this paper is to investigate the option of a spherical primary mirror for such future large aperture NASA missions. Ground-based telescopes such as the Hobby-Eberly have realized this design option, and the current baseline design for ESO's OWL project incorporates a 100-meter segmented spherical primary mirror. While the benefits of fabricating large numbers of identical spherical surface segments are obvious, the optical design for the telescope becomes more complex in order to correct the significant aberration resulting from a spherical primary surface. This paper briefly surveys design approaches of spherical primary telescopes. Image based performance comparisons are made, and examples are presented.

  18. Silicon carbide optics for space and ground based astronomical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, Joseph; Sampath, Deepak; Wainer, Chris; Schwartz, Jay; Peton, Craig; Mix, Steve; Heller, Court

    2012-09-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) optical materials are being applied widely for both space based and ground based optical telescopes. The material provides a superior weight to stiffness ratio, which is an important metric for the design and fabrication of lightweight space telescopes. The material also has superior thermal properties with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, and a high thermal conductivity. The thermal properties advantages are important for both space based and ground based systems, which typically need to operate under stressing thermal conditions. The paper will review L-3 Integrated Optical Systems - SSG’s (L-3 SSG) work in developing SiC optics and SiC optical systems for astronomical observing systems. L-3 SSG has been fielding SiC optical components and systems for over 25 years. Space systems described will emphasize the recently launched Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) developed for JHU-APL and NASA-GSFC. Review of ground based applications of SiC will include supporting L-3 IOS-Brashear’s current contract to provide the 0.65 meter diameter, aspheric SiC secondary mirror for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST).

  19. The Giant Magellan Telescope adaptive optics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchez, Antonin H.; Acton, D. Scott; Agapito, Guido; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bennet, Francis; Biliotti, Valdemaro; Bonaglia, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Brusa-Zappellini, Guido; Busoni, Lorenzo; Carbonaro, Luca; Codona, Johanan L.; Conan, Rodolphe; Connors, Thomas; Durney, Oliver; Espeland, Brady; Esposito, Simone; Fini, Luca; Gardhouse, Rusty; Gauron, Thomas M.; Hart, Michael; Hinz, Philip M.; Kanneganti, Srikrishna; Kibblewhite, Edward J.; Knox, Russell P.; McLeod, Brian A.; McMahon, Thomas; Montoya, Manny; Norton, Timothy J.; Ordway, Mark P.; d'Orgeville, Celine; Parcell, Simon; Piatrou, Piotr K.; Pinna, Enrico; Price, Ian; Puglisi, Alfio; Quiros-Pacheco, Fernando; Riccardi, Armando; Roll, John B.; Trancho, Gelys; Uhlendorf, Kristina; Vaitheeswaran, Vidhya; van Dam, Marcos A.; Weaver, David; Xompero, Marco

    2012-07-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope adaptive optics system will be an integral part of the telescope, providing laser guide star generation, wavefront sensing, and wavefront correction to most of the currently envisioned instruments. The system will provide three observing modes: Natural Guidestar AO (NGSAO), Laser Tomography AO (LTAO), and Ground Layer AO (GLAO). Every AO observing mode will use the telescope’s segmented adaptive secondary mirror to deliver a corrected beam directly to the instruments. High-order wavefront sensing for the NGSAO and LTAO modes is provided by a set of wavefront sensors replicated for each instrument and fed by visible light reflected off the cryostat window. An infrared natural guidestar wavefront sensor with open-loop AO correction is also required to sense tip-tilt, focus, segment piston, and dynamic calibration errors in the LTAO mode. GLAO mode wavefront sensing is provided by laser guidestars over a ~5 arcminute field of view, and natural guidestars over wider fields. A laser guidestar facility will project 120 W of 589 nm laser light in 6 beacons from the periphery of the primary mirror. An off-axis phasing camera and primary and secondary mirror metrology systems will ensure that the telescope optics remain phased. We describe the system requirements, overall architecture, and innovative solutions found to the challenges presented by high-order AO on a segmented extremely large telescope. Further details may be found in specific papers on each of the observing modes and major subsystems.

  20. Advances in Small-Telescope Speckle Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, David J.

    2016-06-01

    The current revolution in CMOS camera technology has enabled a new generation of small telescope systems targeted at the measurement of close binary systems using the techniques of speckle interferometry and bispectrum analysis. These inexpensive, ultra-sensitive, high resolution cameras are now outperforming CCD technology, and come at a truly affordable price. In addition, dedicated, user-friendly speckle interferometry reduction software has been developed for the amateur, making it easy to perform the otherwise complicated data processing tasks. This talk will address these recent advances in hardware and software, and describe some of the results of the informal amateur-professional collaboration that has formed around them.

  1. Optical design of the Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, Malcolm J.; Dunham, Edward W.

    2004-10-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) is a joint venture between Discovery Communications and Lowell Observatory. The telescope will have a 4.2-meter clear aperture, active primary mirror working at F/1.9. Two observing stations are presently planned; a Ritchey-Chretien focus some two meters behind the vertex of the primary mirror and a prime focus featuring a wide-field optical corrector (WFOC) with a two-degree field of view. The Ritchey-Chretien focus will be used for a variety of optical and near infrared imaging and spectroscopic instrumentation while the prime focus will be largely used as a survey tool to search for near-earth and Kuiper belt objects, for example. In order to take advantage of sub-arc second seeing at the DCT site, a stringent set of requirements has been placed on the two foci. The requirements are for the full-width, half-maximum (FWHM) image of a point source to be less than 0.20 arc second at the Ritchey-Chretien focus over a 21 arc minute field and less than 0.27 arc second at prime focus in each of six filter bands including a very broad band for survey purposes. This paper describes the optical design of the field correctors at the two foci. Particular attention is paid to the WFOC. This state of the art device poses a number of optical challenges which are discussed here, as well as mechanical challenges which are discussed elsewhere.

  2. The Discovery Channel Telescope optical coating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Heather K.; Ash, Gary S.; Parsley, William F.

    2010-07-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) is a project of Lowell Observatory, undertaken with support from Discovery Communications, Inc., to design and construct a 4-meter class telescope and support facility on a site approximately 40 miles southeast of Flagstaff, AZ. Lowell Observatory contracted with Dynavac of Hingham, MA to design and build an optical coating system for the DCT optics. The DCT Optical Coating System includes a mechanical roughing pump, two high-vacuum cryogenic pumps, a Meissner trap, evaporative filament aluminum deposition system, LabView software and PLC-based control system, and all ancillary support equipment. The system was installed at the site and acceptance testing was completed in October 2009. The Optical Coating System achieved near perfect reflectivity performance, thickness uniformity of 1000 angstroms +/-10%, and adhesion conforming to MIL-F-48616, Section 4.6.8.1. This paper discusses the design and analysis of the coating system, the process of transportation and assembly as well as testing results.

  3. The NIRCam Optical Telescope Simulator (NOTES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubalak, David; Hakun, Claef; Greeley, Bradford; Eichorn, William; Leviton, Douglas; Guishard, Corina; Gong, Qian; Warner, Thomas; Bugby, David; Robinson, Frederick; Lansing, Peter; Garza, Mario; Kirk, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    The Near Infra-Red Camera (NIRCam), the 0.6-5.0 micron imager and wavefront sensing instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), will be used on orbit both as a science instrument, and to tune the alignment of the telescope. The NIRCam Optical Telescope Element Simulator (NOTES) will be used during ground testing to provide an external stimulus to verify wavefront error, imaging characteristics, and wavefront sensing performance of this crucial instrument. NOTES is being designed and built by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center with the help of Swales Aerospace and Orbital Sciences Corporation. It is a single-point imaging system that uses an elliptical mirror to form an U20 image of a point source. The point source will be fed via optical fibers from outside the vacuum chamber. A tip/tilt mirror is used to change the chief ray angle of the beam as it passes through the aperture stop and thus steer the image over NIRCam's field of view without moving the pupil or introducing field aberrations. Interchangeable aperture stop elements allow us to simulate perfect JWST wavefronts for wavefront error testing, or introduce transmissive phase plates to simulate a misaligned JWST segmented mirror for wavefront sensing verification. NOTES will be maintained at an operating temperature of 80K during testing using thermal switches, allowing it to operate within the same test chamber as the NIRCam instrument. We discuss NOTES' current design status and on-going development activities.

  4. Science with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    Use of the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) to study the energetics and dynamics of the solar atmosphere is described. Studies include the origin and evolution of the Sun's magnetic field, the structure of solar subsurface convection, the heating of the outer solar atmosphere, and sources of the solar wind in the lower lying regions of the outer atmosphere. To achieve the scientific goals of the SOT, it is necessary to observe features in the solar atmosphere on the scale of a typical photon mean-free-path in continuum radiation and also of the hydrodynamic or density scale-height. The 1.3 m telescope, of a Gregorian configuration, achieves close to 0.1 arcsec angular resolution on the Sun in visible and ultraviolet wavelengths.

  5. Optical design of an astrometric space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, E. H.; Morbey, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    A three-mirror telescope derived from the Paul corrector is described. It differs from the original Paul design in several respects. (1) The third mirror is located behind the primary mirror instead of in front of it. (2) The telescope is made off-axis so that there is no central obstruction, thus avoiding the extension and asymmetry of the diffraction pattern caused by the spiders holding an on-axis secondary mirror. (3) Baffling is not a problem as it is with the usual Paul design. The focal surface is flat where a moving ronchi grating is located. This is the first element in the astrometric analyzer. A real image of the pupil is produced behind the focus. This is helpful in the design of relay optics (not described) which reimage the grating onto a CCD.

  6. The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, L.; Barr, J.; Dalrymple, N.; Fraser, M.; Hubbard, R.; Wagner, J.; Warner, M.

    2006-06-01

    Telescope enclosure design is based on an increasingly standard set of criteria. Enclosures must provide failsafe protection in a harsh environment for an irreplaceable piece of equipment; must allow effective air flushing to minimize local seeing while still attenuating wind-induced vibration of the telescope; must reliably operate so that the dome is never the reason for observatory down time; must provide access to utilities, lifting devices and support facilities; and they must be affordable within the overall project budget. The enclosure for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has to satisfy all these challenging requirements plus one more. To eliminate so-called external dome seeing, the exterior surfaces of the enclosure must be maintained at or just below ambient air temperature while being subjected to the full solar loading of an observing day. Further complicating the design of the ATST enclosure and support facilities are the environmental sensitivities and high construction costs at the selected site - the summit of Haleakala on the island of Maui, Hawaii. Previous development work has determined an appropriate enclosure shape to minimize solar exposure while allowing effective interior flushing, and has demonstrated the feasibility of controlling the exterior skin temperature with an active cooling system. This paper presents the evolution of the design since site selection and how the enclosure and associated thermal systems have been tailored to the particular climatic and terrain conditions of the site. Also discussed are load-reduction strategies that have been identified through thermal modeling, CFD modeling, and other analyses to refine and economize the thermal control systems.

  7. Active optics control of VST telescope secondary mirror.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; D'Orsi, Sergio; Fierro, Davide; Marty, Laurent

    2010-06-01

    In telescopes based on active optics, defocus and coma are usually compensated for by secondary mirror movements. They are performed at the Very Large Telescope Survey Telescope (VST) with a hexapod--a parallel robot with six degrees of freedom positioning capability. We describe the application of the two-mirror telescope theory to the VST case and the solutions adopted for the hexapod control. We present the results of performance and reliability tests performed both in the laboratory and at the telescope.

  8. Lunar optical telescopes: an historical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stewart W.

    1992-11-01

    There is a long history of thought and discussion on the possibilities of astronomical observatories on the Moon. Numerous ideas have been suggested and a variety of concepts have resulted for lunar optical telescopes. This paper reviews some of the ideas and efforts of individuals and working groups including Hershel, Clarke, Malina, Herbig, and Hess; working groups of the 1960s; and recent initiatives of Burke, Burns, and others. The enhanced technologies of the 1980s and 1990s can make past dreams of lunar observatories come to reality in the 21st century.

  9. Lunar optical telescopes: An historical perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Stewart W.

    1992-01-01

    There is a long history of thought and discussion on the possibilities of astronomical observatories on the Moon. Numerous ideas have been suggested and a variety of concepts have resulted for lunar optical telescopes. This paper reviews some of the ideas and efforts of individuals and working groups including Hershel, Clarke, Malina, Herbig, and Hess; working groups of the 1960s; and recent initiatives of Burke, Burns, and others. The enhanced technologies of the 1980s and 1990s can make past dreams of lunar observatories come to reality in the 21st century.

  10. Planck Telescope: optical design and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Philippe; Riti, Jean-Bernard; de Chambure, Daniel

    2004-06-01

    The cornerstone mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) scientific program Herschel/Planck is currently in the design manufacturing phase (phase C/D). The Planck satellite will be launched in 2007, together with Herschel. Located around the L2 Lagrange point, Planck aims at obtaining very accurate images of the Cosmic Wave Background fluctuations. Working up to high frequency (857 GHz, i.e. 350 μm wavelength), Planck is expected to give sharper images than the recently launched WMAP satellite. The Planck Telescope is an off-axis (unobscured) Gregorian antenna, with a 1.5 m diameter pupil, a small F-number (~1) and a large FOV (+/-5° circular), owing to place a large number of detectors (bolometers) in the focal plane. This paper presents the optical design, performance, and verification concept of the Planck telescope. The custom made sequential Hartmann system is described. Working at 10.6 μm, it will directly measure the wavefront of the telescope in cryogenic environment i.e. at operational conditions. This will be a major milestone in the spacecraft development.

  11. Advanced X-Ray Telescope Mirrors Provide Sharpest Focus Ever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-03-01

    Performing beyond expectations, the high- resolution mirrors for NASA's most powerful orbiting X-ray telescope have successfully completed initial testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Calibration Facility, Huntsville, AL. "We have the first ground test images ever generated by the telescope's mirror assembly, and they are as good as -- or better than -- expected," said Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Marshall's chief scientist for NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The mirror assembly, four pairs of precisely shaped and aligned cylindrical mirrors, will form the heart of NASA's third great observatory. The X-ray telescope produces an image by directing incoming X-rays to detectors at a focal point some 30 feet beyond the telescope's mirrors. The greater the percentage of X-rays brought to focus and the smaller the size of the focal spot, the sharper the image. Tests show that on orbit, the mirror assembly of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility will be able to focus approximately 70 percent of X-rays from a source to a spot less than one-half arc second in radius. The telescope's resolution is equivalent to being able to read the text of a newspaper from half a mile away. "The telescope's focus is very clear, very sharp," said Weisskopf. "It will be able to show us details of very distant sources that we know are out there, but haven't been able to see clearly." In comparison, previous X-ray telescopes -- Einstein and Rosat -- were only capable of focusing X- rays to five arc seconds. The Advanced X-ray Telescope's resolving power is ten times greater. "Images from the new telescope will allow us to make major advances toward understanding how exploding stars create and disperse many of the elements necessary for new solar systems and for life itself," said Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Advanced X- ray Astrophysics Facility Science Center at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, in Cambridge, MA -- responsible for the telescope

  12. Adaptive optics at the Subaru telescope: current capabilities and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Oya, Shin; Minowa, Yosuke; Lai, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Takato, Naruhisa; Kasdin, Jeremy; Groff, Tyler; Hayashi, Masahiko; Arimoto, Nobuo; Takami, Hideki; Bradley, Colin; Sugai, Hajime; Perrin, Guy; Tuthill, Peter; Mazin, Ben

    2014-08-01

    Current AO observations rely heavily on the AO188 instrument, a 188-elements system that can operate in natural or laser guide star (LGS) mode, and delivers diffraction-limited images in near-IR. In its LGS mode, laser light is transported from the solid state laser to the launch telescope by a single mode fiber. AO188 can feed several instruments: the infrared camera and spectrograph (IRCS), a high contrast imaging instrument (HiCIAO) or an optical integral field spectrograph (Kyoto-3DII). Adaptive optics development in support of exoplanet observations has been and continues to be very active. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme-AO (SCExAO) system, which combines extreme-AO correction with advanced coronagraphy, is in the commissioning phase, and will greatly increase Subaru Telescope's ability to image and study exoplanets. SCExAO currently feeds light to HiCIAO, and will soon be combined with the CHARIS integral field spectrograph and the fast frame MKIDs exoplanet camera, which have both been specifically designed for high contrast imaging. SCExAO also feeds two visible-light single pupil interferometers: VAMPIRES and FIRST. In parallel to these direct imaging activities, a near-IR high precision spectrograph (IRD) is under development for observing exoplanets with the radial velocity technique. Wide-field adaptive optics techniques are also being pursued. The RAVEN multi-object adaptive optics instrument was installed on Subaru telescope in early 2014. Subaru Telescope is also planning wide field imaging with ground-layer AO with the ULTIMATE-Subaru project.

  13. The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope: design and early construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, Joseph P.; Rimmele, Thomas R.; Keil, Stephen L.; Warner, Mark; Barden, Samuel; Bulau, Scott; Craig, Simon; Goodrich, Bret; Hansen, Eric; Hegwer, Steve; Hubbard, Robert; McBride, William; Shimko, Steve; Wöger, Friedrich; Ditsler, Jennifer

    2012-09-01

    The National Solar Observatory’s (NSO) Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) is the first large U.S. solar telescope accessible to the worldwide solar physics community to be constructed in more than 30 years. The 4-meter diameter facility will operate over a broad wavelength range (0.35 to 28 μm ), employing adaptive optics systems to achieve diffraction limited imaging and resolve features approximately 20 km on the Sun; the key observational parameters (collecting area, spatial resolution, spectral coverage, polarization accuracy, low scattered light) enable resolution of the theoretically-predicted, fine-scale magnetic features and their dynamics which modulate the radiative output of the sun and drive the release of magnetic energy from the Sun’s atmosphere in the form of flares and coronal mass ejections. In 2010, the ATST received a significant fraction of its funding for construction. In the subsequent two years, the project has hired staff and opened an office on Maui. A number of large industrial contracts have been placed throughout the world to complete the detailed designs and begin constructing the major telescope subsystems. These contracts have included the site development, AandE designs, mirrors, polishing, optic support assemblies, telescope mount and coudé rotator structures, enclosure, thermal and mechanical systems, and high-level software and controls. In addition, design development work on the instrument suite has undergone significant progress; this has included the completion of preliminary design reviews (PDR) for all five facility instruments. Permitting required for physically starting construction on the mountaintop of Haleakalā, Maui has also progressed. This paper will review the ATST goals and specifications, describe each of the major subsystems under construction, and review the contracts and lessons learned during the contracting and early construction phases. Schedules for site construction, key factory testing of

  14. The Mexican Infrared-Optical New Technology Telescope: TIM Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Gonzalez, I.; Salas, L.; Ruiz, E.; Luna, E.; Pedrayes, M.; Sohn, E.; Si Erra, G.; Sanchez, B.; Valdez, J.; Gutierrez, L.; Hiriart, D.; Iriarte, A.

    2001-07-01

    We present the Mexican Infrared-Optical New Technology Telescope Project (TIM). The design and construction of a 7.8 m telescope, which will operate at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional in San Pedro Martir, B.C. (Mexico), are described. The site has been selected based on seeing and sky condition measurements taken for several years. The f/1.5 primary mirror consists of 19 hexagonal off-axis hyperbolic segments of 1.8 m in diameter. The telescope structure will be alt-az, lightweight, low cost, and high stiffness. It will be supported by hydrostatic bearings. The single secondary will complement a Ritchey-Chretien f/15 design, delivering to Cassegrain focus instrumentation. The telescope will be infrared optimized to allow observations ranging from 0.3 to 20 microns. The TIM mirror cell provides an independent and full active support system for each segment, in order to achieve both, phasing capability and very high quality imaging (0.25 arcsec). The TIM project is one of the most advanced technological UNAM projects. The participation of technical and scientific professionals of other national institutions is crucial for its success. The project is seeking partners and financing.

  15. Optical design of the new solar telescope GREGOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltau, D.; Volkmer, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Berkefeld, Th.

    2012-11-01

    This article describes the considerations which led to the current optical design of the new 1.5 m solar telescope GREGOR. The result is Gregorian design with two real foci in the optical train. The telescope includes a relay optic with a pupil image used by a high order adaptive optics system (AO). The optical design is described in detail and performance characteristics are given. Finally we show some verification results which prove that - without atmospheric effects - the completed telescope reaches a diffraction limited performance.

  16. Telescope simulators for Hubble: an overview of optical designs.

    PubMed

    Davila, P; Wood, H J; Atcheson, P D; Saunders, R; Sullivan, J; Vaughan, A H; Saisse, M

    1993-04-01

    Various optical configurations for Hubble Space Telescope simulators have been proposed, and some are being built for use as verification tools to characterize the performance of second-generation instruments during ground testing. We describe the Hubble Space Telescope, present an overview of three optical designs for simulators, and discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of each configuration.

  17. Advanced Optical Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Steve; Michael, Xuejun

    The following article describes an advanced dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) Optical Network developed by L-3 Photonics. The network, configured as an amplified optical bus, carries traffic simultaneously in both directions, using multiple wavelengths. As a result, data distribution is of the form peer-to-multi-peer, it is protocol independent, and it is scalable. The network leverages the rapid growth in commercial optical technologies, including wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), and when applied to military and commercial platforms such as aircraft, ships, unmanned and other vehicles, provides a cost-effective, low-weight, high-speed, and high noise-immune data distribution system.

  18. Novel optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Aimin; Sun, Jianfeng; Hu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingtao; Liu, Liren

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new method called modified optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging technique for encryption and decryption of remote objects. An image or object can be optically encrypted on the fly by Fresnel telescope scanning system together with an encryption key. For image decryption, the encrypted signals are received and processed with an optical coherent heterodyne detection system. The proposed method has strong performance through use of secure Fresnel telescope scanning with orthogonal polarized beams and efficient all-optical information processing. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experimental results. PMID:26191901

  19. Novel optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Aimin; Sun, Jianfeng; Hu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingtao; Liu, Liren

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new method called modified optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging technique for encryption and decryption of remote objects. An image or object can be optically encrypted on the fly by Fresnel telescope scanning system together with an encryption key. For image decryption, the encrypted signals are received and processed with an optical coherent heterodyne detection system. The proposed method has strong performance through use of secure Fresnel telescope scanning with orthogonal polarized beams and efficient all-optical information processing. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experimental results.

  20. Cost Modeling for Space Optical Telescope Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Luedtke, Alexander; West, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper reviews an on-going effort to develop cost modes for space telescopes. This paper summarizes the methodology used to develop cost models and documents how changes to the database have changed previously published preliminary cost models. While the cost models are evolving, the previously published findings remain valid: it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; technology development as a function of time reduces cost; and lower areal density telescopes cost more than more massive telescopes.

  1. Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope (ADEPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Charles L. Bennett

    2009-03-26

    In 2006, we proposed to NASA a detailed concept study of ADEPT (the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope), a potential space mission to reliably measure the time-evolution of dark energy by conducting the largest effective volume survey of the universe ever done. A peer-review panel of scientific, management, and technical experts reported back the highest possible 'excellent' rating for ADEPT. We have since made substantial advances in the scientific and technical maturity of the mission design. With this Department of Energy (DOE) award we were granted supplemental funding to support specific extended research items that were not included in the NASA proposal, many of which were intended to broadly advance future dark energy research, as laid out by the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF). The proposed work had three targets: (1) the adaptation of large-format infrared arrays to a 2 micron cut-off; (2) analytical research to improve the understanding of the dark energy figure-of- merit; and (3) extended studies of baryon acoustic oscillation systematic uncertainties. Since the actual award was only for {approx}10% of the proposed amount item (1) was dropped and item (2) work was severely restricted, consistent with the referee reviews of the proposal, although there was considerable contradictions between reviewer comments and several comments that displayed a lack of familiarity with the research. None the less, item (3) was the focus of the work. To characterize the nature of the dark energy, ADEPT is designed to observe baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in a large galaxy redshift survey and to obtain substantial numbers of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The 2003 Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) made a precise determination of the BAO 'standard ruler' scale, as it was imprinted on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at z {approx} 1090. The standard ruler was also imprinted on the pattern of galaxies, and was first detected in 2005 in Sloan

  2. James Webb Space Telescope optical telescope element/integrated science instrument module (OTIS) status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Voyon, Mark; Lander, Juli; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Matthews, Gary

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) are integrated together to form the OTIS. Once integrated, the OTIS undergoes primary mirror center of curvature optical tests, electrical and operational tests, acoustics and vibration testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center before being shipped to the Johnson Space Center for cryogenic optical testing of the OTIS. In preparation for the cryogenic optical testing, the JWST project has built a Pathfinder telescope and has completed two Optical Ground System Equipment (OGSE) cryogenic optical tests with the Pathfinder. In this paper, we will summarize optical test results to date and status the final Pathfinder test and the OTIS integration and environmental test preparations.

  3. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element/Integrated Science Instrument Module (OTIS) Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Voyton, Mark; Lander, Juli; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Matthews, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) are integrated together to form the OTIS. Once integrated, the OTIS undergoes primary mirror center of curvature optical tests, electrical and operational tests, acoustics and vibration testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center before being shipped to the Johnson Space Center for cryogenic optical testing of the OTIS. In preparation for the cryogenic optical testing, the JWST project has built a Pathfinder telescope and has completed two Optical Ground System Equipment (OGSE) cryogenic optical tests with the Pathfinder. In this paper, we will summarize optical test results to date and status the final Pathfinder test and the OTIS integration and environmental test preparations

  4. Active optics system of the VLT Survey Telescope.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; Noethe, Lothar; Magrin, Demetrio; Kuijken, Konrad; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Argomedo, Javier; Capaccioli, Massimo; Dall'Ora, Massimo; D'Orsi, Sergio; Farinato, Jacopo; Fierro, Davide; Holzlöhner, Ronald; Marty, Laurent; Molfese, Cesare; Perrotta, Francesco; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Savarese, Salvatore; Rakich, Andrew; Umbriaco, Gabriele

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the active optics system of the VLT Survey Telescope, the 2.6-m survey telescope designed for visible wavelengths of the European Southern Observatory at Cerro Paranal, in the Atacama desert. The telescope is characterized by a wide field of view (1.42 deg diameter), leading to tighter active optics than in conventional telescopes, in particular for the alignment requirements. We discuss the effects of typical error sources on the image quality and present the specific solutions adopted for wavefront sensing and correction of the aberrations, which are based on the shaping of a monolithic primary mirror and the positioning of the secondary in five degrees of freedom.

  5. New Worlds Observer Telescope and Instrument Optical Design Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph M.; Noecker, Charlie; Kendrick, Steve; Woodgate, Bruce; Kilstron, Steve; Cash, Webster

    2008-01-01

    Optical design concepts for the telescope and instrumentation for NASA s New Worlds Observer program are presented. A four-meter multiple channel telescope is discussed, as well as a suite of science instrument concepts. Wide field instrumentation (imager and spectrograph) would be accommodated by a three-mirror-anastigmat telescope design. Planet finding and characterization, and a UV instrument would use a separate channel that is picked off after the first two mirrors (primary and secondary). Guiding concepts are also discussed.

  6. Optical telescope BIRT in ORIGIN for gamma ray burst observing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Content, Robert; Sharples, Ray; Page, Mathew J.; Cole, Richard; Walton, David M.; Winter, Berend; Pedersen, Kristian; Hjorth, Jens; Andersen, Michael; Hornstrup, Allan; den Herder, Jan-Willem A.; Piro, Luigi

    2012-09-01

    The ORIGIN concept is a space mission with a gamma ray, an X-ray and an optical telescope to observe the gamma ray bursts at large Z to determine the composition and density of the intergalactic matter in the line of sight. It was an answer to the ESA M3 call for proposal. The optical telescope is a 0.7-m F/1 with a very small instrument box containing 3 instruments: a slitless spectrograph with a resolution of 20, a multi-imager giving images of a field in 4 bands simultaneously, and a cross-dispersed Échelle spectrograph giving a resolution of 1000. The wavelength range is 0.5 μm to 1.7 μm. All instruments fit together in a box of 80 mm x 80 mm x 200 mm. The low resolution spectrograph uses a very compact design including a special triplet. It contains only spherical surfaces except for one tilted cylindrical surface to disperse the light. To reduce the need for a high precision pointing, an Advanced Image Slicer was added in front of the high resolution spectrograph. This spectrograph uses a simple design with only one mirror for the collimator and another for the camera. The Imager contains dichroics to separate the bandwidths and glass thicknesses to compensate the differences in path length. All 3 instruments use the same 2k x 2k detector simultaneously so that telescope pointing and tip-tilt control of a fold mirror permit to place the gamma ray burst on the desired instrument without any other mechanism.

  7. United States Atlas of Optical Telescopes. [2nd Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, Stephen Paul

    1987-01-01

    This atlas shows the locations of and gives information about optical telescopes used for astronomical research in the United States as of late 1986. Those instruments with mirror or lens diameters of 3/4 m (approx. 30 inches) and larger are included. These telescopes are concentrated in the Southwest, on the West Coast and on the island of Hawaii.

  8. Optical Design for Extremely Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J

    2003-11-26

    Designing an adaptive optics (AO) system for extremely large telescopes (ELT's) will present new optical engineering challenges. Several of these challenges are addressed in this work, including first-order design of multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems, pyramid wavefront sensors (PWFS's), and laser guide star (LGS) spot elongation. MCAO systems need to be designed in consideration of various constraints, including deformable mirror size and correction height. The y,{bar y} method of first-order optical design is a graphical technique that uses a plot with marginal and chief ray heights as coordinates; the optical system is represented as a segmented line. This method is shown to be a powerful tool in designing MCAO systems. From these analyses, important conclusions about configurations are derived. PWFS's, which offer an alternative to Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensors (WFS's), are envisioned as the workhorse of layer-oriented adaptive optics. Current approaches use a 4-faceted glass pyramid to create a WFS analogous to a quad-cell SH WFS. PWFS's and SH WFS's are compared and some newly-considered similarities and PWFS advantages are presented. Techniques to extend PWFS's are offered: First, PWFS's can be extended to more pixels in the image by tiling pyramids contiguously. Second, pyramids, which are difficult to manufacture, can be replaced by less expensive lenslet arrays. An approach is outlined to convert existing SH WFS's to PWFS's for easy evaluation of PWFS's. Also, a demonstration of PWFS's in sensing varying amounts of an aberration is presented. For ELT's, the finite altitude and finite thickness of LGS's means that the LGS will appear elongated from the viewpoint of subapertures not directly under the telescope. Two techniques for dealing with LGS spot elongation in SH WFS's are presented. One method assumes that the laser will be pulsed and uses a segmented micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) to track the LGS light subaperture by

  9. The GSFC Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R.; Fichtel, C.; Kniffen, D.; Trombka, J.; Stacy, G.

    1983-01-01

    A new telescope is being developed at GSFC for the study of point sources of gamma rays in the energy range 1-30 MeV. Using the detection principle of a Compton scatter in a 2.5 cm thick NaI(Tl) detector followed by absorption in a 15 cm thick NaI(Tl) detector, the telescope uses a rocking collimator for field-of-view reduction and background subtraction. Background reduction techniques include lead-plastic scintillator shielding, pulse shape discrimination and Anger camera operation to both NaI detectors, as well as a time-of-flight measurement between them. The instrument configuration and status is described.

  10. The GSFC Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, R.; Fichtel, C.; Kniffen, D.; Trombka, J.; Stacy, G.

    1983-08-01

    A new telescope is being developed at GSFC for the study of point sources of gamma rays in the energy range 1-30 MeV. Using the detection principle of a Compton scatter in a 2.5 cm thick NaI(Tl) detector followed by absorption in a 15 cm thick NaI(Tl) detector, the telescope uses a rocking collimator for field-of-view reduction and background subtraction. Background reduction techniques include lead-plastic scintillator shielding, pulse shape discrimination and Anger camera operation to both NaI detectors, as well as a time-of-flight measurement between them. The instrument configuration and status is described.

  11. Optical Testing of the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronstein, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror, working to a 2018 launch date. Ground testing for the JWST will occur in two test campaigns, at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center. The talk describes the JWST and its optical ground testing, highlighting the roles of many of the University of Rochester Institute of Optics' alumni as well as current faculty and students.

  12. Optical Design for a Survey X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Zhang, William W.; McClelland, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    Optical design trades are underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to define a telescope for an x-ray survey mission. Top-level science objectives of the mission include the study of x-ray transients, surveying and long-term monitoring of compact objects in nearby galaxies, as well as both deep and wide-field x-ray surveys. In this paper we consider Wolter, Wolter-Schwarzschild, and modified Wolter-Schwarzschild telescope designs as basic building blocks for the tightly nested survey telescope. Design principles and dominating aberrations of individual telescopes and nested telescopes are discussed and we compare the off-axis optical performance at 1.0 KeV and 4.0 KeV across a 1.0-degree full field-of-view.

  13. New Worlds Observer Telescope and Instrument Optical Design Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph; Kilston, Steve; Kendrick, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Optical design concepts for the telescope and instrumentation for NASA's New Worlds Observer program are presented. First order parameters are derived from the science requirements, and estimated performance metrics are shown using optical models. A four meter multiple channel telescope is discussed, as well as a suite of science instrument concepts. Wide field instrumentation (imager and spectrograph) would be accommodated by a three-mirror anastigmat telescope design. Planet finding and characterization would use a separate channel which is picked off after the first two mirrors (primary and secondary). Guiding concepts are also discussed.

  14. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Integrated Science Instrument Module (OTIS) Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Voyton, Mark; Lander, Julie; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Matthews, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Integrated ScienceInstrument Module (ISIM)are integrated together to form the OTIS. Once integrated, the OTIS undergoes primary mirrorcenter of curvatureoptical tests, electrical and operational tests, acoustics and vibration testing at the Goddard SpaceFlight Center beforebeing shipped to the Johnson Space Center for cryogenic optical testing of the OTIS. In preparationfor the cryogenicoptical testing, the JWST project has built a Pathfinder telescope and has completed two OpticalGround SystemEquipment (OGSE) cryogenic optical tests with the Pathfinder. In this paper, we will summarize opticaltest results todate and status the final Pathfinder test and the OTIS integration and environmental test preparations

  15. Optical Metrology for the Segmented Optics on the Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Content, David; Colella, David; Fleetwood, Charles; Hadjimichael, Theo; Lehan, John; McMann, Joseph; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wright, Geraldine; Zhang, William

    2004-01-01

    We present the metrology requirements and metrology implementation necessary to prove out the reflector technology for the Constellation X(C-X) spectroscopy X-ray telescope (SXT). This segmented, 1.6m diameter highly nested Wolter-1 telescope presents many metrology and alignment challenges. In particular, these mirrors have a stringent imaging error budget as compared to their intrinsic stiffness; This is required for Constellation-X to have sufficient effective area with the weight requirement. This has implications for the metrology that can be used. A variety of contract and noncontact optical profiling and interferometric methods are combined to test the formed glass substrates before replication and the replicated reflector segments.The reflectors are tested both stand-alone and in-situ in an alignment tower.Some of these methods have not been used on prior X-ray telescopes and some are feasible only because of the segmented approach used on the SXT. Methods discussed include high precision coordinate measurement machines using very low force or optical probe axial interferometric profiling azimuthal circularity profiling and use of advanced null optics such as conical computer generated hologram (CGHs).

  16. Formation metrology and control for large separated optics space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, E.; Quadrelli, M.; Breckenridge, W.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present formation flying performance analysis initial results for a representative large space telescope composed of separated optical elements [Mett 02]. A virtual-structure construct (an equivalent rigid body) is created by unique metrology and control that combines both centralized and decentralized methods. The formation may be in orbit at GEO for super-resolution Earth observation, as in the case of Figure 1, or it may be in an Earth-trailing orbit for astrophysics, Figure 2. Extended applications are envisioned for exo-solar planet interferometric imaging by a formation of very large separated optics telescopes, Figure 3. Space telescopes, with such large apertures and f/10 to f/100 optics, are not feasible if connected by massive metering structures. Instead, the new virtual-structure paradigm of information and control connectivity between the formation elements provides the necessary spatial rigidity and alignment precision for the telescope.

  17. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Mirror Development History and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinber, Lee D.; Clampin, Mark; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Atkinson, Charlie; Texter, Scott; Bergeland, Mark; Gallagher, Benjamin B.

    2012-01-01

    In a little under a decade, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program has designed, manufactured, assembled and tested 21 flight beryllium mirrors for the James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element. This paper will summarize the mirror development history starting with the selection of beryllium as the mirror material and ending with the final test results. It will provide an overview of the technological roadmap and schedules and the key challenges that were overcome. It will also provide a summary or the key tests that were performed and the results of these tests.

  18. 8-Meter UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation proposes using the unprecedented capability of the planned Ares V launch vehicle, to place a 8 meter monolithic space telescope at the Earth-Sun L2 point. This new capability enables a new design pardigm -- simplicity. The six to eight meter class telescope with a massive high Technical Readiness Level ground observatory class monolithic primary mirror has been determined feasible. The proposed design, structural analysis, spacecraft design and shroud integration, thermal analysis, propulsion system, guidance navigation and pointing control assumptions about the avionics, and power systems, operational lifetime, and the idea of in-space servicing are reviewed.

  19. Telescope with a wide field of view internal optical scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, III, John James (Inventor); Zheng, Yunhui (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A telescope with internal scanner utilizing either a single optical wedge scanner or a dual optical wedge scanner and a controller arranged to control a synchronous rotation of the first and/or second optical wedges, the wedges constructed and arranged to scan light redirected by topological surfaces and/or volumetric scatterers. The telescope with internal scanner further incorporates a first converging optical element that receives the redirected light and transmits the redirected light to the scanner, and a second converging optical element within the light path between the first optical element and the scanner arranged to reduce an area of impact on the scanner of the beam collected by the first optical element.

  20. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  1. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  2. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  3. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-18

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  4. Telescopes in education: the great optical astronomy experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Gilbert A.

    2000-10-01

    The idea for developing the Telescopes In Education (TIE) program began around 1990. While working with Boy Scouts, it became apparent that optical astronomy captivated the interest of more boys and their parents than any other Merit Badge that I had worked with in the past. That was the beginning of the learning curve in astronomy and optical instruments.

  5. CFRP composites for optics and structures in telescope applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Robert C.

    1995-10-01

    The use of continuous fiber reinforced plastic, CFRP, composite materials is introduced here as a viable material for optical telescopes. The thermal characteristics of CFRPs make them attractive as dimensionally stable materials for all-composite telescope structures and mirrors. Composite mirrors have only recently shown promise as replacements for heavier and more fragile glass mirrors. The areal density of a CFRP mirror can be as much as 10 times less than that of a glass mirror. Optical test results show CFRP composite mirrors can be fabricated with an average surface roughness of less than 10 angstroms. Concept models of scope and CFRP optics with associated figure and roughness data are presented.

  6. Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) Support of Space to Ground Link Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Wright, Malcolm W.; Roberts, William T.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA/JPL Optical Communication Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) was built for dedicated research and development toward supporting free-space laser communications from space. Recently, the OCTL telescope was used to support the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) from the Lunar Atmospheric Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft and is planned for use with the upcoming Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) demonstration from the International Space Station (ISS). The use of OCTL to support these demonstrations is discussed in this report. The discussion will feed forward to ongoing and future space-to-ground laser communications as it advances toward becoming an operational capability.

  7. World Atlas of large optical telescopes (second edition)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    By early 1986 there will be over 120 large optical telescopes in the world engaged in astronomical research with mirror or lens diameters of one meter (39-inches) and larger. This atlas gives information on these telescopes and shows their observatory sites on continent sized maps. Also shown are observatory locations considered suitable for the construction of future large telescopes. Of the 126 major telescopes listed in this atlas, 101 are situated in the Northern Hemisphere and 25 are located in the Southern Hemisphere. The totals by regions are as follows: Europe (excluding the USSR), 30; Soviet Union, 9; Asia (excluding the USSR), 5; Africa, 9; Australia, 6; The Pacific, 4 (all on Hawaii); South America, 17; North America, 46 (the continental US has 38 of these). In all, the United States has 42 of the world's major telescopes on its territory (continental US plus Hawaii) making it by far the leading nation in astronomical instrumentation.

  8. Active optics system of the VLT Survey Telescope.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; Noethe, Lothar; Magrin, Demetrio; Kuijken, Konrad; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Argomedo, Javier; Capaccioli, Massimo; Dall'Ora, Massimo; D'Orsi, Sergio; Farinato, Jacopo; Fierro, Davide; Holzlöhner, Ronald; Marty, Laurent; Molfese, Cesare; Perrotta, Francesco; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Savarese, Salvatore; Rakich, Andrew; Umbriaco, Gabriele

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the active optics system of the VLT Survey Telescope, the 2.6-m survey telescope designed for visible wavelengths of the European Southern Observatory at Cerro Paranal, in the Atacama desert. The telescope is characterized by a wide field of view (1.42 deg diameter), leading to tighter active optics than in conventional telescopes, in particular for the alignment requirements. We discuss the effects of typical error sources on the image quality and present the specific solutions adopted for wavefront sensing and correction of the aberrations, which are based on the shaping of a monolithic primary mirror and the positioning of the secondary in five degrees of freedom. PMID:26974616

  9. Feasibility study of an optically coherent telescope array in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical methods of image construction which can be used to produce very high angular resolution images at optical wavelengths of astronomical objects from an orbiting array of telescopes are discussed and a concept is presented for a phase-coherent optical telescope array which may be deployed by space shuttle in the 1990's. The system would start as a four-element linear array with a 12 m baseline. The initial module is a minimum redundant array with a photon-counting collecting area three times larger than space telescope and a one dimensional resolution of better than 0.01 arc seconds in the visible range. Later additions to the array would build up facility capability. The advantages of a VLBI observatory in space are considered as well as apertures for the telescopes.

  10. Alignment displacements of the solar optical telescope primary mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medenica, W. V.

    1978-01-01

    Solar optical telescope is a space shuttle payload which is at the present time (1978) being planned. The selected alignment method for the telescope's primary mirror is such that the six inclined legs supporting the mirror are at the same time motorized alignment actuators, changing their own length according to the alignment requirement and command. The alignment displacements were described, including circumvention of some apparent NASTRAN limitations.

  11. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Phillip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsecond angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions. Keywords: Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST); ultraviolet/optical space telescopes; astrophysics; astrobiology; technology development.

  12. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  13. The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) optical alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süss, Martin; Koch, Dietmar; Paluszek, Heiko

    2012-09-01

    The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) is the largest radio telescope recently built in Europe - a 64m Radio Telescope designed to operate in a wavelength regime down to 1mm. The SRT is designed in a classical Gregorian configuration, allowing access to the primary mirror focus (F1), the Gregorian focus (F2) as well as a further translation to different F3 using a beam waveguide system and an automated change between different F3 receiver positions. The primary mirror M1, 64m in diameter, is composed by 1008 individual panels. The surface can be actively controlled. It’s surface, as well as the one of the 8 m Gregorian subreflector, needed to be adjusted after panel mounting at the Sardinia site. The measurement technique used is photogrammetry. In case of the large scale M1 a dedicated combination of a large scale and a small scale approach was developed to achieve extremely high accuracy on the large scale dimension. The measurement/ alignment efforts were carried out in 2010 and 2011, with a final completion in spring 2012. The results obtained are presented and discussed. The overall alignment approach also included the absolute adjustments of M2 to M1 and the alignments of M3, M4 and M5. M3 is a rotating mirror guiding the RF beam to M4 or M5, depending on the operational scenario. These adjustments are based on Lasertracker measurements and have been carried out in an integrated approach.

  14. A suggested 12-m telescope optical system configuration for China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ding-qiang; Liang, Ming; Yuan, Xiangyan; Bai, Hua; Cui, Xiangqun

    2016-08-01

    This is an optical/infrared telescope. It is a general purpose telescope. A segmented primary mirror is adopted with diameter 12 m and f-ratio 1.6. This telescope has prime focus, Cassegrain, Nasmyth and coudé systems. The prime focus system has a 1.5° field-of-view corrector with excellent image quality. It will be used for multi-object fibre spectroscopic observation and CCD photography. In this 12-m telescope, all systems except the prime focus system share the same secondary mirror; the Nasmyth and coudé systems are formed by adding relay mirrors; and the method of moving a secondary mirror is used to enhance image quality. All these features originate from the innovative optical system of the Chinese 2.16-m telescope. At the Cassegrain focus, a dark object spectrograph, for example, can be installed without any corrector; and in case a field of view is needed, a corrector may be added. Both the Nasmyth and coudé systems have exceptionally excellent image quality and the exchange between them occurs very conveniently. Many instruments in visible and infrared wavebands, some with an adaptive optics system, will be installed at the Nasmyth platform. Coudé system will be used for interferometry and for those instruments which require high stability. This configuration has a nearly full range of systems but it is not complex, and it can even be adopted by 20-40-m class telescopes.

  15. Effects of the lunar environment on optical telescopes and instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles L.; Dietz, Kurtis L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of the hostile lunar environment are assessed, and potential techniques for adverse-effect mitigation are developed. The environmental concerns addressed include Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects on telescope electronics, lunar dust obscuration and damage to optical surfaces, and micrometeor cratering of the optics and support structure. The feasibility of shielding the electronics from the GCR flux and associated secondaries is investigated as one option for noise reduction. An alternative approach to noise reduction uses shorter integration ties and multiple images for background subtraction. Dust abatement techniques such as stabilizing the lunar soil at the launch and telescope sites and covering the optics during high contamination-risk times are evaluated. The micrometeorite flux and associated surface cratering are assessed for their impact on the lifetime and integrity of the telescope.

  16. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Smith, W. Scott; Mosier, Gary; Abplanalp, Laura; Arnold, William

    2014-01-01

    ASTRO2010 Decadal stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. AMTD builds on the state of art (SOA) defined by over 30 years of monolithic & segmented ground & space-telescope mirror technology to mature six key technologies. AMTD is deliberately pursuing multiple design paths to provide the science community with op-tions to enable either large aperture monolithic or segmented mirrors with clear engineering metrics traceable to science requirements.

  17. Articulated primary mirror /APM/ for the Solar Optical Telescope /SOT/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gowrinathan, S.; Gottesman, J.

    1981-01-01

    Allowing the location of the primary vs secondary mirrors to be movable in space, the articulated primary mirror (APM) was designed as an inexpensive alternative, providing stable imagery, for the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). Requirements of high resolution in the sub-arc-second region, and the ability to point the telescope through the Instrument Pointing System (IPS) were satisfied. Alignment sensors, contained within the subsystem, locate the points of coincidence of the foci of the primary and secondary optics (conic foci). These are utilized as inputs for subsystem actuators to correct via the digital controller algorithm.

  18. Facility level thermal systems for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, LeEllen; Murga, Gaizka; Fraser, Mark; Climent, Tània

    2012-09-01

    The management and control of the local aero-thermal environment is critical for success of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST). In addition to minimizing disturbances to local seeing, the facility thermal systems must meet stringent energy efficiency requirements to minimize impact on the surrounding environment and meet federal requirements along with operational budgetary constraints. This paper describes the major facility thermal equipment and systems to be implemented along with associated energy management features. The systems presented include the central plant, the climate control systems for the computer room and coudé laboratory, the carousel cooling system which actively controls the surface temperature of the rotating telescope enclosure, and the systems used for active and passive ventilation of the telescope chamber.

  19. Corrective optics space telescope axial replacement alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, Robert B.; Satter, Michael J.; Kaplan, Michael L.; Martella, Mark A.; Freymiller, Ed D.; Buzzetta, Victor

    1993-10-01

    To facilitate the accurate placement and alignment of the corrective optics space telescope axial replacement (COSTAR) structure, mechanisms, and optics, the COSTAR Alignment System (CAS) has been designed and assembled. It consists of a 20-foot optical bench, support structures for holding and aligning the COSTAR instrument at various stages of assembly, a focal plane target fixture (FPTF) providing an accurate reference to the as-built Hubble Space Telescope (HST) focal plane, two alignment translation stages with interchangeable alignment telescopes and alignment lasers, and a Zygo Mark IV interferometer with a reference sphere custom designed to allow accurate double-pass operation of the COSTAR correction optics. The system is used to align the fixed optical bench (FOB), the track, the deployable optical bench (DOB), the mechanisms, and the optics to ensure that the correction mirrors are all located in the required positions and orientations on-orbit after deployment. In this paper, the layout of the CAS is presented and the various alignment operations are listed along with the relevant alignment requirements. In addition, calibration of the necessary support structure elements and alignment aids is described, including the two-axis translation stages, the latch positions, the FPTF, and the COSTAR-mounted alignment cubes.

  20. Advanced development of internal calibration sources for remote sensing telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintner, Eric C.; Hartley, Jeanne M.; Jacobs, Eric S.; Cucchiaro, Paul J.

    2004-11-01

    Contemporary and emerging sensor systems typically require in-flight calibration reference sources. These are required to satisfy increasingly stringent specifications for stability, repeatability, dynamic range, absolute irradiance accuracy, and irradiance distribution uniformity, while meeting stray light, weight, and power constraints. While SSG has successfully designed and flight-qualified an internal calibration source for a telescope in a Schmidt configuration, future remote sensing programs are more likely to require telescopes in a 3-mirror off-axis re-imaging configuration. A major advantage to developing an internal calibration reference source for a re-imaging telescope is the availability of an intermediate field stop where the illumination from the calibration source can be inserted into the optical train. SSG's internal source design offers important advantages over existing approaches using in-flight blackbodies, including reduced volume, weight, and power requirements and the ability to generate multiple irradiance levels over a short period of time. The GIFTS (Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer) telescope has been used as a representative platform to demonstrate this new internal calibration source, as it is representative of a design that may be used for future programs including the HES (Hyperspectral Environmental Suite) telescopes.

  1. Adaptive Optics for the 8 meter Chinese Giant Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Jacques; Liu, Zhong; Deng, Yuanyong; Ji, Haisheng

    2013-12-01

    Solar ELTs enable diffraction limited imaging of the basic structure of the solar atmosphere. Magneto-hydrodynamic considerations limit their size to about 0.03 arcsec. To observe them in the near-infrared 8-meter class telescopes are needed. The Chinese Giant Solar Telescope, or CGST, is such a NIR solar ELT. It is a Ring Telescope with 8-meter outer diameter and a central clear aperture of about 6-meter diameter. At present various options for such a Gregorian type telescope are under study like a continuous ring made of segments or a multiple aperture ring made of 7 off-axis telescopes. The advantages of such a ring telescope is that its MTF covers all spatial frequencies out to those corresponding to its outer diameter, that its circular symmetry makes it polarization neutral, and that its large central hole helps thermal control and provides ample space for MCAO and Gregorian instrumentation. We present the current status of the design of the CGST. Our thinking is guided by the outstanding performance of the 1-meter vacuum solar telescope of the Yunnan Solar Observatory which like the CGST uses both AO and image reconstruction. Using it with a ring-shape aperture mask the imaging techniques for the CGST are being explored. The CGST will have Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO). The peculiarities of Atmospheric Wavefront Tomography for Ring Telescopes are aided by the ample availability of guide stars on the Sun. IR MCAO-aided diffraction limited imaging offers the advantage of a large FOV, and high solar magnetic field sensitivity. Site testing is proceeding in western China, (e.g. northern Yunnan Province and Tibet). The CGST is a Chinese solar community project originated by the Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, the National Astronomical Observatories, the Purple Mountain Observatory, the Nanjing University, the Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology and the Beijing Normal University.

  2. An 8 Meter Monolithic UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The planned Ares V launch vehicle with its 10 meter fairing and at least 55,600 kg capacity to Earth Sun L2 enables entirely new classes of space telescopes. A consortium from NASA, Space Telescope Science Institute, and aerospace industry are studying an 8-meter monolithic primary mirror UV/optical/NIR space telescope to enable new astrophysical research that is not feasible with existing or near-term missions, either space or ground. This paper briefly reviews the science case for such a mission and presents the results of an on-going technical feasibility study, including: optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; launch vehicle performance and trajectory; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN&C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; operations & servicing; mass budget and cost.

  3. Multiple-etalon systems for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Sigwarth, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Multiple etalon systems are discussed that meet the science requirements for a narrow-passband imaging system for the 4-meter National Solar Observatory (NSO)/Advance Technology Solar Telescope (ATST). A multiple etalon system can provide an imaging interferometer that works in four distinct modes: as a spectro-polarimeter, a filter-vector magnetograph, an intermediate-band imager, and broadband high-resolution imager. Specific dual and triple etalon configurations are described that provide a spectrographic passband of 2.0-3.5 micron and reduce parasitic light levels to 10(exp -4) as required for precise polarization measurement, e.g., Zeeman measurements of magnetic sensitive lines. A TESOS-like (Telecentric Etalon SOlar Spectrometer) triple etalon system provides a spectral purity of 10(exp -5). The triple designs have the advantage of reducing the finesse requirement on each etalon; allow the use of more stable blocking filters, and have very high spectral purity. A dual-etalon double-pass (Cavallini-like) system can provide a competing configuration. Such a dual-etalon design can provide high contrast. The selection of the final focal plane instrument will depend on a trade-off between an ideal instrument and practical reality. The trade study will include the number of etalons, their aperture sizes, complexities of the optical train, number of blocking filters, configuration of the electronic control system, computer interfaces, temperature controllers, etalon controllers, and their associated feedback electronics. The heritage of single and multiple etalon systems comes from their use in several observatories, including the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak Observatory (NSO), and Kiepenheuer-Institut fur Sonnenphysik (KIS, Germany), Mees Solar Observatory (University of Hawaii), and Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory (Italy). The design of the ATST multiple etalon system will benefit from the experience gained at these

  4. CCD AND PIN-CMOS DEVELOPMENTS FOR LARGE OPTICAL TELESCOPE.

    SciTech Connect

    RADEKA, V.

    2006-04-03

    Higher quantum efficiency in near-IR, narrower point spread function and higher readout speed than with conventional sensors have been receiving increased emphasis in the development of CCDs and silicon PIN-CMOS sensors for use in large optical telescopes. Some key aspects in the development of such devices are reviewed.

  5. Novel optical designs for consumer astronomical telescopes and their application to professional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Peter; Hodgson, Alan

    2006-06-01

    Since the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope there has been widespread popular interest in astronomy. A further series of events, most notably the recent Deep Impact mission and Mars oppositions have served to fuel further interest. As a result more and more amateurs are coming into astronomy as a practical hobby. At the same time more sophisticated optical equipment is becoming available as the price to performance ratio become more favourable. As a result larger and better optical telescopes are now in use by amateurs. We also have the explosive growth in digital imaging technologies. In addition to displacing photographic film as the preferred image capture modality it has made the capture of high quality astronomical imagery more accessible to a wider segment of the astronomy community. However, this customer requirement has also had an impact on telescope design. There has become a greater imperative for wide flat image fields in these telescopes to take advantage of the ongoing advances in CCD imaging technology. As a result of these market drivers designers of consumer astronomical telescopes are now producing state of the art designs that result in wide, flat fields with optimal spatial and chromatic aberrations. Whilst some of these designs are not scalable to the larger apertures required for professional ground and airborne telescope use there are some that are eminently suited to make this transition.

  6. Simulating the optical performance of a small-sized telescope with secondary optics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulten, Cameron; Zech, Andreas; Okumura, Akira; Laporte, Philippe; Schmoll, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope (GCT) is a small-sized telescope (SST) that represents one of three novel designs that are based on Schwarzschild-Couder optics and are proposed for use within the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The GAmma-ray Telescope Elements (GATE) program has led an effort to build a prototype of the GCT at the Paris Observatory in Meudon, France. The mechanical structure of the prototype, known as the SST-GATE prototype telescope, is now complete along with the successful installation of the camera. We present the results of extensive simulation work to determine the optical performance of the SST-GATE prototype telescope. Using the ROBAST software and assuming an ideal optical system, we find the radius of the encircled point spread function (θ80) of the SST-GATE to be ∼1.3 arcmin (∼0.02°) for an on-axis (θfield =0∘) observation and ∼3.6 arcmin (∼0.06°) for an observation at the edge of the field of view (θfield = 4 .4∘). In addition, this research highlights the shadowing that results from the stopping of light rays by various telescope components such as the support masts and trusses. It is shown that for on-axis observations the effective collection area decreases by approximately 1 m2 as a result of shadowing components other than the secondary mirror. This is a similar loss (∼11%) to that seen with the current generation of conventional Davies-Cotton (DC) Cherenkov telescopes. An extensive random tolerance analysis was also performed and it was found that certain parameters, especially the secondary mirror z-position and the tip and tilt rotations of the mirrors, are critical in order to contain θ80 within the pixel limit radius for all field angles. In addition, we have studied the impact upon the optical performance of introducing a hole in the center of the secondary mirror for use with pointing and alignment instruments. We find that a small circular area (radius < 150 mm) at the center of the secondary mirror

  7. Conically scanned lidar telescope using holographic optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.

    1992-01-01

    Holographic optical elements (HOE) using volume phase holograms make possible a new class of lightweight scanning telescopes having advantages for lidar remote sensing instruments. So far, the only application of HOE's to lidar has been a non-scanning receiver for a laser range finder. We introduce a large aperture, narrow field of view (FOV) telescope used in a conical scanning configuration, having a much smaller rotating mass than in conventional designs. Typically, lidars employ a large aperture collector and require a narrow FOV to limit the amount of skylight background. Focal plane techniques are not good approaches to scanning because they require a large FOV within which to scan a smaller FOV mirror or detector array. Thus, scanning lidar systems have either used a large flat scanning mirror at which the receiver telescope is pointed, or the entire telescope is steered. We present a concept for a conically scanned lidar telescope in which the only moving part is the HOE which serves as the primary collecting optic. We also describe methods by which a multiplexed HOE can be used simultaneously as a dichroic beamsplitter.

  8. Integrated thermal disturbance analysis of optical system of astronomical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dehua; Jiang, Zibo; Li, Xinnan

    2008-07-01

    During operation, astronomical telescope will undergo thermal disturbance, especially more serious in solar telescope, which may cause degradation of image quality. As drives careful thermal load investigation and measure applied to assess its effect on final image quality during design phase. Integrated modeling analysis is boosting the process to find comprehensive optimum design scheme by software simulation. In this paper, we focus on the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software-ANSYS-for thermal disturbance analysis and the optical design software-ZEMAX-for optical system design. The integrated model based on ANSYS and ZEMAX is briefed in the first from an overview of point. Afterwards, we discuss the establishment of thermal model. Complete power series polynomial with spatial coordinates is introduced to present temperature field analytically. We also borrow linear interpolation technique derived from shape function in finite element theory to interface the thermal model and structural model and further to apply the temperatures onto structural model nodes. Thereby, the thermal loads are transferred with as high fidelity as possible. Data interface and communication between the two softwares are discussed mainly on mirror surfaces and hence on the optical figure representation and transformation. We compare and comment the two different methods, Zernike polynomials and power series expansion, for representing and transforming deformed optical surface to ZEMAX. Additionally, these methods applied to surface with non-circular aperture are discussed. At the end, an optical telescope with parabolic primary mirror of 900 mm in diameter is analyzed to illustrate the above discussion. Finite Element Model with most interested parts of the telescope is generated in ANSYS with necessary structural simplification and equivalence. Thermal analysis is performed and the resulted positions and figures of the optics are to be retrieved and transferred to ZEMAX, and thus

  9. Optical Performance Modeling of FUSE Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Friedman, Scott D.; Moos, H. Warren

    2000-01-01

    We describe the Metrology Data Processor (METDAT), the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC), and their application to the image evaluation of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) mirrors. The FUSE instrument - designed and developed by the Johns Hopkins University and launched in June 1999 is an astrophysics satellite which provides high resolution spectra (lambda/Delta(lambda) = 20,000 - 25,000) in the wavelength region from 90.5 to 118.7 nm The FUSE instrument is comprised of four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors, four Rowland circle spectrograph channels with holographic gratings, and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The OSAC code provides a comprehensive analysis of optical system performance, including the effects of optical surface misalignments, low spatial frequency deformations described by discrete polynomial terms, mid- and high-spatial frequency deformations (surface roughness), and diffraction due to the finite size of the aperture. Both normal incidence (traditionally infrared, visible, and near ultraviolet mirror systems) and grazing incidence (x-ray mirror systems) systems can be analyzed. The code also properly accounts for reflectance losses on the mirror surfaces. Low frequency surface errors are described in OSAC by using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence mirrors and Legendre-Fourier polynomials for grazing incidence mirrors. The scatter analysis of the mirror is based on scalar scatter theory. The program accepts simple autocovariance (ACV) function models or power spectral density (PSD) models derived from mirror surface metrology data as input to the scatter calculation. The end product of the program is a user-defined pixel array containing the system Point Spread Function (PSF). The METDAT routine is used in conjunction with the OSAC program. This code reads in laboratory metrology data in a normalized format. The code then fits the data using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence

  10. Optical Design of Telescopes and other Reflective Systems using SLIDERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph M.

    2007-01-01

    Optical design tools are presented to provide automatic generation of reflective optical systems for design studies and educational use. The tools are graphical in nature and use an interactive slider interface with freely available optical design software, OSLO EDU. Operation of the sliders provides input to adjust first-order and other system parameters (e.g. focal length), while appropriate system construction parameters are automatically updated to correct aberrations. Graphical output is also presented in real-time (e.g. a lens drawing) to provide the opportunity for a truly visual approach to optical design. Available systems include two- three- and four-mirror telescopes, relays, and afocal systems, either rotationally symmetric or having just a plane of symmetry. Demonstrations are presented, including a brief discussion of interfacing optical design software to MATLAB, and general research opportunities at NASA.

  11. Identifying T Tauri Stars using Small Scale Optical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, Timothy; Saathoff, I.; Rebull, L.

    2010-05-01

    The Spuck-Butchart Optical Survey Method (SBOS) is a simplified method of identifying T Tauri stars using small scale optical telescopes. However, to date the method has only been used in an attempt to distinguish T Tauri stars from standard stars. AGN and active M dwarf stars emit excess in both infrared and H-alpha, similar to T Tauri stars, making it possible that these types of objects will contaminate T Tauri selection. This study uses observations from the Kitt Peak National Observatory 0.9 Meter Telescope to further investigate the SBOS method and its true efficiency. The results of this study indicate that the initial efficiency of 70% is incorrect. Due to potential contamination by active M dwarf stars, the true efficiency is closer to 35%. The study demonstrates that while identification efficiency is much lower than initially thought, the SBOS method shows great promise for both professional and amateur research of young stellar objects.

  12. Teaching and Research in Astronomy using Small Aperture Optical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, S. K.

    2006-08-01

    Small aperture (<1m, typically 20-50cm) optical telescopes with adequate back-end instrumentation (photometer, CCD camera and CCD spectrograph etc) can be used for spreading the joy and excitement of observational astronomy among postgraduate and research students in Colleges/. On the basis of over a decade's experience in observing with small optical telescopes it has been amply demonstrated that such a facility, which any University department can hope to procure and maintain, can be effectively used for teaching as well quality research. The Physics Department of Pt Ravishankar Shukla University at Raipur, India offers Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A) as one of the specialization as a part of M Sc program in Physics. A set of observational exercises has been incorporated with a view to provide training in observations, analysis and interpretation of the astronomical data to the students. Observing facilities available in the department include 8"-14" aperture telescopes (CGE series from Celestron) equipped with the new-state-of-the-art backend instrumentation like Photometer, CCD Camera and also a CCD spectrograph. Observing facility of this kind is ideally suited for continuous monitoring of a variety of variable stars, and thus can provide valuable data for understanding the physics of stellar variability. This is especially true for a class of variable stars known as chromospherically active stars. The stars belonging to this class have variable light curves, and the most puzzling feature is that their light curves change year after year in a rather queerer way. A large fraction of these active stars are bright ones and, hence, the importance of small aperture telescope for collecting the much needed photometric data. For over a decade the research activity using 14" optical telescope is focused on photometric monitoring of well known as well suspected active stars. This together with spectroscopic data using observing facility at Indian Observatories has led

  13. The input optics of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, D. B.; Arain, M. A.; Ciani, G.; Feldbaum, D.; Fulda, P.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, R.; Heintze, M.; Martin, R. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Williams, L. F.; Mueller, G.; Quetschke, V.; Korth, W. Z.; Reitze, D. H.; Derosa, R. T.; Effler, A.; Kokeyama, K.; Frolov, V. V.; Mullavey, A.; Poeld, J.

    2016-03-01

    The Input Optics (IO) of advanced LIGO will be described. The IO consists of all the optics between the laser and the power recycling mirror. The scope of the IO includes the following hardware: phase modulators, power control, input mode cleaner, an in-vacuum Faraday isolator, and mode matching telescopes. The IO group has developed and characterized RTP-based phase modulators capable of operation at 180 W cw input power. In addition, the Faraday isolator is compensated for depolarization and thermal lensing effects up to the same power and is capable of achieving greater than 40 dB isolation. This research has been supported by the NSF through Grants PHY-1205512 and PHY-1505598. LIGO-G1600067.

  14. Model of optical scatter from microimpacts on the Hubble Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowell, L. B.

    1993-01-01

    The investigation and modelling of optical scatter from damaged or contaminated mirrors is of interest to those who wish to estimate the working life cycle of an optical system. A space born telescope faces a threat to its survival from naturally occurring micrometeoroids and man-made debris. High velocity, in the range of 4 to 14 km/s, impacts of small particles, in the range of 1 to 100 microns, will produce small craters on the impacted surface. These microcraters will typically have a size range of 3 to 300 microns for debris impacts and 6 to 600 microns for micrometeoroid impacts. If the microcraters accumulate on a telescope mirror, there will be an increase in optical scatter and a loss of image resolution. The micrometeoroid model of Cour-Palais and the orbital debris model of Kessler have been encoded in a computer program (SPENV) by the author. The output from this program has been matched with previous calculations and compared with impact data on the LDEF satellite. Subsequent work has been done to marry this computer program with an algorithm to compute optical scatter. The optical scatter algorithm employs Mie theory of scatter from small particles.

  15. The Hubble Space Telescope optical systems failure report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The findings of the Hubble Space Telescope Optical Systems Board of Investigation are reported. The Board was formed to determine the cause of the flaw in the telescope, how it occurred, and why it was not detected before launch. The Board conducted its investigation to include interviews with personnel involved in the fabrication and test of the telescope, review of documentation, and analysis and test of the equipment used in the fabrication of the telescope's mirrors. The investigation proved that the primary mirror was made in the wrong shape (a 0.4-wave rms wavefront error at 632.8 nm). The primary mirror was manufactured by the Perkin-Elmer Corporation (Hughes Danbury Optical Systems, Inc.). The critical optics used as a template in shaping the mirror, the reflective null corrector (RNC), consisted of two small mirrors and a lens. This unit had been preserved by the manufacturer exactly as it was during the manufacture of the mirror. When the Board measured the RNC, the lens was incorrectly spaced from the mirrors. Calculations of the effect of such displacement on the primary mirror show that the measured amount, 1.3 mm, accounts in detail for the amount and character of the observed image blurring. No verification of the reflective null corrector's dimensions was carried out by Perkin-Elmer after the original assembly. There were, however, clear indications of the problem from auxiliary optical tests made at the time. A special optical unit called an inverse null corrector, designed to mimic the reflection from a perfect primary mirror, was built and used to align the apparatus; when so used, it clearly showed the error in the reflective null corrector. A second null corrector was used to measure the vertex radius of the finished primary mirror. It, too, clearly showed the error in the primary mirror. Both indicators of error were discounted at the time as being themselves flawed. The Perkin-Elmer plan for fabricating the primary mirror placed complete

  16. Feasibility of utilizing Cherenkov Telescope Array gamma-ray telescopes as free-space optical communication ground stations.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Vilera, Mariafernanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Cabrero, Juan Francisco

    2013-04-10

    The signals that will be received on Earth from deep-space probes in future implementations of free-space optical communication will be extremely weak, and new ground stations will have to be developed in order to support these links. This paper addresses the feasibility of using the technology developed in the gamma-ray telescopes that will make up the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory in the implementation of a new kind of ground station. Among the main advantages that these telescopes provide are the much larger apertures needed to overcome the power limitation that ground-based gamma-ray astronomy and optical communication both have. Also, the large number of big telescopes that will be built for CTA will make it possible to reduce costs by economy-scale production, enabling optical communications in the large telescopes that will be needed for future deep-space links.

  17. Polarization optical components of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueoka, Stacey Ritsuyo

    The Daniel K Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST), when completed in 2019 will be the largest solar telescope built to date. DKIST will have a suite of first light polarimetric instrumentation requiring broadband polarization modulation and calibration optical elements. Compound crystalline retarders meet the design requirements for efficient modulators and achromatic calibration retarders. These retarders are the only possible large diameter optic that can survive the high flux, 5 arc minute field, and ultraviolet intense environment of a large aperture solar telescope at Gregorian focus. This dissertation presents work performed for the project. First, I measured birefringence of the candidate materials necessary to complete designs. Then, I modeled the polarization effects with three-dimensional ray-tracing codes as a function of angle of incidence and field of view. Through this analysis I learned that due to the incident converging F/13 beam on the calibration retarders, the previously assumed linear retarder model fails to account for effects above the project polarization specifications. I discuss modeling strategies such as Mueller matrix decompositions and simplifications of those strategies while still meeting fit error requirements. Finally, I present characterization techniques and how these were applied to prototype components.

  18. Improved Optical Design for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

    SciTech Connect

    Seppala, L

    2002-09-24

    This paper presents an improved optical design for the LSST, an fll.25 three-mirror telescope covering 3.0 degrees full field angle, with 6.9 m effective aperture diameter. The telescope operates at five wavelength bands spanning 386.5 nm to 1040 nm (B, V, R, I and Z). For all bands, 80% of the polychromatic diffracted energy is collected within 0.20 arc-seconds diameter. The reflective telescope uses an 8.4 m f/1.06 concave primary, a 3.4 m convex secondary and a 5.2 m concave tertiary in a Paul geometry. The system length is 9.2 m. A refractive corrector near the detector uses three fused silica lenses, rather than the two lenses of previous designs. Earlier designs required that one element be a vacuum barrier, but now the detector sits in an inert gas at ambient pressure. The last lens is the gas barrier. Small adjustments lead to optimal correction at each band. The filters have different axial thicknesses. The primary and tertiary mirrors are repositioned for each wavelength band. The new optical design incorporates features to simplify manufacturing. They include a flat detector, a far less aspheric convex secondary (10 {micro}m from best fit sphere) and reduced aspheric departures on the lenses and tertiary mirror. Five aspheric surfaces, on all three mirrors and on two lenses, are used. The primary is nearly parabolic. The telescope is fully baffled so that no specularly reflected light from any field angle, inside or outside of the full field angle of 3.0 degrees, can reach the detector.

  19. Established Designs For Advanced Ground Based Astronomical Telescopes In The 1-meter To 4-meter Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Anthony B.; Barentine, J.; Legters, S.

    2012-01-01

    The same technology and analytic approaches that led to cost-effective unmitigated successes for the spaceborne Kepler and WISE telescopes are now being applied to meter-class to 4-meter-class ground telescopes, providing affordable solutions to ground astronomy, with advanced features as needed for the application. The range of optical and mechanical performance standards and features that can be supplied for ground astronomy shall be described. Both classical RC designs, as well as unobscured designs are well represented in the IOS design library, allowing heritage designs for both night time and day time operations, the latter even in the proximity of the sun. In addition to discussing this library of mature features, we will also describe a process for working with astronomers early in the definition process to provide the best-value solution. Solutions can include remote operation and astronomical data acquisition and transmission.

  20. Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Polarization calibration analysis for CMB measurements with ACTPol and Advanced ACTPol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopman, Brian; ACTPol Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) is a polarization sensitive upgrade for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, located at an elevation of 5190 m on Cerro Toco in Chile. Achieving first light in 2013, ACTPol is entering its third observation season. Advanced ACTPol is a next generation upgrade for ACTPol, with additional frequencies, polarization modulation, and new detector arrays, that will begin in 2016. I will first present an overview of the two projects and then focus on describing the methods used for polarization angle calibration of the ACTPol detectors. These methods utilize polarization ray tracing in the optical design software CODEV together with detector positions determined from planet observations and represent a critical input for mapping the polarization of the CMB.

  1. Optical Studies of Orbital Debris at GEO Using Two Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K. J.; Rodriquez,H. M.; Barker, E.

    2008-01-01

    Beginning in March, 2007, optical observations of debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) were commenced using two telescopes simultaneously at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile. The University of Michigan's 0.6/0.9-m Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope) was used in survey mode to find objects that potentially could be at GEO. Because GEO objects only appear in this telescope's field of view for an average of 5 minutes, a full six-parameter orbit can not be determined. Interrupting the survey for follow-up observations leads to incompleteness in the survey results. Instead, as objects are detected on MODEST, initial predictions assuming a circular orbit are done for where the object will be for the next hour, and the objects are reacquired as quickly as possible on the CTIO 0.9-m telescope. This second telescope then follows-up during the first night and, if possible, over several more nights to obtain the maximum time arc possible, and the best six parameter orbit. Our goal is to obtain an initial orbit for all detected objects fainter than R = 15th in order to estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: magnitude and angular rate. Objects fainter than 15th are largely uncataloged and have a completely different angular rate distribution than brighter objects. Combining the information obtained for both faint and bright objects yields a more complete picture of the debris environment rather than just concentrating on the faint debris. One objective is to estimate what fraction of objects selected on the basis of angular rate are not at GEO. A second objective is to obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. This paper reports on results from two 14 night runs with both telescopes: in March and November 2007: (1) A significant fraction of objects fainter than

  2. Hobby-Eberly Telescope low-resolution spectrograph: optical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos Duenas, Francisco J.; Tejada, Carlos; Hill, Gary J.; Perez G., F.

    1998-07-01

    The Hobby Eberly Telescope (HET) is a revolutionary large telescope of 9.2 meter aperture, which is currently undergoing commissioning at McDonald Observatory. First light was obtained on December 11, 1996. Scientific operations are expected in 1998. The Low Resolution Spectrograph (LRS, a collaboration between the University of Texas at Austin, the Instituto de Astronomia de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximillians-Universitat, Munich and Georg-August-Universitat, Gottingen) is a high throughput, imaging spectrograph which rides on the HET tracker at prime focus. The LRS will be the first HET facility instrument. The unique nature of the HET has led to interesting optical design solutions for the LRS, aimed at high performance and simplicity. The LRS is a grism spectrograph with a refractive collimator and a catadioptric f/1.4 camera. The beam size is 140 mm, resulting in resolving powers between (lambda) /(Delta) (lambda) approximately 600 and 3000 with a 1 arcsec wide slit. The LRS optics were designed and partially fabricated at the IAUNAM. We present a description of the LRS specifications and optical design, and describe the manufacturing process.

  3. Cooperative educational project for optical technicians utilizing amateur telescope making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Ray

    2004-01-01

    In the modern optical shop, technicians are typically skilled machine operators who work on only one phase of the manufacture for each and every component. The product is designed, specified, methodized, scheduled and integrated by people off the shop floor. Even at the component level, the people inside the shop usually see only one stage of completion. In an effort to make the relevance of their work visible; to demonstrate competence to their peers; to gain appreciation for the work of others; and to give them a meaningful connection with the functions of optical systems, I created "The Telescope Project" for my former employer. I invited those interested to participate in an after-hours, partially subsidized project to build telescopes for themselves. The ground-rules included that we would all make the same design (thus practicing consensus and configuration management); that we would all work on every phase (thus learning from each other); and that we would obtain our parts by random lot at the end (thus making quality assurance a personal issue). In the process the participating technicians learned about optical theory, design, tolerancing, negotiation, scheduling, purchasing, fabrication, coating and assembly. They developed an appreciation for each other's contributions and a broader perspective on the consequences of their actions. In the end, each obtained a high-quality telescope for his or her personal use. Several developed an abiding love for astronomy. The project generated much interest from technicians who didn"t initially choose to participate. In this paper I describe the project in detail.

  4. Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence with Air Cerenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, David; Beskin, Gregory

    2001-12-01

    We propose using large Air Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs) to search for optical, pulsed signals from extraterrestrial intelligence. Such dishes collect tens of photons from a nanosecond-scale pulse of isotropic equivalent power of tens of solar luminosities at a distance of 100 pc. The field of view for giant ACTs can be on the order of 10 square degrees, and they will be able to monitor 10-100 stars simultaneously for nanosecond pulses of about 6th magnitude or brighter. Using the Earth's diameter as a baseline, orbital motion of the planet could be detected by timing the pulse arrivals.

  5. Performance predictions for the Keck telescope adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.T.; Olivier, S.S.

    1995-08-07

    The second Keck ten meter telescope (Keck-11) is slated to have an infrared-optimized adaptive optics system in the 1997--1998 time frame. This system will provide diffraction-limited images in the 1--3 micron region and the ability to use a diffraction-limited spectroscopy slit. The AO system is currently in the preliminary design phase and considerable analysis has been performed in order to predict its performance under various seeing conditions. In particular we have investigated the point-spread function, energy through a spectroscopy slit, crowded field contrast, object limiting magnitude, field of view, and sky coverage with natural and laser guide stars.

  6. Extreme Adaptive Optics for the Thirty Meter Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B; al., e

    2006-05-02

    Direct detection of extrasolar Jovian planets is a major scientific motivation for the construction of future extremely large telescopes such as the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). Such detection will require dedicated high-contrast AO systems. Since the properties of Jovian planets and their parent stars vary enormously between different populations, the instrument must be designed to meet specific scientific needs rather than a simple metric such as maximum Strehl ratio. We present a design for such an instrument, the Planet Formation Imager (PFI) for TMT. It has four key science missions. The first is the study of newly-formed planets on 5-10 AU scales in regions such as Taurus and Ophiucus--this requires very small inner working distances that are only possible with a 30m or larger telescope. The second is a robust census of extrasolar giant planets orbiting mature nearby stars. The third is detailed spectral characterization of the brightest extrasolar planets. The final targets are circumstellar dust disks, including Zodiacal light analogs in the inner parts of other solar systems. To achieve these, PFI combines advanced wavefront sensors, high-order MEMS deformable mirrors, a coronagraph optimized for a finely-segmented primary mirror, and an integral field spectrograph.

  7. Management of optics. [for HEAO-2 X ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, T. E.; Russell, M.

    1981-01-01

    American Science and Engineering, Inc., designed the large X-ray optic for the HEAO-2 X-ray Telescope. The key element in this project was the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA), subcontracting the fabrication of the optical surfaces and their assembly and alignment. The roles and organization of the key participants in the creation of HRMA are defined, and the degree of interaction between the groups is described. Management of this effort was extremely complex because of the intricate weaving of responsibilities, and AS&E, as HEAO-2 Program managers, needed to be well versed in the scientific objectives, the technical requirements, the program requirements, and the subcontract management. Understanding these factors was essential for implementing both technical and management controls, such as schedule and budget constraints, in-process control, residence requirements, and scientist review and feedback. Despite unforeseen technical problems and interaction differences, the HEAO-2 was built on schedule and to specification.

  8. Neptune and Titan Observed with Keck Telescope Adaptive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Macintosh, B.A.; Gibbard, S.; Gavel, D.T.; Roe, H.; De Pater, I.; Ghez, A.M.; Acton, S.; Wizinowich, P.L.; Lai, O.

    2000-05-05

    The authors report on observations taken during engineering science validation time using the new adaptive optics system at the 10-m Keck II Telescope. They observe Neptune and Titan at near-infrared wavelengths. These objects are ideal for adaptive optics imaging because they are bright and small, yet have many diffraction-limited resolution elements across their disks. In addition Neptune and Titan have prominent physical features, some of which change markedly with time. They have observed infrared-bright storms on Neptune, and very low-albedo surface regions on Titan, Saturn's largest moon, Spatial resolution on Neptune and Titan was 0.05-0.06 and 0.04-0.05 arc sec, respectively.

  9. Scanning Lidar Transceiver Telescopes Using Holographic Optical Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.

    2000-01-01

    Scanning enables remote measurements perpendicular to the ground track of airborne and spaceborne lidar systems, giving us three dimensional images of atmospheric backscatter or other measurable parameters. For ground based systems, scanning allows one to record a time series of data in multiple spatial dimensions. The large size and cost of scanning systems for atmospheric lidars using conventional scanning technologies is prohibitive for space based systems. By replacing the conventional reflective telescope with a holographic optical element (HOE) in the lidar, single axis conical scanning can be achieved with a mechanically simple system. Relatively inexpensive to produce, HOES can be used to satisfy a variety of scanning lidar applications. I will introduce the concept of the HOE and describe its production and use as a scanning lidar transceiver telescope. I will describe the advantages as well as the disadvantages and limitations of HOES in this application. Optical performance test results and two lidar systems currently using HOES will be described. Examples of data taken with these systems will be presented. Current and planned future developments will be described, including scanning without mechanical motion and wide field-of-view lidar imaging.

  10. Functional safety for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulau, Scott; Williams, Timothy R.

    2012-09-01

    Since inception, the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has planned to implement a facility-wide functional safety system to protect personnel from harm and prevent damage to the facility or environment. The ATST will deploy an integrated safety-related control system (SRCS) to achieve functional safety throughout the facility rather than relying on individual facility subsystems to provide safety functions on an ad hoc basis. The Global Interlock System (GIS) is an independent, distributed, facility-wide, safety-related control system, comprised of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) programmable controllers that monitor, evaluate, and control hazardous energy and conditions throughout the facility that arise during operation and maintenance. The GIS has been designed to utilize recent advances in technology for functional safety plus revised national and international standards that allow for a distributed architecture using programmable controllers over a local area network instead of traditional hard-wired safety functions, while providing an equivalent or even greater level of safety. Programmable controllers provide an ideal platform for controlling the often complex interrelationships between subsystems in a modern astronomical facility, such as the ATST. A large, complex hard-wired relay control system is no longer needed. This type of system also offers greater flexibility during development and integration in addition to providing for expanded capability into the future. The GIS features fault detection, self-diagnostics, and redundant communications that will lead to decreased maintenance time and increased availability of the facility.

  11. Advanced optical manufacturing digital integrated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Li, Wei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    It is necessarily to adapt development of advanced optical manufacturing technology with modern science technology development. To solved these problems which low of ration, ratio of finished product, repetition, consistent in big size and high precision in advanced optical component manufacturing. Applied business driven and method of Rational Unified Process, this paper has researched advanced optical manufacturing process flow, requirement of Advanced Optical Manufacturing integrated System, and put forward architecture and key technology of it. Designed Optical component core and Manufacturing process driven of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Digital Integrated System. the result displayed effective well, realized dynamic planning Manufacturing process, information integration improved ratio of production manufactory.

  12. EUV imaging experiment of an adaptive optics telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamoto, S.; Shibata, T.; Takenaka, E.; Yoshida, M.; Murakami, H.; Shishido, Y.; Gotoh, N.; Nagasaki, K.; Takei, D.; Morii, M.

    2009-08-01

    We report an experimental result of our normal-incident EUV telescope tuned to a 13.5 nm band, with an adaptive optics. The optics consists of a spherical primary mirror and a secondary mirror. Both are coated by Mo/Si multilayer. The diameter of the primary and the secondary mirrors are 80 mm and 55mm, respectively. The secondary mirror is a deformable mirror with 31 bimorph-piezo electrodes. The EUV from a laser plasma source was exposed to a Ni mesh with 31 micro-m wires. The image of this mesh was obtained by a backilluminated CCD. The reference wave was made by an optical laser source with 1 μm pin-hole. We measure the wave form of this reference wave and control the secondary mirror to get a good EUV image. Since the paths of EUV and the optical light for the reference were different from each other, we modify the target wave from to control the deformable mirror, as the EUV image is best. The higher order Zernike components of the target wave form, as well as the tilts and focus components, were added to the reference wave form made by simply calculated. We confirmed the validity of this control and performed a 2.1 arc-sec resolution.

  13. Cryogenic Optical Position Encoders for Mechanisms in the JWST Optical Telescope Element Simulator (OSIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Anderjaska, Thomas; Badger, James (Inventor); Capon, Tom; Davis, CLinton; Dicks, Brent (Inventor); Eichhorn, William; Garza, Mario; Guishard, Corina; Haghani, Shadan; Hakun, Claef; Haney, Paul; Happs, David (Inventor); Hovmand, Lars; Kadari, Madhu; Kirk, Jeffrey; Nyquist, Richard (Inventor); Robinson, F. David; Sullivan, Joseph (Inventor); Wilson, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The JWST Optical Telescope Element Simulator (OSIM) is a configurable, cryogenic, optical stimulus for high fidelity ground characterization and calibration of JWST's flight instruments. OSIM and its associated Beam Image Analyzer (BIA) contain several ultra-precise, cryogenic mechanisms that enable OSIM to project point sources into the instruments according to the same optical prescription as the flight telescope images stars - correct in focal surface position and chief ray angle. OSIM's and BIA's fifteen axes of mechanisms navigate according to redundant, cryogenic, absolute, optical encoders - 32 in all operating at or below 100 K. OSIM's encoder subsystem, the engineering challenges met in its development, and the encoders' sub-micron and sub-arcsecond performance are discussed.

  14. Image inversion analysis of the HST OTA (Hubble Space Telescope Optical Telescope Assembly), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvak, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Technical work during September-December 1990 consisted of: (1) analyzing HST point source images obtained from JPL; (2) retrieving phase information from the images by a direct (noniterative) technique; and (3) characterizing the wavefront aberration due to the errors in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) mirrors, in a preliminary manner. This work was in support of JPL design of compensating optics for the next generation wide-field planetary camera on HST. This digital technique for phase retrieval from pairs of defocused images, is based on the energy transport equation between these image planes. In addition, an end-to-end wave optics routine, based on the JPL Code 5 prescription of the unaberrated HST and WFPC, was derived for output of the reference phase front when mirror error is absent. Also, the Roddier routine unwrapped the retrieved phase by inserting the required jumps of +/- 2(pi) radians for the sake of smoothness. A least-squares fitting routine, insensitive to phase unwrapping, but nonlinear, was used to obtain estimates of the Zernike polynomial coefficients that describe the aberration. The phase results were close to, but higher than, the expected error in conic constant of the primary mirror suggested by the fossil evidence. The analysis of aberration contributed by the camera itself could be responsible for the small discrepancy, but was not verified by analysis.

  15. Slitless Grism Spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquali, A.; Pirzkal, N.; Larsen, S.; Walsh, J. R.; Kümmel, M.

    2006-02-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope is equipped with one grism and three prisms for low-resolution, slitless spectroscopy in the range 1150-10500 Å. The G800L grism provides optical spectroscopy between 5500 Å and >1 μm, with a mean dispersion of 39 and 24 Å pixel-1 (in the first spectral order) when coupled with the Wide Field and the High Resolution Channels, respectively. Given the lack of any on-board calibration lamps for wavelength and narrowband flat-fielding, the G800L grism can only be calibrated using astronomical targets. In this paper, we describe the strategy used to calibrate the grism in orbit, with special attention given to the treatment of the field dependence of the grism flat field, wavelength solution, and sensitivity in both channels. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  16. The Infrared-Optical Telescope (IRT) of the Exist Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutyrev, Alexander; Bloom, Joshua; Gehrels, Neil; Golisano, Craig; Gong, Quan; Grindlay, Jonathan; Moseley, Samuel; Woodgate, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The IRT is a 1.1m visible and infrared passively cooled telescope, which can locate, identify and obtain spectra of GRB afterglows at redshifts up to z 20. It will also acquire optical-IR, imaging and spectroscopy of AGN and transients discovered by the EXIST (The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope). The IRT imaging and spectroscopic capabilities cover a broad spectral range from 0.32.2m in four bands. The identical fields of view in the four instrument bands are each split in three subfields: imaging, objective prism slitless for the field and objective prism single object slit low resolution spectroscopy, and high resolution long slit on single object. This allows the instrument, to do simultaneous broadband photometry or spectroscopy of the same object over the full spectral range, thus greatly improving the efficiency of the observatory and its detection limits. A prompt follow up (within three minutes) of the transient discovered by the EXIST makes IRT a unique tool for detection and study of these events, which is particularly valuable at wavelengths unavailable to the ground based observatories.

  17. LISA telescope assembly optical stability characterization for ESA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlaan, Adrianus L.; Hogenhuis, Harmen; Pijnenburg, Joep; Lemmen, Martin; Lucarelli, Stefano; Scheulen, Dietmar; Ende, David

    2012-09-01

    The LISA Optical Stability Characterization project is part of the LISA CTP activities to achieve the required Technonlogy Readiness Level (TRL) for all of the LISA technologies used. This activity aims demonstration of the Telescope Assembly (TA), with a structure based on CFRP technology, that a CTE of 10-7 1/K can be achieved with measures to tune the CTE to this level. In addition the demonstration is required to prove that the structure exhibits highly predictable mechanical distortion characteristics when cooling down to -90°C, during outgassing in space and when going from 1g environment to 0g. This paper describes the test facilities as well as the first test results. A dedicated test setup is designed and realized to allow monitoring dimensional variations of the TA using three interferometers, while varying the temperature in a thermal vacuum chamber. Critical parameters of the verification setup are the length metrology accuracy in thermal vacuum and the thermal vacuum flexibility and stability. The test programme includes Telescope Assembly CTE measurements and thermal gradient characterization.

  18. An Easily Designed and Constructed Optical Polarimeter for Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topasna, G. A.; Topasna, D. M.; Popko, G. B.

    2013-09-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested an optical polarimeter for use with the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) 0.5 m, f/13.5 Cassegrain telescope. Our instrument is based on the common dual-beam design that utilizes a rotatable half-wave plate and Wollaston prism to image starlight onto a CCD detector after it has passed through a broadband filter. The usable field of view is lsim10'' and the operational range of the instrument is 400-700 nm. Measurements of unpolarized stars demonstrate that the instrumental polarization is lsim0.05%. Observations of seven standard stars were in agreement with their accepted values by an order of Δp(%) lsim 0.23 for the degree of polarization and Δθ(°) lsim 0.94 for the position angle.

  19. Advanced High Reflector Coatings for the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Phillips, A.; Brown, W.; Wallace, V.; Stillburn, James; Sabag, Jacques

    2006-09-01

    The Association of Universities for Research Astronomy’s (AURA) New Initiatives Office (NIO) is developing a Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope (GSMT), a next generation telescope also known as the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). The telescope, whose present design consist of six hundred eighteen 1.2 m diameter mirrors, will have truly remarkable performance. It will be able to resolve crowded star fields into individual stars in galaxies as far away as 10 million light years. It will be able to image and analyze planets and dust clouds around hundreds of nearby stars. Imaging will range from the ultraviolet (UV) to long wavelength infrared (LWIR) wavelengths. The goal is to have the telescope operational by 2014. Figure 1 shows a conceptual picture of the GSMT compared to the 10-m Keck telescope and Figure 2 shows a conceptual picture of the observatory.

  20. The First Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope GRB Afterglow Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roming, P. W. A.; Koch, T. S.; Oates, S. R.; Porterfield, B. L.; Vanden Berk, D. E.; Boyd, P. T.; Holland, S. T.; Hoversten, E. A.; Immler, S.; Marshall, F. E.; Page, M. J.; Racusin, J. L.; Schneider, D. P.; Breeveld, A. A.; Brown, P. J.; Chester, M. M.; Cucchiara, A.; DePasquale, M.; Gronwall, C.; Hunsberger, S. D.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Landsman, W. B.; Schady, P.; Still, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present the first Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow catalog. The catalog contains data from over 64,000 independent UVOT image observations of 229 GRBs first detected by Swift, the High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE2), the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), and the Interplanetary Network (IPN). The catalog covers GRBs occurring during the period from 2005 January 17 to 2007 June 16 and includes ~86% of the bursts detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). The catalog provides detailed burst positional, temporal, and photometric information extracted from each of the UVOT images. Positions for bursts detected at the 3σ level are provided with a nominal accuracy, relative to the USNO-B1 catalog, of ~0farcs25. Photometry for each burst is given in three UV bands, three optical bands, and a "white" or open filter. Upper limits for magnitudes are reported for sources detected below 3σ. General properties of the burst sample and light curves, including the filter-dependent temporal slopes, are also provided. The majority of the UVOT light curves, for bursts detected at the 3σ level, can be fit by a single power-law, with a median temporal slope (α) of 0.96, beginning several hundred seconds after the burst trigger and ending at ~1 × 105 s. The median UVOT v-band (~5500 Å) magnitude at 2000 s for a sample of "well"-detected bursts is 18.02. The UVOT flux interpolated to 2000 s after the burst, shows relatively strong correlations with both the prompt Swift BAT fluence, and the Swift X-ray flux at 11 hr after the trigger.

  1. The Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Spectral Library Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) is a Hubble Large Treasury Project, whose aim is to collect high-quality ultraviolet (1150-3100 Å) spectra of bright stars, utilizing the echelle modes of powerful Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph; with resolution and signal-to-noise rivaling the best that can be achieved at ground-based observatories in the visible. During HST Cycle 18 (2010-2011), ASTRAL was allocated 146 orbits to record eight representative late-type ("cool") stars, including well-known cosmic denizens like Procyon and Betelgeuse. In Cycle 21 (2013-2014), ASTRAL was awarded an additional 230 orbits to extend the project to the hot side of the H-R diagram: 21 targets covering the O-A spectral types, including household favorites Vega and Sirius. The second part of the program was completed in January 2015. I describe the scientific motivations for observing hot and cool stars in the UV; the unique instrumental characteristics of STIS that enabled a broad survey like ASTRAL; progress in the program to date; and prospects for the future.

  2. A real-time technique for optical alignment of telescopes with segmented optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiVittorio, Michael; Gathright, John

    2003-02-01

    While telescopes with segmented optics (currently Keck and HET and in the future GTC, CELT, GSMT, NGST, etc) present extra challenges in terms of optical alignment, they also present the opportunity for using an alignment technique not available to telescopes with monolithic optics. We present a technique for aligning telescope secondary mirrors utilizing the segmented nature of the primary. The data required is gathered in direct image mode and can be collected from science instrument detectors (as compared to a wavefront sensor). From this data aberrations (focus and coma) are calculated from which secondary piston and tip/tilt (or decenter) corrections are determined. In addition, tip/tilt corrections for each of the primary mirror segments can also be calculated. Furthermore, other aberrations are available to determine other alignment or support issues including differentiating secondary tip/tilt from decenter, focal surface tilt, and instrument aberrations. This technique has been used nightly on the Keck I and II telescopes over the last 8 years and has made a significant improvement in image quality.

  3. LBC: the prime focus optical imagers at the LBT telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedichini, Fernando; Giallongo, Emanuele; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Di Paola, Andrea; Fontana, Adriano; Speziali, Roberto; Farinato, Jacopo; Baruffolo, Andrea; Magagna, Carlo E.; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Pasian, Fabio; Smareglia, Riccardo; Anaclerio, Enzo; Gallieni, Daniele; Lazzarini, Paolo G.

    2003-03-01

    The Large Binocular Camera (LBC) is the double optical imager that will be installed at the prime foci of the Large Binocular Telescope (2x8.4 m). Four Italian observatories are cooperating in this project: Rome (CCD Camera), Arcetri-Padua (Optical Corrector) and Trieste (Software). LBC is composed by two separated large field (27 arcmin FOV) cameras, one optimized for the UBV bands and the second for the VRIZ bands. An optical corrector balances the aberrations induced by the fast (F#=1.14) parabolic primary mirror of LBT, assuring that the 80% of the PSF encircled energy falls inside one pixel for more of the 90% of the field. Each corrector uses six lenses with the first having a diameter of 80cm and the third with an aspherical surface. Two filter wheels allow the use of 8 filters. The two channels have similar optical designs satisfying the same requirements, but differ in the lens glasses: fused silica for the "blue" arm and BK7 for the "red" one. The two focal plane cameras use an array of four 4290 chips (4.5x2 K) provided by Marconi optimized for the maximum quantum efficiency (85%) in each channel. The sampling is 0.23 arcseconds/pixel. The arrays are cooled by LN2 cryostats assuring 24 hours of operation. Here we present a description of the project and its current status including a report about the Blue camera and its laboratory tests. This instrument is planned to be the first light instrument of LBT.

  4. Technology Advances at the NRAO Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix James

    2015-08-01

    The 100 meter diameter Green Bank Telescope, with its large frequency coverage, great sensitivity, all-sky tracking, and location at a protected, radio-quiet site, offers a unique platform for technological advances in astronomical instrumentation that can yield an immediate scientific payoff.MUSTANG-1.5 is a feedhorn-coupled bolometer array for 3mm that has recently been installed on the telescope. It has 64 pixels (expandable to 223) and offers sensitivity to angular scales from 9" to more than 3' over a band from 75 GHz to 105 GHz. Its capabilities for science at 3mm are complimentary to, and in some cases superior to, those offered by ALMA. MUSTANG-1.5 is a collaboration between UPenn., NIST, NRAO, and other institutions.ARGUS is a 16-pixel focal plane array for millimeter spectroscopy that will be in use on the GBT in 2015. The array architecture is designed as a scalable technology pathfinder for larger arrays, but by itself it will provide major capabilities for spectroscopy from 75-107 GHz with 8" angular resolution over a wide field-of-view. It is a collaboration between Stanford Univ., Caltech, JPL, Univ. Maryland, Univ. Miami, and NRAO.FLAG is a prototype phased array receiver operating at 21cm wavelength that is under development for the GBT. It will produce multiple beams over a wide field of view with a sensitivity competitive with that of single-pixel receivers, allowing rapid astronomical surveys. FLAG is a collaboration between BYU, WVU, and NRAO.Also under development is a mm-wave phased array receiver for the GBT, designed to operate near 90 GHz as a prototype for very large format phased array receivers in the 3mm band. It is a collaboration between UMass and BYU.VEGAS is the new spectrometer for the GBT, offering multiple configurations well matched to GBT receivers from 1 to 100 GHz and suitable for use with focal plane arrays. It is a collaboration between UCal (Berkeley) and NRAO.The new receivers and spectrometers create extremely big data

  5. The advanced LIGO input optics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Chris L; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan T; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Martin, Rodica M; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Tanner, David B; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design. PMID:26827334

  6. The advanced LIGO input optics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Chris L; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan T; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Martin, Rodica M; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Tanner, David B; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  7. New optical modalities utilizing curved focal plane imaging detector devices and large arrays for terrestrial and spaceborne telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, David

    2010-07-01

    As terrestrial and spaceborne astronomical telescopes advance in multi-functional design sophistication, incorporating greater spectral resolutions, the utilization of curved focal plane ccd and cmos imaging detectors, contoured to match the telescope's Petzval field of curvature, provides a fundamental and novel optical simplicity facilitating new imaging frontiers in astronomical research. For space based telescopes, curved focal plane detector devices require significantly fewer optics than their flat counterparts, which require field flattening optics, in achieving maximum imaging resolutions for adjoining spectrometers or imaging cameras. consequently, with fewer optics comes greater room to place other optics within the same space to accomplish other tasks, providing much greater diversification of observing functions and techniques reserved simultaneously for the telescope. Included within this is the operational capability of producing multi-wavelength spectrometers gathering data concurrently at a multitude of selected wavelengths, with greater sensitivity, reliability, size reduction, and operational longevity of the restructured optical system. Specialized applications involving optical interferometry are also achievable with further enhancements when the curved detectors are applied specifically to refine or maximize detection of fringes, and when employing occulting mask algorithms for existing light paths. for planetary surface mapping space probes, curved focal plane detection provides real-time 3D multi-perspective image acquisition for streaming 3D data sets, replacing onboard or remote computationally intensive 3D reconstructions used for examining terrestrial surface features performed with corresponding flat detectors. For earth based telescopes, where mass of the telescope's optics are not so constrained, more degrees of freedom are also part of the benefits introduced by curved focal plane detector device optimization. Associated with the very

  8. The Unique Optical Design of the NESSI Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; McGraw, J.; Zimmer, P.; Williams, T.

    The NESSI Survey telescope will be the second incarnation of the CCD/Transit Instrument. It is being designed to accomplish precision astronomical measurements, thus requiring excellent image quality and virtually no distortion over an inscribed 1° x 1° scientific field of view. Project constraints such as re-use of an existing unperforated parabolic f/2.2 primary mirror, and the desire to re-use much of the existing CTI structure, have forced the design in one direction. Scientific constraints such as the 1.42° field, 60μm/arcsec plate scale, zero focus shift with wavelength, zero distortion and 80% encircled energy within 0.25arcsec spot diameters have further limited remaining design options. After exploring nearly every optical telescope configuration known to man, and several never before imagined, the NESSI Project Team as arrived at a unique optical design that produces a field and images meeting or exceeding all these constraints. The baseline configuration is that of a "bent Cassegrain," employing a convex hyperbolic secondary, a 45° folding flat and a four lens refractive field group. One unique feature of this design is that all four lenses lie outside the primary aperture, thus introduce no obscuration. A second unique aspect of the design is that the largest lens is only slightly larger than the focal plane array. The field corrector lenses are not large by today's standards but still large enough to make the availability of glass a serious concern. A number of high performing designs were abandoned when it was learned the glass was either not available or would require a special production. With a little luck, a little insight and a lot of work, we followed the "rugged ways to the stars," and were able to arrive at a relatively simple Cassegrain design where only one corrector lens had an aspheric surface, a simple parabola, and all four lenses were made of BK7 glass. This design appears to be manufactureable and essentially meets all of the

  9. Thermal analysis of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 8-meter primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornsby, Linda; Hopkins, Randall C.; Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-07-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) preliminary design concept consists of an 8 meter diameter monolithic primary mirror enclosed in an insulated, optical tube with stray light baffles and a sunshade. ATLAST will be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 point and will experience constant exposure to the sun. The insulation on the optical tube and sunshade serve to cold bias the telescope which helps to minimize thermal gradients. The objective is to maintain the primary mirror at 280K with an active thermal control system. The geometric model of the primary mirror, optical tube, sun baffles, and sunshade was developed using Thermal Desktop®1. A detailed model of the primary mirror was required in order to characterize the static performance and thermal stability of the mirror during maneuvers. This is important because long exposure observations, such as extra-solar terrestrial planet finding and characterization, require a very stable observatory wave front. Steady state thermal analyses served to predict mirror temperatures for several different sun angles. Transient analyses were performed in order to predict thermal time constant of the primary mirror for a 20 degree slew and a 30 degree roll maneuver. This paper describes the thermal model and provides details of the geometry, thermo-optical properties, and the solar environment that influences the thermal performance. All assumptions that were used in the analysis are also documented. Estimates of mirror heater power requirements are reported. The thermal model is used to predict gradients across and through the primary mirror using an idealized boundary temperature on the back and sides of the mirror of 280 K.

  10. Thermal Analysis of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 8 Meter Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Linda; Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) preliminary design concept consists of an 8 meter diameter monolithic primary mirror enclosed in an insulated, optical tube with stray light baffles and a sunshade. ATLAST will be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 and will experience constant exposure to the sun. The insulation on the optical tube and sunshade serve to cold bias the telescope which helps to minimize thermal gradients. The primary mirror will be maintained at 280K with an active thermal control system. The geometric model of the primary mirror, optical tube, sun baffles, and sunshade was developed using Thermal Desktop(R) SINDA/FLUINT(R) was used for the thermal analysis and the radiation environment was analyzed using RADCAD(R). A XX node model was executed in order to characterize the static performance and thermal stability of the mirror during maneuvers. This is important because long exposure observations, such as extra-solar terrestrial planet finding and characterization, require a very stable observatory wave front. Steady state thermal analyses served to predict mirror temperatures for several different sun angles. Transient analyses were performed in order to predict thermal time constant of the primary mirror for a 20 degree slew or 30 degree roll maneuver. This paper describes the thermal model and provides details of the geometry, thermo-optical properties, and the environment which influences the thermal performance. All assumptions that were used in the analysis are also documented. Parametric analyses are summarized for design parameters including primary mirror coatings and sunshade configuration. Estimates of mirror heater power requirements are reported. The thermal model demonstrates results for the primary mirror heated from the back side and edges using a heater system with multiple independently controlled zones.

  11. Multiple Etalon Systems for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Sigwarth, Michael; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Multiple etalons systems are discussed that meet the 4-meter NSO/Advance Technology Solar Telescope (http://www.nso.edu/ATST/index.html) instrument and science requirements for a narrow bandpass imaging system. A multiple etalon system can provide an imaging interferometer working in four distinct modes: as a spectro-polarimeter, a filter-vector magnetograph, and a wide-band and broad-band high-resolution imager. Specific dual and triple etalon configurations will be described that provides spectrographic passband of 2.0-3.5nm and reduces parasitic light levels to 1/10000 as required by precise polarization measurement, e.g., Zeeman measurements of magnetic sensitive lines. A TESOS-like triple etalon system provides for spectral purity of 100 thousandths. The triple designs have the advantage of reducing the finesse requirement on each etalon, allowing much more stable blocking filters, and can have very high spectral purity. A dual-etalon double-pass Cavallini-like configuration can provide a competing configuration. This design can provide high contrast with only a double etalon. The selection of the final focal plan instrument will depend on a trade-off of the ideal instrument versus reality, the number of etalons, the aperture of etalons, the number of blocking filters the electronic control system and computer interfaces, the temperature control and controllers for the etalons and the electronics. The use of existing experience should provide significant cost savings. The heritage of use of etalons and multiple etalon systems in solar physics come from a number of observatories, which includes MSFC Solar Observatory (NASA), Sac Peak Observatory (NSO), and Kiepenheuer Institute for Solar Physics (Germany), Mees Solar Observatory (University of Hawaii), and Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory (Italy). The design of the ATST multiple etalon system will reply on the existing experience from these observatories.

  12. The Zadko Telescope: A Southern Hemisphere Telescope for Optical Transient Searches, Multi-Messenger Astronomy and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coward, D. M.; Todd, M.; Vaalsta, T. P.; Laas-Bourez, M.; Klotz, A.; Imerito, A.; Yan, L.; Luckas, P.; Fletcher, A. B.; Zadnik, M. G.; Burman, R. R.; Blair, D. G.; Zadko, J.; Boër, M.; Thierry, P.; Howell, E. J.; Gordon, S.; Ahmat, A.; Moore, J. A.; Frost, K.

    2010-09-01

    The new 1m f/4 fast-slew Zadko Telescope was installed in June 2008 about 70km north of Perth, Western Australia. It is the only metre-class optical facility at this southern latitude between the east coast of Australia and South Africa, and can rapidly image optical transients at a longitude not monitored by other similar facilities. We report on first imaging tests of a pilot program of minor planet searches, and Target of Opportunity observations triggered by the Swift satellite. In 12 months, 6gamma-ray burst afterglows were detected, with estimated magnitudes; two of them, GRB 090205 (z=4.65) and GRB 090516 (z=4.11), are among the most distant optical transients imaged by an Australian telescope. Many asteroids were observed in a systematic 3-month search. In September 2009, an automatic telescope control system was installed, which will be used to link the facility to a global robotic telescope network; future targets will include fast optical transients triggered by high-energy satellites, radio transient detections, and LIGO gravitational wave candidate events. We also outline the importance of the facility as a potential tool for education, training, and public outreach.

  13. Solar Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics at the Dunn Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, T.; Hegwer, S.; Richards, K.; Woeger, F.

    Solar adaptive optics has become an indispensable tool at ground based solar telescopes. Driven by the quest for ever higher spatial resolution observations of the Sun solar adaptive optics are now operated routinely at major ground based solar telescopes. The current high-resolution solar telescopes, such as the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST), are in the one-meter class and utilize AO for >95 % of the observing time to achieve the diffraction limit at visible and NIR wavelengths. Solar AO [1,2] has revitalized ground-based solar astronomy at existing telescopes. The development of high-order solar AO that is capable of delivering high Strehl in the visible will be absolutely essential for next generation solar telescopes, such as the 4m aperture Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), which undoubtedly will revolutionize solar astronomy [3]. Solar observations are performed over an extended field of view. The limited size of the isoplanatic patch, over which conventional adaptive optics (AO) provides diffraction limited resolution is a severe limitation. Solar science would benefit greatly from AO correction over large field of views. A single sunspot typically has a size of about 30 arcsec; large active regions often cover a field of 2-3 arcmin. Figure 1 shows an image of solar granulation and embedded magnetic g-band bright points observed near the limb of the sun. The field of view is approximately 120"x 80". This diffraction limited image was recorded at the Dunn Solar Telescope with high order adaptive optics and post-processed using speckle interferometry. Post-processing is required to achieve the uniform, diffraction limited imaging over such an extended FOV. However, speckle interferometry as well as other post facto restoration methods typically rely on short exposure imaging, which in most cases can not be deployed when quantitative spectroscopy and polarimetry is performed, i.e., long exposures are required. Multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) is a

  14. Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope: Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Glavallsco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8- to 16-m ultraviolet optical near Infrared space observatory for launch in the 2025 to 2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including: Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy? We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8- to 16-marcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 micron wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 sq m, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 to 2.4 micron, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to that of current generation observatory-class space missions.

  15. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishments include: Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry and government with expertise in science and space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications for monolithic primary mirror from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Pursuing long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Successfully demonstrated capability to make 0.5 m deep mirror substrate and polish it to UVOIR traceable figure specification.

  16. Removing static aberrations from the active optics system of a wide-field telescope.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; Noethe, Lothar; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Argomedo, Javier; Dall'Ora, Massimo; D'Orsi, Sergio; Farinato, Jacopo; Magrin, Demetrio; Marty, Laurent; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Umbriaco, Gabriele

    2012-07-01

    The wavefront sensor in active and adaptive telescopes is usually not in the optical path toward the scientific detector. It may generate additional wavefront aberrations, which have to be separated from the errors due to the telescope optics. The aberrations that are not rotationally symmetric can be disentangled from the telescope aberrations by a series of measurements taken in the center of the field, with the wavefront sensor at different orientation angles with respect to the focal plane. This method has been applied at the VLT Survey Telescope on the ESO Paranal observatory.

  17. Session: CSP Advanced Systems: Optical Materials (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.

    2008-04-01

    The Optical Materials project description is to characterize advanced reflector, perform accelerated and outdoor testing of commercial and experimental reflector materials, and provide industry support.

  18. Measuring the cryogenic optical alignment between the telescope element and the instruments module of the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Tony; Olczak, Eugene

    2011-09-01

    The alignment between the Aft Optical Subsystem (AOS) and the Integrated Science Instruments Module (ISIM) is non-adjustable in orbit, so the alignment must be carefully verified in a cryogenic vacuum environment prior to launch. Optical point source locations calibrated by optical metrology instruments are imaged through the AOS onto the Science Instruments to determine focal, lateral, and clock angle alignment. The pupil image of the AOS is overlaid onto the pupil image of the NIRCam to determine the tip and tilt alignment. In addition, an image from fiducial lights at the Primary Mirror checks the pupil alignment between the telescope entrance pupil, the telescope pupil mask, and the NIRCam aperture stop. The image positions are combined to determine the relative alignment between the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the ISIM in all six degrees of freedom with corresponding alignment uncertainties. Uncertainties in the position of focused images of the test sources and images from the pupils are derived from sensitivities of an optical model of the system and the Science Instrument sensing capability. Additional uncertainty in the pupil alignment measurement is due to uncertainty in the analytical removal of gravity effects that simulate the on-orbit alignment environment.

  19. Analysis of the Optical Design for the SAFIR Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Paul; Khayatian, Behrouz; Bradford, Matt; Dragovan, Mark; Hoppe, Daniel; Imbriale, William; Lee, Roger; Paine, Chris; Turner, Dick; Yorke, Harold; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2006-01-01

    SAFIR, the Single Aperture Far Infra Red Observatory, is a very powerful space mission that will achieve background-limited sensitivity in the far infrared-submillimeter spectral region. Many processes of enormous interest to astronomers can best be studied in this wavelength range, but require the demanding combination of high sensitivity, good angular resolution, and spectroscopic capability. SAFIR is a 10m class telescope to offering good angular resolution, cooled to below 5 K in order to achieve background-limited sensitivity, and equipped with a complement of large-format cameras and broadband spectrometers. Successful operation of such a facility is critically dependent on achieving the level of sensitivity expected, but this is rendered difficult by potential pickup from unwanted sources of radiation. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that the emission from the optical system itself is minimal due to its low temperature, thus emphasizing the importance of minimizing pickup from unwanted astronomical sources of radiation, including the emission from dust in our solar system (analogous to the zodiacal light, hence 'zodi'), and the emission from warm dust in the Milky Way (Galactic 'cirrus').

  20. Hubble Space Telescope COSTAR asphere verification with a modified computer-generated hologram interferometer. [Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, L.; Wilson, M.

    1993-01-01

    To correct for the spherical aberration in the Hubble Space Telescope primary mirror, five anamorphic aspheric mirrors representing correction for three scientific instruments have been fabricated as part of the development of the corrective-optics space telescope axial-replacement instrument (COSTAR). During the acceptance tests of these mirrors at the vendor, a quick and simple method for verifying the asphere surface figure was developed. The technique has been used on three of the aspheres relating to the three instrument prescriptions. Results indicate that the three aspheres are correct to the limited accuracy expected of this test.

  1. Effect of the Keck telescope`s segmented primary on the performance on the Keck adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.

    1997-06-01

    The 349 degree of freedom Keck adaptive optics system will be mapped on to the 36 segment Keck primary mirror. Each telescope segment is independently controlled in piston and tilt by an active control system and each segment also has its own set of aberrations. This presents a unique set of problems for the Keck adaptive optics system, not encountered with continuous primaries. To a certain extent the low order segment aberrations, beginning with focus, can be corrected statically by the adaptive optic system. However, the discontinuous surface at the segment edges present special problems in sensing and correcting wavefront with laser guide stars or natural guide stars.

  2. Segmented X-Ray Optics for Future Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClelland, Ryan S.

    2013-01-01

    Lightweight and high resolution mirrors are needed for future space-based X-ray telescopes to achieve advances in high-energy astrophysics. The slumped glass mirror technology in development at NASA GSFC aims to build X-ray mirror modules with an area to mass ratio of approx.17 sq cm/kg at 1 keV and a resolution of 10 arc-sec Half Power Diameter (HPD) or better at an affordable cost. As the technology nears the performance requirements, additional engineering effort is needed to ensure the modules are compatible with space-flight. This paper describes Flight Mirror Assembly (FMA) designs for several X-ray astrophysics missions studied by NASA and defines generic driving requirements and subsequent verification tests necessary to advance technology readiness for mission implementation. The requirement to perform X-ray testing in a horizontal beam, based on the orientation of existing facilities, is particularly burdensome on the mirror technology, necessitating mechanical over-constraint of the mirror segments and stiffening of the modules in order to prevent self-weight deformation errors from dominating the measured performance. This requirement, in turn, drives the mass and complexity of the system while limiting the testable angular resolution. Design options for a vertical X-ray test facility alleviating these issues are explored. An alternate mirror and module design using kinematic constraint of the mirror segments, enabled by a vertical test facility, is proposed. The kinematic mounting concept has significant advantages including potential for higher angular resolution, simplified mirror integration, and relaxed thermal requirements. However, it presents new challenges including low vibration modes and imperfections in kinematic constraint. Implementation concepts overcoming these challenges are described along with preliminary test and analysis results demonstrating the feasibility of kinematically mounting slumped glass mirror segments.

  3. Segmented X-ray optics for future space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, R. S.

    Lightweight and high resolution mirrors are needed for future space-based X-ray telescopes to achieve advances in high-energy astrophysics. The slumped glass mirror technology in development at NASA GSFC aims to build X-ray mirror modules with an area to mass ratio of ~17 cm2/kg at 1 keV and a resolution of 10 arc-sec Half Power Diameter (HPD) or better at an affordable cost. As the technology nears the performance requirements, additional engineering effort is needed to ensure the modules are compatible with space-flight. This paper describes Flight Mirror Assembly (FMA) designs for several X-ray astrophysics missions studied by NASA and defines generic driving requirements and subsequent verification tests necessary to advance technology readiness for mission implementation. The requirement to perform X-ray testing in a horizontal beam, based on the orientation of existing facilities, is particularly burdensome on the mirror technology, necessitating mechanical over-constraint of the mirror segments and stiffening of the modules in order to prevent self-weight deformation errors from dominating the measured performance. This requirement, in turn, drives the mass and complexity of the system while limiting the testable angular resolution. Design options for a vertical X-ray test facility alleviating these issues are explored. An alternate mirror and module design using kinematic constraint of the mirror segments, enabled by a vertical test facility, is proposed. The kinematic mounting concept has significant advantages including potential for higher angular resolution, simplified mirror integration, and relaxed thermal requirements. However, it presents new challenges including low vibration modes and imperfections in kinematic constraint. Implementation concepts overcoming these challenges are described along with preliminary test and analysis results demonstrating the feasibility of kinematically mounting slumped glass mirror segments.

  4. Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing Algorithm for Coarse Phasing Segmented Mirror Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spechler, Joshua A.; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.

    2013-01-01

    Segment mirror phasing, a critical step of segment mirror alignment, requires the ability to sense and correct the relative pistons between segments from up to a few hundred microns to a fraction of wavelength in order to bring the mirror system to its full diffraction capability. When sampling the aperture of a telescope, using auto-collimating flats (ACFs) is more economical. The performance of a telescope with a segmented primary mirror strongly depends on how well those primary mirror segments can be phased. One such process to phase primary mirror segments in the axial piston direction is dispersed fringe sensing (DFS). DFS technology can be used to co-phase the ACFs. DFS is essentially a signal fitting and processing operation. It is an elegant method of coarse phasing segmented mirrors. DFS performance accuracy is dependent upon careful calibration of the system as well as other factors such as internal optical alignment, system wavefront errors, and detector quality. Novel improvements to the algorithm have led to substantial enhancements in DFS performance. The Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing (ADFS) Algorithm is designed to reduce the sensitivity to calibration errors by determining the optimal fringe extraction line. Applying an angular extraction line dithering procedure and combining this dithering process with an error function while minimizing the phase term of the fitted signal, defines in essence the ADFS algorithm.

  5. Looking Back in Time: Building the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee

    2016-01-01

    When it launches in 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will look back in time at the earliest stars and galaxies forming in the universe. This talk will look back in time at the development of the JWST telescope. This will include a discussion of the design, technology development, mirror development, wave front sensing and control algorithms, lightweight cryogenic deployable structure, pathfinder telescope, and integration and test program evolution and status. The talk will provide the engineering answers on why the mirrors are made of Beryllium, why there are 18 segments, where and how the mirrors were made, how the mirrors get aligned using the main science camera, and how the telescope is being tested. It will also look back in time at the many dedicated people all over the country who helped build it.

  6. Enclosure design for the ARIES 3.6m optical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. K.; Shukla, Vishal; Bangia, Tarun; Raskar, R. D.; Kulkarni, R. R.; Ghanti, A. S.

    2012-09-01

    A 3.6-m, f/9 optical telescope is planned to be installed at Devasthal, India (Latitude:29° 21' 40'' N, Longitude: 79° 41' 04'' E, Altitude: 2450 m above msl). The telescope has Cassegrain focus and alt-azimuth mount. The design of the telescope enclosure and the auxiliary building includes a fixed base enclosure, a telescope pier, a rotating dome structure, an auxiliary building, ventilation and component handling systems. The design is optimized for thermal, mechanical, structural, as well as for telescope installation and maintenance requirements. The design aims to provide seeing limited images within the telescope enclosure. This paper presents design of the 3.6m telescope enclosure.

  7. OSAC analysis of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) telescope. [Optical Surface Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Thomas, David A.; Osantowski, John F.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation is made of the sensitivity of the image quality for the proposed FUSE telescope to mirror misalignments and a wide spatial frequency range of figure errors. Representative figure error data was obtained for the analysis from measurements made on the SEUTS (Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope Spectrograph) telescope mirrors. The tolerancing analysis was carried out with the aid of the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC) program.

  8. Optical design of the atacama cosmology telescope and the millimeter bolometric array camera.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J W; Niemack, M D; Dicker, S R; Aboobaker, A M; Ade, P A R; Battistelli, E S; Devlin, M J; Fisher, R P; Halpern, M; Hargrave, P C; Hincks, A D; Kaul, M; Klein, J; Lau, J M; Limon, M; Marriage, T A; Mauskopf, P D; Page, L; Staggs, S T; Swetz, D S; Switzer, E R; Thornton, R J; Tucker, C E

    2007-06-10

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope is a 6 m telescope designed to map the cosmic microwave background simultaneously at 145, 215, and 280 GHz with arcminute resolution. Each frequency will have a 32 by 32 element focal plane array of transition edge sensor bolometers. The telescope and the cold reimaging optics are optimized for millimeter-wave observations with these sensitive detectors. The design of each is described.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope: Optical telescope assembly handbook. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, Chris

    1990-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope is described along with how its design affects the images produced at the Science Instruments. An overview is presented of the hardware. Details are presented of the focal plane, throughput of the telescope, and the point spread function (image of an unresolved point source). Some detailed simulations are available of this, which might be useful to observers in planning their observations and in reducing their data.

  10. Paper Productivity of Ground-based Large Optical Telescopes from 2000 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Chul

    2011-08-01

    We present an analysis of the scientific (refereed) paper productivity of the current largest (diameter>8m) ground-based optical (and infrared) telescopes during the ten-year period from 2000 to 2009. The telescopes for which we have gathered and analysed the scientific publication data are the two 10-m Keck telescopes, the four 8.2-m Very Large Telescopes (VLT), the two 8.1-m Gemini telescopes, the 8.2-m Subaru telescope, and the 9.2-m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). We have analysed the numbers of papers published in various astronomical journals produced by using these telescopes. While the total numbers of papers from these observatories are largest for the VLT, followed by Keck, Gemini, Subaru, and HET, the number of papers produced by each component of the telescopes is largest for Keck, followed by VLT, Subaru, Gemini, and HET. In 2009, each telescope of the Keck, VLT, Gemini, Subaru, and HET observatories produced 135, 109, 93, 107, and 5 refereed papers, respectively. We have shown that each telescope of the Keck, VLT, Gemini, and Subaru observatories is producing 2.1+/-0.9 Nature and Science papers annually and these papers make up 1.7+/-0.8% of all refereed papers produced by using each of those telescopes. Extending this relation, we propose that this ratio of the number of Nature and Science papers to the total number of refereed papers that will be produced by future extremely large telescopes (ELTs) will remain similar. From a comparison of the publication trends of the above telescopes, we suggest that (i) having more than one telescope of the same kind at the same location and (ii) increasing the number of instruments available at the telescope are good ways to maximize the paper productivity.

  11. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid, segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (eg, Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate it s feasibility.

  12. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (e.g., Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate its feasibility.

  13. Active optics primary mirror support system for the 26m VST telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, Pietro; D'Orsi, Sergio; Ferragina, Luigi; Fierro, Davide; Marty, Laurent; Molfese, Cesare; Perrotta, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    The Very Large Telescope Survey Telescope (VST) is equipped with an active optics system in order to correct low-order aberrations. The 2.6 m primary mirror is supported both axially and laterally and is surrounded by several safety devices for earthquake protection. We describe the mirror support system and discuss the results of the qualification test campaign.

  14. A view in the mirror - Or through the looking glass. [history of development of optical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    The development of optical telescopes from the age of astrology to those of today and the future is discussed. The rationales for changes in the design of telescopes during this time are explored. The cost drivers, and how to reduce them, are also discussed.

  15. The James Webb Telescope Instrument Suite Layout: Optical System Engineering Considerations for a Large, Deployable Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent; Davila, Pam; Jurotich, Matthew; Hobbs, Gurnie; Lightsey, Paul; Contreras, Jim; Whitman, Tony

    2003-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a space-based, infrared observatory designed to study the early stages of galaxy formation in the Universe. The telescope will be launched into an elliptical orbit about the second Lagrange point and passively cooled to 30-50 K to enable astronomical observations from 0.6 to 28 microns. A group from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Northrop Grumman Space Technology prime contractor team has developed an optical and mechanical layout for the science instruments within the JWST field of view that satisfies the telescope s high-level performance requirements. Four instruments required accommodation within the telescope's field of view: a Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) provided by the University of Arizona; a Near-Mared Spectrometer (NIRSpec) provided by the European Space Agency; a Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a European consortium; and a Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) with a tunable filter module provided by the Canadian Space Agency. The size and position of each instrument's field of view allocation were developed through an iterative, concurrent engineering process involving the key observatory stakeholders. While some of the system design considerations were those typically encountered during the development of an infrared observatory, others were unique to the deployable and controllable nature of JWST. This paper describes the optical and mechanical issues considered during the field of view layout development, as well as the supporting modeling and analysis activities.

  16. Development of laser guide stars and adaptive optics for large astronomical telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Avicola, K.; Bissinger, H.; Brase, J.M.; Gavel, D.T.; Friedman, H.; Morris, J.R.; Olivier, S.S.; Rapp, D.; Salmon, J.T.; Waltjen, K.

    1992-06-29

    We describe a feasibility experiment to demonstrate high-order adaptive optics using a sodium-layer laser guide star. We use the copper-vapor-pumped dye lasers developed for LLNL`s atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation program to create the laser guide star. Closed-loop adaptive corrections will be accomplished using a 69-subaperture adaptive optics system on a one-meter telescope at LLNL. The laser bream is projected upwards from a beam director approximately 5 meters away from the main telescope, and is expected to form a spot 1-2 meters in diameter at the atmospheric sodium layer (95 km altitude). We describe the overall system architecture and adaptive optics components, and analyze the expected performance. Our long-term goal is to develop sodium-layer laser guide stars and adaptive optics for large astronomical telescopes. We discuss preliminary design trade-offs for the Keck Telescope at Mauna Kea.

  17. Development of laser guide stars and adaptive optics for large astronomical telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Avicola, K.; Bissinger, H.; Brase, J.M.; Gavel, D.T.; Friedman, H.; Morris, J.R.; Olivier, S.S.; Rapp, D.; Salmon, J.T.; Waltjen, K.

    1992-06-29

    We describe a feasibility experiment to demonstrate high-order adaptive optics using a sodium-layer laser guide star. We use the copper-vapor-pumped dye lasers developed for LLNL's atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation program to create the laser guide star. Closed-loop adaptive corrections will be accomplished using a 69-subaperture adaptive optics system on a one-meter telescope at LLNL. The laser bream is projected upwards from a beam director approximately 5 meters away from the main telescope, and is expected to form a spot 1-2 meters in diameter at the atmospheric sodium layer (95 km altitude). We describe the overall system architecture and adaptive optics components, and analyze the expected performance. Our long-term goal is to develop sodium-layer laser guide stars and adaptive optics for large astronomical telescopes. We discuss preliminary design trade-offs for the Keck Telescope at Mauna Kea.

  18. Stray light analysis of large aperture optical telescope using TracePro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cheng-ming; Zhao, Fei; Zhang, Ze

    2014-11-01

    In order to verify the effect of stray light elimination design, the detailed stray light analysis of one modified large aperture optical telescope using TracePro is described in this paper. Firstly, the sources of stray light in optical telescope and the influence of stray light on optical telescope are introduced. Then, the principle of stray light analysis using TracePro is presented. The solid model, surface properties and light paths of the modified large aperture optical telescope are determined. Ray splitting and importance sampling are adopted to ensure the calculation accuracy and reduce the time consumption. The Point Source Normalized Irradiance Transmittance (PSNIT) curve of the system is plotted. It shows the PSNITs are less than 10-12 when off-axis angles are larger than 30°, which satisfies the requirement of the system. Finally, the several special fields of stray light control are discussed.

  19. Cryogenic Optical Performance of the Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) Flight Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losch, Patricia; Lyons, James J., III; Hagopian, John

    1998-01-01

    The CIRS half-meter diameter beryllium flight telescope's optical performance was tested at the instrument operating temperature of 170 Kelvin. The telescope components were designed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) but fabricated out of house and then assembled, aligned and tested upon receipt at GSFC. A 24 inch aperture cryogenic test facility utilizing a 1024 x 1024 CCD array was developed at GSFC specifically for this test. The telescope,s image quality (measured as encircled energy), boresight stability and focus stability were measured. The gold coated beryllium design exceeded the cold image performance requirement of 80% encircled energy within a 460 micron diameter circle.

  20. Telescope Scientist on the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Carl M. (Technical Monitor); VanSpeybroeck, Leon; Tananbaum, Harvey D.

    2004-01-01

    In this period, the Chandra X-ray Observatory continued to perform exceptionally well, with many scientific observations and spectacular results. The HRMA performance continues to be essentially identical to that predicted from ground calibration data. The Telescope Scientist Team has improved the mirror model to provide a more accurate description to the Chandra observers, enabling them to reduce the systematic errors and uncertainties in their data reduction. There also has been good progress in the scientific program. Using the Telescope Scientist GTO time, we carried out an extensive Chandra program to observe distant clusters of galaxies. The goals of this program were to use clusters to derive cosmological constraints and to investigate the physics and evolution of clusters. A total of 71 clusters were observed with ACIS-I; the last observations were completed in December 2003.

  1. Telescope Scientist on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanSpeybroeck, Leon

    1999-01-01

    The most important activity during this reporting period was the calibration of the AXAF High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) and the analysis of the copious data which were obtained during that project. The calibration was highly successful, and will result in the AXAF being by far the best calibrated X-ray observatory ever flown, and more accurate results by all of its users. This period also included participation in the spacecraft alignment and assembly activities and final flight readiness reviews. The planning of the first year of Telescope Scientist AXAF observations also was accomplished. The Telescope Scientist team also served as a technical resource for various problems which were encountered during this period. Many of these contributions have been documented in memoranda sent to the project.

  2. 8-Meter UV/Optical Space Telescope at L2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    The unprecedented mass/volume capability of an Ares V enables the launch of 8 meter class monolithic space telescopes to the Earth-Sun L2 point. NASA MSFC has determined that a 6 to 8 meter class telescope using a massive high-TRL ground observatory class monolithic primary mirror is feasible. Mature, High-TRL design enables early deployment. Science Instruments, Expendables and Limited Life Components can be replace periodically via Spacecraft Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking.

  3. 8 Meter Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST-8m)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    ATLAST-8m (Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope) is a proposed 8-meter monolithic UV/optical/NIR space observatory (wavelength range 110 to 2500 nm) to be placed in orbit at Sun-Earth L2 by NASA's planned Ares V heavy lift vehicle. Given its very high angular resolution (15 mas @ 500 nm), sensitivity and performance stability, ATLAST-8m is capable of achieving breakthroughs in a broad range of astrophysics including: Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy? An 8-meter UVOIR observatory has the performance required to detect habitability (H2O, atmospheric column density) and biosignatures (O2, O3, CH4) in terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres, to reveal the underlying physics that drives star formation, and to trace the complex interactions between dark matter, galaxies, and intergalactic medium. The ATLAST Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study developed a detailed point design for an 8-m monolithic observatory including optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN&C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; mass and power budgets; and system cost. The results of which were submitted by invitation to NRC's 2010 Astronomy & Astrophysics Decadal Survey.

  4. Active optics system of the ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiol, Daniele; Capobianco, Gerardo; Fantinel, Daniela; Giro, Enrico; Lessio, Luigi; Loreggia, Davide; Rodeghiero, Gabriele; Russo, Federico; Volpicelli, Antonio C.

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) SST-2M is an end-to-end prototype of Small Size class of Telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array. It will apply a dual mirror configuration to Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes. The 18 segments composing the primary mirror (diameter 4.3 m) are equipped with an active optics system enabling optical re-alignment during telescope slew. The secondary mirror (diameter 1.8 m) can be moved along three degrees of freedom to perform focus and tilt corrections. We describe the kinematic model used to predict the system performance as well as the hardware and software design solution that will be implemented for optics control.

  5. Robust determination of optical path difference: fringe tracking at the infrared optical telescope array interferometer.

    PubMed

    Pedretti, Ettore; Traub, Wesley A; Monnier, John D; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Carleton, Nathaniel P; Schloerb, F Peter; Brewer, Michael K; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Lacasse, Marc G; Ragland, Sam

    2005-09-01

    We describe the fringe-packet tracking system used to equalize the optical path lengths at the Infrared Optical Telescope Array interferometer. The measurement of closure phases requires obtaining fringes on three baselines simultaneously. This is accomplished by use of an algorithm based on double Fourier interferometry for obtaining the wavelength-dependent phase of the fringes and a group-delay tracking algorithm for determining the position of the fringe packet. A comparison of data acquired with and without the fringe-packet tracker shows a factor of approximately 3 reduction of the error in the closure-phase measurement. The fringe-packet tracker has been able so far to track fringes with signal-to-noise ratios as low as 1.8 for stars as faint as mH = 7.0.

  6. Robust determination of optical path difference: fringe tracking at the infrared optical telescope array interferometer.

    PubMed

    Pedretti, Ettore; Traub, Wesley A; Monnier, John D; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Carleton, Nathaniel P; Schloerb, F Peter; Brewer, Michael K; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Lacasse, Marc G; Ragland, Sam

    2005-09-01

    We describe the fringe-packet tracking system used to equalize the optical path lengths at the Infrared Optical Telescope Array interferometer. The measurement of closure phases requires obtaining fringes on three baselines simultaneously. This is accomplished by use of an algorithm based on double Fourier interferometry for obtaining the wavelength-dependent phase of the fringes and a group-delay tracking algorithm for determining the position of the fringe packet. A comparison of data acquired with and without the fringe-packet tracker shows a factor of approximately 3 reduction of the error in the closure-phase measurement. The fringe-packet tracker has been able so far to track fringes with signal-to-noise ratios as low as 1.8 for stars as faint as mH = 7.0. PMID:16149339

  7. Wide field/planetary camera optics study. [for the large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Design feasibility of the baseline optical design concept was established for the wide field/planetary camera (WF/PC) and will be used with the space telescope (ST) to obtain high angular resolution astronomical information over a wide field. The design concept employs internal optics to relay the ST image to a CCD detector system. Optical design performance predictions, sensitivity and tolerance analyses, manufacturability of the optical components, and acceptance testing of the two mirror Cassegrain relays are discussed.

  8. Radio and Optical Telescopes for School Students and Professional Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosmer, Laura; Langston, G.; Heatherly, S.; Towner, A. P.; Ford, J.; Simon, R. S.; White, S.; O'Neil, K. L.; Haipslip, J.; Reichart, D.

    2013-01-01

    The NRAO 20m telescope is now on-line as a part of UNC's Skynet worldwide telescope network. The NRAO is completing integration of radio astronomy tools with the Skynet web interface. We present the web interface and astronomy projects that allow students and astronomers from all over the country to become Radio Astronomers. The 20 meter radio telescope at NRAO in Green Bank, WV is dedicated to public education and also is part of an experiment in public funding for astronomy. The telescope has a fantastic new web-based interface, with priority queuing, accommodating priority for paying customers and enabling free use of otherwise unused time. This revival included many software and hardware improvements including automatic calibration and improved time integration resulting in improved data processing, and a new ultra high resolution spectrometer. This new spectrometer is optimized for very narrow spectral lines, which will allow astronomers to study complex molecules and very cold regions of space in remarkable detail. In accordance with focusing on broader impacts, many public outreach and high school education activities have been completed with many confirmed future activities. The 20 meter is now a fully automated, powerful tool capable of professional grade results available to anyone in the world. Drop by our poster and try out real-time telescope control!

  9. Design of differential optical absorption spectroscopy long-path telescopes based on fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Merten, André; Tschritter, Jens; Platt, Ulrich

    2011-02-10

    We present a new design principle of telescopes for use in the spectral investigation of the atmosphere and the detection of atmospheric trace gases with the long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. A combination of emitting and receiving fibers in a single bundle replaces the commonly used coaxial-Newton-type combination of receiving and transmitting telescope. This very simplified setup offers a higher light throughput and simpler adjustment and allows smaller instruments, which are easier to handle and more portable. The higher transmittance was verified by ray-tracing calculations, which result in a theoretical factor threefold improvement in signal intensity compared with the old setup. In practice, due to the easier alignment and higher stability, up to factor of 10 higher signal intensities were found. In addition, the use of a fiber optic light source provides a better spectral characterization of the light source, which results in a lower detection limit for trace gases studied with this instrument. This new design will greatly enhance the usability and the range of applications of active DOAS instruments.

  10. Design of differential optical absorption spectroscopy long-path telescopes based on fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Merten, André; Tschritter, Jens; Platt, Ulrich

    2011-02-10

    We present a new design principle of telescopes for use in the spectral investigation of the atmosphere and the detection of atmospheric trace gases with the long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. A combination of emitting and receiving fibers in a single bundle replaces the commonly used coaxial-Newton-type combination of receiving and transmitting telescope. This very simplified setup offers a higher light throughput and simpler adjustment and allows smaller instruments, which are easier to handle and more portable. The higher transmittance was verified by ray-tracing calculations, which result in a theoretical factor threefold improvement in signal intensity compared with the old setup. In practice, due to the easier alignment and higher stability, up to factor of 10 higher signal intensities were found. In addition, the use of a fiber optic light source provides a better spectral characterization of the light source, which results in a lower detection limit for trace gases studied with this instrument. This new design will greatly enhance the usability and the range of applications of active DOAS instruments. PMID:21343997

  11. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    Objective of this work is to define and initiate a long-term program to mature six inter-linked critical technologies for future UVOIR space telescope mirrors to TRL6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. (1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors: 4 to 8 m monolithic & 8 to 16 m segmented primary mirrors require larger, thicker, stiffer substrates. (2) Support System:Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch and deploy on orbit in a stress-free and undistorted shape. (3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error:A very smooth mirror is critical for producing a high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high-contrast imaging. (4) Segment Edges:Edges impact PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects the total collecting aperture. (5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing:Segment phasing is critical for producing a high-quality temporally stable PSF. (6) Integrated Model Validation:On-orbit performance is determined by mechanical and thermal stability. Future systems require validated performance models. We are pursuing multiple design paths give the science community the option to enable either a future monolithic or segmented space telescope.

  12. Goddard Robotic Telescope - Optical Follow-up of GRBs and Coordinated Observations of AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Wallace, C. A.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Okajima, T.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2010-01-01

    Since it is not possible to predict when a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will occur or when Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) flaring activity starts, follow-up/monitoring ground telescopes must be located as uniformly as possible all over the world in order to collect data simultaneously with Fermi and Swift detections. However, there is a distinct gap in follow-up coverage of telescopes in the eastern U.S. region based on the operations of Swift. Motivated by this fact, we have constructed a 14" fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up Swift/Fermi GRBs and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) AGN. Our telescope system consists of off-the-shelf hardware. With the focal reducer, we are able to match the field of view of Swift narrow instruments (20' x 20'). We started scientific observations in mid-November 2008 and GRT has been fully remotely operated since August 2009. The 3(sigma) upper limit in a 30-second exposure in the R filter is approx.15.4 mag; however, we can reach to approx.18 mag in a 600-second exposures. Due to the weather condition at the telescope site. our observing efficiency is 30-40%, on average.

  13. Optical Observations of GEO Debris with Two Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Rodriguez, H.; Barker, E.

    2007-01-01

    For several years, the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST), the University of Michigan s 0.6/0.9-m Schmidt telescope on Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile has been used to survey the debris population at GEO in the visible regime. Magnitudes, positions, and angular rates are determined for GEO objects as they move across the telescope s field-of-view (FOV) during a 5-minute window. This short window of time is not long enough to determine a full six parameter orbit so usually a circular orbit is assumed. A longer arc of time is necessary to determine eccentricity and to look for changes in the orbit with time. MODEST can follow objects in real-time, but only at the price of stopping survey operations. A second telescope would allow for longer arcs of orbit to obtain the full six orbital parameters, as well as assess the changes over time. An additional benefit of having a second telescope is the capability of obtaining BVRI colors of the faint targets, aiding efforts to determine the material type of faint debris. For 14 nights in March 2007, two telescopes were used simultaneously to observe the GEO debris field. MODEST was used exclusively in survey mode. As objects were detected, they were handed off in near real-time to the Cerro Tololo 0.9-m telescope for follow-up observations. The goal was to determine orbits and colors for all objects fainter than R = 15th magnitude (corresponds to 1 meter in size assuming a 0.2 albedo) detected by MODEST. The hand-off process was completely functional during the final eight nights and follow-ups for objects from night-to-night were possible. The cutoff magnitude level of 15th was selected on the basis of an abrupt change in the observed angular rate distribution in the MODEST surveys. Objects brighter than 15th magnitude tend to lie on a well defined locus in the angular rate plane (and have orbits in the catalog), while fainter objects fill the plane almost uniformly. We need to determine full

  14. Multivariable Parametric Cost Model for Ground Optical: Telescope Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Rowell, Ginger Holmes; Reese, Gayle; Byberg, Alicia

    2004-01-01

    A parametric cost model for ground-based telescopes is developed using multi-variable statistical analysis of both engineering and performance parameters. While diameter continues to be the dominant cost driver, diffraction limited wavelength is found to be a secondary driver. Other parameters such as radius of curvature were examined. The model includes an explicit factor for primary mirror segmentation and/or duplication (i.e. multi-telescope phased-array systems). Additionally, single variable models based on aperture diameter were derived.

  15. Multivariable Parametric Cost Model for Ground Optical Telescope Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Rowell, Ginger Holmes; Reese, Gayle; Byberg, Alicia

    2005-01-01

    A parametric cost model for ground-based telescopes is developed using multivariable statistical analysis of both engineering and performance parameters. While diameter continues to be the dominant cost driver, diffraction-limited wavelength is found to be a secondary driver. Other parameters such as radius of curvature are examined. The model includes an explicit factor for primary mirror segmentation and/or duplication (i.e., multi-telescope phased-array systems). Additionally, single variable models Based on aperture diameter are derived.

  16. Integrated Modeling Activities for the James Webb Space Telescope: Structural-Thermal-Optical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Howard, Joseph M.; Mosier, Gary E.; Parrish, Keith A.; McGinnis, Mark A.; Bluth, Marcel; Kim, Kevin; Ha, Kong Q.

    2004-01-01

    The James Web Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space telescope scheduled for launch in 2011. This is a continuation of a series of papers on modeling activities for JWST. The structural-thermal-optical, often referred to as STOP, analysis process is used to predict the effect of thermal distortion on optical performance. The benchmark STOP analysis for JWST assesses the effect of an observatory slew on wavefront error. Temperatures predicted using geometric and thermal math models are mapped to a structural finite element model in order to predict thermally induced deformations. Motions and deformations at optical surfaces are then input to optical models, and optical performance is predicted using either an optical ray trace or a linear optical analysis tool. In addition to baseline performance predictions, a process for performing sensitivity studies to assess modeling uncertainties is described.

  17. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Soummer, Remi; Sivramakrishnan, Annand; Macintosh, Bruce; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Stahl, H. Philip; Smith, W. Scott; Mosier, Gary; Kirk, Charles; Arnold, William

    2013-01-01

    ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. AMTD is the start of a multiyear effort to develop, demonstrate and mature critical technologies to TRL-6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. AMTD builds on the state of art (SOA) defined by over 30 years of monolithic & segmented ground & space-telescope mirror technology to mature six key technologies: (1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirror Substrates: Both (4 to 8 m) monolithic and (8 to 16 m) segmented primary mirrors require larger, thicker, and stiffer substrates. (2) Support System: Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch and deploy on orbit in a stress-free and undistorted shape. (3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error: Very smooth mirror is critical for producing high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high contrast imaging. (4) Segment Edges: The quality of segment edges impacts PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects total collecting aperture. (5) Segment to Segment Gap Phasing: Segment phasing is critical for producing high-quality temporally-stable PSF. (6) Integrated Model Validation: On-orbit performance is driven by mechanical & thermal stability. Compliance cannot be 100% tested, but relies on modeling. AMTD is pursuing multiple design paths to provide the science community with options to enable either large aperture monolithic or segmented mirrors with clear engineering metrics traceable to science requirements.

  18. Telescope Scientist on the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanSpeybroeck, L.; Smith, Carl M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This period included many scientific observations made with the Chandra Observatory. The results, as is well known, are spectacular. Fortunately, the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) performance continues to be essentially identical to that predicted from ground calibration data. The Telescope Scientist Team has improved the mirror model to provide a more accurate description to the Chandra observers and enable them to reduce the systematic errors and uncertainties in their data reduction. We also have made considerable progress in improving the scattering model. There also has been progress in the scientific program. At this time 58 distant clusters of galaxies have been observed. We are performing a systematic analysis of this rather large data set for the purpose of determining absolute distances utilizing the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect. These observations also have been used to study the evolution of the cluster baryon mass function and the cosmological constraints which result from this evolution.

  19. Telescope Scientist on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanSpeybroeck, L.; Smith, Carl M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This period included many scientific observations made with the Chandra Observatory. The results, as is well known, are spectacular. Fortunately, the HRMA performance continues to be essentially identical to that predicted from ground calibration data. The Telescope Scientist Team has improved the mirror model to provide a more accurate description to the Chandra observers and enable them to reduce the systematic errors and uncertainties in their data reduction. There also has been progress in the scientific program. At this time 47 distant clusters of galaxies have been observed. We are performing a systematic analysis of this rather large data set for the purpose of determining absolute distances utilizing the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect.

  20. An Inexpensive Method to use an Ocean Optics Spectrometer for Telescopic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joel, Berger; Sugerman, B. E. K.

    2012-01-01

    We present a relatively-inexpensive method for using an Ocean Optics spectrometer for telescopic spectroscopy. The Ocean Optics spectrometer is a highly-sensitive, affordable and versatile fiber-optic spectrometer that can be used in a variety of physics and astronomy classes and labs. With about $275 and a small amount of machining, this spectrometer can be easily adapted for any telescope that accepts 2" eyepieces. We provide the equipment list, machining specs, and calibration process, as well as sample stellar spectra. This work was supported by the Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Office of the Provost of Goucher College.

  1. Optical design for amateur reflecting telescopes based on tilted axial-symmetrical planoidal mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuprakov, Sergey A.

    2012-09-01

    Two-mirrors aplanatic optical design for amateur telescopes up to 0.5m class is described. The optical system is low cost, easy for adjusting, fast and large field of view can be used for visual and astrophotography. The method for calculation of baffles for straight light protection is described. The optical performances and sample shots for the builted device are presented. Keywords: two-mirrors system, all-reflecting schmidt system, aplanatic system, protection from straight light, baffles, obscuration, wide-field, telescopes for amateurs.

  2. The Optical Performance of the 81/90/3032mm ADH Baker-Schmidt Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A. D.

    1997-07-01

    The optical performance of the ADH Baker-Schmidt telescope is discussed in the light of test plates taken by the author and the comments from its maker, Perkin Elmer Corp. U.S.A. Although modern optical tests are needed to make a final judgement on the correction requirements, the ADH telescope seems to be a feasible, future refurbishment project. There is no question as to the cost effectiveness of using existing optics, including a full-aperture objective prism. The use of modern detector devices for galactic and extragalactic studies, including low-dispersion spectroscopy, such as developed for other large Schmidts is suggested.

  3. Photonic muscle active optics for space telescopes (active optics with 1023 actuators)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Joe

    2009-08-01

    Presented is a novel optical system using Cis-Trans photoisomerization where nearly every molecule of a mirror substrate is itself an optically powered actuator. Primary mirrors require sub-wavelength figure (shape) error in order to achieve acceptable Strehl ratios. Traditional telescopy methods require rigid and therefore heavy mirrors and reaction structures as well as proportionally heavy and expensive spacecraft busses and launch vehicles. Areal density can be reduced by increasing actuation density. Making every molecule of a substrate an actuator approaches the limit of the areal density vs actuation design trade space. Cis-Trans photoisomerization, a reversible reorganization of molecular structure induced by light, causes a change in the shape and volume of azobenzene based molecules. Induced strain in these "photonic muscles" can be over 40%. Forces are pico-newtons/molecule. Although this molecular limit is not typically multiplied in aggregate materials we have made, considering the large number of molecules in a mole, future optimized systems may approach this limit In some π-π* mixed valence azo-polymer membranes we have made photoisomerization causes a highly controllable change in macroscopic dimension with application of light. Using different wavelengths and polarizations provides the capability to actively reversibly and remotely control membrane mirror shape and dynamics using low power lasers, instead of bulky actuators and wires, thus allowing the substitution of optically induced control for rigidity and mass. Areal densities of our photonic muscle mirrors are approximately 100 g/m2. This includes the substrate and actuators (which are of course the same). These materials are thin and flexible (similar to saran wrap) so high packing ratios are possible, suggesting the possibility of deployable JWST size mirrors weighing 6 kilograms, and the possibility of ultralightweight space telescopes the size of a football field. Photons weigh nothing

  4. Production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR mirror blank for the Advanced Technology Solar telescope (ATST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Werner, Thomas; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope in the world. It is currently being built by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) in a height of 3000 m above sea level on the mountain Haleakala of Maui, Hawaii. The primary mirror blank of diameter 4.26 m is made of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® of SCHOTT AG Advanced Optics. The DKIST primary mirror design is extremely challenging. With a mirror thickness of only 78 to 85 mm it is the smallest thickness ever machined on a mirror of 4.26 m in diameter. Additionally the glassy ZERODUR® casting is one of the largest in size ever produced for a 4 m class ZERODUR® mirror blank. The off axis aspherical mirror surface required sophisticated grinding procedures to achieve the specified geometrical tolerance. The small thickness of about 80 mm required special measures during processing, lifting and transport. Additionally acid etch treatment was applied to the convex back-surface and the conical shaped outer diameter surface to improve the strength of the blank. This paper reports on the challenging tasks and the achievements on the material property and dimensional specification parameter during the production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR® primary mirror blank for AURA.

  5. Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Watterson, C.E.

    1997-05-01

    The Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices project was initiated in march 1991 to support design laboratory guidance on electro-optic device packaging and evaluation. Sandia National Laboratory requested AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), to prepare for future packaging efforts in electro-optic integrated circuits. Los Alamos National Laboratory requested the evaluation of electro-optic waveguide devices for nuclear surety applications. New packaging techniques involving multiple fiber optic alignment and attachment, binary lens array development, silicon V-groove etching, and flip chip bonding were requested. Hermetic sealing of the electro-optic hybrid and submicron alignment of optical components present new challenges to be resolved. A 10-channel electro-optic modulator and laser amplifier were evaluated for potential surety applications.

  6. Precise Radio-Telescope Measurements Advance Frontier Gravitational Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    Scientists using a continent-wide array of radio telescopes have made an extremely precise measurement of the curvature of space caused by the Sun's gravity, and their technique promises a major contribution to a frontier area of basic physics. "Measuring the curvature of space caused by gravity is one of the most sensitive ways to learn how Einstein's theory of General Relativity relates to quantum physics. Uniting gravity theory with quantum theory is a major goal of 21st-Century physics, and these astronomical measurements are a key to understanding the relationship between the two," said Sergei Kopeikin of the University of Missouri. Kopeikin and his colleagues used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio-telescope system to measure the bending of light caused by the Sun's gravity to an accuracy of 0.03 percent. With further observations, the scientists say their precision technique can make the most accurate measure ever of this phenomenon. Bending of starlight by gravity was predicted by Albert Einstein when he published his theory of General Relativity in 1916. According to relativity theory, the strong gravity of a massive object such as the Sun produces curvature in the nearby space, which alters the path of light or radio waves passing near the object. The phenomenon was first observed during a solar eclipse in 1919. Though numerous measurements of the effect have been made over the intervening 90 years, the problem of merging General Relativity and quantum theory has required ever more accurate observations. Physicists describe the space curvature and gravitational light-bending as a parameter called "gamma." Einstein's theory holds that gamma should equal exactly 1.0. "Even a value that differs by one part in a million from 1.0 would have major ramifications for the goal of uniting gravity theory and quantum theory, and thus in predicting the phenomena in high-gravity regions near black holes," Kopeikin said. To make

  7. Testing the equipment for the cryogenic optical test of the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Dziak, K. J.; Huguet, Jesse; Knight, J. Scott; Reis, Carl; Wilson, Erin

    2014-08-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the JWST optics are tested at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. Tens of trucks full of custom test equipment are being delivered to the JSC, in addition to the large pieces built at the Center, and the renovation of the chamber itself. The facility is tested for the thermal stability control for optical measurements and contamination control during temperature transitions. The support for the OTIS is also tested for thermal stability control, load tested in the cryogenic environment, and tested for isolation of the background vibration for the optical measurements. The Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) is tested for the phasing and wavefront error (WFE) measurement of an 18 segment mirror and for cryogenic operation. A photogrammetry system is tested for metrology performance and cryogenic operation. Test mirrors for auto-collimation measurements are tested for optical performance and cryogenic operation. An assembly of optical test sources are calibrated and tested in a cryogenic environment. A Pathfinder telescope is used as a surrogate telescope for cryogenic testing of the OTIS optical test configuration. A Beam Image Analyzer (BIA) is used as a surrogate ISIM with the Pathfinder in this test. After briefly describing the OTIS optical test configuration, the paper will overview the list and configuration of significant tests of the equipment leading up to the OTIS test.

  8. Integrated Modeling Activities for the James Webb Space Telescope: Optical Jitter Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, T. Tupper; Ha, Kong Q.; Johnston, John D.; Howard, Joseph M.; Mosier, Gary E.

    2004-01-01

    This is a continuation of a series of papers on the integrated modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope(JWST). Starting with the linear optical model discussed in part one, and using the optical sensitivities developed in part two, we now assess the optical image motion and wavefront errors from the structural dynamics. This is often referred to as "jitter: analysis. The optical model is combined with the structural model and the control models to create a linear structural/optical/control model. The largest jitter is due to spacecraft reaction wheel assembly disturbances which are harmonic in nature and will excite spacecraft and telescope structural. The structural/optic response causes image quality degradation due to image motion (centroid error) as well as dynamic wavefront error. Jitter analysis results are used to predict imaging performance, improve the structural design, and evaluate the operational impact of the disturbance sources.

  9. The optical design of a visible adaptive optics system for the Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopon, Derek

    The Magellan Adaptive Optics system will achieve first light in November of 2012. This AO system contains several subsystems including the 585-actuator concave adaptive secondary mirror, the Calibration Return Optic (CRO) alignment and calibration system, the CLIO 1-5 microm IR science camera, the movable guider camera and active optics assembly, and the W-Unit, which contains both the Pyramid Wavefront Sensor (PWFS) and the VisAO visible science camera. In this dissertation, we present details of the design, fabrication, assembly, alignment, and laboratory performance of the VisAO camera and its optical components. Many of these components required a custom design, such as the Spectral Differential Imaging Wollaston prisms and filters and the coronagraphic spots. One component, the Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector (ADC), required a unique triplet design that had until now never been fabricated and tested on sky. We present the design, laboratory, and on-sky results for our triplet ADC. We also present details of the CRO test setup and alignment. Because Magellan is a Gregorian telescope, the ASM is a concave ellipsoidal mirror. By simulating a star with a white light point source at the far conjugate, we can create a double-pass test of the whole system without the need for a real on-sky star. This allows us to test the AO system closed loop in the Arcetri test tower at its nominal design focal length and optical conjugates. The CRO test will also allow us to calibrate and verify the system off-sky at the Magellan telescope during commissioning and periodically thereafter. We present a design for a possible future upgrade path for a new visible Integral Field Spectrograph. By integrating a fiber array bundle at the VisAO focal plane, we can send light to a pre-existing facility spectrograph, such as LDSS3, which will allow 20 mas spatial sampling and R˜1,800 spectra over the band 0.6-1.05 microm. This would be the highest spatial resolution IFU to date, either

  10. The Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager: Diffraction limited imaging at visible wavelengths with large ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crass, Jonathan; Mackay, Craig; King, David; Rebolo-López, Rafael; Labadie, Lucas; Puga, Marta; Oscoz, Alejandro; González Escalera, Victor; Pérez Garrido, Antonio; López, Roberto; Pérez-Prieto, Jorge; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis; Velasco, Sergio; Villó, Isidro

    2015-01-01

    One of the continuing challenges facing astronomers today is the need to obtain ever higher resolution images of the sky. Whether studying nearby crowded fields or distant objects, with increased resolution comes the ability to probe systems in more detail and advance our understanding of the Universe. Obtaining these high-resolution images at visible wavelengths however has previously been limited to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) due to atmospheric effects limiting the spatial resolution of ground-based telescopes to a fraction of their potential. With HST now having a finite lifespan, it is prudent to investigate other techniques capable of providing these kind of observations from the ground. Maintaining this capability is one of the goals of the Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI).Achieving the highest resolutions requires the largest telescope apertures, however, this comes at the cost of increased atmospheric distortion. To overcome these atmospheric effects, there are two main techniques employed today: adaptive optics (AO) and lucky imaging. These techniques individually are unable to provide diffraction limited imaging in the visible on large ground-based telescopes; AO currently only works at infrared wavelengths while lucky imaging reduces in effectiveness on telescopes greater than 2.5 metres in diameter. The limitations of both techniques can be overcome by combing them together to provide diffraction limited imaging at visible wavelengths on the ground.The Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager is being developed as a European collaboration and combines AO and lucky imaging in a dedicated instrument for the first time. Initially for use on the 4.2 metre William Herschel Telescope, AOLI uses a low-order adaptive optics system to reduce the effects of atmospheric turbulence before imaging with a lucky imaging based science detector. The AO system employs a novel type of wavefront sensor, the non-linear Curvature Wavefront Sensor (nlCWFS) which provides

  11. The dynamic solar chromosphere: recent advances from high resolution telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, Konstantinos; Tsiropoula, Georgia

    This review focuses on the solar chromosphere, a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer that exhibits phenomena on a large range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution observa-tions from existing telescopes (DST, SST, DOT), as well as long-duration observations with Hinode's SOT employing lines such as the Ca II infrared lines, the Ca II HK and above all the Hα line reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured environment, both in quiet and active regions. The fine-structure chromosphere, is mainly constituted by fibrilar features that connect various parts of active regions or span across network cell interiors. We discuss this highly dynamical solar chromosphere, especially below the magnetic canopy, which is gov-erned by flows reflecting both the complex geometry and dynamics of the magnetic field and the propagation and dissipation of waves in the different atmospheric layers. A comprehensive view of the fine-structure chromosphere requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved, investigation of the intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric lev-els and analysis of its impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through flows resulting from different physical processes such as magnetic reconnection and waves. Furthermore, we assess the challenges facing theory and numerical modelling which require the inclusion of several physical ingredients, such as non-LTE and three-dimensional numerical simulations.

  12. Optical design for ATHENA X-ray telescope based on slumped mirror segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proserpio, Laura; Breunig, Elias; Friedrich, Peter; Winter, Anita

    2014-07-01

    The Hot and Energetic Universe will be the focus of future ESA missions: in late 2013 the theme was selected for the second large-class mission in the Cosmic Vision science program. Fundamental questions on how and why ordinary matter assemble into galaxies and clusters, and how black holes grow and influence their surroundings can be addressed with an advanced X-ray observatory. The currently proposed ATHENA mission presents all the potentiality to answer the outstanding questions. It is based on the heritage of XMM-Newton and on the previous studies for IXO mission. The scientific payload will require state of the art instrumentations. In particular, the baseline for the X-ray optical system, delivering a combination of large area, high angular resolution, and large field of view, is the Silicon Pore Optics technology (SPO) developed by ESA in conjunction with the Cosine Measurement Systems. The slumping technology is also under development for the manufacturing of future X-ray telescopes: for several years the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial physics (MPE) has been involved in the analysis of the indirect slumping approach, which foresees the manufacturing of segmented X-ray shells by shaping thin glass foils at high temperatures over concave moulds so to avoid any contact of the optical surface with other materials during the process, preserving in this way the original X-ray quality of the glass surface. The paper presents an alternative optical design for ATHENA based on the use of thin glass mirror segments obtained through slumping.

  13. Precision-Deployable, Stable, Optical Benches for Cost-Effective Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Rolf; Pellegrino, S.; Dailey, D.; Marks, G.; Bookbinder, J.

    2012-05-01

    To explore the universe at the arcsecond resolution of Chandra, while increasing collecting area by at least an order of magnitude and maintaining affordability, we will need to make creative use of existing and new technology. Precision-deployable, stable, optical benches that fit inside smaller, lower-cost launch vehicles are a prime example of a technology well within current reach that will yield breakthrough benefits for future astrophysics missions. Deployable optical benches for astrophysical applications have a reputation for complexity; however, we are offering an approach, based on techniques used in space for decades, that reduces overall mission cost. Currently, deployable structures are implemented on JAXA’s Astro-H and NASA’s NuStar high-energy astrophysics missions. We believe it is now time to evolve these structures into precision, stable optical benches that are stiff, lightweight, and suitable for space telescopes with focal lengths of 20 meters or more. Such optical benches are required for advanced observatory class missions and can be scaled to Explorer and medium-class missions. To this end, we have formed a partnership between Space Structures Laboratory (SSL) at the California Institute of Technology, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS), Northrop Grumman Astro Aerospace (Astro), and Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO). Combining the expertise and tools from academia and industry is the most effective approach to take this concept to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6. We plan to perform small sub-scale demonstrations, functional tests, and analytical modeling in the academic environment. Using results from SSL, larger prototypes will be developed at facilities at NGAS in Redondo Beach and Carpinteria, CA.

  14. End-to-End Assessment of a Large Aperture Segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Bolcar, Matt; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Olivier; Stark,Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield Exo-Earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an Exo-Earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance.

  15. Cryogenic Optical Performance of the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) Flight Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losch, Patricia; Lyons, James J., III; Hagopian, John

    1998-01-01

    The CIRS half-meter diameter beryllium flight telescope's optical performance was tested at the instrument operating temperature of 170 Kelvin. The telescope components were designed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) but fabricated out of house and then assembled, aligned and tested upon receipt at GSFC. A 24 inch aperture cryogenic test facility utilizing a 1024 x 1024 CCD array was developed at GSFC specifically for this test. The telescope's image quality (measured as encircled energy), boresight stability and focus stability were measured. The gold coated beryllium design exceeded the image performance requirement of 80% encircled energy within a 432 microns diameter circle.

  16. CFRP composite optical telescope assembly for the 1 m ULTRA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Robert N.; Romeo, Robert C.

    2006-06-01

    The focus of the ULTRA Project is to develop and test Ultra-Lightweight Technology for Research applications in Astronomy. The ULTRA project is a collaborative effort involving the private firm Composite Mirror Applications, Inc (CMA) and 3 universities: University of Kansas, San Diego State University, and Dartmouth College. Funding for ULTRA is predominately from a NSF three year MRI program grant to CMA and KU with additional support from CMA, KU and SDSU. The goal of the ULTRA program is to demonstrate that a viable alternative exists to traditional glass mirror and steel telescope technology by designing, fabricating and testing a research telescope constructed from carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials. In particular, a 1m diameter, Cassegrain telescope optics set and optical tube assembly (OTA) are being designed and fabricated by CMA. The completed telescope will be deployed at SDSU's Mt Laguna Observatory in a refurbished structure (new dome and mount provided via KU and SDSU). We expect that a successful completion and testing of this project will lead to future use of CFRP technology in larger telescopes and segmented telescopes. This paper describes the OTA (optical tube assembly) that has been developed for the ULTRA project. The mirror technology is described in another paper in this conference. A poster describes the ULTRA project overview in more detail.

  17. Lunar-based optical telescopes: Planning astronomical tools of the twenty-first century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchey, J. D.; Nein, M. E.

    1995-01-01

    A succession of optical telescopes, ranging in aperture from 1 to 16 m or more, can be deployed and operated on the lunar surface over the next half-century. These candidates to succeed NASA's Great Observatories would capitalize on the unique observational advantages offered by the Moon. The Lunar Telescope Working Group and the LUTE Task Team of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have assessed the feasibility of developing and deploying these facilities. Studies include the 16-m Large Lunar Telescope (LLT); the Lunar Cluster Telescope Experiment (LCTE), a 4-m precursor to the LLT; the 2-m Lunar Transit Telescope (LTT); and its precursor, the 1-m Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE). The feasibility of developing and deploying each telescope was assessed and system requirements and options for supporting technologies, subsystems, transportation, and operations were detailed. Influences of lunar environment factors and site selection on telescope design and operation were evaluated, and design approaches and key tradeoffs were established. This paper provides an overview of the study results. Design concepts and brief system descriptions are provided, including subsystem and mission options selected for the concepts.

  18. Lunar-based optical telescopes: Planning astronomical tools of the twenty-first century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchey, J. D.; Nein, M. E.

    1995-02-01

    A succession of optical telescopes, ranging in aperture from 1 to 16 m or more, can be deployed and operated on the lunar surface over the next half-century. These candidates to succeed NASA's Great Observatories would capitalize on the unique observational advantages offered by the Moon. The Lunar Telescope Working Group and the LUTE Task Team of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have assessed the feasibility of developing and deploying these facilities. Studies include the 16-m Large Lunar Telescope (LLT); the Lunar Cluster Telescope Experiment (LCTE), a 4-m precursor to the LLT; the 2-m Lunar Transit Telescope (LTT); and its precursor, the 1-m Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE). The feasibility of developing and deploying each telescope was assessed and system requirements and options for supporting technologies, subsystems, transportation, and operations were detailed. Influences of lunar environment factors and site selection on telescope design and operation were evaluated, and design approaches and key tradeoffs were established. This paper provides an overview of the study results. Design concepts and brief system descriptions are provided, including subsystem and mission options selected for the concepts.

  19. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Simulation Testbed II: design of a three-lens anastigmat telescope simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet, Élodie; Levecq, Olivier; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Perrin, Marshall D.; Soummer, Rémi

    2014-08-01

    The JamesWebb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop experiment designed to reproduce the main aspects of wavefront sensing and control (WFS and C) for JWST. To replicate the key optical physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) design at optical wavelengths we have developed a three-lens anastigmat optical system. This design uses custom lenses (plano-convex, plano-concave, and bi-convex) with fourth-order aspheric terms on powered surfaces to deliver the equivalent image quality and sampling of JWST NIRCam at the WFS and C wavelength (633 nm, versus JWST's 2.12 μm). For active control, in addition to the segmented primary mirror simulator, JOST reproduces the secondary mirror alignment modes with five degrees of freedom. We present the testbed requirements and its optical and optomechanical design. We study the linearity of the main aberration modes (focus, astigmatism, coma) both as a function of field point and level of misalignments of the secondary mirror. We find that the linearity with the transmissive design is similar to what is observed with a traditional TMA design, and will allow us to develop a linear-control alignment strategy based on the multi-field methods planned for JWST.

  20. Large aperture solar optical telescope and instruments for the SOLAR-C mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Hara, H.; Kano, R.; Shimizu, T.; Ichimoto, K.

    2014-08-01

    A large aperture solar optical telescope and its instruments for the SOLAR-C mission are under study to provide the critical physical parameters in the lower solar atmosphere and to resolve the mechanism of magnetic dynamic events happening there and in the upper atmosphere as well. For the precise magnetic field measurements and high angular resolution in wide wavelength region, covering FOV of 3 arcmin x3 arcmin, an entrance aperture of 1.4 m Gregorian telescope is proposed. Filtergraphs are designed to realize high resolution imaging and pseudo 2D spectro-polarimetry in several magnetic sensitive lines of both photosphere and chromosphere. A full stokes polarimetry is carried out at three magnetic sensitive lines with a four-slit spectrograph of 2D image scanning mechanism. We present a progress in optical and structural design of SOLAR-C large aperture optical telescope and its observing instruments which fulfill science requirements.

  1. A Fiber-Optic Coupled Telescope for Water Vapor DIAL Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell J.; Lonn, Frederick

    1998-01-01

    A fiber-optic coupled telescope of low complexity was constructed and tested. The major loss mechanisms of the optical system have been characterized. Light collected by the receiver mirror is focused onto an optical fiber, and the output of the fiber is filtered by an interference filter and then focused onto an APD detector. This system was used in lidar field measurements with a 532-nm Nd:YAG laser beam. The results were encouraging. A numerical model used for calculation of the expected return signal agreed with the lidar return signal obtained. The assembled system was easy to align and operate and weighed about 8 kg for a 30 cm (12") mirror system. This weight is low enough to allow mounting of the fiber-optic telescope receiver system in a UAV. Furthermore, the good agreement between the numerical lidar model and the performance of the actual receiver system, suggests that this model may be used for estimation of the performance of this and other lidar systems in the future. Such telescopes are relatively easy to construct and align. The fiber optic cable allows easy placement of the optical detector in any position. These telescope systems should find widespread use in aircraft and space home DIAL water vapor receiver systems.

  2. Optical design of an all-reflecting, high resolution camera for active-optics on ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, E. H.; Morbey, C. L.

    Optical designs of high-resolution all-mirror cameras for the active optics of the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) with classical optics (a paraboloidal primary), and the 2.2-m University of Hawaii telescope with Ritchey-Chretien (R-C) optics (a hyperboloidal primary), are presented. An oblate spheroid is used to produce longer focal ratios in the R-C telescope, lessening its disadvantage of a very small field of good definition at focal ratios longer than the optimized secondary focal ratio. Unlike the R-C telescope, the CFHT is not coma-free, and the prolate spheroid works well as its tertiary mirror. In the present camera design, the scale at the final focus is such that 0.25 arcsec covers 0.065 mm in order to match the resolution of the available detector. These cameras are off-axis, resulting in a slight change of magnification with the field rotation of alt-azimuth telescopes.

  3. The Optical Design of the 40-in. Telescope and of the Irenee DuPont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

    PubMed

    Bowen, I S; Vaughan, A H

    1973-07-01

    The optical specifications of two astronomical telescopes designed to permit wide-field photography with critical definition are presented and compared. The 40-in. (1.016-m) and DuPont 100-in. (2.54-m) telescopes use modifications of the Ritchey-Chretién design with Gascoigne correctors. By avoiding the need for field flatteners through choice of mirrors yielding zero Petzval sum (40-in. telescope) or bending of photographic plates to a moderate field curvature (100-in. telescope), it was possible to achieve monochromatic images of ? to (1/4) sec of arc over fields of 3 degrees and 2.1 degrees , respectively.

  4. The Optical Design of the 40-in. Telescope and of the Irenee DuPont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

    PubMed

    Bowen, I S; Vaughan, A H

    1973-07-01

    The optical specifications of two astronomical telescopes designed to permit wide-field photography with critical definition are presented and compared. The 40-in. (1.016-m) and DuPont 100-in. (2.54-m) telescopes use modifications of the Ritchey-Chretién design with Gascoigne correctors. By avoiding the need for field flatteners through choice of mirrors yielding zero Petzval sum (40-in. telescope) or bending of photographic plates to a moderate field curvature (100-in. telescope), it was possible to achieve monochromatic images of ? to (1/4) sec of arc over fields of 3 degrees and 2.1 degrees , respectively. PMID:20125543

  5. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a multi-year effort to systematically mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. This technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. To accomplish our objective, We use a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND result in a high-performance low-cost low-risk system.

  6. Recent developments of advanced structures for space optics at Astrium, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, Thomas; Wulz, Georg; Scheulen, Dietmar

    2003-12-01

    The mechanical division of EADS Astrium GmbH, Friedrichshafen Germany, the former Dornier Satellitensystem GmbH is currently engaged with the development, manufacturing and testing of three different advanced dimensionally stable composite and ceramic material structures for satellite borne optics: -CFRP Camera Structure -Planck Telescope Reflectors -NIRSpec Optical Bench Breadboard for James Web Space Telescope The paper gives an overview over the requirements and the main structural features how these requirements are met. Special production aspects and available test results are reported.

  7. Advanced centering of mounted optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Christian; Winkelmann, Ralf; Klar, Rainer; Philippen, Peter; Garden, Ron; Pearlman, Sasha; Pearlman, Guy

    2016-03-01

    Camera objectives or laser focusing units consist of complex lens systems with multiple lenses. The optical performance of such complex lens systems is dependent on the correct positioning of lenses in the system. Deviations in location or angle within the system directly affect the achievable image quality. To optimize the achievable performance of lens systems, these errors can be corrected by machining the mount of the lens with respect to the optical axis. The Innolite GmbH and Opto Alignment Technology have developed a novel machine for such center turning operation. A confocal laser reflection measurement sensor determines the absolute position of the optical axis with reference to the spindle axis. As a strong advantage compared to autocollimator measurements the utilized Opto Alignment sensor is capable of performing centration and tilt measurements without changing objectives on any radius surface from 2 mm to infinity and lens diameters from 0.5 mm to 300 mm, including cylinder, aspheric, and parabolic surfaces. In addition, it performs significantly better on coated lenses. The optical axis is skewed and offset in reference to the spindle axis as determined by the measurement. Using the information about the mount and all reference surfaces, a machine program for an untrue turning process is calculated from this data in a fully automated manner. Since the optical axis is not collinear with the spindle axis, the diamond tool compensates for these linear and tilt deviations with small correction movements. This results in a simple machine setup where the control system works as an electronic alignment chuck. Remaining eccentricity of <1 μm and angular errors of < 10 sec are typical alignment results.

  8. Integration and testing of the GRAVITY infrared camera for multiple telescope optical beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordo, Paulo; Amorim, Antonio; Abreu, Jorge; Eisenhauer, Frank; Anugu, Narsireddy; Garcia, Paulo; Pfuhl, Oliver; Haug, Marcus; Sturm, Eckhard; Wieprecht, Ekkehard; Perrin, Guy; Brandner, Wolfgang; Straubmeier, Christian; Perraut, Karine; Naia, M. Duarte; Guimarães, M.

    2014-07-01

    The GRAVITY Acquisition Camera was designed to monitor and evaluate the optical beam properties of the four ESO/VLT telescopes simultaneously. The data is used as part of the GRAVITY beam stabilization strategy. Internally the Acquisition Camera has four channels each with: several relay mirrors, imaging lens, H-band filter, a single custom made silica bulk optics (i.e. Beam Analyzer) and an IR detector (HAWAII2-RG). The camera operates in vacuum with operational temperature of: 240k for the folding optics and enclosure, 100K for the Beam Analyzer optics and 80K for the detector. The beam analysis is carried out by the Beam Analyzer, which is a compact assembly of fused silica prisms and lenses that are glued together into a single optical block. The beam analyzer handles the four telescope beams and splits the light from the field mode into the pupil imager, the aberration sensor and the pupil tracker modes. The complex optical alignment and focusing was carried out first at room temperature with visible light, using an optical theodolite/alignment telescope, cross hairs, beam splitter mirrors and optical path compensator. The alignment was validated at cryogenic temperatures. High Strehl ratios were achieved at the first cooldown. In the paper we present the Acquisition Camera as manufactured, focusing key sub-systems and key technical challenges, the room temperature (with visible light) alignment and first IR images acquired in cryogenic operation.

  9. Advanced flow-polishing and surface metrology of the SO56 X Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The surface finishing of X ray grazing incidence optics is a most demanding area of optical processing, both in terms of metrology and application of optical finishing techniques. An existing optical mirror was processed using a new removal technique that uses a jet of finely dispersed and extremely small particles that impact a surface, which under the correct conditions, produces an ultrasmooth surface, especially on aspheric curvatures. The surfaces of the SO56 mirror are tapered conical shapes that have a continuously changing radius with the primary mirror having a parabolic shape and the secondary mirror a hyperbolic shape. An optical ray trace that was conducted of a telescope used the measured parameters from the existing substrates to set up the prescription for the optical layout. The optimization indicated a wavefront performance of 0.10 A at 0.633 micron.

  10. GRT: Goddard Robotic Telescope, Optical Follow-up of the GRBs and Optical Coordinated Observation of the AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okajima, Takashi; Sakamoto, T.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Ukwatta, T.; Urata, Y.

    2008-03-01

    We are constructing the 14" fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope is 1) to follow-up the Swift/GLAST GRBs and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of the GLAST AGNs. Our telescope system consists of the 14" Celestron OTA, the Astro-Physics 1200GTO mount, the Apogee U47 CCD camera, the JIM's electronic focuser, and the Finger Lake Instrumentation's color filter wheel with U, B, V, R, and I filters. With the focal reducer, 18' x 18' field of view has been achieved. The observatory dome is the Astro Haven's 7ft clam-shell dome. We will start the scientific observations on April 2008. While not observing our primary targets (GRBs and AGNs), we are planning to open our telescope time to the public for having a wider use of our telescope in both a different research field and an educational purpose.

  11. Advanced rotorcraft helmet display sighting system optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynal, Francois; Chen, Muh-Fa

    2002-08-01

    Kaiser Electronics' Advanced Rotorcraft Helmet Display Sighting System is a Biocular Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) for Rotary Wing Aviators. Advanced Rotorcraft HMDs requires low head supported weight, low center of mass offsets, low peripheral obstructions of the visual field, large exit pupils, large eye relief, wide field of view (FOV), high resolution, low luning, sun light readability with high contrast and low prismatic deviations. Compliance with these safety, user acceptance and optical performance requirements is challenging. The optical design presented in this paper provides an excellent balance of these different and conflicting requirements. The Advanced Rotorcraft HMD optical design is a pupil forming off axis catadioptric system that incorporates a transmissive SXGA Active Matrix liquid Crystal Display (AMLCD), an LED array backlight and a diopter adjustment mechanism.

  12. HYPATIA and STOIC: an active optics system for a large space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaney, Nicholas; Reinlein, Claudia; Lange, Nicolas; Goy, Matthias; Goncharov, Alexander; Hallibert, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    The next generation of UVOIR space telescopes will be required to provide excellent wavefront control despite perturbations due to thermal changes, gravity release and vibrations. The STOIC project is a response to an ESA Invitation to Tender to develop an active optics correction chain for future space telescopes. The baseline space telescope being considered is a two-mirror, 4m telescope with a monolithic primary mirror - we refer to this concept as Hypatia. The primary mirror diameter could be extended, but is limited in the near future by launch vehicle dimensions. A deformable mirror (pupil diameter 110mm) will be an integral part of the telescope design; it is being designed for high precision and the ability to maintain a stable form over long periods of time. The secondary mirror of the telescope will be activated to control tip-tilt, defocus and alignment with the primary. Wavefront sensing will be based on phase diversity and a dedicated Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The project will develop a laboratory prototype to demonstrate key aspects of the active correction chain. We present the current state of the preliminary design for both the Hypatia space telescope and the laboratory breadboard.

  13. MITSuME: multicolor optical/NIR telescopes for GRB afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Shimokawabe, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kotani, Taro; Yatsu, Yoichi; Ishimura, Takuto; Vasquez, Nicolas; Mori, Yuki; Kudo, Yusuke; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Nagayama, Shogo; Toda, Hiroyuki; Shimozu, Yasuhiro; Kuroda, Daisuke; Watanabe, Junichi; Fukushima, Hideo; Mori, Masaki

    2008-05-22

    Multicolor Imaging Telescopes for Survey and Monstrous Explosions (MITSuME) is built to perform multi-color photometry of NIR/optical afterglow covering the wavebands from K{sub s} to g' allowing the photometric redshift measurements up to z{approx_equal}10.Two 50 cm optical telescopes are built at Akeno, Yamanashi in eastern Japan, and at OAO, Okayama in western Japan. Each telescope has a Tricolor Camera, which allows us to take simultaneous images in g', R{sub c} and I{sub c} bands. These telescopes respond to GCN alerts and start taking series of tricolor images, which are immediately processed through the analys is pipeline on site. The pipeline consists of source finding, catalog matching, sky coordinates mapping to the image pixels, and photometry of the found sources. In addition, an automated search for an optical counterpart is performed.In addition, a wide-field (1 deg.) 91 cm NIR telescope is being built at OAO with filters in K{sub s}, H, J, and y bands.Summary of early results will be also presented.

  14. Adaptive optics for array telescopes using piston-and-tilt wave-front sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wizinowich, P.; Mcleod, B.; Lloyd-Yhart, M.; Angel, J. R. P.; Colucci, D.; Dekany, R.; Mccarthy, D.; Wittman, D.; Scott-Fleming, I.

    1992-01-01

    A near-infrared adaptive optics system operating at about 50 Hz has been used to control phase errors adaptively between two mirrors of the Multiple Mirror Telescope by stabilizing the position of the interference fringe in the combined unresolved far-field image. The resultant integrated images have angular resolutions of better than 0.1 arcsec and fringe contrasts of more than 0.6. Measurements of wave-front tilt have confirmed the wavelength independence of image motion. These results show that interferometric sensing of phase errors, when combined with a system for sensing the wave-front tilt of the individual telescopes, will provide a means of achieving a stable diffraction-limited focus with segmented telescopes or arrays of telescopes.

  15. Optical design trade-offs of the multi conjugate adaptive optics relay for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombini, Matteo; Diolaiti, Emiliano; De Rosa, Adriano

    2014-08-01

    The scope of this paper is to describe some possible design concepts of the post optical relay inside the multi conjugate adaptive optics module for the European Extremely Large Telescope. The module is planned to be placed at the Nasmyth focus of the telescope. The optical relay must re-image the telescope focal plane with diffraction limited performance and low geometric distortion, for a field of view of 75" and for a wavelength range between 0.8 and 2.4μm. A technical annular field of view with inner diameter of 75" and outer diameter of 160" to search 3 for natural guide stars is also required. Wavefront sensing is performed by means of 6 laser guide stars arranged on a circle of at least 120" diameter while wavefront correction is performed by two deformable mirrors inside the relay, in addition to the telescope adaptive mirror. The final optical design will be a trade-off among adaptive optics performance, optical interface requirements, mechanical interface requirements and technological feasibility of key hardware components. The size of the deformable mirrors and the image quality of the layer conjugates are important design drivers, related to the design of the collimating optics after the input focal plane and to the deformable mirrors tilt respect to the chief ray. The optical interface at the output focal plane must be acceptable for the client instruments, in terms of field curvature, focal ratio and exit pupil position. The number of optical surfaces inside the relay has to be as small as possible to limit thermal background. Splitting of the laser guide star channel from the science light channel may be achieved either in wavelength, by means of a dichroic placed close to a pupil image, or in field, by means of an perforated dichroic placed at an intermediate focal plane. The laser guide star beams have to be focused with acceptable optical performance on a fixed image plane compensating the effects of the sodium layer range variation with Zenith

  16. Advanced micromoulding of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Hans-Dieter; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Paatzsch, Thomas; Smaglinski, Ingo; Weber, Lutz

    1999-09-01

    There is a growing need for micro-optical components in the field of tele- and datacom applications. Such components have to be very precise and should be available in reasonable numbers. Microtechnology provides manufacturing techniques that fulfill both requirements. Using micro electro discharge machining, laser micromachining, ultra precision milling and deep lithography with subsequent electroforming methods, complex tools for the replication of highly precise plastic parts have been manufactured. In many cases a combination of methods enumerated above gives a tool which shows both functionality and cost-efficiency. As examples we present the realization of integrated-optical components with passive fiber-waveguide coupling used as components in optical networks and as velocity sensors for two-phase flows, like liquids containing small gas bubbles or particles. In the first case multimode 4 X 4 star couplers have been manufactured in a pilot series that show excess loss values below 3 dB and a uniformity better than 3 dB at 830 nm. This performance becomes possible by using a compression molding process. By stamping the microstructured mold into a semifinished PMMA plate exact replication of the molds as well as very low surface roughness of the waveguide side walls could be observed. In the second case the waveguide channels of the flow sensors show dimensions of between 20 micrometer and 100 micrometer and an aspect ratio of about 20. These structures have been replicated by injection molding of PMMA using variotherm process treatment with a cycle time of about 2 - 3 min.

  17. Spectroscopic Survey Telescope design. III - Optical support structure and overall configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, F. B.

    1990-07-01

    The Universities of Texas and Penn State are working together on an Arecibo-type optical telescope to be utilized in a semitransit mode for spectroscopic survey work. Its optics include a spherical primary mirror, a 2-element all-reflecting Gregorian spherical aberration corrector, and a series of optical fibers that will transmit light to a family of spectrographs. An optical support structure is being developed to permit position adjustment in azimuth only. During an azimuth position change, the instrument's entire weight is borne by steel rollers bearing on a circular crane rail of standard section, with support loads transmitted to the telescope base through pneumatic springs. Extensive application of various analytical procedures and computer-aided engineering tools has effectively allowed the detailed examination of several design iterations, thereby increasing the probability of success in the realized structure.

  18. Optics ellipticity performance of an unobscured off-axis space telescope.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fei; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jianping; Shi, Guangwei; Wu, Hongbo

    2014-10-20

    With the development of astronomy, more and more attention is paid to the survey of dark matter. Dark matter cannot be seen directly but can be detected by weak gravitational lensing measurement. Ellipticity is an important parameter used to define the shape of a galaxy. Galaxy ellipticity changes with weak gravitational lensing and nonideal optics. With our design of an unobscured off-axis telescope, we implement the simulation and calculation of optics ellipticity. With an accurate model of optics PSF, the characteristic of ellipticity is modeled and analyzed. It is shown that with good optical design, the full field ellipticity can be quite small. The spatial ellipticity change can be modeled by cubic interpolation with very high accuracy. We also modeled the ellipticity variance with time and analyzed the tolerance. It is shown that the unobscured off-axis telescope has good ellipticity performance and fulfills the requirement of dark matter survey.

  19. A multipurpose TIM-based optical telescope for Omega and the Trident laser facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Oertel, J.A.; Murphy, T.J.; Berggren, R.R.

    1998-12-31

    The authors have recently designed and are building a telescope which acts as an imaging light collector relaying the image to an optical table for experiment dependent analysis and recording. The expected primary use of this instrument is a streaked optical pyrometer for witness plate measurements of Hohlraum drive temperature. The telescope is based on University of Rochester`s Ten-Inch Manipulator (TIM) which allows compatibility between Omega, Trident, and the NIF lasers. The optics capture a f/7 cone of light, have a field of view of 6-mm, have a spatial resolution of 5 to 7-{micro}m per line pair at the object plane, and are optimized for operation at 280-nm. The image is at a magnification of 11.7x, which is convenient for many experiments, but can be changed using additional optics that reside outside the TIM.

  20. Operation of the adaptive optics system at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas L.; Guerra, Juan Carlos; Boutsia, Konstantina; Fini, Luca; Argomedo, Javier; Biddick, Chris; Agapito, Guido; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Briguglio, Runa; Brusa, Guido; Busoni, Lorenzo; Esposito, Simone; Hill, John; Kulesa, Craig; McCarthy, Don; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio T.; Quiros-Pacheco, Fernando; Riccardi, Armando; Xompero, Marco

    2012-07-01

    The Adaptive Optics System at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory consists of two Adaptive Secondary (ASM) mirrors and two Pyramid Wavefront sensors. The first ASM/Pyramid pair has been commissioned and is being used for science operation using the NIR camera PISCES on the right side of the binocular telescope. The left side ASM/Pyramid system is currently being commissioned, with completion scheduled for the Fall of 2012. We will discuss the operation of the first Adaptive Optics System at the LBT Observatory including interactions of the AO system with the telescope and its TCS, observational modes, user interfaces, observational scripting language, time requirement for closed loop and offsets and observing efficiency.

  1. A launching vehicle for optical modules of a deep-sea neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wolf, E.; Bakker, R.; Boer Rookhuizen, H.; Gostiaux, L.; Groenewegen, R.; van Haren, H.; van Heerwaarden, J.; Hillebrand, Th.; Laan, M.; Smit, A.; KM3NeT Consortium

    2013-10-01

    KM3NeT is a future deep-sea research facility that will be built at depths between 3 and 5 km in the Mediterranean Sea. The facility will host a neutrino telescope consisting of several hundreds of detection units-vertical mechanical structures that suspend the optical sensor modules of the telescope. During the design phase of the KM3NeT telescope, two concepts for the mechanical design for the detection unit have been worked out, one of which is a mooring consisting of two parallel ropes with 20 optical sensor modules attached at regular intervals; a data cable runs along the full length of the structure. For this design, which usually is referred to as a string, a novel deployment method using a recyclable launching vehicle has been successfully tested during two cruises in the Ionian Sea. We will present the design and the results of the deployment tests.

  2. Structural design and analysis for an ultra low CTE optical bench for the Hubble Space Telescope corrective optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neam, Douglas C.; Gerber, John D.

    1992-09-01

    The stringent stability requirements of the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR) necessitates a Deployable Optical Bench (DOB) with both a low CTE and high resonant frequency. The DOB design consists of a monocoque thin shell structure which marries metallic machined parts with graphite epoxy formed structure. Structural analysis of the DOB has been integrated into the laminate design and optimization process. Also, the structural analytical results are compared with vibration and thermal test data to assess the reliability of the analysis.

  3. Optical Modeling of the Alignment and Test of the NASA James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph M.; Hayden, Bill; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2007-01-01

    Optical modeling challenges of the ground alignment plan and optical test and verification of the NASA James Webb Space Telescope are discussed. Issues such as back-out of the gravity sag of light-weighted mirrors, as well as the use of a sparse-aperture auto-collimating flat system are discussed. A walk-through of the interferometer based alignment procedure is summarized, and sensitivities from the sparse aperture wavefront test are included as examples.'

  4. Advanced fiber-optic acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, João G. V.; Leite, Ivo T.; Silva, Susana; Frazão, Orlando

    2014-09-01

    Acoustic sensing is nowadays a very demanding field which plays an important role in modern society, with applications spanning from structural health monitoring to medical imaging. Fiber-optics can bring many advantages to this field, and fiber-optic acoustic sensors show already performance levels capable of competing with the standard sensors based on piezoelectric transducers. This review presents the recent advances in the field of fiber-optic dynamic strain sensing, particularly for acoustic detection. Three dominant technologies are identified — fiber Bragg gratings, interferometric Mach-Zehnder, and Fabry-Pérot configurations — and their recent developments are summarized.

  5. SIMULATION OF ASTRONOMICAL IMAGES FROM OPTICAL SURVEY TELESCOPES USING A COMPREHENSIVE PHOTON MONTE CARLO APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J. R.; Peng, E.; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Hodge, M.; Lorenz, S.; Lupu, A.; Meert, A.; Nagarajan, S.; Todd, N.; Winans, A.; Young, M.; Jernigan, J. G.; Kahn, S. M.; Rasmussen, A. P.; Chang, C.; Gilmore, D. K.; Claver, C.

    2015-05-15

    We present a comprehensive methodology for the simulation of astronomical images from optical survey telescopes. We use a photon Monte Carlo approach to construct images by sampling photons from models of astronomical source populations, and then simulating those photons through the system as they interact with the atmosphere, telescope, and camera. We demonstrate that all physical effects for optical light that determine the shapes, locations, and brightnesses of individual stars and galaxies can be accurately represented in this formalism. By using large scale grid computing, modern processors, and an efficient implementation that can produce 400,000 photons s{sup −1}, we demonstrate that even very large optical surveys can be now be simulated. We demonstrate that we are able to (1) construct kilometer scale phase screens necessary for wide-field telescopes, (2) reproduce atmospheric point-spread function moments using a fast novel hybrid geometric/Fourier technique for non-diffraction limited telescopes, (3) accurately reproduce the expected spot diagrams for complex aspheric optical designs, and (4) recover system effective area predicted from analytic photometry integrals. This new code, the Photon Simulator (PhoSim), is publicly available. We have implemented the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope design, and it can be extended to other telescopes. We expect that because of the comprehensive physics implemented in PhoSim, it will be used by the community to plan future observations, interpret detailed existing observations, and quantify systematics related to various astronomical measurements. Future development and validation by comparisons with real data will continue to improve the fidelity and usability of the code.

  6. History of optical theory of reflecting telescopes and implications for future projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Raymond N.

    1997-03-01

    This contribution, The History of Optical Theory of Reflecting Telescopes and Implications for Future Projects, is a shortened form of the Karl Schwarzschild lecture given in Bochum in September 1993. Some material has been added from an invited paper given in Padua in December 1992. For a full account, with figures and tables, the reader is referred to these two papers.

  7. Systematic design and analysis of laser-guide-star adaptive-optics systems for large telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.T.; Morris, J.R.; Vernon, R.G.

    1994-02-01

    The authors discuss the design of laser-guided adaptive-optics systems for the large, 8-10-m-class telescopes. Through proper choice of system components and optimized system design, the laser power that is needed at the astronomical site can be kept to a minimum. 37 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. KMTNet: a network of 1.6-m wide field optical telescopes installed at three southern observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Yongseok; Kim, Dong-Jin; Park, Byeong-Gon; Lee, Dong-Joo; Koo, Jae-Rim; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Jae Woo; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Lim, Beomdu; Lim, Jin-Sun; Gho, Seung-Won; Kim, Min-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) have installed three identical 1.6-m telescopes, called Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet), which cover 2 x 2 degree field of view with the plate scale of 0.4 arcsec/pixel at three observatories - CTIO, SSO and SAAO in southern hemisphere. The uniqueness of the system is the uninterupted 24-hour monitoring with a wide field optics in southern hemisphere. The telescope adopts prime focus using a parabolic mirror and four spherical flattening lenses. The structural design and driving systems are modified from the degin of 2MASS telescope. The one piece filter-shutter assembly has a sliding shutter and four 310-mm square filters. Each observation system produces a 680MB size image file at site and the images are transfered to KASI data center using the Global Ring Network for Advanced Application Development (GLORIAD) network with the band width of 50Mbps in average. The main science goal of the KMTNet is to discover Earth like extra solar planet using the microlensing technique during bulge season, and 50% of the total observation time is allocated for the science program solely. The other telescope times are allocated for pre-selected seven science programs during non-bulge season. From the test observation, we verify that the most important two requirements are satisfied: 10 arcsec in RMS for the pointing accuracy and 1 arcsec of delivered image quality in I-band. In this presentation, we introduce finally installed system at each observatory and its observational performance obtained from the test observation.

  9. Advanced Geothermal Optical Transducer (AGOT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-01

    Today's geothermal pressure-temperature measuring tools are short endurance, high value instruments, used sparingly because their loss is a major expense. In this project LEL offered to build and test a rugged, affordable, downhole sensor capable ofretuming an uninterrupted data stream at pressures and of 10,000 psi and temperatures up to 250 C, thus permitting continuous deep-well logging. It was proposed to meet the need by specializing LEL's patented 'Twin Column Transducer' technology to satisfy the demands of geothermal pressure/temperature measurements. TCT transducers have very few parts, none of which are moving parts, and all of which can be fabricated from high-temperature super alloys or from ceramics; the result is an extremely rugged device, essentially impervious to chemical attack and readily modified to operate at high pressure and temperature. To measure pressure and temperature they capitalize on the relative expansion of optical elements subjected to thermal or mechanical stresses; if one element is maintained at a reference pressure while the other is opened to ambient, the differential displacement then serves as a measure of pressure. A transducer responding to temperature rather than pressure is neatly created by 'inverting' the pressure-measuring design so that both deflecting structures see identical temperatures and temperature gradients, but whose thermal expansion coefficients are deliberately mismatched to give differential expansion. The starting point for development of a PT Tool was the company's model DPT feedback-stabilized 5,000 psi sensor (U.S. Patent 5,311,014, 'Optical Transducer for Measuring Downhole Pressure', claiming a pressure transducer capable of measuring static, dynamic, and true bi-directional differential pressure at high temperatures), shown in the upper portion of Figure 1. The DPT occupies a 1 x 2 x 4-inch volume, weighs 14 ounces, and is accurate to 1 percent of full scale. Employing a pair of identical, low

  10. Optical very large array (OVLA) prototype telescope: status report and perspective for large mosaic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejonghe, Julien; Arnold, Luc; Lardiere, Olivier; Berger, Jean-Pierre; Cazale, C.; Dutertre, S.; Kohler, D.; Vernet, D.

    1998-08-01

    The OVLA will be a kilometric-size interferometric array of N equals 27 or more 1.5 m telescopes. It is expected to provide visible to infra-red snap-shot images, containing in densified pupil mode N(superscript 2) 10(superscript -4) arc-second wide resolved elements in yellow light. The prototype telescope is under construction at Observatoire de Haute Provence and will be connected in 2000 to the GI2T, Grand Interferometre a 2 Telescopes, thus upgraded to a GI3T. The prototype telescope has a spherical mount, well suited for multi- aperture interferometric work, and a thin active 1.5 m f/1.7 mirror weighting only 180 kg with the active cell. This meniscus-shaped mirror, made of low-cost ordinary window glass, is only 24 mm thick and supported by 32 actuators. We describe the telescope optical concept with emphasis on opto-mechanical aspects and the test results of the active optics system. We also discuss the application of this mirror concept to large mosaic mirrors of moderate cost.

  11. Advanced optics in an interdisciplinary graduate program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nic Chormaic, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, established in November 2011, provides a 5- year interdisciplinary PhD program, through English, within Japan. International and Japanese students entering the program undertake coursework and laboratory rotations across a range of topics, including neuroscience, molecular science, physics, chemistry, marine science and mathematics, regardless of previous educational background. To facilitate interdisciplinarity, the university has no departments, ensuring seamless interactions between researchers from all sectors. As part of the PhD program a course in Advanced Optics has been developed to provide PhD students with the practical and theoretical skills to enable them to use optics tools in any research environment. The theoretical aspect of the course introduces students to procedures for complex beam generation (e.g. Laguerre-Gaussian), optical trapping, beam analysis and photon optics, and is supported through a practical program covering introductory interference/diffraction experiments through to more applied fiber optics. It is hoped that, through early exposure to optics handling and measurement techniques, students will be able to develop and utilize optics tools regardless of research field. In addition to the formal course in Advanced Optics, a selection of students also undertakes 13 week laboratory rotations in the Light-Matter Interactions research laboratory, where they work side-by-side with physicists in developing optics tools for laser cooling, photonics or bio-applications. While currently in the first year, conclusive results about the success of such an interdisciplinary PhD training are speculative. However, initial observations indicate a rich cross-fertilization of ideas stemming from the diverse backgrounds of all participants.

  12. Advanced MEMS systems for optical communication and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horenstein, M. N.; Stewart, J. B.; Cornelissen, S.; Sumner, R.; Freedman, D. S.; Datta, M.; Kani, N.; Miller, P.

    2011-06-01

    Optical communication and adaptive optics have emerged as two important uses of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) devices based on electrostatic actuation. Each application uses a mirror whose surface is altered by applying voltages of up to 300 V. Previous generations of adaptive-optic mirrors were large (~1 m) and required the use of piezoelectric transducers. Beginning in the mid-1990s, a new class of small MEMS mirrors (~1 cm) were developed. These mirrors are now a commercially available, mature technology. This paper describes three advanced applications of MEMS mirrors. The first is a mirror used for corona-graphic imaging, whereby an interferometric telescope blocks the direct light from a distant star so that nearby objects such as planets can be seen. We have developed a key component of the system: a 144-channel, fully-scalable, high-voltage multiplexer that reduces power consumption to only a few hundred milliwatts. In a second application, a MEMS mirror comprises part of a two-way optical communication system in which only one node emits a laser beam. The other node is passive, incorporating a retro-reflective, electrostatic MEMS mirror that digitally encodes the reflected beam. In a third application, the short (~100-ns) pulses of a commercially-available laser rangefinder are returned by the MEMS mirror as a digital data stream. Suitable low-power drive systems comprise part of the system design.

  13. A Ten-Meter Ground-Station Telescope for Deep-Space Optical Communications: A Preliminary Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcliffe, M.; Hoppe, D.; Roberts, W.; Page, N.

    2001-01-01

    This article describes a telescope design for a 10-m optical ground station for deep-space communications. The design for a direct-detection optical communications telescope differs dramatically from a telescope for imaging applications. In general, the requirements for optical manufacturing and tracking performance are much less stringent for direct detection of optical signals. The technical challenge is providing a design that will operate in the daytime/nighttime conditions required for a Deep Space Network tracking application. The design presented addresses these requirements. The design will provide higher performance at lower cost than existing designs.

  14. Active optical system design for the 4.2-m SOAR telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbendam, Victor L.; Ruthven, Gregory P.; Bennett, Victor P.; Blackburn, John P.; Cox, Charles D.; Keung, Chi S.; Facey, Terence A.; Furber, Mark E.; Neufeld, Conrad; Rockwell, Richard A.; Sarnik, Andrea M.; Stein, John T.

    2000-07-01

    The SOAR Telescope project has embarked on the development of a very high quality 4.2-meter diameter optical telescope to be sited on Cerro Pachon in Chile. The telescope will feature an image quality of 0.18 arc seconds, a moderate field of 11 arc minutes, a very large instrument payload capacity for as many as 9 hot instruments, and an Active Optical System optimized for the optical to near IR wavelengths. The active optical system features a 10 cm thick ULETM primary mirror supported by 120 electro- mechanical actuators for a highly correctable surface. the 0.6 meter diameter secondary is articulated by a hexapod for real time optical alignment. The 0.6-meter class tertiary will provide fast beam steering to compensate for atmospheric turbulence at 50 hertz and a turret for directing the light to either of two nasmyth or three-bent cassegrain ports. Both the secondary and tertiary are light- weighted by machining to achieve cost-effective low weight mirrors. This paper discusses the unique features of this development effort including many commercial products and software programs that enable its technical feasibility and high cost efficiency.

  15. Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment Fiber Optic Testing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) is a spectroscopic survey that will collect data from nearly one million Lyman-α emitting galaxies at a redshift of 1.8 < z < 3.8 in order to characterize dark energy. To accomplish this, over 33,000 optical fibers will feed light from these galaxies into 150 Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrographs (VIRUS), an order of magnitude greater than has been done before. A fiber optic test bench has been constructed at the University of Texas at Austin in order to test the transmission and focal ratio degradation (FRD) of individual fibers at several wavelengths ranging from 350-600nm. Furthermore, the fiber optic bundles are undergoing extensive lifetime tests at the Center for Electromechanics on the university’s research campus which will simulate 10 years of motion on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope.

  16. Development of Infrared Phase Closure Capability in the Infrared-Optical Telescope Array (IOTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, Wesley A.

    2002-01-01

    We completed all major fabrication and testing for the third telescope and phase-closure operation at the Infrared-Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) during this period. In particular we successfully tested the phase-closure operation, using a laboratory light source illuminating the full delay-line optical paths, and using an integrated-optic beam combiner coupled to our Picnic-detector camera. This demonstration is an important and near-final milestone achievement. As of this writing, however, several tasks yet remain, owing to development snags and weather, so the final proof of success, phase-closure observation of a star, is now expected to occur in early 2002, soon after this report has been submitted.

  17. Reliability-centered maintenance for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, G.; Formentin, F.; Rampini, F.

    2014-07-01

    In the last years, EIE GROUP has been more and more involved in large optical telescopes and radio antennas array projects. In this frame, the paper describes a fundamental aspect of the Logistic Support Analysis (LSA) process, that is the application of the Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodology for the generation of maintenance plans for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antennas arrays. This helps maintenance engineers to make sure that the telescopes continue to work properly, doing what their users require them to do in their present operating conditions. The main objective of the RCM process is to establish the complete maintenance regime, with the safe minimum required maintenance, carried out without any risk to personnel, telescope and subsystems. At the same time, a correct application of the RCM allows to increase the cost effectiveness, telescope uptime and items availability, and to provide greater understanding of the level of risk that the organization is managing. At the same time, engineers shall make a great effort since the initial phase of the project to obtain a telescope requiring easy maintenance activities and simple replacement of the major assemblies, taking special care on the accesses design and items location, implementation and design of special lifting equipment and handling devices for the heavy items. This maintenance engineering framework is based on seven points, which lead to the main steps of the RCM program. The initial steps of the RCM process consist of: system selection and data collection (MTBF, MTTR, etc.), definition of system boundaries and operating context, telescope description with the use of functional block diagrams, and the running of a FMECA to address the dominant causes of equipment failure and to lay down the Critical Items List. In the second part of the process the RCM logic is applied, which helps to determine the appropriate maintenance tasks for each identified failure mode. Once

  18. Electro-optical characterization of MPPC detectors for the ASTRI Cherenkov telescope camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marano, D.; Belluso, M.; Bonanno, G.; Billotta, S.; Grillo, A.; Garozzo, S.; Romeo, G.; Catalano, O.; La Rosa, G.; Sottile, G.; Impiombato, D.; Giarrusso, S.

    2014-12-01

    This work addresses a systematic and in-depth electro-optical characterization of the Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) sensors constituting the camera detection system at the focal plane of the ASTRI telescope prototype. The paper reports the experimental results of a large set of measurements on the MPPC devices in order to provide a reliable qualification of the detector performance and evaluate its compliance with the telescope focal plane requirements. In particular, breakdown voltage, internal gain, dark count rate, cross-talk and extra-charge probability, and absolute photon detection efficiency measurements are performed on the basic sensor device unit as a function of the detector operating conditions.

  19. R&D towards a Liquid Xenon Advanced Compton Telescope (LXeACT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberlack, Uwe; Olsen, Christopher; Shagin, Petr; Aprile, Elena; Giboni, Karl Ludwig; Santorelli, Roberto

    2007-04-01

    The scientific potential of gamma-ray astronomy in the energy regime of nuclear transitions has long been recognized. Yet, only the tip of the iceberg has been probed by gamma-ray telescopes to-date, due to a lack of sensitivity. A future ``Advanced Compton Telescope'' (ACT) could boost this field by improving sensitivity 100-fold over current instruments. We are working on advancing the liquid xenon time projection chamber (LXeTPC) technology to combine the uniq advantages of this detector type (large homogeneous sensitive volumes with a minimum of electronics channels and hence power, high efficiency, radiation hardness, low background, etc.) with the spectroscopic requirements of the ACT. Rapid advances in UV photosensor technologies have opened new opportunities for the successful development of a LXeACT. These are: (a) Improvement of energy resolution by combination of ionization and scintillation signals. (b) Application of time-of-flight in a compact telescope configuration. We report on the status of our current R&D program, which includes characterization of novel photosensors, such as APDs and Geiger-mode APD pixel arrays (SiPMs), inside LXe.

  20. Advances in optical imaging for pharmacological studies

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Imaging approaches are an essential tool for following up over time representative parameters of in vivo models, providing useful information in pharmacological studies. Main advantages of optical imaging approaches compared to other imaging methods are their safety, straight-forward use and cost-effectiveness. A main drawback, however, is having to deal with the presence of high scattering and high absorption in living tissues. Depending on how these issues are addressed, three different modalities can be differentiated: planar imaging (including fluorescence and bioluminescence in vivo imaging), optical tomography, and optoacoustic approaches. In this review we describe the latest advances in optical in vivo imaging with pharmacological applications, with special focus on the development of new optical imaging probes in order to overcome the strong absorption introduced by different tissue components, especially hemoglobin, and the development of multimodal imaging systems in order to overcome the resolution limitations imposed by scattering. PMID:26441646

  1. Optical Testing and Verification Methods for the James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonille, Scott R.; Miskey, Cherie L.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Rohrbach, Scott O.; Aronstein, David L.; Bartoszyk, Andrew E.; Bowers, Charles W.; Cofie, Emmanuel; Collins, Nicholas R.; Comber, Brian J.; Eichhorn, William L.; Glasse, Alistair C.; Gracey, Renee; Hartig, George F.; Howard, Joseph M.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Kimble, Randy A.; Kirk, Jeffrey R.; Kubalak, David A.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Lindler, Don J.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Maszkiewicz, Michael; Rieke, Marcia J.; Rowlands, Neil; Sabatke, Derek S.; Smith, Corbett T.; Smith, J. Scott; Sullivan, Joseph F.; Telfer, Randal C.; Plate, Maurice Te; Vila, M. Begona; Warner, Gerry D.; Wright, Raymond H.; Wright, David; Zhou, Julia; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.6m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy (40K). The JWST Observatory includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) that contains four science instruments (SI) and the fine guider. The SIs are mounted to a composite metering structure. The SI and guider units were integrated to the ISIM structure and optically tested at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a suite using the Optical Telescope Element SIMulator (OSIM). OSIM is a full field, cryogenic JWST telescope simulator. SI performance, including alignment and wave front error, were evaluated using OSIM. We describe test and analysis methods for optical performance verification of the ISIM Element, with an emphasis on the processes used to plan and execute the test. The complexity of ISIM and OSIM drove us to develop a software tool for test planning that allows for configuration control of observations, associated scripts, and management of hardware and software limits and constraints, as well as tools for rapid data evaluation, and flexible re-planning in response to the unexpected. As examples of our test and analysis approach, we discuss how factors such as the ground test thermal environment are compensated in alignment. We describe how these innovative methods for test planning and execution and post-test analysis were instrumental in the verification program for the ISIM element, with enough information to allow the reader to consider these innovations and lessons learned in this successful effort in their future testing for other programs.

  2. Spacecraft Conceptual Design for the 8-Meter Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Randall C.; Capizzo, Peter; Fincher, Sharon; Hornsby, Linda S.; Jones, David

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office at Marshall Space Flight Center completed a brief spacecraft design study for the 8-meter monolithic Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST-8m). This spacecraft concept provides all power, communication, telemetry, avionics, guidance and control, and thermal control for the observatory, and inserts the observatory into a halo orbit about the second Sun-Earth Lagrange point. The multidisciplinary design team created a simple spacecraft design that enables component and science instrument servicing, employs articulating solar panels for help with momentum management, and provides precise pointing control while at the same time fast slewing for the observatory.

  3. Chemical Approaches for Advanced Optical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhixing

    Advances in optical microscopy have been constantly expanding our knowledge of biological systems. The achievements therein are a result of close collaborations between physicists/engineers who build the imaging instruments and chemists/biochemists who design the corresponding probe molecules. In this work I present a number of chemical approaches for the development of advanced optical imaging methods. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the recent advances of novel imaging approaches taking advantage of chemical tag technologies. Chapter 2 describes the second-generation covalent trimethoprim-tag as a viable tool for live cell protein-specific labeling and imaging. In Chapter 3 we present a fluorescence lifetime imaging approach to map protein-specific micro-environment in live cells using TMP-Cy3 as a chemical probe. In Chapter 4, we present a method harnessing photo-activatable fluorophores to extend the fundamental depth limit in multi-photon microscopy. Chapter 5 describes the development of isotopically edited alkyne palette for multi-color live cell vibrational imaging of cellular small molecules. These studies exemplify the impact of modern chemical approaches in the development of advanced optical microscopies.

  4. Generation of off-axis aspherics. [optical surfaces for telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.; Parks, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    A method for precise generation of optical surfaces is described. The work is turned about one axis, while a grinding head or cutting tool is gradually moved across by an arm turning about a second axis. This geometry can be used to directly generate spherical surfaces or aspherical surfaces presently termed 'hulahoids'. The properties of these surfaces are analyzed to determine how well large paraboloids and their off-axis segments can be generated. Very close approximations are possible. For example, 1.5-m segments of a 10-m paraboloid differ by only 0.6 microns peak-to-peak from the best fit hulahoid when the focal ratio is f/2, and 60 microns when it is f/0.4. For accurate generation the cutting tool may need numerically controlled travel of 1 mm or less, with the position set as a function of the swing arm angle.

  5. Optical Fiber Sensors for Advanced Civil Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Marten Johannes Cornelius

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation is to develop, analyze, and implement optical fiber-based sensors for the nondestructive quantitative evaluation of advanced civil structures. Based on a comparative evaluation of optical fiber sensors that may be used to obtain quantitative information related to physical perturbations in the civil structure, the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) optical fiber sensor is selected as the most attractive sensor. The operation of the EFPI sensor is explained using the Kirchhoff diffraction approach. As is shown in this dissertation, this approach better predicts the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of gap length than methods employed previously. The performance of the optical fiber sensor is demonstrated in three different implementations. In the first implementation, performed with researchers in the Civil Engineering Department at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, optical fiber sensors were used to obtain quantitative strain information from reinforced concrete interior and exterior column-to-beam connections. The second implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the United States Bureau of Mines in Spokane, Washington, used optical fiber sensors to monitor the performance of roof bolts used in mines. The last implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the Turner-Fairbanks Federal Highway Administration Research Center in McLean, Virginia, used optical fiber sensors, attached to composite prestressing strands used for reinforcing concrete, to obtain absolute strain information. Multiplexing techniques including time, frequency and wavelength division multiplexing are briefly discussed, whereas the principles of operation of spread spectrum and optical time domain reflectometery (OTDR) are discussed in greater detail. Results demonstrating that spread spectrum and OTDR techniques can be used to multiplex optical fiber sensors are presented. Finally, practical

  6. End-to-end assessment of a large aperture segmented ultraviolet optical infrared (UVOIR) telescope architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Rioux, Norman; Bolcar, Matthew; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Olivier; Stark, Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-07-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10^-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield exo-earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an exo-earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance. These efforts are combined through integrated modeling, coronagraph evaluations, and exo-earth yield calculations to assess the potential performance of the selected architecture. In addition, we discusses the scalability of this architecture to larger apertures and the technological tall poles to enabling these missions.

  7. Dimensional stability testing in thermal vacuum of the CHEOPS optical telescope assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klop, W. A.; Verlaan, A. L.

    2016-07-01

    The CHEOPS mission (CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite) is dedicated to searching for exoplanetary transits by performing ultra-high precision photometry on bright stars already known to host planets. A 32cm diameter on-axis Ritchey-Chrétien telescope is used for imaging onto a single cooled detector. With integration times up to 48 hours the thermal stability of the telescope and its structure are key to the performance. Using a multi-lateration interferometer setup TNO has successfully demonstrated the μm-level stability of the Structural Thermal Model (STM2) of the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) in thermal vacuum. This OTA was later upgraded to become the Flight Model. Experiments comprise thermal vacuum cycling, thermal vacuum stability testing where axial and lateral deformations are measured to the nm-level sensitivity.

  8. End-to-End Assessment of a Large Aperture Segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Rioux, Norman; Bolcar, Matthew; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Oliver; Stark, Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10^-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield Exo-Earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an Exo-Earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance. These efforts are combined through integrated modeling, coronagraph evaluations, and Exo-Earth yield calculations to assess the potential performance of the selected architecture. In addition, we discusses the scalability of this architecture to larger apertures and the technological tall poles to enabling it.

  9. Normalized Point Source Sensitivity for Off-Axis Optical Performance Evaluation of the Thirty Meter Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seo, Byoung-Joon; Nissly, Carl; Troy, Mitchell; Angeli, George

    2010-01-01

    The Normalized Point Source Sensitivity (PSSN) has previously been defined and analyzed as an On-Axis seeing-limited telescope performance metric. In this paper, we expand the scope of the PSSN definition to include Off-Axis field of view (FoV) points and apply this generalized metric for performance evaluation of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We first propose various possible choices for the PSSN definition and select one as our baseline. We show that our baseline metric has useful properties including the multiplicative feature even when considering Off-Axis FoV points, which has proven to be useful for optimizing the telescope error budget. Various TMT optical errors are considered for the performance evaluation including segment alignment and phasing, segment surface figures, temperature, and gravity, whose On-Axis PSSN values have previously been published by our group.

  10. Advanced optical blade tip clearance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, M. J.; Honeycutt, R. E.; Nordlund, R. E.; Robinson, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced electro-optical system was developed to measure single blade tip clearances and average blade tip clearances between a rotor and its gas path seal in an operating gas turbine engine. This system is applicable to fan, compressor, and turbine blade tip clearance measurement requirements, and the system probe is particularly suitable for operation in the extreme turbine environment. A study of optical properties of blade tips was conducted to establish measurement system application limitations. A series of laboratory tests was conducted to determine the measurement system's operational performance characteristics and to demonstrate system capability under simulated operating gas turbine environmental conditions. Operational and environmental performance test data are presented.

  11. Advance lightpath provisioning in interdomain optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafid, A.; Maach, A.; Khair, M. G.; Drissi, J.

    2005-11-01

    In interconnected optical networks, users submit lightpath requests at the time they wish to establish the lightpath. The service provider consults the information gathered by the interdomain routing protocols for available resources. For each request, the network must decide immediately whether to accept or reject the request. In this model, there is always the uncertainty of whether the user will be able to establish the desired lightpath at the desired time or not. Furthermore, in the context of a number of applications, e.g., grid applications, users need to set up lightpaths in advance to perform their activities that are planned in advance. We propose a new interdomain routing protocol called Advance Optical Routing Border Gateway Protocol (AORBGP) and a scheme that allows the setup of interdomain lightpaths in advance. AORBGP allows gathering information about interdomain paths and availability of wavelengths in the future. The proposed advance lightpath setup scheme makes use of AORBGP to get information about available resources (i.e., wavelengths) required to process lightpath setup requests. One of the key innovations of the scheme is that it provides the user with alternatives, carefully selected, when his or her request cannot be accommodated because of resource shortages. Indeed, the scheme provides the user with options to set up a lightpath later than the requested start time or with shorter duration than the requested duration. We performed a set of simulations to evaluate the benefits of the proposed scheme and the effect of a number of parameters on the performance of AORBGP.

  12. DOTIFS: a new multi-IFU optical spectrograph for the 3.6-m Devasthal optical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Haeun; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Omar, Amitesh; Ravindranath, Swara; Chattopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Rajarshi, Chaitanya V.; Khodade, Pravin

    2014-07-01

    Devasthal Optical Telescope Integral Field Spectrograph (DOTIFS) is a new multi-object Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) being designed and fabricated by the Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), Pune, India, for the Cassegrain side port of the 3.6m Devasthal Optical Telescope, (DOT) being constructed by the Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Nainital. It is mainly designed to study the physics and kinematics of the ionized gas, star formation and H II regions in the nearby galaxies. It is a novel instrument in terms of multi-IFU, built in deployment system, and high throughput. It consists of one magnifier, 16 integral field units (IFUs), and 8 spectrographs. Each IFU is comprised of a microlens array and optical fibers and has 7.4" x 8.7" field of view with 144 spaxel elements, each sampling 0.8" hexagonal aperture. The IFUs can be distributed on the telescope side port over an 8' diameter focal plane by the deployment system. Optical fibers deliver light from the IFUs to the spectrographs. Eight identical, all refractive, dedicated spectrographs will produce 2,304 R~1800 spectra over 370-740nm wavelength range with a single exposure. Volume Phase Holographic gratings are chosen to make smaller optics and get high throughput. The total throughput of the instrument including the telescope is predicted as 27.5% on average. Observing techniques, data simulator and reduction software are also under development. Currently, conceptual and baseline design review has been done. Some of the components have already been procured. The instrument is expected to see its first light in 2016.

  13. The thermo-optical design and experiment research on Hα and white light telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Wu, Mingchang; Yang, Shimo; Gu, Xuedong; Wang, Shen

    2010-07-01

    In order to study the impact of the thermal environment on the optical performance of the Ha and White light telescope(HWT), a thermo-optical experimental system is built test the optical performance of the HWT under a thermal vacuum condition. This system is made up of four sub-systems: an optical system to be tested, a vacuum system, a temperature measurement and control system, and a wavefront sensing system. The temperature conditions of the thermo-optical testing are designed on the basis of the measurement and numerical simulation of the ground observing condition. An integrated STOP test based on the HWT is performed. The optical performances of the HWT under different vacuum degree and different thermal control conditions are tested using the wavefront sensing system. The results show that when the temperature of the secondary mirror is below 40°C, the optical performance of HWT is about λ/8, which satisfies the requirement of λ/6. The secondary mirror structure is the most effect to the system optical performance, which is the key part improving HWT. After the analytical model of HWT is set up by using the finite element analysis software MSC.PATRAN/NASTRAN, finite element based optical analysis (FEMOPT) software is used to calculate the optical performance. The comparison of the temperature control condition simulation and experimental results show that FEMOPT optical structural thermal integral analysis is reasonable.

  14. Advancements in metro optical network architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschis, Loukas

    2005-02-01

    This paper discusses the innovation in network architectures, and optical transport, that enables metropolitan networks to cost-effectively scale to hundreds Gb/s of capacity, and to hundreds km of reach, and to also meet the diverse service needs of enterprise and residential applications. A converged metro network, where Ethernet/IP services, and traditional TDM traffic operate over an intelligent WDM transport layer is increasingly becoming the most attractive architecture addressing the primary need of network operators for significantly improved capital and operational network cost. At the same time, this converged network has to leverage advanced technology, and introduce intelligence in order to significantly improve the deployment and manageability of WDM transport. The most important system advancements and the associated technology innovations that enhance the cost-effectiveness of metropolitan optical networks are being reviewed.

  15. Cryogenic optical performance of the ASTRO-F SiC telescope.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Hidehiro; Onaka, Takashi; Nakagawa, Takao; Enya, Keigo; Murakami, Hiroshi; Yamashiro, Ryoji; Ezaki, Tatsuhiko; Numao, Yasuyuki; Sugiyama, Yoshikazu

    2005-11-10

    The lightweight cryogenic telescope on board the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, ASTRO-F, which is scheduled to be launched early in 2006, forms an F/6 Ritchey-Chretien system with a primary mirror of 710 mm in diameter. The mirrors of the ASTRO-F telescope are made of sandwich-type silicon carbide (SiC) material, comprising a porous core and a chemical-vapor-deposited coat of SiC on the surface. To estimate the optical performance of the flight model telescope, the telescope assembly was tested at cryogenic temperatures, the total wavefront errors of which were measured by an interferometer from outside a liquid-helium chamber. As a result, the wavefront error obtained at 9 K shows that the imaging performance of the ASTRO-F telescope is diffraction limited at a wavelength of 6.2 microm, which is a little worse than our original goal of diffraction-limited performance at 5.0 microm.

  16. Ray-tracing and physical-optics analysis of the aperture efficiency in a radio telescope.

    PubMed

    Olmi, Luca; Bolli, Pietro

    2007-07-01

    The performance of telescope systems working at microwave or visible-IR wavelengths is typically described in terms of different parameters according to the wavelength range. Most commercial ray-tracing packages have been specifically designed for use with visible-IR systems and thus, though very flexible and sophisticated, do not provide the appropriate parameters to fully describe microwave antennas and to compare with specifications. We demonstrate that the Strehl ratio is equal to the phase efficiency when the apodization factor is taken into account. The phase efficiency is the most critical contribution to the aperture efficiency of an antenna and the most difficult parameter to optimize during the telescope design. The equivalence between the Strehl ratio and the phase efficiency gives the designer/user of the telescope the opportunity to use the faster commercial ray-tracing software to optimize the design. We also discuss the results of several tests performed to check the validity of this relationship that we carried out using a ray-tracing software, ZEMAX, and a full Physical Optics software, GRASP9.3, applied to three different telescope designs that span a factor of approximately 10 in terms of D/lambda. The maximum measured discrepancy between phase efficiency and Strehl ratio varies between approximately 0.4% and 1.9% up to an offset angle of >40 beams, depending on the optical configuration, but it is always less than 0.5% where the Strehl ratio is >0.95.

  17. Using the Hands-On Optics ``Terrific Telescopes'' Kit in the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, S. M.; Walker, C. E.; Sparks, R. T.

    2008-06-01

    Hands-On Optics (HOO) is a collaborative four-year program to create and sustain a unique, national, informal science education program to excite students about science by actively engaging them in optics activities. The standards based activities and demonstrations have been successfully used in a variety of settings including formal classrooms, after school clubs, and science centers. One of the themes for the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) is "Looking Through a Telescope". We intend to use HOO activities in conjunction with the IYA to reinforce this important area. In this workshop, participants completed a series of activities involving refraction, lenses, telescopes, and ultraviolet light and took home a kit containing all the materials required to do the activities with a small group of students. Participants explored the basic properties of positive lenses to create images through the use of hands-on activities, exciting experiments, and educator-lead demonstrations, culminating with the building of a small refracting telescope. Several prototype telescopes were examined in the workshop for use in the International Year of Astronomy.

  18. Ray-tracing and physical-optics analysis of the aperture efficiency in a radio telescope.

    PubMed

    Olmi, Luca; Bolli, Pietro

    2007-07-01

    The performance of telescope systems working at microwave or visible-IR wavelengths is typically described in terms of different parameters according to the wavelength range. Most commercial ray-tracing packages have been specifically designed for use with visible-IR systems and thus, though very flexible and sophisticated, do not provide the appropriate parameters to fully describe microwave antennas and to compare with specifications. We demonstrate that the Strehl ratio is equal to the phase efficiency when the apodization factor is taken into account. The phase efficiency is the most critical contribution to the aperture efficiency of an antenna and the most difficult parameter to optimize during the telescope design. The equivalence between the Strehl ratio and the phase efficiency gives the designer/user of the telescope the opportunity to use the faster commercial ray-tracing software to optimize the design. We also discuss the results of several tests performed to check the validity of this relationship that we carried out using a ray-tracing software, ZEMAX, and a full Physical Optics software, GRASP9.3, applied to three different telescope designs that span a factor of approximately 10 in terms of D/lambda. The maximum measured discrepancy between phase efficiency and Strehl ratio varies between approximately 0.4% and 1.9% up to an offset angle of >40 beams, depending on the optical configuration, but it is always less than 0.5% where the Strehl ratio is >0.95. PMID:17571151

  19. Recent advances in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhihua; Wang, Chuan; Shen, Yi; Huang, Liangming; Wu, Lan; Du, Chixin

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports recent advances in spectral domain Doppler optical coherence tomography (SD-DOCT) in our group. A high speed SD-DOCT system is developed and applied to animal study and microchip evaluation. Further improvements concerning SD-DOCT are presented, those including higher-order cross-correlation for phase retrieval, transit-time analysis for velocity quantification, and orthogonal dispersive SD-OCT for depth extension.

  20. Fiber Optics at ESO - Part Two - Fiber Optics Multiple Object Spectroscopy at the 3.6-METER Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enard, D.; Lund, G.; Tarenghi, M.

    1983-09-01

    During a 6-day test period late in November 1982, a prototype optical fiber device (nicknamed "Fiber Optopus") was tested at the 3.6 m telescope Cassegrain focus. The principle of this device, described in more detail in the following paragraphs, is such that the light from up to 50 randomly separated points on the sky (within the Cassegrain focus field of view) can be simultaneously guided via separate flexible optical fibers to the entrance slit of the B&C spectrograph. By making use of a two-dimensional detector such as a CCO the individual spectra, corresponding to each sampled point on the field, can be recorded simultaneously. When fully operational, the Fiber Optopus should enable a very strong reduction in telescope time to be achieved in observing programmes involving low resolution spectral mapping of extended fields. This feature will be of great interest to astronomers wishing to observe clusters of faint objects requiring long integration periods.

  1. Slewing Mirror Telescope optics for the early observation of UV/optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S; Nam, J W; Ahn, K B; Park, I H; Kim, S W; Lee, J; Lim, H; Brandt, S; Budtz-Jørgensen, C; Castro-Tirado, A J; Chen, P; Cho, M H; Choi, J N; Grossan, B; Huang, M A; Jung, A; Kim, J E; Kim, M B; Kim, Y W; Linder, E V; Min, K W; Na, G W; Panasyuk, M I; Ripa, J; Reglero, V; Smoot, G F; Suh, J E; Svertilov, S; Vedenkin, N; Yashin, I

    2013-01-28

    We report on design, manufacture, and testing of a Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT), the first of its kind and a part of Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory-pathfinder (UFFO-p) for space-based prompt measurement of early UV/optical light curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Using a fast slewing mirror of 150 mm diameter mounted on a 2 axis gimbal stage, SMT can deliver the images of GRB optical counterparts to the intensified CCD detector within 1.5~1.8 s over ± 35 degrees in the slewing field of view. Its Ritchey-Chrétien telescope of 100 mm diameter provides a 17 × 17 arcmin² instantaneous field of view. Technical details of design, construction, the laboratory performance tests in space environments for this unique SMT are described in conjunction with the plan for in-orbit operation onboard the Lomonosov satellite in 2013.

  2. Report of the facility definition team spacelab UV-Optical Telescope Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Scientific requirements for the Spacelab Ultraviolet-Optical Telescope (SUOT) facility are presented. Specific programs involving high angular resolution imagery over wide fields, far ultraviolet spectroscopy, precisely calibrated spectrophotometry and spectropolarimetry over a wide wavelength range, and planetary studies, including high resolution synoptic imagery, are recommended. Specifications for the mounting configuration, instruments for the mounting configuration, instrument mounting system, optical parameters, and the pointing and stabilization system are presented. Concepts for the focal plane instruments are defined. The functional requirements of the direct imaging camera, far ultraviolet spectrograph, and the precisely calibrated spectrophotometer are detailed, and the planetary camera concept is outlined. Operational concepts described in detail are: the makeup and functions of shuttle payload crew, extravehicular activity requirements, telescope control and data management, payload operations control room, orbital constraints, and orbital interfaces (stabilization, maneuvering requirements and attitude control, contamination, utilities, and payload weight considerations).

  3. Optical design of zero-power Hubble Space Telescope wave-front correctors for null testing.

    PubMed

    Hannan, P G; Davila, P; Wood, H J

    1993-04-01

    The optical design of the second-generation wide-field/planetary-camera instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope has been modified to compensate for the spherical aberration of the optical telescope assembly (OTA) by introduction of undercorrected spherical aberration into the wave front. This instrument can be tested in a simple manner to ensure that its aberration contribution has the proper sign and magnitude. We present designs for a near-zero power doublet lens that can be used to generate a spherically aberrated wave front that is similar to the OTA wave front. When this lens is used in combination with the instrument, a near-perfect or nulled wave front should be produced, resulting in a high-quality point image on axis. We also present lens designs for a similar test that can be performed on the OTA simulators now being built to verify the other second-generation instruments.

  4. Optical design of zero-power Hubble Space Telescope wave-front correctors for null testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannan, Paul G.; Davila, Pam; Wood, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    The optical design of the second-generation wide-field/planetary-camera instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope has been modified to compensate for the spherical aberration of the optical telescope assembly (OTA) by introduction of undercorrected spherical aberration into the wave front. This instrument can be tested in a simple manner to ensure that its aberration contribution has the proper sign and magnitude. We present designs for a near-zero power doublet lens that can be used to generate a spherically aberrated wave front that is similar to the OTA wave front. When this lens is used in combination with the instrument, a near-perfect or nulled wave front should be produced, resulting in a high-quality point image on axis. We also present lens designs for a similar test that can be performed on the OTA simulators now being built to verify the other second-generation instruments.

  5. Planning and scheduling the Hubble Space Telescope: Practical application of advanced techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Glenn E.

    1994-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a major astronomical facility that was launched in April, 1990. In late 1993, the first of several planned servicing missions refurbished the telescope, including corrections for a manufacturing flaw in the primary mirror. Orbiting above the distorting effects of the Earth's atmosphere, the HST provides an unrivaled combination of sensitivity, spectral coverage and angular resolution. The HST is arguably the most complex scientific observatory ever constructed and effective use of this valuable resource required novel approaches to astronomical observation and the development of advanced software systems including techniques to represent scheduling preferences and constraints, a constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) based scheduler and a rule based planning system. This paper presents a discussion of these systems and the lessons learned from operational experience.

  6. Optical analysis of the star-tracker telescope for Gravity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zissa, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A ray tracing modeling of the star tracker telescope for Gravity Probe was used to predict the character of the output signal and its sensitivity to fabrication errors. In particular, the impact of the optical subsystem on the requirement of 1 milliarc second signal linearity over a + or - 50 milliarc second range was examined. Photomultiplier and solid state detector options were considered. Recommendations are made.

  7. Use of living technical budgets to manage risk on the James Webb Space Telescope optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porpora, Daniel A.; Barto, Allison A.; Lightsey, Paul A.; Knight, J. Scott

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Primary Mirror (PM) and Secondary Mirror (SM) are deployable relative to the rest of the optics. The PM consists of 18 assemblies which are aligned on-orbit using hexapod actuators. The complexity introduces risk that misalignments of individual components could result in a system with an unexpected optical train. In order to monitor risk throughout the life of the project, a series of interrelated technical budgets and independent cross-checks have been created and are continually updated with as-built data to provide confidence in the state of the system as well as the path to completion.

  8. Optical design for the Narrow Field InfraRed Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS) Petite on the Thirty Meter Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B; Gavel, D; Dekany, R; Ellerbroek, B

    2005-08-02

    We describe an exploratory optical design for the Narrow Field InfraRed Adaptive Optics (AO) System (NFIRAOS) Petite, a proposed adaptive optics system for the Thirty Meter Telescope Project. NFIRAOS will feed infrared spectrograph and wide-field imaging instruments with a diffraction limited beam. The adaptive optics system will require multi-guidestar tomographic wavefront sensing and multi-conjugate AO correction. The NFIRAOS Petite design specifications include two small 60 mm diameter deformable mirrors (DM's) used in a woofer/tweeter or multiconjugate arrangement. At least one DM would be a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) DM. The AO system would correct a 10 to 30 arcsec diameter science field as well as laser guide stars (LGS's) located within a 60 arcsec diameter field and low-order or tip/tilt natural guide stars (NGS's) within a 60 arcsec diameter field. The WFS's are located downstream of the DM's so that they can be operated in true closed-loop, which is not necessarily a given in extremely large telescope adaptive optics design. The WFS's include adjustable corrector elements which correct the static aberrations of the AO relay due to field position and LGS distance height.

  9. A comparison between using incoherent or coherent sources to align and test an adaptive optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The concept in the initial alignment of the segmented mirror adaptive optics telescope called the phased array mirror extendable large aperture telescope (Pamela) is to produce an optical transfer function (OTF) which closely approximates the diffraction limited value which would correspond to a system pupil function that is unity over the aperture and zero outside. There are differences in the theory of intensity measurements between coherent and incoherent radiation. As a result, some of the classical quantities which describe the performance of an optical system for incoherent radiation can not be defined for a coherent field. The most important quantity describing the quality of an optical system is the OTF and for a coherent source the OTF is not defined. Instead a coherent transfer function (CTF) is defined. The main conclusion of the paper is that an incoherent collimated source and not a collimated laser source is preferred to calibrate the Hartmann wavefront sensor (WFS) of an aligned adaptive optical system. A distant laser source can be used with minimum problems to correct the system for atmospheric turbulence. The collimation of the HeNe laser alignment source can be improved by using a very small pin hole in the spatial filter so only the central portion of the beam is transmitted and the beam from the filter is nearly constant in amplitude. The size of this pin hole will be limited by the sensitivity of the lateral effect diode (LEDD) elements.

  10. Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark; Flanagan, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    Space telescopes have been a dominant force in astrophysics and astronomy over the last two decades. As Lyman Spitzer predicted in 1946, space telescopes have opened up much of the electromagnetic spectrum to astronomers, and provided the opportunity to exploit the optical performance of telescopes uncompromised by the turbulent atmosphere. This special section of Optical Engineering is devoted to space telescopes. It focuses on the design and implementation of major space observatories from the gamma-ray to far-infrared, and highlights the scientific and technical breakthroughs enabled by these telescopes. The papers accepted for publication include reviews of major space telescopes spanning the last two decades, in-depth discussions of the design considerations for visible and x-ray telescopes, and papers discussing concepts and technical challenges for future space telescopes.

  11. A consideration of the use of optical fibers to remotely couple photometers to telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heacox, William D.

    1988-01-01

    The possible use of optical fibers to remotely couple photometers to telescopes is considered. Such an application offers the apparent prospect of enhancing photometric stability as a consequence of the benefits of remote operation and decreased sensitivity to image details. A properly designed fiber optic coupler will probably show no significant changes in optical transmisssion due to normal variations in the fiber configuration. It may be more difficult to eliminate configuration-dependent effects on the pupil of the transmitted beam, and thus achieve photometric stability to guiding and seeing errors. In addition, there is some evidence for significant changes in the optical throughputs of fibers over the temperature range normally encountered in astronomical observatories.

  12. Monte Carlo modelling of multiconjugate adaptive optics performance on the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of a wide-field adaptive optics system depends on input design parameters. Here we investigate the performance of a multiconjugate adaptive optics system design for the European Extremely Large Telescope, using an end-to-end Monte Carlo adaptive optics simulation tool, DASP (Durham adaptive optics simulation platform). We consider parameters such as the number of laser guide stars, sodium layer depth, wavefront sensor pixel scale, number of deformable mirrors (DMs), mirror conjugation and actuator pitch. We provide potential areas where costs savings can be made, and investigate trade-offs between performance and cost. We conclude that a six-laser guide star system using three DMs seems to be a sweet spot for performance and cost compromise.

  13. Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT), a Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Stanley; AdEPT Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Since the launch of AGILE and FERMI, the scientific progress in high-energy (Eγ > 200MeV) gamma-ray science has been dramatic. Both of these telescopes cover a broad energy range from about ~ 20 MeV to > 10 GeV. However, a significant sensitivity gap remains in the medium-energy regime (0.75 - 200 MeV) that has been explored only by COMPTEL and EGRET on CGRO. Exploring this regime with angular resolution near the kinematic limit and high polarization sensitivity requires a telescope design with a low density electron track imaging detector. The medium-energy (~ 5 to 200 MeV) Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT), will achieve angular resolution of ~0.6 deg at 70 MeV, similar to the angular resolution of Fermi/LAT at ~ 1 GeV. AdEPT will also provide unprecedented polarization sensitivity of ~ 1 % for a 1 Crab source. The enabling technology for AdEPT is the Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) a low-density, large volume, gas time-projection chamber with a 2-dimensional readout. We describe our ROSES/APRA funded program to build a 50x50x100 cm3 AdEPT prototype, measure the angular resolution and polarization sensitivity of this prototype at an accelerator.

  14. Liverpool Telescope follow-up of candidate electromagnetic counterparts during the first run of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperwheat, C. M.; Steele, I. A.; Piascik, A. S.; Bersier, D.; Bode, M. F.; Collins, C. A.; Darnley, M. J.; Galloway, D. K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Lamb, G. P.; Levan, A. J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Mundell, C. G.; Pian, E.; Pollacco, D.; Steeghs, D.; Tanvir, N. R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2016-11-01

    The first direct detection of gravitational waves was made in 2015 September with the Advanced LIGO detectors. By prior arrangement, a worldwide collaboration of electromagnetic follow-up observers were notified of candidate gravitational wave events during the first science run, and many facilities were engaged in the search for counterparts. Three alerts were issued to the electromagnetic collaboration over the course of the first science run, which lasted from 2015 September to 2016 January. Two of these alerts were associated with the gravitational wave events since named GW150914 and GW151226. In this paper we provide an overview of the Liverpool Telescope contribution to the follow-up campaign over this period. Given the hundreds of square degree uncertainty in the sky position of any gravitational wave event, efficient searching for candidate counterparts required survey telescopes with large (˜degrees) fields of view. The role of the Liverpool Telescope was to provide follow-up classification spectroscopy of any candidates. We followed candidates associated with all three alerts, observing 1, 9 and 17 candidates respectively. We classify the majority of the transients we observed as supernovae. No counterparts were identified, which is in line with expectations given that the events were classified as black hole-black hole mergers. However these searches laid the foundation for similar follow-up campaigns in future gravitational wave detector science runs, in which the detection of neutron star merger events with observable electromagnetic counterparts is much more likely.

  15. High Resolution Imaging with Adaptive Optics at the Multiple Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd-Hart, M.; McLeod, B. A.; Wittman, D.; Colucci, D.; McCarthy, D. W.; Angel, R.; Dekany, R.

    1992-12-01

    We present the latest results from an adaptive optics program being implemented at the MMT using a six element adaptive mirror. The tilt of the wavefront over each of the six telescopes is determined with a Shack-Hartmann type sensor using a 24times 24 pixel low-noise CCD. This system allows the MMT to operate at a resolution of 0.3'' at 2 microns -- near the diffraction limit of the individual 1.8-m telescopes. This resolution can be obtained within ~ 1' of any star with visual magnitude < 16, allowing high-resolution near-IR imaging with a NICMOS2 array of a wide variety of targets, including high-redshift galaxies and young and evolved stars. This system can also be used with the MMT operated as a phased array telescope. In this mode, the piston errors between the telescopes are determined by examining the Fourier transform of the combined 2-micron image of the natural guide star using a fast-readout InSb array. In this configuration we have achieved a resolution of 0.075''. In good seeing we expect to obtain images of interest within the isoplanatic patch of guide stars with K magnitude <7. We acknowledge financial support from the NSF (AST92-03336) and the Flintridge Foundation. The adaptive mirror was donated by ThermoTrex Corp.

  16. Adaptive Optics at Optical Wavelengths: Test Observations of Kyoto 3DII Connected to Subaru Telescope AO188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, K.; Sugai, H.; Shimono, A.; Akita, A.; Hattori, T.; Hayano, Y.; Minowa, Y.; Takeyama, N.

    2016-09-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) enables us to observe objects with high spatial resolution, which is important in most astrophysical observations. Most AO systems are operational at near-infrared wavelengths but not in the optical range, because optical observations require a much higher performance to obtain the same Strehl ratio as near-infrared observations. Therefore, to enable AO-assisted observations at optical wavelengths, we connected the Kyoto Tridimensional Spectrograph II (Kyoto 3DII), which can perform integral field spectroscopy, to the second generation AO system of the Subaru Telescope (AO188). We developed a new beam-splitter that reflects light below 594 nm for the wavefront sensors of AO188 and transmits above 644 nm for Kyoto 3DII. We also developed a Kyoto 3DII mount at the Nasmyth focus of the Subaru Telescope. In test observations, the spatial resolution of the combined AO188-Kyoto 3DII was higher than that in natural seeing conditions, even at 6500 Å. The full width at half maximum of an undersampled (1.5 spaxels) bright guide star (7.0 mag in the V-band) was 0.″12.

  17. Adaptive Optics at Optical Wavelengths: Test Observations of Kyoto 3DII Connected to Subaru Telescope AO188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, K.; Sugai, H.; Shimono, A.; Akita, A.; Hattori, T.; Hayano, Y.; Minowa, Y.; Takeyama, N.

    2016-09-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) enables us to observe objects with high spatial resolution, which is important in most astrophysical observations. Most AO systems are operational at near-infrared wavelengths but not in the optical range, because optical observations require a much higher performance to obtain the same Strehl ratio as near-infrared observations. Therefore, to enable AO-assisted observations at optical wavelengths, we connected the Kyoto Tridimensional Spectrograph II (Kyoto 3DII), which can perform integral field spectroscopy, to the second generation AO system of the Subaru Telescope (AO188). We developed a new beam-splitter that reflects light below 594 nm for the wavefront sensors of AO188 and transmits above 644 nm for Kyoto 3DII. We also developed a Kyoto 3DII mount at the Nasmyth focus of the Subaru Telescope. In test observations, the spatial resolution of the combined AO188–Kyoto 3DII was higher than that in natural seeing conditions, even at 6500 Å. The full width at half maximum of an undersampled (1.5 spaxels) bright guide star (7.0 mag in the V-band) was 0.″12.

  18. Reflector adjustment for a large radio telescope based on active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tongying; Zhang, Zhenchao; Li, Aihua; Wang, You

    2012-09-01

    The reflector deformation caused by gravity, temperature, humidity, wind loading and so on can reduce the global performance of a large radio telescope. In this paper, considering the characteristics of the primary reflector of a 13.7 m millimeter-wave telescope a novel reflector adjustment method based on active optics has therefore been proposed to control the active surface of the reflector through the communication between the active surface computer and embedded intelligent controller with a large quantity of displacement actuators, in which the active surface computer estimates and controls the real time active surface figure at any elevation angle, reduces or eliminates the adverse effects of the reflector deformation to increase the resolution and sensitivity of the radio telescope due to the more radio signals collected. A Controller Area Network /Ethernet protocol converter is designed for the communication between the active surface control computer as a host computer in Ethernet and the displacement actuator controller in Controller Area Network. The displacement actuator is driven by a stepper motor and controlled by an intelligent controller with the data from the active surface computer. The closed-loop control of the stepper motor improves the control accuracy greatly through the feedback link based on the optical encoder.

  19. James Webb Space Telescope optical simulation testbed III: first experimental results with linear-control alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egron, Sylvain; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Leboulleux, Lucie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Élodie; Perrin, Marshall D.; Ygouf, Marie; Michau, Vincent; Bonnefois, Aurélie; Fusco, Thierry; Escolle, Clément; Ferrari, Marc; Hugot, Emmanuel; Soummer, Rémi

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop experiment designed to study wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science and Operations Center. The design of JOST reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) using three custom aspheric lenses. It provides similar quality image as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at 633 nm. An Iris AO segmented mirror stands for the segmented primary mirror of JWST. Actuators allow us to control (1) the 18 segments of the segmented mirror in piston, tip, tilt and (2) the second lens, which stands for the secondary mirror, in tip, tilt and x, y, z positions. We present the full linear control alignment infrastructure developed for JOST, with an emphasis on multi-field wavefront sensing and control. Our implementation of the Wavefront Sensing (WFS) algorithms using phase diversity is experimentally tested. The wavefront control (WFC) algorithms, which rely on a linear model for optical aberrations induced by small misalignments of the three lenses, are tested and validated on simulations.

  20. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Simulation Testbed I: overview and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Soummer, Rémi; Choquet, Élodie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Levecq, Olivier; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Ygouf, Marie; Leboulleux, Lucie; Egron, Sylvain; Anderson, Rachel; Long, Chris; Elliott, Erin; Hartig, George; Pueyo, Laurent; van der Marel, Roeland; Mountain, Matt

    2014-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop workbench to study aspects of wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing optomechanical testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope, TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science & Operations Center. We have developed an optical design that reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat using three aspheric lenses; it provides similar image quality as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at HeNe wavelength. A segmented deformable mirror stands in for the segmented primary mirror and allows control of the 18 segments in piston, tip, and tilt, while the secondary can be controlled in tip, tilt and x, y, z position. This will be sufficient to model many commissioning activities, to investigate field dependence and multiple field point sensing & control, to evaluate alternate sensing algorithms, and develop contingency plans. Testbed data will also be usable for cross-checking of the WFS&C Software Subsystem, and for staff training and development during JWST's five- to ten-year mission.

  1. Telescope Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Renaissance Telescope for high resolution and visual astronomy has five 82-degree Field Tele-Vue Nagler Eyepieces, some of the accessories that contribute to high image quality. Telescopes and eyepieces are representative of a family of optical equipment manufactured by Tele-Vue Optics, Inc.

  2. Design Study of 8 Meter Monolithic Mirror UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    The planned Ares V launch vehicle with its 10 meter fairing shroud and 55,000 kg capacity to the Sun Earth L2 point enables entirely new classes of space telescopes. NASA MSFC has conducted a preliminary study that demonstrates the feasibility of launching a 6 to 8 meter class monolithic primary mirror telescope to Sun-Earth L2 using an Ares V. Specific technical areas studied included optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; launch vehicle performance and trajectory; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN&C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; operations and servicing; mass and power budgets; and system cost.

  3. A FOSSIL BULGE GLOBULAR CLUSTER REVEALED BY VERY LARGE TELESCOPE MULTI-CONJUGATE ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Ortolani, Sergio; Barbuy, Beatriz; Momany, Yazan; Saviane, Ivo; Jilkova, Lucie; Bica, Eduardo; Salerno, Gustavo M.; Jungwiert, Bruno E-mail: barbuy@astro.iag.usp.br E-mail: isaviane@eso.org E-mail: bica@if.ufrgs.br

    2011-08-10

    The globular cluster HP 1 is projected on the bulge, very close to the Galactic center. The Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator on the Very Large Telescope allowed us to acquire high-resolution deep images that, combined with first epoch New Technology Telescope data, enabled us to derive accurate proper motions. The cluster and bulge fields' stellar contents were disentangled through this process and produced an unprecedented definition in color-magnitude diagrams of this cluster. The metallicity of [Fe/H] {approx} -1.0 from previous spectroscopic analysis is confirmed, which together with an extended blue horizontal branch imply an age older than the halo average. Orbit reconstruction results suggest that HP 1 is spatially confined within the bulge.

  4. Optical and Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectropolarimetry of 3C 273 and PG 1114+445

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul S.; Schmidt, Gary D.; Allen, Richard G.

    1993-01-01

    New optical spectropolarimetry and broad-band measurements, made during periods when the linear polarization of the quasar 3C 273 was no greater than 1 pct, are combined with ultraviolet polarization measurements made with the Faint Object Spectrograph of the Hubble Space Telescope. Very weak UV polarization during the time of observation is seen in the HST measurements, which is consistent with the completely unpolarized UV continuum and emission lines. Optical spectropolarimetry, however, reveals polarized light, the source of which is consistent with a nonthermal component, diluted by other unpolarized emission sources, such as the 'big blue bump'. Optical spectropolarimetry of the radio-quiet quasar PG 1114+445 is also presented. The polarization of this QSO is thought to result from scattering by dust external to the narrow-line region. 3C 273 and PG 1114+445 are useful in illustrating the range of polarizing mechanisms which can operate in low-polarization QSOs.

  5. Optical telescope system-level design considerations for a space-based gravitational wave mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Sankar, Shannon R.

    2016-07-01

    The study of the Universe through gravitational waves will yield a revolutionary new perspective on the Universe, which has been intensely studied using electromagnetic signals in many wavelength bands. A space-based gravitational wave observatory will enable access to a rich array of astrophysical sources in the measurement band from 0.1 to 100 mHz, and nicely complement observations from ground-based detectors as well as pulsar timing arrays by sampling a different range of compact object masses and astrophysical processes. The observatory measures gravitational radiation by precisely monitoring the tiny change in the proper distance between pairs of freely falling proof masses. These masses are separated by millions of kilometers and, using a laser heterodyne interferometric technique, the change in their proper separation is detected to ~ 10 pm over timescales of 1000 seconds, a fractional precision of better than one part in 1019. Optical telescopes are essential for the implementation of this precision displacement measurement. In this paper we describe some of the key system level design considerations for the telescope subsystem in a mission context. The reference mission for this purpose is taken to be the enhanced Laser Interferometry Space Antenna mission (eLISA), a strong candidate for the European Space Agency's Cosmic Visions L3 launch opportunity in 2034. We will review the flow-down of observatory level requirements to the telescope subsystem, particularly pertaining to the effects of telescope dimensional stability and scattered light suppression, two performance specifications which are somewhat different from the usual requirements for an image forming telescope.

  6. Calculating Statistical Orbit Distributions Using GEO Optical Observations with the Michigan Orbital Debris Survey Telescope (MODEST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, M.; Barker, E.; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K. J.; Rodriquez, H. M.

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Orbital Debris measurements program has a goal to characterize the small debris environment in the geosynchronous Earth-orbit (GEO) region using optical telescopes ("small" refers to objects too small to catalog and track with current systems). Traditionally, observations of GEO and near-GEO objects involve following the object with the telescope long enough to obtain an orbit suitable for tracking purposes. Telescopes operating in survey mode, however, randomly observe objects that pass through their field of view. Typically, these short-arc observation are inadequate to obtain detailed orbits, but can be used to estimate approximate circular orbit elements (semimajor axis, inclination, and ascending node). From this information, it should be possible to make statistical inferences about the orbital distributions of the GEO population bright enough to be observed by the system. The Michigan Orbital Debris Survey Telescope (MODEST) has been making such statistical surveys of the GEO region for four years. During that time, the telescope has made enough observations in enough areas of the GEO belt to have had nearly complete coverage. That means that almost all objects in all possible orbits in the GEO and near- GEO region had a non-zero chance of being observed. Some regions (such as those near zero inclination) have had good coverage, while others are poorly covered. Nevertheless, it is possible to remove these statistical biases and reconstruct the orbit populations within the limits of sampling error. In this paper, these statistical techniques and assumptions are described, and the techniques are applied to the current MODEST data set to arrive at our best estimate of the GEO orbit population distribution.

  7. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun Balloon-Borne Telescope: Astrophysical Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Ramsey, Brian; Apple, Jeff; Kurt, Dietz; Tennant, Allyn; Swartz, Douglas; Christe, Steven D.; Shih, Albert

    2014-01-01

    On September 21, 2013, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun, or HEROES, balloon-borne x-ray telescope launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility's site in Ft. Summer, NM. The flight lasted for approximately 27 hours and the observational targets included the Sun and astrophysical sources GRS 1915+105 and the Crab Nebula. Over the past year, the HEROES team upgraded the existing High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES Project is a multi-NASA Center effort with team members at both Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and is led by Co-PIs (one at each Center). The HEROES payload consists of the hard X-ray telescope HERO, developed at MSFC, combined with several new systems. To allow the HEROES telescope to make observations of the Sun, a new solar aspect system was added to supplement the existing star camera for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter was added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations and two alignment monitoring systems were added for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. This mission was funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands-On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  8. Analysis of telescope array receivers for deep-space inter-planetary optical communication link between Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, Ali Javed; Eftekhar, Ali Asghar; Adibi, Ali; Amoozegar, Farid

    2010-05-01

    Optical communication technology shows promising prospects to fulfill the large bandwidth communication requirements of future deep-space exploration missions that are launched by NASA and various other international space agencies. At Earth, a telescope with a large aperture diameter is required to capture very weak optical signals that are transmitted from distant planets and to support large bandwidth communication link. A single large telescope has the limitations of cost, single point failure in case of malfunction, difficulty in manufacturing high quality optics, maintenance, and trouble in providing communication operations when transmitting spacecraft is close to the Sun. An array of relatively smaller-sized telescopes electrically connected to form an aggregate aperture area equivalent to a single large telescope is a viable alternative to a monolithic gigantic aperture. In this paper, we present the design concept and analysis of telescope array receivers for an optical communication link between Earth and Mars. Pulse-position modulation (PPM) is used at the transmitter end and photon-counting detectors along with the direct-detection technique are employed at each telescope element in the array. We also present the optimization of various system parameters, such as detector size (i.e., receiver field of view), PPM slot width, and the PPM order M, to mitigate the atmospheric turbulence and background noise effects, and to maximize the communication system performance. The performance of different array architectures is evaluated through analytical techniques and Monte-Carlo simulations for a broad range of operational scenarios, such as, Earth-Mars conjunction, Earth-Mars opposition, and different background and turbulence conditions. It is shown that the performance of the telescope array-based receiver is equivalent to a single large telescope; and as compared to current RF technology, telescope array-based optical receivers can provide several orders

  9. Recent advances in reaction bonded silicon carbide optics and optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, Joseph; Schwartz, Jay; Landry, David; Glenn, William; Rider, Brian; Chung, Michael

    2005-08-01

    SSG Precision Optronics, Inc. (SSG) has recently developed a number of Reaction Bonded (RB) Silicon Carbide (SiC) optical systems for space-based remote sensing and astronomical observing applications. RB SiC's superior material properties make it uniquely well suited to meet the image quality and long term dimensional stability requirements associated with these applications. An overview of the RB SiC manufacturing process is presented, along with a summary description of recently delivered RB SiC flight hardware. This hardware includes an RB SiC telescope and Pointing Mirror Assembly (PMA) for the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) mission and an imaging telescope for the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) mission. SSG continues to advance the state-of-the-technology with SiC materials and systems. A summary of development activities related to a low-cost, fracture tough, fiber reinforced RB SiC material formulation, novel tooling to produce monolithic, partially closed back mirror geometries, and extension of the technology to large aspheric mirrors is also provided.

  10. Advanced optic fabrication using ultrafast laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lauren L.; Qiao, Jun; Qiao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Advanced fabrication and finishing techniques are desired for freeform optics and integrated photonics. Methods including grinding, polishing and magnetorheological finishing used for final figuring and polishing of such optics are time consuming, expensive, and may be unsuitable for complex surface features while common photonics fabrication techniques often limit devices to planar geometries. Laser processing has been investigated as an alternative method for optic forming, surface polishing, structure writing, and welding, as direct tuning of laser parameters and flexible beam delivery are advantageous for complex freeform or photonics elements and material-specific processing. Continuous wave and pulsed laser radiation down to the nanosecond regime have been implemented to achieve nanoscale surface finishes through localized material melting, but the temporal extent of the laser-material interaction often results in the formation of a sub-surface heat affected zone. The temporal brevity of ultrafast laser radiation can allow for the direct vaporization of rough surface asperities with minimal melting, offering the potential for smooth, final surface quality with negligible heat affected material. High intensities achieved in focused ultrafast laser radiation can easily induce phase changes in the bulk of materials for processing applications. We have experimentally tested the effectiveness of ultrafast laser radiation as an alternative laser source for surface processing of monocrystalline silicon. Simulation of material heating associated with ultrafast laser-material interaction has been performed and used to investigate optimized processing parameters including repetition rate. The parameter optimization process and results of experimental processing will be presented.

  11. Recent Advances in Miniaturized Optical Gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Olio, F.; Tatoli, T.; Ciminelli, C.; Armenise, M. N.

    2014-03-01

    Low-cost chip-scale optoelectronic gyroscopes having a resolution ≤ 10 °/h and a good reliability also in harsh environments could have a strong impact on the medium/high performance gyro market, which is currently dominated by well-established bulk optical angular velocity sensors. The R&D activity aiming at the demonstration of those miniaturized sensors is crucial for aerospace/defense industry, and thus it is attracting an increasing research effort and notably funds. In this paper the recent technological advances on the compact optoelectronic gyroscopes with low weight and high energy saving are reviewed. Attention is paid to both the so-called gyroscope-on-a-chip, which is a novel sensor, at the infantile stage, whose optical components are monolithically integrated on a single indium phosphide chip, and to a new ultra-high Q ring resonator for gyro applications with a configuration including a 1D photonic crystal in the resonant path. The emerging field of the gyros based on passive ring cavities, which have already shown performance comparable with that of optical fiber gyros, is also discussed.

  12. Characterization benches for neutrino telescope Optical Modules at the APC laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgitas, Theodore; Creusot, Alexandre; Kouchner, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    As has been demonstrated by the first generation of neutrino telescopes Antares and IceCube, precise knowledge of the photon detection efficiency of optical modules is of fundamental importance for the understanding of the instrument and accurate event reconstruction. Dedicated test benches have been developed to measure all related quantities for the Digital Optical Modules of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope being currently deployed in the Mediterranean sea. The first bench is a black box with robotic arms equipped with a calibrated single photon source or laser which enable a precise mapping of the detection efficiency at arbitrary incident angles as well as precise measurements of the time delays induced by the photodetection chain. These measurement can be incorporated and compared to full GEANT MonteCarlo simulations of the optical modules. The second bench is a 2 m×2 m ×2 m water tank equipped with muon hodoscopes on top and bottom. It enables to study and measure the angular dependence of the DOM's detection efficiency of the Cherenkov light produced in water by relativistic muons, thus reproducing in situ detection conditions. We describe these two benches and present their first results and status.

  13. The Optical Design of CHARIS: An Exoplanet IFS for the Subaru Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters-Limbach, Mary; Groff, Tyler; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Driscoll, Dave; Galvin, Michael; Foster, Allen; Carr, Michael; LeClerc, Dave; Fagan, Rad; McElwain, Michael; Knapp, Gillian; Brandt, Timothy; Janson, Markus; Guyone, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Martinache, Frantz; Hayashi, Masahiko; Takato, Naruhisa

    2013-01-01

    High-contrast imaging techniques now make possible both imaging and spectroscopy of planets around nearby stars. We present the optical design for the Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS), a lenslet-based, cryogenic integral field spectrograph (IFS) for imaging exoplanets on the Subaru telescope. The IFS will provide spectral information for 138×138 spatial elements over a 2.07 arcsec × 2.07 arcsec field of view (FOV). CHARIS will operate in the near infrared (lambda = 1.15 - 2.5 micrometers) and will feature two spectral resolution modes of R is approximately 18 (low-res mode) and R is approximately 73 (high-res mode). Taking advantage of the Subaru telescope adaptive optics systems and coronagraphs (AO188 and SCExAO), CHARIS will provide sufficient contrast to obtain spectra of young self-luminous Jupiter-mass exoplanets. CHARIS will undergo CDR in October 2013 and is projected to have first light by the end of 2015. We report here on the current optical design of CHARIS and its unique innovations.

  14. Study of alternate optical and fine guidance sensor designs for the space infrared telescope facility (SIRTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wissinger, A.; Steir, M.; Mcfarlane, M.; Fuschetto, A.

    1984-01-01

    A unique optical design was developed that compensates for the coma degraded images caused by field chopping in SIRTF. The conic constants of a Cassegrain telescope were altered to compensate for the coma induced by the secondary mirror tilt. The modulation transfer function is essentially independent of secondary mirror tilt, and diffraction limited image quality is maintained over a several arcminute field during chopping. With an untilted secondary mirror, the coma compensated (CC) design has a smaller field than the unchopped Ritchey-Chretien design; but use of relay optics, such as the inverted Cassegrain design developed for the fine guidance sensor (FGS), can increase the CC telescope's field size. A reactionless secondary mirror chopper mechanism that uses superconducting magnets was studied. The heart producing elements are confined to a reaction plate that is not directly viewed by the IR focal plane. A design was also developed for a low moment of inertia, reticulated HIP beryllium secondary mirror consistent with blank fabrication technology and optical finishing requirements.

  15. Structural Feasibility Analysis of a Robotically Assembled Very Large Aperture Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William Keats; Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilcox, Brian H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study of robotically constructing a very large aperture optical space telescope on-orbit. Since the largest engineering challenges are likely to reside in the design and assembly of the 150-m diameter primary reflector, this preliminary study focuses on this component. The same technology developed for construction of the primary would then be readily used for the smaller optical structures (secondary, tertiary, etc.). A reasonable set of ground and on-orbit loading scenarios are compiled from the literature and used to define the structural performance requirements and size the primary reflector. A surface precision analysis shows that active adjustment of the primary structure is required in order to meet stringent optical surface requirements. Two potential actuation strategies are discussed along with potential actuation devices at the current state of the art. The finding of this research effort indicate that successful technology development combined with further analysis will likely enable such a telescope to be built in the future.

  16. NASA SBIR Subtopic S2.04 "Advanced Optical Components"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this subtopic is to develop and demonstrate technologies to manufacture ultra-low-cost precision optical systems for very large x-ray, UV/optical or infrared telescopes. Potential solutions include but are not limited to direct precision machining, rapid optical fabrication, slumping or replication technologies to manufacture 1 to 2 meter (or larger) precision quality mirror or lens segments (either normal incidence for uv/optical/infrared or grazing incidence for x-ray). An additional key enabling technology for UV/optical telescopes is a broadband (from 100 nm to 2500 nm) high-reflectivity mirror coating with extremely uniform amplitude and polarization properties which can be deposited on 1 to 3 meter class mirror.

  17. Daytime Polar Alignment of Telescope Mountings Using GPS and Internal Reference Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellon, R. R.; Scheld, D.; Stencel, R. E.

    1998-12-01

    A technique is presented for performing polar alignment of astronomical telescope mountings to high precision during daylight hours. This work originated in the requirement to erect a truck mounted astronomical telescope at multiple locations during the day in order to measure the atmospheric convective turbulence Fried Parameter r0 by tracking stars at various zenith angles. The custom equatorial mounting built for this project incorporates a surveyor's theodolite, which is used to establish an optical line of sight to the North Celestial Pole (NCP). The elevation angle of this line of sight is set directly by adjusting the theodolite tube elevation angle to that of the local geographic latitude obtained from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. The theodolite is set into the azimuth of the Pole by observing an object on the horizon of known bearing angle or by observing the Sun=92s known azimuth at a specified time. Once the theodolite line of sight to the NCP is established, an optical target projector contained within and aligned with the polar axis provides an illuminated pattern, which is viewed by the theodolite. Subsequent adjustments of the elevation and azimuth of the polar axis bring the projected pattern onto the intersection of the crosshairs in the theodolite reticule, thereby bringing the polar axis into close coincidence with the NCP. Denver University astronomers are interested in this application for their proposed Fully Adaptive Segmented Telescope (FAST) instrument, a meter-class instrument which can be transported among high altitude sites (see www. adaptive-optics.com). Equinox Interscience (303-843-0313) can provide this daytime polar alignment capability to interested users for equatorial mountings.

  18. ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT CURVES OF SUPERNOVAE WITH THE SWIFT ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Nousek, John; Vanden Berk, Daniel; Holland, Stephen T.; Immler, Stefan; Gehrels, Neil; Panagia, Nino; Still, Martin

    2009-05-15

    We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of supernovae (SNe) obtained with the UltraViolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift spacecraft. This is the largest sample of UV light curves from any single instrument and covers all major SN types and most subtypes. The UV light curves of SNe Ia are fairly homogenous, while SNe Ib/c and IIP show more variety in their light-curve shapes. The UV-optical colors clearly differentiate SNe Ia and IIP, particularly at early times. The color evolution of SNe IIP, however, makes their colors similar to SNe Ia at about 20 days after explosion. SNe Ib/c are shown to have varied UV-optical colors. The use of UV colors to help type SNe will be important for high-redshift SNe discovered in optical observations. These data can be added to ground-based optical and near infrared data to create bolometric light curves of individual objects and as checks on generic bolometric corrections used in the absence of UV data. This sample can also be compared with rest-frame UV observations of high-redshift SNe observed at optical wavelengths.

  19. The future of space imaging. Report of a community-based study of an advanced camera for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert A. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The scientific and technical basis for an Advanced Camera (AC) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is discussed. In March 1992, the NASA Program Scientist for HST invited the Space Telescope Science Institute to conduct a community-based study of an AC, which would be installed on a scheduled HST servicing mission in 1999. The study had three phases: a broad community survey of views on candidate science program and required performance of the AC, an analysis of technical issues relating to its implementation, and a panel of experts to formulate conclusions and prioritize recommendations. From the assessment of the imaging tasks astronomers have proposed for or desired from HST, we believe the most valuable 1999 instrument would be a camera with both near ultraviolet/optical (NUVO) and far ultraviolet (FUV) sensitivity, and with both wide field and high resolution options.

  20. On-orbit performance of the Hubble Space Telescope optical control system.

    PubMed

    Basedow, R; Ftaclas, C; Crout, R; Nonnenmacher, A

    1993-04-01

    On-orbit data are used to examine the performance of the Hubble Space Telescope optical control system. The precision, relative accuracy, and absolute accuracy of the off-axis Wavefront-Sensor measurements are evaluated and compared with design requirements. The internal stability of the sensors is better than 0.006 microm rms over five years, including launch. Random errors are estimated to be within 0.01 microm rms. Systematic errors are present in the estimates of focus, spherical, and coma aberrations, but none has been identified for astigmatism. Primary-mirror spherical aberration is believed to be the probable cause of all subspecification performances.

  1. Object-oriented software design for the Mt. Wilson 100-inch Hooker telescope adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thomas G.

    2000-06-01

    The object oriented software design paradigm has been instrumented in the development of the Adoptics software used in the Hooker telescope's ADOPT adaptive optics system. The software runs on a Pentium-class PC host and eight DSP processors connected to the host's motherboard bus. C++ classes were created to implement most of the host software's functionality, with the object oriented features of inheritance, encapsulation and abstraction being the most useful. Careful class design at the inception of the project allowed for the rapid addition of features without comprising the integrity of the software. Base class implementations include the DSP system, real-time graphical displays and opto-mechanical actuator control.

  2. The Unique Optical Design of the CTI-II Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Mark R.; McGraw, J. T.; MacFarlane, M.

    2006-12-01

    The CCD/Transit Instrument with Innovative Instrumentation (CTI-II) is being developed for precision ground-based astrometric and photometric astronomical observations. The 1.8m telescope will be stationary, near-zenith pointing and will feature a CCD-mosaic array operated in time-delay and integrate (TDI) mode to image a continuous strip of the sky in five bands. The heart of the telescope is a Nasmyth-like bent-Cassegrain optical system optimized to produce near diffraction-limited images with near zero distortion over a circular1.42 deg field. The optical design includes an f/2.2 parabolic ULE primary with no central hole salvaged from the original CTI telescope and adds the requisite hyperbolic secondary, a folding flat and a highly innovative all-spherical, five lens corrector which includes three plano surfaces. The reflective and refractive portions of the design have been optimized as individual but interdependent systems so that the same reflective system can be used with slightly different refractive correctors. At present, two nearly identical corrector designs are being evaluated, one fabricated from BK-7 glass and the other of fused silica. The five lens corrector consists of an air-spaced triplet separated from follow-on air-spaced doublet. Either design produces 0.25 arcsecond images at 83% encircled energy with a maximum of 0.0005% distortion. The innovative five lens corrector design has been applied to other current and planned Cassegrain, RC and super RC optical systems requiring correctors. The basic five lens approach always results in improved performance compared to the original designs. In some cases, the improvement in image quality is small but includes substantial reductions in distortion. In other cases, the improvement in image quality is substantial. Because the CTI-II corrector is designed for a parabolic primary, it might be especially useful for liquid mirror telescopes. We describe and discuss the CTI-II optical design with respect

  3. A simulation of the pointing performance of the Solar Optical Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundas, David J.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle-based Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) will be able to resolve details subtending 0.1 arcsec for continuous viewing over several hours. The SOT's jitter must contribute only 0.03 arcsec rms pointing error over the observation periods; this requirement is addressed with several control system layers encompassing the Shuttle, the Instrument Pointing System, the Prime Focus Image Control Functional System, and the Gregorian Focus Image Control Functional System. The mathematical models for system pointing stability presented give attention to the interaction of the structural and control systems on pointing stability and to Space Shuttle disturbances.

  4. Development of active/adaptive lightweight optics for the next generation of telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghigo, M.; Basso, S.; Citterio, O.; Mazzoleni, F.; Vernani, D.

    2006-02-01

    The future large optical telescopes will have such large dimensions to require innovative technical solutions either in the engineering and optical fields. Their optics will have dimensions ranging from 30 to 100 m. and will be segmented. It is necessary to develop a cost effective industrial process, fast and efficient, to create the thousands of segments neeededs to assemble the mirrors of these instruments. INAF-OAB (Astronomical Observatory of Brera) is developing with INAF-Arcetri (Florence Astronomical Observatory) a method of production of lightweight glass optics that is suitable for the manufacturing of these segments. These optics will be also probably active and therefore the segments have to be thin, light and relatively flexible. The same requirements are valid also for the secondary adaptive mirrors foreseen for these telescopes and that therefore will benefit from the same technology. The technique under investigation foresees the thermal slumping of thin glass segments using a high quality ceramic mold (master). The sheet of glass is placed onto the mold and then, by means of a suitable thermal cycle, the glass is softened and its shape is changed copying the master shape. At the end of the slumping the correction of the remaining errors will be performed using the Ion Beam Figuring technique, a non-contact deterministic technique. To reduce the time spent for the correction it will be necessary to have shape errors on the segments as small as possible. A very preliminary series of experiments already performed on reduced size segments have shown that it is possible to copy a master shape with high accuracy (few microns PV) and it is very likely that copy accuracies of 1 micron or less are possible. The paper presents in detail the concepts of the proposed process and describes our current efforts that are aimed at the production of a scaled demonstrative adaptive segment of 50 cm of diameter.

  5. Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine and surgery.

    PubMed

    Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Pogue, Brian W; Tearney, Guillermo J; Tunnell, James W; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-02-01

    The guest editors introduce a Biomedical Optics Express feature issue that includes contributions from participants at the 2013 conference on Advances in Optics for Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery XIII.

  6. Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine and surgery.

    PubMed

    Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Pogue, Brian W; Tearney, Guillermo J; Tunnell, James W; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-02-01

    The guest editors introduce a Biomedical Optics Express feature issue that includes contributions from participants at the 2013 conference on Advances in Optics for Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery XIII. PMID:24575348

  7. Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine and surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Pogue, Brian W.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Tunnell, James W.; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    The guest editors introduce a Biomedical Optics Express feature issue that includes contributions from participants at the 2013 conference on Advances in Optics for Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery XIII. PMID:24575348

  8. The Optical Design of the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Newton; Bersanelli, Marco; Childers, Jeffery; D'Arcangelo, Ocleto; Halevi, Doron; Janssen, Michael; Kedward, Keith; Lemaster, Nicole; Lubin, Philip; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Marvil, Joshua; Meinhold, Peter; Mejía, Jorge; Mennella, Aniello; Natoli, Paolo; O'Neil, Hugh; Pina, Agenor; Pryor, Mark; Sandri, Maura; Simonetto, Alessandro; Sozzi, Carlo; Tello, Camilo; Villa, Fabrizio; Villela, Thyrso; Williams, Brian; Wuensche, Carlos Alexandre

    2005-05-01

    We present the optical design of the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST), an off-axis Gregorian telescope designed to measure the angular distribution of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) at 30 and 41.5 GHz on angular scales ranging from 20' to 10°. The aperture of the telescope is 1.9 m, and our design meets the strict requirements imposed by the scientific goals of the mission: the beam size is 20' at 41.5 GHz and 26' at 30 GHz, while the illumination at the edge of the mirrors is lower than -30 dB for the central horn. The primary mirror is an off-axis section of a paraboloid, and the secondary an off-axis section of an ellipsoid. A spinning flat mirror located between the sky and the primary provides a two-dimensional chop by rotating the beams around an ellipse on the sky. BEAST uses a receiver array of cryogenic low noise InP High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) amplifiers. The baseline array has seven horns matched to one amplifier each and one horn matched to two amplifiers (two polarizations) for a total of nine amplifiers. Two horns operate around 30 GHz, and six operate around 41.5 GHz. Subsequent campaigns will include 90 GHz and higher frequency channels.

  9. Precision Linear Actuators for the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope Demonstration Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinoff, Jason; Pfenning, David

    2006-01-01

    The Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT) is an ongoing research effort at Goddard Space Flight Center developing wavefront sensing and control architectures for future space telescopes. The 03.5-m SPOT telescope primary mirror is comprise9 of six 0.86-m hexagonal mirror segments arranged in a single ring, with the central segment missing. The mirror segments are designed for laboratory use and are not lightweighted to reduce cost. Each primary mirror segment is actuated and has tip, tilt, and piston rigid-body motions. Additionally, the radius of curvature of each mirror segment may be varied mechanically. To provide these degrees of freedom, the SPOT mirror segment assembly requires linear actuators capable of

  10. The Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT), a Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.

    2015-01-01

    Since the launch of AGILE and FERMI, the scientific progress in high-energy (Eg > 200 MeV) gamma-ray science has been, and will continue to be dramatic. Both of these telescopes cover a broad energy range from ~20 MeV to >10 GeV. However, neither instrument is optimized for observations below ~200 MeV where many astrophysical objects exhibit unique, transitory behavior, such as spectral breaks, bursts, and flares. Hence, while significant progress from current observations is expected, a significant sensitivity gap will remain in the medium-energy regime (0.75 - 200 MeV) that has been explored only by COMPTEL and EGRET on CGRO. Exploring this regime with angular resolution near the kinematic limit and high polarization sensitivity requires a gamma-ray telescope design with a low density electron track imaging detector.The medium-energy (~5 to ~200 MeV) Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT), will achieve angular resolution of ~0.6° at 70 MeV, similar to the angular resolution of Fermi/LAT at ~1 GeV that brought tremendous success in identifying new sources. AdEPT will also provide unprecedented polarization sensitivity of ~1% for a 1 Crab source. The enabling technology for AdEPT is the Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) a low-density, large volume, gas time-projection chamber with a 2-dimensional readout. The 3-DTI provides high-resolution three-dimensional electron tracking with minimal Coulomb scattering that is essential to achieve high angular resolution and polarization sensitivity. We describe our ROSES/APRA funded program to build a 50´50´100 cm3 AdEPT prototype, measure the angular resolution and polarization sensitivity of this prototype at an accelerator, and highlight some of the key science questions that AdEPT will address.

  11. Updates to the optical alignment and test plan for the James Webb Space Telescope integrated science instrument module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, R.

    2009-08-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.6m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy (~40K). The JWST Observatory architecture includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element that contains four science instruments (SI) including a Guider. The SIs and Guider are mounted to a composite metering structure with outer dimensions of ~2.2x2.2x1.7m. The SI and Guider units are integrated to the ISIM structure and optically tested at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as an instrument suite using a telescope simulator (Optical telescope element SIMulator; OSIM). OSIM is a high-fidelity, cryogenic JWST telescope simulator that features a ~1.5m diameter powered mirror. The SIs are aligned to the structure's coordinate system under ambient, clean room conditions using optomechanical metrology. OSIM is aligned to the ISIM mechanical coordinate system at the cryogenic operating temperature via internal mechanisms and feedback from alignment sensors in six degrees of freedom. SI performance, including focus, pupil shear, pupil roll, boresight, wavefront error, and image quality, is evaluated at the operating temperature using OSIM. This work updates the assembly and ambient and cryogenic optical alignment, test and verification plan for ISIM.

  12. Vision: A Six-telescope Fiber-fed Visible Light Beam Combiner for the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Eugenio V.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; van Belle, Gerard; Monnier, John D.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Ghasempour, Askari; Clark, James H.; Zavala, R. T.; Benson, James A.; Hutter, Donald J.; Schmitt, Henrique R.; Baines, Ellyn K.; Jorgensen, Anders M.; Strosahl, Susan G.; Sanborn, Jason; Zawicki, Stephen J.; Sakosky, Michael F.; Swihart, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Visible-light long baseline interferometry holds the promise of advancing a number of important applications in fundamental astronomy, including the direct measurement of the angular diameters and oblateness of stars, and the direct measurement of the orbits of binary and multiple star systems. To advance, the field of visible-light interferometry requires development of instruments capable of combining light from 15 baselines (6 telescopes) simultaneously. The Visible Imaging System for Interferometric Observations at NPOI (VISION) is a new visible light beam combiner for the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) that uses single-mode fibers to coherently combine light from up to six telescopes simultaneously with an image-plane combination scheme. It features a photometric camera for calibrations and spatial filtering from single-mode fibers with two Andor Ixon electron multiplying CCDs. This paper presents the VISION system, results of laboratory tests, and results of commissioning on-sky observations. A new set of corrections have been determined for the power spectrum and bispectrum by taking into account non-Gaussian statistics and read noise present in electron-multipying CCDs to enable measurement of visibilities and closure phases in the VISION post-processing pipeline. The post-processing pipeline has been verified via new on-sky observations of the O-type supergiant binary ζ Orionis A, obtaining a flux ratio of 2.18+/- 0.13 with a position angle of 223.°9 ± 1.°0 and separation 40.6+/- 1.8 mas over 570-750 nm, in good agreement with expectations from the previously published orbit.

  13. Vision: A Six-telescope Fiber-fed Visible Light Beam Combiner for the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Eugenio V.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; van Belle, Gerard; Monnier, John D.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Ghasempour, Askari; Clark, James H.; Zavala, R. T.; Benson, James A.; Hutter, Donald J.; Schmitt, Henrique R.; Baines, Ellyn K.; Jorgensen, Anders M.; Strosahl, Susan G.; Sanborn, Jason; Zawicki, Stephen J.; Sakosky, Michael F.; Swihart, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Visible-light long baseline interferometry holds the promise of advancing a number of important applications in fundamental astronomy, including the direct measurement of the angular diameters and oblateness of stars, and the direct measurement of the orbits of binary and multiple star systems. To advance, the field of visible-light interferometry requires development of instruments capable of combining light from 15 baselines (6 telescopes) simultaneously. The Visible Imaging System for Interferometric Observations at NPOI (VISION) is a new visible light beam combiner for the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) that uses single-mode fibers to coherently combine light from up to six telescopes simultaneously with an image-plane combination scheme. It features a photometric camera for calibrations and spatial filtering from single-mode fibers with two Andor Ixon electron multiplying CCDs. This paper presents the VISION system, results of laboratory tests, and results of commissioning on-sky observations. A new set of corrections have been determined for the power spectrum and bispectrum by taking into account non-Gaussian statistics and read noise present in electron-multipying CCDs to enable measurement of visibilities and closure phases in the VISION post-processing pipeline. The post-processing pipeline has been verified via new on-sky observations of the O-type supergiant binary ζ Orionis A, obtaining a flux ratio of 2.18+/- 0.13 with a position angle of 223.°9 ± 1.°0 and separation 40.6+/- 1.8 mas over 570–750 nm, in good agreement with expectations from the previously published orbit.

  14. X-ray telescope onboard Astro-E: optical design and fabrication of thin foil mirrors.

    PubMed

    Kunieda, H; Ishida, M; Endo, T; Hidaka, Y; Honda, H; Imamura, K; Ishida, J; Maeda, M; Misaki, K; Shibata, R; Furuzawa, A; Haga, K; Ogasaka, Y; Okajima, T; Tawara, Y; Terashima, Y; Watanabe, M; Yamashita, K; Yoshioka, T; Serlemitsos, P J; Soong, Y; Chan, K W

    2001-02-01

    X-ray telescopes (XRT's) of nested thin foil mirrors are developed for Astro-E, the fifth Japanese x-ray astronomy satellite. Although the launch was not successful, the design concept, fabrication, and alignment procedure are summarized. The main purpose of the Astro-E XRT is to collect hard x rays up to 10 keV with high efficiency and to provide medium spatial resolution in limited weight and volume. Compared with the previous mission, Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), a slightly longer focal length of 4.5-4.75 m and a larger diameter of 40 cm yields an effective area of 1750 cm2 at 8 keV with five telescopes. The image quality is also improved to 2-arc min half-power diameter by introduction of a replication process. Platinum is used instead of gold for the reflectors of one of the five telescopes to enhance the high-energy response. The fabrication and alignment procedure is also summarized. Several methods for improvement are suggested for the reflight Astro-E II mission and for other future missions. Preflight calibration results will be described in a forthcoming second paper, and a detailed study of images will be presented in a third paper.

  15. Software control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope enclosure PLC hardware using COTS software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrowman, Alastair J.; de Bilbao, Lander; Ariño, Javier; Murga, Gaizka; Goodrich, Bret; Hubbard, John R.; Greer, Alan; Mayer, Chris; Taylor, Philip

    2012-09-01

    As PLCs evolve from simple logic controllers into more capable Programmable Automation Controllers (PACs), observatories are increasingly using such devices to control complex mechanisms1, 2. This paper describes use of COTS software to control such hardware using the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) Common Services Framework (CSF). We present the Enclosure Control System (ECS) under development in Spain and the UK. The paper details selection of the commercial PLC communication library PLCIO. Implemented in C and delivered with source code, the library separates the programmer from communication details through a simple API. Capable of communicating with many types of PLCs (including Allen-Bradley and Siemens) the API remains the same irrespective of PLC in use. The ECS is implemented in Java using the observatory's framework that provides common services for software components. We present a design following a connection-based approach where all components access the PLC through a single connection class. The link between Java and PLCIO C library is provided by a thin Java Native Interface (JNI) layer. Also presented is a software simulator of the PLC based upon the PLCIO Virtual PLC. This creates a simulator operating below the library's API and thus requires no change to ECS software. It also provides enhanced software testing capabilities prior to hardware becoming available. Results are presented in the form of communication timing test data, showing that the use of CSF, JNI and PLCIO provide a control system capable of controlling enclosure tracking mechanisms, that would be equally valid for telescope mount control.

  16. The Laser Guide Star System for Adaptive Optics at Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayano, Y.; Saito, Y.; Ito, M.; Saito, N.; Akagawa, K.; Takazawa, A.; Ito, M.; Wada, S.; Takami, H.; Iye, M.

    We report on the current status of developing the new laser guide star (LGS) system for the Subaru adaptive optics (AO) system. We have three major subsystems: the laser unit, the relay optical fiber and the laser launching telescope. A 4W-class all-solid-state 589nm laser has been developed as a light source for sodium laser guide star. We use two mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers operated at the wavelength of 1064nm and 1319nm to generate sum-frequency conversion into 589nm. The side-LD pumped configuration is used for the mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers. We have carefully considered the thermal lens effect in the cavity to achieve a high beam quality with TEM00; M2 = 1.06. The mode-locked frequency is selected at 143 MHz. We obtained the output powers of 16.5 W and 5.0 W at 1064nm and 1319 nm. Sum frequency generated by mixing two synchronized Nd:YAG mode-locked pulsed beams is precisely tuned to the sodium D2 line by thermal control of the etalon in the 1064nm Nd:YAG laser by observing the maximum fluorescence intensity of heated sodium vapor cell. The maximum output power at 589.159 nm reaches to 4.6 W using a PPMgOSLT crystal as a nonlinear optical crystal. And the output power can be maintained within a stability of +/- 1.2% for more than 3 days without optical damage. We developed a single-mode photonic crystal fiber (PCF) to relay the laser beam from laser clean room, in which the laser unit is located on the Nasmyth platform, to the laser launching telescope mounted behind the secondary mirror of Subaru Telescope. The photonic crystal fiber has solid pure silica core with the mode field diameter of 14 micron, which is relatively larger than that of the conventional step-index type single mode fiber. The length of the PCF is 35m and transmission loss due to the pure silica is 10dB/km at 589nm, which means PCF transmits 92% of the laser beam. We have preliminary achieved 75% throughput in total. Small mode-locked pulse width in time allows us to transmit the high

  17. Study of optical materials to be used on Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardello, Marco; Zuccon, Sara; Corso, Alain Jodi; Zuppella, Paola; Gerlin, Francesca; Tessarolo, Enrico; Pelizzo, Maria Guglielmina

    2015-04-01

    The European Space Agency mission Solar Orbiter (SOLO) is dedicated to the study of the solar atmosphere and heliosphere. As a part of the payload, the instrument METIS (Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy) will provide images of the corona, both in the visible range and at the hydrogen Lyman-α emission line (121.6 nm). The realization of optical coatings, based on Al and MgF2, able to reflect/transmit such spectral components is, therefore, necessary. Since optical characteristics of materials in the vacuum ultraviolet range are not well studied and vary greatly with the realization process, we implemented a study of their properties in different deposition conditions. This is aimed to the realization of a custom designed filter able to transmit the 121.6 nm wavelength while reflecting visible light, and thus separating visible from ultraviolet light paths in the METIS instrument.

  18. Analysis of optical efficiency of METIS coronagraph telescope on board of the Solar Orbiter mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polito, V.; Corso, A. J.; Zuppella, P.; Nicolosi, P.; Fineschi, S.; Antonucci, E.; Windt, D. L.; Pelizzo, M. G.

    2012-09-01

    The Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy (METIS) coronagraph is an instrument belonging to the SOLar Orbiter(SOLO) mission payload which will perform the imaging of the solar corona in three different spectral ranges: 30.4 nm (He-II Lyman-α line), 121.6 nm (H-I Lyman- α line) and visible spectral range (500-650 nm). Optical coatings with high reflectance performances at the interested wavelengths are required to collect enough light at the detector level. Different multilayer structures based on Si/Mo couples with appropriate capping layers have been already designed and tested to achieve this purpose. A model has been developed in order to estimate the efficiency's performances of the instrument on the whole field of view (FoV) by considering the ray paths. The results shown have been obtained taking into account of the experimental results on multilayers structures previously tested and the optical design of the instrument.

  19. Design of the Polarimeter for the Fibre Arrayed Solar Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dun, Guang-tao; Qu, Zhong-quan

    2013-01-01

    The theoretical design of the polarimeter used for the Fibre Arrayed Solar Optical Telescope (FASOT) is described. It has the following characteris- tics: (1) It is provided with the function of optical polarization switching, which makes the high-effciency polarimetry possible; (2) In the waveband of 750 nm, the polarimetric effciency is higher than 50% for the every Stokes parameter, and higher than 86.6% for the total polarization, thus an observer can make the simultaneous polarization measurements on multiple magnetosensitive lines in such a broad range of wavelength; (3) According to the selected photospheric and chromospheric lines, the measurement can be focused on either linear polarization or circular polarization; (4) The polarimeter has a loose tolerance on the manufacturing technology of polarimetric elements and installation errors. All this makes this polarimeter become a high-performance polarimetric device.

  20. Active hexagonally segmented mirror to investigate new optical phasing technologies for segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gonté, Frédéric; Dupuy, Christophe; Luong, Bruno; Frank, Christoph; Brast, Roland; Sedghi, Baback

    2009-11-10

    The primary mirror of the future European Extremely Large Telescope will be equipped with 984 hexagonal segments. The alignment of the segments in piston, tip, and tilt within a few nanometers requires an optical phasing sensor. A test bench has been designed to study four different optical phasing sensor technologies. The core element of the test bench is an active segmented mirror composed of 61 flat hexagonal segments with a size of 17 mm side to side. Each of them can be controlled in piston, tip, and tilt by three piezoactuators with a precision better than 1 nm. The context of this development, the requirements, the design, and the integration of this system are explained. The first results on the final precision obtained in closed-loop control are also presented.

  1. Active hexagonally segmented mirror to investigate new optical phasing technologies for segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gonté, Frédéric; Dupuy, Christophe; Luong, Bruno; Frank, Christoph; Brast, Roland; Sedghi, Baback

    2009-11-10

    The primary mirror of the future European Extremely Large Telescope will be equipped with 984 hexagonal segments. The alignment of the segments in piston, tip, and tilt within a few nanometers requires an optical phasing sensor. A test bench has been designed to study four different optical phasing sensor technologies. The core element of the test bench is an active segmented mirror composed of 61 flat hexagonal segments with a size of 17 mm side to side. Each of them can be controlled in piston, tip, and tilt by three piezoactuators with a precision better than 1 nm. The context of this development, the requirements, the design, and the integration of this system are explained. The first results on the final precision obtained in closed-loop control are also presented. PMID:19904341

  2. Development of a safe ground to space laser propagation system for the optical communications telescope laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Janet P.

    2003-01-01

    Furthering pursuits in high bandwidth communications to future NASA deep space and neat-Earth probes, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is building the Optical communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) atop Table Mountain in Southern California. This R&D optical antenna will be used to develop optical communication strategies for future optical ground stations. Initial experiments to be conducted include propagating high-powered, Q-switched laser beams to retro-reflecting satellites. Yet laser beam propagation from the ground to space is under the cognizance of various government agencies, namely: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (ISHA) that is responsible for protecting workforce personnel; the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responsible for protecting pilots and aircraft; and the Laser Clearinghouse of Space Command responsible for protecting space assets. To ensure that laser beam propagation from the OCTL and future autonomously operated ground stations comply with the guidelines of these organizations, JPL is developing a multi-tiered safety system that will meet the coordination, monitoring, and reporting functions required by the agencies. At Tier 0, laser operators will meet OSHA safety standards for protection and access to the high power lasers area will be restricted and interlocked. Tier 1, the area defined from the telescope dome out to a range of 3.4-km, will utilize long wave infrared camera sensors to alert operators of at risk aircraft in the FAA controlled airspace. Tier 2, defined to extend from 3.4-km out to the aircraft service ceiling in FAA airspace, will detect at risk aircraft by radar. Lastly, beam propagation into space, defined as Tier 3, will require coordination with the Laser Clearinghouse. A detailed description of the four tiers is presented along with the design of the integrated monitoring and beam transmission control system.

  3. Development of a Prototype Nickel Optic for the Constellation-X Hard-X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basso, S.; Bruni, R. J.; Citerio, O.; Engelhaupt, D.; Ghigo, M.; Gorenstien, P.; Mazzoleni, F.; ODell, S. L.; Pareschi, G.; Ramsey, B. D.

    2003-01-01

    The Constellation-X mission, planned for launch in 2011, will feature an array of hard-x ray telescopes with a total collecting area goal of 1500 square centimeters at 40 keV. Various technologies are currently being investigated for the optics of these telescopes including multilayer-coated Eletroformed-Nickel-Replicated (ENR) shells. The attraction of the ENR process is that the resulting full-shell optics are inherently stable and offer the promise of good angular resolution and enhanced instrument sensitivity. The challenge for this process is to meet a relatively tight weight budget with a relatively dense material (rho nickel = 9 grams per cubic centimeters.) To demonstrate the viability of the ENR process we are fabricating a prototype HXT mirror module to be tested against a competing segmented-glass-shell optic. The ENR prototype will consist of 5 shells of diameters from 150 mm to 280 mm and of 426 mm total length. To meet the stringent weight budget for Con-X, the shells will be only 150 micron thick. The innermost of these will be coated with Iridium, while the remainder will be coated with graded-density multilayers. Mandrels for these shells are currently under fabrication (Jan 03), with the first shells scheduled for production in February 03. A tentative date of late Summer has been set for prototype testing. Issues currently being addressed are the control of stresses in the multiplayer coating and ways of mitigating their effects on the figure of the necessarily thin shells. Also, the fabrication, handling and mounting of these shells without inducing permanent figure distortions. A full status report on the prototype optic will be presented along with test results as available.

  4. Development of a prototype nickel optic for the Constellation-X hard x-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaine, Suzanne E.; Basso, Stefano; Bruni, Ricardo J.; Citterio, Oberto; Engelhaupt, Darell; Ghigo, Mauro; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Mazzoleni, Francesco; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Pareschi, Giovanni; Parodi, Giancarlo; Ramsey, Brian D.; Speegle, Chet O.

    2004-02-01

    The Constellation-X mission, planned for launch in 2013, will feature an array of hard-x-ray telescopes (HXT) with a total collecting area of greater than 1500 cm2 at 40 keV. Two technologies are currently being investigated for the optics of these telescopes including multilayer-coated Eletroformed-Nickel-Replicated (ENR) shells. The attraction of the ENR process is that the resulting full-shell optics are inherently stable and offer the prospect of better angular resolution which results in lower background and higher instrument sensitivity. The challenge for this process is to meet a relatively tight weight budget with a relatively dense material (ρnickel = 9 g/cm3.) To demonstrate the viability of the ENR process we are fabricating a prototype HXT mirror module to be tested against a competing segmented-glass-shell optic. The ENR prototype will consist of 5 shells of diameters from 150 mm to 280 mm with a length of 426 mm. To meet the stringent weight budget for Con-X, the shells will range in thickness from 100 microns to 150 microns. The innermost of these will be coated with Iridium, while the remainder will be coated with graded-dspaced W/Si multilayers. Mandrels for these shells are in the fabrication stage, the first test shells have been produced and are currently undergoing tests for figure and microroughness. A tentative date of June '04 has been set for the prototype X-ray testing at MSFC. Issues currently being addressed are the control of stresses in the multiplayer coating and ways of mitigating their effects on the figure of the necessarily thin shells. The fabrication, handling and mounting of these shells must be accomplished without inducing permanent figure distortions. A full status report on the prototype optic will be presented along with test results as available.

  5. ATST telescope mount: telescope of machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, Paul; Stolz, Günter; Bonomi, Giovanni; Dreyer, Oliver; Kärcher, Hans

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, and will be able to provide the sharpest views ever taken of the solar surface. The telescope has a 4m aperture primary mirror, however due to the off axis nature of the optical layout, the telescope mount has proportions similar to an 8 meter class telescope. The technology normally used in this class of telescope is well understood in the telescope community and has been successfully implemented in numerous projects. The world of large machine tools has developed in a separate realm with similar levels of performance requirement but different boundary conditions. In addition the competitive nature of private industry has encouraged development and usage of more cost effective solutions both in initial capital cost and thru-life operating cost. Telescope mounts move relatively slowly with requirements for high stability under external environmental influences such as wind buffeting. Large machine tools operate under high speed requirements coupled with high application of force through the machine but with little or no external environmental influences. The benefits of these parallel development paths and the ATST system requirements are being combined in the ATST Telescope Mount Assembly (TMA). The process of balancing the system requirements with new technologies is based on the experience of the ATST project team, Ingersoll Machine Tools who are the main contractor for the TMA and MT Mechatronics who are their design subcontractors. This paper highlights a number of these proven technologies from the commercially driven machine tool world that are being introduced to the TMA design. Also the challenges of integrating and ensuring that the differences in application requirements are accounted for in the design are discussed.

  6. Development of a prototype nickel optic for the Constellation-X hard x-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaine, S.; Basso, S.; Bruni, R. J.; Burkert, W.; Citterio, O.; Cotroneo, V.; Engelhaupt, D.; Freyberg, M. J.; Gorenstein, P.; Gubarev, M.; Hartner, G.; Mazzoleni, F.; O'Dell, S.; Pareschi, G.; Ramsey, B. D.; Speegle, C.; Spiga, D.

    2007-09-01

    The Constellation-X mission concept has been streamlined to a single Atlas V 551 configuration. This decision was reached by the project team after considering the increases in launch costs announced in 2006 coupled with the constrained budget environment apparent with the release of the NASA 2007 budget. Along with the Spectroscopy X-ray Telescopes, this new configuration continues to carry a Hard X-ray Telescope (HXT) component, with some modifications to the original requirements to adjust to the new configuration. The total effective area requirement in the 7 - 40 keV band has been reduced, but at the same time the angular resolution requirement has been increased from 1 arcmin to 30 arcsec. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Marshall Space Flight Center and Brera Observatory, Italy) have been collaborating to develop and HXT which meets the requirements of Constellation-X. The development work we have been engaged in to produce multilayer coated Electroformed-Nickel-Replicate (ENR) shells is well suited for this new configuration. We report here on results of fabrication and testing of a prototyped optic for the HXT. Full beam illumination X-ray tests, taken at MPE-Panter Test Facility, show that these optics meet the new requirement of 30 arcsec for the streamlined Constellation-X configuration. This report also presents preliminary results from studies using titanium nitride as a release agent to simplify and improve the nickel electroforming replication process.

  7. Optical polarimetric observations of GRB prompt emissions by MASTER robots-telescopes net.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbovskoy, Evgeny; Lipunov, Vladimir; Kornilov, Victor; Shatskij, Nikolaj; Kuvshi-Nov, Dmitry; Tyurina, Nataly; Belinski, Alexander; Krylov, Alexander; Balanutsa, Pavel; Chazov, Vadim; Kuznetsov, Artem; Zimnuhov, Dmitry; Balanutsa, Pavel; Kortunov, Petr; Sankovich, Anatoly; Tlatov, An-Drey; Parkhomenko, A.; Krushinsky, Vadim; Zalozhnyh, Ivan; Popov, A.; Kopytova, Taisia; Ivanov, Kirill; Yazev, Sergey; Yurkov, Vladimir

    The main goal of the MASTER-Net project is to produce a unique fast sky survey with all sky observed over a single night down to a limiting magnitude of 19 -20mag. Such a survey will make it possible to address a number of fundamental problems: search for dark energy via the discovery and photometry of supernovas (including SNIa), search for exoplanets, microlensing effects, discovery of minor bodies in the Solar System and space-junk monitoring. All MASTER telescopes can be guided by alerts, and we plan to observe prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts synchronously in several filters and in several polarization planes. Observations on telescopes capable to observ polarisation of GRB prompt emission have been begun in the summer of 2009. Since summer of 2009 an observations of several GRB have been made. In particular for GRB0910 and GRB091127 optical polarisation has been measured. So, for GRB091127 which supervision have begun all through 91 sec polarisation at level of several tens percent has been registered. (GCN 10231, GCN 10052, GCN 10203)

  8. Current status of the laser guide star adaptive optics system for Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayano, Yutaka; Takami, Hideki; Guyon, Olivier; Oya, Shin; Hattori, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Watanabe, Makoto; Murakami, Naoshi; Minowa, Yosuke; Ito, Meguru; Colley, Stephen; Eldred, Michael; Golota, Taras; Dinkins, Matthew; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iye, Masanori

    2008-07-01

    The current status and recent results, since last SPIE conference at Orlando in 2006, for the laser guide star adaptive optics system for Subaru Telescope is presented. We had a first light using natural guide star and succeed to launch the sodium laser beam in October 2006. The achieved Strehl ratio on the 10th magnitude star was around 0.5 at K band. We confirmed that the full-width-half-maximum of the stellar point spread function is smaller than 0.1 arcsec even at the 0.9 micrometer wavelehgth. The size of the artificial guide star by the laser beam tuned at the wavelength of 589 nm was estimated to be 10 arcsec. The obtained blurred artificial guide star is caused by the wavefront error on the laser launching telescope. After the first light and first launch, we found that we need to modify and to fix the components, which are temporarily finished. Also components, which were postponed to fabricate after the first light, are required to build newly. All components used by the natural guide star adaptive optics system are finalized recently and we are ready to go on the sky. Next engineering observation is scheduled in August, 2008.

  9. The design, construction and testing of the optics for a 147-cm-aperture telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchroeder, R. A.; Elmore, L. H.; Shack, R. V.; Slater, P. N.

    1972-01-01

    Geodetic optics research for the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories (AFCRL) is described. The work consisted mainly of the fabrication of the optical components for a telescope with a 152-cm-diam (60-in.) primary mirror masked down to 147-cm-diam for use by the AFCRL for a lunar ranging experiment. Among the achievements of this contract were the following: completion of the primary and secondary mirrors for a high-quality 147-cm-diam telescope system in eight months from the start of edging the primary; manufacture and testing of a unique center mount for the primary according to an AFCRL design that allowed for a thin-edged and therefore less-massive mirror; and development of a quantitative analysis of the wire test for calculating the departure of the mirror figure from the design figure quickly and accurately after each polishing step. This analysis method in conjunction with a knowledge of polishing rates for given weights and diameters of tools, mirror, and polishing materials should considerably reduce the polishing time required for future large mirrors.

  10. Advanced electro-optical tracker/ranger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, R. A.; Defoe, D. N.

    1980-06-01

    The preliminary engineering design study of an Advanced Electro-Optical Tracker/Ranger (AEOTR) to provide passive target tracking and rangefinding for air to air gun fire control is described. Area correlation processing is used in the comparison of stereo image pairs for stereometric ranging and in the comparison of successive images for tracking. The application of these techniques to the AEOTR, the limitations imposed by packaging, environmental and state-of-the-art sensor and processing hardware constraints, and the projected performance are evaluated. Principal emphasis is given to the use of AEOTR in the gun director engagement mode in which target track and range data is provided to a gun fire control computer. The feasibility of use of the AEOTR to provide target video as an aid to visual target identification, and to provide automatic airborne target detection, is also evaluated. The necessary functions and subsystems are defined and integrated into a preliminary design, whose performance is estimated and compared with the program goals. In addition, a preliminary mounting location study for the F-15, F-16 and F-18 advanced fighters is included. CAI-built hardware was used to successfully demonstrate the feasibility of the ranging and tracking concepts employed in the AEOTR.

  11. Theoretical design and analysis of the layered synthetic microstructure optic for the dual path X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, D. L.; Chao, S.

    1984-01-01

    A ray tracing analysis was performed for several configurations for the inner channel of the dual path X-ray telescope, which is proposed to use the second mirror of the Stanford/MSFC Wolter-Schwarzchild telescope and a normal incident layered synthetic microstructure (LSM) mirror to form a secondary image near the front of the telescope. The LSM mirror shapes considered were spherical, ellipsoid, hyperboloid, and constant optical path length (OPL) aspheric. Only the constant OPL case gave good axial resolution. All cases had poor off axis resolution as judged by the RMS blur circle radius.

  12. VISION: A Six-Telescope Fiber-Fed Visible Light Beam Combiner for the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Eugenio; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; van Belle, Gerard; Monnier, John D.; Stassun, Keivan; Ghasempour, Askari; Swihart, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Visible-light long baseline interferometry holds the promise of advancing a number of important applications in fundamental astronomy, including the direct measurement of the angular diameters and oblateness of stars, and the direct measurement of the orbits of binary and multiple star systems. To advance, the field of visible-light interferometry requires development of instruments capable of combining more than just two or three beams at once. The Visible Imaging System for Interferometric Observations at NPOI (VISION) is a new visible light beam combiner for the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) that uses single-mode fibers to coherently combine light from up to six telescopes simultaneously with an image-plane combination scheme. It features a photometric camera for calibrations, and spatial filtering from single-mode fibers with two Andor Ixon electron multiplying CCDs. Here we present the VISION system, results of laboratory tests, and results of commissioning on-sky observations. We determine a new set of corrections to the power spectrum and bispectrum when using an electron-multipying CCD to measure visibility and closure phase, by taking into account non-Gaussian statistics and read noise, as required by our post-processing pipeline. We verify our post-processing pipeline via new on-sky observations of the O-type supergiant binary Zeta Orionis A, obtaining a flux ratio, position angle and separation in good agreement with expectations from the previously published orbit.

  13. Design and Performance Evaluation of Sensors and Actuators for Advanced Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art commercial sensors and actuators do not meet many of NASA s next generation spacecraft and instrument needs. Nor do they satisfy the DoD needs for satellite missions, especially micro/nano satellite missions. In an effort to develop advanced optical devices and instruments that meet mission requirements, NASA Langley recently completed construction of a new cleanroom housing equipment capable of fabricating high performance active optic and adaptive optic technologies including deformable mirrors, reconfigurable lenses (both refractive and diffractive), spectrometers, spectro-polarimeters, tunable filters and many other active optic devices. In addition to performance, these advanced optic technologies offer advantages in speed, size, weight, power consumption, and radiation tolerance. The active optic devices described in this paper rely on birefringent liquid crystal materials to alter either the phase or the polarization of the incoming light. Design considerations and performance evaluation results for various NASA applications are presented. Applications presented will include large space telescopes, optical communications, spacecraft windows, coronagraphs, and star trackers. Keywords: Photonics, Adaptive Optics, Tunable Filters, MEMs., MOEMs, Coronagraph, Star Tracker

  14. Active x-ray optics for the next generation of x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Carolyn; Wang, Hongchang; Doel, Peter; Brooks, David; Thompson, Samantha; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Button, Tim; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Zhang, Dou; James, Ady; Theobald, Craig; Willis, Graham; Smith, Andrew D.

    2009-05-01

    The immediate future for X-ray astronomy is the need for high sensitivity, requiring large apertures and collecting areas, the newly combined NASA, ESA and JAXA mission IXO (International X-ray Observatory) is specifically designed to meet this need. However, looking beyond the next decade, there have been calls for an X-ray space telescope that can not only achieve this high sensitivity, but could also boast an angular resolution of 0.1 arc-seconds, a factor of five improvement on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. NASA's proposed Generation-X mission is designed to meet this demand; it has been suggested that the X-ray optics must be active in nature in order to achieve this desired resolution. The Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) project is a UK based consortium looking at the application of active/adaptive optics to both large and small scale devices, intended for astronomical and medical purposes respectively. With Generation-X in mind, an active elliptical prototype has been designed by the SXO consortium to perform point-to-point X-ray focussing, while simultaneously manipulating its optical surface to improve its initial resolution. Following the completion of the large scale SXO prototype, presented is an overview of the production and operation of the prototype, with emphasis on the X-ray environment and preliminary results.

  15. Optical/infrared views of the distant universe with ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J. S.; Tolstoy, E.

    1997-05-01

    Ground-based optical/IR observatories offer access to the rest frame ultraviolet and visible spectral regions of objects with high redshifts. Current observations of high redshift objects with natural seeing of 0.5-1 arcsec include optical/IR photometry and a variety of spectroscopic measurements. These take advantage of the large apertures and efficient instruments of ground-based observatories to obtain high spectral resolution and to reach low surface brightnesses, which is required to overcome cosmological effects. The success of natural guide star adaptive optics systems suggests that observations could become routine with image diameters <=0.25 arcsec (and often approaching 0.1 arcsec) over modest fields of view in the IJHK bands. The combination of adaptive optics on 8-10-m class telescopes, versatile arrays of powerful instruments (including multi-slit or integral field unit spectrographs), and airglow suppression schemes will support deeper and more intensive infrared investigations of faint galaxies, and will allow us to take advantage of increased brightness in strong emission lines. This work should lead to a better understanding of selection effects at high redshift, as well as the identification and measurement of internal properties for typical galaxies at early epochs.

  16. Study on power coupling of annular vortex beam propagating through a two-Cassegrain-telescope optical system in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiyun; Sheng, Shen; Huang, Zhisong; Zhao, Siqing; Wang, Hua; Sun, Zhenhai; Xu, Xiegu

    2013-02-25

    As a new attractive application of the vortex beams, power coupling of annular vortex beam propagating through a two- Cassegrain-telescope optical system in turbulent atmosphere has been investigated. A typical model of annular vortex beam propagating through a two-Cassegrain-telescope optical system is established, the general analytical expression of vortex beams with limited apertures and the analytical formulas for the average intensity distribution at the receiver plane are derived. Under the H-V 5/7 turbulence model, the average intensity distribution at the receiver plane and power coupling efficiency of the optical system are numerically calculated, and the influences of the optical topological charge, the laser wavelength, the propagation path and the receiver apertures on the power coupling efficiency are analyzed. These studies reveal that the average intensity distribution at the receiver plane presents a central dark hollow profile, which is suitable for power coupling by the Cassegrain telescope receiver. In the optical system with optimized parameters, power coupling efficiency can keep in high values with the increase of the propagation distance. Under the atmospheric turbulent conditions, great advantages of vortex beam in power coupling of the two-Cassegrain-telescope optical system are shown in comparison with beam without vortex.

  17. Cassegrain and Nasmyth adaptive optics systems of 8.2-m Subaru telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iye, Masanori; Takami, Hideki; Takato, Naruhisa; Oya, Shin; Hayano, Yutaka; Guyon, Olivier; Colley, Stephen A.; Hattori, Masayuki; Watanabe, M.; Eldred, Michael; Saito, Yoshihiko; Saito, N.; Akagawa, Kazuyuki; Wada, Satoshi

    2004-12-01

    The performance of the Cassegrain Adaptive Optics (AO) system of the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope is reported. The system is based on a curvature wavefront sensor with 36 photon-counting avalanche photodiode modules and a bimorph wavefront correcting deformable mirror with 36 driving electrodes. This AO system has been in service since 2002 April for two open-use instruments, an infrared camera and spectrograph (IRCS) and a coronagraph imager with adaptive optics (CIAO). The Strehl ratio in the K-band is around 0.3 when a bright guide star is available under 0".4 seeing condition. High sensitivity of the wavefront sensor allows significant improvement in the image quality, even for faint guide stars down to R=18 mag. The design of the new Nasmyth Adaptive Optics system with 188 control elements under construction is described. This new system with fivefold increase in the number of control elements will provide twice higher Strehl ratio of 0.7. To increase the sky coverage for this new system, a power laser system to produce an artificail guide star in the upper atmosphere is also under construction. The AO system with laser guide capability enables the coverage up to 80% of the entire sky and offers diffraction limited observation for almost any target in the sky. An all solid-state 4W laser to generate the sodium D line emission by summing the two YAG laser frequencies is under development. The generated laser beam is tranmitted through a photonic crystal fiber to the laser launching telescope attached at the backside of the secondary mirror. Expected performance of this laser guide Nasmyth AO system is shown.

  18. Cryogenic Optical Performance of a Lightweighted Mirror Assembly for Future Space Astronomical Telescopes: Correlating Optical Test Results and Thermal Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Arnold, William R.; Baker, Marcus A.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Burdick, Gregory; Effinger, Michael R.; Gaddy, Darrell E.; Goode, Brian K.; Hanson, Craig; Hogue, William D.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Kirk, Charlie; Maffett, Steven P.; Matthews, Gary W.; Siler, Richard D.; Smith, W. Scott; Stahl, H. Philip; Tucker, John M.; Wright, Ernest R.

    2013-01-01

    A 43cm diameter stacked core mirror demonstrator was interferometrically tested at room temperature down to 250 degrees Kelvin for thermal deformation. The 2.5m radius of curvature spherical mirror assembly was constructed by low temperature fusing three abrasive waterjet core sections between two CNC pocket milled face sheets. The 93% lightweighted Corning ULE® mirror assembly represents the current state of the art for future UV, optical, near IR space telescopes. During the multiple thermal test cycles, test results of interferometric test, thermal IR images of the front face were recorded in order to validate thermal optical model.

  19. Cryogenic Optical Performance of a Light-weight Mirror Assembly for Future Space Astronomical Telescopes: Optical Test Results and Thermal Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Baker, Markus A.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Carpenter, James R.; Effinger, Michael R.; Gaddy, Darrell E.; Goode, Brian K.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Hogue, William D.; Siler, Richard D.; Smith, W. Scott; Stahl. H. Philip; Tucker, John M.; Wright, Ernest R.; Kirk, Charles S.; Hanson, Craig; Burdick, Gregory; Maffett, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A 40 cm diameter mirror assembly was interferometrically tested at room temperature down to 250 degrees Kelvin for thermal deformation. The 2.5 m radius of curvature spherical mirror assembly was constructed by low temperature fusing three abrasive waterjet core sections between two face sheets. The 93% lightweighted Corning ULE mirror assembly represents the current state of the art for future UV, optical, near IR space telescopes. During the multiple thermal test cycles, test results of interferometric test, thermal IR images of the front face were recorded in order to validate thermal optical model.

  20. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun: Hard X-Ray Balloon-Borne Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Apple, Jeff; StevensonChavis, Katherine; Dietz, Kurt; Holt, Marlon; Koehler, Heather; Lis, Tomasz; O'Connor, Brian; RodriquezOtero, Miguel; Pryor, Jonathan; Ramsey, Brian; Rinehart-Dawson, Maegan; Smith, Leigh; Sobey, Alexander; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Christe, Steven; Cramer, Alexander; Edgerton, Melissa; Rodriquez, Marcello; Shih, Albert; Gregory, Don; Jasper, John; Bohon, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Set to fly in the Fall of 2013 from Ft. Sumner, NM, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) mission is a collaborative effort between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Goddard Space Flight Center to upgrade an existing payload, the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope, to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES science payload consists of 8 mirror modules, housing a total of 109 grazing-incidence optics. These modules are mounted on a carbon-fiber - and Aluminum optical bench 6 m from a matching array of high pressure xenon gas scintillation proportional counters, which serve as the focal-plane detectors. The HERO gondola utilizes a differential GPS system (backed by a magnetometer) for coarse pointing in the azimuth and a shaft angle encoder plus inclinometer provides the coarse elevation. The HEROES payload will incorporate a new solar aspect system to supplement the existing star camera, for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter will be added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations. HEROES will also implement two novel alignment monitoring system that will measure the alignment between the optical bench and the star camera and between the optics and detectors for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. The overall payload will also be discussed. This mission is funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist

  1. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun: Hard X-ray balloon-borne telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, J.; Apple, J.; Chavis, K. S.; Dietz, K.; Holt, M.; Koehler, H.; Lis, T.; O'Connor, B.; Otero, M. R.; Pryor, J.; Ramsey, B.; Rinehart-Dawson, M.; Smith, L.; Sobey, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Christe, S.; Cramer, A.; Edgerton, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Shih, A.; Gregory, D.; Jasper, J.; Bohon, S.

    Set to fly in the Fall of 2013 from Ft. Sumner, NM, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) mission is a collaborative effort between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Goddard Space Flight Center to upgrade an existing payload, the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope, to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES science payload consists of 8 mirror modules, housing a total of 109 grazing-incidence optics. These modules are mounted on a carbon-fiber - and Aluminum optical bench 6 m from a matching array of high pressure xenon gas scintillation proportional counters, which serve as the focal-plane detectors. The HERO gondola utilizes a differential GPS system (backed by a magnetometer) for coarse pointing in the azimuth and a shaft angle encoder plus inclinometer provides the coarse elevation. The HEROES payload will incorporate a new solar aspect system to supplement the existing star camera, for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter will be added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations. HEROES will also implement two novel alignment monitoring system that will measure the alignment between the optical bench and the star camera and between the optics and detectors for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. The overall payload will also be discussed. This mission is funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  2. Study of advanced InSb arrays for SIRTF (Space Infrared Telescope Facility)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Alan; Feitt, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The Santa Barbara Research Center has completed a study leading to the development of advanced Indium Antimonide detector arrays for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) Focal Plane Array Detector (FPAD) Subsystem of the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Band 1. The overall goal of the study was to perform design tradeoff studies, analysis and research to develop a Direct Readout Integrated Circuit to be hybridized to an advanced, high performance InSb detector array that would satisfy the technical requirements for Band 1 as specified in the IRAC Instrument Requirements Document (IRD), IRAC-202. The overall goal of the study was divided into both a near-term goal and a far-term goal. The near-term goal identifies current technology available that approaches, and in some cases meets the program technological goals as specified in IRAC-202. The far-term goal identifies technology development required to completely achieve SIRTF program goals. Analyses of potential detector materials indicates that InSb presently meets all Band 1 requirements and is considered to be the baseline approach due to technical maturity. The major issue with regard to photovoltaic detectors such as InSb and HgCdTe is to achieve a reduction in detector capacitance.

  3. Parametrized tests of post-Newtonian theory using Advanced LIGO and Einstein Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Chandra Kant; Arun, K. G.; Iyer, Bala R.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2010-09-15

    General relativity has very specific predictions for the gravitational waveforms from inspiralling compact binaries obtained using the post-Newtonian (PN) approximation. We investigate the extent to which the measurement of the PN coefficients, possible with the second generation gravitational-wave detectors such as the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the third generation gravitational-wave detectors such as the Einstein Telescope (ET), could be used to test post-Newtonian theory and to put bounds on a subclass of parametrized-post-Einstein theories which differ from general relativity in a parametrized sense. We demonstrate this possibility by employing the best inspiralling waveform model for nonspinning compact binaries which is 3.5PN accurate in phase and 3PN in amplitude. Within the class of theories considered, Advanced LIGO can test the theory at 1.5PN and thus the leading tail term. Future observations of stellar mass black hole binaries by ET can test the consistency between the various PN coefficients in the gravitational-wave phasing over the mass range of 11-44M{sub {center_dot}}. The choice of the lower frequency cutoff is important for testing post-Newtonian theory using the ET. The bias in the test arising from the assumption of nonspinning binaries is indicated.

  4. Science Programs for a 2-m Class Telescope at Dome C, Antarctica: PILOT, the Pathfinder for an International Large Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, M. G.; Lawrence, J. S.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Bailey, J. A.; Blake, C.; Bedding, T. R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bond, I. A.; Glazebrook, K.; Hidas, M. G.; Lewis, G.; Longmore, S. N.; Maddison, S. T.; Mattila, S.; Minier, V.; Ryder, S. D.; Sharp, R.; Smith, C. H.; Storey, J. W. V.; Tinney, C. G.; Tuthill, P.; Walsh, A. J.; Walsh, W.; Whiting, M.; Wong, T.; Woods, D.; Yock, P. C. M.

    2005-08-01

    The cold, dry, and stable air above the summits of the Antarctic plateau provides the best ground-based observing conditions from optical to sub-millimetre wavelengths to be found on the Earth. Pathfinder for an International Large Optical Telescope (PILOT) is a proposed 2m telescope, to be built at Dome C in Antarctica, able to exploit these conditions for conducting astronomy at optical and infrared wavelengths. While PILOT is intended as a pathfinder towards the construction of future grand-design facilities, it will also be able to undertake a range of fundamental science investigations in its own right. This paper provides the performance specifications for PILOT, including its instrumentation. It then describes the kinds of projects that it could best conduct. These range from planetary science to the search for other solar systems, from star formation within the Galaxy to the star formation history of the Universe, and from gravitational lensing caused by exo-planets to that produced by the cosmic web of dark matter. PILOT would be particularly powerful for wide-field imaging at infrared wavelengths, achieving near diffraction-limited performance with simple tip-tilt wavefront correction. PILOT would also be capable of near diffraction-limited performance in the optical wavebands, as well be able to open new wavebands for regular ground-based observation, in the mid-IR from 17 to 40μm and in the sub-millimetre at 200μm.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys Confirmation of the Dark Substructure in A520

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, M. J.; Hoekstra, H.; Mahdavi, A.; Babul, A.

    2014-03-01

    We present a weak-lensing study of the cluster A520 based on Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) data. The excellent data quality provides a mean source density of ~109 arcmin-2, which improves both resolution and significance of the mass reconstruction compared to a previous study based on Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) images. We take care in removing instrumental effects such as the charge trailing due to radiation damage of the detector and the position-dependent point-spread function. This new ACS analysis confirms the previous claims that a substantial amount of dark mass is present between two luminous subclusters where we observe very little light. The centroid of the dark peak in the current ACS analysis is offset to the southwest by ~1' with respect to the centroid from the WFPC2 analysis. Interestingly, this new centroid is in better agreement with the location where the X-ray emission is strongest, and the mass-to-light ratio estimated with this centroid is much higher (813 ± 78 M ⊙/L R⊙) than the previous value; the aperture mass with the WFPC2 centroid provides a consistent mass. Although we cannot provide a definite explanation for the dark peak, we discuss a revised scenario, wherein dark matter with a more conventional range (σDM/m DM < 1 cm2 g-1) of self-interacting cross-section can lead to the detection of this dark substructure. If supported by detailed numerical simulations, this hypothesis opens up the possibility that the A520 system can be used to establish a lower limit of the self-interacting cross-section of dark matter. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc.

  6. Design Study of an 8 Meter Monolithic Mirror UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    This paper will review a recent NASA MSFC preliminary study that demonstrated the feasibility of launching a 6 to 8 meter class monolithic primary mirror telescope to Sun-Earth L2 using an Ares V. The study started with the unique capabilities of the Ares V vehicle and examined the feasibility of launching a large aperture low cost low risk telescope based on a conventional ground based glass primary mirror. Specific technical areas studied included optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; launch vehicle performance and trajectory; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN & C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; operations & servicing, mass budget and system cost. The study telescope was an on-axis three-mirror anastigmatic design with a fine steering mirror. The observatory has a 100 arc-minute (8.4 X 12 arc-minutes) of diffraction limited field of view at a wavelength les than 500 nm. The study assumed that the primary mirror would be fabricated from an existing Schott Zerodur residual VLT blank edged to 6.2 meters, 175 mm thick at the edge with a mass of 11,000 kg. The entire mass budget for the observatory including primary mirror, structure, light baffle tube, instruments, space craft, avionics, etc. is less than 40,000 kg - a 33% mass margin on the Ares V's 60,000 kg Sun-Earth L2 capability. An 8 meter class observatory would have a total mass of less than 60,000 kg of which the primary mirror is the largest contributor.

  7. Design and performance evaluation of sensors and actuators for advanced optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2011-04-01

    Current state-of-the-art commercial sensors and actuators do not meet many of NASA's next generation spacecraft and instrument needs. Nor do they satisfy the DoD needs for satellite missions, especially micro/nano satellite missions. In an effort to develop advanced optical devices and instruments that meet mission requirements, NASA Langley recently completed construction of a new cleanroom housing equipment capable of fabricating high performance active optic and adaptive optic technologies including deformable mirrors, reconfigurable lenses (both refractive and diffractive), spectrometers, spectro-polarimeters, tunable filters and many other active optic devices. In addition to performance, these advanced optic technologies offer advantages in speed, size, weight, power consumption, and radiation tolerance. The active optic devices described in this paper rely on birefringent liquid crystal materials to alter either the phase or the polarization of the incoming light. Design considerations and performance evaluation results for various NASA applications are presented. Applications presented will include large space telescopes, optical communications, spacecraft windows, coronagraphs, and star trackers.

  8. Development of the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory: A Laser Communications Relay Demonstration Ground Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K. E.; Antsos, D.; Roberts, L. C. Jr.,; Piazzolla, S.; Clare, L. P.; Croonquist, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) project will demonstrate high bandwidth space to ground bi-directional optical communications links between a geosynchronous satellite and two LCRD optical ground stations located in the southwestern United States. The project plans to operate for two years with a possible extension to five. Objectives of the demonstration include the development of operational strategies to prototype optical link and relay services for the next generation tracking and data relay satellites. Key technologies to be demonstrated include adaptive optics to correct for clear air turbulence-induced wave front aberrations on the downlink, and advanced networking concepts for assured and automated data delivery. Expanded link availability will be demonstrated by supporting operations at small sun-Earth-probe angles. Planned optical modulation formats support future concepts of near-Earth satellite user services to a maximum of 1.244 Gb/s differential phase shift keying modulation and pulse position modulations formats for deep space links at data rates up to 311 Mb/s. Atmospheric monitoring instruments that will characterize the optical channel during the link include a sun photometer to measure atmospheric transmittance, a solar scintillometer, and a cloud camera to measure the line of sight cloud cover. This paper describes the planned development of the JPL optical ground station.

  9. Microsecond Time Resolution Optical Photometry using a H.E.S.S. Cherenkov Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Deil, Christoph; Domainko, Wilfried; Hermann, German

    2008-02-22

    We have constructed an optical photometer with microsecond time resolution, which is currently being operated on one of the H.E.S.S. telescopes. H.E.S.S. is an array of four Cherenkov telescopes, each with a 107 m{sup 2} mirror, located in the Khomas highland in Namibia. In its normal mode of operation H.E.S.S. observes Cherenkov light from air showers generated by very high energy gamma-rays in the upper atmosphere. Our detector consists of seven photomultipliers, one in the center to record the lightcurve from the target and six concentric photomultipliers as a veto system to reject disturbing signals e.g. from meteorites or lightning at the horizon. The data acquisition system has been designed to continuously record the signals with zero deadtime. The Crab pulsar has been observed to verify the performance of the instrument and the GPS timing system. Compact galactic targets were observed to search for flares on timescales of a few microseconds to {approx}100 ms. The design and sensitivity of the instrument as well as the data analysis method are presented.

  10. James Webb Space Telescope segment phasing using differential optical transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codona, Johanan L.; Doble, Nathan

    2015-04-01

    Differential optical transfer function (dOTF) is an image-based, noniterative wavefront sensing method that uses two star images with a single small change in the pupil. We describe two possible methods for introducing the required pupil modification to the James Webb Space Telescope, one using a small (<λ/4) displacement of a single segment's actuator and another that uses small misalignments of the NIRCam's filter wheel. While both methods should work with NIRCam, the actuator method will allow both MIRI and NIRISS to be used for segment phasing, which is a new functionality. Since the actuator method requires only small displacements, it should provide a fast and safe phasing alternative that reduces the mission risk and can be performed frequently for alignment monitoring and maintenance. Since a single actuator modification can be seen by all three cameras, it should be possible to calibrate the non-common-path aberrations between them. Large segment discontinuities can be measured using dOTFs in two filter bands. Using two images of a star field, aberrations along multiple lines of sight through the telescope can be measured simultaneously. Also, since dOTF gives the pupil field amplitude as well as the phase, it could provide a first approximation or constraint to the planned iterative phase retrieval algorithms.

  11. Laser guide star wavefront sensing for ground-layer adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Clare, Richard M; Le Louarn, Miska; Béchet, Clementine

    2011-02-01

    We propose ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO) to improve the seeing on the 42 m European Extremely Large Telescope. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFSs) with laser guide stars (LGSs) will experience significant spot elongation due to off-axis observation. This spot elongation influences the design of the laser launch location, laser power, WFS detector, and centroiding algorithm for LGS GLAO on an extremely large telescope. We show, using end-to-end numerical simulations, that with a noise-weighted matrix-vector-multiply reconstructor, the performance in terms of 50% ensquared energy (EE) of the side and central launch of the lasers is equivalent, the matched filter and weighted center of gravity centroiding algorithms are the most promising, and approximately 10×10 undersampled pixels are optimal. Significant improvement in the 50% EE can be observed with a few tens of photons/subaperture/frame, and no significant gain is seen by adding more than 200 photons/subaperture/frame. The LGS GLAO is not particularly sensitive to the sodium profile present in the mesosphere nor to a short-timescale (less than 100 s) evolution of the sodium profile. The performance of LGS GLAO is, however, sensitive to the atmospheric turbulence profile. PMID:21283238

  12. James Webb Space Telescope segment phasing using differential optical transfer functions

    PubMed Central

    Codona, Johanan L.; Doble, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Differential optical transfer function (dOTF) is an image-based, noniterative wavefront sensing method that uses two star images with a single small change in the pupil. We describe two possible methods for introducing the required pupil modification to the James Webb Space Telescope, one using a small (<λ/4) displacement of a single segment's actuator and another that uses small misalignments of the NIRCam's filter wheel. While both methods should work with NIRCam, the actuator method will allow both MIRI and NIRISS to be used for segment phasing, which is a new functionality. Since the actuator method requires only small displacements, it should provide a fast and safe phasing alternative that reduces the mission risk and can be performed frequently for alignment monitoring and maintenance. Since a single actuator modification can be seen by all three cameras, it should be possible to calibrate the non-common-path aberrations between them. Large segment discontinuities can be measured using dOTFs in two filter bands. Using two images of a star field, aberrations along multiple lines of sight through the telescope can be measured simultaneously. Also, since dOTF gives the pupil field amplitude as well as the phase, it could provide a first approximation or constraint to the planned iterative phase retrieval algorithms. PMID:27042684

  13. Laser guide star wavefront sensing for ground-layer adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Clare, Richard M; Le Louarn, Miska; Béchet, Clementine

    2011-02-01

    We propose ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO) to improve the seeing on the 42 m European Extremely Large Telescope. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFSs) with laser guide stars (LGSs) will experience significant spot elongation due to off-axis observation. This spot elongation influences the design of the laser launch location, laser power, WFS detector, and centroiding algorithm for LGS GLAO on an extremely large telescope. We show, using end-to-end numerical simulations, that with a noise-weighted matrix-vector-multiply reconstructor, the performance in terms of 50% ensquared energy (EE) of the side and central launch of the lasers is equivalent, the matched filter and weighted center of gravity centroiding algorithms are the most promising, and approximately 10×10 undersampled pixels are optimal. Significant improvement in the 50% EE can be observed with a few tens of photons/subaperture/frame, and no significant gain is seen by adding more than 200 photons/subaperture/frame. The LGS GLAO is not particularly sensitive to the sodium profile present in the mesosphere nor to a short-timescale (less than 100 s) evolution of the sodium profile. The performance of LGS GLAO is, however, sensitive to the atmospheric turbulence profile.

  14. Design and performance characterization of the LCOGTN One-Meter Telescope optical tube assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldeman, Benjamin J.; Haynes, Rachel M.; Posner, Vincent; Tufts, Joseph R.; Pickles, Andrew J.; Dubberley, Matthew A.

    2010-07-01

    Scientific performance specifications, a necessity for ease of commissioning and minimal maintenance, and a desire for automated sensing and remote collimation have led to novel designs and features in LCOGT's one-meter Optical Tube Assembly (OTA). We discuss the design and performance of the quasi-RC optical system with 18 point whiffletree and radial hub mount. Position probes and IR temperature sensors on the primary and secondary mirrors give feedback for active collimation and thermal control. A carbon fiber/epoxy composite truss, with unique spherical node connections, mounts to parallel and offset Invar vanes. A flexure based, closed loop, 3-DOF secondary mirror mechanism is used for tip/tilt collimation. The optics and deflections of the OTA components were iteratively designed for passive collimation with a changing gravity vector. We present the FEA predictions, measured deflections, and measured hysteresis for many of the components. Vibration modes, amplitudes, and damping of the system are presented with an FFT frequency analysis. Thermal CTE effects on loading and focal position are quantified. All of these system effects are then related to the overall scientific performance of the 1.0 m telescope.

  15. Adaptive optics with four laser guide stars: correction of the cone effect in large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Viard, Elise; Le, Louarn Miska; Hubin, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    We study the performance of an adaptive optics (AO) system with four laser guide stars (LGSs) and a natural guide star (NGS). The residual cone effect with four LGSs is obtained by a numerical simulation. This method allows the adaptive optics system to be extended toward the visible part of the spectrum without tomographic reconstruction of three-dimensional atmospheric perturbations, resolving the cone effect in the visible. Diffraction-limited images are obtained with 17-arc ms precision in median atmospheric conditions at wavelengths longer than 600 nm. The gain achievable with such a system operated on an existing AO system is studied. For comparison, performance in terms of achievable Strehl ratio is also computed for a reasonable system composed of a 40 x 40 Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor optimized for the I band. Typical errors of a NGS wave front are computed by use of analytical formulas. With the NGS errors and the cone effect, the Strehl ratio can reach 0.45 at 1.25 microm under good-seeing conditions with the Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS; a 14 x 14 subpupil wave-front sensor) at the Very Large Telescope and 0.8 with a 40 x 40 Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor. PMID:11900425

  16. Optical design of off-axis Cassegrain telescope using freeform surface at the secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Suryakant; Gupta, Amit; Singh, Ganga Sharan

    2015-02-01

    Freeform surfaces enable imaginative optics by providing abundant degrees of freedom for an optical designer as compared to spherical surfaces. An off-axis two-mirror-based telescope design is presented, in which the primary mirror is a concave prolate spheroid and the secondary mirror is freeform surface-based. The off-axis configuration is employed here for removing the central obscuration problem which otherwise limits the central maxima in the point spread function. In this proposed design, an extended X-Y polynomial is used as a surface descriptor for the off-axis segment of the secondary mirror. The coefficients of this extended polynomial are directly related to the Seidel aberrations, and are thus optimized here for a better control of asymmetric optical aberrations at various field points. For this design, the aperture stop is located 500 mm before the primary mirror and the entrance pupil diameter is kept as 80 mm. The effective focal length is 439 mm and covers a full field of view of 2 deg. The image quality obtained here is near diffraction limited which can be inferred from metrics such as the spot diagram and modulation transfer function.

  17. Adaptive optics with four laser guide stars: correction of the cone effect in large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Viard, Elise; Le, Louarn Miska; Hubin, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    We study the performance of an adaptive optics (AO) system with four laser guide stars (LGSs) and a natural guide star (NGS). The residual cone effect with four LGSs is obtained by a numerical simulation. This method allows the adaptive optics system to be extended toward the visible part of the spectrum without tomographic reconstruction of three-dimensional atmospheric perturbations, resolving the cone effect in the visible. Diffraction-limited images are obtained with 17-arc ms precision in median atmospheric conditions at wavelengths longer than 600 nm. The gain achievable with such a system operated on an existing AO system is studied. For comparison, performance in terms of achievable Strehl ratio is also computed for a reasonable system composed of a 40 x 40 Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor optimized for the I band. Typical errors of a NGS wave front are computed by use of analytical formulas. With the NGS errors and the cone effect, the Strehl ratio can reach 0.45 at 1.25 microm under good-seeing conditions with the Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS; a 14 x 14 subpupil wave-front sensor) at the Very Large Telescope and 0.8 with a 40 x 40 Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor.

  18. Electro-Optic Segment-Segment Sensors for Radio and Optical Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramovici, Alex

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses an electro-optic sensor that consists of a collimator, attached to one segment, and a quad diode, attached to an adjacent segment. Relative segment-segment motion causes the beam from the collimator to move across the quad diode, thus generating a measureable electric signal. This sensor type, which is relatively inexpensive, can be configured as an edge sensor, or as a remote segment-segment motion sensor.

  19. Optical alignment and testing of the Diffuse IR Background Experiment IR cryogenic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John

    1989-01-01

    Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) optical alignment and testing methods are discussed. Using strobe videography, vibration and performance testing of a 32 hz tuning-fork chopper was carried out. The Cosmic Background explorer satellite provides improved microwave and IR all-sky maps of the cosmic background radiation from a polar orbit. A liquid helium cryostat houses the DIRBE and the Far IR Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instruments at a temperature of 2 K. Differential MicRowave Radiometers (DMRs) provide large scale maps of anisotropy of the 3 K background at wavelengths of 3.3, 5.7, and 9.6 mm. The DIRBE telescope is an IR photometric instrument with 10 wavelength bands between 1 and 300 microns, designed to measure radiation from the epoch of galaxy formation. Stringent stray light requirements mean that the DIRBE flight instrument has to be built and tested in a class 100 environment.

  20. The optical field angle distortion calibration feasibility study for the Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchetti, K.; Abshire, G.; Hallock, L.; Mccutcheon, R.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an analytical study to investigate the feasibility of calibrating the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) fine guidance sensors (FGSs) within HST mission accuracy limits are presented. The study has two purposes: (1) to determine the mathematical feasibility of the optical field angle distortion (OFAD) calibration algorithm and (2) to confirm that the OFAD, plate scale, and FGS-to-FGS alignment calibration algorithms produced a calibration of the FGSs that satisfied mission requirements. The study concluded that the mathematical specification of the OFAD algorithm is adequate and permits a determination of the FGS calibration parameters (accurate to better than 0.003 arc-second) sufficient to meet the mission requirements. The algorithms implemented, the characteristics of the simulated data and procedures for data analysis, and the study's results are discussed. In addition, several useful techniques for improving the stability and accuracy of the OFAD solution are outlined.

  1. Development of Prototype Nickel Optic for the Constellation-X Hard X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaine, S.; Gorenstein, P.; Bruni, R.; Pareschi, G.; Citterio, O.; Ghigo, M.; Mazzoleni, F.; Spiga, D.; Basso, S.; Conti, G.; Ramsey, B.; Gubarev, M.; O'Dell, S.; Speegle, C.; Engelhaupt, D.; Freyberg, M.; Burkert, W.; Hartner, G.

    2005-12-01

    The Constellation-X mission planned for launch in 2015, will feature an array of Hard X-ray telescopes (HXT) whose bandwidth extends to \\ 70 keV. Several technologies are being investigated for fabrication of these optics, including multilayer Coated Electroformed-Nickel-Replicated (ENR) shells. We are building a prototype HXT mirror module using an ENR process to fabricate the in dividual shells.This prototype consists of 5 shells with diameters ranging from 150 mm to 280 mm with a length of 426 mm. This paper presents a progress update and focuses on accomplishments during this past year. In particular, we will present results from high energy full illumination tests, taken at the MPE Panter Test Facility. This work was supported in part by NASA Grant NNG05WC27G and CONX/NASA grant 44A-1046805.

  2. Compensation of spatial dispersion of an acousto-optic deflector with a special Keplerian telescope.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinglei; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2016-01-15

    Compensation of spatial dispersion caused by the acousto-optic deflector (AOD) when using a femtosecond laser is difficult across the whole scanning range of the system, and this is a significant impediment to its use. In conventional methods, the dispersion of the AOD was compensated only when it was at a particular position, while at other positions, the quality of the light beam was reduced. We developed a novel method for compensating the spatial dispersion within the entire scanning range using a special Keplerian telescope. Our experimental results show that the residual dispersion of the AOD is compensated sufficiently, and the focal spots of the laser reach the diffraction limit within a 40-MHz ultrasound bandwidth. PMID:26766675

  3. Compensation of spatial dispersion of an acousto-optic deflector with a special Keplerian telescope.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinglei; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2016-01-15

    Compensation of spatial dispersion caused by the acousto-optic deflector (AOD) when using a femtosecond laser is difficult across the whole scanning range of the system, and this is a significant impediment to its use. In conventional methods, the dispersion of the AOD was compensated only when it was at a particular position, while at other positions, the quality of the light beam was reduced. We developed a novel method for compensating the spatial dispersion within the entire scanning range using a special Keplerian telescope. Our experimental results show that the residual dispersion of the AOD is compensated sufficiently, and the focal spots of the laser reach the diffraction limit within a 40-MHz ultrasound bandwidth.

  4. Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project. III. Optical Continuum Emission and Broadband Time Delays in NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fausnaugh, M. M.; Denney, K. D.; Barth, A. J.; Bentz, M. C.; Bottorff, M. C.; Carini, M. T.; Croxall, K. V.; De Rosa, G.; Goad, M. R.; Horne, Keith; Joner, M. D.; Kaspi, S.; Kim, M.; Klimanov, S. A.; Kochanek, C. S.; Leonard, D. C.; Netzer, H.; Peterson, B. M.; Schnülle, K.; Sergeev, S. G.; Vestergaard, M.; Zheng, W.-K.; Zu, Y.; Anderson, M. D.; Arévalo, P.; Bazhaw, C.; Borman, G. A.; Boroson, T. A.; Brandt, W. N.; Breeveld, A. A.; Brewer, B. J.; Cackett, E. M.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Dalla Bontà, E.; De Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Dietrich, M.; Edelson, R.; Efimova, N. V.; Ely, J.; Evans, P. A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Flatland, K.; Gehrels, N.; Geier, S.; Gelbord, J. M.; Gonzalez, L.; Gorjian, V.; Grier, C. J.; Grupe, D.; Hall, P. B.; Hicks, S.; Horenstein, D.; Hutchison, T.; Im, M.; Jensen, J. J.; Jones, J.; Kaastra, J.; Kelly, B. C.; Kennea, J. A.; Kim, S. C.; Korista, K. T.; Kriss, G. A.; Lee, J. C.; Lira, P.; MacInnis, F.; Manne-Nicholas, E. R.; Mathur, S.; McHardy, I. M.; Montouri, C.; Musso, R.; Nazarov, S. V.; Norris, R. P.; Nousek, J. A.; Okhmat, D. N.; Pancoast, A.; Papadakis, I.; Parks, J. R.; Pei, L.; Pogge, R. W.; Pott, J.-U.; Rafter, S. E.; Rix, H.-W.; Saylor, D. A.; Schimoia, J. S.; Siegel, M.; Spencer, M.; Starkey, D.; Sung, H.-I.; Teems, K. G.; Treu, T.; Turner, C. S.; Uttley, P.; Villforth, C.; Weiss, Y.; Woo, J.-H.; Yan, H.; Young, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present ground-based optical photometric monitoring data for NGC 5548, part of an extended multiwavelength reverberation mapping campaign. The light curves have nearly daily cadence from 2014 January to July in nine filters (BVRI and ugriz). Combined with ultraviolet data from the Hubble Space Telescope and Swift, we confirm significant time delays between the continuum bands as a function of wavelength, extending the wavelength coverage from 1158 Å to the z band (~9160 Å). We find that the lags at wavelengths longer than the V band are equal to or greater than the lags of high-ionization-state emission lines (such as He ii λ 1640 and λ 4686), suggesting that the continuum-emitting source is of a physical size comparable to the inner broad-line region (BLR). The trend of lag with wavelength is broadly consistent with the prediction for continuum reprocessing by an accretion disk with τ \\propto {λ }4/3. However, the lags also imply a disk radius that is 3 times larger than the prediction from standard thin-disk theory, assuming that the bolometric luminosity is 10% of the Eddington luminosity (L=0.1{L}{{Edd}}). Using optical spectra from the Large Binocular Telescope, we estimate the bias of the interband continuum lags due to BLR emission observed in the filters. We find that the bias for filters with high levels of BLR contamination (~20%) can be important for the shortest continuum lags and likely has a significant impact on the u and U bands owing to Balmer continuum emission.

  5. NEOSTEL: the telescope detail design program for the ESA optical ground network dedicated to NEO discovery and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibin, L.; Chiarini, M.; Bernardi, F.; Ragazzoni, R.; Salinari, P.

    The Fly-Eye architecture applied for a Space Debris and NEO Surveillance and Tracking optical telescope has been originally proposed by CGS and further refined in the framework of the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Preparatory Program studies. The high level architecture of a Telescope based on the Fly-Eye concept has been defined in the TELAD Study. Following TELAD conceptual design, the activities of NEOSTEL aim now at generating the Detailed Design of a NEO Survey Telescope based on the Fly-Eye concept. All components of the telescope are designed at detailed level to satisfy the specific requirements for the Survey and Follow Up of the Near Earth Objects. The NEO Survey Telescope detailed design generated under this Program will be directly utilized for the manufacturing of the first prototype, planned to be launched by the SSA Program in the second half of 2015. In addition, the result of the Detailed Design will produce the documentation necessary to prepare the future site that will host the NEO Survey Telescope prototype as well as the high level architecture of the data processing SW that will be required at the telescope site. The product of the prototypation activity will then constitute a full Italian key Optical Core Technology, dedicated to the NEO thematic but also extendable to the SST Segment, therefore offering possibility of application both at Civil and at Institutional level. Furthermore the Fly-Eye Telescope Technology can actively collaborate with a dedicated Space Segment, opening the way to a complete and autonomous EU System.

  6. Active optics and modified-Rumsey wide-field telescopes: MINITRUST demonstrators with vase- and tulip-form mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Gérard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulié, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires the development of larger aperture telescopes. The optical properties of a three-mirror modified-Rumsey design provide significant advantages when compared to other telescope designs: (i) at any wavelength, the design has a flat field and is anastigmatic; (ii) the system is extremely compact, i.e., it is almost four times shorter than a Schmidt. Compared to the equally compact flat-field Ritchey-Chrétien with a doublet-lens corrector, as developed for the Sloan digital sky survey - and which requires the polishing of six optical surfaces - the proposed modified-Rumsey design requires only a two-surface polishing and provides a better imaging quality. All the mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. Starting from the classical Rumsey design, it is shown that the use of all eight available free parameters allows the simultaneous aspherization of the primary and tertiary mirrors by active optics methods from a single deformable substrate. The continuity conditions between the primary and the tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by an intermediate narrow ring of constant thickness that is not optically used. After the polishing of a double vase form in a spherical shape, the primary-tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by in situ stressing. The tulip-form secondary is hyperbolized by stress polishing. Other active optics alternatives are possible for a space telescope. The modified-Rumsey design is of interest for developing large space- and ground-based survey telescopes in UV, visible, or IR ranges, such as currently demonstrated with the construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° field of view. Double-pass optical tests show diffraction-limited images.

  7. Observations of optical components of gamma-bursts by means of the network of MASTER robotic telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbovskoy, E. S.

    2012-05-01

    We present results of the prompt, early, and afterglow optical observations of five gamma-ray bursts, GRBs 100901A, 100902A, 100905A, 100906A, and 101020A, made with the Mobile Astronomical System of TElescope-Robots in Russia (MASTER-II net), the 1.5-m telescope of the Sierra Nevada Observatory, and the 2.56-m Nordic Optical Telescope. For two sources, GRB100901A and GRB100906A, we detected optical counterparts and obtained light curves starting before cessation of gamma-ray emission, at 113 s and 48 s after the trigger, respectively. Observations of GRB100906A were conducted in two polarizing filters. Observations of the other three bursts gave the upper limits on the optical flux; their properties are briefly discussed. More detailed analysis of GRB100901A and GRB100906A supplemented by Swift data provides the following results and indicates a different origin of the prompt optical radiation in the two bursts. The light curves patterns and spectral distributions suggest a common production site of the prompt optical and high-energy emission in GRB100901A. Results of spectral fits for GRB100901A in the range from the optical to X-rays favor power law energy distributions and a consistent value of the optical extinction in the host galaxy. GRB100906A produced a smoothly peaking optical light curve suggesting that the prompt optical radiation in this GRB originated in a front shock. This is supported by a spectral analysis.We have found that the Amati and Ghirlanda relations are satisfied for GRB100906A. An upper limit on the value of the optical extinction on the host of GRB100906A is obtained.

  8. Determination of parameters and research autoreflection scheme to measurement errors relative position of the optical elements of the Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molev, Fedor; Konyakhin, Igor; Ezhova, Kseniia

    2014-05-01

    The main advantages and disadvantages of using autoreflection and autocollimation schemes for constructing the measuring channel, which is designed to control the relative position of the elements of the optical system Space Telescope are described in this paper. Results of modeling in the Zemax software complex are given. Methods of determining the autocollimation images coordinates for calculate the error relative position of the optical system are described.

  9. Applications of Gas Imaging Micro-Well Detectors to an Advanced Compton Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloser, P. F.; Hunter, S. D.; Ryan, J. M.; McConnell, M. L.; Miller, R. S.; Jackson, T. N.; Bai, B.; Jung, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a concept for an Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) based on the use of pixelized gas micro-well detectors to form a three-dimensional electron track imager. A micro-well detector consists of an array of individual micro-patterned proportional counters opposite a planar drift electrode. When combined with thin film transistor array readouts, large gas volumes may be imaged with very good spatial and energy resolution at reasonable cost. The third dimension is determined by timing the drift of the ionization electrons. The primary advantage of this approach is the excellent tracking of the Compton recoil electron that is possible in a gas volume. Such good electron tracking allows us to reduce the point spread function of a single incident photon dramatically, greatly improving the imaging capability and sensitivity. The polarization sensitivity, which relies on events with large Compton scattering angles, is particularly enhanced. We describe a possible ACT implementation of this technique, in which the gas tracking volume is surrounded by a CsI calorimeter, and present our plans to build and test a small prototype over the next three years.

  10. AdEPT, the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope for Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; Venters, Tonia M.; Krizmanic, John; Hanu, Andrei; Sasaki, Makoto; Timokhin, Andrey; AdEPT Instrument Team

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT) is being developed as a future NASA/GSFC end-to-end MIDEX mission to perform high-sensitivity medium-energy (5-200 MeV) astronomy and revolutionary gamma-ray polarization measurements. The enabling technology for AdEPT is the GSFC Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI), a large volume gaseous time projection chamber with 2-dimentional micro-well detector (MWD) readout. The low density and high spatial resolution of the 3-DTI allows AdEPT to achieve high angular resolution (~0.5 deg at 67.5 MeV) and, for the first time, exceptional gamma-ray polarization sensitivity. These capabilities enable a wide range of scientific discovery potential for AdEPT. We will discuss several of the key science goals of the AdEPT mission. These include: 1) Explore fundamental processes of particle acceleration in active astrophysical objects, 2) Reveal the magnetic field configuration of the most energetic accelerators in the Universe, 3) Explore the origins and acceleration of cosmic rays and the Galactic MeV diffuse emission, 4) Search for dark matter in the Galactic center, and 5) Test relativity with polarization measurements.

  11. AdEPT, the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope for Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.

    2016-04-01

    The Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT) is being developed as a future NASA/GSFC end-to-end MIDEX mission to perform high-sensitivity medium-energy (5-200 MeV) astronomy and revolutionary gamma-ray polarization measurements. The enabling technology for AdEPT is the GSFC Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI), a large volume gaseous time projection chamber with 2-dimentional micro-well detector (MWD) readout. The low density and high spatial resolution of the 3-DTI allows AdEPT to achieve high angular resolution (~0.5 deg at 67.5 MeV) and, for the first time, exceptional gamma-ray polarization sensitivity. These capabilities enable a wide range of scientific discovery potential for AdEPT. We will discuss several of the key science goals of the AdEPT mission. These include: 1) Explore fundamental processes of particle acceleration in active astrophysical objects, 2) Reveal the magnetic field configuration of the most energetic accelerators in the Universe, 3) Explore the origins and acceleration of cosmic rays and the Galactic MeV diffuse emission, 4) Search for dark matter in the Galactic center, and 5) Test relativity with polarization measurements.

  12. THE GHOSTS SURVEY. I. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Radburn-Smith, D. J.; Dalcanton, J. J.; De Jong, R. S.; Streich, D.; Vlajic, M.; Seth, A. C.; Bailin, J.; Bell, E. F.; Brown, T. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Goudfrooij, P.; Holfeltz, S.; Bullock, J. S.; Courteau, S.; Sick, J.; Holwerda, B. W.; Purcell, C.; Zucker, D. B.

    2011-08-01

    We present an overview of the GHOSTS survey, the largest study to date of the resolved stellar populations in the outskirts of disk galaxies. The sample consists of 14 disk galaxies within 17 Mpc, whose outer disks and halos are imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). In the first paper of this series, we describe the sample, explore the benefits of using resolved stellar populations, and discuss our ACS F606W and F814W photometry. We use artificial star tests to assess completeness and use overlapping regions to estimate photometric uncertainties. The median depth of the survey at 50% completeness is 2.7 mag below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). We comprehensively explore and parameterize contamination from unresolved background galaxies and foreground stars using archival fields of high-redshift ACS observations. Left uncorrected, these would account for 10{sup 0.65xF814W-19.0} detections per mag per arcsec{sup 2}. We therefore identify several selection criteria that typically remove 95% of the contaminants. Even with these culls, background galaxies are a significant limitation to the surface brightness detection limit which, for this survey, is typically V {approx} 30 mag arcsec{sup -2}. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly available and contain some 3.1 million stars across 76 ACS fields, predominantly of low extinction. The uniform magnitudes of TRGB stars in these fields enable galaxy distance estimates with 2%-7% accuracy.

  13. SNAP telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis,R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar,A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland,S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kim, A.G.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder, E.V.; Loken,S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi,H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto,E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will require a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction limited images spanning a one degree field in the visible and near infrared wavelength regime. This requirement, equivalent to nearly one billion pixel resolution, places stringent demands on its optical system in terms of field flatness, image quality, and freedom from chromatic aberration. We discuss the advantages of annular-field three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) telescopes for applications such as SNAP, and describe the features of the specific optical configuration that we have baselined for the SNAP mission. We discuss the mechanical design and choice of materials for the telescope. Then we present detailed ray traces and diffraction calculations for our baseline optical design. We briefly discuss stray light and tolerance issues, and present a preliminary wavefront error budget for the SNAP Telescope. We conclude by describing some of tasks to be carried out during the upcoming SNAP research and development phase.

  14. Tiling strategies for optical follow-up of gravitational-wave triggers by telescopes with a wide field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shaon; Bloemen, Steven; Nelemans, Gijs; Groot, Paul J.; Price, Larry R.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: Binary neutron stars are among the most promising candidates for joint gravitational-wave and electromagnetic astronomy. The goal of this work is to investigate various observing strategies that telescopes with wide field of view might incorporate while searching for electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave triggers. Methods: We examined various strategies of scanning the gravitational-wave sky localizations on the mock 2015-16 gravitational-wave events. First, we studied the performance of the sky coverage using a naive tiling system that completely covers a given confidence interval contour using a fixed grid. Then we propose the ranked-tiling strategy where we sample the localization in discrete two-dimensional intervals that are equivalent to the telescope's field of view and rank them based on their sample localizations. We then introduce an optimization of the grid by iterative sliding of the tiles. Next, we conducted tests for all the methods on a large sample of sky localizations that are expected in the first two years of operation of the Laser interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo detectors. We investigated the performance of the ranked-tiling strategy for telescope arrays and compared their performance against monolithic telescopes with a giant field of view. Finally, we studied the ability of optical counterpart detection by various types of telescopes. Results: Our analysis reveals that the ranked-tiling strategy improves the localization coverage over the contour-covering method. The improvement is more significant for telescopes with larger fields of view. We also find that while optimizing the position of the tiles significantly improves the coverage compared to contour-covering tiles. For ranked-tiles the same procedure leads to negligible improvement in the coverage of the sky localizations. We observed that distributing the field of view of the telescopes into arrays of multiple telescopes significantly

  15. OPTICAL PROPER MOTION MEASUREMENTS OF THE M87 JET: NEW RESULTS FROM THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Sparks, W. B.; Biretta, J. A.; Anderson, Jay; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Norman, Colin; Nakamura, Masanori

    2013-09-10

    We report new results from a Hubble Space Telescope archival program to study proper motions in the optical jet of the nearby radio galaxy M87. Using over 13 yr of archival imaging, we reach accuracies below 0.1c in measuring the apparent velocities of individual knots in the jet. We confirm previous findings of speeds up to 4.5c in the inner 6'' of the jet, and report new speeds for optical components in the outer part of the jet. We find evidence of significant motion transverse to the jet axis on the order of 0.6c in the inner jet features, and superluminal velocities parallel and transverse to the jet in the outer knot components, with an apparent ordering of velocity vectors possibly consistent with a helical jet pattern. Previous results suggested a global deceleration over the length of the jet in the form of decreasing maximum speeds of knot components from HST-1 outward, but our results suggest that superluminal speeds persist out to knot C, with large differentials in very nearby features all along the jet. We find significant apparent accelerations in directions parallel and transverse to the jet axis, along with evidence for stationary features in knots D, E, and I. These results are expected to place important constraints on detailed models of kiloparsec-scale relativistic jets.

  16. JIM: a joint integrated module of glass x-ray optics for astronomical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proserpio, Laura; Breunig, Elias; Friedrich, Peter; Winter, Anita; Rohé, Christian; Eder, Josef; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela D.; Menz, Benedikt; Civitani, Marta; Basso, Stefano; Buratti, Enrico

    2015-09-01

    For several years, the Max-Planck-Institute for extraterrestrial Physics in Germany (MPE) and the Astronomical Observatory of Brera in Italy (INAF-OAB) have been studying the slumping technology for the manufacturing of segmented glass X-ray optics for astronomy. Despite some differences in their specific approaches, the synergy of the two institutes has always been good, focusing on the common goal of developing a technology able to meet the outstanding requirements for future X-ray telescopes: i.e. large collecting areas, low mass and good angular resolution. This synergy has in the last year resulted in an active collaboration for the production of a Joint Integrated Module (JIM) that puts together the expertise of the two research groups. In particular, the indirect slumping approach of MPE has been employed for the manufacturing of X-ray mirror segments that have been integrated into a kind of X-ray Optical Unit following the approach developed at INAF-OAB. The module has then been tested in X-ray at the MPE PANTER facility, in Neuried. The several steps and the results of this joint activity are reviewed and discussed in this paper.

  17. Plan for Safe Laser Beam Propagation from the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, K. E.; Roberts, W. T.; Garkanian, V.; Battle, F.; Leblanc, R.; Hemmati, H.; Robles, P.

    2002-10-01

    JPL is building a state-of-the-art Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) to perform research and development of laser beam propagation and signal detection technologies to meet NASA's future needs for high-bandwidth communications from Earth-orbiting and deep-space probes. Laser beam propagation between ground and space is regulated by several government agencies -- regulation that is significant when propagating high-brightness, Q-switched laser beams that will be used for uplinking commands to deep-space probes and as an acquisition, pointing, and tracking beacon for downlink optical communication. To ensure safe laser operation and beam propagation from the OCTL, JPL has identified a four-tier safety system. The safety system starts with safe beam propagation within the OCTL, extends to safe beam propagation through the air and into space, and is designed to meet the requirements of State (California Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and Federal agencies (Federal Aviation Administration and the U.S. Space Command's Laser Clearinghouse).

  18. The GMT-CFA-CARNEGIE-CATOLICA LARGE EARTH FINDER (G-CLEF): A Fiber-fed, Optical Echelle Spectrograph For The Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Furesz, G.; Frebel, A.; Geary, J.; Evans, I.; Norton, T.; Hertz, E.; DePonte Evans, J.; Jordan, A.; Guzman, D.; Epps, H.; Barnes, S.; Crane, J.

    2011-01-01

    The GMT-CfA-Carnegie-Catolica Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) is a fiber-fed optical echelle spectrograph in concept design study phase for first light at the Giant Magellan Telescope. G-CLEF is designed to be a multipurpose echelle spectrograph that operates in a number of modes so as to enable precision radial velocity (RV) measurements, detailed abundance studies, isotopic abundance measurements and probe the IGM and ISM at high Z. Four resolution modes are implemented with image and pupil slicing. Extremely precise RV will be achieved by vacuum enclosing the spectrograph, with advanced fiber scrambling and state-of-the-art calibrators, especially ultra stabilized etalons and possibly laser frequency combs. The optical design is a asymmetric white pupil design with two camera arms splitting the 350 nm - 950 nm passband into red and blue channels. G-CLEF will have an extremely large, mosaiced echelle grating and volume phase holograph cross dispersers.

  19. Advanced acousto-optic signal processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.

    1983-01-01

    The basic acousto-optic signal processing architectures (spectrum analyzer, space-integrating, time-integrating, and triple product processor) systems and algorithms such as the chirp-Z transform are reviewed. New acousto-optic data processing systems and applications that utilze these basic architectures and new ones are described. These include a matched spatial filter acousto-optic processor, two new hybrid time and space-integrating systems, a triple product processor, and four new matrix-vector iterative feedback systems.

  20. TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS OF LOOPS WITH CORONAL RAIN OBSERVED BY HINODE/SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Antolin, P.; Verwichte, E. E-mail: erwin.verwichte@warwick.ac.uk

    2011-08-01

    The condensations composing coronal rain, falling down along loop-like structures observed in cool chromospheric lines such as H{alpha} and Ca II H, have long been a spectacular phenomenon of the solar corona. However, considered a peculiar sporadic phenomenon, it has not received much attention. This picture is rapidly changing due to recent high-resolution observations with instruments such as the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), CRISP of the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Furthermore, numerical simulations have shown that coronal rain is the loss of thermal equilibrium of loops linked to footpoint heating. This result has highlighted the importance that coronal rain can play in the field of coronal heating. In this work, we further stress the importance of coronal rain by showing the role it can play in the understanding of the coronal magnetic field topology. We analyze Hinode/SOT observations in the Ca II H line of a loop in which coronal rain puts in evidence in-phase transverse oscillations of multiple strand-like structures. The periods, amplitudes, transverse velocities, and phase velocities are calculated, allowing an estimation of the energy flux of the wave and the coronal magnetic field inside the loop through means of coronal seismology. We discuss the possible interpretations of the wave as either standing or propagating torsional Alfven or fast kink waves. An estimate of the plasma beta parameter of the condensations indicates a condition that may allow the often observed separation and elongation processes of the condensations. We also show that the wave pressure from the transverse wave can be responsible for the observed low downward acceleration of coronal rain.

  1. Quasi-real-time Adaptive Optics Simulations on GPUs for the Next Generation Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratadour, D.

    2012-09-01

    Final design studies for the first generation of Adaptive Optics (AO) systems for the E-ELT (European Extremely Large Telescope) should begin in 2012, the first step of which will involve realistic end-to-end numerical simulations of the instruments and their environment. In this paper we present the first performance analysis of our simulation code, showing its ability to provide Shack-Hartmann (SH) images and measurements at the kHz scale for VLT-sized AO system and in quasi-real-time (up to 100 iterations per second) for ELT-sized on a single top-end GPU. The simulation code includes multiple layers atmospheric turbulence generation, ray tracing through these layers, image formation at the focal plane of every sub-aperture of a SH sensor using either natural or laser guide stars and centroiding on these images using various algorithms. Turbulence is generated on-the-fly giving the ability to simulate hours of observations without the need of loading extremely large phase screens in the global memory. Because of its performance this code additionally provides the unique ability to test real-time controllers for future AO systems under nominal conditions. This open source project is distributed under a GPL license and can be used to simulate a wide range of AO systems from classical AO on a medium size telescope to multi-conjugate AO on an ELT. Simulation parameters (number of turbulent layers, turbulence strength, number and position of targets, etc.) can be modified dynamically thanks to the modular underlying implementation using the Standard Template Library. While a simulation run is fully scriptable, a Graphical User Interface is also provided for easier fine tuning of the system parameters and easier access to sophisticated system designs.

  2. Advances in Telescope and Detector Technologies - Impacts on the Study and Understanding of Binary Star and Exoplanet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott; Devinney, Edward J.

    2012-04-01

    Current and planned telescope systems (both on the ground and in space) as well as new technologies will be discussed with emphasis on their impact on the studies of binary star and exoplanet systems. Although no telescopes or space missions are primarily designed to study binary stars (what a pity!), several are available (or will be shortly) to study exoplanet systems. Nonetheless those telescopes and instruments can also be powerful tools for studying binary and variable stars. For example, early microlensing missions (mid-1990s) such as EROS, MACHO and OGLE were initially designed for probing dark matter in the halos of galaxies but, serendipitously, these programs turned out to be a bonanza for the studies of eclipsing binaries and variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds and in the Galactic Bulge. A more recent example of this kind of serendipity is the Kepler Mission. Although Kepler was designed to discover exoplanet transits (and so far has been very successful, returning many planetary candidates), Kepler is turning out to be a ``stealth'' stellar astrophysics mission returning fundamentally important and new information on eclipsing binaries, variable stars and, in particular, providing a treasure trove of data of all types of pulsating stars suitable for detailed Asteroseismology studies. With this in mind, current and planned telescopes and networks, new instruments and techniques (including interferometers) are discussed that can play important roles in our understanding of both binary star and exoplanet systems. Recent advances in detectors (e.g. laser frequency comb spectrographs), telescope networks (both small and large - e.g. Super-WASP, HAT-net, RoboNet, Las Combres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Network), wide field (panoramic) telescope systems (e.g. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and Pan-Starrs), huge telescopes (e.g. the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), the Overwhelming Large Telescope (OWL) and the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT

  3. The Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi

    2011-08-01

    We present the status of the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) project, a new general purpose, fully steerable 64 m diameter parabolic radio telescope under construction in Sardinia. The instrument is funded by Italian Ministry of University and Research (MIUR), by the Sardinia Regional Government (RAS), and by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and it is charge to three research structures of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF): the Institute of Radio Astronomy of Bologna, the Cagliari Astronomical Observatory (in Sardinia), and the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Florence. The radio telescope has a shaped Gregorian optical configuration with a 8 m diameter secondary mirror and additional Beam-Wave Guide (BWG) mirrors. One of the most challenging feature of SRT is the active surface of the primary reflector which provides good efficiency up to about 100 GHz. This paper reports on the most recent advances of the construction.

  4. Simulation and analysis of laser guide star adaptive optics systems for the eight to ten meter class telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.T.; Olivier, S.S.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses the design and analysis of laser-guided adaptive optic systems for the large, 8--10 meter class telescopes. We describe a technique for calculating the expected modulation transfer function and the point spread function for a closed loop adaptive optics system, parameterized by the degree of correction and the seeing conditions. The results agree closely with simulations and experimental data, and validate well known scaling law models even at low order correction. Scaling law.model analysis of a proposed adaptive optics system at the Keck telescope leads to the conclusion that a single laser guide star beacon will be adequate for diffraction limited imaging at wavelengths between 1 and 3 am with reasonable coverage of the sky. Cone anisoplanatism will dominate wavefront correction error at the visible wavelengths unless multiple laser guide stars are used.

  5. Optical protocols for advanced spacecraft networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    Most present day fiber optic networks are in fact extensions of copper wire networks. As a result, their speed is still limited by electronics even though optics is capable of running three orders of magnitude faster. Also, the fact that photons do not interact with one another (as electrons do) provides optical communication systems with some unique properties or new functionality that is not readily taken advantage of with conventional approaches. Some of the motivation for implementing network protocols in the optical domain, a few possible approaches including optical code-division multiple-access (CDMA), and how this class of networks can extend the technology life cycle of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) with increased performance and functionality are described.

  6. Applications of advanced diffractive optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, W. Hudson; Morris, James E.; Feldman, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Digital Optics Corporation is a UNC-Charlotte spin-off company, established to transfer technology developed at UNC-Charlotte for the design and manufacture Computer Generated Holograms (CGH's) and to market products based on CGH technology. DOC acquired core technologies from UNC-Charlotte including: (1) a CGH encoding process that can provide holograms with extremely high diffraction efficiency; (2) a low cost, high precision CGH manufacturing process; and (3) extensive holographic and refractive element design capabilities for design and evaluation of complex optical systems. These technologies have been used to design and/or manufacture optical components for a variety of applications including: (1) generation of Spot arrays; (2) fiber optic coupling elements; (3) optical interconnects between VLSI chips within and between multichip modules; and (4) imaging systems for head-mounted displays (HMD's).

  7. Predicted optical performance of the high-altitude balloon experiment (HABE) telescope in an adverse thermal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Akau, R.L.; Givler, R.C.; Eastman, D.R.

    1994-04-01

    The High-Altitude Balloon Experiment (HABE) telescope was designed to operate at an ambient temperature of {minus}55 C and an altitude of 26 km, using a precooled primary mirror. Although at this altitude the air density is only 1.4 percent of the value at sea level, the temperature gradients within the telescope are high enough to deform the optical wavefront. This problem is considerably lessened by precooling the primary mirror to {minus}35 C. This paper describes the application of several codes to determine the range of wavefront deformation during a mission.

  8. A Proposal to Localize Fermi GBM GRBs Through Coordinated Scanning of the GBM Error Circle via Optical Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Linnemann, J. T.; Tollefson, K.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Bhat, P. N.; Sonbas, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of implementing a system that will coordinate ground-based optical telescopes to cover the Fermi GBM Error Circle (EC). The aim of the system is to localize GBM detected GRBs and facilitate multi-wavelength follow-up from space and ground. This system will optimize the observing locations in the GBM EC based on individual telescope location, Field of View (FoV) and sensitivity. The proposed system will coordinate GBM EC scanning by professional as well as amateur astronomers around the world. The results of a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the feasibility of the project are presented.

  9. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-Curvature Optical Metrology System during Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST primary mirror consists of 18 1.5 m hexagonal segments, each with 6-DoF and RoC adjustment. The telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. The testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The performance of these metrology systems, including hardware, software, procedures, was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC, using the JWST Pathfinder telescope. This paper describes the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance.

  10. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: RELATION BETWEEN GALAXY CLUSTER OPTICAL RICHNESS AND SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, Neelima; Hlozek, Renee; Addison, Graeme; Dunkley, Joanna; Louis, Thibaut; Battaglia, Nick; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D.; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Duenner, Rolando; Gralla, Megan; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hilton, Matt; Hughes, John P.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; and others

    2013-04-10

    We present the measured Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) flux from 474 optically selected MaxBCG clusters that fall within the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) Equatorial survey region. The ACT Equatorial region used in this analysis covers 510 deg{sup 2} and overlaps Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We also present the measured SZ flux stacked on 52 X-ray-selected MCXC clusters that fall within the ACT Equatorial region and an ACT Southern survey region covering 455 deg{sup 2}. We find that the measured SZ flux from the X-ray-selected clusters is consistent with expectations. However, we find that the measured SZ flux from the optically selected clusters is both significantly lower than expectations and lower than the recovered SZ flux measured by the Planck satellite. Since we find a lower recovered SZ signal than Planck, we investigate the possibility that there is a significant offset between the optically selected brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and the SZ centers, to which ACT is more sensitive due to its finer resolution. Such offsets can arise due to either an intrinsic physical separation between the BCG and the center of the gas concentration or from misidentification of the cluster BCG. We find that the entire discrepancy for both ACT and Planck can be explained by assuming that the BCGs are offset from the SZ maxima with a uniform random distribution between 0 and 1.5 Mpc. Such large offsets between gas peaks and BCGs for optically selected cluster samples seem unlikely given that we find the physical separation between BCGs and X-ray peaks for an X-ray-selected subsample of MaxBCG clusters to have a much narrower distribution that peaks within 0.2 Mpc. It is possible that other effects are lowering the ACT and Planck signals by the same amount, with offsets between BCGs and SZ peaks explaining the remaining difference between ACT and Planck measurements. Several effects that can lower the SZ signal equally for both ACT and Planck, but not explain

  11. Advances in GaAs bistable optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, J. L.; Tarng, S. S.; Gibbs, H. M.; Tai, K.; Weinberger, D. A.; Gossard, A. C.; McCall, S. L.; Passner, A.; Venkatesan, T. N. C.; Weigmann, W.

    1984-01-01

    Bistable optical devices (BOD's) using GaAs as the nonlinear medium are viable candidators for the achievement of fast ( ns), room temperature, low-power (mw), externally controllable optical switches which are easily fabricated and operated. Advances were made in all of these areas and efforts are in progress to improve performances in ways that are simultaneously compatible.

  12. Recent advances in digital camera optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Keizo

    2012-10-01

    The digital camera market has extremely expanded in the last ten years. The zoom lens for digital camera is especially the key determining factor of the camera body size and image quality. Its technologies have been based on several analog technological progresses including the method of aspherical lens manufacturing and the mechanism of image stabilization. Panasonic is one of the pioneers of both technologies. I will introduce the previous trend in optics of zoom lens as well as original optical technologies of Panasonic digital camera "LUMIX", and in addition optics in 3D camera system. Besides, I would like to suppose the future trend in digital cameras.

  13. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach to define & execute a long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Because we cannot predict the future, we are pursuing multiple technology paths including monolithic & segmented mirrors. Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry & government; experts in science & space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Maturing 6 critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast exoplanet imaging. AMTD achieving all its goals & accomplishing all its milestones.

  14. Digital polarization holography advancing geometrical phase optics.

    PubMed

    De Sio, Luciano; Roberts, David E; Liao, Zhi; Nersisyan, Sarik; Uskova, Olena; Wickboldt, Lloyd; Tabiryan, Nelson; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    Geometrical phase or the fourth generation (4G) optics enables realization of optical components (lenses, prisms, gratings, spiral phase plates, etc.) by patterning the optical axis orientation in the plane of thin anisotropic films. Such components exhibit near 100% diffraction efficiency over a broadband of wavelengths. The films are obtained by coating liquid crystalline (LC) materials over substrates with patterned alignment conditions. Photo-anisotropic materials are used for producing desired alignment conditions at the substrate surface. We present and discuss here an opportunity of producing the widest variety of "free-form" 4G optical components with arbitrary spatial patterns of the optical anisotropy axis orientation with the aid of a digital spatial light polarization converter (DSLPC). The DSLPC is based on a reflective, high resolution spatial light modulator (SLM) combined with an "ad hoc" optical setup. The most attractive feature of the use of a DSLPC for photoalignment of nanometer thin photo-anisotropic coatings is that the orientation of the alignment layer, and therefore of the fabricated LC or LC polymer (LCP) components can be specified on a pixel-by-pixel basis with high spatial resolution. By varying the optical magnification or de-magnification the spatial resolution of the photoaligned layer can be adjusted to an optimum for each application. With a simple "click" it is possible to record different optical components as well as arbitrary patterns ranging from lenses to invisible labels and other transparent labels that reveal different images depending on the side from which they are viewed. PMID:27505793

  15. Selection considerations between ZERODUR® and silicon carbide for dimensionally-stable spaceborne optical telescopes in two-earth-orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Tony; Westerhoff, Thomas; Weidmann, Gunter

    2015-09-01

    A key consideration in defining a space telescope mission is definition of the optical materials. This selection defines both the performance of the system and system complexity and cost. Optimal material selection for system stability must consider the thermal environment and its variation. Via numerical simulations, we compare the thermal and structural-mechanical behavior of ZERODUR® and SiC as mirror substrates for telescope assemblies in space. SiC has significantly larger CTE values then ZERODUR®, but also its thermal diffusivity k/(ρcp) is larger, and that helps to homogenize thermal gradients in the mirror. Therefore it is not obvious at first glance which material performs with better dimensional stability under realistic unsteady, inhomogeneous thermal loads. We specifically examine the telescope response to transient, gradient driving, thermal environments representative of low- and high-earth- orbits.

  16. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Relation Between Galaxy Cluster Optical Richness and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehgal, Neelima; Addison, Graeme; Battaglia, Nick; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Duenner, Rolando; Gralla, Megan; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renee; Hughes, John P.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; Louis, Thibaut; Marriage, Tobias A.; Marsden, Danica; Menateau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Wollack, Ed

    2012-01-01

    We present the measured Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) flux from 474 optically-selected MaxBCG clusters that fall within the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) Equatorial survey region. The ACT Equatorial region used in this analysis covers 510 square degrees and overlaps Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We also present the measured SZ flux stacked on 52 X-ray-selected MCXC clusters that fall within the ACT Equatorial region and an ACT Southern survey region covering 455 square degrees. We find that the measured SZ flux from the X-ray-selected clusters is consistent with expectations. However, we find that the measured SZ flux from the optically-selected clusters is both significantly lower than expectations and lower than the recovered SZ flux measured by the Planck satellite. Since we find a lower recovered SZ signal than Planck, we investigate the possibility that there is a significant offset between the optically-selected brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and the SZ centers, to which ACT is more sensitive due to its finer resolution. Such offsets can arise due to either an intrinsic physical separation between the BCG and the center of the gas concentration or from misidentification of the cluster BCG. We find that the entire discrepancy for both ACT and Planck can be explained by assuming that the BCGs are offset from the SZ maxima with a uniform random distribution between 0 and 1.5 Mpc. In contrast, the physical separation between BCGs and X-ray peaks for an X-ray-selected subsample of MaxBCG clusters shows a much narrower distribution that peaks within 0.2 Mpc. We conclude that while offsets between BCGs and SZ peaks may be an important component in explaining the discrepancy, it is likely that a combination of factors is responsible for the ACT and Planck measurements. Several effects that can lower the SZ signal equally for both ACT and Planck, but not explain the difference in measured signals, include a larger percentage of false detections in the

  17. The advanced cosmic microwave explorer - A millimeter-wave telescope and stabilized platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinhold, P. R.; Chingcuanco, A. O.; Gundersen, J. O.; Schuster, J. A.; Seiffert, M. D.; Lubin, P. M.; Morris, D.; Villela, T.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed and flown a 1 m diameter Gregorian telescope system for measurements of anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR). The telescope is incorporated in a balloon-borne stabilized platform with arcminute stabilization capability. To date, the system has flown four times and observed from the ground at the South Pole twice. The telescope has used both coherent and incoherent detectors. We describe the development of the telescope, pointing platform, and one of the receivers employed in making measurements of the CBR. Performance of the system during the first flight and operation on the ground at the South Pole are described, and the quality of the South Pole as a millimeter wave observing site is discussed.

  18. Design and validation of the mounting structure for BETTII balloon-based telescope with thin-walled optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Stephen; Dow, Tom; Garrard, Ken; Sohn, Alex; Fixsen, Dale; Rinehart, Stephen; Mentzell, Eric; Veach, Todd; Rizzo, Maxime; Dhabal, Arnab

    2016-04-01

    The NASA Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) system is designed to study the infrared emissions from star formation and active galactic nuclei through a double-Fourier Michelson interferometer located on a balloon at an altitude of 37 km. The BETTII external optics include a pair of identical beam-reducing, four-mirror telescopes, each with a 522-mm aperture, nonrotationally symmetric primary mirror. These telescopes were designed and assembled at the North Carolina State University Precision Engineering Consortium and are composed entirely of thin-walled aluminum components. The mounting structure is designed to be light weight and stiff to reduce thermal equilibration time in the rarified air at the edge of space and to maintain robust alignment of the optical elements. The mounts also prevent deformation of the large optical elements via custom-built kinematic Kelvin couplings and fixed-load clamps; the maximum form error of the optical surfaces are 300 nm RMS. This work details the design of the thin mirrors and mounting structure as well as validation of the mount assembly process, mount stiffness, and the kinematic couplings.

  19. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE OPTICAL IMAGING OF THE ERODING DEBRIS DISK HD 61005

    SciTech Connect

    Maness, H. L.; Kalas, P.; Peek, K. M. G.; Chiang, E. I.; Graham, James R.; Scherer, K.; Fitzgerald, M. P.; Hines, D. C.; Schneider, G.; Metchev, S. A.

    2009-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope optical coronagraphic polarization imaging observations of the dusty debris disk HD 61005. The scattered light intensity image and polarization structure reveal a highly inclined disk with a clear asymmetric, swept back component, suggestive of significant interaction with the ambient interstellar medium (ISM). The combination of our new data with the published 1.1 mum discovery image shows that the grains are blue scattering with no strong color gradient as a function of radius, implying predominantly submicron-sized grains. We investigate possible explanations that could account for the observed swept back, asymmetric morphology. Previous work has suggested that HD 61005 may be interacting with a cold, unusually dense interstellar cloud. However, limits on the intervening interstellar gas column density from an optical spectrum of HD 61005 in the Na I D lines render this possibility unlikely. Instead, HD 61005 may be embedded in a more typical warm, low-density cloud that introduces secular perturbations to dust grain orbits. This mechanism can significantly distort the ensemble disk structure within a typical cloud crossing time. For a counterintuitive relative flow direction-parallel to the disk midplane-we find that the structures generated by these distortions can very roughly approximate the HD 61005 morphology. Future observational studies constraining the direction of the relative ISM flow will thus provide an important constraint for future modeling. Independent of the interpretation for HD 61005, we expect that interstellar gas drag likely plays a role in producing asymmetries observed in other debris disk systems, such as HD 15115 and delta Velorum.

  20. A robust optical parametric oscillator and receiver telescope for differential absorption lidar of greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Iain; Jack, James W.; Rae, Cameron F.; Moncrieff, John B.

    2015-10-01

    We report the development of a differential absorption lidar instrument (DIAL) designed and built specifically for the measurement of anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The DIAL is integrated into a commercial astronomical telescope to provide high-quality receiver optics and enable automated scanning for three-dimensional lidar acquisition. The instrument is portable and can be set up within a few hours in the field. The laser source is a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO) which outputs light at a wavelength tunable near 1.6 μm. This wavelength region, which is also used in telecommunications devices, provides access to absorption lines in both carbon dioxide at 1573 nm and methane at 1646 nm. To achieve the critical temperature stability required for a laserbased field instrument the four-mirror OPO cavity is machined from a single aluminium block. A piezoactuator adjusts the cavity length to achieve resonance and this is maintained over temperature changes through the use of a feedback loop. The laser output is continuously monitored with pyroelectric detectors and a custom-built wavemeter. The OPO is injection seeded by a temperature-stabilized distributed feedback laser diode (DFB-LD) with a wavelength locked to the absorption line centre (on-line) using a gas cell containing pure carbon dioxide. A second DFB-LD is tuned to a nearby wavelength (off-line) to provide the reference required for differential absorption measurements. A similar system has been designed and built to provide the injection seeding wavelengths for methane. The system integrates the DFB-LDs, drivers, locking electronics, gas cell and balanced photodetectors. The results of test measurements of carbon dioxide are presented and the development of the system is discussed, including the adaptation required for the measurement of methane.

  1. Wavefront Analysis of Adaptive Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Hillman, Lloyd

    1997-01-01

    The motivation for this work came from a NASA Headquarters interest in investigating design concepts for a large space telescope employing active optics technology. The development of telescope optical requirements and potential optical design configurations is reported.

  2. Real-Time Optical Surveillance of LEO/MEO with Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, P.; McGraw, J.; Ackermann, M.

    J.T. McGraw and Associates, LLC operates two proof-of-concept wide-field imaging systems to test novel techniques for uncued surveillance of LEO/MEO/GEO and, in collaboration with the University of New Mexico (UNM), uses a third small telescope for rapidly queued same-orbit follow-up observations. Using our GPU-accelerated detection scheme, the proof-of-concept systems operating at sites near and within Albuquerque, NM, have detected objects fainter than V=13 at greater than 6 sigma significance. This detection approximately corresponds to a 16 cm object with albedo of 0.12 at 1000 km altitude. Dozens of objects are measured during each operational twilight period, many of which have no corresponding catalog object. The two proof-of-concept systems, separated by ~30km, work together by taking simultaneous images of the same orbital volume to constrain the orbits of detected objects using parallax measurements. These detections are followed-up by imaging photometric observations taken at UNM to confirm and further constrain the initial orbit determination and independently assess the objects and verify the quality of the derived orbits. This work continues to demonstrate that scalable optical systems designed for real-time detection of fast moving objects, which can be then handed off to other instruments capable of tracking and characterizing them, can provide valuable real-time surveillance data at LEO and beyond, which substantively informs the SSA process.

  3. Numerical simulation studies for the first-light adaptive optics system of the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbillet, Marcel; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone

    2004-10-01

    We present our latest results concerning the simulation studies performed for the first-light adaptive optics (AO) system of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), namely WLBT. After a brief description of the "raw" performance evaluation results, in terms of Strehl ratios attained in the various considered bands (from V to K), we focus on the "scientific" performance that will be obtained when considering the subsequent instrumentation that will benefit from the correction given by the AO system WLBT and the adaptive secondary mirrors LBT 672. In particular, we discuss the performance of the coupling with the instrument LUCIFER, working at near-infrared bands, in terms of signal-to-noise values and limiting magnitudes, and in both the cases of spectroscopy and photometric detection. We also give the encircled energies that are expected in the visible bands, result relevant in one hand for the instrument PEPSI, and in other hand for the "technical viewer" that will be on board the WLBT system itself.

  4. PRECURSOR OF SUNSPOT PENUMBRAL FORMATION DISCOVERED WITH HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Toshifumi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Suematsu, Yoshinori

    2012-03-10

    We present observations of a precursory signature that would be helpful for understanding the formation process of sunspot penumbrae. The Hinode Solar Optical Telescope successfully captured the entire evolution of a sunspot from the pore to a large well-developed sunspot with penumbra in an emerging flux region appearing in NOAA Active Region 11039. We found an annular zone (width 3''-5'') surrounding the umbra (pore) in Ca II H images before the penumbra formed around the umbra. The penumbra developed as if to fill the annular zone. The annular zone shows weak magnetogram signals, meaning less magnetic flux or highly inclined fields there. Pre-existing ambient magnetic field islands were distributed at the outer edge of the annular zone and did not come into the zone. There are no strong systematic flow patterns in the zone, but we occasionally observed small magnetic flux patches streaming out. The observations indicate that the annular zone is different from the sunspot moat flow region and that it represents the structure in the chromosphere. We conclude that the annular zone reflects the formation of a magnetic canopy overlying the region surrounding the umbra at the chromospheric level, long before the formation of the penumbra at the photospheric level. The magnetic field structure in the chromosphere needs to be considered in the formation process of the penumbrae.

  5. RIMAS - Optical Design Development of the Imager/Spectrometer for the Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, John

    2012-01-01

    The Rapid IMAger - Spectrometer (RIMAS) is a collaborative effort between the University of Maryland at College Park, NASA-GSFC and Lowell Observatory designed for use on the 4.3 meter Discovery Channel Telescope at Lowell. The primary science goal of the instrument is the study of gamma-ray burst (ORB) afterglow appearing in the near-infrared. Continuous operation will allow measurements beginning minutes after the prompt emission. We present the results of the RIMAS optical design development. The instrument consists of two arms separated by a dichroic: the first for the Y and J bands (0.9 - 1.35 microns) and the second for the Hand K-bands (1.5 - 1.8 and 2.0 - 2.4 microns). Each arm will be equipped with two broad band filters for imaging, as well as low resolution and echelle grisms. The imaging modes are designed to be diffraction limited, with one pixel corresponding to approx.0.35 arcseconds, while the diffractive modes have resolving powers of approximately 20 and 4,000. With photometric and spectroscopic capabilities, RIMAS will be well positioned to quickly determine redshifts, followed by high resolution spectroscopic studies of ORB afterglow.

  6. PALM-3000: EXOPLANET ADAPTIVE OPTICS FOR THE 5 m HALE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Dekany, Richard; Bouchez, Antonin; Baranec, Christoph; Hale, David; Zolkower, Jeffry; Henning, John; Croner, Ernest; McKenna, Dan; Hildebrandt, Sergi; Milburn, Jennifer; Roberts, Jennifer; Burruss, Rick; Truong, Tuan; Guiwits, Stephen; Angione, John; Trinh, Thang; Shelton, J. Christopher; Palmer, Dean; Troy, Mitchell; Tesch, Jonathan

    2013-10-20

    We describe and report first results from PALM-3000, the second-generation astronomical adaptive optics (AO) facility for the 5.1 m Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory. PALM-3000 has been engineered for high-contrast imaging and emission spectroscopy of brown dwarfs and large planetary mass bodies at near-infrared wavelengths around bright stars, but also supports general natural guide star use to V ≈ 17. Using its unique 66 × 66 actuator deformable mirror, PALM-3000 has thus far demonstrated residual wavefront errors of 141 nm rms under ∼1'' seeing conditions. PALM-3000 can provide phase conjugation correction over a 6.''4 × 6.''4 working region at λ = 2.2 μm, or full electric field (amplitude and phase) correction over approximately one-half of this field. With optimized back-end instrumentation, PALM-3000 is designed to enable 10{sup –7} contrast at 1'' angular separation, including post-observation speckle suppression processing. While continued optimization of the AO system is ongoing, we have already successfully commissioned five back-end instruments and begun a major exoplanet characterization survey, Project 1640.

  7. Large binocular telescope interferometer adaptive optics: on-sky performance and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Vanessa P.; Hinz, Philip M.; Puglisi, Alfio T.; Esposito, Simone; Vaitheeswaran, Vidhya; Skemer, Andrew J.; Defrère, Denis; Vaz, Amali; Leisenring, Jarron M.

    2014-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer is a high contrast imager and interferometer that sits at the combined bent Gregorian focus of the LBT's dual 8.4 m apertures. The interferometric science drivers dictate 0.1" resolution with 103 - 104 contrast at 10 μm, while the 4 μm imaging science drivers require even greater contrasts, but at scales <0.2". In imaging mode, LBTI's Adaptive Optics system is already delivering 4 μm contrast of 104 - 105 at 0.3" - 0.75" in good conditions. Even in poor seeing, it can deliver up to 90% Strehl Ratio at this wavelength. However, the performance could be further improved by mitigating Non-Common Path Aberrations. Any NCPA remedy must be feasible using only the current hardware: the science camera, the wavefront sensor, and the adaptive secondary mirror. In preliminary testing, we have implemented an "eye doctor" grid search approach for astigmatism and trefoil, achieving 5% improvement in Strehl Ratio at 4 μm, with future plans to test at shorter wavelengths and with more modes. We find evidence of NCPA variability on short timescales and discuss possible upgrades to ameliorate time-variable effects.

  8. Fine pointing of the Solar Optical Telescope in the Space Shuttle environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gowrinathan, S.

    1985-01-01

    Instruments requiring fine (i.e., sub-arcsecond) pointing, such as the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), must be equipped with two-stage pointing devices, coarse and fine. Coarse pointing will be performed by a gimbal system, such as the Instrument Pointing System, while the image motion compensation (IMC) will provide fine pointing. This paper describes work performed on the SOT concept design that illustrates IMC as applied to SOT. The SOT control system was modeled in the frequency domain to evaluate performance, stability, and bandwidth requirements. The two requirements of the pointing control, i.e., the 2 arcsecond reproducibility and 0.03 arcsecond rms pointing jitter, can be satisfied by use of IMC at about 20 Hz bandwidth. The need for this high bandwidth is related to Shuttle-induced disturbances that arise primarily from man push-offs and vernier thruster firings. A block diagram of SOT model/stability analysis, schematic illustrations of the SOT pointing system, and a structural model summary are included.

  9. Active control of adaptive optics system in a large segmented mirror telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, M.; Agrawal, B. N.

    2014-02-01

    For a large adaptive optics system such as a large segmented mirror telescope (SMT), it is often difficult, although not impossible, to directly apply common multi-input multi-output (MIMO) controller design methods due to the computational burden imposed by the large dimension of the system model. In this article, a practical controller design method is proposed which significantly reduces the system dimension for a system where the dimension required to represent the dynamics of the plant is much smaller than the dimension of the full plant model. The proposed method decouples the dynamic and static parts of the plant model by a modal decomposition technique to separately design a controller for each part. Two controllers are then combined using the so-called sensitivity decoupling method so that the resulting feedback loop becomes the superposition of the two individual feedback loops of the dynamic and static parts. A MIMO controller was designed by the proposed method using the H ∞ loop-shaping technique for an SMT model to be compared with other controllers proposed in the literature. Frequency-domain analysis and time-domain simulation results show the superior performance of the proposed controller.

  10. Discovery of an Unusual Optical Transient with the Hubble Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    The Supernova Cosmology Project; Barbary, Kyle; Dawson, Kyle S.; Tokita, Kouichi; Aldering, Greg; Amanullah, Rahman; Connolly, Natalia V.; Doi, Mamoru; Faccioli, Lorenzo; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Goldhaber, Gerson; Goobar, Ariel; Gude, Alexander; Huang, Xiaosheng; Ihara, Yutaka; Konishi, Kohki; Kowalski, Marek; Lidman, Chris; Meyers, Josh; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nugent, Peter; Perlmutter, Saul; Rubin, David; Schlegel, David; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Suzuki, Nao; Swift, Hannah K.; Takanashi, Naohiro; Thomas, Rollin C.; Yasuda, Naoki

    2008-09-08

    We present observations of SCP 06F6, an unusual optical transient discovered during the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey. The transient brightened over a period of ~;;100 days, reached a peak magnitude of ~;;21.0 in both i_775 and z_850, and then declined over a similar timescale. There is no host galaxy or progenitor star detected at the location of the transient to a 3 sigma upper limit of i_775 = 26.4 and z_850 = 26.1, giving a corresponding lower limit on the flux increase of a factor of ~;;120. Multiple spectra show five broad absorption bands between 4100 AA and 6500 AA and a mostly featureless continuum longward of 6500 AA. The shape of the lightcurve is inconsistent with microlensing. The transient's spectrum, in addition to being inconsistent with all known supernova types, is not matched to any spectrum in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database. We suggest that the transient may be one of a new class.

  11. Thin fused silica optics for a few arcsec angular resolution and large collecting area x-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citterio, O.; Civitani, M. M.; Pareschi, G.; Basso, S.; Campana, S.; Conconi, P.; Ghigo, M.; Mattaini, E.; Moretti, A.; Parodi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2013-09-01

    The implementation of a X-ray mission with high imaging capabilities, similar to those achieved with Chandra (< 1 arcsec Half Energy Width, HEW), but with a much larger throughput is a very attractive perspective, even if challenging. For such a mission the scientific opportunities, in particular for the study of the early Universe, would remain at the state of the art for the next decades. At the beginning of the new millennium the XEUS mission has been proposed, with an effective area of several m2 and an angular resolution better than 2 arcsec HEW. Unfortunately, after the initial study, this mission was not implemented, mainly due to the costs and the low level of technology readiness. Currently the most advanced proposal for such a kind of mission is the SMART-X project, led by CfA and involving several other US Institutes. This project is based on adjustable segments of thin foil mirrors with piezo-electric actuators, aiming to achieve an effective area < 2 m2 at 1 keV and an angular resolution better than 1 arcsec HEW. Another attractive technology to realize an X-ray telescope with similar characteristics is being developed at NASA/Goddard. In this case the mirrors are based on Si substrates that are super-polished and figured starting from a bulky Si ingot, from which they are properly cut. Here we propose an alternative method based on precise direct grinding, figuring and polishing of thin (a few mm) glass shells with innovative deterministic polishing methods. This is followed by a final correction via ion figuring to obtain the desired accuracy in order to achieve the 1 arc sec HEW requirement. For this purpose, a temporary stiffening structure is used to support the shell from the polishing operations up to its integration in the telescope supporting structure. We will present the technological process under development, the results achieved so far and some mission scenarios based on this kind of optics, aiming to achieve an effective area more than

  12. Thin fused silica optics for a high angular resolution and large collecting area X Ray telescope after Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareschi, Giovanni; Citterio, Oberto; Civitani, Marta M; Basso, Stefano; Campana, Sergio; Conconi, Paolo; Ghigo, Mauro; Mattaini, Enrico; Moretti, Alberto; Parodi, Giancarlo; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    2014-08-01

    The implementation of an X-ray mission with high imaging capabilities, similar to those achieved with Chandra (<1 arcsec Half Energy Width, HEW), but with a much larger throughput is very attractive, even if challenging. For such a mission the scientific opportunities, in particular for the study of the early Universe, would remain at the state of the art for the next decades. Initially the ESA-led XEUS mission was proposed, with an effective area of several m2 and an angular resolution better than 2 arcsec HEW. Unfortunately, this mission was not implemented, mainly due to the costs and the low level of technology readiness. Currently the most advanced proposal for such a mission is the SMART-X project, led by CfA together with other US institutes. This project is based on adjustable segments of thin foil mirrors with piezo-electric actuators, aiming to achieve an effective area >2 m2 at 1 keV and an angular resolution better than 1 arcsec HEW. Another attractive technology to realize an X-ray telescope with similar characteristics is being developed at NASA/Goddard. In this case the mirrors are based on Si substrates that are super-polished and figured starting from a bulky Si ingot, from which they are properly cut. Here we propose an alternative method based on precise direct grinding, figuring and polishing of thin (a few mm) glass shells with innovative deterministic polishing methods. This is followed by a final correction via ion figuring to obtain the desired accuracy. For this purpose, a temporary stiffening structure is used to support the shell from the polishing operations up to its integration in the telescope supporting structure. This paper deals with the technological process under development, the results achieved so far and some mission scenarios based on this kind of optics, aiming to achieve an effective area more than 10 times larger than Chandra and an angular resolution of 1 arcsec HEW on axis and of a few arcsec off-axis across a large

  13. Optics characterization of a 900-GHz HEB receiver for the ASTE telescope: design, measurement and tolerance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, A.; Soma, T.; Shiino, T.; Kaneko, K.; Uzawa, Y.; Yamamoto, S.

    2014-09-01

    The optics of a 900-GHz HEB receiver for the ASTE telescope have been analyzed by quasi-optical analysis and Physical Optics simulations in combination with beam pattern measurements. The disagreement between simulations and measurements has motivated an extensive campaign of Monte Carlo analyses to find out the cause of such a difference in results. Monte Carlo analyses have considered fabrication and assembly tolerances in all components in the RF chain, as well as some non-expected fabrication errors. This strategy has allowed determining the defective component. In short, the use of all available analyses techniques together with measurements has allowed singling out an underperforming element in an astronomical receiver. The change of this component will improve the optical efficiency and ease astronomical observations. These ideas can be of interest for any quasi-optical receiver at THz frequencies.

  14. Development of the Advance Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT) for medium-energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; Bloser, Peter F.; Dion, Michael P.; McConnell, Mark L.; de Nolfo, Georgia A.; Son, Seunghee; Ryan, James M.; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2010-07-01

    Progress in high-energy gamma-ray science has been dramatic since the launch of INTEGRAL, AGILE and FERMI. These instruments, however, are not optimized for observations in the medium-energy (~0.3< Eγ < ~200 MeV) regime where many astrophysical objects exhibit unique, transitory behavior, such as spectral breaks, bursts, and flares. We outline some of the major science goals of a medium-energy mission. These science goals are best achieved with a combination of two telescopes, a Compton telescope and a pair telescope, optimized to provide significant improvements in angular resolution and sensitivity. In this paper we describe the design of the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT) based on the Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) detector. This technology achieves excellent, mediumenergy sensitivity, angular resolution near the kinematic limit, and gamma-ray polarization sensitivity, by high resolution 3-D electron tracking. We describe the performance of a 30×30×30 cm3 prototype of the AdEPT instrument.

  15. Development of the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT) for Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; Bloser, Peter F.; Dion, Michael P.; McConnell, Mark L.; deNolfo, Georgia A.; Son, Seunghee; Ryan, James M.; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2011-01-01

    Progress in high-energy gamma-ray science has been dramatic since the launch of INTEGRAL, AGILE and FERMI. These instruments, however, are not optimized for observations in the medium-energy (approx.0.3< E(sub gamma)< approx.200 MeV) regime where many astrophysical objects exhibit unique, transitory behavior, such as spectral breaks, bursts, and flares. We outline some of the major science goals of a medium-energy mission. These science goals are best achieved with a combination of two telescopes, a Compton telescope and a pair telescope, optimized to provide significant improvements in angular resolution and sensitivity. In this paper we describe the design of the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT) based on the Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) detector. This technology achieves excellent, medium-energy sensitivity, angular resolution near the kinematic limit, and gamma-ray polarization sensitivity, by high resolution 3-D electron tracking. We describe the performance of a 30x30x30 cm3 prototype of the AdEPT instrument.

  16. Advanced Imaging Optics Utilizing Wavefront Coding.

    SciTech Connect

    Scrymgeour, David; Boye, Robert; Adelsberger, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Image processing offers a potential to simplify an optical system by shifting some of the imaging burden from lenses to the more cost effective electronics. Wavefront coding using a cubic phase plate combined with image processing can extend the system's depth of focus, reducing many of the focus-related aberrations as well as material related chromatic aberrations. However, the optimal design process and physical limitations of wavefront coding systems with respect to first-order optical parameters and noise are not well documented. We examined image quality of simulated and experimental wavefront coded images before and after reconstruction in the presence of noise. Challenges in the implementation of cubic phase in an optical system are discussed. In particular, we found that limitations must be placed on system noise, aperture, field of view and bandwidth to develop a robust wavefront coded system.

  17. Optical Studies of Space Debris at GEO: Survey and Follow-up with Two Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, P.; Abercomby, K. J.; Rodriquez, H. M.; Barker, E. S.

    2007-01-01

    For 14 nights in March 2007, we used two telescopes at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile to study the nature of space debris at Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). In this project one telescope was dedicated to survey operations, while a second telescope was used for follow-up observations for orbits and colors. The goal was to obtain orbital and photometric information on every faint object found with the survey telescope. Thus we concentrate on objects fainter than R = 15th magnitude.

  18. Inspirations from biological optics for advanced photonic systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Luke P; Szema, Robert

    2005-11-18

    Observing systems in nature has inspired humans to create technological tools that allow us to better understand and imitate biology. Biomimetics, in particular, owes much of its current development to advances in materials science and creative optical system designs. New investigational tools, such as those for microscopic imaging and chemical analyses, have added to our understanding of biological optics. Biologically inspired optical science has become the emerging topic among researchers and scientists. This is in part due to the availability of polymers with customizable optical properties and the ability to rapidly fabricate complex designs using soft lithography and three-dimensional microscale processing techniques.

  19. Design and evaluation of an optical fine-pointing control system for telescopes utilizing a digital star sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Romanczyk, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    One of the most significant problems associated with the development of large orbiting astronomical telescopes is that of maintaining the very precise pointing accuracy required. A proposed solution to this problem utilizes dual-level pointing control. The primary control system maintains the telescope structure attitude stabilized within the field of view to the desired accuracy. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of optically stabilizing the star images to the desired accuracy a regulating system has been designed and evaluated. The control system utilizes a digital star sensor and an optical star image motion compensator, both of which have been developed for this application. These components have been analyzed mathematically, analytical models have been developed, and hardware has been built and tested.

  20. Optical Spectroscopic Observations of Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates. VI. Further Observations from TNG, WHT, OAN, SOAR, and Magellan Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez Crespo, N.; Massaro, F.; Milisavljevic, D.; Landoni, M.; Chavushyan, V.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Masetti, N.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Strader, J.; Chomiuk, L.; Katagiri, H.; Kagaya, M.; Cheung, C. C.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Ricci, F.; La Franca, F.; Smith, Howard A.; Tosti, G.

    2016-04-01

    Blazars, one of the most extreme classes of active galaxies, constitute so far the largest known population of γ-ray sources, and their number is continuously growing in the Fermi catalogs. However, in the latest release of the Fermi catalog there is still a large fraction of sources that are classified as blazar candidates of uncertain type (BCUs) for which optical spectroscopic observations are necessary to confirm their nature and their associations. In addition, about one-third of the γ-ray point sources listed in the Third Fermi-LAT Source Catalog (3FGL) are still unassociated and lacking an assigned lower-energy counterpart. Since 2012 we have been carrying out an optical spectroscopic campaign to observe blazar candidates to confirm their nature. In this paper, the sixth of the series, we present optical spectroscopic observations for 30 γ-ray blazar candidates from different observing programs we carried out with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, William Herschel Telescope, Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope, and Magellan Telescopes. We found that 21 out of 30 sources investigated are BL Lac objects, while the remaining targets are classified as flat-spectrum radio quasars showing the typical broad emission lines of normal quasi-stellar objects. We conclude that our selection of γ-ray blazar candidates based on their multifrequency properties continues to be a successful way to discover potential low-energy counterparts of the Fermi unidentified gamma-ray sources and to confirm the nature of BCUs.

  1. Advanced fiber optic seismic sensors (geophone) research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan

    The systematical research on the fiber optic seismic sensors based on optical Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology is presented in this thesis. Optical fiber sensors using fiber Bragg gratings have a number of advantages such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, lightweight, low power consumption. The FBG sensor is intrinsically sensitive to dynamic strain signals and the strain sensitivity can approach sub micro-strain. Furthermore, FBG sensors are inherently suited for multiplexing, which makes possible networked/arrayed deployment on a large scale. The basic principle of the FBG geophone is that it transforms the acceleration of ground motion into the strain signal of the FBG sensor through mechanical design, and after the optical demodulation generates the analog voltage output proportional to the strain changes. The customized eight-channel FBG seismic sensor prototype is described here which consists of FBG sensor/demodulation grating pairs attached on the spring-mass mechanical system. The sensor performance is evaluated systematically in the laboratory using the conventional accelerometer and geophone as the benchmark, Two major applications of FBG seismic sensor are demonstrated. One is in the battlefield remote monitoring system to detect the presence of personnel, wheeled vehicles, and tracked vehicles. The other application is in the seismic reflection survey of oilfield exploration to collect the seismic waves from the earth. The field tests were carried out in the air force base and the oilfield respectively. It is shown that the FBG geophone has higher frequency response bandwidth and sensitivity than conventional moving-coil electromagnetic geophone and the military Rembass-II S/A sensor. Our objective is to develop a distributed FBG seismic sensor network to recognize and locate the presence of seismic sources with high inherent detection capability and a low false alarm rate in an integrated system.

  2. The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) Technology Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, Carl; Balasubramanian, K.; Bolcar, M.; Clampin, M.; Feinberg, L.; Hartman, K.; Mosier, C.; Quijada, M.; Rauscher, B.; Redding, D.; Shaklan, S.; Stahl, P.; Thronson, H.

    2014-01-01

    We present the key technologies and capabilities that will enable a future, large-aperture ultravioletopticalinfrared (UVOIR) space observatory. These include starlight suppression systems, vibration isolation and control systems, lightweight mirror segments, detector systems, and mirror coatings. These capabilities will provide major advances over current and near-future observatories for sensitivity, angular resolution, and starlight suppression. The goals adopted in our study for the starlight suppression system are 10-10 contrast with an inner working angle of 40 milliarcsec and broad bandpass. We estimate that a vibration and isolation control system that achieves a total system vibration isolation of 140 dB for a vibration-isolated mass of 5000 kg is required to achieve the high wavefront error stability needed for exoplanet coronagraphy. Technology challenges for lightweight mirror segments include diffraction-limited optical quality and high wavefront error stability as well as low cost, low mass, and rapid fabrication. Key challenges for the detector systems include visible-blind, high quantum efficiency UV arrays, photon counting visible and NIR arrays for coronagraphic spectroscopy and starlight wavefront sensing and control, and detectors with deep full wells with low persistence and radiation tolerance to enable transit imaging and spectroscopy at all wavelengths. Finally, mirror coatings with high reflectivity ( 90), high uniformity ( 1) and low polarization ( 1) that are scalable to large diameter mirror substrates will be essential for ensuring that both high throughput UV observations and high contrast observations can be performed by the same observatory.

  3. Recent advances in optical measurement methods in physics and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gerardo, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Progress being made in the development of new scientific measurement tools based on optics and the scientific advances made possible by these new tools is impressive. In some instances, new optical-based measurement methods have made new scientific studies possible, while in other instances they have offered an improved method for performing these studies, e.g., better signal-to-noise ratio, increased data acquisition rate, remote analysis, reduced perturbation to the physical or chemical system being studied, etc. Many of these advances were made possible by advances in laser technology - spectral purity, spectral brightness, tunability, ultrashort pulse width, amplitude stability, etc. - while others were made possible by improved optical components - single-made fibers, modulators, detectors, wavelength multiplexes, etc. Attention is limited to just a few of many such accomplishments made recently at Sandia. 17 references, 16 figures.

  4. Performance of the primary mirror center-of-curvature optical metrology system during cryogenic testing of the JWST Pathfinder telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror (PM) is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal segments, each 1.5 m point-to-point. Each segment has a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system and a radius of-curvature (RoC) actuation system. The full telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. This testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The COCOA includes an interferometer, a reflective null, an interferometer-null calibration system, coarse and fine alignment systems, and two displacement measuring interferometer systems. A multiple-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) is used for alignment and phasing of the PM segments. The ADMA is used to measure, and set, the spacing between the PM and the focus of the COCOA null (i.e. the PM center-of-curvature) for determination of the ROC. The performance of these metrology systems was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC. This testing was performed using the JWST Pathfinder telescope, consisting mostly of engineering development and spare hardware. The Pathfinder PM consists of two spare segments. These tests provided the opportunity to assess how well the center-of-curvature optical metrology hardware, along with the software and procedures, performed using real JWST telescope hardware. This paper will describe the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance. The knowledge gained and the lessons learned during this testing will be of great benefit to the accurate and efficient cryogenic testing of the JWST flight telescope.

  5. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-curvature Optical Metrology System During Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror (PM) is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal segments, each 1.5 m point-to-point. Each segment has a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system and a radius-of-curvature (RoC) actuation system. The full telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. This testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The COCOA includes an interferometer, a reflective null, an interferometer-null calibration system, coarse & fine alignment systems, and two displacement measuring interferometer systems. A multiple-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) is used for alignment & phasing of the PM segments. The ADMA is used to measure, and set, the spacing between the PM and the focus of the COCOA null (i.e. the PM center-of-curvature) for determination of the ROC. The performance of these metrology systems was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC. This testing was performed using the JWST Pathfinder telescope, consisting mostly of engineering development & spare hardware. The Pathfinder PM consists of two spare segments. These tests provided the opportunity to assess how well the center-of-curvature optical metrology hardware, along with the software & procedures, performed using real JWST telescope hardware. This paper will describe the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance. The knowledge gained and the lessons learned during this testing will be of great benefit to the accurate & efficient cryogenic testing of the JWST flight telescope.

  6. Isoplanatic patch considerations for solar telescope multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Jacques M.

    2014-08-01

    I compare recent site surveys for the future large 4-meter solar and 30-meter nighttime telescopes at the nearby Haleakala and Mauna Kea sites respectively. They show that the outstanding early morning image quality at the solar site corresponds indeed to that observed at the late night one at the nighttime site. That confirms the notion that daytime solar site heating only shows itself later in the morning. The nighttime survey includes observations of the refractive index structure function Cn 2(h) to high altitudes from which the radius of the isoplanatic patch (Ɵ0) can be determined. At zenith (ζ = 00) it equals 2.5 arcsec at 500 nm wavelength. For the early morning (best) seeing at the solar site, which occurs at ζsun = 750 and the cos1.6(ζ) dependence of Θ0,that means an extremely small Ɵ0 (0.26 arcsec). Such small values compromise Adaptive Optics (AO) solar correlation wavefront sensing for which areas are needed equal to about 8"× 8" I suggest options for measuring Cn2(h), and therefore Ɵ0, during the day. These make use of the solar image as well as of daytime images of bright stars and planets. Some use the MASS technique on stars; some use the SHABAR technique using very large detector baselines on the Sun and shorter baselines on planets. It is suggested that these Cn2(h) measurements are made also during regular solar observations. In that way optimal solar observations can be planned using real-time Ɵ0 observations by image selection and optimization of the MCAO configuration.

  7. Analysis of Flows inside Quiescent Prominences as Captured by Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, M. S.; McKenzie, D. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Wilburn, M.

    2016-02-01

    Developing an understanding of how magnetic fields can become entangled in a prominence is important for predicting a possible eruption. This work investigates the kinetic energy and vorticity associated with plasma motion residing inside quiescent prominences (QPs). These plasma flow characteristics can be utilized to improve our understanding of how the prominence maintains a stable magnetic field configuration. Three different contrast-enhanced solar prominence observations from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope were used to construct velocity maps—in the plane of the sky—via a Fourier local correlation tracking program. The resulting velocities were then used to perform the first-ever analysis of the two-dimensional kinetic energy and enstrophy spectra of a prominence. Enstrophy is introduced here as a means of quantifying the vorticity that has been observed in many QPs. The kinetic energy power spectral density (PSD) produced indices ranging from -1.00 to -1.60. There was a consistent anisotropy in the kinetic energy spectrum of all three prominences examined. Examination of the intensity PSD reveals that a different scaling relationship exists between the observed prominence structure and velocity maps. All of the prominences exhibited an inertial range of at least 0.8≤slant k≤slant 2.0 {rads} {{Mm}}-1. Quasi-periodic oscillations were also detected in the centroid of the velocity distributions for one prominence. Additionally, a lower limit was placed on the kinetic energy density (ɛ ˜ 0.22-7.04 {{km}}2 {{{s}}}-2) and enstrophy density (ω ˜ 1.43-13.69 × \\quad {10}-16 {{{s}}}-2) associated with each prominence.

  8. Two Easily Made Astronomical Telescopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, M.; Jacobs, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The directions and diagrams for making a reflecting telescope and a refracting telescope are presented. These telescopes can be made by students out of plumbing parts and easily obtainable, inexpensive, optical components. (KR)

  9. Linear semiconductor optical amplifiers for amplification of advanced modulation formats.

    PubMed

    Bonk, R; Huber, G; Vallaitis, T; Koenig, S; Schmogrow, R; Hillerkuss, D; Brenot, R; Lelarge, F; Duan, G-H; Sygletos, S; Koos, C; Freude, W; Leuthold, J

    2012-04-23

    The capability of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) to amplify advanced optical modulation format signals is investigated. The input power dynamic range is studied and especially the impact of the SOA alpha factor is addressed. Our results show that the advantage of a lower alpha-factor SOA decreases for higher-order modulation formats. Experiments at 20 GBd BPSK, QPSK and 16QAM with two SOAs with different alpha factors are performed. Simulations for various modulation formats support the experimental findings.

  10. Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2006-01-03

    A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

  11. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  12. Advanced Sensors Boost Optical Communication, Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Brooklyn, New York-based Amplification Technologies Inc. (ATI), employed Phase I and II SBIR funding from NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory to forward the company's solid-state photomultiplier technology. Under the SBIR, ATI developed a small, energy-efficient, extremely high-gain sensor capable of detecting light down to single photons in the near infrared wavelength range. The company has commercialized this technology in the form of its NIRDAPD photomultiplier, ideal for use in free space optical communications, lidar and ladar, night vision goggles, and other light sensing applications.

  13. Recent advances in optically pumped semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilla, Juan; Shu, Qi-Ze; Zhou, Hailong; Weiss, Eli; Reed, Murray; Spinelli, Luis

    2007-02-01

    Optically pumped semiconductor lasers offer significant advantages with respect to all traditional diode-pumped solid state lasers (including fiber lasers) in regards to wavelength flexibility, broad pump tolerance, efficient spectral and spatial brightness conversion and high power scaling. In this talk we will describe our recent progress in the lab and applying this technology to commercial systems. Results include diversified wavelengths from 460 to 570nm, power scaling to >60W of CW 532nm, and the launch of a low cost 5W CW visible source for forensic applications.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope and Optical Data on SDSSJ0804+5103 (EZ Lyn) One Year after Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkody, Paula; Mukadam, Anjum S.; Sion, Edward M.; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Henden, Arne; Townsley, Dean

    2013-05-01

    We present an ultraviolet (UV) spectrum and light curve of the short orbital period cataclysmic variable EZ Lyn obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope 14 months after its dwarf nova outburst, along with ground-based optical photometry. The UV spectrum can be fit with a 13,100 K, log g = 8 white dwarf using 0.5 solar composition, while fits to the individual lines are consistent with solar abundance for Si and Al, but only 0.3 solar for C. The Discrete Fourier Transforms of the UV and optical light curves at 14 months following outburst show a prominent period at 256 s. This is the same period reported by Pavlenko in optical data obtained seven months and one year after outburst, indicating its long-term stability over several months, but this period is not evident in the pre-outburst data and is much shorter than the 12.6 minute period that was seen in observations obtained during an interval from 8 months to 2.5 yr after the 2006 outburst. In some respects, the long and short periods are similar to the behavior seen in GW Lib after its outburst but the detailed explanation for the appearance and disappearance of these periods and their relation to non-radial pulsation modes remain to be explored with theoretical models. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  15. Instrumentation of LOTIS: Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System; a fully automated wide field of view telescope system searching for simultaneous optical counterparts of gamma ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.S.; Ables, E.; Barthelmy, S.D.; Bionta, R.M.; Ott, L.L.; Parker, E.L.; Williams, G.G.

    1998-03-06

    LOTIS is a rapidly slewing wide-field-of-view telescope which was designed and constructed to search for simultaneous gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical counterparts. This experiment requires a rapidly slewing ({lt} 10 sec), wide-field-of-view ({gt} 15{degrees}), automatic and dedicated telescope. LOTIS utilizes commercial tele-photo lenses and custom 2048 x 2048 CCD cameras to view a 17.6 x 17.6{degrees} field of view. It can point to any part of the sky within 5 sec and is fully automated. It is connected via Internet socket to the GRB coordinate distribution network which analyzes telemetry from the satellite and delivers GRB coordinate information in real-time. LOTIS started routine operation in Oct. 1996. In the idle time between GRB triggers, LOTIS systematically surveys the entire available sky every night for new optical transients. This paper will describe the system design and performance.

  16. Novel Adaptive Optics concepts : wavefront sensing with sodium laser guide stars at Extemely Large Telescopes and simultaneous differential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellner, Stephan Albert

    2005-12-01

    Since more than 15 years, Adaptive Optics (AO) is a proven concept to reach diffraction limited imaging at modern astronomical telescopes. In the case of next generation telescopes (Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs)) with aperture diameters of up to 100m, sodium laser guide star based multi-conjugated-AO systems will be a basic requirement to exploit their full capability in terms of resolution and light concentration. A drawback of such an approach emerges in the finite distance and vertical extent of the sodium beacon in the mesosphere with respect to the telescope. This induces effects such as perspective elongation, where conventional wavefront sensing mechanisms will fail. Although several engineering concepts are under development to counteract these constraints at the cost of overall light efficiency and increased system complexity, this thesis proposes a novel kind of wavefront sensing technique to overcome the imposed limitations in a more natural way. The sensing technique is composed of two independently working sensors, a reflective rod and a mask with circular slits, each a representative of a novel wavefront sensor class, the so called z-invariant and Inverse Bessel Beam technique. Both are discussed in this thesis with a focus on the Inverse Bessel Beam technique. The latter is compared to alternative concepts such as temporal gating, with respect to the photon efficiency. Furthermore, the reflective rod was tested for its feasibility in laboratory conditions and in a more realistic environment at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) at La Palma. With this test run its sensing principle has been verified. A novel technique already intensively used at 8m class telescopes is Simultaneous Differential Imaging. The direct detection of giant extra-solar planets is and will be a major science driver for galactic astronomy in the coming years. Modern telescope facilities such as the VLT reach, by means of adaptive optics, potentially the capability in terms

  17. Integrated modeling of advanced optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Needels, Laura; Levine, B. Martin

    1993-02-01

    This poster session paper describes an integrated modeling and analysis capability being developed at JPL under funding provided by the JPL Director's Discretionary Fund and the JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program (CSI). The posters briefly summarize the program capabilities and illustrate them with an example problem. The computer programs developed under this effort will provide an unprecedented capability for integrated modeling and design of high performance optical spacecraft. The engineering disciplines supported include structural dynamics, controls, optics and thermodynamics. Such tools are needed in order to evaluate the end-to-end system performance of spacecraft such as OSI, POINTS, and SMMM. This paper illustrates the proof-of-concept tools that have been developed to establish the technology requirements and demonstrate the new features of integrated modeling and design. The current program also includes implementation of a prototype tool based upon the CAESY environment being developed under the NASA Guidance and Control Research and Technology Computational Controls Program. This prototype will be available late in FY-92. The development plan proposes a major software production effort to fabricate, deliver, support and maintain a national-class tool from FY-93 through FY-95.

  18. Recent advances in ALON optical ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Joseph M.; Hartnett, Thomas M.; Goldman, Lee M.; Twedt, Richard; Warner, Charles

    2005-05-01

    Aluminum Oxynitride (ALONTM Optical Ceramic) is a transparent ceramic material which combines transparency from the UV to the MWIR with excellent mechanical properties. ALON"s optical and mechanical properties are isotropic by virtue of its cubic crystalline structure. Consequently, ALON is transparent in its polycrystalline form and can be made by conventional powder processing techniques. This combination of properties and manufacturability make ALON suitable for a range of applications from IR windows, domes and lenses to transparent armor. The technology for producing transparent ALON was developed at Raytheon and has been transferred to Surmet Corporation where it is currently in production. Surmet is currently selling ALON into a number of military (e.g., windows and domes) and commercial (e.g., supermarket scanner windows) applications. The capability to manufacture large ALON windows for both sensor window and armor applications is in place. ALON windows up to 20x30 inches have been fabricated. In addition, the capability to shape and polish these large and curved windows is being developed and demonstrated at Surmet. Complex shapes, both hyper-hemispherical and conformal, are also under development and will be described.

  19. Advanced Optical Technologies for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is involved in the development of photonic devices and systems for space exploration missions. Photonic technologies of particular interest are those that can be utilized for in-space communication, remote sensing, guidance navigation and control, lunar descent and landing, and rendezvous and docking. NASA Langley has recently established a class-100 clean-room which serves as a Photonics Fabrication Facility for development of prototype optoelectronic devices for aerospace applications. In this paper we discuss our design, fabrication, and testing of novel active pixels, deformable mirrors, and liquid crystal spatial light modulators. Successful implementation of these intelligent optical devices and systems in space, requires careful consideration of temperature and space radiation effects in inorganic and electronic materials. Applications including high bandwidth inertial reference units, lightweight, high precision star trackers for guidance, navigation, and control, deformable mirrors, wavefront sensing, and beam steering technologies are discussed. In addition, experimental results are presented which characterize their performance in space exploration systems.

  20. Advanced NDE research in electromagnetic, thermal, and coherent optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, S. Ballou

    1992-01-01

    A new inspection technology called magneto-optic/eddy current imaging was investigated. The magneto-optic imager makes readily visible irregularities and inconsistencies in airframe components. Other research observed in electromagnetics included (1) disbond detection via resonant modal analysis; (2) AC magnetic field frequency dependence of magnetoacoustic emission; and (3) multi-view magneto-optic imaging. Research observed in the thermal group included (1) thermographic detection and characterization of corrosion in aircraft aluminum; (2) a multipurpose infrared imaging system for thermoelastic stress detection; (3) thermal diffusivity imaging of stress induced damage in composites; and (4) detection and measurement of ice formation on the space shuttle main fuel tank. Research observed in the optics group included advancements in optical nondestructive evaluation (NDE).

  1. Optical Modeling Activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). 3; Wavefront Aberrations due to Alignment and Figure Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This is part three of a series describing the ongoing optical modeling activities for James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients. The work here investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The optical design of the telescope is a three-mirror anastigmat, with an active fold mirror at the exit pupil for fine guiding. The primary mirror is over 6.5 meters in diameter, and is composed of 18 hexagonal segments that can individually positioned on hexapods, as well as compensated for radius of curvature. This effectively gives both alignment and figure control of the primary mirror. The secondary mirror can be moved in rigid body only, giving alignment control of the telescope. The tertiary mirror is fixed, however, as well as the location of the science instrumentation. Simulations are performed of various combinations of active alignment corrections of component figure errors, and of primary mirror figure corrections of alignment errors. Single field point and moderate field knowledge is assumed in the corrections. Aberrations over the field are reported for the varying cases, and examples presented.

  2. Structural innovations in the Columbus Project - an 11.3 meter optical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Warren B.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of the Steward Observatory's Columbus Project is the construction of an 11.3-m effective aperture telescope by the 500th aniversary of the discovery of America in 1992. The configuration of the telescope is projected to consist of two 8-m diameter F:1 primary mirrors with 14-m center separation; these two mirrors can be supported with a relatively lightweight and simple structure that will facilitate the achievement of high servo performance with modest technology and costs.

  3. Optical diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma using advanced optical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-02-01

    Clinical imaging techniques for diagnosing breast cancer mainly include X-ray mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which have respective drawbacks. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a potentially attractive optical technique to bridge the current gap in clinical utility. In this paper, MPM was used to image normal and ductal cancerous breast tissues, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Our results showed that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of normal breast tissue, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) lesions at the molecular level comparable to histopathology. These findings indicate that, with integration of MPM into currently accepted clinical imaging system, it has the potential to make a real-time histological diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma in vivo.

  4. The Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT), a High Sensitivity Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Stanley D; De Nolfo, Georgia; Hanu, Andrei R; Krizmanic, John F; Stecker, Floyd W.; Timokhin, Andrey; Venters, Tonia M.

    2014-08-01

    Since the launch of AGILE and FERMI, the scientific progress in high-energy (Eg > 200 MeV) gamma-ray science has been, and will continue to be dramatic. Both of these telescopes cover a broad energy range from ~20 MeV to >10 GeV. However, neither instrument is optimized for observations below ~200 MeV where many astrophysical objects exhibit unique, transitory behavior, such as spectral breaks, bursts, and flares. Hence, while significant progress from current observations is expected, a significant sensitivity gap will remain in the medium-energy regime (0.75 - 200 MeV) that has been explored only by COMPTEL and EGRET on CGRO. Tapping into this unexplored regime requires development of a telescope with significant improvement in sensitivity. Our mission concept, covering ~5 to ~200 MeV, is the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT). The AdEPT telescope will achieve angular resolution of ~0.6 deg at 70 MeV, similar to the angular resolution of Fermi/LAT at ~1 GeV that brought tremendous success in identifying new sources. AdEPT will also provide unprecedented polarization sensitivity, ~1% for a 1 Crab source. The enabling technology for AdEPT is the Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) a low-density, large volume, gas time-projection chamber with a 2-dimensional readout. The 3-DTI provides high-resolution three-dimensional electron tracking with minimal Coulomb scattering that is essential to achieve high angular resolution and polarization sensitivity. We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of the 3-DTI detector, describe the development of a 50x50x100 cm3 AdEPT prototype, and highlight a few of the key science questions that AdEPT will address.

  5. Advances in the archiving and distribution facilities at the Space Telescope Science Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, Robert J.; Postman, Marc; Pollizzi, Joseph; Richon, J.

    1998-07-01

    The Hubble Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute contains over 4.3 TB of data, primarily for the Hubble Space Telescope, but also from complementary space- based and ground-based facilities. We are in the process of upgrading and generalizing many of the HDA's component system, developing tools to provide more integrated access to the HDA holdings, and working with other major data providing organizations to implement global data location services for astronomy and other space science disciplines. This paper describes the key elements of our archiving and data distribution systems, including a planned transition to DVD media, data compression, data segregation, on-the-fly calibration, an engineering data warehouse, and distributed search and retrieval facilities.

  6. Advanced optical interference filters based on metal and dielectric layers.

    PubMed

    Begou, Thomas; Lemarchand, Fabien; Lumeau, Julien

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the design and the fabrication of an advanced optical interference filter based on metal and dielectric layers. This filter respects the specifications of the 2016 OIC manufacturing problem contest. We study and present all the challenges and solutions that allowed achieving a low deviation between the fabricated prototype and the target. PMID:27607695

  7. Spectroscopic classification of optical transients with the SEDM (Spectral Energy Distribution Machine) on Palomar 60-inch (P60) telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagorodnova, N.; Neill, D.; Walters, R.

    2016-07-01

    The Caltech Time Domain Astronomy group reports the classification of the optical transients SN 2016czr, SN 2016ejc and AT 2016eki. The candidates were discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS: http://119.78.210.3/ptss2/ ), the Gaia ESA survey (Rixon et al,2014, ATel #6593) and the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae ASAS-SN (see Shappee et al. 2014, ApJ, 788, 48 and http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~assassin/index.shtml ). The observations were performed on 2016-07-28 and 2016-07-29 with the Palomar 60-inch (P60) telescope and the Spectral Energy Distribution Machine (SEDM) (http://www.astro.caltech.edu/sedm/, range 350-950nm, spectral resolution R~100) on Palomar 60-inch (P60) telescope.

  8. Optical observations of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with the Nordic Optical Telescope. Comet activity before the solar conjunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaprudin, B.; Lehto, H. J.; Nilsson, K.; Pursimo, T.; Somero, A.; Snodgrass, C.; Schulz, R.

    2015-11-01

    Context. 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) is a short-period Jupiter-family comet that was chosen as a target for the Rosetta mission by the European Space Agency (ESA). Monitoring of 67P with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT; La Palma, Spain) intends to aid this mission by providing ground-based reference information about the overall activity of the target and its astrometric position before the rendezvous. One motivation for our observations was to monitor sudden major increases in activity because they might have affected the Rosetta mission planning. None were observed. Ground-based photometric observations register the global activity of the comet, while the Rosetta spacecraft mostly measures local events. These data combined can lead to new insights into the comet behavior. Aims: The aim of this work is to perform the photometric and the astrometric monitoring of comet 67P with the NOT and to compare the results with the latest predictions for its position and activity. A new method of fitting extended-source components to the target surface brightness distribution was developed and applied to the data to estimate the size and contribution of the coma to the total brightness of the target. Methods: Comet 67P was monitored by the NOT in service mode during the period between 12.5.2013 and 11.11.2014. The very first observations were performed in the V band alone, but in the latest observations, the R band was used as well to estimate the color and nature of activity of the target. We applied a new method for estimating the coma size by deconvolving the point spread function profile from the image, which used Markov chain Monte Carlo and Bayesian statistics. This method will also be used for coma size estimations in further observations after the solar conjunction of 67P. Results: Photometric magnitudes in two colors were monitored during the period of observations. At the end of April 2014, the beginning of activity was observed. In late September 2014, a

  9. KMTNET: A Network of 1.6 m Wide-Field Optical Telescopes Installed at Three Southern Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Lee; Lee, Chung-Uk; Park, Byeong-Gon; Kim, Dong-Jin; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Yongseok; Han, Cheongho; Chun, Moo-Young; Yuk, Insoo

    2016-02-01

    The Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) is a wide-field photometric system installed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI). Here, we present the overall technical specifications of the KMTNet observation system, test observation results, data transfer and image processing procedure, and finally, the KMTNet science programs. The system consists of three 1.6 m wide-field optical telescopes equipped with mosaic CCD cameras of 18k by 18k pixels. Each telescope provides a 2.0 by 2.0 square degree field of view. We have finished installing all three telescopes and cameras sequentially at the Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile, the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) in South Africa, and the Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) in Australia. This network of telescopes, which is spread over three different continents at a similar latitude of about -30 degrees, enables 24-hour continuous monitoring of targets observable in the Southern Hemisphere. The test observations showed good image quality that meets the seeing requirement of less than 1.0 arcsec in I-band. All of the observation data are transferred to the KMTNet data center at KASI via the international network communication and are processed with the KMTNet data pipeline. The primary scientific goal of the KMTNet is to discover numerous extrasolar planets toward the Galactic bulge by using the gravitational microlensing technique, especially earth-mass planets in the habitable zone. During the non-bulge season, the system is used for wide-field photometric survey science on supernovae, asteroids, and external galaxies.

  10. An advanced optical system for laser ablation propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstue, Grant; Fork, Richard; Reardon, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel space-based ablation driven propulsion engine concept utilizing transmitted energy in the form of a series of ultra-short optical pulses. Key differences are generating the pulses at the transmitting spacecraft and the safe delivery of that energy to the receiving spacecraft for propulsion. By expanding the beam diameter during transmission in space, the energy can propagate at relatively low intensity and then be refocused and redistributed to create an array of ablation sites at the receiver. The ablation array strategy allows greater control over flight dynamics and eases thermal management. Research efforts for this transmission and reception of ultra-short optical pulses include: (1) optical system design; (2) electrical system requirements; (3) thermal management; (4) structured energy transmission safety. Research has also been focused on developing an optical switch concept for the multiplexing of the ultra-short pulses. This optical switch strategy implements multiple reflectors polished into a rotating momentum wheel device to combine the pulses from different laser sources. The optical system design must minimize the thermal load on any one optical element. Initial specifications and modeling for the optical system are being produced using geometrical ray-tracing software to give a better understanding of the optical requirements. In regards to safety, we have advanced the retro-reflective beam locking strategy to include look-ahead capabilities for long propagation distances. Additional applications and missions utilizing multiplexed pulse transmission are also presented. Because the research is in early development, it provides an opportunity for new and valuable advances in the area of transmitted energy for propulsion as well as encourages joint international efforts. Researchers from different countries can cooperate in order to find constructive and safe uses of ordered pulse transmission for propulsion in future space

  11. Advanced optical sensing and processing technologies for the distributed control of large flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G. M.; Fraser, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to examine state-of-the-art optical sensing and processing technology applied to control the motion of flexible spacecraft. Proposed large flexible space systems, such an optical telescopes and antennas, will require control over vast surfaces. Most likely distributed control will be necessary involving many sensors to accurately measure the surface. A similarly large number of actuators must act upon the system. The used technical approach included reviewing proposed NASA missions to assess system needs and requirements. A candidate mission was chosen as a baseline study spacecraft for comparison of conventional and optical control components. Control system requirements of the baseline system were used for designing both a control system containing current off-the-shelf components and a system utilizing electro-optical devices for sensing and processing. State-of-the-art surveys of conventional sensor, actuator, and processor technologies were performed. A technology development plan is presented that presents a logical, effective way to develop and integrate advancing technologies.

  12. Active optics and the axisymmetric case: MINITRUST wide-field three-reflection telescopes with mirrors aspherized from tulip and vase forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulie, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2004-09-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires larger size telescopes. Compared to the catadioptric Schmidt, the optical properties of a three mirror telescope provides significant advantages. (1) The flat field design is anastigmatic at any wavelength, (2) the system is extremely compact -- four times shorter than a Schmidt -- and, (3) compared to a Schmidt with refractive corrector -- requiring the polishing of three optical surfaces --, the presently proposed Modified-Rumsey design uses all of eight available free parameters of a flat fielded anastigmatic three mirror telescope for mirrors generated by active optics methods. Compared to a Rumsey design, these parameters include the additional slope continuity condition at the primary-tertiary link for in-situ stressing and aspherization from a common sphere. Then, active optics allows the polishing of only two spherical surfaces: the combined primary-tertiary mirror and the secondary mirror. All mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. This compact system is of interest for space and ground-based astronomy and allows to built larger wide-field telescopes such as demonstrated by the design and construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° FOV, consisting of an in-situ stressed double vase form primary-tertiary and of a stress polished tulip form secondary. Optical tests of these telescopes, showing diffraction limited images, are presented.

  13. Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekers, Ron; Wilson, Thomas L.

    ``Radio Telescopes" starts with a brief historical introduction from Jansky's1931 discovery of radio emission from the Milky Way through the development ofradio telescope dishes and arrays to aperture synthesis imaging. It includessufficient basics of electromagnetic radiation to provide some understanding of thedesign and operation of radio telescopes. The criteria such as frequencyrange, sensitivity, survey speed, angular resolution, and field of view thatdetermine the design of radio telescopes are introduced. Because it is soeasy to manipulate the electromagnetic waves at radio frequencies, radiotelescopes have evolved into many different forms, sometimes with "wire"structures tuned to specific wavelengths, which look very different from anykind of classical telescope. To assist astronomers more familiar with otherwavelength domains, the appendix A.1. includes a comparison of radioand optical terminology. Some of the different types of radio telescopesincluding the filled aperture dishes, electronically steered phased arrays, andaperture synthesis radio telescopes are discussed, and there is a sectioncomparing the differences between dishes and arrays. Some of the morerecent developments including hierarchical beam forming, phased arrayfeeds, mosaicing, rotation measure synthesis, digital receivers, and longbaseline interferometers are included. The problem of increasing radiofrequency interference is discussed, and some possible mitigation strategies areoutlined.

  14. QUIESCENT PROMINENCE DYNAMICS OBSERVED WITH THE HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE. I. TURBULENT UPFLOW PLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Thomas E.; Slater, Gregory; Hurlburt, Neal; Shine, Richard; Tarbell, Theodore; Title, Alan; Okamoto, Takenori J.; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Katsukawa, Yukio; Magara, Tetsuya; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi

    2010-06-20

    Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) observations reveal two new dynamic modes in quiescent solar prominences: large-scale (20-50 Mm) 'arches' or 'bubbles' that 'inflate' from below into prominences, and smaller-scale (2-6 Mm) dark turbulent upflows. These novel dynamics are related in that they are always dark in visible-light spectral bands, they rise through the bright prominence emission with approximately constant speeds, and the small-scale upflows are sometimes observed to emanate from the top of the larger bubbles. Here we present detailed kinematic measurements of the small-scale turbulent upflows seen in several prominences in the SOT database. The dark upflows typically initiate vertically from 5 to 10 Mm wide dark cavities between the bottom of the prominence and the top of the chromospheric spicule layer. Small perturbations on the order of 1 Mm or less in size grow on the upper boundaries of cavities to generate plumes up to 4-6 Mm across at their largest widths. All plumes develop highly turbulent profiles, including occasional Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex 'roll-up' of the leading edge. The flows typically rise 10-15 Mm before decelerating to equilibrium. We measure the flowfield characteristics with a manual tracing method and with the Nonlinear Affine Velocity Estimator (NAVE) 'optical flow' code to derive velocity, acceleration, lifetime, and height data for several representative plumes. Maximum initial speeds are in the range of 20-30 km s{sup -1}, which is supersonic for a {approx}10,000 K plasma. The plumes decelerate in the final few Mm of their trajectories resulting in mean ascent speeds of 13-17 km s{sup -1}. Typical lifetimes range from 300 to 1000 s ({approx}5-15 minutes). The area growth rate of the plumes (observed as two-dimensional objects in the plane of the sky) is initially linear and ranges from 20,000 to 30,000 km{sup 2} s{sup -1} reaching maximum projected areas from 2 to 15 Mm{sup 2}. Maximum contrast of the dark flows relative to

  15. Advanced Optical Burst Switched Network Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejabati, Reza; Aracil, Javier; Castoldi, Piero; de Leenheer, Marc; Simeonidou, Dimitra; Valcarenghi, Luca; Zervas, Georgios; Wu, Jian

    In recent years, as the bandwidth and the speed of networks have increased significantly, a new generation of network-based applications using the concept of distributed computing and collaborative services is emerging (e.g., Grid computing applications). The use of the available fiber and DWDM infrastructure for these applications is a logical choice offering huge amounts of cheap bandwidth and ensuring global reach of computing resources [230]. Currently, there is a great deal of interest in deploying optical circuit (wavelength) switched network infrastructure for distributed computing applications that require long-lived wavelength paths and address the specific needs of a small number of well-known users. Typical users are particle physicists who, due to their international collaborations and experiments, generate enormous amounts of data (Petabytes per year). These users require a network infrastructures that can support processing and analysis of large datasets through globally distributed computing resources [230]. However, providing wavelength granularity bandwidth services is not an efficient and scalable solution for applications and services that address a wider base of user communities with different traffic profiles and connectivity requirements. Examples of such applications may be: scientific collaboration in smaller scale (e.g., bioinformatics, environmental research), distributed virtual laboratories (e.g., remote instrumentation), e-health, national security and defense, personalized learning environments and digital libraries, evolving broadband user services (i.e., high resolution home video editing, real-time rendering, high definition interactive TV). As a specific example, in e-health services and in particular mammography applications due to the size and quantity of images produced by remote mammography, stringent network requirements are necessary. Initial calculations have shown that for 100 patients to be screened remotely, the network

  16. Advanced magneto-optical materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Shaoying

    The magneto-optical materials with both high Faraday rotation and high transmittance capabilities are greatly desired in high speed switches, isolators, and visible imaging systems. In this thesis work, new magneto-optical materials that possess both high Faraday effect and high transmittance in the visible range of the spectrum were studied and synthesized. New Bismuth iron gallium garnet thin-films (Bi3Fe4Ga 1O12, BIGG) have been successfully deposited on gadolinium gallium garnet substrates with a pulsed laser deposition technique in our lab. X-ray diffraction analyses have proven that the BIGG films are of good epitaxial quality with a lattice constant close to 12.61+/-0.01Á. The bandwidth of BIGG's transmittance spectrum has been extended and its left edge has been shifted about 50nm towards the shorter wavelengths relative to those of Bi3Fe5O12 (BIG) films. The BIGG film is more transparent than a BIG film although BIGG's Faraday rotation angle is slightly less than that of a BIG film. The figure of merit of the BIGG garnet film has reached 16.5°, which is about 1.8 times that of a typical BIG film. Currently, the switches using BIGG films were tested and a 2.4 ns response time had been reached with a phi1 mm circular aperture at the wavelength of 532 nm. Iron Borate (FeBO3) is another material that is far superior in terms of the transmittance in the visible spectrum at room temperature to most garnet materials. The FeBO3 is one of the orthoferrites with a large natural birefringence for the light propagated along the magnetization direction. The effect of birefringence on Faraday rotation reduced the maximum obtainable rotation. In order to eliminate the birefringence and further improve the transmittance, a high energy ball-milling technique was used to synthesize FeBO3 nanoparticles. Our numerical simulation shows the nanoparticles could eliminate the birefringence, and concurrently keep the intrinsic Faraday rotation. After milling and centrifuging

  17. Development of a prototype nickel optic for the Constellation-X hard x-ray telescope: IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaine, S.; Basso, S.; Bruni, R. J.; Burkert, W.; Citterio, O.; Conti, G.; Engelhaupt, D.; Freyberg, M. J.; Ghigo, M.; Gorenstein, P.; Gubarev, M.; Hartner, G.; Mazzoleni, F.; O'Dell, S.; Pareschi, G.; Ramsey, B. D.; Speegle, C.; Spiga, D.

    2006-06-01

    The Constellation-X mission planned for launch in 2015-2020 timeframe, will feature an array of Hard X-ray telescopes (HXT) with a total collecting area greater than 1500 cm2 at 40 keV. Two technologies are being investigated for the optics of these telescopes, one of which is multilayer-coated Electroformed-Nickel-Replicated (ENR) shells. The attraction of the ENR process is that the resulting full-shell optics are inherently stable and offer the prospect of better angular resolution which results in lower background and higher instrument sensitivity. We are building a prototype HXT mirror module using an ENR process to fabricate the individual shells. This prototype consists of 5 shells with diameters ranging from 15 cm to 28 cm with a length of 42.6 cm. The innermost of these will be coated with iridium, while the remainder will be coated with graded d-spaced W/Si multilayers. The assembly structure has been completed and last year we reported on full beam illumination results from the first test shell mounted in this structure. We have now fabricated and coated two (15 cm and 23 cm diameter) 100 micron thick shells which have been aligned and mounted. This paper presents the results of full beam illumination X-ray tests, taken at MPE-Panter. The HEW of the individual shells will be discussed, in addition to results from the full two shell optic test.

  18. Giant Magellan Telescope: overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Matt; McCarthy, Patrick; Raybould, Keith; Bouchez, Antonin; Farahani, Arash; Filgueira, Jose; Jacoby, George; Shectman, Steve; Sheehan, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is a 25-meter optical/infrared extremely large telescope that is being built by an international consortium of universities and research institutions. It will be located at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The GMT primary mirror consists of seven 8.4-m borosilicate honeycomb mirror segments made at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab (SOML). Six identical off-axis segments and one on-axis segment are arranged on a single nearly-paraboloidal parent surface having an overall focal ratio of f/0.7. The fabrication, testing and verification procedures required to produce the closely-matched off-axis mirror segments were developed during the production of the first mirror. Production of the second and third off-axis segments is underway. GMT incorporates a seven-segment Gregorian adaptive secondary to implement three modes of adaptive-optics operation: natural-guide star AO, laser-tomography AO, and ground-layer AO. A wide-field corrector/ADC is available for use in seeing-limited mode over a 20-arcmin diameter field of view. Up to seven instruments can be mounted simultaneously on the telescope in a large Gregorian Instrument Rotator. Conceptual design studies were completed for six AO and seeing-limited instruments, plus a multi-object fiber feed, and a roadmap for phased deployment of the GMT instrument suite is being developed. The partner institutions have made firm commitments for approximately 45% of the funds required to build the telescope. Project Office efforts are currently focused on advancing the telescope and enclosure design in preparation for subsystem- and system-level preliminary design reviews which are scheduled to be completed in the first half of 2013.

  19. Advanced materials and techniques for fibre-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Philip J.

    2014-06-01

    Fibre-optic monitoring systems came of age in about 1999 upon the emergence of the world's first significant commercialising company - a spin-out from the UK's collaborative MAST project. By using embedded fibre-optic technology, the MAST project successfully measured transient strain within high-performance composite yacht masts. Since then, applications have extended from smart composites into civil engineering, energy, military, aerospace, medicine and other sectors. Fibre-optic sensors come in various forms, and may be subject to embedment, retrofitting, and remote interrogation. The unique challenges presented by each implementation require careful scrutiny before widespread adoption can take place. Accordingly, various aspects of design and reliability are discussed spanning a range of representative technologies that include resonant microsilicon structures, MEMS, Bragg gratings, advanced forms of spectroscopy, and modern trends in nanotechnology. Keywords: Fibre-optic sensors, fibre Bragg gratings, MEMS, MOEMS, nanotechnology, plasmon.

  20. Engineering novel infrared glass ceramics for advanced optical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, K.; Buff, A.; Smith, C.; Sisken, L.; Musgraves, J. David; Wachtel, P.; Mayer, T.; Swisher, A.; Pogrebnyakov, A.; Kang, M.; Pantano, C.; Werner, D.; Kirk, A.; Aiken, S.; Rivero-Baleine, C.

    2016-05-01

    Advanced photonic devices require novel optical materials that serve specified optical function but also possess attributes which can be tailored to accommodate specific optical design, manufacturing or component/device integration constraints. Multi-component chalcogenide glass (ChG) materials have been developed which exhibit broad spectral transparency with a range of physical properties that can be tuned to vary with composition, material microstructure and form. Specific tradeoffs that highlight the impact of material morphology and optical properties including transmission, loss and refractive index, are presented. This paper reports property evolution in a representative 20 GeSe2-60 As2Se3-20 PbSe glass material including a demonstration of a 1D GRIN profile through the use of controlled crystallization.