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Sample records for advanced oropharyngeal squamous

  1. Management of locally advanced HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: where are we?

    PubMed

    Samuels, Stuart E; Eisbruch, Avraham; Beitler, Jonathan J; Corry, June; Bradford, Carol R; Saba, Nabil F; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Smee, Robert; Strojan, Primož; Suárez, Carlos; Mendenhall, William M; Takes, Robert P; Rodrigo, Juan P; Haigentz, Missak; Rapidis, Alexander D; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-10-01

    HPV-related (HPV+) oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) has a better prognosis compared to HPV unrelated (HPV-) OPC. This review summarizes and discusses several of the controversies regarding the management of HPV+ OPC, including the mechanism of its treatment sensitivity, modern surgical techniques, chemotherapy regimens, and treatment de-intensification protocols. We also discuss and reconsider potential adverse prognostic factors such as tumor EGFR expression, tumor hypoxia, and patient smoking history, as well as the significance of retropharyngeal adenopathy. Finally, we discuss elective nodal treatment of uninvolved lymph node stations. While this review does not exhaust all controversies related to the management of HPV+ OPC, it aims to highlight some of the most clinically relevant ones.

  2. Reduced-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Advanced Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  3. Subsite, T Class, and N Class Cannot be Used to Exclude the Retropharyngeal Nodes From Treatment De-Intensification in Advanced Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Matthew E.; Chinn, Steven B.; Bellile, Emily; Gallagher, K. Kelly; Kang, Stephen Y.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Prince, Mark E.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Carey, Thomas E.; Worden, Francis P.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Chepeha, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Understanding the drainage patterns to the retropharyngeal nodes is an important consideration in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) because treatment of these nodes is related to increased morbidity. Prediction of these drainage patterns could not only help minimize treatment morbidity, but could also prevent failures in at-risk patients, as de-escalation trials are underway for this disease. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of pathologic retropharyngeal adenopathy (RPA) in OPSCC relative to involvement of the oropharyngeal subsite, number of neck nodes, T classification and N classification. Design Retrospective review from 2003–2010 Setting Academic Referral Center Participants 205 previously untreated, advanced stage (III, IV), pathologically confirmed patients with OPSCC Exposure: Concurrent chemoradiation Main Outcome Measures Radiologic evidence of pathologic RPA was tabulated and related to involvement of the oropharyngeal subsite, number of neck nodes, T classification and N classification. Results Pathologic RPA was identified in 18% of patients. There were pathologic retropharyngeal lymph nodes in 12/89 (13%) base of tongue cancers, 24/109 (22%) tonsil cancers, and 1/7 (14%) other oropharyngeal subsite cancers. Increasing prevalence of RPA was positively correlated with closer proximity to the posterior tonsillar pillar. A multivariate predictive regression model using the oropharyngeal subsite, involvement of the posterior tonsillar pillar, number of metastatic nodes, T classification, and N classification, showed that the number of metastatic nodes was statistically significant with an odds ratio of 1.436 (p=0.0001, 95% confidence interval: 1.203 – 1.714). Conclusions and Relevance The prevalence of pathologic RPA in this cohort was 18% and patients with multiple nodes had the highest risk for pathologic RPA, followed by involvement of the posterior tonsillar pillar. However, this data suggests that there is no clear

  4. Review of paraneoplastic syndromes associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Deepu George; Rooban, T; Janani, V; Joshua, E; Rao, UK; Ranganathan, K

    2010-01-01

    Malignancies are usually preceded by the presence of various paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS), which could be the indirect and/or remote effects of the metabolites produced by neoplastic cells. PNS manifested by oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas, which is the most common head and neck malignancy, are highlighted in this review. Knowledge of the clinical spectrum of these syndromes will equip the oral physician for early diagnosis and management of these hidden malignancies, especially of the pharyngeal region. PMID:21731261

  5. Early diagnosis of asymptomatic oral and oropharyngeal squamous cancers.

    PubMed

    Mashberg, A; Samit, A

    1995-01-01

    An examination of the oral cavity and oropharynx in asymptomatic patients at high risk requires an orderly visual inspection of the entire oral and oropharyngeal mucosa with particular attention to the tongue, floor of mouth, soft palate, uvula, tonsillar pillars, and the lingual aspects of the retromolar trigones. Completion and clear documentation of the entire examination should be recorded. Detected lesions that do not resolve in a reasonable length of time--two to three weeks--require intense and assiduous investigation. The following specifics should be considered. 1. Alcohol drinkers and cigarette smokers, especially those 40 years of age and older, are at very high risk for the development of upper aerodigestive tract and lung squamous carcinomas. 2. The floor of the mouth, the ventrolateral tongue, and the soft palate complex are the high-risk sites within the oral cavity and oropharynx. 3. Persistent mucosal erythroplasia rather than leukoplakia is the earliest visual sign of oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. These lesions should not be regarded merely as precancerous changes. The evidence indicates that these lesions in high-risk sites should be considered to be invasive carcinoma or carcinoma in situ unless proven otherwise by biopsy. 4. Toluidine blue staining is a useful diagnostic adjunct, particularly as a method of ruling out false-negative clinical impressions. It may also be used as a rinse in high-risk patients to encompass the entire oral mucosa after a negative clinical examination and as a guide to improve biopsy yields. 5. If oral or oropharyngeal cancer is identified, evaluations of the larynx, hypopharynx, esophagus, and lungs should be performed to rule out multiple primary cancers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7583906

  6. Late Consequential Surgical Bed Soft Tissue Necrosis in Advanced Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated With Transoral Robotic Surgery and Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, J. Nicholas; Lin, Alexander; Gamerman, Victoria; Mitra, Nandita; Grover, Surbhi; McMenamin, Erin M.; Weinstein, Gregory S.; O'Malley, Bert W.; Cohen, Roger B.; Orisamolu, Abimbola; Ahn, Peter H.; Quon, Harry

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: A subset of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP-SCC) managed with transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) developed soft tissue necrosis (STN) in the surgical bed months after completion of PORT. We investigated the frequency and risk factors. Materials and Methods: This retrospective analysis included 170 consecutive OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT between 2006 and 2012, with >6 months' of follow-up. STN was defined as ulceration of the surgical bed >6 weeks after completion of PORT, requiring opioids, biopsy, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Results: A total of 47 of 170 patients (28%) had a diagnosis of STN. Tonsillar patients were more susceptible than base-of-tongue (BOT) patients, 39% (41 of 104) versus 9% (6 of 66), respectively. For patients with STN, median tumor size was 3.0 cm (range 1.0-5.6 cm), and depth of resection was 2.2 cm (range 1.0-5.1 cm). Median radiation dose and dose of fraction to the surgical bed were 6600 cGy and 220 cGy, respectively. Thirty-one patients (66%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Median time to STN was 2.5 months after PORT. All patients had resolution of STN after a median of 3.7 months. Multivariate analysis identified tonsillar primary (odds ratio [OR] 4.73, P=.01), depth of resection (OR 3.12, P=.001), total radiation dose to the resection bed (OR 1.51 per Gy, P<.01), and grade 3 acute mucositis (OR 3.47, P=.02) as risk factors for STN. Beginning May 2011, after implementing aggressive avoidance of delivering >2 Gy/day to the resection bed mucosa, only 8% (2 of 26 patients) experienced STN (all grade 2). Conclusions: A subset of OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT are at risk for developing late consequential surgical bed STN. Risk factors include tonsillar location, depth of resection, radiation dose to the surgical bed, and severe mucositis. STN risk is significantly decreased with carefully avoiding a radiation dosage of >2 Gy/day to the

  7. Radiation Therapy and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-20

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  8. SU-E-T-352: Why Is the Survival Rate Low in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z; Feng, Y; Rasmussen, K; Rice, J; Stephenson, S; Ferreira, Maria C; Liu, T; Yuh, K; Wang, R; Grecula, J; Lo, S; Mayr, N; Yuh, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumors are composed of a large number of clonogens that have the capability of indefinite reproduction. Even when there is complete clinical or radiographic regression of the gross tumor mass after treatment, tumor recurrence can occur if the clonogens are not completely eradicated by radiotherapy. This study was to investigate the colonogen number and its association with the tumor control probability (TCP) in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCCA). Methods: A literature search was conducted to collect clinical information of patients with OSCCA, including the prescription dose, tumor volume and survival rate. The linear-quadratic (LQ) model was incorporated into TCP model for clinical data analysis. The total dose ranged from 60 to 70 Gy and tumor volume ranged from 10 to 50 cc. The TCP was calculated for each group according to tumor size and dose. The least χ{sup 2} method was used to fit the TCP calculation to clinical data while other LQ model parameters (α, β) were adopted from the literature, due to the limited patient data. Results: A total of 190 patients with T2–T4 OSCCA were included. The association with HPV was not available for all the patients. The 3-year survival rate was about 82% for T2 squamous cell carcinoma and 40% for advanced tumors. Fitting the TCP model to the survival data, the average clonogen number was 1.56×10{sup 12}. For the prescription dose of 70 Gy, the calculated TCP ranged from 40% to 90% when the tumor volume varied from 10 to 50 cc. Conclusion: Our data suggests variation between the clonogen number and TCP in OSCCA. Tumors with larger colonogen number tend to have lower TCP and therefore dose escalation above 70 Gy may be indicated in order to improve the TCP and survival rate. Our result will require future confirmation with a large number of patients.

  9. Parenteral Nutrition for Patients Treated for Locally Advanced Inoperable Tumors of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx Stage III; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx Stage IV; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage III; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage IV; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage III; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage IV; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Stage III; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Stage IV; Locally Advanced Malignant Neoplasm

  10. Health-Related Quality-of-Life Outcomes Following IMRT Versus Conventional Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Min Karnell, Lucy H.; Funk, Gerry F.; Lu Heming; Dornfeld, Ken; Buatti, John M.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To compare health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were extracted from the database of an ongoing longitudinal Outcome Assessment Project. Eligible criteria included (1) treated with definitive radiation, and (2) provided 12-month posttreatment HRQOL data. Excluded were 7 patients who received IMRT before October 1, 2002, during this institution's developmental phase of the IMRT technique. The HRQOL outcomes of patients treated with IMRT were compared with those of patients who received CRT. Results: Twenty-six patients treated using IMRT and 27 patients treated using CRT were included. Patients in the IMRT group were older and had more advanced-stage diseases and more patients received concurrent chemotherapy. However, the IMRT group had higher mean Head and Neck Cancer Inventory scores (which represent better outcomes) for each of the four head-and-neck cancer-specific domains, including eating, speech, aesthetics, and social disruption, at 12 months after treatment. A significantly greater percentage of patients in the CRT group had restricted diets compared with those in the IMRT group (48.0% vs. 16.0%, p = 0.032). At 3 months after treatment, both groups had significant decreases from pretreatment eating scores. However, the IMRT group had a significant improvement during the first year, but the CRT group had only small improvement. Conclusions: Proper delivery of IMRT can improve HRQOL for patients with oropharyngeal cancer compared with CRT.

  11. Effect of gabapentin on swallowing during and after chemoradiation for oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Starmer, Heather M; Yang, WuYang; Raval, Raju; Gourin, Christine G; Richardson, Marian; Kumar, Rachit; Jones, Bronwyn; McNutt, Todd; Cheng, Zhi; Cheng, Sierra; Quon, Harry

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of gabapentin (neurontin) on swallowing and feeding tube use during chemoradiation (CRT) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), and physiologic swallowing outcomes following completion of treatment. A total of 23 patients treated for OPSCC with concurrent CRT and prophylactically treated for pain using gabapentin were assessed. Historical controls were matched for T stage and primary site of disease. Timing of PEG use and removal were recorded. Video fluoroscopic swallowing studies were completed post-treatment to assess physiologic outcomes as well as penetration-aspiration scores (PAS). Functional oral intake scale (FOIS) scores were determined at the time of swallowing evaluation to assess diet level. Patients treated with gabapentin began using their PEG tubes later (3.7 vs. 2.29 weeks; P = 0.013) and had their PEG tubes removed earlier (7.29 vs. 32.56 weeks; P = 0.039) than the historical controls. A number of physiologic parameters were found to be less impacted in the gabapentin group, including oral bolus control (P = 0.01), epiglottic tilt (P = 0.0007), laryngeal elevation (P = 0.0017), and pharyngeal constriction (P = 0.002). PAS scores were significantly lower in the group treated with gabapentin (1.89 vs. 4; P = 0.0052). Patients receiving gabapentin had more advanced diet levels at the time of the initial swallowing study as evidenced by their FOIS scores (5.4 vs. 3.21; P = 0.0003). We conclude that patients using gabapentin for pain management during CRT appears to do well maintaining swallow function during treatment and have favorable post-treatment physiologic swallowing outcomes. Prospective evaluation is warranted.

  12. Human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: what the clinician should know.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M; Sambur, Ian M; de Almeida, John R; Posner, Marshall; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Rodrigo, Juan P; Strojan, Primož; Takes, Robert P; Ferlito, Alfio

    2013-02-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is rising in contrast to the decreasing incidence of carcinomas arising in other subsites of the head and neck. The human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has played an increasing role in these epidemiological changes and as the etiology for a significant fraction of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, OPSCC in particular. Most importantly, many retrospective studies have shown that the prognosis differs significantly between patients with HPV-associated tumors and non-HPV associated tumors. Thus, questions arise on the choices of treatment for patients based on HPV status and the consequences of therapy. Given the recognized relevance of HPV status in OPSCC, many new questions concerning the biology, treatment, and prevention of HPV infection arise. This review is intended to highlight some of the major issues and frequently asked questions relevant for the clinician dealing with patients with OPSCC. PMID:22752642

  13. Phase I trial of split-dose induction docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) chemotherapy followed by curative surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (TISOC-1)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Induction chemotherapy (ICT) with docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF) followed by radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for unresectable locally advanced head and neck cancer. This phase I study was designed to investigate the safety and tolerability of a split-dose TPF ICT regimen prior to surgery for locally advanced resectable oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods Patients received TPF split on two dosages on day 1 and 8 per cycle for one or three 3-week cycles prior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Docetaxel was escalated in two dose levels, 40 mg/m2 (DL 0) and 30 mg/m2 (DL −1), plus 40 mg/m2 cisplatin and 2000 mg/m2 fluorouracil per week using a 3 +3 dose escalation algorithm. Results Eighteen patients were enrolled and were eligible for toxicity and response. A maximum tolerated dose of 30 mg/m2 docetaxel per week was reached. The most common grade 3+ adverse event was neutropenia during ICT in 10 patients. Surgery reached R0 resection in all cases. Nine patients (50%) showed complete pathologic regression. Conclusions A split-dose regime of TPF prior to surgery is feasible, tolerated and merits additional investigation in a phase II study with a dose of 30 mg/m docetaxel per week. Trial registration number NCT01108042 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier) PMID:23083061

  14. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in the United States across time.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andrew P; Saha, Sandeep; Yu, Menggang; Kimple, Randall J; Lambert, Paul F

    2014-04-21

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are involved in approximately 5% of all human cancer. Although initially recognized for causing nearly all cases of cervical carcinoma, much data has now emerged implicating HPVs as a causal factor in other anogenital cancers as well as a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), most commonly oropharyngeal cancers. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) have improved survival compared to patients with HPV- cancers. Furthermore, epidemiological evidence shows the incidence of OPSCC has been steadily rising over time in the United States. It has been proposed that an increase in HPV-related OPSCCs is the driving force behind the increasing rate of OPSCC. Although some studies have revealed an increase in HPV+ head and neck malignancies over time in specific regions of the United States, there has not been a comprehensive study validating this trend across the entire country. Therefore, we undertook this meta-analysis to assess all literature through August 2013 that reported on the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC for patient populations within the United States. The results show an increase in the prevalence of HPV+ OPSCC from 20.9% in the pre-1990 time period to 51.4% in 1990-1999 and finally to 65.4% for 2000-present. In this manner, our study provides further evidence to support the hypothesis that HPV-associated OPSCCs are driving the increasing incidence of OPSCC over time in the United States.

  15. Prediction of concurrent chemoradiotherapy outcome in advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    HASEGAWA, MASAHIRO; MAEDA, HIROYUKI; DENG, ZEYI; KIYUNA, ASANORI; GANAHA, AKIRA; YAMASHITA, YUKASHI; MATAYOSHI, SEN; AGENA, SHINYA; TOITA, TAKAFUMI; UEHARA, TAKAYUKI; SUZUKI, MIKIO

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as a predictor of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) response and indicator of planned neck dissection (PND) for patients with advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC; stage III/IV). Overall, 39 OPSCC patients (32 men, 7 women; median age 61 years, range 39–79 years) were enrolled. The primary lesion and whole neck were irradiated up to 50.4 Gy, and subsequently the primary site and metastatic lymph nodes were boosted with a further 16.2 Gy. Although several chemotherapy regimens were employed, 82.1% of OPSCC patients received the combination of nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil. HPV-related OPSCC (16 cases) was defined as both HPV DNA-positive status by polymerase chain reaction and p16INK4a overexpression by immunohistochemistry. Patients with N2 and N3 disease received PND 2–3 months after CCRT completion. Compared to non-responders, CCRT responders showed significantly lower nodal stage (N0 to N2b) and HPV-positive status in univariate analysis. Patients with HPV-related OPSCC had longer time to treatment failure (TTF) than those with HPV-unrelated OPSCC (p=0.040). Three-year TTF was 81.3 and 47.8% in the HPV-related and HPV-unrelated groups, respectively. There were also significant differences in disease-free survival (DFS) between the two OPSCC patient groups (p=0.042). Three-year DFS was 93.8 and 66.7% in patients with HPV-related and HPV-unrelated OPSCC, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis showed a lower risk of TTF event occurrence in HPV-related OPSCC (p=0.041) than in HPV-unrelated OPSCC. Thus, HPV testing in addition to nodal stage was useful for predicting CCRT response, especially in advanced OPSCC. Because patients who received PND showed moderate locoregional control, PND is an effective surgical procedure for controlling neck lesions in patients with advanced HPV-unrelated disease. PMID:24969413

  16. Hsp90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Receiving Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  17. VX-970, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced HPV-Negative Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-28

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  18. Clinical relevance of copy number profiling in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    van Kempen, Pauline M W; Noorlag, Rob; Braunius, Weibel W; Moelans, Cathy B; Rifi, Widad; Savola, Suvi; Koole, Ronald; Grolman, Wilko; van Es, Robert J J; Willems, Stefan M

    2015-10-01

    Current conventional treatment modalities in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are nonselective and have shown to cause serious side effects. Unraveling the molecular profiles of head and neck cancer may enable promising clinical applications that pave the road for personalized cancer treatment. We examined copy number status in 36 common oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in a cohort of 191 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) and 164 oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) using multiplex ligation probe amplification. Copy number status was correlated with human papillomavirus (HPV) status in OPSCC, with occult lymph node status in OSCC and with patient survival. The 11q13 region showed gain or amplifications in 59% of HPV-negative OPSCC, whereas this amplification was almost absent in HPV-positive OPSCC. Additionally, in clinically lymph node-negative OSCC (Stage I-II), gain of the 11q13 region was significantly correlated with occult lymph node metastases with a negative predictive value of 81%. Multivariate survival analysis revealed a significantly decreased disease-free survival in both HPV-negative and HPV-positive OPSCC with a gain of Wnt-induced secreted protein-1. Gain of CCND1 showed to be an independent predictor for worse survival in OSCC. These results show that copy number aberrations, mainly of the 11q13 region, may be important predictors and prognosticators which allow for stratifying patients for personalized treatment of HNSCC. PMID:26194878

  19. Clinicopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in Chilean population

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César; González-Arriagada, Wilfredo A; Loyola-Brambilla, Marco; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Coletta, Ricardo Della; Venegas, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    In oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC and OPSCC) exist an association between clinical and histopathological parameters with cell proliferation, basal lamina, connective tissue degradation and surrounding stroma markers. We evaluated these associations in Chilean patients. A convenience sample of 37 cases of OCSCC (n=16) and OPSCC (n=21) was analyzed clinically (TNM, clinical stage) and histologically (WHO grade of differentiation, pattern of tumor invasion). We assessed the expression of p53, Ki67, HOXA1, HOXB7, type IV collagen (ColIV) and carcinoma-associated fibroblast (α-SMA-positive cells). Additionally we conducted a univariate/bivariate analysis to assess the relationship of these variables with survival rates. Males were mostly affected (56.2% OCSCC, 76.2% OPSCC). Patients were mainly diagnosed at III/IV clinical stages (68.8% OCSCC, 90.5% OPSCC) with a predominantly infiltrative pattern invasion (62.9% OCSCC, 57.1% OPSCC). Significant association between regional lymph nodes (N) and clinical stage with OCSCC-HOXB7 expression (Chi-Square test P < 0.05) was observed. In OPSCC a statistically significant association exists between p53, Ki67 with gender (Chi-Square test P < 0.05). In OCSCC and OPSCC was statistically significant association between ki67 with HOXA1, HOXB7, and between these last two antigens (Pearson’s Correlation test P < 0.05). Furthermore OPSCC-p53 showed significant correlation when it was compared with α-SMA (Kendall’s Tau-c test P < 0.05). Only OCSCC-pattern invasion and OPSCC-primary tumor (T) pattern resulted associated with survival at the end of the follow up period (Chi-Square Likelihood Ratio, P < 0.05). Clinical, histological and immunohistochemical features are similar to seen in other countries. Cancer proliferation markers were associated strongly from each other. Our sample highlights prognostic value of T and pattern of invasion, but the conclusions may be limited and should be considered with caution

  20. Metastasis occurring eleven years after diagnosis of human papilloma virus-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Jessica; Wildes, Tanya; El-Mofty, Samir; Adkins, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is associated with a favourable prognosis, although approximately 20–25% of patients ultimately develop recurrent cancer. Most disease recurrence events appear within 3 years; however, long-term follow-up of reported studies are limited, and the risk of late recurrence is unknown. We present a case report of a patient who developed distant metastases of HPV-related SCC 11 years after initial diagnosis and treatment of HPV-related OPSCC. Late disease recurrence may occur after initial diagnosis of HPV-related OPSCC. This observation has implications on the appropriate duration of follow-up and surveillance of these patients. PMID:25435908

  1. Transoral robotic surgery and a paradigm shift in the management of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Quon, Harry; O'Malley, Bert W; Weinstein, Gregory S

    2010-08-01

    Efforts to improve upon oncologic results for resectable oropharyngeal carcinoma over the past 40 years have yielded many treatment options. However, the two fundamental approaches, surgical and nonsurgical, have not been compared in a randomized trial. Both approaches can be effective and both can cause treatment-related swallowing complications. Early experience combining technological advancements with conformal radiotherapy and transoral robotic surgery suggests that the risk of swallowing complications may be reduced and that treatment outcomes may be improved through pathologic stratification and risk-adapted adjuvant therapy. This may also be a valid strategy upon which treatment de-intensification may be studied for human-papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma due to its favorable prognosis. PMID:27628771

  2. Radiosensitization of Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoprotein E6*I

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Ervinna; Delic, Naomi C.; Hong, Angela; Zhang Mei; Rose, Barbara R.; Lyons, J. Guy

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) whose disease is associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection have a significantly better outcome than those with HPV-negative disease, but the reasons for the better outcome are not known. We postulated that they might relate to an ability of HPV proteins to confer a better response to radiotherapy, a commonly used treatment for OSCC. Methods and Materials: We stably expressed the specific splicing-derived isoforms, E6*I and E6*II, or the entire E6 open reading frame (E6total), which gives rise to both full length and E6*I isoforms, in OSCC cell lines. Radiation resistance was measured in clonogenicity assays, p53 activity was measured using transfected reporter genes, and flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle and apoptosis. Results: E6*I and E6total sensitized the OSCC cells to irradiation, E6*I giving the greatest degree of radiosensitization (approximately eightfold lower surviving cell fraction at 10 Gy), whereas E6*II had no effect. In contrast to radiosensitivity, E6*I was a weaker inhibitor than E6total of tumor suppressor p53 transactivator activity in the same cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that irradiated E6*I expressing cells had a much higher G2M:G1 ratio than control cells, indicating that, after G2, cells were diverted from the cell cycle to programmed cell death. Conclusion: This study supports a role for E6*I in the enhanced responsiveness of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas to p53-independent radiation-induced death.

  3. Phase Ib Study of BKM120 With Cisplatin and XRT in High Risk Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; HPV Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Early Invasive Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Carcinoma of Larynx; Cancer of Nasopharynx

  4. Association of Human Papillomavirus and p16 Status With Outcomes in the IMCL-9815 Phase III Registration Trial for Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Treated With Radiotherapy With or Without Cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, David I.; Harari, Paul M.; Giralt, Jordi; Bell, Diana; Raben, David; Liu, Joyce; Schulten, Jeltje; Ang, Kian K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a retrospective evaluation of the IMCL-9815 study to examine the association of human papillomavirus (HPV) and p16 protein expression status with outcomes in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) receiving radiotherapy (RT) plus cetuximab or RT alone. Patients and Methods In the IMCL-9815 study, patients were randomly allocated to receive RT plus weekly cetuximab or RT alone. A subpopulation of patients with p16-evaluable OPC was retrospectively evaluated on the basis of locoregional control (LRC), overall survival (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS). Evaluable samples from patients with p16-positive OPC were also tested for HPV DNA. Results Tumor p16 status was evaluable in 182 patients with OPC enrolled in the IMCL-9815 study; 41% were p16 positive. When treated with RT alone or RT plus cetuximab, p16-positive patients had a longer OS than p16-negative patients (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.74 and hazard ratio, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.36, respectively). The addition of cetuximab to RT increased LRC, OS, and PFS in both patients with p16-positive OPC and those with p16-negative disease. Interaction tests for LRC, OS, and PFS did not demonstrate any significant interaction between p16 status and treatment effect (P = .087, .085, and .253, respectively). Similar trends were observed when patients with p16-positive/HPV-positive OPC (n = 49) and those with p16-positive/HPV-negative OPC (n = 14) were compared. Conclusion p16 status was strongly prognostic for patients with OPC. The data suggest that the addition of cetuximab to RT improved clinical outcomes regardless of p16 or HPV status versus RT alone. PMID:26712222

  5. Clinical Impact of Prolonged Diagnosis to Treatment Interval (DTI) Among Patients with Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sonam; Bekelman, Justin; Lin, Alexander; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Roman, Benjamin R.; Mitra, Nandita; Swisher-McClure, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) We examined practice patterns using the National Cancer Database (NCDB) to determine risk factors for prolonged diagnosis to treatment interval (DTI) and survival outcomes in patients receiving chemoradiation for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Methods and Materials We identified 6,606 NCDB patients with Stage III-IV OPSCC receiving chemoradiation from 2003-2006. We determined risk factors for prolonged DTI (>30 days) using univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. We examined overall survival (OS) using Kaplan Meier and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. Results 3,586 (54.3%) patients had prolonged DTI. Race, IMRT, insurance status, and high volume facilities were significant risk factors for prolonged DTI. Patients with prolonged DTI had inferior OS compared to DTI ≤ 30 days (Hazard Ratio (HR)=1.12, 95% CI 1.04-1.20, p=0.005). For every week increase in DTI there was a 2.2% (95% CI 1.1%-3.3%, p<0.001) increase in risk of death. Patients receiving IMRT, treatment at academic, or high-volume facilities were more likely to experience prolonged DTI (High vs. Low volume: 61.5% vs. 51.8%, adjusted OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.21-1.58; Academic vs. Community: 59.5% vs. 50.6%, adjusted OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.13-1.42; non-IMRT vs. IMRT: 53.4% vs. 56.5%; adjusted OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.04-1.31). Conclusions Our results suggest that prolonged DTI has a significant impact on survival outcomes. We observed disparities in DTI by socioeconomic factors. However, facility level factors such as academic affiliation, high volume, and IMRT also increased risk of DTI. These findings should be considered in developing efficient pathways to mitigate adverse effects of prolonged DTI. PMID:27086482

  6. Metastatic model of HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrates heterogeneity in tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Daniel W; Coppock, Joseph D; Zeng, Erliang; Lee, Kimberly M; Spanos, William C; Onken, Michael D; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lee, John H; Vermeer, Paola D

    2016-04-26

    Human papillomavirus induced (HPV+) cancer incidence is rapidly rising, comprising 60-80% of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs); while rare, recurrent/metastatic disease accounts for nearly all related deaths. An in vivo pre-clinical model for these invasive cancers is necessary for testing new therapies. We characterize an immune competent recurrent/metastatic HPV+ murine model of OPSSC which consists of four lung metastatic (MLM) cell lines isolated from an animal with HPV+ OPSCC that failed cisplatin/radiation treatment. These individual metastatic clonal cell lines were tested to verify their origin (parental transgene expression and define their physiological properties: proliferation, metastatic potential, heterogeneity and sensitivity/resistance to cisplatin and radiation. All MLMs retain expression of parental HPV16 E6 and E7 and degrade P53 yet are heterogeneous from one another and from the parental cell line as defined by Illumina expression microarray. Consistent with this, reverse phase protein array defines differences in protein expression/activation between MLMs as well as the parental line. While in vitro growth rates of MLMs are slower than the parental line, in vivo growth of MLM clones is greatly enhanced. Moreover, in vivo resistance to standard therapies is dramatically increased in 3 of the 4 MLMs. Lymphatic and/or lung metastasis occurs 100% of the time in one MLM line. This recurrent/metastatic model of HPV+ OPSCC retains the characteristics evident in refractory human disease (heterogeneity, resistance to therapy, metastasis in lymph nodes/lungs) thus serving as an ideal translational system to test novel therapeutics. Moreover, this system may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27013584

  7. Metastatic model of HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrates heterogeneity in tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Vermeer, Daniel W.; Coppock, Joseph D.; Zeng, Erliang; Lee, Kimberly M.; Spanos, William C.; Onken, Michael D.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lee, John H.; Vermeer, Paola D.

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus induced (HPV+) cancer incidence is rapidly rising, comprising 60–80% of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs); while rare, recurrent/metastatic disease accounts for nearly all related deaths. An in vivo pre-clinical model for these invasive cancers is necessary for testing new therapies. We characterize an immune competent recurrent/metastatic HPV+ murine model of OPSSC which consists of four lung metastatic (MLM) cell lines isolated from an animal with HPV+ OPSCC that failed cisplatin/radiation treatment. These individual metastatic clonal cell lines were tested to verify their origin (parental transgene expression and define their physiological properties: proliferation, metastatic potential, heterogeneity and sensitivity/resistance to cisplatin and radiation. All MLMs retain expression of parental HPV16 E6 and E7 and degrade P53 yet are heterogeneous from one another and from the parental cell line as defined by Illumina expression microarray. Consistent with this, reverse phase protein array defines differences in protein expression/activation between MLMs as well as the parental line. While in vitro growth rates of MLMs are slower than the parental line, in vivo growth of MLM clones is greatly enhanced. Moreover, in vivo resistance to standard therapies is dramatically increased in 3 of the 4 MLMs. Lymphatic and/or lung metastasis occurs 100% of the time in one MLM line. This recurrent/metastatic model of HPV+ OPSCC retains the characteristics evident in refractory human disease (heterogeneity, resistance to therapy, metastasis in lymph nodes/lungs) thus serving as an ideal translational system to test novel therapeutics. Moreover, this system may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27013584

  8. Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Radiotherapy or Radiochemotherapy: Prognostic Role of TP53 and HPV Status

    SciTech Connect

    Fallai, Carlo; Perrone, Federica; Licitra, Lisa; Pilotti, Silvana; Locati, Laura; Bossi, Paolo; Orlandi, Ester; Palazzi, Mauro; Olmi, Patrizia

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the TP53 mutation and human papilloma virus (HPV) status in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Methods and materials: The TP53 mutation and HPV status were analyzed in 78 cases of locoregionally advanced OPSCC. The possible correlation of these factors with locoregiownal control, relapse-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival (OS) was also investigated. Results: Of these 78 cases, 22 had disruptive and 22 had non-disruptive (silent) TP53 mutations; the remaining 34 cases had wild-type (WT) TP53. HPV 16 DNA was found in 9 cases (11%), but all HPV-positive (HPV+) cases carried a functional p53 protein, except for 1 case that had a silent mutation. HPV+ patients fared better than HPV-negative (HPV-) patients in terms of all survival parameters, with highly statistically significant differences between the groups. Specifically, no distant metastases were observed in the HPV+ patients, whereas they occurred in 17% of the HPV- patients. However, no difference was observed between the WT TP53 and mutation group, even when this was analyzed in terms of disruptive and non-disruptive mutations. Regardless, treatment with chemotherapy nearly doubled the 5-year OS rates, both in the mutation (42% vs. 22%) and WT (30 vs. 16%) group, but only the mutation group showed improvement in all survival parameters. In addition, the second tumor-free 5-year survival rate was 72% in HPV- cases, but no second tumors were observed in HPV+ and WT p53 cases. Conclusions: Patients with HPV+ OPSCC have an excellent prognosis after radiochemotherapy, but cisplatin-based chemotherapy may not confer a satisfactory outcome, especially in WT cases, thereby justifying the additional or alternative use of taxanes and epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors. Uncommon distant metastases and second tumors in the HPV+ group may be cause for clinicians to review the follow-up policies in these patients.

  9. Factors Associated With Pharyngoesophageal Stricture In Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemotherapy And Radiation Therapy For Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Best, Simon R.; Ha, Patrick K.; Blanco, Ray G.; Saunders, John R.; Zinreich, Eva S.; Levine, Marshall A.; Pai, Sara I.; Walker, Melissa; Trachta, Jaclyn; Ulmer, Karen; Murakami, Peter; Thompson, Richard; Califano, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to elucidate factors associated with pharyngoesophageal strictures after treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods We conducted a retrospective review of patients receiving cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy combined with concurrent hyperfractionated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Results Strictures developed in 13 of 67 patients (19%). Strictures were associated with tumor location (tonsil vs base of tongue; p = .03), neck dissection after completion of therapy (p = .03), and the duration of treatment-induced mucositis (weeks with mucositis grade ≥2; National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Toxicity Criteria; p < .001). Age, sex, race, tumor stage, nodal stage, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, human papillomavirus (HPV) status, smoking, radiation dose, maximum severity of mucositis, amifostine use, and pretreatment swallow dysfunction were not significantly associated with stricture. In multivariate analysis, only duration of mucositis, after controlling for age, sex, and tumor location, remained highly significant (p < .01). Conclusion The duration of treatment-related mucositis is an independent risk factor for stricture formation in patients with oropharyngeal SCC treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. PMID:21246640

  10. Origin of Tumor Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Raktoe, Sawan A.S.; Dehnad, Homan; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Braunius, Weibel; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To model locoregional recurrences of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) treated with primary intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in order to find the origins from which recurrences grow and relate their location to original target volume borders. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of OSCC treated with primary IMRT between January 2002 and December 2009. Locoregional recurrence volumes were delineated on diagnostic scans and coregistered rigidly with treatment planning computed tomography scans. Each recurrence was analyzed with two methods. First, overlapping volumes of a recurrence and original target were measured ('volumetric approach') and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Then, the center of mass (COM) of a recurrence volume was assumed as the origin from where a recurrence expanded, the COM location was compared with original target volume borders and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Results: One hundred thirty-one OSCC were assessed. For all patients alive at the end of follow-up, the mean follow-up time was 40 months (range, 12-83 months); 2 patients were lost to follow-up. The locoregional recurrence rate was 27%. Of all recurrences, 51% were local, 23% were regional, and 26% had both local and regional recurrences. Of all recurrences, 74% had imaging available for assessment. Regarding volumetric analysis of local recurrences, 15% were in-field gross tumor volume (GTV), and 65% were in-field clinical tumor volume (CTV). Using the COM approach, we found that 70% of local recurrences were in-field GTV and 90% were in-field CTV. Of the regional recurrences, 25% were volumetrically in-field GTV, and using the COM approach, we found 54% were in-field GTV. The COM of local out-field CTV recurrences were maximally 16 mm outside CTV borders, whereas for regional recurrences, this was 17 mm. Conclusions: The COM model is practical and specific for recurrence assessment. Most

  11. Prognostic Impact of Pretreatment Plasma Fibrinogen in Patients with Locally Advanced Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Daniel; Danilovic, Ivan; Seemann, Rudolf; Kornek, Gabriela; Engelmann, Johannes; Pillerstorff, Robert; Holawe, Simone; Psyrri, Amanda; Erovic, Boban M.; Farwell, Gregory; Perisanidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to determine the prognostic significance of pretreatment plasma fibrinigen in patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OOSCC). Methods A cohort of 183 patients with locally advanced OOSCC receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy was retrospectively examined. Using ROC curve analysis, a pretreatment plasma fibrinogen cutoff value of 447mg/dL was determined. The primary endpoints were overall survival and recurrence-free survival. A secondary endpoint was to determine whether pretreatment plasma fibrinogen could predict treatment response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Cox regression models and Kaplan–Meier curves were used for survival analyses. Results Seventy-one patients had an elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen (fibrinogen >447mg/dL). Patients with high fibrinogen showed significantly higher pathologic stages after neoadjuvant treatment than those with low fibrinogen (p = 0.037). In univariate analysis, elevated fibrinogen was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.005) and recurrence-free survival (p = 0.008) Multivariate analysis revealed that elevated fibrinogen remained an independent risk factor for death (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.09–2.90, p = 0.021) and relapse (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.11–2.86, p = 0.016). Conclusion Elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen is associated with lack of response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and reduced OS and RFS in patients with OOSCC. Thus, plasma fibrinogen may emerge as a novel prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target in OOSCC. PMID:27362659

  12. [Concurrent radiochemotherapy in the treatment of squamous cell oral and oropharyngeal cancer].

    PubMed

    Semin, D Iu; Medvedev, V S; Marbynskiĭ, Iu S; Gulidov, I A; Isaev, P A; Radzhanova, M U; Derbugov, D N; Pol'kin, V V

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the end results of the radiochemotherapy of 237 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of oral mucosa (locally advanced, stage III-IV, - 134; 56.4%, and metastases to regional lymph nodes of the neck - 91; 38.4%) carried out at the Center's Clinic. Interstitial neutron (252 californium) plus polychemotherapy was given to 26 (11%) (group 1); neutron + distant radio + polychemotherapy - 34 (14 %) (group 2); distant fractionated radiotherapy + polychemotherapy - 177 (75%) (group 3). Complete response was reported in 190 (80.2%); partial - 44 (18.6%) and stabilization - 3 (1.3%). Overall response was 98.8%; 5-year survival - 64.5 +/- 3.3%, irrespective of tumor site, grade and method of treatment. Concomitant modality proved highly effective, free from toxic and functional or cosmetic harm.

  13. B7-H1 expression model for immune evasion in human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ukpo, Odey C; Thorstad, Wade L; Lewis, James S

    2013-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas. Persistent viral infection is postulated to lead to carcinogenesis, although infection of benign adjacent epithelium is not typically observed. It is known that immune evasive tumor cells can provide an ideal niche for a virus. The B7-H1/PD-1 cosignaling pathway plays an important role in viral immune evasion by rendering CD8+ cytotoxic T cells anergic. We hypothesized that HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas express B7-H1 as a mechanism for immune evasion. A tissue microarray was utilized, for which HPV E6/E7 mRNA by in situ hybridization was previously performed. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect B7-H1 and staining was characterized by pattern, distribution, and intensity. B7-H1 was expressed by 84 of the 181 (46.4%) cases. Both tumor cell membranous and cytoplasmic expression were present and cytoplasmic expression was identified in some peritumoral lymphocytes. Expression was analyzed in several different ways and then considered binarily as positive versus negative. Tumors expressing B7-H1 were more likely to be HPV positive (49.2 vs. 34.1 %, p = 0.08). B7-H1 expression showed no correlation with disease recurrence in the entire cohort (OR = 1.09, p = 0.66), HPV positive cohort (OR = 0.80, p = 0.69) or HPV negative cohort (OR = 2.02, p = 0.22). However, B7-H1 expression intensity did correlate with the development of distant metastasis (p = 0.03), and B7-H1 intensity of 3+ (versus all other staining) showed a strong trend towards distant metastasis in the HPV positive (OR = 6.67, p = 0.13) and HPV negative (OR = 9.0, p = 0.13) cohorts. There was no correlation between B7-H1 expression and patient survival for any of the different ways in which staining was characterized, whether binarily, by distribution, intensity, or combined scores. B7-H1 is expressed in the majority of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas with transcriptionally-active HPV. This

  14. A quantitative histomorphometric classifier (QuHbIC) identifies aggressive versus indolent p16-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James S; Ali, Sahirzeeshan; Luo, Jingqin; Thorstad, Wade L; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus-related (p16-positive) oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients develop recurrent disease, mostly distant metastasis, in approximately 10% of cases, and the remaining patients, despite cure, can have major morbidity from treatment. Identifying patients with aggressive versus indolent tumors is critical. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides of a microarray cohort of p16-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cases were digitally scanned. A novel cluster cell graph was constructed using the nuclei as vertices to characterize and measure spatial distribution and cell clustering. A series of topological features defined on each node of the subgraph were analyzed, and a random forest decision tree classifier was developed. The classifier (QuHbIC) was validated over 25 runs of 3-fold cross-validation using case subsets for independent training and testing. Nineteen (11.9%) of the 160 patients on the array developed recurrence. QuHbIC correctly predicted outcomes in 140 patients (87.5% accuracy). There were 23 positive patients, of whom 11 developed recurrence (47.8% positive predictive value), and 137 negative patients, of whom only 8 developed recurrence (94.2% negative predictive value). The best other predictive features were stage T4 (18 patients; 83.1% accuracy) and N3 nodal disease (10 patients; 88.6% accuracy). QuHbIC-positive patients had poorer overall, disease-free, and disease-specific survival (P<0.001 for each). In multivariate analysis, QuHbIC-positive patients still showed significantly poorer disease-free and disease-specific survival, independent of all other variables. In summary, using just tiny hematoxylin and eosin punches, a computer-aided histomorphometric classifier (QuHbIC) can strongly predict recurrence risk. With prospective validation, this testing may be useful to stratify patients into different treatment groups.

  15. A quantitative histomorphometric classifier (QuHbIC) identifies aggressive versus indolent p16-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James S; Ali, Sahirzeeshan; Luo, Jingqin; Thorstad, Wade L; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus-related (p16-positive) oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients develop recurrent disease, mostly distant metastasis, in approximately 10% of cases, and the remaining patients, despite cure, can have major morbidity from treatment. Identifying patients with aggressive versus indolent tumors is critical. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides of a microarray cohort of p16-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cases were digitally scanned. A novel cluster cell graph was constructed using the nuclei as vertices to characterize and measure spatial distribution and cell clustering. A series of topological features defined on each node of the subgraph were analyzed, and a random forest decision tree classifier was developed. The classifier (QuHbIC) was validated over 25 runs of 3-fold cross-validation using case subsets for independent training and testing. Nineteen (11.9%) of the 160 patients on the array developed recurrence. QuHbIC correctly predicted outcomes in 140 patients (87.5% accuracy). There were 23 positive patients, of whom 11 developed recurrence (47.8% positive predictive value), and 137 negative patients, of whom only 8 developed recurrence (94.2% negative predictive value). The best other predictive features were stage T4 (18 patients; 83.1% accuracy) and N3 nodal disease (10 patients; 88.6% accuracy). QuHbIC-positive patients had poorer overall, disease-free, and disease-specific survival (P<0.001 for each). In multivariate analysis, QuHbIC-positive patients still showed significantly poorer disease-free and disease-specific survival, independent of all other variables. In summary, using just tiny hematoxylin and eosin punches, a computer-aided histomorphometric classifier (QuHbIC) can strongly predict recurrence risk. With prospective validation, this testing may be useful to stratify patients into different treatment groups. PMID:24145650

  16. Cf-252 neutron brachytherapy for advanced tonsillar-oropharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Californium-252 was found to be very effective for clearing and controlling large T3-T4 tumors of the tonsillar-oropharyngeal region. A single Cf-NT treatment was combined with 6000 cGy of Co-60 irradiation and was well tolerated. With multiple insertions, the external beam dose was reduced. Although the patients for this study were elderly, feeble and generally of low performance status, 100% tumor clearance and 67% local control was possible. Cf-NT and radiation was readily combined with additional surgery.

  17. Identification of methylation markers for the prediction of nodal metastasis in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Melchers, L J; Clausen, M J A M; Mastik, M F; Slagter-Menkema, L; van der Wal, J E; Wisman, G B A; Roodenburg, J L N; Schuuring, E

    2015-01-01

    Hypermethylation is an important mechanism for the dynamic regulation of gene expression, necessary for metastasizing tumour cells. Our aim is to identify methylation tumour markers that have a predictive value for the presence of regional lymph node metastases in patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OOSCC). Significantly differentially expressed genes were retrieved from four reported microarray expression profiles comparing pN0 and pN+ head-neck tumours, and one expression array identifying functionally hypermethylated genes. Additional metastasis-associated genes were included from the literature. Thus genes were selected that influence the development of nodal metastases and might be regulated by methylation. Methylation-specific PCR (MSP) primers were designed and tested on 8 head-neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and technically validated on 10 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) OOSCC cases. Predictive value was assessed in a clinical series of 70 FFPE OOSCC with pathologically determined nodal status. Five out of 28 methylation markers (OCLN, CDKN2A, MGMT, MLH1 and DAPK1) were frequently differentially methylated in OOSCC. Of these, MGMT methylation was associated with pN0 status (P = 0.02) and with lower immunoexpression (P = 0.02). DAPK1 methylation was associated with pN+ status (P = 0.008) but did not associate with protein expression. In conclusion, out of 28 candidate genes, two (7%) showed a predictive value for the pN status. Both genes, DAPK1 and MGMT, have predictive value for nodal metastasis in a clinical group of OOSCC. Therefore DNA methylation markers are capable of contributing to diagnosis and treatment selection in OOSCC. To efficiently identify additional new methylation markers, genome-wide methods are needed. PMID:26213212

  18. Absent and abundant MET immunoreactivity is associated with poor prognosis of patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    De Herdt, Maria J.; Willems, Stefan M.; van der Steen, Berdine; Noorlag, Rob; Verhoef, Esther I.; van Leenders, Geert J.L.H.; van Es, Robert J.J.; Koljenović, Senada; de Jong, Robert J. Baatenburg; Looijenga, Leendert H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Although the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) MET is widely expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), its prognostic value remains unclear. This might be due to the use of a variety of antibodies and scoring systems. Here, the reliability of five commercial C-terminal MET antibodies (D1C2, CVD13, SP44, C-12 and C-28) was evaluated before examining the prognostic value of MET immunoreactivity in HNSCC. Using cancer cell lines, it was shown that D1C2 and CVD13 specifically detect MET under reducing, native and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) conditions. Immunohistochemical staining of routinely FFPE oral SCC with D1C2 and CVD13 demonstrated that D1C2 is most sensitive in the detection of membranous MET. Examination of membranous D1C2 immunoreactivity with 179 FFPE oral and oropharyngeal SCC – represented in a tissue microarray – illustrated that staining is either uniform (negative or positive) across tumors or differs between a tumor's center and periphery. Ultimately, statistical analysis revealed that D1C2 uniform staining is significantly associated with poor 5-year overall and disease free survival of patients lacking vasoinvasive growth (HR = 3.019, p < 0.001; HR = 2.559, p < 0.001). These findings might contribute to reliable stratification of patients eligible for treatment with biologicals directed against MET. PMID:26909606

  19. Clinicopathologic Features of Advanced Squamous NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Socinski, Mark A; Obasaju, Coleman; Gandara, David; Hirsch, Fred R; Bonomi, Philip; Bunn, Paul; Kim, Edward S; Langer, Corey J; Natale, Ronald B; Novello, Silvia; Paz-Ares, Luis; Pérol, Maurice; Reck, Martin; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Reynolds, Craig H; Spigel, David R; Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Wakelee, Heather; Mayo, Carlos; Thatcher, Nick

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. NSCLC accounts for more than 85% of all lung cancers, and the prognosis for advanced-stage disease is typically poor. In recent years, the importance of histologic subtypes of NSCLC has been recognized, and the distinction between squamous and other NSCLC histologic subtypes is now critical to patient management. Squamous cell lung cancer (sqCLC) represents approximately 25% to 30% of NSCLC. The prognosis for patients with advanced NSCLC is poorer for those with sqCLC than for those with adenocarcinoma. This is partly due to a number of clinical characteristics that distinguish sqCLC from other NSCLC histologic subtypes, such as smoking history, comorbid diseases, age, and molecular profile. Together, these factors make sqCLC an especially challenging disease to manage. Herein, we review some of the key clinicopathologic features of sqCLC. Understanding these features to optimally address many of the unique therapeutic challenges of this disease is likely to be central to ultimately improving outcomes for patients with squamous NSCLC.

  20. Cine MRI of swallowing in patients with advanced oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Kreeft, Anne Marijn; Rasch, Coen R N; Muller, Sara H; Pameijer, Frank A; Hallo, Eeke; Balm, Alfons J M

    2012-06-01

    Treatment of oral and oropharyngeal cancer may cause dysphagia. Purpose is to examine whether cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields additional information compared to standard examination in the evaluation of posttreatment dysphagia and mobility of oral and oropharyngeal structures. Thirty-four cine MRIs were made in 23 patients with advanced oral and oropharyngeal cancer, consisting of an MR image every 800 ms during swallowing which is compared to videofluoroscopy and quality of life questionnaires. A scoring system was applied to assess mobility on cine MR and videofluoroscopy leading to a score ranging from 9 to 17. Cine MRI of the swallowing in a midsagittal plane visualized the tumor (if located in the same plane), important anatomic structures and surgical reconstructions. Posttreatment mobility on cine MRI and videofluoroscopy was significantly diminished compared to pretreatment, mean pretreatment cine MRI score was 10.8 and posttreatment 12.4 (p = 0.017). Impaired mobility on cine MRI was significantly correlated to more swallowing problems (Spearman's correlation coefficient 0.73, p = 0.04), on videofluoroscopy not. Cine MRI is a promising new technique as an adjunct to standard examinations for evaluation of swallowing in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Cine MRI directly visualizes the dynamics of swallowing and allows evaluation of pre- and posttreatment differences. Abnormal findings are significantly correlated with subjective swallowing complaints of patients.

  1. Histopathologic risk factors in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma variants: an update with special reference to HPV-related carcinomas.

    PubMed

    El-Mofty, Samir K

    2014-07-01

    Accurate identification of the microscopic risk factors of oral and oropharyngeal (OP) squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and their morphologic variants is of at most importance, as these generally determine treatment modalities, prognosis and overall patient outcome. The great majority of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas are microscopically described as kerartinizing squamous cell carcinoma (KSCC). They bear certain resemblance to keratinizing stratified squamous epithelium. Tobacco habits and excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages have been considered to be the main etiologic agents in these carcinomas. The tumors occurred in older patients more commonly affected the oral tongue and floor of the mouth with well established morphologic risk factors including tumor grade, pattern of invasion and perineural involvement. Within the last 30 years however, the advent and expanding prevalence of high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) as an important etiologic agent for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, particularly in the OP, has resulted in a significant change in the established morphologic criteria for risk assessment. The majority of HPV relate carcinomas of the OP are nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma (NKSCC). These tumors are found to be more responsive to treatment with a favorable patient outcome and good prognosis. Consequently, alterations in treatment protocols aimed at de-escalation are currently being evaluated. More recently, other morphologic variants that are HPV positive are reported with increasing frequency in the OP and other head and neck sites. As a result, several clinical and pathologic questions have emerged. Importantly, whether the virus is biologically active in these tumors and involved in their pathogenesis, and second, what are the clinical implications with regard to patient management and outcome in the HPV-related variants. Examples of HPV-related squamous cell carcinoma variants that will be addressed here are

  2. Adoption of Transoral Robotic Surgery Compared With Other Surgical Modalities for Treatment of Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cracchiolo, Jennifer R.; Roman, Benjamin R.; Kutler, David I.; Kuhel, William I.; Cohen, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has increased for treatment of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). To define the adoption of TORS, we analyzed patterns of surgical treatment for OPSCC in the US. Methods Cases of T1–T3 OPSCC treated with surgery between 2010 and 2013 from the National Cancer Database were queried. Results Of 3,071 patients who underwent primary surgical management for T1–T3 OPSCC, 846 (28%) underwent TORS. On multivariable analysis, low tumor stage (T2 vs T1: OR 0.75, CI 0.37–0.51, p<0.0001; T3 vs T1: O.R. 0.33, CI 0.28–0.38, p<0.0001), treatment at an academic cancer center (O.R. 2.23, C.I. 1.29–3.88, p=0.004) and treatment at a high volume hospital (34–155 cases vs 1–4 cases: O.R. 9.07, C.I. 3.19–25.79, p<0.0001) were associated with increased TORS approach. Significant geographic variation was observed, with high adoption in the Middle Atlantic. Positive margin rates were lower when TORS was performed at a high volume vs. low volume hospital (8.2% vs 16.7% respectively, p=0.001). Conclusions Tumor and non-tumor factors are associated with TORS adoption. This analysis suggests uneven diffusion of this technology in the treatment of OPSCC. PMID:27392812

  3. Prognostic significance of decreased expression of six large common fragile site genes in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ge; Kasperbauer, Jan L; Tombers, Nicole M; Cornell, Melissa D; Smith, David I

    2014-12-01

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) are large regions with profound genomic instability that often span extremely large genes a number of which have been found to be important tumor suppressors. RNA sequencing previously revealed that there was a group of six large CFS genes which frequently had decreased expression in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs) and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction experiments validated that these six large CFS genes (PARK2, DLG2, NBEA, CTNNA3, DMD, and FHIT) had decreased expression in most of the tumor samples. In this study, we investigated whether the decreased expression of these genes has any clinical significance in OPSCCs. We analyzed the six CFS large genes in 45 OPSCC patients and found that 27 (60%) of the OPSCC tumors had decreased expression of these six genes. When we correlated the expression of these six genes to each patient's clinical records, for 11 patients who had tumor recurrence, 10 of them had decreased expression of almost all 6 genes. When we divided the patients into two groups, one group with decreased expression of the six genes and the other group with either slight changes or increased expression of the six genes, we found that there is significant difference in the incidence of tumor recurrence between these two groups by Kaplan-Meier plot analysis (P < .05). Our results demonstrated that those OPSCC tumors with decreased expression of this select group of six large CFS genes were much more likely to be associated with tumor recurrence and these genes are potential prognostic markers for predicting tumor recurrence in OPSCC.

  4. Long-Term Regional Control in the Observed Neck Following Definitive Chemoradiation for Node-Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Anuj; Morris, Luc G.T.; Rao, Shyam S.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Wong, Richard J.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Ohri, Nisha; Setton, Jeremy; Lok, Benjamin H.; Riaz, Nadeem; Mychalczak, Borys R.; Schoder, Heiko; Ganly, Ian; Shah, Jatin P.; Pfister, David G.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for node-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (N+ OPSCC) have undergone a planned neck dissection (ND) after treatment. Recently, negative post-treatment positron-emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging has been found to have a high negative predictive value for the presence of residual disease in the neck. Here we present the first comprehensive analysis of a large, uniform cohort of N+ OPSCC patients achieving a PET/CT-based complete response (CR) after chemoradiotherapy, and undergoing observation, rather than ND. From 2002 to 2009, 302 patients with N+ OPSCC treated with 70 Gy intensity-modulated radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy underwent post-treatment clinical assessment including PET/CT. CR was defined as no evidence of disease on clinical examination and post-treatment PET/CT. ND was reserved for patients with

  5. Do 18F-FDG PET/CT parameters in oropharyngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas indicate HPV status?

    PubMed Central

    Kendi, AT; Magliocca, K; Corey, A; Nickleach, DC; Galt, J; Higgins, K; Beitler, JJ; El-Deiry, MW; Wadsworth, JT; Hudgins, PA; Saba, NF; Schuster, DM

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship of PET/CT parameters with HPV status of oropharyngeal (OP) and oral cavity (OC) squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients with OC and OP SCC who underwent staging 18F-FDG PET/CT. PET/CT parameters were measured for the primary tumor and the hottest involved node, including maximum, mean, peak standardized uptake values (SUV max, SUV mean, SUV peak), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), standardized added metabolic activity (SAM), normalized standardized added metabolic activity (N SAM). Patient characteristics compared between HPV positive (HPV+) and negative (HPV−) groups. ROC analysis was used to dichotomize PET/CT parameters into high and low. Logistic regression models predicting HPV status were fit for each PET/CT parameter. Results The HPV+ group was comprised of 18 patients all with OP SCC; the HPV− group consisted of 21 patients, 4 OP cancer patients and 17 OC cancer patients. The HPV+ group had a higher proportion of N2 stage (94% vs 43%; p<0.001). Nodal PET/CT parameters were higher in the HPV+ group (p<0.01), this difference was not present for the primary lesion. After adjusting for sex and age, the association of higher nodal SUV max (OR 9.67), SUV mean (OR 10.48), SUV peak (OR 9.67), MTV (OR 14.52), TLG (OR 11.84) and SAM, N SAM (OR 16.21) with HPV+ status remained statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion Nodal PET/CT parameters predict HPV status. High nodal FDG uptake should raise suspicion for positive HPV status in the evaluation of the primary lesion. PMID:25608156

  6. miRNAs in human papilloma virus associated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Carolina; Calvopiña, Diego; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2014-11-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer in the world with 600,000 new cases diagnosed annually. Tobacco and alcohol use have been associated as the principal etiological factors of this pathogenesis. The incidence of smoking-associated HNSCC has declined, while human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated HNSCC is on the rise. There are currently no clinically validated biomarkers to detect this cancer at an early stage (cancers independent of HPV status). It is well-established that the aberrant expression of miRNAs can lead to tumorigenesis. miRNA expression differences have also been demonstrated in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC tumor tissues as well as in body fluids. Therefore, miRNAs have the potential to provide an unprecedented insight into the pathogenesis of HNSCC and serve as potential biomarkers. This review addresses HNSCC disease burden and the regulation of miRNA by HPV viral oncoproteins, potential miRNA biomarkers and future perspectives. miRNA provides an unique opportunity to fulfill the current clinical challenge in HNSCC patient management by enabling early detection followed by targeted interventions, leading to a significant reduction in mortality and morbidity.

  7. Oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in young adults: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Majchrzak, Ewa; Szybiak, Bartosz; Wegner, Anna; Pienkowski, Piotr; Pazdrowski, Jakub; Luczewski, Lukasz; Sowka, Marcin; Golusinski, Pawel; Malicki, Julian; Golusinski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a disease of middle-aged to elderly adults. However, an increased incidence of HNSCC in young people under 45 years of age has been reported recently. In the present review, we focused on the epidemiology and aetiology of HNSCC in adults under 45 years of age. Methods We reviewed literature related to HNSCC in adult patients less than 45 years of age and discussed current treatment options and prognosis. Results HNSCC in young adults is associated with a higher incidence rate in nonsmokers, lower female-to-male ratio, a higher percentage of oral cavity and oropharynx tumours, and fewer second primary tumours. However, aside from traditional risk factors of tobacco and alcohol exposure, the causes of these cancers in young adults remain unclear. Agents that might contribute to risk include infection with high-risk human papillomavirus subtypes as well as genetic factors or immunodeficiency status. The expected increase in incidence and mortality of the young with HNSCC may become a major public health concern if current trends persist, particularly lifestyle habits that may contribute to this disease. Conclusions Given the younger age and potential long-term adverse sequelae of traditional HNSCC treatments, young adults should be treated on a case-by-case basis and post-therapy quality of life must be considered in any treatment-decision making process. PMID:24587773

  8. Bupropion Hydrochloride or Patient's Choice for Smoking Cessation in Patients With Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy With or Without Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-27

    Current Smoker; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  9. Matched Survival Analysis in Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Resectable Oropharyngeal Carcinoma: Platinum-Based Induction and Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Versus Primary Surgical Resection

    SciTech Connect

    Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Gava, Alessandro; Baggio, Vittorio; Marchiori, Carlo; Stellin, Marco; Fuson, Roberto; Lamon, Stefano; Da Mosto, Maria Cristina

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: The outcome of a prospective case series of 47 patients with newly diagnosed resectable locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with platinum-based induction-concurrent chemoradiotherapy (IC/CCRT) was compared with the outcome of 47 matched historical control patients treated with surgery and postoperative RT. Methods and Materials: A total of 47 control patients with locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were identified from review of a prospectively compiled comprehensive computerized head-and-neck cancer database and were matched with a prospective case series of patients undergoing IC/CCRT by disease stage, nodal status, gender, and age ({+-}5 years). The IC/CCRT regimen consisted of one cycle of induction chemotherapy followed by conventionally fractionated RT to a total dose of 66-70 Gy concomitantly with two cycles of chemotherapy. Each cycle of chemotherapy consisted of cisplatinum, 100 mg/m{sup 2}, and a continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 5 days. The survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimates. Matched-pair survival was compared using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: No significant difference was found in the overall survival or progression-free survival rates between the two groups. The matched analysis of survival did not show a statistically significant greater hazard ratio for overall death (hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-2.80; p = .415) or progression (hazard ratio, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-2.87; p = .301) for patients undergoing IC/CCRT. Conclusion: Although the sample size was small and not randomized, this matched-pair comparison between a prospective case series and a historical cohort treated at the same institution showed that the efficacy of IC/CCRT with salvage surgery is as good as primary surgical resection and postoperative RT.

  10. Cisplatin, Radiation Therapy, and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-02

    Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  11. High Level of Tregs Is a Positive Prognostic Marker in Patients with HPV-Positive Oral and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lukesova, E.; Boucek, J.; Rotnaglova, E.; Salakova, M.; Koslabova, E.; Grega, M.; Eckschlager, T.; Rihova, B.; Prochazka, B.; Klozar, J.; Tachezy, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been proved as one of the etiological factors of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Patients with tumors of viral etiology have a lower recurrence rate and better prognosis. OPSCC is linked to an alteration in the immune system. Only a limited number of studies have correlated both the immunological parameters and HPV status with patient prognosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether HPV infection and the immunological status influence patient prognosis individually or in concurrence. Material and Methods. Sixty patients with oral and oropharyngeal carcinomas were enrolled. They were divided into HPV-positive and HPV-negative groups based on the expression of HPV 16 E6 mRNA. Basic lymphocyte subpopulations were determined in the peripheral blood by means of flow cytometry. Results. Significantly better disease-specific survival (DSS) was observed in patients with HPV-positive tumors. Nodal status, tumor grade, recurrence, and CD8+/Tregs ratio were identified as factors influencing DSS. A higher level of Tregs and a lower ratio of CD8/Tregs influenced overall survival (OS) independently of HPV status and age. Patients with HPV-positive tumors and high levels of Tregs survived significantly better than patients from the other groups. Conclusion. Better survival is associated with HPV positivity and elevated Tregs levels. Our data suggest that HPV infection and Tregs do not influence patient prognosis in concurrence. PMID:24864233

  12. [Oropharyngeal cancer].

    PubMed

    Blanchard, David; Rame, Jean-Pierre; Louis, Marie-Yolande; Gery, Bernard; Florescu, Carmen; de Raucourt, Dominique; Gervais, Radj

    2014-05-01

    Oropharyngeal carcinomas, contrary to other head and neck carcinomas are of increasing frequency, mostly due to a frequent association with human papillomavirus infection. Pluridisciplinary management is necessary. New techniques as transoral surgery or intensity-modulated radiation therapy have the potential to reduce toxicities and morbidity while offering equivalent local control rates. Early stages may be treated with single modality treatment (surgery or radiotherapy) with five-year overall survival rate exceeding 80%. Advanced stages need therapeutic associations and five-years survival rates are inferior to 40%. PMID:24886893

  13. Molecular subclassification determined by human papillomavirus and epidermal growth factor receptor status is associated with the prognosis of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Nakashima, Torahiko; Nishijima, Toshimitsu; Satoh, Masanobu; Hatanaka, Yui; Shiratsuchi, Hideki; Yasumatsu, Ryuji; Toh, Satoshi; Komune, Shizuo; Oda, Yoshinao

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is an indicator of good response to chemoradiotherapy in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a molecular-therapeutic target in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Here we investigated the prevalence and prognostic significance of HPV infection and EGFR alteration in OPSCC. We analyzed the presence of high-risk HPV using in situ hybridization, protein expressions of p16 and EGFR using immunohistochemistry, and the EGFR gene copy number gain using chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) in 105 cases of OPSCC. The biopsy specimens before chemoradiotherapy were used for these analyses. HPV infection and p16 protein overexpression were detected in 53.3% and 52.4% of the OPSCCs, and each factor was associated with better overall survival (P = .0026 and P = .0026) and nonkeratinizing histology (P = .0002 and P = .0004), respectively. EGFR gene copy number gain (high polysomy or amplification) was detected in 12.4% of the OPSCCs and was correlated with EGFR protein overexpression (P = .0667) and worse overall survival (P < .0001). HPV infection and EGFR gene copy number gain (EGFR CISH positive) were mutually exclusive. The HPV-negative/EGFR CISH-positive OPSCCs had significantly worse overall survival than did the HPV-positive/EGFR CISH-negative OPSCCs and HPV-negative/EGFR CISH-negative OPSCCs (P < .0001 and P < .0001, respectively). The EGFR CISH-negative OPSCCs had favorable prognosis irrespective of HPV infection. Our results suggest that EGFR gene copy number gain-positive tumors represent an HPV-negative, aggressive subgroup of OPSCCs. The molecular subclassification of OPSCCs based on HPV infection and EGFR status may serve as important information for appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  14. High expression of myoferlin is associated with poor outcome in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients and is inversely associated with HPV-status

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bhavna; Brown, Nicole V.; Swanson, Benjamin J.; Schmitt, Alessandra C.; Old, Matthew; Ozer, Enver; Agrawal, Amit; Schuller, David E.; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Kumar, Pawan

    2016-01-01

    Myoferlin (MYOF) is a member of ferlin family of membrane proteins that was originally discovered as a muscle specific protein. Recent studies have shown that myoferlin is also expressed in other cell types including endothelial cells and cancer cells. However, very little is known about the expression and biological role of myoferlin in head and neck cancer. In this study, we examined expression profile of myoferlin in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) and assessed its correlation with disease progression and patient outcome. In univariate analyses, nuclear MYOF was associated with poor overall survival (p<0.001) and these patients had 5.5 times increased hazard of death (95% Cl 3.4-8.8). Nuclear myoferlin expression was also directly associated with tumor recurrence (p<0.001), perineural invasion (p=0.008), extracapsular spread (p=0.009), higher T-stage (p=0.0015) and distant metastasis (p<0.001). In addition, nuclear MYOF expression was directly associated with IL-6 (p<0.001) and inversely with HPV status (p=0.0014). In a subgroup survival analysis, MYOF nuclear+/IL-6+ group had worst survival (84.6% mortality), whereas MYOF nuclear-/IL-6- had the best survival. Similarly, patients with HPV-negative/MYOF-positive tumors had worse survival compared to HPV-positive/MYOF-negative. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that nuclear myoferlin expression independently predicts poor clinical outcome in OPSCC patients. PMID:26919244

  15. Atypical Clinical Behavior of p16-Confirmed HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Radical Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; Liu Feifei; Waldron, John; Ringash, Jolie; Hope, Andrew; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report atypical clinical behavior observed in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort study was conducted for all newly diagnosed OPC cases treated with radiotherapy on July 1, 2003 to April 30, 2009. HPV positivity was determined by p16 immunostaining in tumors. The incidence of additional malignancies and the pattern of distant metastases (DMs) were compared between the HPV-positive (HPV+) and HPV-negative (HPV-) cohorts. Results: HPV status was evaluated in 318 of 613 consecutive OPC cases (52%), showing 236 HPV+ and 82 HPV- patients. Compared with HPV-, HPV+ cases were less likely to have additional malignancies (prior: 11% vs. 20%, p = 0.038; synchronous: 1% vs. 9%, p = 0.001; metachronous: 6% vs. 16%, p = 0.003). Whereas the majority (10 of 12) of HPV- additional head-and-neck (HN) mucosal malignancies were in the oral cavity, there was none (0 of 7) in the HPV+ cohort (p < 0.001). HPV+ synchronous HN second primaries (SPs) were in the supraglottis, post-cricoid, and nasopharynx; metachronous HN SPs were in the glottis, supraglottis, and ethmoid plus glottis/post-cricoid region. All SPs that could be tested were HPV+. There was no difference in DM rate (10% vs. 15%, p = 0.272), but HPV+ DMs were more likely to involve multiple organs (46% vs. 0%, p = 0.005) and unusual sites. Conclusions: This study reports atypical clinical behavior seen in HPV+ OPC, including multicentric lesions in HN mucosa and DM to multiple organs and unusual sites. The frequency of these events is low, but they may have clinical implications. The routine assessment of HPV status for all OPC is warranted.

  16. Epidemiology of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pytynia, Kristen B.; Dahlstrom, Kristina R.; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx is increasing in incidence in epidemic proportion. This site specific increase in incidence is due to an increase in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related squamous cell carcinoma, while the incidence of tobacco related squamous cell carcinoma is decreasing. In particular, the incidence of HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increased among middle aged white men, and sexual behavior is a risk factor. HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma represents a growing etiologically distinct subset of head and neck cancers with unique epidemiological, clinical, and molecular characteristics that differ from those of HPV-unassociated cancers. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of HPV-related OPSCC, the prevalence of oral/oropharyngeal HPV infection, and efforts aimed at reducing the incidence of HPV-related OPSCC. PMID:24461628

  17. Genomic Copy Number Variations Characterize the Prognosis of Both P16-Positive and P16-Negative Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma After Curative Resection

    PubMed Central

    Rhie, Arang; Park, Weon Seo; Choi, Moon Kyung; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Ryu, Junsun; Ryu, Chang Hwan; Kim, Jong-Il; Jung, Yuh-Seog

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recently increasing high-risk HPV+ OSCC exhibits unique clinical and molecular characteristics compared to HPV-unrelated (HPV−) counterpart. Genomic copy number variations (CNVs), unique in HPV+ OSCCs, and their role for the prognosis prediction remains poorly studied. Here, we analyzed the distinct genomic copy number variations (CNVs) in human papillomavirus-related (HPV+) oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and their role as a prognosticator after curative resection. For 58 consecutive, Korean OSCC patients that underwent surgery-based treatment with median 10 years of follow-up, HPV-related markers, and genome-wide CNV analysis were analyzed. Clinical associations between the CNV profile and survival analyses were followed. p16 expression predicted the overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.27, confidence interval [CI]: 0.39–0.80, P = 0.0006) better than HPV L1 PCR (HR = 0.83, CI: 0.66–1.29, P = 0.64), smoking, or other variables. Although the overall number of CNVs was not significantly different, 30 loci showed unique CNV patterns between the p16+ and p16− groups. A region containing PRDM2 was amplified only in the p16+ group, whereas EGFR and 11q13.3 showed increased amplification in p16− counterpart. Loss of a locus containing FGF18 led to a worse, but gain of region including CDK10 and RAD18 led to better overall survival (OS) in all OSCC patients. Meanwhile, subgroup analysis of p16+ OSCC revealed that amplification of regions harboring HRAS and loss of locus bearing KDR led to better OS. p16+ OSCC exhibit distinct CNV patterns compared with p16− counterpart. Specific patterns of CNVs predict better survival, especially in p16+ OSCC. This might allow better insights of the outcome after curative resection for HPV+ and HPV− OSCC. PMID:26683928

  18. CD56-positive lymphocyte infiltration in relation to human papillomavirus association and prognostic significance in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Steffen; Wittekindt, Claus; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Hennig, Ben; Thevarajah, Mauran; Würdemann, Nora; Prigge, Elena-Sophie; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Dreyer, Thomas; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Klussmann, Jens Peter

    2016-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (OSCC) are clinical and biological distinct from their HPV-unrelated counterparts. Patients with HPV-related OSCC display improved prognosis and therefore we investigated possible immune cell infiltrations associated with this tumor phenotype. We retrospectively analyzed a randomly selected cohort of 140 OSCC for presence of immune cells and HPV by immunohistochemistry and PCR followed by bead-based hybridization (Luminex technology). HPV prevalence was 24.3% as determined by positive staining of p16INK4a and detection of high risk HPV-DNA. We found significantly higher numbers of CD56 positive (CD56+) cells in tumor and surrounding microenvironment in HPV-associated compared to HPV-negative OSCC (t-test: p = 0.004 and p = 0.002). For the entire cohort presence of CD56+ cells was associated with increased overall survival independent from HPV (Kaplan-Meier: p = 0.002; Cox regression: p = 0.042). Presence of CD56+ cells also correlated with a better outcome in HPV-negative and especially in HPV-negative OSCC with alcohol consumption ≤ 2 standard drinks per day (Kaplan-Meier: p = 0.05 and p = 0.003). Immunofluorescence localization of granular Granzyme B (GZMB) within CD56+ cells and coexpression of CD16 and CD56 suggests that detected CD56+ cells mainly represent cytotoxic Natural Killer (NK) cells. The fraction of potentially cytotoxic NK cells was significantly higher in HPV-associated compared to HPV-negative OSCC (Mann-Whitney-U-Test: p = 0.011). The elevated abundance and activity of cytotoxic NK cells in OSCC with HPV driven carcinogenesis might contribute to favorable outcome in HPV-related OSCC.

  19. Helical Tomotherapy and Larynx Sparing in Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma: A Dosimetric Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gielda, Benjamin T.; Millunchick, Cheryl H.; Smart, Joseph P.; Marsh, James C.; Turian, Julius V.; Coleman, Joy L.

    2010-10-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is gaining acceptance as a standard treatment technique for advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oropharynx. Dose to the uninvolved larynx and surrounding structures can pose a problem in patients with significant neck disease, potentially compromising laryngeal function and quality of life. Tomotherapy may allow greater laryngeal sparing. Seven patients with stage IV SCC of the oropharynx were replanned using Tomotherapy version 3.1. All contours/planning target volumes (PTVs) from the original plans were preserved, with the exception of the larynx, which was drawn to include all soft tissue encompassed by the thyroid/cricoid cartilage. A simultaneous integrated boost technique was used with PTV 1, 2, and 3 receiving 69.96, 59.40, and 54.00 Gy, respectively in 33 fractions. Dosimetry was evaluated via the Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS). Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was calculated from the dose volume histogram (DVH) using the general method with 'a' = 5.0. Mean larynx dose for all patients was 24.4 Gy. Mean EUD to the larynx was 34.2 Gy. Homogeneity was adequate; average maximum dose was 109.7% of the highest prescription. All other organs at risk (OAR) were adequately spared. Tomotherapy can spare the uninvolved larynx in the setting of advanced SCC of the oropharynx to levels that are similar to or better than those reported with other techniques. Sparing is achieved without compromising target coverage or other OAR sparing. The clinical benefit of this sparing remains to be determined in a prospective study.

  20. Human Papillomavirus 16 Infection and TP53 Mutation: Two Distinct Pathogeneses for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in an Eastern Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Dong-Xia; Li, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, p53 expression, and TP53 mutations in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) and determine their utility as prognostic predictors in a primarily eastern Chinese population. Methods The HPV infection status was tested via p16INK4A immunohistochemistry and validated using PCR, reverse blot hybridization and in situ hybridization (ISH) in 188 OPSCC samples. p53 expression levels and TP53 gene mutations were assessed through immunohistochemistry and sequencing, respectively. Clinicopathological characteristics and follow-up information were collected. Overall survival was estimated using the Log-rank test. Results Overall, 22 of the 188 OPSCC samples were associated with HPV infection. HPV16 was identified in all 22 samples, whereas no samples were positive for HPV18. All 22 HPV-associated OPSCC samples were p53 negative and lacked TP53 mutations. HPV16 positivity, female patients, non-smokers, and patients with histological grade I and stage N0 diseases showed better overall survival (p = 0.009, 0.003, 0.048, 0.009, and 0.004, respectively). No significant differences in overall survival between smoking and non-smoking patients were observed in the HPV-associated OPSCC group. Patients without mutations in TP53 exons 5–8 had better prognoses (p = 0.031) among the 43 sequenced specimens. Multivariate analysis indicated that HPV16 infection status (p = 0.011), histological grade (p = 0.017), and N stage (p = 0.019) were independent prognostic factors for patients with OPSCC. Conclusions Distinct from the situation in Europe and America, for the patients with OPSCC in this study, HPV16 infection was relatively low, although it was still the most important independent prognostic predictor for the disease. In addition to the high smoking and drinking rate in this population, HPV16 infection and TP53 dysfunction appear to be two distinct pathogens for OPSCC

  1. Concurrent Chemoradiation With Carboplatin-5-Fluorouracil Versus Cisplatin in Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Cancers: Is More Always Better?

    SciTech Connect

    Barkati, Maroie; Fortin, Bernard; Soulieres, Denis; Clavel, Sebastien; Despres, Phillipe; Charpentier, Danielle; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Guertin, Louis; Olivier, Marie-Jo; Coulombe, Genevieve; Donath, David; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The optimal chemotherapy regimen remains undefined in the treatment of locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer by concomitant chemoradiation. This article compares two platinum-based chemotherapy regimens. Methods and Materials: In this retrospective study, we reviewed all consecutive patients treated for Stage III or IVA-B oropharyngeal cancer using either a combination of carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5FU) every 3 weeks or high-dose cisplatin every 3 weeks concomitant with definitive radiation therapy. Results: A total of 200 patients were treated with carboplatin-5FU and 53 patients with cisplatin. Median potential follow-up was 43 months. The 3-year overall survival rates for carboplatin-5FU and cisplatin respectively were 79.1% and 74.9% (p = 0.628), the 3-year disease-free survival rates were 76.0% and 71.3% (p = 0.799), and the 3-year locoregional control rates were 88.4% and 94.2% (p = 0.244). Conclusions: We could not demonstrate differences between these two regimens, which both proved efficacious. Polychemotherapy and monochemotherapy therefore seem comparable in this retrospective analysis.

  2. De-escalation of radiation dose for human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A case report and preclinical and clinical literature review

    PubMed Central

    WU, CHENG-CHIA; HOROWITZ, DAVID P.; DEUTSCH, ISRAEL; RAHMATI, RAHMATULLAH; SCHECTER, JORDAN M.; SAQI, ANJALI; WANG, TONY J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has been considered to be a relatively homogeneous disease. However, recent data have demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative disease are two different clinical entities associated with different outcomes. Preclinical and clinical studies have reported a divergence in treatment strategies as well as prognostic outcomes for HNSCCs that are HPV-positive versus HPV-negative. The present study describes the case of a 52-year-old man who presented with stage IVB cT2N3M0 right tonsillar HPV-positive squamous cell carcinoma. Induction chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (TPF), followed by chemoradiation therapy with carboplatin and 70 Gray (Gy) radiation in daily fractions was recommended. The patient completed the TPF and carboplatin treatment; however, he was unable to tolerate the radiation course, receiving a final dose of 46 Gy. A 60-day follow-up right neck salvage dissection was subsequently performed. Despite having received a partial radiation treatment of 46 Gy, the patient had no pathological evidence of disease at 60 days post radiation treatment. Repeat positron emission tomography-computed tomography at 32 months after the right neck dissection revealed no evidence of disease. The present study also discusses the current preclinical in vitro and in vivo targets for HPV-positive HNSCC and the obstacles presented in advancing clinical treatment modalities. Previous preclinical models investigating radiation sensitivity have yielded mixed results. Thus, it is important to understand and establish representative preclinical models for studying HPV and HNSCC to improve clinical research and therapeutic development. This review may guide future understanding of the role of HPV in HNSCC. PMID:26870181

  3. Treatment Options for Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  4. Stages of Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  6. [Oropharyngeal anthrax].

    PubMed

    Onerci, M; Ergin, N T

    1993-07-01

    We report on a 46-year old man suffering from the oropharyngeal form of human anthrax. The patient presented with a sore throat and extensive swelling of the right neck, the oropharynx and especially the right tonsil. The skin of the mandibular and submandibular region showed vesicular lesions followed by ulcerations resulting in a blackish eschar. The diagnosis was verified by bacteriological culture. Thus, in cases of known exposure, in areas where anthrax is endemic or in immigrant workers coming from such areas, infection with bacillus anthracis should be included in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory oedematous lesions of the oropharynx. PMID:8369089

  7. Oropharyngeal anthrax.

    PubMed

    Navacharoen, N; Sirisanthana, T; Navacharoen, W; Ruckphaopunt, K

    1985-12-01

    The first bacteriologically confirmed case of oropharyngeal anthrax is described. A 59-year-old male patient presented with sore throat and extensive swelling of the neck and anterior chest wall five hours after the ingestion of uncooked water buffalo meat. Marked inflammation of the oropharynx and a small necrotic area in the left tonsil were found. Culture taken from this area grew Bacillus anthracis. In anthrax-susceptible areas, this acute illness should be added to the differential diagnoses of inflammatory lesion of the oropharynx with extensive neck swelling.

  8. Epigenetic changes in the CDKN2A locus are associated with differential expression of P16INK4A and P14ARF in HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schlecht, Nicolas F; Ben-Dayan, Miriam; Anayannis, Nicole; Lleras, Roberto A; Thomas, Carlos; Wang, Yanhua; Smith, Richard V; Burk, Robert D; Harris, Thomas M; Childs, Geoffrey; Ow, Thomas J; Prystowsky, Michael B; Belbin, Thomas J

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is recognized as a distinct disease entity associated with improved survival. DNA hypermethylation profiles differ significantly by HPV status suggesting that a specific subset of methylated CpG loci could give mechanistic insight into HPV-driven OPSCC. We analyzed genome-wide DNA methylation of primary tumor samples and adjacent normal mucosa from 46 OPSCC patients undergoing treatment at Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY using the Illumina HumanMethylation27 beadchip. For each matched tissue set, we measured differentially methylated CpG loci using a change in methylation level (M value). From these analyses, we identified a 22 CpG loci panel for HPV+ OPSCC that included four CDKN2A loci downstream of the p16(INK4A) and p14(ARF) transcription start sites. This panel was significantly associated with overall HPV detection (P < 0.05; ROC area under the curve = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.91-1.0) similar to the subset of four CDKN2A-specific CpG loci (0.90, 95% CI: 0.82-0.99) with equivalence to the full 22 CpG panel. DNA hypermethylation correlated with a significant increase in alternative open reading frame (ARF) expression in HPV+ OPSCC primary tumors, but not to the other transcript variant encoded by the CDKN2A locus. Overall, this study provides evidence of epigenetic changes to the downstream region of the CDKN2A locus in HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer that are associated with changes in expression of the coded protein products. PMID:25619363

  9. Candidiasis (oropharyngeal)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Candida is a fungus present in the mouths of up to 60% of healthy people, but overt infection is associated with immunosuppression, diabetes, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and corticosteroid use. In most people, untreated candidiasis persists for months or years unless associated risk factors are treated or eliminated. In neonates, spontaneous cure of oropharyngeal candidiasis usually occurs after 3 to 8 weeks. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent and treat oropharyngeal candidiasis in: adults having treatment causing immunosuppression; infants and children; people with diabetes; people with dentures; and people with HIV infection? Which treatments reduce the risk of acquiring resistance to antifungal drugs? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 46 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antifungals (absorbed or partially absorbed, and topical absorbed/partially absorbed/non-absorbed: e.g., amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, and nystatin) used for intermittent or continuous prophylaxis or therapy, and denture hygiene. PMID:19445752

  10. Candidiasis (oropharyngeal)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Candida is a fungus present in the mouths of up to 60% of healthy people, but overt infection is associated with immunosuppression, diabetes, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and corticosteroid use. In most people, untreated candidiasis persists for months or years unless associated risk factors are treated or eliminated. In neonates, spontaneous cure of oropharyngeal candidiasis usually occurs after 3 to 8 weeks. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent and treat oropharyngeal candidiasis in: adults having treatment causing immunosuppression; infants and children; people with diabetes; people with dentures; and people with HIV infection? Which treatments reduce the risk of acquiring resistance to antifungal drugs? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 51 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antifungals (absorbed or partially absorbed, and topical absorbed/partially absorbed/non-absorbed: e.g., amphotericin B, clotrimazole, fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, nystatin, posaconazole) used for intermittent or continuous prophylaxis or treatment, and denture hygiene. PMID:22348417

  11. Candidiasis (oropharyngeal)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Candida is a fungus present in the mouths of up to 60% of healthy people, but overt infection is associated with immunosuppression, diabetes, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and corticosteroid use. In most people, untreated candidiasis persists for months or years unless associated risk factors are treated or eliminated. In neonates, spontaneous cure of oropharyngeal candidiasis usually occurs after 3 to 8 weeks. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent and treat oropharyngeal candidiasis in: adults undergoing treatments that cause immunosuppression; infants and children; people with dentures; and people with HIV infection? Which antifungal regimens reduce the risk of acquiring resistance to antifungal drugs? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 47 RCTs or systematic reviews of RCTs that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antifungals (absorbed, partially or topically absorbed, or non-absorbed; for example, imidazole [ketoconazole, clotrimazole, toiconazole, miconazole], polyene [amphotericin B, nystatin], triazole [fluconazole, itraconazole], melaleuca and posaconazole), intermittent or continuous prophylaxis, or treatment, and denture hygiene. PMID:24209593

  12. Assessing p16 Status of Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma by Combined Assessment of the Number of Cells Stained and the Confluence of p16 Staining: A Validation by Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Barasch, Samuel; Mohindra, Pranshu; Hennrick, Kenneth; Hartig, Gregory K; Harari, Paul M; Yang, David T

    2016-09-01

    Human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has favorable prognosis relative to other head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Criteria for predicting human papillomavirus status based upon p16 staining, including difficult cases with partial staining patterns, have been developed; however, clinical validation of these criteria and the clinical significance of partial p16 staining have not been reported. Eighty-one archival OPSCC cases were initially stained for p16 by immunohistochemistry with clone G175-405. The percentage of p16 cells and percentage of confluence of p16 cells were categorized as 25%, 26% to 75%, or >75%. Of all cases, 16 (20%) had partial p16 expression, with 26% to 75% p16 cells. Applying previously developed criteria of >75% p16 cells or >50% positive cells with >25% confluence, 48 (59%) patients were categorized p16 and demonstrated expected clinical characteristics and superior disease-free survival and overall survival (P<0.001) compared with p16 patients. By themselves, the partial staining patients had intermediate outcomes; however, separating the partial staining cases by degree of confluence showed that those with >75% confluence had superior disease-free survival (P=0.042). When the 16 original partial staining cases were re-stained with the alternative anti-p16 E6H4 clone, p16 status remained concordant for all cases, but only 3 of the 16 were interpreted as demonstrating partial staining. This report shows that the prevalence of partial p16 staining varies with the antibody utilized and clinically validates the application of a graded evaluation of both the number as well as confluence of positive cells for risk stratification of patients with OPSCC.

  13. Clinicopathological evaluation of pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with S-1 as a treatment for locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KAWANO, SHINTARO; ZHENG, YANQUN; OOBU, KAZUNARI; MATSUBARA, RYOTA; GOTO, YUICHI; CHIKUI, TORU; YOSHITAKE, TADAMASA; KIYOSHIMA, TAMOTSU; JINNO, TEPPEI; MARUSE, YASUYUKI; MITATE, EIJI; KITAMURA, RYOJI; TANAKA, HIDEAKI; TOYOSHIMA, TAKESHI; SUGIURA, TSUYOSHI; NAKAMURA, SEIJI

    2016-01-01

    The administration of pre-operative chemotherapy with S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy at a total dose of 30 Gy was clinicopathologically evaluated as a treatment for locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in the present study. The participants comprised 81 patients with OSCC, consisting of 29 patients with stage II disease, 12 patients with stage III disease and 40 patients with stage IV disease. All patients received a total radiation dose of 30 Gy in daily fractions of 2 Gy, 5 times a week, for 3 weeks, and the patients were concurrently administered S-1 at a dose of 80–120 mg, twice daily, over 4 consecutive weeks. Radical surgery was performed in all cases at 2–6 weeks subsequent to the end of pre-operative chemoradiotherapy. The most common adverse event was oropharyngeal mucositis, but this was transient in all patients. No severe hematological or non-hematological toxicities were observed. The clinical and histopathological response rates were 70.4 and 75.3%, respectively. Post-operatively, local failure developed in 6 patients (7.4%) and neck failure developed in 2 patients (2.5%). Distant metastases were found in 7 patients (8.6%). The overall survival rate, disease-specific survival rate and locoregional control rate at 5 years were 87.7, 89.9 and 90.6%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence occurred more frequently in patients that demonstrated a poor histopathological response compared with patients that demonstrated a good response (P<0.01). These results indicate that pre-operative S-1 chemotherapy with radiotherapy at a total dose of 30 Gy is feasible and effective for patients with locally advanced OSCC, and that little or no histopathological response may be a risk factor for locoregional recurrence in this treatment. PMID:27123119

  14. Spontaneous regression in advanced squamous cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeon Hee; Park, Bo Mi; Park, Se Yeon; Choi, Jae Woo; Kim, Sun Young; Kim, Ju Ock; Jung, Sung Soo; Park, Hee Sun; Moon, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of malignant tumors is rare especially of lung tumor and biological mechanism of such remission has not been addressed. We report the case of a 79-year-old Korean patient with non-small cell lung cancer, squamous cell cancer with a right hilar tumor and multiple lymph nodes, lung to lung metastasis that spontaneously regressed without any therapies. He has sustained partial remission state for one year and eight months after the first histological diagnosis. PMID:27076978

  15. [Oropharyngeal candidiasis and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Pinel, B; Cassou-Mounat, T; Bensadoun, R-J

    2012-05-01

    The oropharyngeal candidiasis is a common condition in cancer patients treated by irradiation, during and after their treatment. For example, almost 70% of patients treated with chemoradiation for head and neck cancer are colonized, and 40% of symptomatic patients have an oropharyngeal candidiasis. Furthermore, we noticed an increase in non-albicans Candida strains, which are present in almost 50% of samples. Cancer treatments, especially radiation therapy, and comorbidities are risk factors of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Oropharyngeal candidiasis has substantial effects on quality of life, and may limit treatment. Epidemiologic data, physiopathology, clinical diagnosis criteria, consequences and treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis will be discussed in this article.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Cetuximab for Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Marco J.; Polinder, Suzanne; Lorenzen, Sylvie; Lordick, Florian; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spaander, Manon C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Costly biologicals in palliative oncology are emerging at a rapid pace. For example, in patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma addition of cetuximab to a palliative chemotherapy regimen appears to improve survival. However, it simultaneously results in higher costs. We aimed to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of adding cetuximab to first-line chemotherapeutic treatment of patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, based on data from a randomized controlled phase II trial. Methods A cost effectiveness analysis model was applied based on individual patient data. It included only direct medical costs from the health-care perspective. Quality-adjusted life-years and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated. Sensitivity analysis was performed by a Monte Carlo analysis. Results Adding cetuximab to a cisplatin-5-fluorouracil first-line regimen for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma resulted in an the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €252,203 per quality-adjusted life-year. Sensitivity analysis shows that there is a chance of less than 0.001 that the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio will be less than a maximum willingness to pay threshold of €40,000 per quality-adjusted life-year, which is representative for the threshold used in The Netherlands and other developed countries. Conclusions Addition of cetuximab to a cisplatin-5-fluorouracil first-line regimen for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is not cost-effective when appraised according to currently accepted criteria. Cost-effectiveness analyses using outcome data from early clinical trials (i.c. a phase II trial) enable pharmaceutical companies and policy makers to gain early insight into whether a new drug meets the current eligibility standards for reimbursement and thereby potential admittance for use in regular clinical practice. PMID:27100871

  17. Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-04

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With High Risk Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  19. Weekly Low-Dose Docetaxel-Based Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal or Hypopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Retrospective, Single-Institution Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, Junichi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Takeda, Atsuya; Ohashi, Toshio; Tomita, Toshiki; Shiotani, Akihiro; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Fujii, Masato; Kubo, Atsushi

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the efficacy, toxicity, and prognostic factors of weekly low-dose docetaxel-based chemoradiotherapy for Stage III/IV oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2005, 72 consecutive patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCR; radiation at 60 Gy plus weekly docetaxel [10 mg/m{sup 2}]). Thirty of these patients also received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC; docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil) before concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Survival was calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. The prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months, with overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control rates at 3 years of 59%, 45%, and 52%, respectively. Thirty-six patients (50%) experienced more than one Grade 3 to 4 acute toxicity. Grade 3 mucositis occurred in 32 patients (44%), Grade 4 laryngeal edema in 1 (1%). Grade >=3 severe hematologic toxicity was observed in only 2 patients (3%). Grade 3 dysphagia occurred as a late complication in 2 patients (3%). Multivariate analyses identified age, T stage, hemoglobin level, and completion of weekly docetaxel, but not NAC, as significant factors determining disease-free survival. Conclusions: Docetaxel is an active agent used in both concurrent and sequential chemoradiotherapy regimens. Mucositis was the major acute toxicity, but this was well tolerated in most subjects. Anemia was the most significant prognostic factor determining survival. Further studies are warranted to investigate the optimal protocol for integrating docetaxel into first-line chemoradiotherapy regimens, as well as the potential additive impact of NAC.

  20. Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Who Have Undergone Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Spindle Cell Variant; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  1. Factors related to advanced stage oral squamous cell carcinoma in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kerdpon, D; Sriplung, H

    2001-04-01

    A critical factor that indicates a poor prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is advanced stage disease. This study, therefore, aimed to identify the factors related to advanced stage (TNM staging III, IV) OSCC in Thailand. There were 161 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and lip (ICD-9 140, 141, 143-5), included in the study. Sixty-two per cent of the patients presented with advanced stage disease. Information on demographic characteristics, risk habits, health-seeking behaviour prior to health care professional (HCP) consultation, tumour characteristics and patient and professional delay was obtained by questionnaire-based interview of the patients. These variables were included as initial variables in a logistic regression to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of advanced versus early stage OSCC. Having traditional herbal medication before HCP consultation significantly increased the risk of advanced stage OSCC (OR 5.77; 95% C.I. 1.25-26.62). Floor of mouth location of tumour was associated with a lower risk of advanced stage disease (OR 0.27; 95% C.I. 0.09-0.82) as was having an ulcer (OR 0.43, 95% C.I. 0.02-0.89). The findings indicate that having traditional herbal medication before HCP consultation increased the risk of advanced stage disease. The lower risk of advanced stage OSCC associated with ulcerative tumours and those on the floor of the mouth may be due to their being more readily detected by the patients. PMID:11287274

  2. Immunological Treatment Options for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirandola, Leonardo; Bernardini, Giovanni; Cunha, Nicholas D’; Tijani, Lukman; Nguyen, Diane; Cordero, Joehassin; Jenkins, Marjorie R.; Cobos, Everardo; Kast, W. Martin; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) are usually treated by a multimodal approach with surgery and/or radiochemotherapy as the mainstay of local–regional treatment in cases with advanced disease. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy have the disadvantage of causing severe side effects, while the clinical outcome of patients diagnosed with HNSCC has remained essentially unchanged over the last decade. The potential of immunotherapy is still largely unexplored. Here the authors review the current status of the art and discuss the future challenges in HNSCC treatment and prevention. PMID:22251006

  3. Stages of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  4. SU-E-T-398: Feasibility of Automated Tools for Robustness Evaluation of Advanced Photon and Proton Techniques in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H; Liang, X; Kalbasi, A; Lin, A; Ahn, P; Both, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Advanced radiotherapy (RT) techniques such as proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) and photon-based volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) have dosimetric advantages in the treatment of head and neck malignancies. However, anatomic or alignment changes during treatment may limit robustness of PBS and VMAT plans. We assess the feasibility of automated deformable registration tools for robustness evaluation in adaptive PBS and VMAT RT of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods: We treated 10 patients with bilateral OPC with advanced RT techniques and obtained verification CT scans with physician-reviewed target and OAR contours. We generated 3 advanced RT plans for each patient: proton PBS plan using 2 posterior oblique fields (2F), proton PBS plan using an additional third low-anterior field (3F), and a photon VMAT plan using 2 arcs (Arc). For each of the planning techniques, we forward calculated initial (Ini) plans on the verification scans to create verification (V) plans. We extracted DVH indicators based on physician-generated contours for 2 target and 14 OAR structures to investigate the feasibility of two automated tools (contour propagation (CP) and dose deformation (DD)) as surrogates for routine clinical plan robustness evaluation. For each verification scan, we compared DVH indicators of V, CP and DD plans in a head-to-head fashion using Student's t-test. Results: We performed 39 verification scans; each patient underwent 3 to 6 verification scan. We found no differences in doses to target or OAR structures between V and CP, V and DD, and CP and DD plans across all patients (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Automated robustness evaluation tools, CP and DD, accurately predicted dose distributions of verification (V) plans using physician-generated contours. These tools may be further developed as a potential robustness screening tool in the workflow for adaptive treatment of OPC using advanced RT techniques, reducing the need for physician-generated contours.

  5. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Compared With Conventional Radiotherapy in Patients Treated With Concurrent Carboplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Clavel, Sebastien; Nguyen, David H.A.; Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe; Khaouam, Nader; Donath, David; Soulieres, Denis; Guertin, Louis; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, the toxicity and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in patients treated with concomitant carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and December 2007, 249 patients were treated with definitive chemoradiation. One hundred patients had 70 Gy in 33 fractions using IMRT, and 149 received CRT at 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months. Three-year actuarial rates for locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 95.1% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.005), 85.3% vs. 69.3% (p = 0.001), and 92.1% vs. 75.2% (p < 0.001) for IMRT and CRT, respectively. The benefit of the radiotherapy regimen on outcomes was also observed with a Cox multivariate analysis. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with less acute dermatitis and less xerostomia at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Conclusions: This study suggests that simultaneous integrated boost using IMRT is associated with favorable locoregional control and survival rates with less xerostomia and acute dermatitis than CRT when both are given concurrently with chemotherapy.

  6. Prognostic significance of CT-emphysema score in patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Saing; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Cho, Eun Kyung; Jeong, Yu Mi; Kim, Jeong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Although emphysema is a known independent risk factor of lung cancer, no study has addressed the prognostic impact of computed tomography (CT)-emphysema score in advanced stage lung cancer. Methods For 84 consecutive patients with stage IIIB and IV squamous cell lung cancer that underwent palliative chemotherapy, severity of emphysema was semi-quantitatively scored using baseline chest CT images according to the Goddard scoring system (possible scores range, 0–24). The cutoff of high CT-emphysema score was determined using the maximum chi-squared test and the prognostic significance of the high CT-emphysema score was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards analysis. Results The median CT-emphysema score was 5 (range, 0–22). Patients with a high CT-emphysema score (≥4) tended to have poorer overall survival (OS) (median: 6.3 vs. 13.7 months) than those with a score of <4 (P=0.071). Multivariable analysis revealed that a higher CT-emphysema score was a significant independent prognostic factor for poor OS [hazard ratio (HR) =2.06; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.24–3.41; P=0.005), along with no response to first-line therapy (P=0.009) and no second-line therapy (P<0.001). Conclusions CT-emphysema score is significantly associated with poor prognosis in patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer. PMID:27621848

  7. Salivary biomarkers for detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma – current state and recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Yakob, Maha; Fuentes, Laurel; Wang, Marilene B.; Abemayor, Elliot; Wong, David T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignant neoplasm of the oral cavity. Detection of OSCC is currently based on thorough clinical oral examination combined with biopsy for histological analysis. Most cases of OSCC are not detected until the cancer has developed into advanced stages; thus, a reliable early stage diagnostic marker is needed. This literature review presents an overview of the status of current advances in salivary diagnostics for OSCC. Though many protein and mRNA salivary biomarkers have been identified that can detect OSCC with high sensitivity and specificity, the most discernable findings occur with the use of multiple markers. Studies that incorporate proteomic, transcriptomic, and potentially additional “omics”, including methylomics, need to be initiated to bring technology to clinical applications and allow the best use of saliva in diagnosing OSCC. PMID:24883261

  8. Phase II Study of Cetuximab in Combination with Cisplatin and Radiation in Unresectable, Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Trial E3303

    PubMed Central

    Egloff, Ann Marie; Lee, Ju-Whei; Langer, Corey J.; Quon, Harry; Vaezi, Alec; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Seethala, Raja R.; Wang, Lin; Shin, Dong M.; Argiris, Athanassios; Yang, Donghua; Mehra, Ranee; Ridge, John Andrew; Patel, Urjeet A.; Burtness, Barbara A.; Forastiere, Arlene A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Cisplatin or cetuximab combined with radiotherapy (RT) each yield superior survival in locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer (LA-SCCHN) compared to RT alone. E3303 evaluated the triple combination. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Patients with stage IV unresectable LA-SCCHN received a loading dose of cetuximab (400mg/m2) followed by 250mg/m2/week and cisplatin 75mg/m2 q 3 weeks x3 cycles concurrent with standard fractionated RT. In the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, patients continued maintenance cetuximab for 6–12 months. Primary endpoint was 2-year progression-free survival (PFS). Patient tumor and blood correlates, including tumor human papillomavirus (HPV) status, were evaluated for association with survival. RESULTS Sixty-nine patients were enrolled; 60 proved eligible and received protocol treatment. Oropharyngeal (OP) primaries constituted the majority (66.7%), stage T4 48.3% and N2–3 91.7%. Median RT dose delivered was 70 Gy, 71.6% received all 3 cycles of cisplatin and 74.6% received maintenance cetuximab. Median PFS was 19.4 months, 2-year PFS 47% (95%CI: 33–61%). 2-year overall survival (OS) was 66% (95%CI: 53–77%); median OS was not reached. Response rate was 66.7%. Most common grade ≥3 toxicities included mucositis (55%), dysphagia (46%) and neutropenia (26%); one attributable grade 5 toxicity occurred. Only tumor HPV status was significantly associated with survival. HPV was evaluable in 29 tumors; 10 (all OP) were HPV+. HPV+ patients had significantly longer OS and PFS (p=0.004 and p=0.036, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Concurrent cetuximab, cisplatin and RT were well-tolerated and yielded promising 2-year PFS and OS in LA-SCCHN with improved survival for patients with HPV+ tumors. PMID:25107914

  9. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva

    PubMed Central

    GAUDINEAU, A.; WEITBRUCH, D.; QUETIN, P.; HEYMANN, S.; PETIT, T.; VOLKMAR, P.; BODIN, F.; VELTEN, M.; RODIER, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative therapies have been sought to alleviate mutilation and morbidity associated with surgery for vulvar neoplasms. Our prime objective was to assess tumor absence in pathological vulvar and nodal specimens following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced vulvar neoplasms. Data were retrospectively collected from January 2001 to May 2009 from 22 patients treated with neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of inguino-pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy) in association with chemotherapy when possible. Surgery occurred at intervals of between 5 to 8 weeks. The median age of patients at diagnosis was 74.1 years. All patients were primarily treated with radiotherapy and 15 received a concomitant chemotherapy. Additionally, all patients underwent radical vulvectomy and bilateral inguino-femoral lymphadenectomy. Tumor absence in the vulvar and nodal pathological specimens was achieved for 6 (27%) patients, while absence in the vulvar pathological specimens was only achieved for 10 (45.4%) patients. Postoperative follow-up revealed breakdown of groin wounds, vulvar wounds and chronic lymphedema in 3 (14.3%), 7 (31.8%) and 14 cases (63.6%), respectively. Within a median follow-up time of 2.3 years [interquartile range (IQR), 0.6–4.6], 12 (54.6%) patients experienced complete remission and 6 cases succumbed to metastatic evolution within a median of 2.2 years (IQR, 0.6–4.6), with 1 case also experiencing perineal recurrence. Median survival time, estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, was 5.1 years (IQR, 1.0–6.8). We suggest that neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy may represent a reliable and promising strategy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva. PMID:23205089

  10. Adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced squamous carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Pradier, Olivier . E-mail: opradier@gwdg.de; Christiansen, Hans; Schmidberger, Heinz; Martin, Alexios; Jaeckel, Martin C.; Steiner, Wolfgang; Ambrosch, Petra; Kahler, Elke; Hess, Clemens F.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of an adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and to show that a less invasive surgery with organ preservation in combination with radiotherapy is an alternative to a radical treatment. Patients and Methods: Between 1987 and 2000, 208 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with postoperative radiotherapy after surgical CO{sub 2} laser resection. Primary sites included oral cavity, 38; oropharynx, 88; larynx, 36; hypopharynx, 46. Disease stages were as follows: Stage III, 40 patients; Stage IV, 168 patients. Before 1994, the treatment consisted of a split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum (Treatment A). After 1994, the patients received a conventional radiotherapy (Treatment B). Results: Patients had 5-year locoregional control and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates of 68% and 48%, respectively. The 5-year DSS was 70% and 44% for Stages III and IV, respectively (p = 0.00127). Patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater or equal to 13.5 g/dL before radiotherapy had a 5-year DSS of 55% as compared with 39% for patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater than 13.5 g/dL (p = 0.0054). Conclusion: In this series of patients with advanced head-and-neck tumors, transoral laser surgery in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy resulted in locoregional control and DSS rates similar to those reported for radical surgery followed by radiotherapy. Treatment B has clearly been superior to Treatment A. A further improvement of our treatment regimen might be expected by the combination of adjuvant radiotherapy with concomitant platinum-based chemotherapy.

  11. Rapid sequence treatment of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Moloy, P.J.; Moran, E.M.; Azawi, S. )

    1991-01-01

    A review of the literature suggested that prolonged treatment time may lessen the probability of cure for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. To shorten treatment time, rapid sequence treatment (RST) was devised in which chemotherapy, surgery, and irradation were administered in a total treatment time of 8 weeks. Twelve patients were treated and followed 3 years or longer. Medical complications were minor. Osteonecrosis occurred in each of the first five patients and was the only major complication of the protocol. Surgical techniques were modified, and no additional patient developed osteonecrosis. No patient developed local or regional recurrence. Two patients developed distant metastases and three other patients developed second primaries. Absolute survival was 50%. Rapid sequence treatment is an aggressive and potentially hazardous protocol that yielded encouraging results in this pilot study.

  12. Biphenotypic human papillomavirus-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Pitiyage, Gayani; Lei, Mary; Guererro Urbano, Teresa; Odell, Edward; Thavaraj, Selvam

    2015-07-11

    Human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is now recognised as a subtype of head and neck cancer with distinct clinical, molecular and histological characteristics. The majority of these carcinomas are of non-keratinising squamous type but there is a growing number of histomorphologic variants of this disease. Here we describe the clinical, histomorphologic and immunophenotypic features of two cases of human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrating a clearly delineated biphasic differentiated and undifferentiated phenotype.

  13. Exploring the link between human papilloma virus and oral and oropharyngeal cancers.

    PubMed

    Khode, Shailesh R; Dwivedi, Raghav C; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Kazi, Rehan

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma involving the oral cavity (OC) and oropharynx regions are a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. The recent discovery of a strong association between human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and OC and oropharyngeal (OP) cancer has prompted world-wide research into the exact etiology and pathogenesis of these cancers in relation to the HPV. HPV-positive OC/OP cancers generally present at a relatively advanced stage (by virtue of cervical nodal involvement) and are more commonly seen in younger patients without significant exposure to alcohol or tobacco. These factors are implicated in prognosis, regardless of HPV association. In this article, we review the biology and epidemiology, risk factors, association, molecular analyses, treatment response and prognosis of HPV-related cancers. Role of HPV vaccination in HPV-related OC/OP cancers has also been discussed.

  14. Rapid Response of Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with Thrombocytopenia after First-Line Treatment with Pembrolizumab Plus Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hui, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Xinwei; Ren, Baozhu; Li, Runmei; Ren, Xiubao

    2015-01-01

    We present the first clinical evidence of advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer with severe thrombocytopenia showing dramatic improvement after first-line treatment with pembrolizumab plus autologous cytokine-induced killer cells.

  15. Infrahyoid flap in oropharyngeal reconstruction following carcinoma resection: A study of 6 patients and literature review

    PubMed Central

    INFANTE-COSSIO, PEDRO; GONZALEZ-CARDERO, EDUARDO; LOPEZ-MARTOS, RICARDO; NUÑEZ-VERA, VICTORIA; OLMOS-JUAREZ, ERIKA; RUIZ-MOYA, ALEJANDRO; HARO-LUNA, JUAN-JOSE; TORRES-CARRRANZA, EUSEBIO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe the techniques used and the results obtained with the infrahyoid flap for the reconstruction of medium-sized oropharyngeal defects following resection for advanced squamous cell cancer. During a period of 1 year, six patients with oropharyngeal defects were reconstructed using the infrahyoid flap. The tumor characteristics, location and size of the defect, resective and reconstructive techniques employed and the complications and outcomes of the speech and swallowing functions, as identified in the follow-up visits every 3 months, were evaluated. All flaps were performed simultaneously in association with tumoral excision and ipsilateral supraomohyoid neck dissection. The mean size of the skin paddle was 7.0×3.5 cm. The donor site was primarily sutured. The postoperative course was uneventful and all flaps were viable. One case of marginal skin paddle loss occurred without affecting the survival of the flap. Five patients received postoperative radiotherapy and one patient received concurrent postoperative chemotherapy. During the follow-up period (mean, 63 months), all patients showed excellent oral swallowing. Speech was excellent in five patients and in one patient speech was classified as good. The aesthetic results of the cervical donor site were good. Based on the present case report and the literature review, the infrahyoid flap is a simple and safe procedure for the reconstruction of the oropharynx, with a high success rate, minimal donor site morbidity and good aesthetic and functional results. The infrahyoid flap is a valid surgical option that may be considered in selected oncological patients undergoing reconstruction of medium-size oropharyngeal defects. PMID:27123141

  16. Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, George R.; Patel, Payal K.; Kirkpatrick, William R.; Westbrook, Steven D.; Berg, Deborah; Erlandsen, Josh; Redding, Spencer W.; Patterson, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) remains a common problem in the HIV-infected population despite the availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Although Candida albicans is the most frequently implicated pathogen, other Candida spp. may also cause infection. The emergence of antifungal resistance within these causative yeasts, especially in patients with recurrent oropharyngeal infection or with long-term use of antifungal therapies, requires a working knowledge of alternative antifungal agents. Identification of the infecting organism and antifungal susceptibility testing enhances the ability of clinicians to prescribe appropriate antifungal therapy. Characterization of the responsible mechanisms has improved our understanding of the development of antifungal resistance and could enhance the management of these infections. Immune reconstitution has been shown to reduce rates of oropharyngeal candidiasis but few studies have evaluated the current impact of ART on the epidemiology of oropharyngeal candidiasis and antifungal resistance in these patients. Preliminary results from an ongoing clinical study showed that in patients with advanced AIDS oral yeast colonization was extensive, occurring in 81.1% of the 122 patients studied and symptomatic infection occurred in a third. In addition, resistant yeasts were still common occurring in 25.3% of patients colonized with yeasts or with symptomatic infection. Thus, oropharyngeal candidasis remains a significant infection in advanced AIDS even with ART. Current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, treatment, and mechanisms of antifungal resistance observed in oropharyngeal candidiasis are important in managing patients with this infection and are the focus of this review. PMID:20156694

  17. Non-coding RNAs deregulation in oral squamous cell carcinoma: advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Yu, T; Li, C; Wang, Z; Liu, K; Xu, C; Yang, Q; Tang, Y; Wu, Y

    2016-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a common cause of cancer death. Despite decades of improvements in exploring new treatments and considerable advance in multimodality treatment, satisfactory curative rates have not yet been reached. The difficulty of early diagnosis and the high prevalence of metastasis associated with OSCC contribute to its dismal prognosis. In the last few decades the emerging data from both tumor biology and clinical trials led to growing interest in the research for predictive biomarkers. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are promising biomarkers. Among numerous kinds of ncRNAs, short ncRNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), have been extensively investigated with regard to their biogenesis, function, and importance in carcinogenesis. In contrast to miRNAs, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are much less known concerning their functions in human cancers especially in OSCC. The present review highlighted the roles of miRNAs and newly discovered lncRNAs in oral tumorigenesis, metastasis, and their clinical implication.

  18. Combined-modality treatment for advanced oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, K.-H.; Lin, C.-Y. |; Kang, C.-J.; Huang, S.-F.; Chen, I.-H.; Liao, C.-T. |; Wang, H.-M. |; Cheng, A.-J. |; Chang, J.T.-C. ||. E-mail: jtchang@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate prognostic factors in advanced-stage oral tongue cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant therapy and to identify indications for adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 201 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue managed between January 1995 and November 2002. All had undergone wide excision and neck dissection plus adjuvant radiotherapy or CCRT. Based on postoperative staging, 123 (61.2%) patients had Stage IV and 78 (38.8%) had Stage III disease. All patients were followed for at least 18 months after completion of radiotherapy or until death. The median follow-up was 40.4 months for surviving patients. The median dose of radiotherapy was 64.8 Gy (range, 58.8-72.8 Gy). Cisplatin-based regimens were used for chemotherapy. Results: The 3-year overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates were 48% and 50.8%, respectively. Stage, multiple nodal metastases, differentiation, and extracapsular spread (ECS) significantly affected disease-specific survival on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, multiple nodal metastases, differentiation, ECS, and CCRT were independent prognostic factors. If ECS was present, only CCRT significantly improved survival (3-year RFS with ECS and with CCRT = 48.2% vs. without CCRT = 15%, p = 0.038). In the presence of other poor prognostic factors, results of the two treatment strategies did not significantly differ. Conclusions: Based on this study, ECS appears to be an absolute indication for adjuvant CCRT. CCRT can not be shown to be statistically better than radiotherapy alone in this retrospective series when ECS is not present.

  19. Comprehensive Genomic Profiling of Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Esophageal Adenocarcinomas Reveals Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Adrienne; Ali, Siraj M.; Klempner, Samuel J.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Vacirca, Jeffrey L.; Khaira, Depinder; Yelensky, Roman; Chmielecki, Juliann; Elvin, Julia A.; Lipson, Doron; Miller, Vincent A.; Stephens, Philip J.; Ross, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) and esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs) account for >95% of esophageal malignancies and represent a major global health burden. ESCC is the dominant histology globally but represents a minority of U.S. cases, with EAC accounting for the majority of U.S. cases. The patient outcomes for advanced ESCC and EAC are poor, and new therapeutic options are needed. Using a sensitive sequencing assay, we compared the genomic profiles of ESCC and EAC with attention to identification of therapeutically relevant genomic alterations. Methods. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive genomic profiling was performed on hybridization-captured, adaptor ligation-based libraries to a median coverage depth of >650× for all coding exons of 315 cancer-related genes plus selected introns from 28 genes frequently rearranged in cancer. Results from a single sample were evaluated for all classes of genomic alterations (GAs) including point mutations, short insertions and deletions, gene amplifications, homozygous deletions, and fusions/rearrangements. Clinically relevant genomic alterations (CRGAs) were defined as alterations linked to approved drugs and those under evaluation in mechanism-driven clinical trials. Results. There were no significant differences by sex for either tumor type, and the median age for all patients was 63 years. All ESCCs and EACs were at an advanced stage at the time of sequencing. All 71 ESCCs and 231 EACs featured GAs on profiling, with 522 GAs in ESCC (7.4 per sample) and 1,303 GAs in EAC (5.6 per sample). The frequency of clinically relevant GAs in ESCC was 94% (2.6 per sample) and 93% in EAC (2.7 per sample). CRGAs occurring more frequently in EAC included KRAS (23% EAC vs. 6% ESCC) and ERBB2 (23% EAC vs. 3% ESCC). ESCC samples were enriched for CRGA in PIK3CA (24% ESCC vs. 10% EAC), PTEN (11% ESCC vs. 4% EAC), and NOTCH1 (17% ESCC vs. 3% EAC). Other GAs that differed significantly between histologic

  20. Oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Nguyen, Ly M.; Thomas, Sroka; Hong-Ly, Bevan; Chi, Alexander; Vos, Paul; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We aimed to study the prevalence of oral sex and its possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection in the development of oropharyngeal cancer in the US population for possible prevention. Methods: We conduct a systemic review on the prevalence of oral sex among Americans among different age groups, the prevalence of HPV 16 infection reported in oropharyngeal cancer, and correlation between oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer. Results: Oral sex is prevalent among adolescents and sexually active adults. Sixty percent of oropharyngeal cancer reported in the United States is associated with HPV 16 infections. Individuals who practiced oral sex with multiple partners are at risk for developing oropharyngeal cancer and need to be informed about practicing safe sex or getting vaccination. Conclusion: Family physicians will play a key role in prevention and educating the public about the risk of oral sex. PMID:27428229

  1. Intratumoral PV701 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Unresectable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  2. Rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Clinical results in 178 advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.D.; Demange, L.; Froissart, D.; Panis, X.; Loirette, M.

    1985-07-01

    The authors present a series of 178 patients with Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated by rapid irradiation using multiple and small fractions per day. An initial group of 91 patients (G1) received a total dose of 72 Gy in 80 sessions and 10 days, according to the following split course schedule: J1 to J5, 36 Gy in 40 sessions, eight daily fractions of .9 Gy separated by 2 hours; J6 to J20, rest period; J21 to J25, same as in J1 except that the spinal cord was shielded. This protocol was altered for the following 87 patients (G2) by lessening the total dose to 60 to 66 Gy and the number of fractions to 60. The rest period was lengthened to 4 weeks. All patients but five completed the whole program and the minimal follow-up period was 24 months. At the end of irradiation, 121 patients achieved a total remission, but local recurrences occurred in 56%. Moreover, acute intolerance was considered as severe in 34% of G1 patients, and included extensive mucosal necrosis and bleeding. Although this rate was significantly reduced in G2 patients, late complications were observed in 20 of the 25 survivors, and included trismus, cervical sclerosis, and recurrent laryngeal edema. The crude survival rate is 13% at 2 years. Although this study was not randomized, this particular type of accelerated and hyperfractionated combination of irradiation did not really improve the clinical results in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck. Other schedules and probably other tumors, less extended, should be tested.

  3. Recent Advances in Targetable Therapeutics in Metastatic Non-Squamous NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Pranshu; Osman, Diaa; Gan, Gregory N.; Simon, George R.; Boumber, Yanis

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is the most common subtype of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). With the discovery of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements, and effective targeted therapies, therapeutic options are expanding for patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Here, we review novel therapies in non-squamous NSCLC, which are directed against oncogenic targets, including EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF, MET, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), RET, and NTRK. With the rapidly evolving molecular testing and development of new targeted agents, our ability to further personalize therapy in non-squamous NSCLC is rapidly expanding. PMID:27200298

  4. General Information about Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  6. Potential Benefits of Scanned Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Advanced Photon Therapy With Regard to Sparing of the Salivary Glands in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Water, Tara A. van de; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Jong, Marije E. de; Schilstra, Cornelis; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that scanned intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) results in a significant dose reduction to the parotid and submandibular glands as compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with photons (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. In addition, we investigated whether the achieved dose reductions would theoretically translate into a reduction of salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with N0 oropharyngeal carcinoma were used. The intensity-modulated plans delivered simultaneously 70 Gy to the boost planning target volume (PTV2) and 54 Gy to the elective nodal areas (PTV1). The 3D-CRT technique delivered sequentially 70 Gy and 46 Gy to PTV2 and PTV1, respectively. Normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Results: Planning target volume coverage results were similar for IMPT and IMRT. Intensity-modulated proton therapy clearly improved the conformity. The 3D-CRT results were inferior to these results. The mean dose to the parotid glands by 3D-CRT (50.8 Gy), IMRT (25.5 Gy), and IMPT (16.8 Gy) differed significantly. For the submandibular glands no significant differences between IMRT and IMPT were found. The dose reductions obtained with IMPT theoretically translated into a significant reduction in normal tissue complication probability. Conclusion: Compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT, IMPT improved sparing of the organs at risk, while keeping similar target coverage results. The dose reductions obtained with IMPT vs. IMRT and 3D-CRT varied widely per individual patient. Intensity-modulated proton therapy theoretically translated into a clinical benefit for most cases, but this requires clinical validation.

  7. Medical Imaging of Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is associated with documented risk factors, yet no comprehensive screening program is in place in the United States for early detection of the disease. Oral cancer often is diagnosed in more advanced stages, resulting in a poor prognosis. Dental practitioners and radiographers play an important role in the management of the disease and in helping to improve the quality of life for people who have oral cancer. This article discusses types of oral and oropharyngeal cancer, their diagnosis, treatment options, and the role of dental imaging in patients with these cancers. PMID:26538220

  8. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? Cancer starts when cells in ... the parts of the mouth and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes ...

  9. Worldwide trends show oropharyngeal cancer rates increasing

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer significantly increased during the period 1983-2002 among people in countries that are economically developed. Oropharyngeal cancer occurs primarily in the middle part of the throat behind t

  10. Feasibility and Response of Concurrent Weekly Docetaxel with Radical Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    I, Rajesh; B, Rajesh; B, Selvamani; John, Subhashini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: (1) To study the feasibility, adverse effects and response of concurrent weekly Docetaxel with radical radiotherapy in inoperable locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. (2) To assess the compliance and tolerance of weekly Docetaxel with radiotherapy. Material and Methods: Twenty one patients with stage III and IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma satisfying inclusion criteria were selected and treated with conventional external radiotherapy of 70Gy in 35 fractions with weekly concurrent Docetaxel (15mg/sqm), administered one hour before radiotherapy. Assessment of toxicities and evaluationof response was carried out. Results: Majority of patients had stage IV diseaseand 17/21 (81%) received the planned radiotherapydose of 70Gy and ≥4 cycles of weekly chemotherapy. Duration of treatment ranged from 7.1to 11.2 weeks. The toxicities noted were Grade III mucositis in 57% and grade III skin reaction in 23%, grade III dysphagia in 38% and grade II weight loss in 23% of patients. Systemic toxicities associated with chemotherapy were minimal and there was no dose limiting toxicities. The overall locoregional response at first follow up was 85%, with complete response of 70% and partial response of 15%. Conclusion: Concurrent Docetaxel is a feasible and suitable alternate to Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil chemotherapy with good patient compliance. The late toxicities and survival need to be followed up. PMID:25954690

  11. Iodine-125 seed implantation as an adjunct to surgery in advanced recurrent squamous cell cancer of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Park, R.I.; Liberman, F.Z.; Lee, D.J.; Goldsmith, M.M.; Price, J.C. )

    1991-04-01

    Survival for extensive recurrent squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck remains poor, with the major cause of death being local recurrence. Surgical implantation of iodine-125 interstitial seeds allows tumoricidal doses of radiation to be delivered to residual tumor while minimizing radiation doses to the surrounding tissues. From 1978 to 1988, 39 implantations were performed on 35 patients for extensive recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. The decision for implantation was based on positive margins or close to resection margins from frozen sections after salvage resection. The determinate 5-year disease-free survival was 41%, with both the overall and no evidence of disease 5-year survivals being 29%. Significant complications occurred in 36% of all cases. This figure increased to 56% when flap reconstruction was required. Possible reasons for this seemingly high complication rate are discussed. Considering the advanced nature of these recurrent carcinomas, surgical resection with iodine-125 seed implantation appears to be an effective method of managing disease that might otherwise be judged unresectable and treated for palliation only.

  12. HPV Genotypes Predict Survival Benefits From Concurrent Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Huang, Yi-Ting; Chao, Angel; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone or concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: Between August 1993 and May 2000, 327 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage III/IVA or stage IIB with positive lymph nodes) were eligible for this study. HPV genotypes were determined using the Easychip Registered-Sign HPV genechip. Outcomes were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: We detected 22 HPV genotypes in 323 (98.8%) patients. The leading 4 types were HPV16, 58, 18, and 33. The 5-year overall and disease-specific survival estimates for the entire cohort were 41.9% and 51.4%, respectively. CCRT improved the 5-year disease-specific survival by an absolute 9.8%, but this was not statistically significant (P=.089). There was a significant improvement in disease-specific survival in the CCRT group for HPV18-positive (60.9% vs 30.4%, P=.019) and HPV58-positive (69.3% vs 48.9%, P=.026) patients compared with the RT alone group. In contrast, the differences in survival with CCRT compared with RT alone in the HPV16-positive and HPV-33 positive subgroups were not statistically significant (P=.86 and P=.53, respectively). An improved disease-specific survival was observed for CCRT treated patients infected with both HPV16 and HPV18, but these differenced also were not statistically significant. Conclusions: The HPV genotype may be a useful predictive factor for the effect of CCRT in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Verifying these results in prospective trials could have an impact on tailoring future treatment based on HPV genotype.

  13. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-12

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  14. Human papillomavirus prevalence in oropharyngeal cancer before vaccine introduction, United States.

    PubMed

    Steinau, Martin; Saraiya, Mona; Goodman, Marc T; Peters, Edward S; Watson, Meg; Cleveland, Jennifer L; Lynch, Charles F; Wilkinson, Edward J; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Copeland, Glen; Saber, Maria S; Hopenhayn, Claudia; Huang, Youjie; Cozen, Wendy; Lyu, Christopher; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2014-05-01

    We conducted a study to determine prevalence of HPV types in oropharyngeal cancers in the United States and establish a prevaccine baseline for monitoring the impact of vaccination. HPV DNA was extracted from tumor tissue samples from patients in whom cancer was diagnosed during 1995-2005. The samples were obtained from cancer registries and Residual Tissue Repository Program sites in the United States. HPV was detected and typed by using PCR reverse line blot assays. Among 557 invasive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas, 72% were positive for HPV and 62% for vaccine types HPV16 or 18. Prevalence of HPV-16/18 was lower in women (53%) than in men (66%), and lower in non-Hispanic Black patients (31%) than in other racial/ethnic groups (68%-80%). Results indicate that vaccines could prevent most oropharyngeal cancers in the United States, but their effect may vary by demographic variables.

  15. Efficacy of short-term nivolumab treatment in a Chinese patient with relapsed advanced-stage lung squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Guoliang; He, Hanping; Bi, Jianping; Li, Ying; Li, Yanping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Mingwei; Han, Guang; Lin, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Currently, the options are limited for the treatment of patients who have failed 2 lines of chemotherapy for advanced lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Recently, nivolumab, a fully human IgG4 programmed death 1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody, was approved to treat patients with advanced stage, relapsed/refractory lung SCC. Although nivolumab has demonstrated antitumor activity with survival benefit in Caucasian patients, its efficacy in Asian patients is unknown. Case Report: In this report, we describe a Chinese patient with relapsed advanced stage lung SCC who had an excellent response to nivolumab after only 2 doses without any adverse effects. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated the tumor was stained positive for programmed death-ligand 1. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report of satisfactory efficacy of short-term nivolumab treatment in a Chinese patient with relapsed advanced-stage lung SCC. Further clinical trials in Asian countries are needed to test whether nivolumab immunotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for Asian patients with lung SCC. PMID:27749580

  16. Impact of Adding Concomitant Chemotherapy to Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuyts, Sandra Dirix, Piet; Clement, Paul M.J.; Poorten, Vincent Vander; Delaere, Pierre; Schoenaers, Joseph; Hermans, Robert; Bogaert, Walter van den

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) schedule combined with concomitant chemotherapy (Cx) in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2007, a total of 90 patients with locoregionally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma underwent irradiation according to a hybrid fractionation schedule consisting of 20 fractions of 2 Gy (once daily) followed by 20 fractions of 1.6 Gy (twice daily) to a total dose of 72 Gy. Concomitant Cx (cisplatinum 100 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered at the start of Weeks 1 and 4. Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with a previous patient group (n = 73) treated with the same schedule, but without concomitant Cx, between 2001 and 2004. Results: The locoregional control (LRC) rate was 70% after 2 years. Two-year overall and 2-year disease-free survival rates were 74% and 60%, respectively. In comparison with the RT-only group, an improvement of 15% in both LRC (p = 0.03) and overall survival (p = 0.09) was observed. All patients were treated to full radiation dose according to protocol, although the Cx schedule had to be adjusted in 12 patients. No acute Grade 4 or 5 toxicity was seen, but incidences of Grade 3 acute mucositis (74.5% vs. 50.7%; p = 0.002) and dysphagia (82.2% vs. 47.9%; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the chemoradiotherapy group compared with patients treated with RT alone. Conclusion: With this chemoradiotherapy regimen, excellent LRC and survival rates were achieved, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  17. Teledynamic Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; McCullough, Gary; He, Xuming; McWeeny, Elizabeth; Perlman, Adrienne L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the present investigation was to test the feasibility and clinical utility of a real-time Internet-based protocol for remote, telefluoroscopic evaluation of oropharyngeal swallowing. Method: In this prospective cohort study, the authors evaluated 32 patients with a primary diagnosis of stroke or head/neck cancer. All…

  18. Leptin receptor expression and Gln223Arg polymorphism as prognostic markers in oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, P R S; Maia, L L; Santos, M; Peterle, G T; Alves, L U; Takamori, J T; Souza, R P; Barbosa, W M; Mercante, A M C; Nunes, F D; Carvalho, M B; Tajara, E H; Louro, I D; Silva-Conforti, A M A

    2015-11-25

    The leptin gene product is released into the blood stream, passes through the blood-brain barrier, and finds the leptin receptor (LEPR) in the central nervous system. This hormone regulates food intake, hematopoiesis, inflammation, immunity, differentiation, and cell proliferation. The LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism has been reported to alter receptor function and expression, both of which have been related with prognostics in several tumor types. Furthermore, several studies have shown a relationship between the Gln223Arg polymorphism and tumor development, and its role in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is now well understood. In this study, 315 DNA samples were used for LEPR Gln223Arg genotyping and 87 primary oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas were used for immunohistochemical expression analysis, such that a relationship between these and tumor development and prognosis could be established. Homozygous LEPR Arg223 was found to be associated with a 2-fold reduction in oral and oropharyngeal cancer risk. In contrast, the presence of the Arg223 allele in tumors was associated with worse disease-free and disease-specific survival. Low LEPR expression was found to be an independent risk factor, increasing the risk for lymph node metastasis 4-fold. In conclusion, the Gln223Arg polymorphism and LEPR expression might be valuable markers for oral and oropharyngeal cancer, suggesting that LEPR might serve as a potential target for future therapies.

  19. Ultra-deep targeted sequencing of advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma identifies a mutation-based prognostic gene signature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Jung; Huang, Yi; Hsu, An; Tang, Petrus; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chen, Hua-Chien; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have heterogeneous outcomes that limit the implementation of tailored treatment options. Genetic markers for improved prognostic stratification are eagerly awaited. Methods Herein, next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed in 345 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples obtained from advanced OSCC patients. Genetic mutations on the hotspot regions of 45 cancer-related genes were detected using an ultra-deep (>1000×) sequencing approach. Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox regression analyses were used to investigate the associations between the mutation status and disease-free survival (DFS). Results We identified 1269 non-synonymous mutations in 276 OSCC samples. TP53, PIK3CA, CDKN2A, HRAS and BRAF were the most frequently mutated genes. Mutations in 14 genes were found to predict DFS. A mutation-based signature affecting ten genes (HRAS, BRAF, FGFR3, SMAD4, KIT, PTEN, NOTCH1, AKT1, CTNNB1, and PTPN11) was devised to predict DFS. Two different resampling methods were used to validate the prognostic value of the identified gene signature. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that presence of a mutated gene signature was an independent predictor of poorer DFS (P = 0.005). Conclusions Genetic variants identified by NGS technology in FFPE samples are clinically useful to predict prognosis in advanced OSCC patients. PMID:25980437

  20. Current trends in initial management of oropharyngeal cancer: the declining use of open surgery.

    PubMed

    Haigentz, Missak; Silver, Carl E; Corry, June; Genden, Eric M; Takes, Robert P; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2009-12-01

    The widespread availability of novel primary treatment approaches against oropharyngeal cancers has provided several potentially curative surgical and nonsurgical treatment options for patients, generating both hope and controversy. As treatment is usually curative in intent, management considerations must include consideration of primary tumor and nodal disease control as well as long-term toxicities and functional outcomes. Anatomical and functional organ preservation (speech and deglutition) remains of paramount importance to patients with oropharyngeal cancer and the physicians involved in their care, accounting for the growing popularity of chemoradiotherapy and transoral surgical techniques for this indication. These novel approaches have greatly diminished the role of open surgery as initial therapy for oropharyngeal cancers. Open surgery which is often reserved for salvage on relapse, may still be an appropriate therapy for certain early stage primary lesions. The growing treatment armamentarium requires careful consideration for optimal individualized care. The identification of oncogenic human papillomavirus as a predictive and prognostic marker in patients with oropharyngeal cancer has great potential to further optimize the choice of treatment. In this review, novel primary therapies against oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma are presented in the context of anatomical, quality of life, and emerging biological considerations. PMID:19866522

  1. Comparison of Acute Toxicities in Two Primary Chemoradiation Regimens in the Treatment of Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Katherine Y.; Gogineni, Hrishikesh; Zaboli, David; Lake, Spencer; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Best, Simon R.; Levine, Marshall A.; Tang, Mei; Zinreich, Eva S.; Saunders, John R.; Califano, Joseph A.; Blanco, Ray G.; Pai, Sara I.; Messing, Barbara; Ha, Patrick K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The optimal dosage and frequency of platinum-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) regimen for treating advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains unresolved. This study aims to compare the toxicity and efficacy of weekly versus more dose-intensive cisplatin-based CRTs. Methods We reviewed 155 stage III/IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients with no evidence of distant metastasis treated with one of two CRT regimens from 2000 to 2010 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. Twice-daily radiation was provided as a split course over a 45-day period. Regimen A consisted of concomitant cisplatin (30 mg/m2/1 h) weekly for 6 cycles; regimen B consisted of concomitant cisplatin (12 mg/m2/1 h) and 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/20 h) on days 1 through 5 and days 29 through 33. Main outcome measures included acute toxicities (myelosuppression, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, gastrointestinal dysfunction), unplanned hospitalizations, and disease control at 12 months. Results Patients on regimen A were much less likely to experience ototoxicity due to their treatment (0% vs. 9.8%, P = 0.04). They were more likely to experience thrombocytopenia acutely (46% vs. 26%, P = 0.02), but the toxicity was not limiting (grade 1–2). No significant differences exist in the incidence of other toxicities or unplanned hospitalizations. At 1 year, 97% of patients on A vs. 86% of patients on regimen B were free of disease (P = 0.11). Conclusions With concurrent radiotherapy, low-dose, single-agent, weekly cisplatin is less likely than higher-dose daily cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil provided at the beginning and end of treatment to be associated with ototoxicity. The preliminary data suggest at least equivalent efficacy, but longer follow-up is required. PMID:22290566

  2. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage and locally advanced small bulk squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

    PubMed

    Tichler, T; Ramon, Y; Rath, P; Hendler, S; Brenner, H J

    1988-01-01

    Thirty patients with Stages I, II and III squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx (6, 12 and 12 patients, respectively) were entered into a combined modality protocol using preoperative chemotherapy, followed by resection with or without radical neck dissection and radiotherapy. None of the patients received prior treatment and all had good performance status. Primary sites included alveolar ridge (in nine patients), buccal mucosa (in eight), tongue (in six), floor of mouth (in five), and hard palate and tonsillar fossa in one each. Chemotherapy was given as a neoadjuvant debulking procedure using two courses of the Price-Hill regimen (5FU, methotrexate with citrovorum rescue, vincristine, bleomycin, and hydrocortisone) followed in 10 to 14 days by local resection for Stage I-II patients and radical neck dissection plus radiotherapy for Stage III patients. Response to chemotherapy alone was observed in 70% (21 of 30), with 17% (5 of 30) complete responders. Responses were seen in 100% of Stage I, 75% of Stage II, and 50% of Stage III patients. Age greater than 80 years was a poor prognostic indicator. Both men and women responded equally well. Of the 25 patients not entering CR with chemotherapy, a further 75% (11 of 15) did so after local resection and 50% (5 of 10) after local resection, radical neck dissection, and radiotherapy. Overall salvage rate post chemotherapy was 64% (16 of 25). All five patients in CR with chemotherapy alone are alive at a median follow-up time of greater than or equal to 43 months; full survival data are discussed. Toxicity was minimal and did not affect change in treatment course in any patient. These results show that further investigations on the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage and locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx are indicated.

  3. Lenalidomide and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck

  4. Current Technologies and Recent Developments for Screening of HPV-Associated Cervical and Oropharyngeal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sunny S.; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Klacsmann, Flora; Miller, Daniel L.; Johnson, Jeff J.; Chang, Hsueh-Chia; Stack, M. Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal infection by the human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for a growing number of malignancies, predominantly represented by cervical cancer and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Because of the prevalence of the virus, persistence of infection, and long latency period, novel and low-cost methods are needed for effective population level screening and monitoring. We review established methods for screening of cervical and oral cancer as well as commercially-available techniques for detection of HPV DNA. We then describe the ongoing development of microfluidic nucleic acid-based biosensors to evaluate circulating host microRNAs that are produced in response to an oncogenic HPV infection. The goal is to develop an ideal screening platform that is low-cost, portable, and easy to use, with appropriate signal stability, sensitivity and specificity. Advances in technologies for sample lysis, pre-treatment and concentration, and multiplexed nucleic acid detection are provided. Continued development of these devices provides opportunities for cancer screening in low resource settings, for point-of-care diagnostics and self-screening, and for monitoring response to vaccination or surgical treatment. PMID:27618102

  5. Current Technologies and Recent Developments for Screening of HPV-Associated Cervical and Oropharyngeal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sunny S; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Klacsmann, Flora; Miller, Daniel L; Johnson, Jeff J; Chang, Hsueh-Chia; Stack, M Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal infection by the human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for a growing number of malignancies, predominantly represented by cervical cancer and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Because of the prevalence of the virus, persistence of infection, and long latency period, novel and low-cost methods are needed for effective population level screening and monitoring. We review established methods for screening of cervical and oral cancer as well as commercially-available techniques for detection of HPV DNA. We then describe the ongoing development of microfluidic nucleic acid-based biosensors to evaluate circulating host microRNAs that are produced in response to an oncogenic HPV infection. The goal is to develop an ideal screening platform that is low-cost, portable, and easy to use, with appropriate signal stability, sensitivity and specificity. Advances in technologies for sample lysis, pre-treatment and concentration, and multiplexed nucleic acid detection are provided. Continued development of these devices provides opportunities for cancer screening in low resource settings, for point-of-care diagnostics and self-screening, and for monitoring response to vaccination or surgical treatment. PMID:27618102

  6. Sunitinib, Cetuximab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  7. IMRT With Simultaneous Integrated Boost and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Montejo, Michael E.; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Bentz, Brandon G.; Hunt, Jason P.; Buchman, Luke O.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Hitchcock, Ying J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of accelerated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between April 2003 and May 2008, 43 consecutive patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma received accelerated chemoradiation with concurrent cisplatin or cetuximab. The doses for intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost were 67.5, 60.0, and 54 Gy in 30 daily fractions of 2.25, 2.0, and 1.8 Gy to the planning target volumes for gross disease, high-risk nodes, and low-risk nodes, respectively. Results: Of the patients, 90.7% completed chemoradiotherapy as prescribed. The median treatment duration was 43 days (range, 38-55 days). The complete response rate was 74.4%. With median follow-up of 36.7 months (range, 16.8-78.1 months) in living patients, the estimated 1-, 2-, and 5-year locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 82%, 82%, and 82%; 73%, 65%, and 61%; and 73%, 73%, and 70%, respectively. One treatment-related death occurred from renal failure. Grade 3 mucositis and dermatitis occurred in 13 patients (30.2%) and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Grade 2 xerostomia occurred in 12 patients (27.9%). In patients with adequate follow-up, 82% were feeding tube free by 6 months after therapy; 13% remained feeding tube dependent at 1 year. Grade 3 soft-tissue fibrosis, esophageal stricture, osteoradionecrosis, and trismus occurred in 3 patients (6.9%), 5 patients (11.6%), 1 patient (2.3%), and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Conclusions: Our results show that intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost with concurrent chemotherapy improved local and regional control. Acute and late toxicities were tolerable and acceptable. A prospective trial of this fractionation regimen is necessary for further assessment of its efficacy and toxicity compared with other approaches.

  8. Associations of ATM Polymorphisms With Survival in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Zhongli; Zhang, Wencheng; Zhou, Yuling; Yu, Dianke; Chen, Xiabin; Chang, Jiang; Qiao, Yan; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Ying; Wu, Chen; Xiao, Zefen; Tan, Wen; and others

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are associated with survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy or surgery only. Methods and Materials: Four tagSNPs of ATM were genotyped in 412 individuals with clinical stage III or IV ESCC receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy, and in 388 individuals with stage I, II, or III ESCC treated with surgery only. Overall survival time of ESCC among different genotypes was estimated by Kaplan-Meier plot, and the significance was examined by log-rank test. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for death from ESCC among different genotypes were computed by a Cox proportional regression model. Results: We found 2 SNPs, rs664143 and rs664677, associated with survival time of ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy. Individuals with the rs664143A allele had poorer median survival time compared with the rs664143G allele (14.0 vs 20.0 months), with the HR for death being 1.45 (95% CI 1.12-1.89). Individuals with the rs664677C allele also had worse median survival time than those with the rs664677T allele (14.0 vs 23.5 months), with the HR of 1.57 (95% CI 1.18-2.08). Stratified analysis showed that these associations were present in both stage III and IV cancer and different radiation therapy techniques. Significant associations were also found between the SNPs and locosregional progression or progression-free survival. No association between these SNPs and survival time was detected in ESCC patients treated with surgery only. Conclusion: These results suggest that the ATM polymorphisms might serve as independent biomarkers for predicting prognosis in ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy.

  9. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage

  10. Positron Emission Tomography for Neck Evaluation Following Definitive Treatment with Chemoradiotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ad, Voichita; Mishra, Mark; Ohri, Nitin; Intenzo, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the current review was to assess published data on the role of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for evaluation of nodal residual disease after definitive chemoradiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods Studies were identified by searching PubMed electronic databases. Only studies using a post-chemoradiotherapy PET for nodal residual disease evaluation were included in the present review. Both prospective and retrospective studies were included. Information regarding sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of PET for detecting nodal residual disease after definitive chemoradiotherapy for HNSCC was extracted and analyzed. Results Twenty published studies were included in the present review. Existing data suggest that a negative post-chemoradiotherapy PET scan is associated with a negative predictive value up to 100%. The sensitivity of PET in detecting nodal residual disease is greater for scans performed ≥ 10 weeks after definitive treatment with chemoradiotherapy for HNSCC. Conclusions Further studies are needed to quantify the reliability of PET in detecting nodal residual disease after chemoradiotherapy for locoregionally advanced HNSCC. The optimal timing of PET imaging after chemoradiotherapy remains to be defined. PMID:21864252

  11. Circulating Tumour Cells as an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients with Advanced Oesophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Su, Po-Jung; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lee, Chia-Lin; Huang, Wen-Kuan; Wu, Chiao-En; Chang, Hsien-Kun; Chao, Yin-Kai; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Lin, Nina Ming-Jung; Ye, Siou-Ru; Lee, Jane Ying-Chieh; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    The role of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in advanced oesophageal cancer (EC) patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) remains uncertain. A negative selection protocol plus flow cytometry was validated to efficiently identify CTCs. The CTC number was calculated and analysed for survival impact. The protocol's efficacy in CTC identification was validated with a recovery rate of 44.6 ± 9.1% and a coefficient of variation of 20.4%. Fifty-seven patients and 20 healthy donors were enrolled. Initial staging, first response to CRT, and surgery after CRT were prognostic for overall survival, with P values of <0.0001, <0.0001, and <0.0001, respectively. The CTC number of EC patients is significantly higher (P = 0.04) than that of healthy donors. Multivariate analysis for disease-specific progression-free survival showed that surgery after response to CCRT, initial stage, and CTC number (≥21.0 cells/mL) played independent prognostic roles. For overall survival, surgery after CCRT, performance status, initial stage, and CTC number were significant independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, a negative selection plus flow cytometry protocol efficiently detected CTCs. The CTC number before CCRT was an independent prognostic factor in patients with unresectable oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Further large-scale prospective studies for validation are warranted. PMID:27530152

  12. Circulating Tumour Cells as an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients with Advanced Oesophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Po-Jung; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lee, Chia-Lin; Huang, Wen-Kuan; Wu, Chiao-En; Chang, Hsien-Kun; Chao, Yin-Kai; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Lin, Nina Ming-Jung; Ye, Siou-Ru; Lee, Jane Ying-Chieh; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    The role of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in advanced oesophageal cancer (EC) patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) remains uncertain. A negative selection protocol plus flow cytometry was validated to efficiently identify CTCs. The CTC number was calculated and analysed for survival impact. The protocol’s efficacy in CTC identification was validated with a recovery rate of 44.6 ± 9.1% and a coefficient of variation of 20.4%. Fifty-seven patients and 20 healthy donors were enrolled. Initial staging, first response to CRT, and surgery after CRT were prognostic for overall survival, with P values of <0.0001, <0.0001, and <0.0001, respectively. The CTC number of EC patients is significantly higher (P = 0.04) than that of healthy donors. Multivariate analysis for disease-specific progression-free survival showed that surgery after response to CCRT, initial stage, and CTC number (≥21.0 cells/mL) played independent prognostic roles. For overall survival, surgery after CCRT, performance status, initial stage, and CTC number were significant independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, a negative selection plus flow cytometry protocol efficiently detected CTCs. The CTC number before CCRT was an independent prognostic factor in patients with unresectable oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Further large-scale prospective studies for validation are warranted. PMID:27530152

  13. Selection of a patient subgroup with advanced esophageal squamous carcinoma who could benefit from second-line chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Kyong Hwa; Oh, Sang Cheul; Seo, Jae Hong; Shin, Sang Won; Kim, Jun Suk; Kim, Yeul Hong

    2010-01-01

    Despite first-line therapy, most patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) experience disease progression and may become eligible for second-line chemotherapy. Although commonly used, the role of salvage chemotherapy in patients with recurrent or metastatic ESCC has not yet been established. We analyzed 53 patients who had received second-line chemotherapy after the failure of cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy as first-line therapy in ESCC between March 2000 and June 2008. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for second-line chemotherapy were 2.4 and 5.2 months, respectively, with an overall response rate of 18.9%. In multivariate analysis, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG PS) of 2 or more and PFS under first-line therapy <4 months were independent prognostic factors for decreased OS. OS was estimated based on the number of adverse prognostic factors: 0 = good; 1 = intermediate, and 2 = poor. The median OS for the good, intermediate, and poor prognostic groups were 11.2, 4.5 and 4.3 months, respectively (p < 0.001). The good prognostic group showed better OS than the intermediate or poor groups (p < 0.001). Second-line chemotherapy may be beneficial for OS in ESCC patients with ECOG PS 0-1 and PFS under first-line therapy ≥4 months.

  14. Targeted Therapy in Locally Advanced and Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (LA-R/M HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Echarri, María José; Lopez-Martin, Ana; Hitt, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy are the standard treatment options for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Chemoradiotherapy is an alternative for patients with locally advanced disease. In recurrent/metastatic disease and after progression to platin-based regimens, no standard treatments other than best supportive care are currently available. Most SCCHN tumours overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This receptor is a tyrosine-kinase membrane receptor that has been implicated in angiogenesis, tumour progression and resistance to different cancer treatments. In this review, we analysed the different drugs and pathways under development to treat SCCHN, especially recurrent/metastatic disease. Until now, the EGFR signalling pathway has been considered the most important target with respect to new drugs; however, new drugs, such as immunotherapies, are currently under study. As new treatments for SCCHN are developed, the influence of therapies with respect to overall survival, progression free survival and quality of life in patients with this disease is changing. PMID:26927178

  15. Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy For Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Sanghera, Paul; McConkey, Chris; Ho, Kean-Fatt; Glaholm, John; Hartley, Andrew . E-mail: andrew.hartley@uhb.nhs.uk

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the tumor control rates in locally advanced head-and-neck cancer using accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from patients with squamous cell cancer of the larynx, oropharynx, oral cavity, and hypopharynx (International Union Against Cancer Stage II-IV), who received accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with chemotherapy between January 1, 1998, and April 1, 2005, were retrospectively analyzed. Two different chemotherapy schedules were used, carboplatin and methotrexate, both single agents administered on an outpatient basis. The endpoints were overall survival, local control, and disease-free survival. Results: A total of 81 patients were analyzed. The 2-year overall survival rate was 71.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61.5-81.8%). The 2-year disease-free survival rate was 68.6% (95% CI, 58.4-78.8%). The 2-year local control rate was 75.4% (95% CI, 65.6-85.1%). When excluding patients with Stage II oral cavity, larynx, and hypopharynx tumors, 68 patients remained. For these patients, the 2-year overall survival, local control, and disease-free survival rate was 67.6% (95% CI, 56.0-79.2%), 72.0% (95% CI, 61.0-83.0%), and 64.1% (95% CI, 52.6-75.7%), respectively. Conclusion: Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy and synchronous chemotherapy can achieve high tumor control rates while being resource sparing and should be the subject of prospective evaluation.

  16. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, or Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  17. Survival Outcomes and Patterns of Recurrence in Patients with Stage III or IV Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated with Primary Surgery or Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Robyn; Warkentin, Heather; Ghosh, Sunita; Scrimger, Rufus; Jha, Naresh; Parliament, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare and contrast the patterns of failure in patients with locally advanced squamous cell oropharyngeal cancers undergoing curative-intent treatment with primary surgery or radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy. Methods and materials Two hundred and thirty-three patients with stage III or IV oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent curative-intent treatment from 2006-2012, were reviewed. The median length of follow-up for patients still alive at the time of analysis was 4.4 years. Data was collected retrospectively from a chart review. Results One hundred and thirty-nine patients underwent primary surgery +/- adjuvant therapy, and 94 patients underwent primary radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy (CRT). Demographics were similar between the two groups, except primary radiotherapy patients had a higher age-adjusted Charleston co-morbidity score (CCI). Twenty-nine patients from the surgery group recurred; 15 failed distantly only, seven failed locoregionally, and seven failed both distantly and locoregionally. Twelve patients recurred who underwent chemoradiotherapy; ten distantly alone, and two locoregionally. One patient who underwent radiotherapy (RT) alone failed distantly. Two and five-year recurrence-free survival rates for patients undergoing primary RT were 86.6% and 84.9% respectively. Two and five-year recurrence-free survival rates for primary surgery was 80.9% and 76.3% respectively (p=0.21). There was no significant difference in either treatment when they were stratified by p16 status or smoking status. Conclusions Our analysis does not show any difference in outcomes for patients treated with primary surgery or radiotherapy. Although the primary pattern of failure in both groups was distant metastatic disease, some local failures may be preventable with careful delineation of target volumes, especially near the base of skull region. PMID:27610285

  18. Locally advanced adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous carcinomas of the cervix compared to squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix in Gynecologic Oncology Group trials of cisplatin-based chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Peter G; Java, James J; Whitney, Charles W.; Stehman, Frederick B; Lanciano, Rachelle; Thomas, Gillian M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conflicting results have been reported for adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas of the cervix with respect to their response to therapy and prognosis. The current study sought to evaluate impact of adeno- and adenosquamous histology in the randomized trials of primary cisplatin-based chemoradiation for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods Patients with adeno- and adenosquamous cervical carcinomas were retrospectively studied and compared to squamous cell carcinomas in GOG trials of chemoradiation. Results Among 1671 enrolled in clinical trials of chemoradiation, 182 adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas were identified (10.9%). A higher percentage of adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas were stage IB2 (27.5% versus 20.0%) and fewer had stage IIIB (21.4% versus 28.6%). The mean tumor size was larger for squamous than adeno- and adenosquamous. Adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas were more often poorly differentiated (46.2% versus 26.8%). When treated with radiation therapy alone, the 70 patients with adeno- and adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix showed a statistically poorer overall survival (p=0.0499) compared to the 647 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. However, when treated with radiation therapy with concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy, the 112 patients with adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas had a similar overall survival (p=0.459) compared the 842 patients with squamous cell carcinoma. Adverse effects to treatment were similar across histologies. Conclusion Adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas of the cervix are associated with worse overall survival when treated with radiation alone but with similar progression-free and overall survival compared to squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix when treated with cisplatin based chemoradiation. PMID:25152438

  19. NRF2 Mutation Confers Malignant Potential and Resistance to Chemoradiation Therapy in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Kokubu, Akiko; Saito, Shigeru; Narisawa-Saito, Mako; Sasaki, Hiroki; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Yoshimatsu, Yuki; Tachimori, Yuji; Kushima, Ryoji; Kiyono, Tohru; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cancer (ESC) is one of the most aggressive tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. A combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CRT) has improved the clinical outcome, but the molecular background determining the effectiveness of therapy remains unknown. NRF2 is a master transcriptional regulator of stress adaptation, and gain of-function mutation of NRF2 in cancer confers resistance to stressors including anticancer therapy. Direct resequencing analysis revealed that Nrf2 gain-of-function mutation occurred recurrently (18/82, 22%) in advanced ESC tumors and ESC cell lines (3/10). The presence of Nrf2 mutation was associated with tumor recurrence and poor prognosis. Short hairpin RNA-mediated down-regulation of NRF2 in ESC cells that harbor only mutated Nrf2 allele revealed that themutant NRF2 conferred increased cell proliferation, attachment-independent survival, and resistance to 5-fluorouracil and γ-irradiation. Based on the Nrf2 mutation status, gene expression signatures associated with NRF2 mutation were extracted from ESC cell lines, and their potential utility for monitoring and prognosis was examined in a cohort of 33 pre-CRT cases of ESC. The molecular signatures of NRF2 mutation were significantly predictive and prognostic for CRT response. In conclusion, recurrent NRF2 mutation confers malignant potential and resistance to therapy in advanced ESC, resulting in a poorer outcome. Molecular signatures of NRF2 mutation can be applied as predictive markers of response to CRT, and efficient inhibition of aberrant NRF2 activation could be a promising approach in combination with CRT. PMID:21969819

  20. Initial evidence for Sec62 as a prognostic marker in advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WEMMERT, SILKE; LINDNER, YASMIN; LINXWEILER, JOHANNES; WAGENPFEIL, STEFAN; BOHLE, RAINER; NIEWALD, MARCUS; SCHICK, BERNHARD

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a malignancy with an increasing incidence. To aid with the selection of the most appropriate therapy, biomarkers have become a specific research focus. Sec62 is involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress tolerance and cell migration, and has been identified as a novel prognostic marker for non-small cell lung cancer. In addition, Sec62 may be a promising candidate in HNSCC. Pretreatment biopsies of 35 patients with locally advanced HNSCC, who were treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy without prior surgery, were examined for the expression of Sec62 protein, as well as the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), p16 and survivin proteins. Immunohistological results were correlated with patient overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) times. In the present patient cohort, 12/35 cases (34%) demonstrated strong and 8/35 cases (23%) moderate Sec62 staining intensity. Additionally, in 11/35 cases (31%), weak staining was observed, and only 4/35 cases (11%) were Sec62-negative. Notably, a high Sec62 protein level was associated with a significantly poorer OS and PFS (P=0.020 and P=0.028, respectively). Furthermore, higher nuclear survivin expression showed a weak trend for poorer OS rate (P=0.079), whilst neither cytoplasmic survivin, EGFR nor p16 influenced OS or PFS significantly. The present study indicated that Sec62 is a promising prognostic marker for HNSCC. Increased Sec62 protein expression may indicate a poorer prognosis in advanced HNSCC. As the present study was focused on patients treated by chemoradiation therapy, further studies with larger patient cohorts and alternative treatment approaches are required in order to define the prognostic value of Sec62 in HNSCC. PMID:26998059

  1. Transoral robotic surgery and oropharyngeal cancer: a literature review.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Pádraig; Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The incidence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has risen steadily over the past decade due to the increase in cancers associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV). The prognosis for the treatment of this type of cancer with radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy is good. However, because these treatments can have detrimental effects on organ function and quality of life, researchers are looking into transoral robotic surgery (TORS) as a possible alternate therapy. TORS might have a positive effect on postoperative function and quality of life for cancer survivors. The aim of this review is to report on the current situation regarding the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer with TORS, with a focus on the long-term oncologic and functional outcomes of this strategy. The articles cited in this review were selected from the PubMed and MEDLINE database. They contain study results pertaining to TORS implementation, complications, oncologic and functional outcomes, and the implications of HPV-associated cancer. We found that while TORS has some clear advantages and strengths and almost certainly a permanent place in future treatment, further research is necessary to correctly evaluate the role it will play in the complete management of oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:25181669

  2. Narrow band imaging: clinical applications in oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vu, A; Farah, C S

    2016-07-01

    Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) is an endoscopic optical imaging enhancement technology that improves the contrast of mucosal surface texture, and enhances visualisation of mucosal and submucosal vasculature. White light is filtered to emit two 30-nm narrow bands of blue (415 nm) and green light (540 nm) light simultaneously, the former corresponding to the main peak absorption spectrum of haemoglobin, and the latter allowing visualisation of blood vessels in the deeper mucosal and submucosal layers. NBI has been used to better assess oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD), identify oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and to define surgical margins of head and neck malignancies. NBI shows great potential in improving detection rates of OPMD, facilitating better assessment of oral and oropharyngeal SCC, and reducing the risk of recurrence for oral SCC. Although further research is required to better understand and define intrapapillary capillary loop (IPCL) patterns and to relate these with clinical, histopathological and molecular parameters especially for early mucosal changes, there is building evidence to recommend its use as the new gold standard for endoscopic assessment in head and neck oncology. PMID:26713751

  3. Phase I/II Study of Postoperative Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Advanced-Stage Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck (cSCCHN)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-17

    Recurrent Skin Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity

  4. Increased frequency and suppressive activity of CD127(low/-) regulatory T cells in the peripheral circulation of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma are associated with advanced stage and nodal involvement.

    PubMed

    Drennan, Samantha; Stafford, Nicholas D; Greenman, John; Green, Victoria L

    2013-11-01

    The presence of regulatory T (Treg) cells is thought to be an important mechanism by which head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) successfully evades the immune system. Using multicolour flow cytometry, the frequency and functional capacity of two CD4(+)  CD127(low/-) Treg cell populations, separated on the basis of different levels of CD25 expression (CD25(inter) and CD25(high) ), from the peripheral circulation of newly presenting HNSCC patients were assessed with regard to clinicopathological features and healthy controls. The frequency of circulating Treg cells was similar between HNSCC patients and healthy controls, and for patients with HNSCC developing from different subsites (laryngeal compared with oropharyngeal). However, patients with advanced stage tumours and those with nodal involvement had significantly elevated levels of CD4(+)  CD25(high)  CD127(low/-) Treg cells compared with patients who had early stage tumours (P = 0·03) and those without nodal involvement (P = 0·03), respectively. CD4(+)  CD25(high)  CD127(low/-) Treg cells from the entire HNSCC patient cohort and from patients whose tumours had metastasized to the lymph nodes were also shown to suppress the proliferation of effector T cells significantly more, compared with those from healthy controls (P = 0·04) or patients with no nodal involvement (P = 0·04). Additionally, CD4(+)  CD25(inter)  CD127(low/-) Treg cells consistently induced greater suppressive activity than CD4(+)  CD25(high)  CD127(low/-) Treg cells on the proliferation of the effector T-cell populations (CD4(+)  CD25(-)  CD127(-/+) and CD4(+)  CD25(+)  CD127(+) ). Peripheral Treg cells, identified by the CD127(low/-) phenotype, have been shown to be influenced by a patient's tumour stage and/or nodal status in HNSCC; suggesting a role in tumour progression that could be manipulated by future immunotherapy.

  5. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  7. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  8. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  9. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  10. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... called “oropharyngeal cancers.” How does HPV cause cancer? HPV can cause normal cells in infected skin ... unclear if having HPV alone is sufficient to cause oropharyngeal cancers, or if other factors (such as smoking or ...

  11. Accelerated fractionation radiation therapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, P.G.; Gemer, L.S. )

    1991-09-01

    The authors treated 14 patients who had advanced head and neck cancer with an accelerated fractionation schedule of irradiation consisting of two fractions given 6 hours apart. In the morning a volume of 1.7 Gy was given to an area that encompassed the entire tumor, enlarged lymph nodes, and all areas at risk for microscopic disease. Six hours later, 1.1 Gy was given to an area that included only the tumor and any enlarged lymph nodes, with a 2-cm margin. The treatment was well tolerated; of the 13 patients who completed therapy, six did not require a break in therapy, and seven patients did. The median rest period was 2 days. There was no grade 4 toxicity. Grade 3 toxicity included skin changes (one case), mucositis (two), dysphagia (two), weight loss (three), and a decrease in the hemoglobin level (one case). The response rate in the 13 who completed therapy was 13/13 (100%); 11 of the 13 (83%) had a complete response. Only one of the 11 who achieved a complete response had failure at the primary site. At a median follow-up of 24 months, the absolute survival was 7/13 (54%) and the corrected survival was 7/10 (70%). This technique permits radiation therapy to be given on an accelerated schedule without a planned break in treatment. The overall response rate and survival at 2 years was excellent.

  12. Continuation maintenance therapy with S-1 in chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Seiichiro; Karayama, Masato; Inui, Naoki; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Kuroishi, Shigeki; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Yokomura, Koshi; Koshimizu, Naoki; Toyoshima, Mikio; Imokawa, Shiro; Asada, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Masafumi; Yamada, Takashi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-08-01

    Objectives Maintenance therapy is a standard therapeutic strategy in non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer. However, there is no consensus regarding the benefit of maintenance therapy for patients with squamous cell lung cancer. We assessed maintenance therapy with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine agent, following induction therapy with carboplatin and S-1 in patients with squamous cell lung cancer. Methods In this phase II trial, chemotherapy-naïve patients with squamous cell lung cancer were enrolled to induction therapy with four cycles of carboplatin (at an area under the curve of 5 on day 1) and S-1 (80 mg/m(2)/day on days 1-14) in a 28-day cycle. Patients who achieved disease control after induction therapy received maintenance therapy with S-1 in a 21-day cycle until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival after administration of maintenance therapy. Results Fifty-one patients were enrolled in the study. The median progression-free survival from the start of maintenance therapy was 3.0 months (95 % confidence interval, 2.5-3.5). The most common toxicities associated with maintenance therapy were anemia, thrombocytopenia, and fatigue, but they were not severe. Conclusion S-1 maintenance therapy might be a feasible treatment option in patients with squamous cell lung cancer.

  13. Oropharyngeal leprosy in art, history, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Scollard, D M; Skinsnes, O K

    1999-04-01

    Advanced lesions of the face, nasopharynx, and oropharynx have played an important role in the medical and social history of Hansen's disease. Renaissance artists included detailed portrayals of these lesions in some of their paintings, a testimony not only to their artistic skill and powers of observation but also to the common presence of these patients in European cities and towns of the period. The disease is now understood as a broad immunologic spectrum of host responses to Mycobacterium leprae, with a variety of clinical and pathologic manifestations in nerve, soft tissues, and bone. This review incorporates the findings of 2 extraordinary studies (one from Europe and the other from Japan) of pharyngeal and facial lesions. In the 1950s, studies of skeletal remains from the churchyard of a Danish leprosarium revealed a triad of maxillofacial lesions unique to leprosy and designated facies leprosa. In pre-World War II Japan, before effective treatment had been discovered, a prominent otorhinolaryngologist studying oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal lesions prepared watercolor illustrations of the natural progression of untreated Hansen's disease. As a result of effective antimicrobial therapy, such advanced lesions are now rarely seen, but the presenting signs and symptoms of leprosy still occasionally arise in the nasal and oral mucosa. The nasopharynx and oropharynx may be important early sites of inoculation and infection by M leprae, and they require additional emphasis in worldwide efforts toward early diagnosis and treatment of Hansen's disease.

  14. Oropharyngeal leprosy in art, history, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Scollard, D M; Skinsnes, O K

    1999-04-01

    Advanced lesions of the face, nasopharynx, and oropharynx have played an important role in the medical and social history of Hansen's disease. Renaissance artists included detailed portrayals of these lesions in some of their paintings, a testimony not only to their artistic skill and powers of observation but also to the common presence of these patients in European cities and towns of the period. The disease is now understood as a broad immunologic spectrum of host responses to Mycobacterium leprae, with a variety of clinical and pathologic manifestations in nerve, soft tissues, and bone. This review incorporates the findings of 2 extraordinary studies (one from Europe and the other from Japan) of pharyngeal and facial lesions. In the 1950s, studies of skeletal remains from the churchyard of a Danish leprosarium revealed a triad of maxillofacial lesions unique to leprosy and designated facies leprosa. In pre-World War II Japan, before effective treatment had been discovered, a prominent otorhinolaryngologist studying oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal lesions prepared watercolor illustrations of the natural progression of untreated Hansen's disease. As a result of effective antimicrobial therapy, such advanced lesions are now rarely seen, but the presenting signs and symptoms of leprosy still occasionally arise in the nasal and oral mucosa. The nasopharynx and oropharynx may be important early sites of inoculation and infection by M leprae, and they require additional emphasis in worldwide efforts toward early diagnosis and treatment of Hansen's disease. PMID:10225629

  15. Cisplatin, Cetuximab, and Radiation in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer: A Retrospective Review

    PubMed Central

    Peddi, Prakash; Shi, Runhua; Nair, Binu; Ampil, Fred; Mills, Glenn M; Jafri, Syed H

    2015-01-01

    Efficacy of cisplatin versus cetuximab with radiation in locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC) was evaluated. A total of 96 patients with newly diagnosed LAHNC treated at our institution between 2006 and 2011 with concurrent radiation and cisplatin (group A, n = 45), cetuximab (group B, n = 24), or started with cisplatin but switched to cetuximab because of toxicity (group C, n = 27) were reviewed. Chi-square test, analysis of variance, and log-rank test were used for analysis. The three groups had similar baseline characteristics, except for median age, T stage, albumin levels, hemoglobin levels, performance status, and comorbidities. A complete response (CR) was seen in 77%, 17%, and 67% of patients (P < 0.001), respectively. There was no significant difference in median overall survival (OS) between groups A and C. The median OS for groups A and C was not reached (>65 months), even though it was significantly longer than median OS for group B (11.6 months; P ≤ 0.001). The 2-year OS in groups A and C is significantly higher than that in group B (70% for groups A and C, 22% for group B). There is no significant difference in progression-free survival (PFS) between groups A and C. The median PFS for these groups was not reached (>62 months), and is significantly longer than that for group B (4.3 months; P ≤ 0.001). The 2-year PFS of group A (67%) and group C (76%) was significantly longer than that of group B (20%). Cisplatin with radiation appears to be more efficacious even in suboptimal dosing than cetuximab with radiation in LAHNC but the two groups were not well matched. PMID:25628515

  16. [Efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy in cases with cervical lymph node metastasis from oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer].

    PubMed

    Shimane, Toshikazu; Ikeda, Kenichiro; Akiyama, Rio; Uzuki, Aya; Sugimoto, Akane; Ikenoya, Youichi; Hayashi, Takeshi; Egawa, Shunya; Kobayashi, Sei; Sanbe, Takeyuki; Suzaki, Harumi

    2011-04-01

    We reported the efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy(CCRT)for cervical lymph node metastasis in patients with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The subjects were 17 patients with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer with cervical lymph node metastasis, who underwent CCRT treatment between January 2005 and December 2009. The proportion of patients showing a complete response(CR)was 64. 7%; however, if patients without any residual viable cancer cells in the specimens obtained by neck dissection were also defined as CR, then, 82. 4% achieved CR. Thus, CCRT showed good efficacy without the need for planned neck dissection(PND). The limited recurrence cases and absence of serious complications associated with neck dissection after CCRT suggested that PND is not necessarily required. However, since assessment of cervical lymph nodes after CCRT is difficult, it would be desirable to develop a reliable examination and to study the most suitable examination for detecting the presence/absence of cervical lymph node metastasis.

  17. Oropharyngeal cancer: an emergent disease?

    PubMed

    Granados-García, Martín

    2016-04-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer incidence has recently increased, thereby attracting public attention. Akin to other malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract, it has been attributed to the carcinogenic effects of tobacco and alcohol use. However, recent evidence shows that a substantial increase in the disease is attributable to the effects of human papillomavirus (HPV). Marked progress has been made in relation to the knowledge of molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in the genesis and progression of these cancers. This has led to the development of new and promising therapies of a more specific and less toxic nature that have prolonged life and improved its quality. However, these therapies have failed to significantly increase the proportion of patients who are cured. To decrease the mortality associated with these neoplasms, it is necessary to adopt public health measures aimed at prevention and early diagnosis. PMID:27557387

  18. [Oropharyngeal candidiasis in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Laurent, Marie; Gogly, Bruno; Tahmasebi, Farzad; Paillaud, Elena

    2011-03-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection of the oral cavity caused by an overgrowth of candida species, the commonest being Candida albicans. The prevalence in the hospital or institution varies from 13 to 47% of elderly persons. The main clinical types are denture stomatitis, acute atrophic glossitis, thrush and angular cheilitis. Diagnosis is usually made on clinical ground. Culture and sensitivity testing should be undertaken if initial therapy is unsuccessful. Predisposing factors of oral candidiasis could be local and/or systemic. Local factors include wearing dentures, impaired salivary gland function and poor oral health. Systemic factors include antibiotics and some other drugs, malnutrition, diabetes, immunosuppression and malignancies. Management involves an appropriate antifungal treatment and oral hygiene. Predisposing factors should be treated or eliminated where feasible. Oral hygiene involves cleaning the teeth and dentures. Dentures should be disinfected daily and left out overnight.

  19. Treatment Options by Stage (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  20. Sirolimus and Gold Sodium Thiomalate in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-13

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. Incidence, Trends and Ethnic Differences of Oropharyngeal, Anal and Cervical Cancers: Singapore, 1968-2012

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jennifer O.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chow, Khuan-Yew; D’Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, several Western countries have reported an increase in oropharyngeal and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Trends in HPV-associated cancers in Asia have not been as well described. We describe the epidemiology of potentially HPV-related cancers reported to the Singapore Cancer Registry from 1968–2012. Analysis included 998 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), 183 anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) and 8,019 invasive cervical cancer (ICC) cases. Additionally, 368 anal non-squamous cell carcinoma (ANSCC) and 2,018 non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinoma (non-OP HNC) cases were included as comparators. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) were determined by gender and ethnicity (Chinese, Malay and Indian). Joinpoint regression was used to evaluate annual percentage change (APC) in incidence. OPSCC incidence increased in both genders (men 1993–2012, APC = 1.9%, p<0.001; women 1968–2012, APC = 2.0%, p = 0.01) and was 5 times higher in men than women. In contrast, non-OP HNC incidence declined between 1968–2012 among men (APC = -1.6%, p<0.001) and women (APC = -0.4%, p = 0.06). ASCC and ANSCC were rare (ASR = 0.2 and 0.7 per 100,000 person-years, respectively) and did not change significantly over time except for increasing ANSCCs in men (APC = 2.8%, p<0.001). ICC was the most common HPV-associated cancer (ASR = 19.9 per 100,000 person-years) but declined significantly between 1968–2012 (APC = -2.4%). Incidence of each cancer varied across ethnicities. Similar to trends in Western countries, OPSCC incidence increased in recent years, while non-OP HNC decreased. ICC remains the most common HPV-related cancer in Singapore, but Pap screening programs have led to consistently decreasing incidence. PMID:26720001

  2. Incidence, Trends and Ethnic Differences of Oropharyngeal, Anal and Cervical Cancers: Singapore, 1968-2012.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jennifer O; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chow, Khuan-Yew; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, several Western countries have reported an increase in oropharyngeal and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Trends in HPV-associated cancers in Asia have not been as well described. We describe the epidemiology of potentially HPV-related cancers reported to the Singapore Cancer Registry from 1968-2012. Analysis included 998 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), 183 anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) and 8,019 invasive cervical cancer (ICC) cases. Additionally, 368 anal non-squamous cell carcinoma (ANSCC) and 2,018 non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinoma (non-OP HNC) cases were included as comparators. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) were determined by gender and ethnicity (Chinese, Malay and Indian). Joinpoint regression was used to evaluate annual percentage change (APC) in incidence. OPSCC incidence increased in both genders (men 1993-2012, APC = 1.9%, p<0.001; women 1968-2012, APC = 2.0%, p = 0.01) and was 5 times higher in men than women. In contrast, non-OP HNC incidence declined between 1968-2012 among men (APC = -1.6%, p<0.001) and women (APC = -0.4%, p = 0.06). ASCC and ANSCC were rare (ASR = 0.2 and 0.7 per 100,000 person-years, respectively) and did not change significantly over time except for increasing ANSCCs in men (APC = 2.8%, p<0.001). ICC was the most common HPV-associated cancer (ASR = 19.9 per 100,000 person-years) but declined significantly between 1968-2012 (APC = -2.4%). Incidence of each cancer varied across ethnicities. Similar to trends in Western countries, OPSCC incidence increased in recent years, while non-OP HNC decreased. ICC remains the most common HPV-related cancer in Singapore, but Pap screening programs have led to consistently decreasing incidence. PMID:26720001

  3. Patterns of Locoregional Failure After Exclusive IMRT for Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe Gunn, G. Brandon; Endres, Eugene J.; Chaljub, Gregory; Cheruvu, Praveena; Parker, Brent

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the patterns of failure after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: We analyzed patients treated at the University of Texas Medical Branch between May 2002 and February 2006 who met the following criteria: (1) definitive IMRT without chemotherapy for oropharyngeal SCC; (2) no pretreatment radical surgery; (3) minimal follow-up of 1 year. The location of each nodal/primary failure was co-registered to the pretreatment planning computed tomography scan and then expanded by 5 mm to a planning target volume (PTV) of the failure (PTV-f). We then investigated whether the prescription dose to the PTV-f had been appropriate for the amount of disease present before treatment and whether the PTV-f had been adequately covered. Results: A total of 50 patients were eligible. With a median follow-up of 32.6 months (range, 12.1-58.6), three local and six regional failures were observed in 8 patients. All but one failure, that had been neglected, were recorded within 14 months of the treatment end. Of the nine failures, four developed in the neck treated electively to the lowest dose level; in all of them, we could retrospectively identify initial positive lymph nodes that might have justified the subsequent failure. The remaining five failures developed in proximity of the high-dose volume. In all but one, the volume of region of interest receiving {>=}95% of the dose of the PTV-f was >95%, suggesting adequate coverage. In 1 patient, about 20% of PTV-f was outside the 95% isodose, so that marginal underdosing could not be ruled out. Conclusions: A potential cause could be identified in all the failures in the lowest dose level. The implications and possible remedies are discussed. Most failures around the high-dose region were 'true failures' with no apparent technical caus000.

  4. [Results of complex treatment of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal using advanced radiotherapy technologies].

    PubMed

    Glebovskaya, V V; Tkachev, S I; Rasulov, A O; Tsaryuk, V F; Gordeev, S S; Fedyanin, M Yu; Aliev, V A; Mamedly, Z Z; Kuzmichev, D V; Trofimova, O P; Borisova, T N; Yazhgunovich, I P

    2015-01-01

    During recent decades radiotherapy is the basis, on which it is built a medical complex that is the first-line treatment of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. An increase of overall and disease-free survival and quality of life of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal at the present stage of development of a comprehensive medical treatment is largely due to the improvement of technical equipment of radiotherapy departments of oncology clinics. The use of modem linear electron accelerators and systems of computer dosimetric planning to create a 3D program of isodose distribution, diagnostic devices (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) as well as a number of other conditions permit accurate summarizing of proposed dose, reducing of absorbed dose to critical structures, diminishing unplanned interruptions in chemoradiotherapy course by means of modern technologies of conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT, IMRT, VMAT). The paper presents the preliminary results of a comprehensive medical treatment of 14 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. PMID:26571840

  5. Clinical value of routine serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen in follow-up of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation or chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jinju; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Tae Sung; Kim, Ju Hyun; Koh, Suk Bong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical benefits of routine squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) monitoring of patients with locally advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiation or chemoradiation. Methods A total of 53 patients with recurrent cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiation were enrolled in this study. A retrospective review of medical records was conducted. The role of routine monitoring of serum SCC-Ag was evaluated in terms of cost effectiveness and effect on survival after diagnosis of recurrence. Results Serum SCC-Ag abnormality (≥2.5 ng/mL) was observed in 62.3% of patients when recurrent disease was diagnosed. The first indicator of relapse was abnormal serum SCC-Ag level in 21 patients (39.6%), 10 of whom had asymptomatic recurrent disease amenable to salvage therapy. Adding SCC-Ag measurement to the basic follow up protocol improved the sensitivity for detecting recurrence (The sensitivity of the basic protocol vs. addition of SCC-Ag: 49.1% vs. 88.7%, P<0.001). Twenty-three patients who were candidates for salvage therapy with curative intent showed better survival compared with those who were not candidates for therapy (5-year survival: 36.6% vs. 0%, P=0.012). Conclusion Surveillance with routine serum SCC-Ag monitoring can better detect asymptomatic recurrent disease that is potentially amenable to salvage therapy with curative intent. Early diagnosis of recurrent disease that can be treated with salvage therapy may lead to better survival. PMID:27462593

  6. Alimentation impact of treatments of 254 oropharyngeal cancers (1998-2003).

    PubMed

    Buiret, Guillaume; Daveau, Clémentine; Landry, Guillaume; Colin, Carole; Pignat, Jean-Christian; Poupart, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the functional impact of the various possible treatments of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas to find the main prognostic factors of dysphagia induced by these treatments. Patients. Clinical data from 254 patients treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx between 1998 and 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. A multivariate model enabled us to evaluate the role of each potentially harmful factor on swallowing. Main Outcome Measures. The significant factors influencing the consumption of liquid, pasty, and normal food were the same: the initial T stage and the type of treatment. Conclusion. Whatever the possible and selected treatment was, the impact on the functional capacities, and thus, the quality of life of the patients was considerable. Even though we could not significantly demonstrate exclusive radiotherapy caused more long-term undesirable effects than surgery followed by radiotherapy, our daily practice has shown that we should favour the latter.

  7. Treatment de-escalation in HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma: ongoing trials, critical issues and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mirghani, H; Amen, F; Blanchard, P; Moreau, F; Guigay, J; Hartl, D M; Lacau St Guily, J

    2015-04-01

    Due to the generally poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), treatment has been intensified, these last decades, leading to an increase of serious side effects. High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection has been recently etiologically linked to a subset of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), which is on the increase. These tumors are different, at the clinical and molecular level, when compared to tumors caused by traditional risk factors. Additionally, their prognosis is much more favorable which has led the medical community to consider new treatment strategies. Indeed, it is possible that less intensive treatment regimens could achieve similar efficacy with less toxicity and improved quality of life. Several clinical trials, investigating different ways to de-escalate treatment, are currently ongoing. In this article, we review these main approaches, discuss the rationale behind them and the issues raised by treatment de-escalation in HPV-positive OPSCC. PMID:24622970

  8. Alimentation Impact of Treatments of 254 Oropharyngeal Cancers (1998–2003)

    PubMed Central

    Buiret, Guillaume; Daveau, Clémentine; Landry, Guillaume; Colin, Carole; Pignat, Jean-Christian; Poupart, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the functional impact of the various possible treatments of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas to find the main prognostic factors of dysphagia induced by these treatments. Patients. Clinical data from 254 patients treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx between 1998 and 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. A multivariate model enabled us to evaluate the role of each potentially harmful factor on swallowing. Main Outcome Measures. The significant factors influencing the consumption of liquid, pasty, and normal food were the same: the initial T stage and the type of treatment. Conclusion. Whatever the possible and selected treatment was, the impact on the functional capacities, and thus, the quality of life of the patients was considerable. Even though we could not significantly demonstrate exclusive radiotherapy caused more long-term undesirable effects than surgery followed by radiotherapy, our daily practice has shown that we should favour the latter. PMID:22084765

  9. [Successful treatment of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus by combination chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil plus nedaplatin following tracheal stent tube placement-a case report].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Junya; Kubo, Naoshi; Lee, Tomohiro; Shinto, Osamu; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Shibutani, Masatsune; Yamazoe, Sadaaki; Nagahara, Hisashi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Yashiro, Masakazu; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Ohira, Masaichi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2013-11-01

    The patient was a 68-year-old man who complained of hoarseness and dyspnea. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a type 3 tumor located in the middle thoracic esophagus at 30 cm from the incisor tooth that involved one-fourth of the circumference of the esophagus. Histopathological examination revealed moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Chest computed tomography( CT) revealed severe tracheal stenosis due to compression by a metastatic lymph node along the left recurrent laryngeal nerve. The patient was diagnosed as having cT4( 106recL-trachea), N2( 101L, 106recL, 106recR), M0, Stage IVa unresectable esophageal carcinoma. After insertion of a tracheal stent tube( spiral Z stent: diameter, 18 mm; length, 80 mm) to improve dyspnea, combination chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil( 5-FU) plus nedaplatin was administered. Subsequent CT and endoscopy showed that the main tumor and the metastatic lymph node had significantly reduced in size and that complete response (CR) had been achieved. Thirty months after the initial treatment, the patient showed no sign of disease recurrence, after completion of 19 cycles of chemotherapy. The patient did not experience any severe adverse events. We report a case of a patient with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus successfully treated with 5-FU/nedaplatin combination chemotherapy following tracheal stent tube placement.

  10. Highly Aggressive HPV-related Oropharyngeal Cancer: Clinical, Radiologic, and Pathologic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kaka, Azeem S.; Kumar, Bhavna; Kumar, Pawan; Wakely, Paul E.; Kirsch, Claudia M.; Old, Matthew O.; Ozer, Enver; Agrawal, Amit; Carrau, Ricardo E.; Schuller, David E.; Siddiqui, Farzan; Teknos, Theodoros N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives While the majority of HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas have a favorable prognosis, we search for markers of poor prognosis by carefully examining a subset of highly-aggressive cases. Study Design Seven patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer who presented with non-pulmonary distant metastasis or developed distant metastasis post-treatment were identified. Eight control cases were chosen which responded well to treatment. Pathology and radiological studies were reviewed and compared. Results Two cases displayed a small cell carcinoma (SmCC) component upon pathologic review. Biomarker analysis revealed lower expression of NOTCH1 in the aggressive cohort in comparison to controls (p=0.04). Cases showed a predominance of clustering of lymph nodes, extracapsular spread and central tumor necrosis. Conclusion While most HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers display a positive prognosis, it is evident that there is a subset, which behave more aggressively. This early investigation identifies pathologic and radiologic features that may help to predict this behavior. PMID:23770280

  11. Low podoplanin expression in pretreatment biopsy material predicts poor prognosis in advanced-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated by primary radiation.

    PubMed

    Dumoff, Kimberly L; Chu, Christina S; Harris, Eleanor E; Holtz, David; Xu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Paul J; Acs, Geza

    2006-05-01

    Lymphatic invasion and nodal metastasis are predictors of poor outcome in cervix carcinoma. We have recently found that low podoplanin immunoreactivity in cervix carcinoma correlated with the presence of lymphatic invasion and nodal metastasis. In the current study, we examined whether podoplanin expression in pretreatment cervical biopsies can predict the presence lymphatic invasion, nodal metastasis, and outcome in advanced-stage tumors treated by nonsurgical means. Podoplanin expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 48 cervical biopsies and corresponding hysterectomy specimens of early-stage invasive squamous cell carcinoma and in 74 pretreatment biopsies from advanced-stage tumors treated with primary radiation. We found a highly significant correlation between podoplanin expression obtained in biopsy and corresponding hysterectomy materials (r = 0.8962, P < 0.0001). Low podoplanin expression showed a significant correlation with lymphatic invasion (P < 0.0001) and nodal metastasis (P = 0.0058). Low podoplanin expression in pretreatment biopsy material showed a significant correlation with poor disease-free (P = 0.0009) and overall (P = 0.0002) survival in advanced-stage tumors. Our results suggest that in advanced-stage cervix carcinomas treated by radiation, when traditional prognostic indicators are not available and treatment decisions are based on biopsy material and clinical staging parameters, examination of podoplanin expression in pretreatment biopsy material may be a useful marker to predict lymphatic metastasis and patient outcome. Prospective studies involving larger numbers of patients are needed to further evaluate the clinical utility of examination of podoplanin expression in patients with cervix carcinoma.

  12. Discussing a diagnosis of human papillomavirus oropharyngeal cancer with patients: An exploratory qualitative study of health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Rachael H.; Marlow, Laura A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (SCC) has now been well established. Clinicians' experiences and challenges of talking to patients about HPV have yet to be explored. Methods Fifteen health professionals caring for patients with oropharyngeal SCC were interviewed. Interviews were analyzed thematically. Results Participants expressed mixed views about explaining the causal role of HPV to their patients. Normalizing HPV and emphasizing the positive prognosis associated with it were regarded as key messages to be communicated. Challenging experiences included managing couples in a consultation and patients' concerns about transmitting HPV to their partners. Some participants described limitations to their HPV knowledge and identified the need for further information and training. Conclusion This study identified challenges experienced by health professionals working with patients with oropharyngeal SCC and highlights some key messages to convey to patients. Clinical guidance for health professionals and further information for patients about HPV‐positive oropharyngeal SCC are needed. © 2015 The Authors Head & Neck Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 394–401, 2016 PMID:25351993

  13. Long-term follow-up after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for advanced recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, Hans . E-mail: hchrist@gwdg.de; Hermann, Robert Michael; Martin, Alexios; Florez, Rodrigo; Kahler, Elke; Nitsche, Mirko; Hille, Andrea; Steiner, Wolfgang; Hess, Clemens F.; Pradier, Olivier

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and Methods: Between 1988 and 2000, 37 patients with advanced local recurrences (23 local and 14 locoregional recurrences) of HNSCC without distant metastases were treated in curative intent with organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (before 1994 split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum, after 1994 conventional radiotherapy). Initial therapy of the primary (8.1% oral cavity, 35.1% oropharynx, 13.5% hypopharynx, and 43.3% larynx) before relapse was organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery without any adjuvant therapy. Results: After a median follow-up of 124 months, the 5-year overall survival rate was 21.3%, the loco-regional control rate 48.3%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, stage of original primary tumor (Stage I/II vs. Stage III/IV), and patient age (<58 years vs. {>=}58 years) showed statistically significant impact on prognosis. In laryngeal cancer, larynx preservation rate after treatment for recurrent tumor was 50% during follow-up. Conclusion: Our data show that organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy is a curative option for patients who have advanced recurrence after transoral laser surgery and is an alternative to radical treatment.

  14. Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Squamous cell carcinoma typically develops in sun-damaged skin in fair-skinned patients. Overview Squamous ... skin cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma usually occurs on sun-damaged skin, especially in light-skinned individuals with ...

  15. A Multi-institutional Investigation of the Prognostic Value of Lymph Nodal Yield in Advanced Stage Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OCSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, James J.; Zender, Chad A.; Mehta, Vikas; Davis, Kara; Ferris, Robert L.; Lavertu, Pierre; Rezaee, Rod; Feustel, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although existing literature provides surgical recommendations for treating occult disease (cN0) in early stage oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, a focus on late stage OCSCC is less pervasive. Methods The records of 162 late stage OCSCC pN0 individuals that underwent primary neck dissections were reviewed. Lymph node yield (LNY) as a prognosticator was examined. Results Despite being staged pN0, patients that had a higher LNY had an improved regional/distant control rates, DFS, DSS, and OS. LNY consistently outperformed all other standard variables as being the single best prognostic factor with a tight risk ratio range (RR = 0.95–0.98) even when correcting for the number of lymph nodes examined. Conclusion The results of this study showed that lower regional recurrence rates and improved survival outcomes were seen as lymph node yield increased for advanced T-stage OCSCC pN0. This suggests that increasing lymph node yield with an extended cervical lymphadenectomy may result in lower recurrence rates and improved survival outcomes for this advanced stage group. PMID:24038739

  16. Predictive value of EGFR overexpression and gene amplification on icotinib efficacy in patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qingxia; Lu, Ping; Ma, Changwu; Liu, Wei; Liu, Ying; Li, Weiwei; Hu, Shaoxuan; Ling, Yun; Guo, Lei; Ying, Jianming; Huang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to search for a molecular marker for targeted epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor Icotinib by analyzing protein expression and amplification of EGFR proto-oncogene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to assess EGFR expression and gene amplification status in 193 patients with ESCC. We also examined the association between EGFR overexpression and the efficacy of a novel EGFR TKI, icotinib, in 62 ESCC patients. Of the 193 patients, 95 (49.2%) patients showed EGFR overexpression (3+), and 47(24.4%) patients harbored EGFR FISH positivity. EGFR overexpression was significantly correlated with clinical stage and lymph node metastasis (p<0.05). In addition, EGFR overexpression was significantly correlated with EGFR FISH positivity (p<0.001). Among the 62 patients who received icotinib, the response rate was 17.6% for patients with high EGFR-expressing tumors, which was markedly higher than the rate (0%) for patients with low to moderate EGFR-expressing tumors (p=0.341). Furthermore, all cases responded to icotinib showed EGFR overexpression. In conclusion, our study suggests that EGFR overexpression might potentially be used in predicting the efficacy in patients treated with Icotinib. These data have implications for both clinical trial design and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27013591

  17. Radon exposure and oropharyngeal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Espinosa, Tania; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer is a multifactorial disease. Alcohol and tobacco are the main risk factors. Radon is a human carcinogen linked to lung cancer risk, but its influence in other cancers is not well known. We aim to assess the effect of radon exposure on the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer through a systematic review of the scientific literature. This review performs a qualitative analysis of the available studies. 13 cohort studies were included, most of them mortality studies, which analysed the relationship between occupational or residential radon exposure with oropharyngeal cancer mortality or incidence. Most of the included studies found no association between radon exposure and oral and pharyngeal cancer. This lack of effect was observed in miners studies and in general population studies. Further research is necessary to quantify if this association really exists and its magnitude, specially performing studies in general population, preferably living in areas with high radon levels.

  18. Oral Rigosertib for Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Penile Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  19. High RAB25 expression is associated with good clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Gabriel, Marta; Arroyo-Solera, Irene; León, Xavier; Gallardo, Alberto; López, Montserrat; Céspedes, Maria V; Casanova, Isolda; López-Pousa, Antonio; Quer, Miquel; Mangues, Maria A; Barnadas, Agustí; Mangues, Ramón; Pavón, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Currently there are no molecular markers able to predict clinical outcome in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In a previous microarray study, RAB25 was identified as a potential prognostic marker. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between RAB25 expression and clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced HNSCC treated with standard therapy. In a retrospective immunohistochemical study (n = 97), we observed that RAB25-negative tumors had lower survival (log-rank, P = 0.01) than patients bearing positive tumors. In an independent prospective mRNA study (n = 117), low RAB25 mRNA expression was associated with poor prognosis. Using classification and regression tree analysis (CART) we established two groups of patients according to their RAB25 mRNA level and their risk of death. Low mRNA level was associated with poor local recurrence-free (log-rank, P = 0.005), progression-free (log-rank, P = 0.002) and cancer-specific (log-rank, P < 0.001) survival. Multivariate Cox model analysis showed that low expression of RAB25 was an independent poor prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio: 3.84, 95% confidence interval: 1.93–7.62, P < 0.001). Patients whose tumors showed high RAB25 expression had a low probability of death after treatment. We also found lower RAB25 expression in tumors than in normal tissue (Mann–Whitney U, P < 0.001). Moreover, overexpression of RAB25 in the UM-SCC-74B HNSCC cell line increased cisplatin sensitivity, and reduced cell migration and invasion. Our findings support a tumor suppressor role for RAB25 in HNSCC and its potential use to identify locally advanced patients with a high probability of survival after genotoxic treatment. PMID:24403269

  20. High RAB25 expression is associated with good clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Téllez-Gabriel, Marta; Arroyo-Solera, Irene; León, Xavier; Gallardo, Alberto; López, Montserrat; Céspedes, Maria V; Casanova, Isolda; López-Pousa, Antonio; Quer, Miquel; Mangues, Maria A; Barnadas, Agustí; Mangues, Ramón; Pavón, Miguel A

    2013-12-01

    Currently there are no molecular markers able to predict clinical outcome in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In a previous microarray study, RAB25 was identified as a potential prognostic marker. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between RAB25 expression and clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced HNSCC treated with standard therapy. In a retrospective immunohistochemical study (n = 97), we observed that RAB25-negative tumors had lower survival (log-rank, P = 0.01) than patients bearing positive tumors. In an independent prospective mRNA study (n = 117), low RAB25 mRNA expression was associated with poor prognosis. Using classification and regression tree analysis (CART) we established two groups of patients according to their RAB25 mRNA level and their risk of death. Low mRNA level was associated with poor local recurrence-free (log-rank, P = 0.005), progression-free (log-rank, P = 0.002) and cancer-specific (log-rank, P < 0.001) survival. Multivariate Cox model analysis showed that low expression of RAB25 was an independent poor prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio: 3.84, 95% confidence interval: 1.93-7.62, P < 0.001). Patients whose tumors showed high RAB25 expression had a low probability of death after treatment. We also found lower RAB25 expression in tumors than in normal tissue (Mann-Whitney U, P < 0.001). Moreover, overexpression of RAB25 in the UM-SCC-74B HNSCC cell line increased cisplatin sensitivity, and reduced cell migration and invasion. Our findings support a tumor suppressor role for RAB25 in HNSCC and its potential use to identify locally advanced patients with a high probability of survival after genotoxic treatment. PMID:24403269

  1. Apparent diffusion coefficient values detected by diffusion-weighted imaging in the prognosis of patients with locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma receiving chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu; Zhen, Fuxi; Sun, Nana; Chen, Jiayan; Cao, Yuandong; Zhang, Sheng; Cheng, Hongyan; Ge, Xiaolin; Sun, Xinchen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values measured by magnetic resonance imaging have prognostic value in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). However, the role of ADC needs to be validated in a cohort of Chinese ESCC patients. This study assessed the role of ADC in predicting the outcome of patients with ESCC treated only by chemoradiation in the People’s Republic of China. Patients and methods Seventy-three patients with local advanced ESCC were retrospectively analyzed in this study; none of the patients underwent surgery before or after chemoradiation. The ADC values of the primary tumors were determined by magnetic resonance imaging. The ADC values were then correlated with clinicopathological and other radiological parameters. Survival analysis was carried out to determine if ADC had an impact on survival of these patients. Results The median ADC value of the esophageal cancer tissue was 1.256*10−3 mm2/sec (range: 0.657–2.354*10−3 mm2/sec, interquartile range 0.606*10−3 mm2/sec). No clinicopathological or radiological parameters were associated with the ADC values except the sites of tumor tissues. ADC <1.076*10−3 mm2/sec predicted significantly worse survival in patients with ESCC (12.9 months vs undefined, P=0.0108). Conclusion The ADC value is a potent prognostic factor which can be used to predict the outcome of patients with ESCC treated only by chemoradiation. PMID:27703377

  2. Induction chemotherapy with concurrent chemoradiotherapy versus concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijuan; Jiang, Nan; Shi, Yuexian; Li, Shipeng; Wang, Peiguo; Zhao, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) has been considered to be the standard of care for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (LA-SCCHN). Whether induction chemotherapy (IC) with CCRT will further improve the clinical outcomes or not is still unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis to compare the two regimens for LA-SCCHN. Literature searches were carried out in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and Chinese Biology Medicine from inception to November 2014. Five prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 922 patients were included in meta-analysis. Results were expressed as hazard ratios (HRs) or relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Compared with CCRT, IC with CCRT showed no statistically significant differences in overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate (ORR) or locoregional recurrence rate (LRR), but could increase risks of grade 3–4 febrile neutropenia (P = 0.0009) and leukopenia (P = 0.04). In contrast, distant metastasis rate (DMR) decreased (P = 0.006) and complete response rate (CR) improved (P = 0.010) for IC with CCRT. In conclusion, the current studies do not support the use of IC with CCRT over CCRT, and the further positioning of IC with CCRT as standard treatment for LA-SCCHN will come from more RCTs directly comparing IC followed by CCRT with CCRT. PMID:26041604

  3. Unusual length of pedicle: pedunculated squamous papilloma of uvula causing unusual Dysphagia of long duration in a child of 10 years.

    PubMed

    Devi, Ramisetty Sabitha; Rajsekhar, B; Srinivas, G Vijay; Moon, Ninad J

    2014-01-01

    Benign oropharyngeal tumors are far less common compared to malignant tumors. Oropharyngeal papilloma is present in adults. Squamous papillomas are exophytic masses of oral cavity. When they occur on the palate they are most often asymptomatic and benign. Pedunculated squamous papillomas usually arise from the soft palate, tonsil, or the epiglottis. These lesions can sometimes prove to be fatal. A case of pedunculated squamous papilloma, arising from the laryngopharynx, the clinical presentation, the site of origin, and the size of the lesion were quite unusual. The narrow base of the pedicle made the intraoral excision possible. But here, we present a case of a 10-year-old boy who had history of dysphagia of 3-year duration for solid food and he was comfortable only in squatting position the reason being squamous papilloma of uvula (unusual site) atypically because of astonishing length of pedicle (2.3 inches).

  4. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Andrew P.; Saha, Sandeep; Kraninger, Jennifer L.; Swick, Adam D.; Yu, Menggang; Lambertg, Paul F.; Kimple, Randall

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The global incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has been increasing, and it has been proposed that a rising rate of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cancers is driving the observed changes in OPSCC incidence. We carried out this systematic review to further examine the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC over time worldwide. Methods A systematic literature search was performed to identify all articles through January 31, 2014 that reported on the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC. Articles that met inclusion criteria were divided into four time frames (pre-1995, 1995—1999, 2000—2004, and 2005—present) based on the median year of the study's sample collection period. Employing a weighted analysis of variance (ANOVA) model, we examined the trends of HPV-positivity over time worldwide, in North America, and in Europe. Results Our literature search identified 699 unique articles. 175 underwent review of the entire study and 105 met inclusion criteria. These 105 articles reported on the HPV prevalence in 9541 OPSCC specimens across 23 nations. We demonstrated significant increases in the percentage change of HPV-positive OPSCCs from pre-1995 to present: 20.6% worldwide (p-value for trend: p<0.001), 21.6% in North America (p=0.013) and 21.5% in Europe (p=0.033). Discussion Interestingly, while in Europe there was a steady increase in HPV prevalence across all time frames, reaching nearly 50% most recently, in North America HPV prevalence appears to have plateaued over the past decade at about 65%. These findings may have important implications regarding predictions for the future incidence of OPSCC. PMID:26049691

  5. Phase I/II Study of Erlotinib Combined With Cisplatin and Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Herchenhorn, Daniel; Dias, Fernando L.; Viegas, Celia M.P.; Federico, Miriam H.; Araujo, Carlos Manoel M.; Small, Isabelle; Bezerra, Marcos; Fontao, Karina M.D.; Knust, Renata E.; Ferreira, Carlos G.; Martins, Renato G.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Erlotinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is active against head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and possibly has a synergistic interaction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We investigated the safety and efficacy of erlotinib added to cisplatin and radiotherapy in locally advanced HNSCC. Methods and Materials: In this Phase I/II trial 100 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin was administered on Days 8, 29, and 50, and radiotherapy at 70 Gy was started on Day 8. During Phase I, the erlotinib dose was escalated (50 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg) in consecutive cohorts of 3 patients, starting on Day 1 and continuing during radiotherapy. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Grade 4 event requiring radiotherapy interruptions. Phase II was initiated 8 weeks after the last Phase I enrollment. Results: The study accrued 9 patients in Phase I and 28 in Phase II; all were evaluable for efficacy and safety. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred in Phase I, and the recommended Phase II dose was 150 mg. The most frequent nonhematologic toxicities were nausea/vomiting, dysphagia, stomatitis, xerostomia and in-field dermatitis, acneiform rash, and diarrhea. Of the 31 patients receiving a 150-mg daily dose of erlotinib, 23 (74%; 95% confidence interval, 56.8%-86.3%) had a complete response, 3 were disease free after salvage surgery, 4 had inoperable residual disease, and 1 died of sepsis during treatment. With a median 37 months' follow-up, the 3-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 61% and 72%, respectively. Conclusions: This combination appears safe, has encouraging activity, and deserves further studies in locally advanced HNSCC.

  6. Monitoring of Circulating Tumor Cells and Their Expression of EGFR/Phospho-EGFR During Combined Radiotherapy Regimens in Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Tinhofer, Ingeborg; Hristozova, Tsvetana; Stromberger, Carmen; KeilhoIz, Ulrich; Budach, Volker

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: The numbers of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and their expression/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) during the course of combined chemo- or bioradiotherapy regimens as potential biomarkers of treatment efficacy in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) were determined. Methods and Materials: Peripheral blood samples from SCCHN patients with locally advanced stage IVA/B disease who were treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy or induction chemotherapy followed by bioradiation with cetuximab were included in this study. Using flow cytometry, the absolute number of CTCs per defined blood volume as well as their expression of EGFR and its phosphorylated form (pEGFR) during the course of treatment were assessed. Results: Before treatment, we detected {>=}1 CTC per 3.75 mL blood in 9 of 31 patients (29%). Basal expression of EGFR was detected in 100% and pEGFR in 55% of the CTC+ cases. The frequency of CTC detection was not influenced by induction chemotherapy. However, the number of CTC+ samples significantly increased after radiotherapy. This radiation-induced increase in CTC numbers was less pronounced when radiotherapy was combined with cetuximab compared to its combination with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. The former treatment regimen was also more effective in reducing pEGFR expression in CTCs. Conclusions: Definitive radiotherapy regimens of locally advanced SCCHN can increase the number of CTCs and might thus contribute to a systemic spread of tumor cells. Further studies are needed to evaluate the predictive value of the radiation-induced increase in CTC numbers and the persistent activation of the EGFR signalling pathway in individual CTC+ cases.

  7. SU-E-T-275: Radiobiological Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rekha Reddy, B.; Ravikumar, M.; Tanvir Pasha, C.R; Anil Kumar, M.R; Varatharaj, C.; Pyakuryal, A; Narayanasamy, Ganesh

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiobiological outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment (IMRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using HART (Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy; J Appl Clin Med Phys 11(1): 137–157, 2010) program and compare with the clinical outcomes. Methods: We have treated 20 patients of stage III and IV HNSCC Oropharynx and hypopharynx with accelerated IMRT technique and concurrent chemotherapy. Delineation of tumor and normal tissues were done using Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA) contouring guidelines and radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70Gy in 35 fractions to the primary and involved lymph nodes, 63Gy to intermediate risk areas and 56 Gy to lower risk areas, Monday to Saturday, 6 Days/week using 6 MV Photons with an expected overall treatment time of 6 weeks. The TCP and NTCP's were calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics using the Poisson Statistics (PS) and JT Lyman models respectively and the Resultwas correlated with clinical outcomes of the patients with mean follow up of 24 months. Results: Using HART program, the TCP (0.89± 0.01) of primary tumor and the NTCP for parotids (0.20±0.12), spinal cord (0.05±0.01), esophagus (0.30±0.2), mandible (0.35±0.21), Oral cavity (0.37±0.18), Larynx (0.30±0.15) were estimated and correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Conclusion: Accelerated IMRT with Chemotherapy is a clinical feasible option in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC with encouraging initial tumour response and acceptable acute toxicities. The correlation between the clinical outcomes and radiobiological model estimated parameters using HART programs are found to be satisfactory.

  8. Population-based p16 and HPV positivity rates in oropharyngeal cancer in Southeast Scotland.

    PubMed

    Wells, L A R; Junor, E J; Conn, B; Pattle, S; Cuschieri, K

    2015-10-01

    We assessed a population-based cohort of patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in Southeast Scotland over 13 months. p16 and human papilloma virus (HPV) expression were determined, and correlated with stage, treatment, smoking and alcohol history, and disease outcomes. Retrospective analysis was performed on 60 patients. p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV genotyping were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. HPV infection (as defined by p16 positivity and/or HPV PCR positivity) was identified in 57% of samples, while dual positives were detected in 45% of cases. HPV16 was most prevalent of the HPV types and was associated with 90% of positive samples. Cause-specific 1-year and 2-year survivals were 82.5% and 78.2%, respectively. The p16-positive and HPV-positive groups demonstrated significantly increased cause-specific survival in comparison with their negative counterparts.

  9. [The role of microRNAs in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma : Biomarkers for prognosis, therapy selection, and novel therapeutics].

    PubMed

    Heß, A K; Weichert, W; Budach, V; Tinhofer, I

    2016-05-01

    Despite recent advances in radiochemotherapy, treatment of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is still challenging, and survival rates have improved only slightly. This is due to the high frequency of metastases and local and/or regional tumor recurrences that have acquired radio- or chemoresistance. MiRNAs regulate diverse processes in tumorigenesis, metastasis, and therapy resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Hence, miRNAs are highly valued in biomarker studies. Establishment of the miRNA profiles of oropharyngeal tumors enables personalized treatment selection, since expression of distinct miRNAs can predict the response to two different radiochemotherapy regimens. Development of novel miRNA therapeutics has a high clinical potential for further improving treatment of cancerous disease. The use of nanoparticles with distinct surface modifications as miRNA vectors permits prolonged bioavailability, high efficacy in tumor targeting, and low toxicity. Nevertheless, the efficacy of miRNA therapy has only been shown in animal models to date.

  10. Volumetric Change of Selected Organs at Risk During IMRT for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ricchetti, Francesco; Wu Binbin; McNutt, Todd; Wong, John; Forastiere, Arlene; Marur, Shanthi; Starmer, Heather; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess volumetric changes of selected organs at risk (OAR) during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six consecutive patients that were treated with definitive IMRT {+-} chemotherapy between November 2007 and November 2008 were selected for the present study. As part of an internal quality assurances program, a repeat kilovolt (KV) computed tomography was planned weekly during the 7-week treatment course. On each available scan, a single observer contoured the parotid submandibular, and thyroid glands (PG/SMG/TG), larynx (L), and constrictor, masticatory, and sternocleidomastoid muscles (CM/MM/SCM) as appropriate. The volume at each scan was compared with the one at planning CT in a pair-wise fashion. p values <0.05 after correction for multiple testing were considered significant. Results: A total of 159 scans was obtained during treatment for a total of 185 scans, including the baseline imaging. All OARs showed statistically significant changes over baseline by week 5. At week 7, the PG showed the largest absolute change with an average reduction of {approx}10 mL followed by both the SCM and MM ({approx}-5 mL). The largest ({approx}-30%) relative change was observed for the salivary glands. L and CM showed a {approx}15% increase in volume during treatment. Conclusion: All selected OAR undergo significant volumetric changes during a course of IMRT for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

  11. EBV, HSV, CMV and HPV in laryngeal and oropharyngeal carcinoma in Polish patients.

    PubMed

    Polz-Gruszka, Dorota; Stec, Agnieszka; Dworzański, Jakub; Polz-Dacewicz, Małgorzata

    2015-03-01

    The role of viruses in the etiology of oral cancer has been proposed in many studies. The aim of the present study was to analyze the prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus, Human Herpes virus type 1, Cytomegalovirus and Human Papilloma virus among patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma in a Polish population. We investigated fresh-frozen tumor tissue fragments obtained from 80 patients with OSCC using the polymerase chain reaction assay. HPV was detected in 32.5% (22.5% were HPV 16), more often in laryngeal (36%) than in oropharyngeal carcinoma (26.6%). EBV was identified in 57.5%, HHV-1 in 7.5%, and CMV in 10% of patients. Co-infection with one or more viruses was detected in 30% of cases and most frequently it was co-infection with EBV and HPV (15%). Further studies are necessary to determine the potential role of EBV and the possible importance of HHV-1 as an infection co-factor in oropharyngeal cancer.

  12. Comparison of cisplatinum/paclitaxel with cisplatinum/5-fluorouracil as first-line therapy for nonsurgical locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guofang; Wang, Zhehai; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Qingqing; Tang, Ning; Guo, Jun; Liu, Liyan; Han, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Background To retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) with cisplatinum/paclitaxel versus cisplatinum/5-fluorouracil in patients with locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) who received nonsurgical treatment. Methods This study retrospectively evaluated 202 patients with locally advanced ESCC treated at Shandong Cancer Hospital between January 2009 and December 2013. All the patients initially received dCRT, including platinum and paclitaxel or 5-fluorouracil, with concurrent 1.8 or 2 Gy/fraction radiation (total dose, 54–60 Gy). The patient population was divided into two treatment groups: 105 patients who received the cisplatinum/paclitaxel regimen were allocated to group A, and 97 patients who received the cisplatinum/5-fluorouracil regimen were allocated to group B. We compared the progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) by various clinical variables, including prior treatment characteristics, major toxicities (mainly in grade 3 and 4 hematological), and response to dCRT. We used the receiver operating curve analysis to determine the optimal cutoff value of clinical stage and radiation dose. The Kaplan–Meier method was used for survival comparison and Cox regression for multivariate analysis. Results Median PFS and OS in group A were significantly better compared with group B (median PFS, 15.9 versus 13.0 months, P=0.016 and median OS, 33.9 versus 23.1 months, P=0.014, respectively). The 1- and 2-year survival rates of the two groups were 82.9% versus 76.3%, and 61.9% versus 47.6%, respectively. The complete response and response rate were 17.1% versus 7.2% (P=0.032) and 52.4% versus 30.9% (P=0.042) in group A and B, respectively. Meanwhile, group B was associated with a significantly lower rate of grade 3/4 overall toxicity than group A (P=0.039). Conclusion Our data showed that patients with locally advanced ESCC in group A had longer PFS and OS compared with

  13. Human Papillomavirus–Related Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Chernock, Rebecca D.; Zhang, Qin; El-Mofty, Samir K.; Thorstad, Wade L.; Lewis, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the frequency of human papillomavirus–related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in African Americans and whites and to examine patient outcomes in these 2 groups. Design Retrospective study. Setting One tertiary care, university medical center. Patients Information on patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma diagnosed between 1998 and 2007, and with primary surgical samples available for review, were selected from a radiotherapy database. One patient was Native American and was excluded from analysis; data on 174 patients were analyzed. Results One hundred forty-eight patients (85.1%) were white and 26 (14.9%) were African American. Human papillomavirus in situ hybridization–positive and p16-positive tumors were much more common in whites (63.5% and 83.1% of tumors, respectively) than in African Americans (11.5% and 34.6% of tumors, respectively) (P<.001). African Americans were also more likely to have received definitive (nonsurgical) rather than postoperative radiation therapy (P=.001) and had a higher frequency of T3/T4–stage tumors (P=.03) compared with whites. Disease-free survival was significantly shorter for African Americans (P=.02). In multivariate analysis, viral status (P=.006), T stage (P=.02), and treatment type (P=.002), but not race (P=.98), were significant factors contributing to disease-free survival. Conclusions In high-stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, the proportion of human papillomavirus–related tumors is much higher in whites than in African Americans. African Americans also appear to develop higher T-stage tumors and are more likely to receive definitive therapy. The shorter disease-free survival observed in African Americans may be due to viral status, treatment type, and higher T stage, but does not appear to be due to race. PMID:21339403

  14. The role of human papillomavirus in squamous carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Li, Guojun; Sturgis, Erich M

    2006-03-01

    Human papillomavirus type-16 infection is associated with a significant portion of squamous carcinoma of the head and neck, particularly for the oropharynx and for those lacking the other risk factors of tobacco and alcohol. The link between human papillomavirus type-16 and carcinoma of the oropharynx is based on the identification of human papillomavirus type-16 in oropharyngeal tumors and the association of human papillomavirus type-16 with the risk of oropharyngeal cancer estimated in case-control epidemiologic studies. This review highlights the molecular mechanism of human papillomavirus carcinogenesis and the association of human papillomavirus type-16 as a risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx as well as recent research efforts utilizing human papillomavirus as a biomarker of clinical outcomes.

  15. DETECTION OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS IN HEAD AND NECK SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMAS: A LITERATURE REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Jelihovschi, I; Bidescu, Aida Corina; Tucaliuc, Simona Elena; Iancu, Luminiţa Smaranda

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are the most common sexually transmitted viruses. There is mounting evidence that incriminates HPV as a risk factor for malignant transformation of oropharyngeal epithelium. In 2011 the International Research Agency of Cancer and National Cancer Institute (USA) declared HPV-16 as an independent risk factor for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Leaders in the field of HPV research admit that this subtype of head and neck cancer is a sexually transmitted entity and its global incidence is on the rise. In the 1980s, clinicians observed a new group of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) independent of tobacco smoking or alcohol use. The new HNSCC patient is a middle-aged man, non-smoker, non-drinker with higher social status and the suspected risk factors for HNSCC being related to sexual practices (oral sex, multiple sexual partners, unprotected sex and drug use). Routine HPV testing of HNSCC patients is seriously considered as HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers comprise a distinct molecular, clinical and pathologic entity that has a markedly better prognosis than HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancers. The current treatment protocols for OPSCC include radiation, chemotherapy and surgery alone or in combination, involving high toxicity levels. Future therapeutic concepts for OPSCC may be personalized in relation to HPV-status to avoid unnecessary toxicity. The current review summarizes the contemporary trends in the diagnosis of HPV-related head and neck cancers, presenting the advantages and disadvantages of the main methods.

  16. Induction chemotherapy and cetuximab for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: results from a phase II prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Kies, Merrill S; Holsinger, Floyd Christopher; Lee, J Jack; William, William N; Glisson, Bonnie S; Lin, Heather Y; Lewin, Jan S; Ginsberg, Lawrence E; Gillaspy, Katharine A; Massarelli, Erminia; Byers, Lauren; Lippman, Scott M; Hong, Waun K; El-Naggar, Adel K; Garden, Adam S; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the potential efficacy of combining cetuximab with chemotherapy in patients with advanced nodal disease, we conducted a phase II trial with induction chemotherapy (ICT) consisting of six weekly cycles of paclitaxel 135 mg/m(2) and carboplatin (area under the curve = 2) with cetuximab 400 mg/m(2) in week 1 and then 250 mg/m(2) (PCC). PATIENTS AND METHODS Forty-seven previously untreated patients (41 with oropharynx primaries; 33 men, 14 women; median age, 53 years; performance status of 0 or 1) with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN; T1-4, N2b/c/3) were treated and evaluated for clinical and radiographic response. After ICT, patients underwent risk-based local therapy, which consisted of either radiation, concomitant chemoradiotherapy, or surgery, based on tumor stage and site at diagnosis. Results After induction PCC, nine patients (19%) achieved a complete response, and 36 patients (77%) achieved a partial response. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicity was skin rash (45%), followed by neutropenia (21%) without fever. At a median follow-up time of 33 months, locoregional or systemic disease progression was observed in six patients. The 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 87% (95% CI, 78% to 97%) and 91% (95% CI, 84% to 99%), respectively. Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16, found in 12 (46%) of 26 biopsies, was associated with improved PFS (P = .012) and OS (P = .046). CONCLUSION ICT with weekly PCC followed by risk-based local therapy seems to be feasible, effective, and well tolerated. PFS is promising, and this sequential treatment strategy should be further investigated. Patients with HPV-positive tumors have an excellent prognosis.

  17. Radiochemotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: Higher-dose cisplatin every 3 weeks versus cisplatin/5-fluorouracil every 4 weeks.

    PubMed

    Rades, Dirk; Strojan, Primoz; Seidl, Daniel; Janssen, Stefan; Bajrovic, Amira; Kazic, Nadja; Hakim, Samer G; Wollenberg, Barbara; Schild, Steven E

    2016-09-01

    Many patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LASCCHN) receive cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy. The optimal regimen is still unclear when considering both efficacy and feasibility. This study compared two regimens for locoregional control (LRC), overall survival (OS), and adverse events. Data of 329 patients with LASCCHN receiving definitive or postoperative radiochemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 131 patients received 100 mg/m(2) cisplatin on days 1, 22, and 43 (group A), and 198 patients received 20 mg/m(2) cisplatin plus 600/1000 mg/m(2) 5-FU on days 1-5 and days 29-33 (group B). Radiochemotherapy regimens plus nine factors were compared for LRC and OS, and radiochemotherapy regimens additionally for adverse events. On univariate analysis, chemotherapy type was not associated with LRC (p = 0.36). On multivariate analysis, performance score (p = 0.039), N-category (p = 0.007), histologic grade (p = 0.007), upfront surgery (p = 0.030), and pre-radiochemotherapy hemoglobin levels (p < 0.001) were associated with LRC. On univariate analysis, chemotherapy type had no impact on OS (p = 0.64). On multivariate analysis, performance score (p < 0.001), T-category (p = 0.025), N-category (p < 0.001), histologic grade, and hemoglobin levels (p < 0.001) were associated with OS. Renal failure occurred significantly more often in group A (p = 0.008). Otherwise, adverse events were not significantly different. Thus, both radiochemotherapy regimens appeared similarly effective for LASCCHN. Patients receiving 100 mg/m(2) of cisplatin require close monitoring of their renal function. PMID:27499514

  18. A novel RT-PCR method for quantification of human papillomavirus transcripts in archived tissues and its application in oropharyngeal cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ge; Chernock, Rebecca D; Gay, Hiram A; Thorstad, Wade L; Zhang, Tian R; Wang, Hongwei; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Luo, Yuling; Lewis, James S; Wang, Xiaowei

    2013-02-15

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is strongly associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, which is distinctively different from most other head and neck cancers. However, a robust quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) method for comprehensive expression profiling of HPV genes in routinely fixed tissues has not been reported. To address this issue, we have established a new real-time RT-PCR method for the expression profiling of the E6 and E7 oncogenes from 13 high-risk HPV types. This method was validated in cervical cancer and by comparison with another HPV RNA detection method (in situ hybridization) in oropharyngeal tumors. In addition, the expression profiles of selected HPV-related human genes were also analyzed. HPV E6 and E7 expression profiles were then analyzed in 150 archived oropharyngeal SCC samples and compared with other variables and with patient outcomes. Our study showed that RT-qPCR and RNA in situ hybridization were 100% concordant in determining HPV status. HPV transcriptional activity was found in most oropharyngeal SCC (81.3%), a prevalence that is higher than in previous studies. Besides HPV16, three other HPV types were also detected, including 33, 35 and 18. Furthermore, HPV and p16 had essentially identical expression signatures, and both HPV and p16 were prognostic biomarkers for the prediction of disease outcome. Thus, p16 mRNA or protein expression signature is a sensitive and specific surrogate marker for HPV transcriptional activity (all genotypes combined).

  19. The epidemiology of oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wahi, P. N.

    1968-01-01

    Records of the Sarojini Naidu Medical College Hospital, Agra, India, suggested that there was a much higher endemicity of oral and oropharyngeal cancer in Mainpuri district, a rural area about 75 miles (120 km) from Agra City, than there was in Agra district itself. It was decided in 1963 to set up a complete cancer registry in Mainpuri district, based on the Sarojini Naidu Medical College and in association with the WHO International Reference Centre for the Histopathological Nomenclature and Classification of Oropharyngeal Tumours, which would, among other duties, undertake a study of the epidemiology by means of an intensive field-programme in the area. The epidemiological survey was carried out between March 1964 and September 1966. All factors considered to have any relevance to the disease were surveyed and particularly strong correlations were discovered between the prevalence of oral cancer and the use of local tobaccos (adulterated to a greater or lesser extent with various other materials), especially for chewing but also for smoking. There was also some correlation between prevalence of oral cancer and the use of certain alcoholic drinks. A number of other factors, most probably influencing or modifying the use of tobacco and alcohol, were found to be significant also. PMID:5302449

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma —

    Cancer.gov

    The hallmarks of squamous cell carcinoma are the differentiation features of the squamous epithelium: keratinization and intercellular bridges. Large central masses of keratin, individual cell keratinization, and/or keratin pearls may form. Necrosis of tumor cell nests and accumulation of acute inflammatory cells are frequent features of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma.

  1. Feasibility of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy after taxane-based induction chemotherapy for nonoperated locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Levy, Antonin; Blanchard, Pierre; Bellefqih, Sara; Brahimi, Nacéra; Guigay, Joël; Janot, François; Temam, Stéphane; Daly-Schveitzer, Nicolas; Bourhis, Jean; Tao, Yungan

    2014-11-01

    To assess the use of radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) following taxane-based induction chemotherapy (T-ICT) in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (LAHNSCC) and to evaluate the tolerability of CRT after T-ICT. From 01/2006 to 08/2012, 173 LAHNSCC patients treated as a curative intent by T-ICT, followed by definitive RT/CRT were included in this analysis. There was an 86% objective response (OR) after ICT among 154 evaluable patients. Forty-four patients received less than three cycles (25%) and 20 received only one cycle of T-ICT. The 3-year actuarial overall survival (OS) was 49% and there was no OS difference according to the type of ICT (regimen or number of cycle) or the addition of concurrent CT (cisplatin, carboplatin, or cetuximab) to RT. In multivariate analysis (MVA), clinically involved lymph node (cN+), age more than 60 years, the absence of OR after ICT, and performance status of at least 1 predicted for a decreased OS, with hazard ratios (HR) of 2.8, 2.2, 2.1, and 2, respectively. The 3-year actuarial locoregional control (LRC) and distant control (DC) rates were 52 and 73%, respectively. In MVA, the absence of OR after ICT (HR: 3.2), cN+ (HR: 3), and age more than 60 years (HR: 1.7) were prognostic for a lower LRC whereas cN+ (HR: 4.2) and carboplatin-based T-ICT (HR: 2.9) were prognostic for a lower DC. The number of cycles (≤ 2) received during ICT was borderline significant for DC in the MVA (P=0.08). Among patients receiving less than or equal to three cycles of ICT, higher outcomes were observed in patients who received cisplatin-based T-ICT (vs. carboplatin-based T-ICT) or subsequent CRT (vs. RT). T-ICT in our experience, followed by RT or CRT, raises several questions on the role and type of induction, and the efficacy of CRT over RT. The role of RT or CRT following induction, although feasible in these advanced patients, awaits answers from randomized trials.

  2. c-Met Expression Is a Marker of Poor Prognosis in Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Baschnagel, Andrew M.; Williams, Lindsay; Hanna, Alaa; Chen, Peter Y.; Krauss, Daniel J.; Pruetz, Barbara L.; Akervall, Jan; Wilson, George D.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the prognostic significance of c-Met expression in relation to p16 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Archival tissue from 107 HNSCC patients treated with chemoradiation was retrieved, and a tissue microarray was assembled. Immunohistochemical staining of c-Met, p16, and EGFR was performed. c-Met expression was correlated with p16, EGFR, clinical characteristics, and clinical endpoints including locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Fifty-one percent of patients were positive for p16, and 53% were positive for EGFR. Both p16-negative (P≤.001) and EGFR-positive (P=.019) status predicted for worse DFS. Ninety-three percent of patients stained positive for c-Met. Patients were divided into low (0, 1, or 2+ intensity) or high (3+ intensity) c-Met expression. On univariate analysis, high c-Met expression predicted for worse LRC (hazard ratio [HR] 2.27; 95% CI, 1.08-4.77; P=.031), DM (HR 4.41; 95% CI, 1.56-12.45; P=.005), DFS (HR 3.00; 95% CI, 1.68-5.38; P<.001), and OS (HR 4.35; 95% CI, 2.13-8.88; P<.001). On multivariate analysis, after adjustment for site, T stage, smoking history, and EGFR status, only high c-Met expression (P=.011) and negative p16 status (P=.003) predicted for worse DFS. High c-Met expression was predictive of worse DFS in both EGFR-positive (P=.032) and -negative (P=.008) patients. In the p16-negative patients, those with high c-Met expression had worse DFS (P=.036) than did those with low c-Met expression. c-Met expression was not associated with any outcome in the p16-positive patients. Conclusions: c-Met is expressed in the majority of locally advanced HNSCC cases, and high c-Met expression predicts for worse clinical outcomes. High c-Met expression predicted for worse DFS in p16

  3. Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis following Oropharyngeal Infection.

    PubMed

    Bostanci, Asli; Turhan, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Internal jugular vein thrombosis (IJVT) is a rare condition which may lead to life-threatening complications such as sepsis and pulmonary embolism. Prolonged central venous catheterization, intravenous (IV) drug use, trauma, and radiotherapy are the most frequent causes of the IJVT. IJVT that develops after the oropharyngeal infection is a quite rare situation today. In this paper, a 37-year-old woman was presented; swelling occurred on her neck after acute tonsillitis and she was diagnosed with IJVT through Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging and managed without complications. Early diagnosis and conservative treatment with broad-spectrum IV antibiotics and anticoagulant agents have a critical importance for the prevention of fatal complications. PMID:26457221

  4. Nab-paclitaxel-based compared to docetaxel-based induction chemotherapy regimens for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Schell, Amy; Ley, Jessica; Wu, Ningying; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Wildes, Tanya Marya; Michel, Loren; Thorstad, Wade; Gay, Hiram; Lewis, James; Rich, Jason; Diaz, Jason; Paniello, Randal C; Nussenbaum, Brian; Adkins, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that nab-paclitaxel-based induction chemotherapy (IC) and concurrent chemoradiotherapy resulted in low relapse rates (13%) and excellent survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We compare the disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) between patients given nab-paclitaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil with cetuximab (APF-C) and historical controls given docetaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil with cetuximab (TPF-C). Patients with locally advanced HNSCC were treated with APF-C (n = 30) or TPF-C (n = 38). After 3 cycles of IC, patients were scheduled to receive cisplatin concurrent with definitive radiotherapy. T and N classification and smoking history were similar between the two groups and within p16-positive and p16-negative subsets. The median duration of follow-up for living patients in the APF-C group was 43.5 (range: 30–58) months versus 52 (range: 13–84) months for TPF-C. The 2-year DSS for patients treated with APF-C was 96.7% [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 85.2%, 99.8%] and with TPF-C was 77.6% (CI: 62.6%, 89.7%) (P = 0.0004). Disease progression that resulted in death was more frequent in the TPF-C group (39%) compared with the APF-C group (3%) when adjusted for competing risks of death from other causes (Gray's test, P = 0.0004). In p16 positive OPSCC, the 2-year DSS for APF-C was 100% and for TPF-C was 74.6% (CI: 47.4%, 94.6%) (P = 0.0019) and the 2-year OS for APF-C was 94.1% (CI: 65.0%, 99.2%) and for TPF-C was 74.6% (CI: 39.8%, 91.1%) (P = 0.013). In p16 negative HNSCC, the 2-year DSS for APF-C was 91.7% (CI: 67.6%, 99.6%) and for TPF-C was 82.6% (CI: 64.4%, 94.8%) (P = 0.092). A 2-year DSS and OS were significantly better with a nab-paclitaxel-based IC regimen (APF-C) compared to a docetaxel-based IC regimen (TPF-C) in p16-positive OPSCC. PMID:25619559

  5. Concurrent weekly docetaxel and concomitant boost radiation therapy in the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, Roy B. . E-mail: roy_tishler@dfci.harvard.edu; Posner, Marshall R.; Norris, Charles M.; Mahadevan, Anand; Sullivan, Christopher; Goguen, Laura; Wirth, Lori J.; Costello, Rosemary; Case, MaryAnn; Stowell, Sara; Sammartino, Dan; Busse, Paul M.; Haddad, Robert I.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: In a Phase I/II trial, we investigated concurrent weekly docetaxel and concomitant boost radiation in patients with locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN) after induction chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: Patients presented with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III/IV and were treated initially with induction chemotherapy using cisplatinum/5-fluorouracil (PF), carboplatinum-5-FU, or docetaxel-PF. Patients then received docetaxel four times weekly with concomitant boost (CB) radiation (1.8 Gy once-daily X20, 1.8/1.5 Gy twice a day). Fifteen patients each received 20 mg/M{sup 2} and 25 mg/M{sup 2}. Results: Thirty-one patients were enrolled and 30 were evaluable for response and toxicity. Median follow-up was 42 months (range, 27-63 months). Primary sites were: oropharynx 19, oral cavity 2, larynx/hypopharynx 5, and unknown primary 4. Eighty-seven percent of patients had N2/N3 disease; 60% had T3/T4 disease. Twenty percent of patients had a complete response (CR) to induction chemotherapy. After chemoradiotherapy, 21 of 30 patients had a CR, 2 had progressive disease, and 7 had partial response (PR). Nineteen of 26 patients presenting with neck disease had neck dissections, and 7 of 19 were positive. Ninety-three percent of all patients were rendered disease-free after all planned therapy. Treatment failed in 8 patients, and 7 have died of disease. An additional patient died with no evidence of disease. Twenty-one patients (70%) are currently alive with no evidence of disease. No acute dose-limiting toxicity was observed at either dose level. Conclusions: This intensive treatment regimen of concurrent docetaxel/concomitant boost radiation and surgery after induction chemotherapy in poor prognosis patients yields good local regional control and survival. Docetaxel/CB chemoradiotherapy represents an aggressive alternative regimen to platinum-based chemoradiotherapy or surgery in patients who have a poor response to

  6. Curative-Intent Aggressive Treatment Improves Survival in Elderly Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma and High Comorbidity Index

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Yang, Hsuan-Chia; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Wu, Li-Li; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Chia-Lun; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Ding, Yi-Fang; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract For locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), therapeutic decisions depend on comorbidity or age. We estimated the treatment outcomes of patients with different Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) scores and ages to determine whether aggressive treatment improves survival. Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance and cancer registry databases were analyzed, and we included >20-year-old patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage III or IV HNSCC (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 140.0–148.9) undergoing surgery, chemotherapy (CT), radiotherapy (RT), concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), sequential CT and RT, or surgery with adjuvant treatment. The exclusion criteria were a past cancer history, distant metastasis, AJCC stage I or II, missing sex data, an age < 20 years, nasopharyngeal cancer, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, and HNSCC recurrence. The index date was the date of first HNSCC diagnosis, and comorbidities were scored using the CCI. The enrolled patients were categorized into Group 1 (curative-intent aggressive treatments) and Group 2 (best supportive care or palliative treatments). We enrolled 21,174 stage III or IV HNSCC patients without distant metastasis (median follow-up, 3.25 years). Groups 1 and 2 comprised 18,584 and 2232 patients, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, and clinical stage, adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of overall death in Group 1 were 0.33 (0.31–0.35), 0.34 (0.31–0.36), and 0.37 (0.28–0.49), and those of all-cause death among patients undergoing curative surgical aggressive treatments were 1.13 (0.82–1.55), 0.67 (0.62–0.73), and 0.49 (0.46–0.53) for CCI scores of ≥10, 5 to 9, and <5, respectively. Aggressive treatments improve survival in elderly (≥65 years) and critically ill HNSCC patients. Curative nonsurgical aggressive treatments including definitive RT or CCRT might be suitable for

  7. Primary Tumor Volume Is an Important Predictor of Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Treated With Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Strongin, Anna; Yovino, Susannah; Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey; Cullen, Kevin; Zimrin, Ann; Strome, Scott; Regine, William; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The tumor volume has been established as a significant predictor of outcomes among patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy alone. The present study attempted to add to the existing data on tumor volume as a prognostic factor among patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients who had undergone definitive chemoradiotherapy for Stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and larynx were identified. The primary tumor volumes were calculated from the treatment planning computed tomography scans, and these were correlated to the survival and tumor control data obtained from the retrospective analysis. Results: The interval to progression correlated with the primary tumor volume (p = .007). The critical cutoff point for the tumor volume was identified as 35 cm{sup 3}, and patients with a tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a significantly better prognosis than those with a tumor volume >35 cm{sup 3} at 5 years (43% vs. 71%, p = .010). Longer survival was also correlated with smaller primary tumor volumes (p = .022). Similarly, patients with a primary tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a better prognosis in terms of both progression-free survival (61% vs. 33%, p = .004) and overall survival (84% vs. 41%, p = < .001). On multivariate analysis, the primary tumor volume was the best predictor of recurrence (hazard ratio 4.7, 95% confidence interval 1.9-11.6; p = .001) and survival (hazard ratio 10.0, 95% confidence interval 2.9-35.1; p = < .001). In contrast, the T stage and N stage were not significant factors. Analysis of variance revealed that tumors with locoregional failure were on average 21.6 cm{sup 3} larger than tumors without locoregional failure (p = .028) and 27.1-cm{sup 3} larger than tumors that recurred as distant metastases (p = .020). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the primary tumor volume is a significant prognostic factor in patients with advanced cancer

  8. Curative-Intent Aggressive Treatment Improves Survival in Elderly Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma and High Comorbidity Index.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Yang, Hsuan-Chia; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Wu, Li-Li; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Chia-Lun; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Ding, Yi-Fang; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    For locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), therapeutic decisions depend on comorbidity or age. We estimated the treatment outcomes of patients with different Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) scores and ages to determine whether aggressive treatment improves survival.Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance and cancer registry databases were analyzed, and we included >20-year-old patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage III or IV HNSCC (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 140.0-148.9) undergoing surgery, chemotherapy (CT), radiotherapy (RT), concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), sequential CT and RT, or surgery with adjuvant treatment. The exclusion criteria were a past cancer history, distant metastasis, AJCC stage I or II, missing sex data, an age < 20 years, nasopharyngeal cancer, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, and HNSCC recurrence. The index date was the date of first HNSCC diagnosis, and comorbidities were scored using the CCI. The enrolled patients were categorized into Group 1 (curative-intent aggressive treatments) and Group 2 (best supportive care or palliative treatments).We enrolled 21,174 stage III or IV HNSCC patients without distant metastasis (median follow-up, 3.25 years). Groups 1 and 2 comprised 18,584 and 2232 patients, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, and clinical stage, adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of overall death in Group 1 were 0.33 (0.31-0.35), 0.34 (0.31-0.36), and 0.37 (0.28-0.49), and those of all-cause death among patients undergoing curative surgical aggressive treatments were 1.13 (0.82-1.55), 0.67 (0.62-0.73), and 0.49 (0.46-0.53) for CCI scores of ≥10, 5 to 9, and <5, respectively.Aggressive treatments improve survival in elderly (≥65 years) and critically ill HNSCC patients. Curative nonsurgical aggressive treatments including definitive RT or CCRT might be suitable for HNSCC patients with CCI scores

  9. HPV-Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ethnicity, and Sex, United States, 2008–2012 The graph above shows age-adjusted incidence rates for HPV- ... were diagnosed with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. This graph was adapted from Viens LJ, Henley SJ, Watson ...

  10. A Comparison of Clinical Outcomes Between HPV Positive and HPV Negative Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Oropharynx.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is now recognized as a major risk factor for the development of oropharyngeal head and neck cancers, specifically HPV type 16. HPV-16 positive oropharyngeal cancer may in fact represent a distinct disease entity which is associated with improved prognosis and survival (National Cancer Institute, 2016). In this study, we examined the characteristics of patients with early stage HPV-16 positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma and their post-operative course contrasting the findings to patients with HPV-16 negative tumors. Overall, it was noted that 30-day readmissions and surgical site infections are not affected by the HPV status of the tumor. Robotic surgery is used more frequently with patients who were positive for the HPV infection, and the data suggest that there is a trend toward shorter length of hospital stays as well as a difference in postoperative complications.

  11. The role of HPV status in recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof; Camille, Nadia; Gupta, Vishal; Bakst, Richard; Teng, Marita; Miles, Brett; Genden, Eric; Sikora, Andrew; Posner, Marshall

    2014-12-01

    Although the prognostic role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is well established, its prognostic and/or predictive role in recurrent/metastatic settings remains to be defined. Despite epidemic growth of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma, a low recurrence rate in HPV-positive patients results in a small number of patients entering clinical trials for recurrent and/or metastatic SCCHN. The consequent lack of statistical power and also significant data contamination by misclassification of HPV-positive patients leads to premature study conclusions. Even emerging data from the analysis of 2 randomized trials, SPECTRUM and EXTREME, do not provide enough evidence for any HPV-based therapeutic strategy. Many upcoming studies for locally advanced disease, including the ones with de-escalated strategies, will have an increasing number of patients with HPV. Optimal HPV testing strategies for reliable patient selection and HPV-driven therapeutic approaches will be essential. Here, we comprehensively review the existing data regarding HPV status and prognostic or predictive outcomes in recurrent/metastatic settings and discuss current promising studies and future directions that may help in the design of upcoming trials. PMID:25674839

  12. The role of HPV status in recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof; Camille, Nadia; Gupta, Vishal; Bakst, Richard; Teng, Marita; Miles, Brett; Genden, Eric; Sikora, Andrew; Posner, Marshall

    2014-12-01

    Although the prognostic role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is well established, its prognostic and/or predictive role in recurrent/metastatic settings remains to be defined. Despite epidemic growth of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma, a low recurrence rate in HPV-positive patients results in a small number of patients entering clinical trials for recurrent and/or metastatic SCCHN. The consequent lack of statistical power and also significant data contamination by misclassification of HPV-positive patients leads to premature study conclusions. Even emerging data from the analysis of 2 randomized trials, SPECTRUM and EXTREME, do not provide enough evidence for any HPV-based therapeutic strategy. Many upcoming studies for locally advanced disease, including the ones with de-escalated strategies, will have an increasing number of patients with HPV. Optimal HPV testing strategies for reliable patient selection and HPV-driven therapeutic approaches will be essential. Here, we comprehensively review the existing data regarding HPV status and prognostic or predictive outcomes in recurrent/metastatic settings and discuss current promising studies and future directions that may help in the design of upcoming trials.

  13. Human Papilloma Virus and Oropharyngeal Carcinoma - Lessons from History.

    PubMed

    Vlantis, Alexander Chris

    2016-03-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) is a common virus that infects epithelium in 10% of the world's population. While most sexually active people become infected, the majority with a healthy natural immunity control their infection. When the infection becomes persistent in cervical mucosa for instance, it is associated with nearly all cervical cancers. Fortunately cervical cancer screening is both sensitive and specific and when accessed has led to significant reductions of this disease. Despite this, cervical cancer still remains one of the leading causes of death from cancer. Oropharyngeal mucosa is becoming persistently infected with HPV in an increasing number of people leading to a potential epidemic of oropharyngeal carcinoma. While only 10% of new oropharyngeal infections persist, those in elderly men who smoke are more likely to do so. Some centres report more than 70% of oropharyngeal cancers are associated with HPV infection, which is different to cancers caused by alcohol and tobacco. Other centres report only a 20% association. Education against high-risk sexual behaviour has been met with limited success. Screening for oropharyngeal HPV infection has been disappointing with a pickup rate of only 40%. Some hope lies in detecting viral DNA in both the saliva and plasma. A HPV vaccine has been available since 2006 but is not yet routinely given to both sexes in many countries. Its effect on the incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas is currently unknown. Vigilance by dental and medical colleagues in the meantime is essential. PMID:26981602

  14. Ipsilateral Irradiation for Oral and Oropharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Primary Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vergeer, Marije R.; Doornaert, Patricia; Jonkman, Anja; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Ende, Piet L.A. van den; Jong, Martin A. de; Leemans, C. Rene; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to evaluate the contralateral nodal control (CLNC) in postoperative patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with ipsilateral irradiation of the neck and primary site. Late radiation-induced morbidity was also evaluated. Methods and Materials: The study included 123 patients with well-lateralized squamous cell carcinomas treated with surgery and unilateral postoperative irradiation. Most patients had tumors of the gingiva (41%) or buccal mucosa (21%). The majority of patients underwent surgery of the ipsilateral neck (n = 102 [83%]). The N classification was N0 in 73 cases (59%), N1 or N2a in 23 (19%), and N2b in 27 cases (22%). Results: Contralateral metastases developed in 7 patients (6%). The 5-year actuarial CLNC was 92%. The number of lymph node metastases was the only significant prognostic factor with regard to CLNC. The 5-year CLNC was 99% in N0 cases, 88% in N1 or N2a cases, and 73% in N2b cases (p = 0.008). Borderline significance (p = 0.06) was found for extranodal spread. Successful salvage could be performed in 71% of patients with contralateral metastases. The prevalence of Grade 2 or higher xerostomia was 2.6% at 5 years. Conclusions: Selected patients with oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma treated with primary surgery and postoperative ipsilateral radiotherapy have a very high CLNC with a high probability of successful salvage in case of contralateral metastases. However, bilateral irradiation should be applied in case of multiple lymph node metastases in the ipsilateral neck, particularly in the presence of extranodal spread. The incidence of radiation-induced morbidity is considerably lower as observed after bilateral irradiation.

  15. Candidate Dosimetric Predictors of Long-Term Swallowing Dysfunction After Oropharyngeal Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David L.; Hutcheson, Katherine; Barringer, Denise; Tucker, Susan L.; Kies, Merrill; Ang, K. Kian; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Dong Lei; Lewin, Jan S.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate long-term swallowing function in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and to identify novel dose-limiting criteria predictive for dysphagia. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients with Stage IV oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma enrolled on a Phase II trial were prospectively evaluated by modified barium swallow studies at baseline, and 6, 12, and 24 months post-IMRT treatment. Candidate dysphagia-associated organs at risk were retrospectively contoured into original treatment plans. Twenty-one (68%) cases were base of tongue and 10 (32%) were tonsil. Stage distribution was T1 (12 patients), T2 (10), T3 (4), T4 (2), and TX (3), and N2 (24), N3 (5), and NX (2). Median age was 52.8 years (range, 42-78 years). Thirteen patients (42%) received concurrent chemotherapy during IMRT. Thirteen (42%) were former smokers. Mean dose to glottic larynx for the cohort was limited to 18 Gy (range, 6-39 Gy) by matching IMRT to conventional low-neck fields. Results: Dose-volume constraints (V30 < 65% and V35 < 35% for anterior oral cavity and V55 < 80% and V65 < 30% for high superior pharyngeal constrictors) predictive for objective swallowing dysfunction were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Aspiration and feeding tube dependence were observed in only 1 patient at 24 months. Conclusions: In the context of glottic laryngeal shielding, we describe candidate oral cavity and superior pharyngeal constrictor organs at risk and dose-volume constraints associated with preserved long-term swallowing function; these constraints are currently undergoing prospective validation. Strict protection of the glottic larynx via beam-split IMRT techniques promises to make chronic aspiration an uncommon outcome.

  16. Polymorphisms in NAT2 and GSTP1 Are Associated With Survival in Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Troy, Jesse D.; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Diergaarde, Brenda; Youk, Ada O.; Buch, Shama C.; Romkes, Marjorie; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Functional polymorphisms in drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) may be determinants of survival in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OOSCC). Methods OOSCC cases (N=159) with a history of either tobacco or alcohol use were genotyped for polymorphisms in eight DMEs. Overall and disease-specific survival were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier plots and the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) in exploratory analyses of patient subgroups. Results Kaplan-Meier analyses showed N-acteyltransferase-2 (NAT2) fast acetylators experienced a 19.7% higher 5-year survival rate than slow acetylators (P=0.03) and this association was similar in oropharyngeal and oral cancer. After multiple adjustment, including tumor site and stage, the NAT2 fast acetylator phenotype was associated with improved overall survival (vs. slow acetylators) provided chemotherapy or radiation were not used (HR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.10–0.66). However, NAT2 phenotype was unrelated to survival in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0. 54–2.73) or radiotherapy (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.31–1.59) (P-for-NAT2/treatment-interaction=0.04). Normal activity GSTP1 was associated with a 19.2% reduction in 5-year disease-specific survival relative to reduced activity GSTP1 (P=0.04) but this association was not modified by treatment. Conclusions Our results suggest that functional polymorphisms in NAT2 and GSTP1 are associated with OOSCC survival. Confirmation of these results in larger studies is required. PMID:23523331

  17. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  18. Human Papilloma Virus in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma - The Enigma Unravelled.

    PubMed

    Khot, Komal P; Deshmane, Swati; Choudhari, Sheetal

    2016-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) has long been regarded as a disease entity having a remarkable incidence worldwide and a fairly onerous prognosis; thus encouraging further research on factors that might modify disease outcome. Squamous cell carcinomas encompass at least 90% of all oral malignancies. Several factors like tobacco and tobacco-related products, alcohol, genetic predisposition and hormonal factors are suspected as possible causative factors. Human papilloma virus (HPV), the causal agent of cervical cancer also appears to be involved in the aetiology of oral and oropharyngeal cancer. HPVpositive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) seems to differ from HPV-negative SCC. Many questions about the natural history of oral HPV infection remain under investigation. The aim of this review is to highlight the current understanding of HPV-associated oral cancer with an emphasis on its prognosis, detection and management. PMID:26981603

  19. Gastrostomy Tube Use after Transoral Robotic Surgery for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-khudari, Samer; Bendix, Scott; Lindholm, Jamie; Simmerman, Erin; Hall, Francis; Ghanem, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate factors that influence gastrostomy tube (g-tube) use after transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for oropharyngeal (OP) cancer. Study Design/Methods. Retrospective review of TORS patients with OP cancer. G-tube presence was recorded before and after surgery at followup. Kaplan-Meier and Cox hazards model evaluated effects of early (T1 and T2) and advanced (T3, T4) disease, adjuvant therapy, and free flap reconstruction on g-tube use. Results. Sixteen patients had tonsillar cancer and 13 tongue base cancer. Of 22 patients who underwent TORS as primary therapy, 17 had T1 T2 stage and five T3 T4 stage. Seven underwent salvage therapy (four T1 T2 and three T3 T4). Nine underwent robotic-assisted inset free flap reconstruction. Seventeen received adjuvant therapy. Four groups were compared: primary early disease (PED) T1 and T2 tumors, primary early disease with adjunctive therapy (PEDAT), primary advanced disease (PAD) T3 and T4 tumors, and salvage therapy. Within the first year of treatment, 0% PED, 44% PEDAT, 40% PAD, and 57% salvage patients required a g-tube. Fourteen patients had a temporary nasoenteric tube (48.3%) postoperatively, and 10 required a g-tube (34.5%) within the first year. Four of 22 (18.2%) with TORS as primary treatment were g-tube dependent at one year and had received adjuvant therapy. Conclusion. PED can be managed without a g-tube after TORS. Similar feeding tube rates were found for PEDAT and PAD patients. Salvage patients have a high rate of g-tube need after TORS. PMID:23936676

  20. Cryostimulation improves recovery from oropharyngeal dysphagia after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zart, Patrícia; Levy, Deborah Salle; Bolzan, Geovana de Paula; Mancopes, Renata; da Silva, Ana Maria Toniolo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Stroke is considered one of the most frequent neurological causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Aim: To determine the effect of cryostimulation on oropharyngeal sensitivity and, subsequently, on the swallowing reaction and premature escape of food in patients with neurogenic dysphagia after stroke. Methods: Clinical and experimental study. The study enrolled 7 adult subjects, 6 men and 1 woman ranging from 28 to 64 years of age, with a diagnosis of stroke and current oropharyngeal dysphagia without any other underlying disease. The selected subjects underwent speech-language pathology evaluation and videofluoroscopic assessment of the dysphagia. The subjects were then treated with cryostimulation consisting of 10 applications to each structure (anterior faucial pillar, posterior oropharyngeal wall, soft palate, and back tongue) 3 times a day (for a total of 30 daily applications per structure) for 4 consecutive days. The patients were then re-evaluated based on the same criteria. The pre- and post-cryostimulation results of the clinical and videofluoroscopic evaluations were analyzed descriptively and statistically using Student's t-test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Cryostimulation had beneficial effects on oropharyngeal sensitivity in 6 of the 7 subjects. There was also a significant improvement in swallowing and in the premature escape in six subjects. Conclusion: Cryostimulation increased sensitivity and subsequently improved the swallowing reaction and premature escape of food in patients with neurogenic dysphagia after stroke. These effects were evident by both speech-language pathology and videofluoroscopic evaluation. PMID:25991991

  1. The Genomics, Epigenomics, and Transcriptomics of HPV-Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer--Understanding the Basis of a Rapidly Evolving Disease.

    PubMed

    Lechner, M; Fenton, T R

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been shown to represent a major independent risk factor for head and neck squamous cell cancer, in particular for oropharyngeal carcinoma. This type of cancer is rapidly evolving in the Western world, with rising trends particularly in the young, and represents a distinct epidemiological, clinical, and molecular entity. It is the aim of this review to give a detailed description of genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, and posttranscriptional changes that underlie the phenotype of this deadly disease. The review will also link these changes and examine what is known about the interactions between the host genome and viral genome, and investigate changes specific for the viral genome. These data are then integrated into an updated model of HPV-induced head and neck carcinogenesis.

  2. Second primary tumors and field cancerization in oral and oropharyngeal cancer: molecular techniques provide new insights and definitions.

    PubMed

    Braakhuis, Boudewijn J M; Tabor, Maarten P; Leemans, C René; van der Waal, Isaac; Snow, Gordon B; Brakenhoff, Ruud H

    2002-02-01

    Second primary tumors (SPTs) are a significant problem in treating oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma and have a negative impact on survival. In most studies the definition of SPT is based on the criteria of Warren and Gates, published in 1932. These criteria, however, are ill-defined and lead to confusion. Recent molecular studies have shown that a tumor can be surrounded by a mucosal field consisting of genetically altered cells. Furthermore, evidence has been provided that SPTs (defined by classical criteria) can share some or even all genetic markers with the index tumor, indicating that both tumors have arisen from a common cell clone. We propose that these secondary neoplastic lesions should not be considered SPTs, implying that the present concept of SPT needs revision. This review describes a novel classification of the secondary tumors that develop after treatment of a carcinoma in the oral cavity or oropharynx. On the basis of the molecular analysis of the tumors and the genetically altered mucosal field in between, we propose definitions for a "true SPT," a local recurrence, a "SFT" (second field tumor derived from the same genetically altered mucosal field as the primary tumor), and a metastasis. Considering the etiologic differences of these lesions, we believe that an accurate molecular definition is essential to make headway with the clinical management of oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

  3. Human papillomavirus tumor-infiltrating T-regulatory lymphocytes and P53 codon 72 polymorphisms correlate with clinical staging and prognosis of oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rittà, Massimo; Landolfo, Vincenzo; Mazibrada, Jasenka; De Andrea, Marco; Dell'Oste, Valentina; Caneparo, Valeria; Peretti, Alberto; Giordano, Carlo; Pecorari, Giancarlo; Garzaro, Massimiliano; Landolfo, Santo

    2013-04-01

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA positivity, p53 codon 72 polymorphisms, and the type of leukocyte infiltration in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and their combined impact upon patient survival is poorly investigated. For this reason, leukocyte infiltration profile and p53 codon 72 polymorphisms were assessed in freshly removed HNSCC specimens (N=71 patients). HPV detection was performed by nested-PCR followed by DNA sequencing. Viral loads were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The choice to investigate fresh instead of archive paraffin-embedded specimens was privileged to avoid possible artifacts due to sample processing. HPV DNA was detected in 14% of cases. Oropharyngeal carcinomas were the most frequently associated with the presence of HPV16 DNA (41%) and were associated with p53 Pro/Pro or Pro/Arg polymorphisms. In HPV16-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas increased infiltrations of CD3+ and FoxP3+ T-cells correlated with higher HPV16 copy numbers. The presence of HPV may trigger a stronger immune response and may be considered a reliable marker for clinical staging and a more favorable prognosis of oropharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:23686119

  4. ACTOplus Met XR in Treating Patients With Stage I-IV Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer Undergoing Definitive Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Oral Cavity Neoplasm; Oropharyngeal Neoplasm; Stage I Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  5. [Clinical significance and functional outcomes of ligation of exterior carotid artery in surgical treatment of oropharyngeal cancer].

    PubMed

    Klochikhin, A L; Trofimov, E I; Gamilovskaia, Iu V; Chistiakov, A L

    2010-01-01

    This work was designed to analyse outcomes of the treatment of 65 patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer who had received combined treatment including radical resection of the tumour. Thirty three patients underwent surgery without ligation of exterior carotid artery while the remaining 32 (control group) were operated after preceding ligation of this vessel. The influence of ligation of exterior carotid artery on cerebral circulation was evaluated by the following methods: estimation of the intraoperative blood loss from A.T. Staroverov's formula, ultrasound dopplerography of extracranial carotid segments, electroencephalography, measurement of the fields of vision using statistical quantitative perimetry, evaluation of the patients' neurologic status. It was shown that ligation of exterior carotid artery has no apparent effect on the intraoperative blood loss during radical surgery for the management of oropharyngeal cancer nor does it influence healing of the postoperative wound and oncological outcome of this treatment. PMID:20436415

  6. Active Tobacco Smoking and Distant Metastasis in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Sean M.; Ali, Nawal N.; Margalit, Danielle N.; Chan, Annie W.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Distant metastasis is the site of first relapse in approximately one-third of patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma, irrespective of human papillomavirus status. Yet the risk factors associated with distant metastasis are not well characterized. We sought to characterize the relationship between smoking status and distant metastasis. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the association between tobacco smoking status and distant metastasis in a retrospective cohort study of 132 patients who underwent definitive radiation therapy and chemotherapy for Stage III-IVA/B oropharyngeal cancer. Information on tobacco smoking was prospectively collected by patient questionnaires and physician notes at the time of diagnosis. Thirty-three percent of the patients were nonsmokers, 51% were former smokers, 16% were active smokers. The cumulative lifetime tobacco smoking in pack-years was 20 (range, 0-150). Results: With a median follow-up time of 52 months, the overall rate of distant metastasis at 4 years was 8%. Distant metastasis was the most common first site of relapse, occurring in 56% of the patients with recurrences. Active smokers had higher rates of distant metastasis than non-active smokers (including never- and former smokers; 31% vs. 4%, p < 0.001) and former smokers (31% vs. 3%, p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the risk of distant metastasis for patients with lifetime cumulative pack-years >20 and {<=}20 (10% vs. 4%, p = 0.19). In univariate analysis, active smoking (p = 0.0004) and N category (p = 0.009) were predictive of increased risk of distant metastasis. In multivariate analysis, active smoking was the most significant predictive factor for increased risk of distant metastasis (hazard ratio, 12.7, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: This study identified a strong association between active smoking and distant metastasis in patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

  7. [Oropharyngeal aerobic flora in patients hospitalized in an ORL department].

    PubMed

    Dumont, Y; Borderon, E; Farcy, M C; Penot, J C

    1986-01-01

    As patients with E.N.T. carcinoma have relative frequent infectious complications of E.N.T. area, we have carried out a study or oropharyngeal colonization by aerobic bacteria and fungi in 84 hospitalized patients. The results of the tests are analysed according to different parameters, essentially the presence or the absence of neoplasia and antibiotherapy. The presence of one of these two factors does not substantially modify oropharyngeal flora of patients. However their association coincides with a height percentage of colonies of enterobacteriaceae, of pseudomonas and of fungi.

  8. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Pinto, Harlan; Chang, Daniel T.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To report outcomes, failures, and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. Methods And Materials: Between Aug 2001 and Oct 2007, 107 patients were treated with IMRT with curative intent at Stanford University. Twenty-two patients were treated postoperatively, and 85 were treated definitively. Concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered to 86 patients (80%) and cetuximab to 8 patients (7%). The prescribed dose was 66 Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction for definitively treated cases and 60 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction for postoperative cases. Median follow-up was 29 months among surviving patients (range, 4-105 months). Results: Eight patients had persistent disease or local-regional failure at a median of 6.5 months (range, 0-9.9 months). Six local failures occurred entirely within the high-risk clinical target volume (CTV) (one with simultaneous distant metastasis). One patient relapsed within the high- and intermediate-risk CTV. One patient had a recurrence at the junction between the IMRT and low-neck fields. Seven patients developed distant metastasis as the first site of failure. The 3-year local-regional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 92%, 92%, 83%, and 81%, respectively. T stage (T4 vs. T1-T3) was predictive of poorer LRC (p = 0.001), overall survival (p = 0.001), and disease-free survival (p < 0.001) rates. Acute toxicity consisted of 58% grade 3 mucosal and 5% grade 3 skin reactions. Six patients (6%) developed grade >=3 late complications. Conclusions: IMRT provides excellent LRC for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Distant metastases are a major failure pattern. No marginal failures were observed.

  9. Pathway Analysis using Gene-expression Profiles of HPV-positive and HPV-negative Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients in a Hispanic Population: Methodological Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Erick; González, Lorena; Pérez-Mitchell, Carlos; Ortiz, Ana P.; Ramírez-Sola, Maricarmen; Acosta, Jaime; Bernabe-Dones, Raúl D.; González-Aquino, Carlos; Montes-Rodríguez, Ingrid; Cadilla, Carmen L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The incidence of oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer in Puerto Rican men is higher than it is in the men of any other ethnic/racial group in the United States of America (US). The information regarding the effect of the human papilloma virus (HPV) in the gene-expression profile among patients with this cancer is limited in Hispanic community. We aim to describe the methodology for future studies to identify the molecular networks for determining overrepresented signaling and metabolic canonical pathways, based on the differential gene-expression profiles of HPV+ and HPV− samples from patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in Puerto Rico. Methods We analyzed the RNA expression of 5 tissue samples from subjects diagnosed with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, 2 HPV+ and 3 HPV−, using Affymetrix GeneChips. The relative difference between the average gene expressions of the HPV+ and HPV− samples was assessed, based on the fold change (log2-scale). Results Our analysis revealed 10 up regulated molecules (Mup1, LRP1, P14KA, ALYREF, and BHMT) and 5 down regulated ones (PSME4, KEAP1, ELK3, FAM186B, and PRELID1), at a cutoff of 1.5-fold change. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed the following biological functions to be affected in the HPV+ samples: cancer, hematological disease, and RNA post-transcriptional modification. QRT-PCR analysis confirmed only the differential regulation of ALYREF, KEAP1, and FAM186B genes. Conclusion The relevant methodological procedures described are sufficient to detect the most significant biological functions and pathways according to the HPV status in patients with oropharyngeal cancer in Puerto Rico. PMID:26932277

  10. Patient Preferences in Making Treatment Decisions in Patients With Stage I-IVA Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-01

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Tongue Cancer

  11. Cumulative coffee consumption and reduced risk of oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Biazevic, Maria Gabriela Haye; Toporcov, Tatiana Natasha; Antunes, José Leopoldo Ferreira; Rotundo, Ligia Drovandi Braga; Brasileiro, Rosana Sarmento; de Carvalho, Marcos Brasilino; de Góis Filho, José Francisco; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo

    2011-01-01

    We examined the association between coffee consumption and oral cancer in a hospital-based case-control study comprising 143 patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma attended at 3 major hospitals in Sao Paulo, Brazil, and 240 controls without cancer, recruited from outpatient units of the same hospitals and matched with cases by sex and age. Associations were assessed by multivariate logistic regression conditioned on sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics. Tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, and higher intake of bacon and deep-fried foods were directly related to disease; the inverse was observed to family income and salad intake. Coffee consumption and tobacco smoking were partially correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.14 among cases, 0.31 among controls). When adjusted for all covariates, a cumulative coffee consumption higher than 18.0 daily liters × year during lifetime was indicated to be protective against disease (adjusted odds ratio 0.39, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.94, P = 0.037). This observation may have pharmacological implications for clinical medication of these cancers and is relevant to programs aimed at reducing the burden of disease.

  12. Association between Chronic Periodontitis and Oral/Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Renata Costa de; Dias, Fernando Luiz; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case control study was to assess the association between the extent and severity of chronic periodontitis and oral cavity and/or oropharyngeal cancer. The case group comprised 35 patients (mean age 56.1±8.4), diagnosed for oral and/or oropharyngeal cancer. The control group comprised 40 individuals (mean age 55.4±9.4) without diagnostic of cancer. All individuals were subjected to a periodontal examination, including bleeding on probing, plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), and decayed, extracted and filled teeth index (DMFT). The case group had significantly more sites with plaque. GI and BOP had similar values in both groups. The median PPD and CAL values were significantly higher for the case group. Chronic generalized periodontitis was predominant in 80% of patients with oral and/or oropharyngeal cancer. Eighty nine percent of the patients in the case group presented severe chronic periodontitis. There was no significant difference between groups for median values of DMFT. The extent and severity of chronic periodontitis remained as risk indicators for oral cavity and/or oropharyngeal cancer even after the adjustments for traditional confound factors, i.e. smoking and alcohol consumption. PMID:27224557

  13. The Role of Transoral Robotic Surgery in the Management of Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dowthwaite, Samuel A.; Franklin, Jason H.; Palma, David A.; Fung, Kevin; Yoo, John; Nichols, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is an emerging treatment option for the treatment of head and neck malignancies, particularly for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Preliminary studies have demonstrated excellent oncologic and functional outcomes that have led to a resurgence of interest in the primary surgical management of OPSCC. The aim of the present study was to review the evidence base supporting the use of TORS in OPSCC. Methods. Studies evaluating the application of TORS in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and more specifically OPSCC, were identified for review. Further searches were made of reference lists for complete evaluation of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in treating OPSCC. Results. Seventeen results relating to the application of TORS in treatment of OPSCC were identified. Further results relating to the role of transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) in OPSCC were included for review. Feasibility, oncologic, and functional data is summarized and discussed. Discussion. Management strategies for patients with OPSCC continue to evolve. Minimally invasive surgical techniques including TORS and TLM offer impressive functional and oncologic outcomes particularly for patients with early T-classification and low-volume regional metastatic disease. Potential exists for treatment deintensification, particularly in patients who are HPV positive. PMID:22606380

  14. Spontaneous remission of a squamous cell carcinoma of the floor of the mouth.

    PubMed

    de Andrade Sousa, Alexandre; Lopes Rena, Rafael; Souza Silva, Guilherme; Marcos Arantes Soares, João; Porcaro-Salles, José Maria; Nunes, Laiz; Alves Mesquita, Ricardo; Jham, Bruno Correia

    2014-10-01

    Spontaneous remission is a rare, but well recognized event in oncology. Certain tumours, such as melanomas, hypernephromas and neuroblastomas, are known for showing spontaneous regression. Similarly, spontaneous regression of oral lymphomas, as well as oropharyngeal and recurrent tongue carcinomas, has been reported. Here, we present a novel case of a patient with a primary squamous cell carcinoma on the floor of the mouth whose tumour regressed spontaneously in three months, without any treatment. We also review of the literature on the spontaneous remission of oral cancer and discuss possible mechanisms for this phenomenon.

  15. Impact of human papillomavirus on head and neck squamous cell cancers in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Ingrid, Labouba; Chloé, Bertolus; Hervé, Koumakpayi Ismail; Ernest, Belembaogo; Jérôme, Miloundja; Nicolas, Berthet

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancers are among the most aggressive. Their incidence and mortality rates are relatively lower in Middle Africa than worldwide, but in Gabon, these rates tend to be 2-3 fold higher than in neighboring countries. The main risk factors are alcohol and tobacco consumption. However, in the last decades, there was cumulated evidence that human papillomaviruses were a significant risk factor, particularly for oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. In Gabon, as elsewhere in Africa, assessment of these 3 risk factors need to be improved to determine their respective role in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers. The potential differences in alcohol/tobacco consumption habits as well as in infectious ecology between developing and developed countries can make it difficult to transpose current data on this issue. Determining the respective role of alcohol/tobacco consumption and human papillomaviruses in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers is crucial for the management of these cancers that could become a serious public health issue in Gabon. Human papillomaviruses are not only a risk factor but also a biomarker with promising clinical potential for the follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers potentially able to select an adequate treatment. Then, assessing the epidemiological impact of human papillomaviruses in Gabon and in all of Africa would prove useful for the clinical follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers, and would also provide essential data to plan a global prevention strategy against head and neck squamous cell cancers due to human papillomaviruses. PMID:26557156

  16. Locally Advanced Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Impact of Pre-Radiotherapy Hemoglobin Level and Interruptions During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Stoehr, Monika; Kazic, Nadja; Hakim, Samer G.; Walz, Annette; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Stage IV head and neck cancer patients carry a poor prognosis. Clear understanding of prognostic factors can help to optimize care for the individual patient. This study investigated 11 potential prognostic factors including pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level and interruptions during radiotherapy for overall survival (OS), metastases-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC) after radiochemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven factors were investigated in 153 patients receiving radiochemotherapy for Stage IV squamous cell head and neck cancer: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), tumor site, grading, T stage, N stage, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level, surgery, chemotherapy type, and interruptions during radiotherapy >1 week. Results: On multivariate analysis, improved OS was associated with KPS 90-100 (relative risk [RR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-4.93; p = .012), hemoglobin {>=}12 g/dL (RR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.01-3.53; p = .048), and no radiotherapy interruptions (RR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.15-5.78; p = .021). Improved LC was significantly associated with lower T stage (RR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.16-4.63; p = .013), hemoglobin {>=}12 g/dL (RR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.92-9.09; p < .001), surgery (RR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.28-5.88; p = .008), and no radiotherapy interruptions (RR, 3.32; 95% CI, 1.26-8.79; p = .015). Improved MFS was associated with KPS 90-100 (RR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.46-8.85; p = .012). Conclusions: Significant predictors for outcome in Stage IV head and neck cancer were performance status, stage, surgery, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level, and interruptions during radiotherapy >1 week. It appears important to avoid anemia and radiotherapy interruptions to achieve the best treatment results.

  17. Evaluation of Microbial Load in Oropharyngeal Mucosa from Tannery Workers

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Arévalo, Diana C.; Castellanos-Arévalo, Andrea P.; Camarena-Pozos, David A.; Colli-Mull, Juan G.; Maldonado-Vega, María

    2014-01-01

    Background Animal skin provides an ideal medium for the propagation of microorganisms and it is used like raw material in the tannery and footware industry. The aim of this study was to evaluate and identify the microbial load in oropharyngeal mucosa of tannery employees. Methods The health risk was estimated based on the identification of microorganisms found in the oropharyngeal mucosa samples. The study was conducted in a tanners group and a control group. Samples were taken from oropharyngeal mucosa and inoculated on plates with selective medium. In the samples, bacteria were identified by 16S ribosomal DNA analysis and the yeasts through a presumptive method. In addition, the sensitivity of these microorganisms to antibiotics/antifungals was evaluated. Results The identified bacteria belonged to the families Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Neisseriaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Moraxellaceae, and Xanthomonadaceae, of which some species are considered as pathogenic or opportunistic microorganisms; these bacteria were not present in the control group. Forty-two percent of bacteria identified in the tanners group are correlated with respiratory diseases. Yeasts were also identified, including the following species: Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida albicans, and Candida krusei. Regarding the sensitivity test of bacteria identified in the tanners group, 90% showed sensitivity to piperacillin/tazobactam, 87% showed sensitivity to ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, 74% showed sensitivity to ampicillin/sulbactam, and 58% showed sensitivity to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Conclusion Several of the bacteria and yeast identified in the oropharyngeal mucosa of tanners have been correlated with infections in humans and have already been reported as airborne microorganisms in this working environment, representing a health risk for workers. PMID:25830072

  18. Oropharyngeal Reflux Monitoring and Atypical Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhyanesh A; Harb, Ali H; Vaezi, Michael F

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been increasing since the 1990 s, with up to 27.8 % of people in North America affected by this disorder. The healthcare burden of patients who primarily have extra-esophageal manifestations of GERD (atypical GERD) is estimated to be 5 times that of patients with primarily heartburn and regurgitation due to lack of a gold standard diagnostic test, poor responsiveness to PPI therapy, and delay in recognition. Empiric twice daily PPI therapy for 1-2 months is currently considered the best diagnostic test, but due to poor responsiveness to PPIs in patients with atypical GERD in multiple randomized controlled trials, newer modes of diagnostic procedures such as oropharyngeal pH monitoring have gained significantly more traction. The utility of oropharyngeal pH monitoring systems such as Restech Dx-pH is currently limited due to lack of consensus on normal and abnormal cutoff values. Recent studies suggest its utility as a prognostic tool and its ability to predict responsiveness to medical and surgical therapy. However, routine use of oropharyngeal pH monitoring is still not widespread due to the lack of well-controlled prospective studies. PMID:26908280

  19. Unusual presentatıon of oropharyngeal tularemıa: a case report.

    PubMed

    Polat, Meltem; Kara, Soner Sertan; Tapısız, Anıl; Tezer, Hasan

    2013-05-01

    Tularemia is a bacterial zoonotic disease that is caused by Francisella tularensis and among the infectious reasons that cause fever of unknown origin (FUO) in children. Typhoidal or pneumonic tularemia can manifest predominantly as FUO. However, presentation of oropharyngeal tularemia as FUO is uncommon. Here, we report a case of an 11-month-old infant with oropharyngeal tularemia presenting as FUO. To the best of our knowledge, this clinical presentation of oropharyngeal tularemia has not been previously reported in literature.

  20. Identification of transcriptionally active HPV infection in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsies of oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morbini, Patrizia; Alberizzi, Paola; Tinelli, Carmine; Paglino, Chiara; Bertino, Giulia; Comoli, Patrizia; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Benazzo, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenic activity is the result of viral oncogene E6 and E7 expression in infected cells. Oncogene expression analysis is, however, not part of the routine diagnostic evaluation of HPV-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) since it requires fresh tumor tissue. We compared the diagnostic accuracy of several methods commonly employed for HPV characterization in OPSCC with the results of the newly available HPV E6/E7 mRNA in situ hybridization (ISH) on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsy samples, in order to establish if the latter should be introduced in the diagnostic routine to increase accuracy when fresh tissue is not available. p16 immunostain, DNA ISH for high-risk HPV genotypes, SPF LiPA amplification and genotyping, and HPV16 E6 amplification were performed on 41 consecutive OPSCC samples. Twenty (48.7%) cases were positive by mRNA ISH; sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 90% for p16, 90% and 100% for DNA ISH, 70% and 76% for SPF10 LiPA, 90% and 76% for E6 amplification. A diagnostic algorithm considering p16 immunostain as first step followed by either high-risk HPV DNA ISH or HPV16 E6 amplification in p16-positive cases correctly characterized 90% of mRNA-positive and all mRNA-negative cases; combining the 3 tests correctly identified all cases. While no stand-alone test was sufficiently accurate for classifying HPV-associated OPSCC, the high sensitivity and specificity of the established combination of p16 immunostain, DNA ISH, and HPV16 DNA amplification suggests that the introduction of labour- and cost-intensive mRNA ISH, is not necessary in the diagnostic routine of oropharyngeal tumors.

  1. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia after Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen K.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Review. Objective Postoperative oropharyngeal dysphagia is one of the most common complications following anterior cervical spine surgery (ACSS). We review and summarize recent literature in order to provide a general overview of clinical signs and symptoms, assessment, incidence and natural history, pathophysiology, risk factors, treatment, prevention, and topics for future research. Methods A search of English literature regarding dysphagia following anterior cervical spine surgery was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. The search was focused on articles published since the last review on this topic was published in 2005. Results Patients who develop dysphagia after ACSS show significant alterations in swallowing biomechanics. Patient history, physical examination, X-ray, direct or indirect laryngoscopy, and videoradiographic swallow evaluation are considered the primary modalities for evaluating oropharyngeal dysphagia. There is no universally accepted objective instrument for assessing dysphagia after ACSS, but the most widely used instrument is the Bazaz Dysphagia Score. Because dysphagia is a subjective sensation, patient-reported instruments appear to be more clinically relevant and more effective in identifying dysfunction. The causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia after ACSS are multifactorial, involving neuronal, muscular, and mucosal structures. The condition is usually transient, most often beginning in the immediate postoperative period but sometimes beginning more than 1 month after surgery. The incidence of dysphagia within one week after ACSS varies from 1 to 79% in the literature. This wide variance can be attributed to variations in surgical techniques, extent of surgery, and size of the implant used, as well as variations in definitions and measurements of dysphagia, time intervals of postoperative evaluations, and relatively small sample sizes used in published studies. The factors most commonly associated with an

  2. An Ultra-Deep Targeted Sequencing Gene Panel Improves the Prognostic Stratification of Patients With Advanced Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Chen, Shu-Jen; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Yang, Lan-Yan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Chen, I-How; Chang, Kai-Ping; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Chen, Hua-Chien; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-02-01

    An improved prognostic stratification of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and pathologically positive (pN+) nodes is urgently needed. Here, we sought to examine whether an ultra-deep targeted sequencing (UDT-Seq) gene panel may improve the prognostic stratification in this patient group.A mutation-based signature affecting 10 genes (including genetic mutations in 6 oncogenes and 4 tumor suppressor genes) was devised to predict disease-free survival (DFS) in 345 primary tumor specimens obtained from pN+ OSCC patients. Of the 345 patients, 144 were extracapsular spread (ECS)-negative and 201 were ECS-positive. The 5-year locoregional control, distant metastases, disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival (OS) rates served as outcome measures.The UDT-Seq panel was an independent risk factor (RF) for 5-year locoregional control (P = 0.0067), distant metastases (P = 0.0001), DFS (P < 0.0001), disease-specific survival (DSS, P < 0.0001), and OS (P = 0.0003) in pN+ OSCC patients. The presence of ECS and pT3-4 disease were also independent RFs for DFS, DSS, and OS. A prognostic scoring system was formulated by summing up the significant covariates (UDT-Seq, ECS, pT3-4) separately for each survival endpoint. The presence of a positive UDT-Seq panel (n = 77) significantly improved risk stratification for all the survival endpoints as compared with traditional AJCC staging (P < 0.0001). Among ECS-negative patients, those with a UDT-Seq-positive panel (n = 31) had significantly worse DFS (P = 0.0005) and DSS (P = 0.0002). Among ECS-positive patients, those with a UDT-Seq-positive panel (n = 46) also had significantly worse DFS (P = 0.0032) and DSS (P = 0.0098).Our UDT-Seq gene panel consisting of clinically actionable genes was significantly associated with patient outcomes and provided better prognostic stratification than traditional AJCC staging. It was also able to predict prognosis in

  3. An Ultra-Deep Targeted Sequencing Gene Panel Improves the Prognostic Stratification of Patients With Advanced Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Chen, Shu-Jen; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Yang, Lan-Yan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Chen, I-How; Chang, Kai-Ping; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Chen, Hua-Chien; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-02-01

    An improved prognostic stratification of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and pathologically positive (pN+) nodes is urgently needed. Here, we sought to examine whether an ultra-deep targeted sequencing (UDT-Seq) gene panel may improve the prognostic stratification in this patient group.A mutation-based signature affecting 10 genes (including genetic mutations in 6 oncogenes and 4 tumor suppressor genes) was devised to predict disease-free survival (DFS) in 345 primary tumor specimens obtained from pN+ OSCC patients. Of the 345 patients, 144 were extracapsular spread (ECS)-negative and 201 were ECS-positive. The 5-year locoregional control, distant metastases, disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival (OS) rates served as outcome measures.The UDT-Seq panel was an independent risk factor (RF) for 5-year locoregional control (P = 0.0067), distant metastases (P = 0.0001), DFS (P < 0.0001), disease-specific survival (DSS, P < 0.0001), and OS (P = 0.0003) in pN+ OSCC patients. The presence of ECS and pT3-4 disease were also independent RFs for DFS, DSS, and OS. A prognostic scoring system was formulated by summing up the significant covariates (UDT-Seq, ECS, pT3-4) separately for each survival endpoint. The presence of a positive UDT-Seq panel (n = 77) significantly improved risk stratification for all the survival endpoints as compared with traditional AJCC staging (P < 0.0001). Among ECS-negative patients, those with a UDT-Seq-positive panel (n = 31) had significantly worse DFS (P = 0.0005) and DSS (P = 0.0002). Among ECS-positive patients, those with a UDT-Seq-positive panel (n = 46) also had significantly worse DFS (P = 0.0032) and DSS (P = 0.0098).Our UDT-Seq gene panel consisting of clinically actionable genes was significantly associated with patient outcomes and provided better prognostic stratification than traditional AJCC staging. It was also able to predict prognosis in

  4. An Ultra-Deep Targeted Sequencing Gene Panel Improves the Prognostic Stratification of Patients With Advanced Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Chen, Shu-Jen; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Yang, Lan-Yan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Chen, I-How; Chang, Kai-Ping; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Chen, Hua-Chien; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An improved prognostic stratification of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and pathologically positive (pN+) nodes is urgently needed. Here, we sought to examine whether an ultra-deep targeted sequencing (UDT-Seq) gene panel may improve the prognostic stratification in this patient group. A mutation-based signature affecting 10 genes (including genetic mutations in 6 oncogenes and 4 tumor suppressor genes) was devised to predict disease-free survival (DFS) in 345 primary tumor specimens obtained from pN+ OSCC patients. Of the 345 patients, 144 were extracapsular spread (ECS)-negative and 201 were ECS-positive. The 5-year locoregional control, distant metastases, disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival (OS) rates served as outcome measures. The UDT-Seq panel was an independent risk factor (RF) for 5-year locoregional control (P = 0.0067), distant metastases (P = 0.0001), DFS (P < 0.0001), disease-specific survival (DSS, P < 0.0001), and OS (P = 0.0003) in pN+ OSCC patients. The presence of ECS and pT3–4 disease were also independent RFs for DFS, DSS, and OS. A prognostic scoring system was formulated by summing up the significant covariates (UDT-Seq, ECS, pT3–4) separately for each survival endpoint. The presence of a positive UDT-Seq panel (n = 77) significantly improved risk stratification for all the survival endpoints as compared with traditional AJCC staging (P < 0.0001). Among ECS-negative patients, those with a UDT-Seq-positive panel (n = 31) had significantly worse DFS (P = 0.0005) and DSS (P = 0.0002). Among ECS-positive patients, those with a UDT-Seq-positive panel (n = 46) also had significantly worse DFS (P = 0.0032) and DSS (P = 0.0098). Our UDT-Seq gene panel consisting of clinically actionable genes was significantly associated with patient outcomes and provided better prognostic stratification than traditional AJCC staging. It was also able to predict

  5. Durvalumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage I Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  6. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  7. Prevalence of Polyoma BK Virus (BKPyV), Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Polz-Gruszka, Dorota; Morshed, Kamal; Jarzyński, Adrian; Polz-Dacewicz, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of BK virus, Human Papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus in oropharyngeal cancer, and to test our hypothesis that BKV/HPV/EBV co-infection plays a role in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The correlation between viral infection, OSCC, anatomic location, pre-treatment staging, evidence of metastases to lymph nodes, and grading was also investigated. The examination samples were collected from 62 patients from paraffin tissue blocks. Males (90.3%) with, smoking (83.9%) and alcohol abuse (67.7%) problems prevailed in the studied group. G2 histological type was recognized in 80.6% cases. T4 (77.4%) and N2 (56.5%) traits occurred in the majority of patients. No cases of metastasis were observed (M0 100%). HPV - 24.2%, EBV - 27.4% and BKV 17.7% were detected in the studied samples. We observed co-infection EBV/BKV in 8% of cases, HPV/BKV in 4.8%, and HPV/EBV in 9% cases. Only in two cases co-infection of all three viruses was found.

  8. Manofluorography in the evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Nativ-Zeltzer, Noga; Kahrilas, Peter J; Logemann, Jerilyn A

    2012-06-01

    Manofluorography, that is, the concurrent use of manometry and videofluorography for the evaluation of pharyngeal dysphagia, has not been widely used clinically, partially because of various limitations of conventional manometry. Technological advancements in recent years have led to substantial improvements in manometric devises, which can now overcome many of the shortcomings of standard manometry. In parallel with this, studies examining the utility of high-resolution manometry for the evaluation of pharyngeal disorders of swallowing have begun to emerge. This review summarizes the technological developments in manometry and the existing literature on pharyngeal high-resolution manofluorography with pressure topography. The article also discusses the potential clinical value of high-resolution pharyngeal-esophageal pressure topography and suggests directions for future investigations. Studies conducted so far have shown heterogeneous approaches to utilizing high-resolution manofluorography. These studies have revealed important information regarding its diagnostic potential and researchers have devised innovative methods of measurements. However, substantial research is required to transform manofluorography into a clinically useful tool. There is a need to conduct validation studies, correlating manometric measures with structural changes in the swallow seen on videofluorography and devise diagnostic methods that utilize the advantages of both tools. Furthermore, studies comparing healthy and clinical populations are needed to identify measures most clinically significant in order to develop diagnostic paradigms.

  9. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy to radiation and concurrent chemoradiation for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix: a review of the recent literature.

    PubMed

    Colombo, A; Landoni, F; Maneo, A; Zanetta, G; Nava, S; Tancini, G

    1998-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer; nevertheless it fails to control disease progression within the irradiation fields in more than 40% of cases, particularly in patients with bulky tumor. Distant metastases are not infrequent in more advanced cases. Chemotherapy has been integrated with radiotherapy to improve local control and treat distant subclinical metastases. Schedules of combined treatment more frequently represented by neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiation (NACT) and by concomitant chemotherapy and radiation (CT-RT). A review of the recent literature is presented. The role of NACT is controversial: high response rates are reported but doubtful advantages in terms of survival or local control have been shown. In randomized trials, hydroxyurea concomitant to radiation improves local control and survival, particularly in stage IIIB and IVA. Several randomized trials of concurrent chemoradiation with 5FU, cisplatin and mitomycin C are underway, but few have been published: no significative differences are reported in term of local control or survival. Acute toxicity is higher than in radiation alone, but usually manageable. For the analysis of late morbidity a longer follow-up is required. Large randomized trials of adequate radiotherapy versus concomitant chemoradiation are necessary to refine our understanding of the benefits of this integrated treatment.

  10. Weekly nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel in combination with cisplatin versus weekly solvent-based paclitaxel plus cisplatin as first-line therapy in Chinese patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-ying; Yao, Zhi-hua; Tang, Hong; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-san; Yao, Shu-na; Yang, Shu-jun; Liu, Yan-yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective More effective regimens for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are urgently needed. Therefore, a retrospective study concerning the efficacy and safety of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel plus cisplatin (nab-TP) versus solvent-based paclitaxel plus cisplatin (sb-TP) as a first-line therapy was conducted in Chinese patients with advanced ESCC. Methods From June 2009 to June 2015, 32 patients were treated with nab-paclitaxel (125 mg/m2) on the first and eighth days (30 minutes infusion) and cisplatin (75 mg/m2) on the second day every 21 days (nab-TP arm). Also, 43 patients were treated with solvent-based paclitaxel (80 mg/m2) intravenously on the first and eighth days and the same dose of cisplatin (sb-TP arm). The two groups were compared in terms of objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and safety profile. OS and PFS were estimated using Kaplan–Meier methods to determine associations between chemotherapy regimens and survival outcomes. Results Nab-TP demonstrated a higher ORR (50% vs 30%; P=0.082) and disease control rate (81% vs 65%; P=0.124) than sb-TP. Median OS was similar for nab-TP and sb-TP (12.5 vs 10.7 months; P=0.269). However, nab-TP resulted in a longer median PFS (6.1 months [95% confidence interval: 5.3–6.9]) than sb-TP (5.0 months [95% confidence interval: 4.4–5.6]) (P=0.029). The most common adverse events included anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia in both the groups and no statistically significant differences were observed between the groups. With statistically significant differences, significantly less grade ≥3 peripheral neuropathy, arthralgia, and myalgia occurred in the nab-TP arm (all P<0.05). Dose reduction, treatment delays, and second-line therapy were similar between the two regimens. There were no treatment-related deaths in either group. Conclusion Nab-paclitaxel plus cisplatin is found

  11. A Phase II Trial of Induction nab-Paclitaxel and Cetuximab Given With Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil Followed by Concurrent Cisplatin and Radiation for Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Douglas; Ley, Jessica; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Thorstad, Wade; Lewis, James; Wildes, Tanya; Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Gay, Hiram; Mehan, Paul; Nussenbaum, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background Complete Response (CR) at the primary tumor site as assessed by clinical examination following induction chemotherapy with cisPlatin and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)[PF] is a favorable predictive factor for overall survival and disease-control in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. In most series, the rate of CR at the primary site after induction PF was 20–30%. We evaluated the efficacy and feasibility of induction nAb-paclitaxel and Cetuximab given with PF (ACPF) followed by definitive chemoradiation (CRT) in a phase II trial. Methods Patients with HNSCC were treated with ACPF (nab-paclitaxel 100 mg/m2/week; cetuximab 250 mg/m2/week; cisplatin 75 mg/m2 Day 1; 5-fluorouracil 750 mg/m2/day Days 1–3) every 21 days for 3 cycles followed by CRT (cisplatin 100 mg/m2 on days 1,22 and 43 of RT). CR at the primary tumor site after 2 cycles of ACPF was the primary endpoint. Results Thirty patients were enrolled, of which 22 (73%) had large (T3/T4) primary tumors. The CR rate at the primary tumor site after 2 cycles of ACPF was 53% and the overall response rate was 100%. Twenty-nine (96%) patients completed 3 cycles of ACPF, 26 (90%) completed definitive radiation therapy (RT) per protocol and 22 of the 27 evaluable patients (81%) received > 2 of the 3 planned doses of cisplatin with RT. The estimated 2-year overall and progression-free survivals were 84% and 65%, respectively. Conclusion Induction ACPF resulted in a high CR rate (53%) at the primary tumor site even in large tumors and did not adversely affect delivery of definitive CRT. Further investigation of ACPF is warranted. PMID:22991252

  12. Feasibility and toxicity of adjuvant chemotherapy using S-1 granules for local advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shinsuke; Honda, Kohei; Sato, Teruyuki; Yamazaki, Kazuharu; Ishikawa, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    S-1 granulated powder has recently been released to the market as an additional format to that of the capsule. Patients who previously found it difficult to swallow the capsules are now able to take S-1 in powder form. This study evaluated the feasibility of S-1 granulated powder as adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer. S-1 was orally administered for 2  weeks, followed by 1  week of rest (one course) for 12  months (16 courses). Twenty-four stage III and IV head and neck cancer patients were enrolled in this study. In total, 10 (47.6%) of the patients follow the planned schedule and dose. Severe adverse events were observed in 22 patients (91.7%), whereas no grade 4 adverse events were observed. S-1 granulated powder should be presented as an additional option for the treatment of head and neck cancer, especially for patients experiencing difficulty in swallowing oral medications.

  13. Oropharyngeal Dermoid Cyst in an Infant with Intermittent Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Matthias W.; Haileselassie, Bereketeab; Kannan, Sujatha; Chen, Cynthia; Poretti, Andrea; Tunkel, David E.; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dermoid cysts are benign epithelial inclusions and cystic lesions that may occur in several locations including the oropharynx. We describe the case of a two-month-old baby girl who presented with progressive respiratory distress, hypoxemia, and feeding difficulties because of an oropharyngeal dermoid cyst. The child had an airway work-up that included laryngoscopy. However, the mass remained undetected. This is most likely explained by the mobile nature of the lesion, prolapsing into the high nasopharynx in supine position. In our patient, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), initially performed to rule out brainstem pathology, revealed an oropharyngeal dermoid cyst. This case shows the potential role of neuroimaging in the diagnostic work-up of a young child presenting with respiratory distress by excluding a central nervous system lesion and diagnosing an “unexpected” nasopharyngeal mass lesion. In addition, MRI allowed exclusion of skull base lesions of neural origin such as an anterior meningoencephalocele or heterotopic neuroglial tissue which would be managed differently from pharyngeal masses. PMID:25260210

  14. Losses of heterozygosity in oral and oropharyngeal epithelial carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Grati, F R; Sirchia, S M; Garagiola, I; Sironi, E; Galioto, S; Rossella, F; Serafini, P; Dulcetti, F; Bozzetti, A; Brusati, R; Simoni, G

    2000-04-01

    We analyzed 25 oral and oropharyngeal epithelial carcinomas for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability by using 55 oligonucleotide repeat markers located in 45 chromosomal regions. The aim was to identify which chromosomal regions and tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) are preferentially lost in these tumors and to relate LOH at specific loci to clinicopathologic data. The analysis was performed on tumor tissue and on a corresponding normal tissue (blood lymphocytes) with the use of the polymerase chain reaction technique followed by microsatellite allele separation with denaturing gel electrophoresis. Thirty-two of 45 chromosomal regions demonstrated a significant (>/=20%) incidence of LOH. An allelic loss of >/=50% was found in 9p21 (77.8%), 8p22-23 (70%), 3p12 (61.5%), 1p36.1 and 12q22 (60%), 3q28 (57.1%), 5q23.3 (54.5%), 3p25-26, 3p24, and 7q35 (50%). We did not find any microsatellite instability. Our results suggest that in addition to a group of TSGs, pleiotropic for several tumor types, other suppressor genes are specifically involved in oral and oropharyngeal carcinogenesis.

  15. Alterations in oropharyngeal sensory evoked potentials (PSEP) with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pitts, Teresa; Hegland, Karen Wheeler; Sapienza, Christine M; Bolser, Donald C; Davenport, Paul W

    2016-07-15

    Movement of a food bolus from the oral cavity into the oropharynx activates pharyngeal sensory mechanoreceptors. Using electroencephalography, somatosensory cortical-evoked potentials resulting from oropharyngeal mechanical stimulation (PSEP) have been studied in young healthy individuals. However, limited information is known about changes in processing of oropharyngeal afferent signals with Parkinson's disease (PD). To determine if sensory changes occurred with a mechanical stimulus (air-puff) to the oropharynx, two stimuli (S1-first; S2-s) were delivered 500ms apart. Seven healthy older adults (HOA; 3 male and 4 female; 72.2±6.9 years of age), and thirteen persons diagnosed with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD; 11 male and 2 female; 67.2±8.9 years of age) participated. Results demonstrated PSEP P1, N1, and P2 component peaks were identified in all participants, and the N2 peak was present in 17/20 participants. Additionally, the PD participants had a decreased N2 latency and gated the P1, P2, and N2 responses (S2/S1 under 0.6). Compared to the HOAs, the PD participants had greater evidence of gating the P1 and N2 component peaks. These results suggest that persons with PD experience changes in sensory processing of mechanical stimulation of the pharynx to a greater degree than age-matched controls. In conclusion, the altered processing of sensory feedback from the pharynx may contribute to disordered swallow in patients with PD. PMID:27090350

  16. A Phase II First-Line Study of Gemcitabine, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab in Advanced Stage Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clément-Duchêne, Christelle; Krupitskaya, Yelena; Ganjoo, Kristen; Lavori, Philip; McMillan, Alex; Kumar, Atul; Zhao, Gary; Padda, Sukhmani; Zhou, Lisa; Pedro-Salcedo, Melanie San; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Wakelee, Heather A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bevacizumab improves responses and progression-free survival when added to first-line paclitaxel/carboplatin or cisplatin/gemcitabine for patients with advanced nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer. This study was designed to evaluate toxicities and efficacy of gemcitabine/carboplatin/bevacizumab. Methods Patients with untreated advanced nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer, with no evidence of brain metastases and not on anticoagulation were eligible. Patients received gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8; carboplatin area under the curve 5 day 1; and bevacizumab 15 mg/kg day 1 every 3 weeks for up to six cycles. Bevacizumab was then continued every 3 weeks until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results From July 2006 to December 2008, 48 patients were enrolled: 23 (48%) men, 25 (52%) women, and 19 (40%) never smokers. One patient never received therapy and is not included in the analysis. Median cycle number was 8 (1– 42) with 37 patients (78.7%) completing ≥4 cycles of three drugs. Dose reductions occurred in 34 (72.3%) patients. Grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia (47%/15%), thrombocytopenia (11%/15%), anemia (6%/0%), dyspnea (6%/2%), bacterial pneumonia (4%/0%), and hypertension (4%/2%). No neutropenic fevers occurred. One patient died of hemoptysis. Grade 3 bleeding occurred in three other patients. There were seven (14.9%) partial responses. Median time to first event (progression/death/toxicity requiring discontinuation) was 6.4 months (95% confidence interval: 4.8 –7.9 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 12.8 months (95% confidence interval: 10.0 –16.5). The OS is 57% at 1 year and 10% at 2 years. Conclusions Although perhaps skewed by a high proportion of nonsmokers and women, treatment with gemcitabine/carboplatin/bevacizumab has an acceptable toxicity profile with promising median OS despite a low response rate. PMID:20881641

  17. Lobomycosis and squamous cell carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Lisiane; Rodrigues, Luciana; Rodrigues, Carlos Alberto Chirano; Santos, Mônica; Talhari, Sinésio; Talhari, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    The occurence of squamous cell carcinoma on long-lasting ulcers is classic. Malignant transformation may occur on burn scars and chronic ulcers of varying etiology, including infectious agents. Transformation of old lobomycosis lesion scars into squamous cell carcinoma has been rarely reported. Careful and long-term follow-up of such patients is important to avoid carcinomatous transformation. PMID:23739701

  18. Expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fibroblast growth factor 2, phosphatidyl inositol 3 phosphate kinase and their clinical and prognostic significance in early and advanced stage of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Usul Afsar, Cigdem; Sahin, Berksoy; Gunaldi, Meral; Kılıc Bagir, Emine; Gumurdulu, Derya; Burgut, Refik; Erkisi, Melek; Kara, Ismail Oguz; Paydas, Semra; Karaca, Feryal; Ercolak, Vehbi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer related to death in the world. Squamous cell lung carcinoma (SqCLC) is the second most frequent histological subtype of lung carcinomas. Recently, growth factors, growth factor receptors, and signal transduction system-related gene amplifications and mutations are extensively under investigation to estimate the prognosis and to develop individualized therapies in SqCLC. In this study, besides the signal transduction molecule phosphatidyl inositol-3-phosphate kinase (IP3K) p110α, we explored the expressions of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and receptor-1 (FGFR1) in tumor tissue and also their clinical and prognostic significance in patients with early/advanced SqCLC. Materials and methods: From 2005 to 2013, 129 patients (23 early, 106 advanced disease) with a histopathological SqCLC diagnosis were selected from the hospital files of Cukurova University Medical Faculty for this study. Two independent pathologists evaluated FGFR1, FGF2, and PI3K (p110α) expressions in both tumor and stromal tissues from 99 of the patients with sufficient tissue samples, using immunohistochemistry. Considering survival analysis separately for patients with both early and advanced stage diseases, the relationship between the clinical features of the patients and expressions were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: FGFR1 expression was found to be low in 59 (60%) patients and high in 40 (40%) patients. For FGF2; 12 (12%) patients had high, 87 (88%) patients had low expression and for IP3K; 31 (32%) patients had high and 66 (68%) patients had low expressions. In univariate analysis, overall survival (OS) was significantly associated with stage of the disease and the performance status of the patient (P<0.0001 and P<0.001). There was no significant difference in OS of the patients with either low or high expressions of FGFR1, FGF2, and IP3K. When the patients with early or advanced stage

  19. [Prognostic and predictive value of koilocytosis, expression of e6 hpv types 16/18, p16ink4a, p53 in locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of oral cavity and oropharynx, associated with human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Riaboshapka, A N

    2014-11-01

    To determine the predictive and prognostic value of koilocytosis, expression of E6 HPV types 16/18, p16INK4a, p53 in patients with locally advanced HPV-associated squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity and oropharynx. In biopsy specimens of squamous cell carcinomas of oral cavity and oropharynx from 60 patients performed koylocytes count, immunohistochemical detection of HPV 16/18 types E6 protein, proteins p16INK4a and p53. Koilocytosis was detected in 50 patients (83.3%); in all 60 patients (100%) were simultaneous expression of p16INK4a and E6 HPV types 16/18; p53 expression was found in 37 patients (61.7%). After combined treatment (induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy) stable disease (SD) was detected in 11 patients (18.3%), partial response (PR) - in 25 patients (41.7%), complete response (CR) - in 24 patients (40.0%). There were no cases of disease progression. Treatment effect correlated with expression of p16INK4a (ρ = 0.3, p = 0.024) and expression of p53 (ρ = - 0.3, p = 0.019). Patients with a low expression of p16INK4a (2 points) and high expression of p53 (4 "+") had a high level of SD and had no CR. For all patients, the median of overall survival (OS) was 17 months, 1-year cumulative survival rate was 66.7%, 2-year cumulative survival rate - 35.0%. Median of overall survival was correlated with koilocytosis (ρ=0.5, p<0,001) and expression of E6 HPV types 16/18 (ρ=0.9, p<0.001), p16INK4a (ρ=0.9, p=0.037), p53 (ρ=-0.9; p<0.001). Patients with low expression of p53 (0 and 1 "+") had cumulative 1-year survival rates 87% and 90%, respectively (p<0.001), 2-year survival rates - 52% and 80%, respectively (p=0.015). In the Cox proportional hazards model the significant prognostic factors were prevalence of primary tumor (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3 - 3.5, p=0.003) and p53 expression (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1=1.7, p=0.016). High expression of p16INK4a associated with a high effect of combined treatment, high expression of a p53 - with low effect of

  20. A case of propofol-induced oropharyngeal angioedema and bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    You, Byung-Chul; Jang, An-Soo; Han, Ji-Su; Cheon, Hong-Woo; Park, Jong-Suk; Lee, June-Hyuk; Park, Sung-Woo; Kim, Do-Jin; Park, Choon-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is an ultrashort-acting sedative agent with sedative and amnestic effects that is used not only for anesthesia but also for sedation during minor outpatient procedures and endoscopic examinations. Rare cases of anaphylaxis following propofol administration have been reported in the medical literature. Documentation of anaphylaxis is often lacking because the cause and effect relationship is often hard to prove. Only a minority of patients get referred for allergy testing to confirm the offending drug. Here we report a 74-year-old woman who had an anaphylactic reaction with severe oropharyngeal edema and bronchospasm for a few minutes after receiving propofol during endoscopic examination. An allergy skin test was positive for both propofol and soybean. Soybean in the intralipid is one component of propofol, and we concluded that this anaphylaxis was caused by soybean. PMID:22211170

  1. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy type 1: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Walmari; Baijens, Laura W J; Kremer, Bernd

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review was conducted to investigate the pathophysiology of and diagnostic procedures for oropharyngeal dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy (MD). The electronic databases Embase, PubMed, and The Cochrane Library were used. The search was limited to English, Dutch, French, German, Spanish, and Portuguese publications. Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the included articles. Swallowing assessment tools, the corresponding protocols, the studies' outcome measurements, and main findings are summarized and presented. The body of literature on pathophysiology of swallowing in dysphagic patients with MD type 1 remains scant. The included studies are heterogeneous with respect to design and outcome measures and hence are not directly comparable. More importantly, most studies had methodological problems. These are discussed in detail and recommendations for further research on diagnostic examinations for swallowing disorders in patients with MD type 1 are provided.

  2. Prevalence of HPV associated oropharyngeal cancer among south Texans.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Stephanie D; DiBurro, Mark; Westbrook, Steven; Redding, Spencer W; Miller, Frank R

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this study was to begin to assess the prevalence of oropharyngeal cancer among all oral cancers and thus the potential role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in this disease in the south Texas Region served by the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA), and University Health System (UHS) in San Antonio, Texas. This health system represents the largest catchment area for oral cancer serving the south Texas populations, extending from the U.S.-Mexico border, north to Williamson County, west to Eagle Pass, and east to Gonzales County. With the move towards electronic medical records (EMR) nationwide, our team conducted a feasibility study to answer this question utilizing electronic record coding data across both local networks.

  3. Usefulness of Interim FDG-PET After Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Receiving Sequential Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Dok Hyun; Cho, Yoojin; Kim, Sang Yoon; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Lee, Sang-wook; Song, Si Yeol; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Jae Seung; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Kim, Sung-Bae

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Induction chemotherapy (ICT) has been used to select patients for organ preservation and determine subsequent treatments in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LASCCHN). Still, the clinical outcomes of LASCCHN patients who showed response to ICT are heterogeneous. We evaluated the efficacy of interim 18-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) after ICT in this specific subgroup of LASCCHN patients who achieved partial response (PR) after ICT to predict clinical outcomes after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with LASCCHN who showed PR to ICT by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors before definitive CCRT were chosen in this retrospective analysis. FDG-PET was performed before and 2-4 weeks after ICT to assess the extent of disease at baseline and the metabolic response to ICT, respectively. We examined the correlation of the metabolic response by the percentage decrease of maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on the primary tumor or lymph node after ICT or a specific threshold of SUVmax on interim FDG-PET with clinical outcomes including complete response (CR) rate to CCRT, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: A SUVmax of 4.8 on interim FDG-PET could predict clinical CR after CCRT (100% vs. 20%, p = 0.001), PFS (median, not reached vs. 8.5 mo, p < 0.001), and OS (median, not reached vs. 12.0 months, p = 0.001) with a median follow-up of 20.3 months in surviving patients. A 65% decrease in SUVmax after ICT from baseline also could predict clinical CR after CCRT (100% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.003), PFS (median, not reached vs. 8.9 months, p < 0.001) and OS (median, not reached vs. 24.4 months, p = 0.001) of the patients. Conclusion: These data suggest that interim FDG-PET after ICT might be a useful determinant to predict clinical outcomes in patients with LASCCHN receiving sequential ICT followed by CCRT.

  4. Phase I trial of dacomitinib, a pan-human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) inhibitor, with concurrent radiotherapy and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (XDC-001).

    PubMed

    Prawira, Amy; Brana-Garcia, Irene; Spreafico, Anna; Hope, Andrew; Waldron, John; Razak, Albiruni R Abdul; Chen, Eric X; Jang, Raymond; O'Sullivan, Brian; Giuliani, Meredith; Bayley, Andrew; Cho, John; Wang, Lisa; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Weinreb, Ilan; Siu, Lillian L; Hansen, Aaron R

    2016-10-01

    Background Curative-intent, non-surgical treatment options for locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LA-SCCHN) include radiotherapy with/without chemotherapy or radiotherapy with cetuximab. This single institution phase I dose escalation trial tested the pan-human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, dacomitinib, in combination with standard cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods Patients received oral dacomitinib once daily at 3 protocol-defined dose levels (15 mg, 30 mg, and 45 mg). Cisplatin was given intravenously at 100 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was delivered using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a dose of 70Gy in 35 daily fractions to the primary and nodal disease. Dose escalation was performed using a standard 3 + 3 design. Results Twelve patients with LA-SCCHN were enrolled between January 2013 and August 2014. No dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) were observed in the 15 mg and 30 mg dose levels. In the 45 mg dose level, one of four evaluable patients developed a DLT with intolerable grade 2 diarrhea requiring discontinuation of therapy. Adverse events (AEs) attributed to dacomitinib alone include diarrhea, hypertension, and acneiform and maculopapular rash. The most common non-hematological AEs include weight loss, diarrhea, dry mouth, mucositis, nausea, hypoalbuminemia, and hyponatremia. Frequency and severity of AEs did not increase with increasing dose levels of dacomitinib. All patients completed the full course of radiotherapy on schedule and the median dose of cisplatin was 200 mg/m(2), which is comparable to historical standards. Of the 10 patients evaluable for response, 1 patient relapsed with metastatic disease. Conclusions The triple combination has a tolerable side effect profile and dose levels 15 mg and 30 mg were cleared safely. The addition of dacomitinib did not preclude delivery of standard chemoradiotherapy. Studies testing the

  5. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER TORS FOR OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Katherine A.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Kupferman, Michael E.; Lewin, Jan S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Summarize functional outcomes after transoral robotic surgery (TORS) ± adjuvant therapy for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). STUDY DESIGN A systematic review was conducted. The MEDLINE database was searched (MeSH terms: transoral robotic surgery, pharyngeal neoplasms, oropharyngeal neoplasms). METHODS Peer-reviewed human subject papers published through December, 2013 were included. Exclusion criteria were: 1) case report design (n<10), 2) review article, or 3) technical, animal or cadaver studies. Functional outcomes extracted included feeding tube dependence, swallow examination findings, speech ratings, velopharyngeal insufficiency, pneumonia, and oral intake measures. RESULTS Twelve papers comprising 441 patients with OPC treated with TORS ± adjuvant therapy were included. Feeding tube rates were the most commonly reported functional outcome. Excluding prophylactic placement, 18% to 39% of patients required gastrostomy placement, typically during adjuvant therapy. Chronic gastrostomy dependence ranged from 0% to 7% (mean follow-up: 11–26 months), regardless of disease stage. Composite MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) scores ranged from 65.2 to 78 (89 patients, 3 series, mean follow-up: 12–13 months). Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies were not systematically reported. Incidence of postoperative pneumonia was 0% to 7%. Predictors of swallowing function included baseline function, T-stage, N-stage, tongue base primary tumors, and adjuvant chemoradiation. Rates of transient hypernasality were 4% to 9%. A single study suggested dose-dependent effects of adjuvant therapy (none, radiation alone, chemoradiation) on diet scores at 6- and 12-months. CONCLUSIONS Crude endpoints of functional recovery after TORS ± adjuvant therapy suggest promising swallowing outcomes, depending on the functional measure reported. PMID:24643851

  6. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  7. Surgery Versus Radiotherapy for Early Oropharyngeal Tumors: a Never-Ending Debate.

    PubMed

    Monnier, Yan; Simon, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Therapeutic options for early stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) include both surgery and radiotherapy as single treatment modality. Retrospective data reporting on locoregional control and survival rates in early stage OPSCC have shown equivalent efficacy, although no prospective randomized trials are available to confirm these results. Given the assumed comparable oncologic results in both groups, complication rates and functional outcomes associated with each modality play a major role when making treatment decisions. Radiotherapy is used preferentially in many centers because few trials have reported higher complication rates in surgical patients. However, these adverse effects were mainly due to traditional invasive open surgical approaches used for access to the oropharynx. In order to decrease the morbidity of these techniques, transoral surgical (TOS) approaches have been developed progressively. They include transoral laser microsurgery (TLM), transoral robotic surgery (TORS), and conventional transoral techniques. Meta-analysis comparing these new approaches with radiotherapy showed equivalent efficacy in terms of oncologic results. Furthermore, studies reporting on functional outcomes in patients undergoing TOS for OPSCC did not show major long-term functional impairment following treatment. Given the abovementioned statements, it is our practice to treat early stage OPSCC as follows: whenever a single modality treatment seems feasible (T1-2 and N0-1), we advocate TOS resection of the primary tumor associated with selective neck dissection, as indicated. In our opinion, the advantage of this approach relies on the possibility to stratify the risk of disease progression based on the pathological features of the tumor. Depending on the results, adjuvant radiation treatment or chemoradiotherapy can be chosen for high-risk patients. For tumors without adverse features, no adjuvant treatment is given. This approach also allows prevention of

  8. Individuals infected with JC polyomavirus do not present detectable JC virus DNA in oropharyngeal fluids.

    PubMed

    Matos, Ana; Duque, Vitor; Luxo, Cristina; Meliço-Silvestre, António; Major, Eugene O

    2012-04-01

    JC virus (JCV) is ubiquitous in the human population. Primary infection normally occurs during childhood and is followed by a lifelong persistent infection. The main mode of transmission remains unknown. Several authors have hypothesized that JCV transmission occurs through the respiratory route, and that respiratory secretions could represent a possible source of viral particles. The present study intended to evaluate oropharyngeal fluids from patients infected with JCV, in order to ascertain if respiratory secretions could indeed constitute a source of exposure to this polyomavirus. Oropharyngeal washing samples from 25 patients co-infected with JCV and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 were evaluated for the presence of JCV DNA. Regardless of the titre of antibodies or the presence of viral urinary excretion, JCV genome was not detected in oropharyngeal samples collected from any of the patients infected with JCV included in this study, which may suggest that oropharyngeal fluids are an unlikely source for JCV infection.

  9. Prevalence and clinical features of human papillomavirus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in Okinawa, southern Japan.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zeyi; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Matayoshi, Sen; Kiyuna, Asanori; Yamashita, Yukashi; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Mikio

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies from Okinawa, a subtropical island in southern Japan, demonstrated a higher prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral carcinoma and a higher incidence of oral and pharyngeal carcinoma than those for mainland Japan. The present study aims to investigate epidemiologic and clinical features of HPV in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in Okinawa. A total of 150 DNA samples from 150 Okinawan patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) were screened for HPV sequences by PCR using three consensus primer sets, and HPV types were determined by direct sequencing. The samples were consisted of 46 cases from the hypopharynx, 44 from the oropharynx, 16 from the larynx, 25 from the oral cavity, 10 from the maxillary sinus, and 9 from the nasopharynx. HPV DNA was detected in 45 (30.0%) HNSCCs, and HPV-16 was identified in 86.7% of positive specimens. The highest prevalence of the HPV sequence was found in oropharyngeal carcinomas (50.0%), especially in tonsillar cancer (63.6%). Multivariate analysis showed that oropharyngeal carcinoma (P = 0.002; OR = 5.34; 95% CI = 1.83-15.58), oral cavity carcinoma (P = 0.012; OR = 4.94; 95% CI = 1.43-17.10), and histological poor differentiation (P = 0.011; OR = 4.25; 95% CI = 1.39-13.04) each independently increased the prevalence of HPV infection. The present study reveals that patients with HNSCC, e.g., oropharyngeal and oral cavity carcinomas, in Okinawa have relatively high HPV-16 positive rates and low HPV-18 positive rates comparing with mainland Japan.

  10. FLUOROSCOPIC EVALUATION OF ORO-PHARYNGEAL DYSPHAGIA: ANATOMY, TECHNIQUE, AND COMMON ETIOLOGIES

    PubMed Central

    Edmund, Dr; Au, Frederick Wing-Fai; Steele, Catriona M.

    2015-01-01

    Target Audience Radiologists and other professionals involved in imaging of oropharyngeal swallowing Objectives To review anatomy of the upper GI tract To review techniques and contrast agents used in the fluoroscopic examination of the oropharynx and hypopharynx To provide a pictorial review of some important causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia, and to link these to key findings in the clinical history to assist in establishing a clinical diagnosis To provide self-assessment questions to reinforce key learning points PMID:25539237

  11. [A Case of Severe Hyponatremia Caused by Renal Salt Wasting Syndrome in Oropharyngeal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Taro; Shirakura, Satoru; Hatanaka, Akio; Okano, Wataru; Tokumaru, Takao; Yamada, Masato; Saito, Yoshihiro; Beppu, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Hyponatremia is one of the electrolyte abnormalities frequently encountered in cancer therapy. Cisplatin is a well-known drug which can raise various adverse events, including hyponatremia. A male with advanced oropharyngeal cancer is presented in the present report, who was treated with radiotherapy with concurrent administration of cisplatin and who underwent a total of three episodes of severe hyponatremia in the course of therapy. The first two attacks of hyponatremia following cisplatin administration were accompanied by dehydration and excessive urination, and the patient recovered in one week with rehydration and salt supplementation. Excessive loss of salt in urine confirmed that these events were caused by renal salt wasting syndrome after cisplatin administration. On the other hand, the third attack was due to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion after surgery for a bone fracture. Estimation of the extracellular fluid volume and salt intake/output balance is always believed to be necessary for the diagnosis and proper management of severe hyponatremia after chemotherapy-based treatment with cisplatin. PMID:26548098

  12. The clinical impact of HPV tumor status upon head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Eleni; Li, Ryan; Eisele, David; Fakhry, Carole

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human papillomavirus (HPV) is etiologically responsible for a distinct subset of head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCCs). HPV-positive HNSCCs (HPV-HNSCCs) most commonly arise from the oropharynx and are responsible for the increasing incidence of oropharyngeal SCC (OSCC) in the United States (US) and abroad. HPV-positive OSCC (HPV-OSCC) has a unique demographic and risk factor profile and tumor biology. HPV-OSCC patients tend to be white, younger, and have a higher cumulative exposure to sexual behaviors as compared with HPV-negative OSCC patients. HPV-positive tumor status also significantly improves survival, and is indeed the single strongest prognostic factor for OSCC. The mechanisms that underlie the improved prognosis conferred by HPV-positive disease are unknown. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical impact of HPV status in HNSCC, particularly in OSCC, both in terms of the unique clinic-demographic profile and prognostic implications. PMID:24134947

  13. Do high-risk human papillomaviruses cause oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Mirghani, H; Amen, F; Moreau, F; Lacau St Guily, J

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are an established etiologic factor for a growing number of oropharyngeal cancers. However, their potential role in other upper aerodigestive tract locations is still a matter of debate, particularly in the oral cavity. This is of paramount importance as in the future diagnosis, treatment and follow up in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma may vary according to HPV status. This article reviews the recent published data and highlights some of the pitfalls that have hampered the accurate assessment of HR-HPV oncological role outside the oropharynx. We demonstrate that, in contrast to the oropharynx, only a small fraction of cancers located in the oral cavity seem to be HPV-related even in young non-smoking non-drinking patients. We emphasize several relevant factors to consider in assumed HPV-induced oral cavity cancers and discuss the current theories that explain why HPV-induced cancers arise preferentially in the oropharynx.

  14. Oral candidiasis mimicking an oral squamous cell carcinoma: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Hélder Antônio Rebelo; Paiva, Helena Borges; de Freitas Silva, Brunno Santos; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; da Silva, Fernanda Bragança Monteiro; Pontes, Flávia Sirotheau Corrêa; Dos Santos Pinto, Décio

    2012-03-01

    Oral candidiasis is a significant problem in immune-compromised patients. The most common forms of mucosal candidiasis are oropharyngeal, oesophageal and vaginal, and more than 90% of HIV positive persons will manifest at least one episode of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Local and systemic factors such as uninterrupted daily use of a prosthesis by patients, smoking habit, as well as high glucose intake may contribute to the development of the lesion. The aim of this article is to report an uncommon case of oral candidiasis presenting an aggressive clinical behaviour in a 64-year-old male patient, with a significant smoking habit and a medical history of non-controlled diabetes. The lesion affected the hard and soft palate of the right side, revealing erythematous and ulcerated areas, elevated borders and central portions resembling necrosis, mimicking the clinical features of oral squamous cell carcinoma. However, the correct diagnosis of oral candidiasis was obtained after histopathological and cytological examinations and the patient was easily treated with traditional antifungal drugs and correction of his glucose levels.

  15. Influence of Smoking History on Imaging Characteristics among HPV-Positive Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients: A Blinded Matched-Pair Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cantrell, Sarah C.; Reid, Holly H.; Li, Guojun; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancers represent a distinct clinical entity with more favorable prognosis than HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancers. However, among patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas, those with a significant smoking history have a much worse prognosis. Recently, imaging characteristics of oropharyngeal cancers were identified as markers of poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether nodal imaging characteristics differ between smokers and never/light smokers with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer. Materials and Methods Review of 130 pretreatment CT examinations of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers in smokers (>10 pack-years) and never/light smokers (≤10 pack-years) matched for T stage and tumor subsite was performed with the reviewing radiologist blinded to HPV status, smoking history, and clinical stage. An additional 24 pretreatment CT examinations of patients with HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancers were also reviewed in a blinded fashion. Imaging characteristics of metastatic nodal disease were compared using chi-square testing (Fisher exact testing where appropriate) and McNemar chi-square testing for the matched-pair analysis. Results As expected, those with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer were more likely to be younger, male, non-Hispanic white, never/former smokers, and never drinkers than those with HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancer. Furthermore, the HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers were more likely to be in the tonsil, smaller T-category, higher N-category, poorly differentiated, tonsil primaries, smaller T-category, higher N-category, and poorly differentiated than HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancers. However, among the HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers, we could identify no obvious difference in the pretreatment imaging characteristics of paired smokers and never/light smokers. Conclusions Among patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer, no

  16. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  17. Squamous cell and adenosquamous carcinomas of the gallbladder: clinicopathological analysis of 34 cases identified in 606 carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Roa, Juan C; Tapia, Oscar; Cakir, Asli; Basturk, Olca; Dursun, Nevra; Akdemir, Deniz; Saka, Burcu; Losada, Hector; Bagci, Pelin; Adsay, N Volkan

    2011-08-01

    The information in the literature on squamous cell and adenosquamous carcinomas of the gallbladder is highly limited. In this study, 606 resected invasive gallbladder carcinoma cases were analyzed. Squamous differentiation was identified in 41 cases (7%). Those without any identifiable glandular-type invasive component were classified as pure squamous cell carcinomas (8 cases) and those with the squamous component constituting 25-99% of the tumors were classified as adenosquamous carcinomas (26 cases) and included into the analysis. The remaining 7 that had <25% squamous component were classified as adenocarcinoma with focal squamous change and excluded. The clinicopathological characteristics of adenosquamous carcinoma/squamous cell carcinomas were documented and contrasted with that of ordinary gallbladder adenocarcinomas. The average patient age was 65 years (range 26-81); female/male ratio, 3.8. In only 13%, there was a preoperative clinical suspicion of malignancy. Grossly, 58% presented as thickening and hardening of the wall and 6% were polypoid. In 12%, mucosa adjacent to the tumor revealed squamous metaplasia. All pure squamous cell carcinomas had prominent keratinization. Giant cells and tumor-infiltrating eosinophils were observed in 29 and 51% of the squamous cell carcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas versus 10% (P=0.02) and 6% (P=0.001) in gallbladder adenocarcinomas, respectively. All but three cases had 'advanced' (pT2 and above) carcinomas. Follow-up was available in 31 patients: 25 died of disease (median=5 months, range 0-20), and 6 were alive (median=64 months, range 5-112.5). The survival of patients with squamous cell carcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas was significantly worse than that of gallbladder adenocarcinomas (P=0.003), and this adverse prognosis persisted when compared with stage-matched advanced gallbladder adenocarcinoma cases (median=11.4 months, P=0.01). In conclusion, squamous differentiation was noted in 7% of gallbladder

  18. Decreased HPV-specific T cell responses and accumulation of immunosuppressive influences in oropharyngeal cancer patients following radical therapy.

    PubMed

    Al-Taei, Saly; Banner, Russell; Powell, Ned; Evans, Mererid; Palaniappan, Nachi; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Man, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is a type of squamous cell head and neck cancer that is often associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, suggesting the potential for immunotherapeutic targeting of HPV antigens. This study aimed to determine the effect of radical therapy on HPV-specific T cells and other immune parameters in 20 OPC patients, as a prelude to future immunotherapy studies. HPV DNA could be detected in 9/12 available tissue samples (8/9 HPV(+) samples were also p16(+)). HPV-specific T cell responses against HPV16 E6 and E7 peptides were detected by enzyme-linked immunoSPOT in 10/13 and 8/13 evaluable patients, respectively, but did not appear to correlate with HPV status. Post-treatment, both HPV E6 and E7 T cell responses were decreased (4/13 and 2/13 patients, respectively). These reductions in T cell response could not be explained by a concurrent decrease in memory T cells whose absolute numbers were relatively unaffected by radical therapy (27,975 vs. 25,661/10(5) PBMC) despite a significant decrease in overall lymphocyte counts (1.74 vs. 0.69 × 10(9)/L). Instead, there were significant increases in regulatory T cells (3.7 vs. 6.8 %) and a population of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (CD14(-)HLA-DR(-)CD15(hi), 12.38 vs. 21.92 %). This suggests that immunosuppression may contribute to the reduction in HPV-specific T cell responses post-treatment, although study of larger patient cohorts will be required to test whether this affects clinical outcome. Overall these findings suggest that HPV-targeted immunotherapy in post-therapy OPC patients will require multiple strategies to boost T cell immunity and to overcome the influence of immunosuppressive cells.

  19. Surgical salvage improves overall survival for HPV-positive and HPV-negative recurrent locoregional and distant metastatic oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Theresa; Qualliotine, Jesse R.; Ha, Patrick K.; Califano, Joseph A.; Kim, Young; Saunders, John R.; Blanco, Ray; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Zhang, Zhe; Chung, Christine H.; Kiess, Ana; Gourin, Christine G.; Koch, Wayne; Richmon, Jeremy D.; Agrawal, Nishant; Eisele, David W.; Fakhry, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) tumor status and surgical salvage are associated with improved prognosis for patients with recurrent oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Current data regarding types of surgery and the impact of surgery for distant metastatic disease are limited. Methods A retrospective analysis of patients with recurrent OPSCC from two institutions between 2000-2012 was performed. P16 immunohistochemistry and/or in situ hybridization, as clinically available, were used to determine HPV tumor status. Clinical characteristics, distribution of recurrence site and treatment modalities were compared by HPV tumor status. Overall survival was examined by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards methods. Results The study included 108 patients with 65 locoregional and 43 distant metastatic first recurrences. The majority were HPV-positive (n=80). HPV-positive tumor status was associated with longer time to recurrence (p<0.01). Anatomic site distribution of recurrences did not differ by HPV tumor status. HPV-positive tumor status (adjusted HR [aHR] 0.23 (95%CI 0.09-0.58), p=0.002), longer time to recurrence (≥1 year; aHR 0.36 (0.18-0.74), p=0.006), and surgical salvage (aHR 0.26 (0.12-0.61), p=0.002) were independently associated with overall survival after recurrence. Surgical salvage was independently associated with improved overall survival compared to non-surgical treatment in both locoregional (aHR 0.15 (0.04-0.56), p=0.005) and distant metastatic recurrence (aHR 0.19 (0.05-0.75), p=0.018). Conclusions Surgical salvage is associated with improved overall survival for recurrent locoregional and distant metastatic OPSCC, independent of HPV tumor status. Further prospective data is needed to confirm the role of surgical salvage for distant metastases. PMID:25782027

  20. Will targeting oropharyngeal gonorrhoea delay the further emergence of drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains?

    PubMed

    Lewis, D A

    2015-06-01

    Gonorrhoea is an important sexually transmitted infection associated with serious complications and enhanced HIV transmission. Oropharyngeal infections are often asymptomatic and will only be detected by screening. Gonococcal culture has low sensitivity (<50%) for detecting oropharyngeal gonorrhoea, and, although not yet approved commercially, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) are the assay of choice. Screening for oropharyngeal gonorrhoea should be performed in high-risk populations, such as men-who-have-sex-with-men(MSM). NAATs have a poor positive predictive value when used in low-prevalence populations. Gonococci have repeatedly thwarted gonorrhoea control efforts since the first antimicrobial agents were introduced. The oropharyngeal niche provides an enabling environment for horizontal transfer of genetic material from commensal Neisseria and other bacterial species to Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This has been the mechanism responsible for the generation of mosaic penA genes, which are responsible for most of the observed cases of resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC). As antimicrobial-resistant gonorrhoea is now an urgent public health threat, requiring improved antibiotic stewardship, laboratory-guided recycling of older antibiotics may help reduce ESC use. Future trials of antimicrobial agents for gonorrhoea should be powered to test their efficacy at the oropharynx as this is the anatomical site where treatment failure is most likely to occur. It remains to be determined whether a combination of frequent screening of high-risk individuals and/or laboratory-directed fluoroquinolone therapy of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea will delay the further emergence of drug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae strains.

  1. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: new translational therapies.

    PubMed

    Prince, Anthony; Aguirre-Ghizo, Julio; Genden, Eric; Posner, Marshall; Sikora, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma includes cancers of the mouth, throat, larynx, and lymph nodes of the neck. Although early disease is amenable to single-modality treatment with surgery or radiation, patients with advanced disease have a dramatically worse prognosis, despite potentially morbid/toxic treatment regimens involving surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or all 3 modalities. The present review seeks to provide an overview of current understanding and treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the nonspecialist clinician or basic/translational researcher, followed by an overview of major translational approaches to the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Translational research topics addressed include targeted molecular therapy, immunotherapy, minimally invasive robotic surgery, and ablation of dormant/residual tumor cells. Despite the many potentially promising avenues of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma research, only 2 new treatment approaches (antiepidermal growth factor receptor therapy and robotic surgery) have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in the past 30 years. Focused research programs involving integrated teams of clinicians, basic scientists, and translational clinician-researchers have the potential to accelerate discovery and change treatment paradigms for patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:21105129

  2. The relationship between p16 expression and high-risk human papillomavirus infection in squamous cell carcinomas from sites other than uterine cervix: a study of 137 cases.

    PubMed

    Doxtader, Erika E; Katzenstein, Anna-Luise A

    2012-03-01

    p16 is known to be an excellent surrogate marker of human papillomavirus infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Recent studies have demonstrated a link between human papillomavirus infection and a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, especially from the oropharynx. The aims of this study were to determine the incidence of p16 expression in squamous cell carcinomas of noncervical origin and to assess its utility as a surrogate marker of human papillomavirus infection in various noncervical primary sites. One hundred thirty-seven squamous cell carcinomas from 5 primary sites, including 34 from the oropharynx (tonsil and base of tongue), 43 cases from nonoropharyngeal head and neck sites, and 20 cases each from the lung, esophagus, and skin, were retrieved from our surgical pathology archives. Immunohistochemistry for p16 was performed on each case. All p16-positive cases and 21 p16-negative cases were further tested for both high-risk and low-risk human papillomavirus by in situ hybridization. p16 expression was detected in 54 cases overall, including 25 (74%) of 34 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas, 8 (19%) of 43 nonoropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinomas including 3 of 4 from the sinonasal cavity, 6 (30%) of 20 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, 7 (35%) of 20 lung squamous cell carcinomas, and 8 (40%) of 20 skin squamous cell carcinomas. Of the 54 p16-positive cases, 30 were positive for high-risk human papillomavirus, including 24 (96%) of 25 from the oropharynx, 5 (63%) of 8 from nonoropharyngeal head and neck sites, and 1 (17%) of 6 from the esophagus. All 7 lung and 8 skin cases tested were negative. All p16-positive cases were negative for low-risk human papillomavirus. In selected head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, mainly from the oropharynx and sinonasal cavity, p16 positivity correlates well with high-risk human papillomavirus infection. p16 is not a reliable indicator of high-risk human papillomavirus

  3. The Impact of Radiographic Retropharyngeal Adenopathy in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, G. Brandon; Debnam, J. Matthew; Fuller, Clifton D.; Morrison, William H.; Frank, Steven J.; Beadle, Beth M.; Sturgis, Erich M.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Phan, Jack; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.

    2013-01-01

    Background We carried out this study to define the incidence of radiographic retropharyngeal lymph node (RPLN) involvement in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) and its impact on clinical outcomes, which have not been well established to date. Methods Our departmental database was queried for patients irradiated for OPC from 2001–2007. Analyzable patients were those with imaging data available for review to determine radiographic RPLN status. Demographic, clinical, and outcomes data were retrieved and analyzed. Results The cohort consisted of 981 patients. Median follow up was 69 months. The base of tongue (47%) and tonsil (46%) were the most common primary sites. The majority of patients had T1-2 primaries (64%) and 94% stage 3-4B disease. IMRT was used in 77%, and systemic therapy was delivered to 58%. The incidence of radiographic RPLN involvement was 10% and highest for pharyngeal wall (23%) and lowest for base of tongue tumors (6%). RPLN adenopathy correlated with a number of patient and tumor factors. RPLN involvement was associated with poorer 5-year outcomes on univariate analysis (p <.001 for all): local control (79% vs. 92%), nodal control (80% vs. 93%), recurrence-free (51% vs. 81%), distant metastases-free (66% vs. 89%), and overall survival (52% vs. 82%), and maintained significance for local control (p=.023), recurrence-free (p=.001), distant metastases-free (p=.003), and overall survival (p=.001) on multivariate analysis. Conclusions In this cohort of nearly 1000 patients investigating radiographic RPLN adenopathy in OPC, RPLN involvement was observed in 10% of patients and portends a negative influence on disease recurrence, distant relapse, and survival. PMID:23733178

  4. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Antonio; Mozzanica, Francesco; Sonzini, Giulia; Plebani, Daniela; Urbani, Emanuele; Pecis, Marica; Montano, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated that patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may present subclinical manifestations of dysphagia, in not one were different textures and volumes systematically studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) with boluses of different textures and volumes in a large cohort of patients with OSAS. A total of 72 OSAS patients without symptoms of dysphagia were enrolled. The cohort was divided in two groups: 30 patients with moderate OSAS and 42 patients with severe OSAS. Each patient underwent a FEES examination using 5, 10 and 20 ml of liquids and semisolids, and solids. Spillage, penetration, aspiration, retention, and piecemeal deglutition were considered. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), pooling score (PS), and dysphagia outcome and severity scale (DOSS) were used for quantitative analysis. Each patient completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire. Forty-six patients (64 %) presented spillage, 20 (28 %) piecemeal deglutition, 26 (36 %) penetration, and 30 (44 %) retention. No differences were found in the PAS, PS, and DOSS scores between patients with moderate and severe OSAS. Patients with severe OSAS scored higher General Burden and Food selection subscales of the SWAL-QOL. Depending on the DOSS score, the cohort of patients was divided into those with and those without signs of dysphagia. Patients with signs of dysphagia scored lower in the General Burden and Symptoms subscales of the SWAL-QOL. OSAS patients show signs of swallowing impairment in about half of the population; clinicians involved in the management of these patients should include questions on swallowing when taking the medical history.

  5. The role for surgical management of HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M

    2012-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma has become the predominate cause of oropharyngeal carcinoma in the United States and Europe. Management of this disease is controversial. Traditional open surgical techniques gave way to concurrent chemoradiotherapy following several American and European organ-preservation trials suggesting that both modalities were equally efficacious. More recently, minimally invasive surgical techniques have gained popularity. These techniques provide an opportunity to achieve a complete surgical resection without the treatment-related morbidity associated with open surgery. Proponents of this technique contend that transoral surgical techniques provide a means to analyze the tumor tissue, prognosticate, and personally direct therapy. Skeptics suggest that HPV-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma responds well to chemoradiotherapy and that surgery may not provide a treatment advantage. Both approaches provide a unique perspective and both are currently being studied under trial. PMID:22782229

  6. Bedside screening to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with neurological disorders: an updated systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kertscher, Berit; Speyer, Renée; Palmieri, Maria; Plant, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent comorbidity in neurological patients and presents a serious health threat, which may le to outcomes of aspiration pneumonia ranging from hospitalization to death. Therefore, an early identification of risk followed by an accurate diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia is fundamental. This systematic review provides an update of currently available bedside screenings to identify oropharyngeal dysphagia in neurological patients. An electronic search was carried out in the databases PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsychInfo (formerly PsychLit), and all hits from 2008 up to December 2012 were included in the review. Only studies with sufficient methodological quality were considered, after which the psychometric characteristics of the screening tools were determined. Two relevant bedside screenings were identified, with a minimum sensitivity and specificity of ≥70 and ≥60 %, respectively.

  7. FGFR4 Profile as a Prognostic Marker in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Mouth and Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Roberta Lelis; de Carvalho, Marcos Brasilino; dos Santos, Marcelo; Mercante, Ana Maria da Cunha; Gazito, Diana; de Cicco, Rafael; Group, GENCAPO; Tajara, Eloiza Helena; Louro, Iúri Drumond; da Silva, Adriana Madeira Álvares

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) is a member of a receptor tyrosine kinase family of enzymes involved in cell cycle control and proliferation. A common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) Gly388Arg variant has been associated with increased tumor cell motility and progression of breast cancer, head and neck cancer and soft tissue sarcomas. The present study evaluated the prognostic significance of FGFR4 in oral and oropharynx carcinomas, finding an association of FGFR4 expression and Gly388Arg genotype with tumor onset and prognosis. Patients and Methods DNA from peripheral blood of 122 patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas was used to determine FGFR4 genotype by PCR-RFLP. Protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) on paraffin-embedded tissue microarrays. Results Presence of allele Arg388 was associated with lymphatic embolization and with disease related premature death. In addition, FGFR4 low expression was related with lymph node positivity and premature relapse of disease, as well as disease related death. Conclusion Our results propose FGFR4 profile, measured by the Gly388Arg genotype and expression, as a novel marker of prognosis in squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth and oropharynx. PMID:23226373

  8. Phase II Study Evaluating the Addition of Cetuximab to the Concurrent Delivery of Weekly Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, and Daily Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Suntharalingam, Mohan; Kwok, Young; Goloubeva, Olga; Parekh, Arti; Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey; Zimrin, Ann; Strome, Scott; Ord, Robert; Cullen, Kevin J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report the mature data of a prospective Phase II trial designed to evaluate the efficacy of an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor cetuximab (CTX) added to the concurrent therapy of weekly paclitaxel/carboplatin (PC) and daily radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2009, a total of 43 patients were enrolled in the study. The median follow-up was 31 months (range, 9-59 months). All patients had Stage III/IV disease at presentation, and 67% had oropharyngeal primaries. The weekly IV dose schedules were CTX 250 mg/m{sup 2} (400 mg/m{sup 2} IV loading dose 1 week before RT), paclitaxel 40 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin AUC 2. RT was given at 1.8 Gy per day to 70.2 Gy. Intensity-modulated RTwas used in 70% of cases. Results: All patients completed the planned RT dose, 74% without any treatment breaks. The planned CTX and PC cycles were completed in 70% (91% with at least seven of planned nine cycles) and 56% (93% with at least seven of planned eight cycles) of patients, respectively. Toxicity included Grade 3 mucositis (79%), rash (9%), leucopenia (19%), neutropenia (19%), and RT dermatitis (16%). The complete response (CR) rate at the completion of therapy was 84%. The estimated 3-year local regional control rate was 72%. Six patients with an initial CR subsequently experienced a local recurrence, 10 patients experienced distant progression. The median overall survival and disease-free survivals have not been reached. The 3-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival were 59% and 58%, respectively. Conclusions: The addition of CTX to weekly PC and daily RT was well tolerated and resulted in encouraging local control and survival rates.

  9. Impact of Squamous Differentiation in Breast Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pai, Trupti; Shet, Tanuja; Desai, Sangeeta; Patil, Asawari; Nair, Nita; Parmar, Vani; Gupta, Sudeep; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Sarin, Rajiv; Badwe, Rajendra

    2016-09-01

    This study attempted to review the impact of extent of squamous differentiation in 56 infiltrating duct carcinomas (IDC) with squamous differentiation (metaplastic squamous carcinomas [MSC]). Tumors showing 100% squamous elements were labeled as primary squamous carcinomas (PSC; n = 28) and compared with 28 MSC showing lesser squamous components. A clinicopathological comparison revealed that lymphovascular emboli were never seen in any PSC but were noted in 7/28 of other MSC, while perineural invasion was seen only in PSC and not in MSC. Nodal metastasis was significantly more in other MSC as opposed to PSC. Most MSC presented with 2- to 5-cm sized tumors while PSC were 5 to 10 cm in size. PSC showed cystic change while MSC did not. Disease free survival (DFS) for MSC versus PSC was 64% versus 39.8%, while overall survival (OAS) was 72.7% in MSC versus 66.7% in PSC. Tumor stage affected DFS in MSC while none of the factors affected DFS/OAS in PSC. The extent of squamous differentiation affected DFS with best behavior for metaplastic carcinomas showing <40% squamous elements and worse for those with >90% squamous component (P = .024). PSC of breast is an aggressive disease and show distinct clinicopathological features from other MSC, and though the current definition of MSC does not advocate quantifying the squamous element, clearly this affects prognosis. PMID:27076454

  10. Impact of Squamous Differentiation in Breast Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pai, Trupti; Shet, Tanuja; Desai, Sangeeta; Patil, Asawari; Nair, Nita; Parmar, Vani; Gupta, Sudeep; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Sarin, Rajiv; Badwe, Rajendra

    2016-09-01

    This study attempted to review the impact of extent of squamous differentiation in 56 infiltrating duct carcinomas (IDC) with squamous differentiation (metaplastic squamous carcinomas [MSC]). Tumors showing 100% squamous elements were labeled as primary squamous carcinomas (PSC; n = 28) and compared with 28 MSC showing lesser squamous components. A clinicopathological comparison revealed that lymphovascular emboli were never seen in any PSC but were noted in 7/28 of other MSC, while perineural invasion was seen only in PSC and not in MSC. Nodal metastasis was significantly more in other MSC as opposed to PSC. Most MSC presented with 2- to 5-cm sized tumors while PSC were 5 to 10 cm in size. PSC showed cystic change while MSC did not. Disease free survival (DFS) for MSC versus PSC was 64% versus 39.8%, while overall survival (OAS) was 72.7% in MSC versus 66.7% in PSC. Tumor stage affected DFS in MSC while none of the factors affected DFS/OAS in PSC. The extent of squamous differentiation affected DFS with best behavior for metaplastic carcinomas showing <40% squamous elements and worse for those with >90% squamous component (P = .024). PSC of breast is an aggressive disease and show distinct clinicopathological features from other MSC, and though the current definition of MSC does not advocate quantifying the squamous element, clearly this affects prognosis.

  11. Different prognostic models for different patient populations: validation of a new prognostic model for patients with oropharyngeal cancer in Western Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rietbergen, M M; Witte, B I; Velazquez, E R; Snijders, P J F; Bloemena, E; Speel, E J; Brakenhoff, R H; Kremer, B; Lambin, P; Leemans, C R

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is a major determinant in prognostic risk modelling. Recently, a prognostic model was proposed in which HPV status, comorbidity and nodal stage were the most important prognostic factors to determine high-, intermediate- and low-risk survival groups. Here, we report on the validation of this model using an independent single-institutional cohort. Methods: A total number of 235 patients curatively treated for OPSCC in the period 2000–2011 at the MUMC (Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands) were included. The presence of an oncogenic HPV infection was determined by p16 immunostaining, followed by a high-risk HPV DNA PCR on the p16-positive cases. The model variables included were HPV status, comorbidity and nodal stage. As a measure of model performance, the Harrell's Concordance index (Harrell's C-index) was used. Results: The 5-year overall survival (OS) estimates were 84.6%, 54.5% and 28.7% in the low-, intermediate- and high-risk group, respectively. The difference between the survival curves was highly significant (P<0.001). The Harrell's C-index was 0.69 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63–0.75). Conclusion: In this study a previously developed prognostic risk model was validated. This model will help to personalise treatment in OPSCC patients. This model is publicly available at www.predictcancer.org. PMID:25950384

  12. Targeted treatments for metastatic esophageal squamous cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Digklia, Antonia; Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2013-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma, one of the two major sub-types of esophageal carcinomas, constitutes the great majority of tumors in the upper and middle third of the organ. Declining in incidence in western countries, it continues to be a significant public health problem in the far east. Targeted treatments are novel therapies introduced in the clinical therapeutic armamentarium of oncology in the last 10-15 years. They represent a rational way of treating various cancers based on their molecular lesions. Although no such agent has been approved so far for the treatment of esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC), several are in clinical trials and several others have displayed pre-clinical activity that would justify the efforts and risks of pursuing their clinical development in this disease. This paper discusses some of these targeted agents in more advanced development in metastatic ESCC, as well as some promising drugs with pre-clinical or initial clinical data in the disease. PMID:23799158

  13. A Therapeutic Maneuver for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Valter Nilton; Corrêa, Sabrina Mello Alves; Soares, Renato José

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigates resources to provide better conditions for oropharyngeal swallowing for improvement in the quality of life of Parkinson’s disease patients. METHOD Three men and one woman with an average age of 70.25 years had been afflicted with Parkinson’s disease for an average of 9.25 years. The patients were submitted to a rehabilitation program for oropharyngeal dysphagia after a clinical evaluation of swallowing. The rehabilitation program consisted of daily sessions for two consecutive weeks during which a biofeedback resource adapted especially for this study was used. The patients were then reevaluated for swallowing ability at follow-up. RESULTS The patients presenting difficulties with swallowing water displayed no such problems after rehabilitation. Only one patient exhibited slow oral transit of food and other discrete oropharyngeal food remnants when swallowing a biscuit. The sample variance was used to analyze the pressure measurements, demonstrating a numerical similarity of the results obtained with the swallowing of saliva or of biscuits (VAR = 4.41). A statistical difference was observed between the swallowing of saliva and biscuits, showing a significant pressure increase at the end of the rehabilitation program (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION The effortful swallow maneuver reinforced by using biofeedback appears to be a therapeutic resource in the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Parkinson’s disease patients. PMID:18925327

  14. Oropharyngeal Tularemia Outbreak Associated with Drinking Contaminated Tap Water, Turkey, July–September 2013

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Bekir; Isik, Mehmet Emirhan; Tutus, Celal; Ozturk, Huseyin; Temel, Fehminaz; Kizilaslan, Mecit; Zhu, Bao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, an oropharyngeal tularemia outbreak in Turkey affected 55 persons. Drinking tap water during the likely exposure period was significantly associated with illness (attack rate 27% vs. 11% among non–tap water drinkers). Findings showed the tap water source had been contaminated by surface water, and the chlorination device malfunctioned. PMID:26584074

  15. The Utility of Pitch Elevation in the Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; Hind, Jacqueline A.; Gangnon, Ronald; Logemann, Jeri A.; Robbins, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a pitch elevation task in the assessment of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Method: This study was a pilot prospective cohort study including 40 consecutive patients (16 male and 24 female) who were referred by their physician for a swallowing evaluation. Patients were evaluated with a noninstrumental clinical…

  16. Oropharyngeal Tularemia Outbreak Associated with Drinking Contaminated Tap Water, Turkey, July-September 2013.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Dilber; Celebi, Bekir; Isik, Mehmet Emirhan; Tutus, Celal; Ozturk, Huseyin; Temel, Fehminaz; Kizilaslan, Mecit; Zhu, Bao-Ping

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, an oropharyngeal tularemia outbreak in Turkey affected 55 persons. Drinking tap water during the likely exposure period was significantly associated with illness (attack rate 27% vs. 11% among non-tap water drinkers). Findings showed the tap water source had been contaminated by surface water, and the chlorination device malfunctioned.

  17. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dastych, Milan; Senkyrik, Michal; Pavlik, Tomas; Prokesova, Jitka; Jecmenova, Marketa; Dolina, Jiri; Hep, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG). Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274), dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001). Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9%) of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76). Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76). Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers. PMID:25243153

  18. Prognostic value of matrix metalloproteinases in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mishev, Georgi; Deliverska, Elitsa; Hlushchuk, Ruslan; Velinov, Nikolay; Aebersold, Daniel; Weinstein, Felix; Djonov, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a correlation between the expressions of four matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs): MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9 and MMP-13, and the TNM (tumour–node–metastasis) stages of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC); and to explore the implication of these MMPs in OSCC dissemination. Samples from 61 patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal tumour were studied by immunohistochemistry against MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9 and MMP-13. The assessment of immunoreactivity was semi-quantitative. The results showed that MMP-2 and MMP-9 had similar expression patterns in the tumour cells with no changes in the immunoreactivity during tumour progression. MMP-9 always had the highest expression, whereas that of MMP-2 was moderate. MMP-7 showed a significant decrease in expression levels during tumour evolution. MMP-13 had constant expression levels within stage T2 and T3, but showed a remarkable decline in immunoreactivity in stage T4. No significant differences in the MMPs immunoreactivity between tumour cells and stroma were observed. Although strong evidence for the application of MMPs as reliable predictive markers for node metastasis was not acquired, we believe that combining patients’ MMPs expression intensity and clinical features may improve the diagnosis and prognosis. Strong evidence for the application of MMPs as reliable predictive markers for node metastasis was not acquired. Application of MMPs as prognostic indicators for the malignancy potential of OSCC might be considered in every case of tumour examination. We believe that combining patients’ MMPs expression intensity and clinical features may improve the process of making diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:26019601

  19. Will targeting oropharyngeal gonorrhoea delay the further emergence of drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains?

    PubMed

    Lewis, D A

    2015-06-01

    Gonorrhoea is an important sexually transmitted infection associated with serious complications and enhanced HIV transmission. Oropharyngeal infections are often asymptomatic and will only be detected by screening. Gonococcal culture has low sensitivity (<50%) for detecting oropharyngeal gonorrhoea, and, although not yet approved commercially, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) are the assay of choice. Screening for oropharyngeal gonorrhoea should be performed in high-risk populations, such as men-who-have-sex-with-men(MSM). NAATs have a poor positive predictive value when used in low-prevalence populations. Gonococci have repeatedly thwarted gonorrhoea control efforts since the first antimicrobial agents were introduced. The oropharyngeal niche provides an enabling environment for horizontal transfer of genetic material from commensal Neisseria and other bacterial species to Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This has been the mechanism responsible for the generation of mosaic penA genes, which are responsible for most of the observed cases of resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC). As antimicrobial-resistant gonorrhoea is now an urgent public health threat, requiring improved antibiotic stewardship, laboratory-guided recycling of older antibiotics may help reduce ESC use. Future trials of antimicrobial agents for gonorrhoea should be powered to test their efficacy at the oropharynx as this is the anatomical site where treatment failure is most likely to occur. It remains to be determined whether a combination of frequent screening of high-risk individuals and/or laboratory-directed fluoroquinolone therapy of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea will delay the further emergence of drug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae strains. PMID:25911525

  20. Capecitabine and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-01

    Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  1. Current Aspects on Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Markopoulos, Anastasios K

    2012-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common malignant epithelial neoplasm affecting the oral cavity. This article overviews the essential points of oral squamous cell carcinoma, highlighting its risk and genomic factors, the potential malignant disorders and the therapeutic approaches. It also emphasizes the importance of the early diagnosis. PMID:22930665

  2. Ganetespib Window of Opportunity Study in Head and Neck Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-22

    Stage I Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  3. Predictors of Distant Metastasis after Radical Surgery Followed by Postoperative Radiotherapy with or without Chemotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Mi Joo; Kim, Yeon Sil; Kim, Ji Yoon; Lee, Yun Hee; Jang, Ji Hyun; Kang, Jin Hyoung; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Lee, Youn Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the prognostic factors for distant metastasis (DM) in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Materials and Methods Eighty-five patients treated between January 1995 and August 2014 were evaluated retrospectively. Data regarding the pathological tumour and nodal status, human papillomavirus (HPV) status, treatment characteristics, and pretreatment maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography–computed tomography scan (18F-FDG PET-CT) were evaluated, and their influence on DM and survival outcomes were analyzed. Results Median follow-up period was 48.0 months. Recurrence was observed in 20 patients, including locoregional recurrence and DM. DM was observed in 13 patients. A multivariate analysis confirmed that the presence of lymphovascular invasion (p=0.031), lower neck lymph node (LN) involvement (p=0.006), SUVmax ≥ 9.7 (p=0.014), and tumour size ≥ 3 cm (p=0.037) significantly affected DM. HPV status was not associated with DM. Perineural invasion (p=0.048), lower neck LNinvolvement (p=0.008), SUVmax ≥ 9.7 (p=0.019), and tumour size ≥ 3 cm (p=0.033) were also significant factors for the DM-free survival rate. Conclusion Lower neck LN involvement, high SUVmax in pretreatment 18F-FDG PET-CT, and large tumour size were predictive factors for DM in patients of OPC. PMID:26987396

  4. Patient-Reported Voice and Speech Outcomes After Whole-Neck Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Griffith, Kent A.; Feng, Felix Y.; Vineberg, Karen A.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To describe voice and speech quality changes and their predictors in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated on prospective clinical studies of organ-preserving chemotherapy–intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-one patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated on 2 consecutive prospective studies of definitive chemoradiation using whole-field IMRT from 2003 to 2011. Patient-reported voice and speech quality were longitudinally assessed from before treatment through 24 months using the Communication Domain of the Head and Neck Quality of Life (HNQOL-C) instrument and the Speech question of the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQOL-S) instrument, respectively. Factors associated with patient-reported voice quality worsening from baseline and speech impairment were assessed. Results: Voice quality decreased maximally at 1 month, with 68% and 41% of patients reporting worse HNQOL-C and UWQOL-S scores compared with before treatment, and improved thereafter, recovering to baseline by 12-18 months on average. In contrast, observer-rated larynx toxicity was rare (7% at 3 months; 5% at 6 months). Among patients with mean glottic larynx (GL) dose ≤20 Gy, >20-30 Gy, >30-40 Gy, >40-50 Gy, and >50 Gy, 10%, 32%, 25%, 30%, and 63%, respectively, reported worse voice quality at 12 months compared with before treatment (P=.011). Results for speech impairment were similar. Glottic larynx dose, N stage, neck dissection, oral cavity dose, and time since chemo-IMRT were univariately associated with either voice worsening or speech impairment. On multivariate analysis, mean GL dose remained independently predictive for both voice quality worsening (8.1%/Gy) and speech impairment (4.3%/Gy). Conclusions: Voice quality worsening and speech impairment after chemo-IMRT for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were frequently reported by patients, underrecognized by clinicians, and

  5. Influence of Pathological Nodal Status and Maximal Standardized Uptake Value of the Primary Tumor and Regional Lymph Nodes on Treatment Plans in Patients With Advanced Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Wang, H.-M.; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Lin, C.-Y.; Ng, S.-H.; Huang, S.-F.; Chen, I.-H.; Hsueh Chuen; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: A better understanding of the prognostic factors in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) may optimize the therapeutic approach. In this study, we sought to investigate whether the combination of clinical information, pathologic results, and preoperative maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) at the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes might improve the prognostic stratification in this patient group. Methods and Materials: A total of 347 consecutive OSCC patients were investigated. All participants underwent fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography within 2 weeks before surgery and neck dissection. The duration of follow-up was at least 24 months in all surviving patients. The optimal cutoff values for SUVmax at the primary tumor (SUVtumor-max) and regional lymph nodes (SUVnodal-max) were selected according to the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate. Independent prognosticators were identified by Cox regression analysis. Results: In multivariate analysis, a cutoff SUVtumor-max of 8.6, a cutoff SUVnodal-max of 5.7, and the presence of pathologic lymph node metastases were found to be significant prognosticators for the 5-year DFS. A scoring system using these three prognostic factors was formulated to define distinct prognostic groups. The 5-year rates for patients with a score between 0 and 3 were as follows: neck control, 94%, 86%, 77%, 59% (p < 0.0001); distant metastases, 1%, 7%, 22%, 47% (p < 0.0001); disease-specific survival, 93%, 85%, 61%, 36%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Based on the study findings, the combined evaluation of pathologic node status and SUVmax at the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes may improve prognostic stratification in OSCC patients.

  6. Oropharyngeal airway changes after rapid maxillary expansion: the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Ortu, Eleonora; Giannoni, Mario; Ortu, Maurizio; Gatto, Roberto; Monaco, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to elucidate the state of the art about how rapid maxillary expansion (RME) produces changes in the oropharyngeal airways in terms of CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography) data during the growth period, according to the available literature. Electronic search was done from January 2009 to April 2014 on PubMed and Scopus databases; in addition manual search was conducted as well. According to keywords, seven papers were eligible for our purpose, but definitely five papers were selected in agreement with the inclusion/exclusion criteria. The current literature suggests that the potential relationship between RME and oropharyngeal airway changes is still unclear. In fact, although the pharyngeal airway changes after the rapid palatal expansion are evident clinically, current orthodontic literature does not provide conclusive evidence about the nature of this relationship. PMID:25126159

  7. Symptom management during and after treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer: A review of the literature and areas for future research

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Heidi; DeRubeis, Mary Beth; Burke, Nancy; Shannon, Melissa; Karsies, Danielle; Wolf, Gregory; Eisbruch, Avi; Worden, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer are at risk for poor outcomes due to the multi-modal nature of treatment and the potential for treatment-related toxicity. Although treatment with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy has drastically reduced the need for a debilitating and disfiguring surgery, treatment related toxicities are often difficult to control. Acute toxicities include mucositis, skin desquamation, depression, cachexia, fatigue and nausea and vomiting. Failure to control these symptoms can adversely affect the patient’s ability to complete their treatment regimen. Although there are many promising new treatments in the area of symptom management for this patient population, a review of the literature reflects the need for more research. PMID:27081644

  8. Simultaneous Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Iradj; Shekarriz, Ramin; Nosrati, Anahita; Orang, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is a rather common cancer in northern Iran. Incidence of adenocarcinoma of esophagus has an increasing trend in Iran. Co-existence of both cancers in one patient is very rare. We report a middle age woman from northern Iran with a typical presentation of esophageal cancer, who was found to have a dual esophageal cancer. The disease was found in the advanced stage with pulmonary metastasis at the presentation. Palliative chemo-radiotherapy induced partial clinical response PMID:26609356

  9. Simultaneous Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Iradj; Shekarriz, Ramin; Nosrati, Anahita; Orang, Elahe

    2015-10-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is a rather common cancer in northern Iran. Incidence of adenocarcinoma of esophagus has an increasing trend in Iran. Co-existence of both cancers in one patient is very rare. We report a middle age woman from northern Iran with a typical presentation of esophageal cancer, who was found to have a dual esophageal cancer. The disease was found in the advanced stage with pulmonary metastasis at the presentation. Palliative chemo-radiotherapy induced partial clinical response. PMID:26609356

  10. The Oropharyngeal Morphology in the Semiaquatic Giant Asian Pond Turtle, Heosemys grandis, and Its Evolutionary Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Monika; Weissenbacher, Anton; Heiss, Egon

    2012-01-01

    The oropharynx as a functional entity plays a fundamental role in feeding. Transitions from aquatic to terrestrial lifestyles in vertebrates demanded major changes of the oropharynx for the required adaptations to a different feeding environment. Extant turtles evolved terrestrial feeding modes in three families (testudinids, emydids, geoemydids)–independently from other amniotes–and are therefore important model organisms to reconstruct morpho-functional changes behind aquatic-terrestrial transitions. In this study we hypothesized that the oropharyngeal morphology in semiaquatic turtles of the geoemydid family shows parallels to testudinids, the only purely terrestrial extant lineage. We provide an in-depth description of the oropharynx in the semiaquatic geoemydid Heosemys grandis by using a combination of micro computed tomography (micro-CT) and subsequent digital in situ 3-D reconstruction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and histology. We show that H. grandis has a large tongue with rough papillose surface and well-developed lingual muscles. The attachment sites of the lingual muscles on the hyolingual skeleton and their courses within the tongue are nearly identical with testudinids. The hyolingual skeleton itself is mainly cartilaginous and shows distinct–but compared to testudinids rather small–anterior extensions of the hyoid body and hypoglossum. Oral glands are well developed in H. grandis but are smaller and simpler than in testudinids. Similarly, oropharyngeal keratinization was minimal and found only in the anterior palate, regions close to the beak, and tongue tip. We conclude that H. grandis shows distinct oropharyngeal morpho-functional adaptations for a terrestrial lifestyle but still retains characters typical for aquatic forms. This makes this species an important example showing the oropharyngeal adaptations behind aquatic-terrestrial transitions in turtles. PMID:23029486

  11. Nasopharyngeal versus oropharyngeal sampling for detection of pneumococcal carriage in adults.

    PubMed

    Watt, James P; O'Brien, Katherine L; Katz, Scott; Bronsdon, Melinda A; Elliott, John; Dallas, Jean; Perilla, Mindy J; Reid, Raymond; Murrow, Laurel; Facklam, Richard; Santosham, Mathuram; Whitney, Cynthia G

    2004-11-01

    Several studies have shown that nasopharyngeal sampling is more sensitive than oropharyngeal sampling for the detection of pneumococcal carriage in children. The data for adults are limited and conflicting. This study was part of a larger study of pneumococcal carriage on the Navajo and White Mountain Apache Reservation following a clinical trial of a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Persons aged 18 years and older living in households with children enrolled in the vaccine trial were eligible. We collected both nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens by passing a flexible calcium alginate wire swab either nasally to the posterior nasopharynx or orally to the posterior oropharynx. Swabs were placed in skim milk-tryptone-glucose-glycerin medium and frozen at -70 degrees C. Pneumococcal isolation was performed by standard techniques. Analyses were based on specimens collected from 1,994 adults living in 1,054 households. Nasopharyngeal specimens (11.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.8 and 12.6%) were significantly more likely to grow pneumococci than were oropharyngeal specimens (5.8%; 95% CI, 4.8 to 6.9%) (P < 0.0001). Few persons had pneumococcal growth from both specimens (1.7%). Therefore, both tests together were more likely to identify pneumococcal carriage (15.2%; 95% CI, 13.7 to 16.9%) than either test alone. Although we found that nasopharyngeal sampling was more sensitive than oropharyngeal sampling, nasopharyngeal sampling alone would have underestimated the prevalence of pneumococcal carriage in this adult population. Sampling both sites may give more accurate results than sampling either site alone in studies of pneumococcal carriage in adults. PMID:15528682

  12. Simplified Designing and Insetting of the Free Flap in Reconstructing Oral and/or Oropharyngeal Defect.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jiyoung; Yim, Ji Hong; Kim, Eun Key

    2015-09-01

    Reconstructing oral and/or oropharyngeal defect after tumor ablation requires anatomic restoration of the complex structures to maximize functional outcomes. This study introduces a simple and adjustable way of designing and insetting of a free flap in such reconstruction. Patients who received free flap reconstruction of oral and/or oropharyngeal defect with 33% to 66% of the native tongue left intact after resection of the tumor were enrolled and reviewed. Flap was designed as an oval shape according to the maximum width and length of the defect, and sutured from the most posterior part. Natural imbrication of the flap formed by anterior pulling of the tongue was marked and de-epithelized to create a three-dimensional shape. A total of 30 patients met the inclusion criteria of this study and the median follow-up was 32 months. All flaps survived after 1 case of venous reanastomosis. The average hospital stay was 23.7 days. All patients were decannulated. Twenty (66.7%) patients could eat a normal or soft diet, and 19 (63.3%) patients had normal or intelligible speech. Simplified designing of the flap with adjustable tailoring allowed for easy and effective way of free flap oral and/or oropharyngeal reconstruction. De-epithelization (or trimming) of the naturally imbricated area during the procedure of insetting created a bilobed shape in effect to conform to the three-dimensional defect.

  13. Optimal management of oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis in patients living with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Jose A

    2010-01-01

    Mucocutaneous candidiasis is frequently one of the first signs of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Over 90% of patients with AIDS will develop oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) at some time during their illness. Although numerous antifungal agents are available, azoles, both topical (clotrimazole) and systemic (fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole) have replaced older topical antifungals (gentian violet and nystatin) in the management of oropharyngeal candidiasis in these patients. The systemic azoles, are generally safe and effective agents in HIV-infected patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis. A constant concern in these patients is relapse, which is dependent on the degree of immunosuppression commonly seen after topical therapy, rather than with systemic azole therapy. Candida esophagitis (CE) is also an important concern since it occurs in more than 10% of patients with AIDS and can lead to a decrease in oral intake and associated weight loss. Fluconazole has become the most widely used antifungal in the management of mucosal candidiasis. However, itraconazole and posaconazole have similar clinical response rates as fluconazole and are also effective alternative agents. In patients with fluconazole-refractory mucosal candidiasis, treatment options now include itraconazole solution, voriconazole, posaconazole, and the newer echinocandins (caspofungin, micafungin, and anidulafungin). PMID:22096388

  14. Comparison between bioluminescence imaging technique and CFU count for the study of oropharyngeal candidiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Elena; Roselletti, Elena; Luciano, Eugenio; Sabbatini, Samuele; Mosci, Paolo; Pericolini, Eva

    2015-05-01

    We recently described a bioluminescence in vivo imaging technique, representing a powerful tool to test the real-time progression of oropharyngeal candidiasis, hence potentially useful to evaluate the efficacy of antifungal therapies. In this study, the in vivo imaging technique was compared with CFU measurement of target organs (tongue, esophagus and stomach) for monitoring and quantifying oropharyngeal candidiasis. We have correlated these two analytical methods at different times post-infection using engineered, luminescent Candida albicans in mice rendered susceptible to oral candidiasis by cortisone-acetate. Scatter plots, Pearson correlation and Student's t test were used to compare the methods. We observed that the bioluminescence in vivo imaging technique was more reliable than CFU counts in detecting early infection of, and its extent in, the oral cavity of the mouse. This was also evident following the introduction of a variable such as treatment with fluconazole. The results described in this study could validate the bioluminescence in vivo imaging technique as a method to monitor and quantify oropharyngeal candidiasis and to assess early discovery of active compounds in vivo.

  15. Oropharyngeal Cancer Survival: A Population-Based Study of Patients Diagnosed between 1978 and 2002

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Dyego Leandro Bezerra; Bernal, María Milagros; Jerez Roig, Javier; Curado, Maria Paula

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This paper aims at studying oropharyngeal cancer survival from the Population-Based Cancer Registry of Zaragoza, Spain, for the 1978–2002 period. Methods. The survival rates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the automated calculation method of the Catalan Institute of Oncology was utilized to obtain the relative survival. Results. The oropharyngeal cancer survival rate was 61.3% in the first year and 33.9% in the fifth year. One-year relative survival was 62.2% (CI 95%: 57.4–67.4), and five-year relative survival was 36.6% (CI 95%: 31.8–42.1). Comparison of survival rates by sex revealed statistically significant differences (P value = 0.017) with better survival in women. There were no differences when comparing the three age groups and the three studied time periods 1978–1986, 1987–1994, and 1995–2002. Conclusions. The data suggests that there were no significant changes in oropharyngeal cancer survival in the province of Zaragoza throughout the years. PMID:22928119

  16. Geographic variation in human papillomavirus–related oropharyngeal cancer: Data from 4 multinational randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Natalie; Compton, Natalie; Robinson, Max; Powell, Ned; Biswas–Baldwin, Nigel; Paleri, Vindh; Hartley, Andrew; Fresco, Lydia; Al‐Booz, Hoda; Junor, Elizabeth; El‐Hariry, Iman; Roberts, Sally; Harrington, Kevin; Ang, K. Kian; Dunn, Janet; Woodman, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background There are variations in the proportions of head and neck cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) between countries and regions. It is unclear if these are true variations or due to different study designs and assays. Methods We tested formalin‐fixed paraffin‐embedded diagnostic biopsies for p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV‐DNA (by polymerase chain reaction [PCR] and in situ hybridization [ISH]) using validated protocols on samples from 801 patients with head and neck cancer recruited prospectively between 2006 and 2011 in 4 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Results Twenty‐one percent of patients (170 of 801) showed both HPV‐DNA and p16‐positivity, detected almost exclusively in oropharyngeal cancer (55%; 15 of 302); and only 1% of the patients (5 of 499) with nonoropharyngeal cancer were HPV positive. HPV‐positive oropharyngeal cancer differed between Western and Eastern Europe (37%, 155 of 422 vs 6%, 8 of 144; p < .0001) and between Western Europe and Asia (37% vs 2%; 4 of 217; p < .0001). Other independent determinants of HPV positivity were tumor site and smoking. Conclusion This is the first study to establish geographic variability as an independent risk factor in HPV‐positive oropharyngeal cancer prevalence, with higher prevalence in Western Europe. © 2016 The Authors Head & Neck Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1863–E1869, 2016 PMID:26749143

  17. Complications in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma in patients with systemic sclerosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Coček, Ales; Hahn, Ales; Ambruš, Miloslav; Valešová, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a chronic, progressive disease with an extremely poor prognosis. The incidence of malignant tumors in patients with systemic sclerosis is increased when compared with that of the general population. In certain malignancies, systemic sclerosis presents as a paraneoplastic process. The symptoms of sclerosis in the organs of the head and neck often overlap with symptoms of malignant diseases, which may increase the difficulty of a differential diagnosis. Additionally, the presence of sclerosis may complicate standard examination procedures, due to poor access to the oral cavity and oropharynx. When considering treatment options, it is important to evaluate the surgical and oncological risks to soft tissues of the head and neck with regard to both diseases, as well as the relatively poor prognosis for systemic sclerosis and oropharyngeal cancer. The low incidence of patients with systemic sclerosis and oropharyngeal carcinoma together presents a clear case for a casuistic approach. Based upon our own experience, we can attest to the difficulty of treating such patients. However, we have no evidence to indicate that these patients have reduced tolerance to surgical treatments. The current study presents the case of a 47-year-old female with systemic sclerosis, who was diagnosed with oropharyngeal carcinoma. The patient initially tolerated radiotherapy treatment well, however post-radiotherapy complications occurred. Despite many enigmatic indications to the contrary, it appears that the complications in this instance may be due to late toxicity from radiotherapy.

  18. Complications in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma in patients with systemic sclerosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ČOČEK, ALES; HAHN, ALES; AMBRUŠ, MILOSLAV; VALEŠOVÁ, MARIE

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a chronic, progressive disease with an extremely poor prognosis. The incidence of malignant tumors in patients with systemic sclerosis is increased when compared with that of the general population. In certain malignancies, systemic sclerosis presents as a paraneoplastic process. The symptoms of sclerosis in the organs of the head and neck often overlap with symptoms of malignant diseases, which may increase the difficulty of a differential diagnosis. Additionally, the presence of sclerosis may complicate standard examination procedures, due to poor access to the oral cavity and oropharynx. When considering treatment options, it is important to evaluate the surgical and oncological risks to soft tissues of the head and neck with regard to both diseases, as well as the relatively poor prognosis for systemic sclerosis and oropharyngeal cancer. The low incidence of patients with systemic sclerosis and oropharyngeal carcinoma together presents a clear case for a casuistic approach. Based upon our own experience, we can attest to the difficulty of treating such patients. However, we have no evidence to indicate that these patients have reduced tolerance to surgical treatments. The current study presents the case of a 47-year-old female with systemic sclerosis, who was diagnosed with oropharyngeal carcinoma. The patient initially tolerated radiotherapy treatment well, however post-radiotherapy complications occurred. Despite many enigmatic indications to the contrary, it appears that the complications in this instance may be due to late toxicity from radiotherapy. PMID:25435929

  19. Oropharyngeal 24-Hour pH Monitoring in Children With Airway-Related Problems

    PubMed Central

    Mesallam, Tamer A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Diagnosis and clinical presentation of pediatric laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is still controversial. The aims of this work were to study the possibility of performing 24-hour oropharyngeal pH monitoring for children in the outpatient clinic setup and to explore the results of this test in correlation to airway-related problems. Methods In this descriptive qualitative study, 26 children suffering from airway-related problems were included. Oropharyngeal 24-hour pH monitoring was performed for all subjects in the outpatient clinic setting. The distribution of airway diagnoses among the study group was studied versus the results of the pH monitoring. Results There were 16 males and 10 females participated in the study with a mean age of 6.88 (SD, ±5.77) years. Thirty-five percent of the patients were under the age of 3 years (range, 11 months to 3 years). Eight-five percent of the patients tolerated the pH probe insertion and completed 24-hour of pH recording. Laryngomalacia and subglottic stenosis (SGS) were more frequently reported in the positive LPR patients (77%). Conclusion Oropharyngeal 24-hour pH monitoring can be conducted for children in the outpatient setup even in young age children below 3 years old. Among the positive LPR group, SGS and laryngomalacia were the most commonly reported airway findings. PMID:27090271

  20. Enrichment of a squamous carcinoma vaccine.

    PubMed

    O-Sullivan, InSug; Chopra, Amla; Cohen, Edward P

    2007-03-01

    We describe a new vaccination strategy for squamous cell carcinoma. In a mouse model, the vaccine is prepared by transfer of unfractionated DNA-fragments (25 kb) from KLN205 cells, a squamous carcinoma cell line (DBA/2 mouse origin [H-2(d)]) into LM cells, a highly immunogenic mouse fibroblast cell line that expresses allogeneic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-determinants (H-2(k)). The number of vaccine cells can then be expanded for multiple immunizations, as desired. As only a small proportion of the transfected cell population was expected to have incorporated DNA segments that included genes specifying antigens associated with the squamous carcinoma cells, we devised a novel strategy to enrich the vaccine for cells that induced immunity to the squamous carcinoma cells. Twenty-five percent of tumor-bearing mice treated by immunization with the vaccine appeared to have rejected the squamous carcinoma cells; they survived indefinitely (more than 70 days). The therapeutic benefits of the enriched vaccine could be further enhanced by treating the tumor-bearing mice with paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent, followed by immunization with the enriched vaccine. Under these circumstances, 75% of mice with squamous carcinoma appeared to have rejected the squamous carcinoma cells. Toxic effects including the development of autoimmune disease were not detected in tumor-bearing mice receiving the combined therapy.

  1. Identification of Prognostic Biomarkers for Progression of Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Carcinoma, Squamous Cell; Carcinoma, Squamous; Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Neoplasms; Cancer of Lung; Cancer of the Lung; Lung Cancer; Neoplasms, Lung; Neoplasms, Pulmonary; Pulmonary Cancer; Pulmonary Neoplasms

  2. Xerostomia After Treatment for Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Using the University of Washington Saliva Domain and a Xerostomia-Related Quality-of-Life Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Simon N.; Johnson, Ian A.; Lowe, Derek

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: The first aim of this study was to identify which clinical factors are associated with xerostomia in patients after treatment for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, using the Xerostomia-Related Quality-of-Life Scale (XeQoLS) and the University of Washington Quality-of-Life Questionnaire Version 4 dry mouth item (UW-QOL v4). The second aim was to compare these two questionnaires and postulate a cutoff in the UW-QOL below which patients are doing sufficient badly to warrant further evaluation and support. Methods and Materials: In all, 371 patients alive and disease free treated between 1992 and 2005 were sent the survey, of whom 250 (67%) responded. Various clinical factors correlated with xerostomia, particularly adjuvant radiotherapy and Pstage. Results: In logistic regression analyses to predict three or more problems on the XeQoLS, only adjuvant radiotherapy (p < 0.001) was significant at the 5% level. There were significant (p < 0.001) correlations between the XeQoLS scores (total average and domain) with all the UW-QOL domain scores, the strongest with swallowing (-0.69), taste (-0.64), chewing (-0.64), mood (-0.60), and saliva (-0.59) domains. Patients scoring <70 (i.e., 0 or 30) on the UW-QOL could be used as a screening cutoff because it formed 1 in 5 of all patients (49/242) but accounted for half (299/566) of the significant problems generated by the XeQoLS. This also identified 13/21 patients with 10 or more problems. Conclusion: The UW-QOL saliva domain seems to be a suitable means of screening for dry mouth in head-and-neck clinics and could be used to trigger interventions.

  3. Maximizing Benefits from Maintenance Pemetrexed with Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Oligoprogressive Non-Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shao-Lun; Hsu, Feng-Ming; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Ho, Chao-Chi; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance pemetrexed offers survival benefit with well-tolerated toxicities for advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We present 3 consecutively enrolled patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC, receiving stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for oligoprogressive disease during maintenance pemetrexed. All of them had sustained local control of thoracic oligoprogression after the SABR, while maintenance pemetrexed were kept for additionally long progression-free interval. SABR targeting oligoprogression with continued pemetrexed is an effective and safe approach to extend exposure of maintenance pemetrexed, thus maximizing the benefit from it. PMID:27721771

  4. Oropharyngeal morphology in the basal tortoise Manouria emys emys with comments on form and function of the testudinid tongue.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Egon; Natchev, Nikolay; Schwaha, Thomas; Salaberger, Dietmar; Lemell, Patrick; Beisser, Christian; Weisgram, Josef

    2011-10-01

    In tetrapods, the ability to ingest food on land is based on certain morphological features of the oropharynx in general and the feeding apparatus in particular. Recent paleoecological studies imply that terrestrial feeding has evolved secondarily in turtles, so they had to meet the morphological oropharyngeal requirements independently to other amniotes. This study is designed to improve our limited knowledge about the oropharyngeal morphology of tortoises by analyzing in detail the oropharynx in Manouria emys emys. Special emphasis is placed on the form and function of the tongue. Even if Manouria is considered a basal member of the only terrestrial turtle clade and was hypothesized to have retained some features reflecting an aquatic ancestry, Manouria shows oropharyngeal characteristics found in more derived testudinids. Accordingly, the oropharyngeal cavity in Manouria is richly structured and the glands are large and complexly organized. The tongue is large and fleshy and bears numerous slender papillae lacking lingual muscles. The hyolingual skeleton is mainly cartilaginous, and the enlarged anterior elements support the tongue and provide insertion sides for the well-developed lingual muscles, which show striking differences to other reptiles. We conclude that the oropharyngeal design in Manouria differs clearly from semiaquatic and aquatic turtles, as well as from other reptilian sauropsids.

  5. Prognostic Significance of Tumor Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1{alpha} Expression for Outcome After Radiotherapy in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Priyamal; Slevin, Nick J.; Sloan, Philip; Valentine, Helen; Cresswell, Jo; Ryder, David; Price, Patricia; Homer, Jarrod J.; West, Catharine

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a heterogeneous group of patients in terms of subsite, treatment, and biology. Currently most management decisions are based on clinical parameters with little appreciation of patient differences in underlying tumor biology. We investigated the prognostic significance of clinicopathologic features and tumor hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) expression in a homogeneous series of patients who underwent radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: An audit identified 133 consecutive patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil or tongue base. All patients received primary radiotherapy between 1996 and 2001. Tumor HIF-1{alpha} expression was examined in 79 patients. Results: Features associated with poor locoregional control were low Hb level (p = 0.05) and advancing T (p = 0.008), N (p = 0.03), and disease (p = 0.008) stage. HIF-1{alpha} expression was a more significant adverse prognostic factor in the tonsil (hazard ratio [HR], 23.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]. 3.04-176.7) than the tongue-base tumor (HR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.14-7.19) group (p = 0.03, test for interaction). High tumor HIF-1{alpha} expression was associated with low blood Hb levels (p = 0.03). In a multivariate analysis HIF-1{alpha} expression retained prognostic significance for locoregional control (HR, 7.10; 95% CI, 3.07-16.43) and cancer-specific survival (HR, 9.19; 95% CI, 3.90-21.6). Conclusions: There are significant differences in radiation therapy outcome within a homogeneous subsite of the oropharynx related to molecular marker expression. The work highlights the importance of studying homogeneous groups of patients in HNSCC, and the complex interrelationships between tumor biology and clinicopathologic factors. The establishment of tumor-type specific markers would represent a major advance in this area.

  6. Depsipeptide in Unresectable Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-29

    Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  7. Human papillomavirus infection in oral squamous cell carcinomas from Chilean patients.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Montserrat; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Pennacchiotti, Gina; Carrillo, Diego; Muñoz, Juan P; Peña, Nelson; Montes, Rodrigo; Lobos, Nelson; Aguayo, Francisco

    2015-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causal agent of cervical, anogenital and a subset of oropharyngeal carcinomas. In addition, the role of HPV in oral carcinogenesis has been suggested, although the findings are inconclusive. In this study, using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genotyping by specific PCR and DNA sequencing, we analyzed the HPV presence in 80 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) from Chilean subjects. In addition, we determined the expression of p16, p53, pRb and Ki-67 using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The CDKN2A (p16) promoter methylation was evaluated using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). HPV sequences were found in 9/80 (11%) OSCCs. Non-statistically significant association with p53, pRb, Ki-67 and p16 levels were found (p=0.77; 0.29; 0.83; 0.21, respectively). HPV-16 and 18 were the most prevalent HPV genotypes in 8/9 (89%) OSCCs. In addition, CDKN2A (p16) was methylated in 39% of OSCCs. No association with HPV presence (p=0.917) was found. These results suggest that HPV positive OSCCs are entities that do not resemble the molecular alterations of HPV-associated tumors in a Chilean population. More studies are warranted to determine the role of HPV in OSCCs.

  8. Atypical squamous cells in the urine revealing endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium with squamous cell differentiation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinong; Otis, Christopher N; Florence, Roxanne R

    2015-01-01

    Urine cytology is mainly used to detect urothelial carcinoma (UC), especially for high-grade lesions including urothelial carcinoma in situ. Benign squamous cells are often seen in the urine specimens of women, they are either exfoliated from the trigone area of the bladder, the urethra, or the cervicovaginal region. However, abnormal squamous cells in the urine raise concerns of abnormalities of the urinary tract and cervicovaginal area which range from squamous metaplasia of the urothelium, a cervicovaginal squamous intraepithelial lesion, condyloma acuminatum of the bladder, UC with squamous differentiation, and squamous cell carcinoma. We present here a unique case of atypical squamous cells (ASCs) in the urine subsequently leading to the diagnosis of endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium with squamous differentiation. The presence of ASCs in voided urine is a rare finding that may indicate an underlying malignancy. Careful evaluation of squamous cells in the urine is an important part of our daily cytopathology practice.

  9. Risk Factors and Dose-Effect Relationship for Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis in Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik Jae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Yong Bae; Yoo, Sei Whan; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Gwi Eon; Choi, Eun Chang; Cha, In Ho

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze risk factors and the dose-effect relationship for osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible after radiotherapy of oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: One-hundred ninety-eight patients with oral (45%) and oropharyngeal cancer (55%) who had received external radiotherapy between 1990 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had a dental evaluation before radiotherapy. The median radiation dose was 60 Gy (range, 16-75 Gy), and the median biologically effective dose for late effects (BED{sub late}) in bone was 114 Gy{sub 2} (range, 30-167 Gy{sub 2}). Results: The frequency of ORN was 13 patients (6.6%). Among patients with mandibular surgery, eight had ORN at the surgical site. Among patients without mandibular surgery, five patients had ORN on the molar area of the mandible. The median time to ORN was 22 months (range, 1-69 months). Univariate analysis revealed that mandibular surgery and Co-60 were significant risk factors for ORN (p = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively). In multivariate analysis, mandibular surgery was the most important factor (p = 0.001). High radiation doses over BED 102.6 Gy{sub 2} (conventional dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction) were also a significant factor for ORN (p = 0.008) and showed a positive dose-effect relationship in logistic regression (p = 0.04) for patients who had undergone mandibular surgery. Conclusions: Mandibular surgery was the most significant risk factor for ORN of mandible in oral and oropharyngeal cancers patients. A BED of 102.6 Gy{sub 2} or higher to the mandible also significantly increases the risk of ORN.

  10. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy With Helical Tomotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Preliminary Result

    SciTech Connect

    Shueng, Pei-Wei; Wu, Le-Jung; Chen, Shiou-Yi

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To review the experience with and evaluate the treatment plan for helical tomotherapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between November 1, 2006 and January 31, 2009, 10 histologically confirmed oropharyngeal cancer patients were enrolled. All patients received definitive concurrent chemoradiation with helical tomotherapy. The prescription dose to the gross tumor planning target volume, the high-risk subclinical area, and the low-risk subclinical area was 70Gy, 63Gy, and 56Gy, respectively. During radiotherapy, all patients were treated with cisplatin, 30mg/m{sup 2}, plus 5-fluorouracil (425mg/m{sup 2})/leucovorin (30mg/m{sup 2}) intravenously weekly. Toxicity of treatment was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Several parameters, including maximal or median dose to critical organs, uniformity index, and conformal index, were evaluated from dose-volume histograms. Results: The mean survival was 18 months (range, 7-22 months). The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates at 18 months were 67%, 70%, 80%, and 100%, respectively. The average for uniformity index and conformal index was 1.05 and 1.26, respectively. The mean of median dose for right side and left side parotid glands was 23.5 and 23.9Gy, respectively. No Grade 3 toxicity for dermatitis and body weight loss and only one instance of Grade 3 mucositis were noted. Conclusion: Helical tomotherapy achieved encouraging clinical outcomes in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment toxicity was acceptable, even in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy. Long-term follow-up is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  11. Evaluation of nasal and oropharyngeal flora in patients with acne vulgaris according to treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ozuguz, Pınar; Callioglu, Elif E; Tulaci, Kamil G; Kacar, Seval D; Balta, Ilknur; Asik, Gulsah; Karatas, Serap; Karaca, Semsettin

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in nasal and oropharyngeal flora in patients with acne during treatments with tetracycline and isotretinoin. Swab specimens were taken from the right and left nasal cavities and oropharynx of 55 patients with acne and 20 healthy volunteers who were admitted to the dermatology department (Etlik Educational and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey) before the administration of treatment and in the third month of treatment. Study participants were divided into four groups as follows: patients with acne on topical treatment only, systemic isotretinoin, and systemic tetracycline, and the control group. Of 55 patients with acne, 18 were male and 37 were female. The mean age of the patients and the control group was 22.21 ± 4.22 and 21.95 ± 7.64, respectively. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the nasal flora of five patients, normal flora was suppressed in the oropharyngeal cultures of seven patients, and normal flora grew in the cultures of the other 20 patients who were on tetracycline treatment. On the other hand, normal flora grew in the nasal and oropharyngeal cultures of all the patients who were on isotretinoin treatment. Treatment options and follow-up procedures for acne vulgaris may lead to the development of bacterial resistance and damage to flora. In particular, systemic tetracycline treatment leads to changes in flora of the nose and throat in patients with acne with an increased carriage of S. aureus. Therefore, careful attention should be paid to the duration of tetracycline treatment in order to not increase the risk of disturbance of microbial flora.

  12. Dose Uncertainties in IMPT for Oropharyngeal Cancer in the Presence of Anatomical, Range, and Setup Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kraan, Aafke C.; Water, Steven van de; Teguh, David N.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Madden, Tom; Kooy, Hanne M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties influence the dose delivered with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), but clinical quantification of these errors for oropharyngeal cancer is lacking. We quantified these factors and investigated treatment fidelity, that is, robustness, as influenced by adaptive planning and by applying more beam directions. Methods and Materials: We used an in-house treatment planning system with multicriteria optimization of pencil beam energies, directions, and weights to create treatment plans for 3-, 5-, and 7-beam directions for 10 oropharyngeal cancer patients. The dose prescription was a simultaneously integrated boost scheme, prescribing 66 Gy to primary tumor and positive neck levels (clinical target volume-66 Gy; CTV-66 Gy) and 54 Gy to elective neck levels (CTV-54 Gy). Doses were recalculated in 3700 simulations of setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties. Repeat computed tomography (CT) scans were used to evaluate an adaptive planning strategy using nonrigid registration for dose accumulation. Results: For the recalculated 3-beam plans including all treatment uncertainty sources, only 69% (CTV-66 Gy) and 88% (CTV-54 Gy) of the simulations had a dose received by 98% of the target volume (D98%) >95% of the prescription dose. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed considerable spread around planned values. Causes for major deviations were mixed. Adaptive planning based on repeat imaging positively affected dose delivery accuracy: in the presence of the other errors, percentages of treatments with D98% >95% increased to 96% (CTV-66 Gy) and 100% (CTV-54 Gy). Plans with more beam directions were not more robust. Conclusions: For oropharyngeal cancer patients, treatment uncertainties can result in significant differences between planned and delivered IMPT doses. Given the mixed causes for major deviations, we advise repeat diagnostic CT scans during treatment, recalculation of the dose, and if required, adaptive

  13. Species distribution & antifungal susceptibility pattern of oropharyngeal Candida isolates from human immunodeficiency virus infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Das, Partha Pratim; Saikia, Lahari; Nath, Reema; Phukan, Sanjib Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The changing spectrum of Candida species in causation of oropharyngeal candidiasis and their antifungal susceptibility pattern among the HIV infected individuals has made the identification to species level mandatory and detection of drug resistance necessary for patient care. The present study was carried out to determine the species distribution and antifungal susceptibility profile of oral Candida isolates colonizing or infecting both HIV seropositive and seronegative individuals. Methods: A case-control study was conducted including 141 consecutive, non-repeat HIV-seropositive individuals and an equal number of sex and age matched HIV-seronegative control. Speciation of the oropharyngeal Candida isolates was done using standard yeast identification protocol. Antifungal susceptibility testing was done by the disk-diffusion method as well as by Fungitest method. Results: From the 59 culture positive HIV seropositive cases, 61 Candida isolates were recovered; Candida albicans (n=47, 77.0%), C. dubliniensis (n=9, 14.7%), C. parapsilosis (n=2, 3.2%), C. glabrata (n=2, 3.2%), and C. famata (n=1, 1.6%). Candida colonization in HIV-seropositive individuals was significantly higher than that of HIV-seronegative (control) group. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed (n=6, 9.3%) C. albicans isolates resistant to voriconazole and fluconazole by disk-diffusion method whereas no resistance was seen by Fungitest method. Interpretation & conclusions: C. albicans was the commonest Candida species infecting or colonizing HIV seropositive individuals. Oropharyngeal Candida isolates had high level susceptibility to all the major antifungals commonly in use. Increased level of immunosuppression in HIV-seropositives and drug resistance of non-albicans Candida species makes identification and susceptibility testing of Candida species necessary in different geographical areas of the country. PMID:27377507

  14. Azole resistance in oropharyngeal Candida albicans strains isolated from patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    He, X; Tiballi, R N; Zarins, L T; Bradley, S F; Sangeorzan, J A; Kauffman, C A

    1994-01-01

    For 212 oropharyngeal isolates of Candida albicans, the fluconazole MICs for 50 and 90% of strains tested were 0.5 and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively, and those of itraconazole were 0.05 and 0.2 micrograms/ml, respectively. Of 16 isolates for which fluconazole MICs were > 64 micrograms/ml, itraconazole MICs for 14 were < or = 0.8 micrograms/ml and for 2 were > 6.4 micrograms/ml. Most fluconazole-resistant strains remained susceptible to itraconazole; whether itraconazole will prove effective for refractory thrush remains to be shown. PMID:7840596

  15. Outbreak of oral-oropharyngeal anthrax: an unusual manifestation of human infection with Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Sirisanthana, T; Navachareon, N; Tharavichitkul, P; Sirisanthana, V; Brown, A E

    1984-01-01

    An oral-oropharyngeal form of human anthrax is described in 24 individuals. The cases occurred as an epidemic in northern Thailand, concurrent with an epidemic of the common cutaneous form. This syndrome is a potentially fatal, febrile illness, characterized by a mucosal lesion in the oral cavity and/or oropharynx which can progress to pseudomembranous necrosis, and to cervical adenopathy and edema. Cattle and water buffaloes, recently arrived from Burma and eaten raw or undercooked, were the probable source of the infection. Determination of etiology was based on both microbiologic and epidemiologic evidence. The clinical syndrome and epidemiology are discussed.

  16. Correlation between in vitro and in vivo antifungal activities in experimental fluconazole-resistant oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T J; Gonzalez, C E; Piscitelli, S; Bacher, J D; Peter, J; Torres, R; Shetti, D; Katsov, V; Kligys, K; Lyman, C A

    2000-06-01

    Oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis (OPEC) is a frequent opportunistic mycosis in immunocompromised patients. Azole-resistant OPEC is a refractory form of this infection occurring particularly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. The procedures developed by the Antifungal Subcommittee of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) are an important advance in standardization of in vitro antifungal susceptibility methodology. In order to further understand the relationship between NCCLS methodology and antifungal therapeutic response, we studied the potential correlation between in vitro susceptibility to fluconazole and in vivo response in a rabbit model of fluconazole-resistant OPEC. MICs of fluconazole were determined by NCCLS methods. Three fluconazole-susceptible (FS) (MIC, /=64 microgram/ml) isolates of Candida albicans from prospectively monitored HIV-infected children with OPEC were studied. FR isolates were recovered from children with severe OPEC refractory to fluconazole, and FS isolates were recovered from those with mucosal candidiasis responsive to fluconazole. Fluconazole at 2 mg/kg of body weight/day was administered to infected animals for 7 days. The concentrations of fluconazole in plasma were maintained above the MICs for FS isolates throughout the dosing interval. Fluconazole concentrations in the esophagus were greater than or equal to those in plasma. Rabbits infected with FS isolates and treated with fluconazole had significant reductions in oral mucosal quantitative cultures (P < 0.001) and tissue burden of C. albicans in tongue, soft palate, and esophagus (P < 0.001). In comparison, rabbits infected with FR isolates were unresponsive to fluconazole and had no reduction in oral mucosal quantitative cultures or tissue burden of C. albicans versus untreated controls. We conclude that there is a strong correlation between in vitro

  17. Effect of Recombinant Human Deoxyribonuclease on Oropharyngeal Secretions in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancers Treated With Radiochemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Bharat B.; Wang, Edward; Sejpal, Samir; Agulnik, Mark; Mittal, Amit; Harris, Kirk

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: The current study examined the effect of recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) on quality of life (QOL) measures, clinical improvement, and DNA content of thick oropharyngeal secretions (OPS) in patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancers. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with local-regional advanced H and N cancer receiving chemoradiationtherapy (CRT) were randomized to receive either placebo or rhDNase. Endpoints included MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Head and Neck (FACT-NH) scores, along with clinical assessment and DNA concentration of OPS. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in patients' QOL outcomes over the study period. Both groups showed an increase in symptom and interference scores, although patients in the rhDNase group showed a greater decline in both scores during the 3 months posttreatment. Similarly, both groups showed a decline in physical and functional well being but recovered in the 3 months posttreatment follow-up, with the rhDNase group exhibiting speedier recovery. Patients in the rhDNase group exhibited significant clinical improvement in OPS, blindly assessed by a physician, compared with the placebo group (67% vs 27%, respectively; P=.046). The rhDNase group showed no change in OPS-DNA concentration, although the placebo group showed a significant increase in DNA concentration during the drug trial (P=.045). There was no differences in acute toxicities between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Our preliminary data suggest that rhDNase did not significantly improve study primary endpoints of QOL measures compared with the placebo group. However, there was a significant improvement in secondary endpoints of clinically assessed OPS and DNA concentration compared with placebo in H and N cancer patients treated with CRT. Further investigation in larger numbers of patients is warranted.

  18. Verrucous carcinomas of the head and neck, including those with associated squamous cell carcinoma, lack transcriptionally active high-risk human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kalyani R; Chernock, Rebecca D; Zhang, Tian R; Wang, Xiaowei; El-Mofty, Samir K; Lewis, James S

    2013-11-01

    Most oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and histologic variants harbor transcriptionally active human papillomavirus (HPV). While HPV DNA can be found in many non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinomas, transcriptionally active HPV is rare. Verrucous carcinoma is a variant with bland cytology, warty appearance, locally destructive growth, and lack of metastasis when lacking a frankly invasive carcinoma component. Studies have shown variable rates of HPV DNA and p16 protein expression in such tumors but still have not clearly addressed if the virus has biological activity or clinical relevance in the positive cases. Department files were searched for verrucous neoplasms, including pure verrucous carcinoma, verrucous carcinoma with dysplasia or minimal invasion, and SCC arising in verrucous carcinoma (ie, having a major component of frankly invasive carcinoma). p16 immunohistochemistry, HPV DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and E6/E7 mRNA reverse transcription PCR for high-risk HPV types were performed. Of the 49 cases, 6 (12.2%) showed strong (>50%) staining for p16. HPV DNA was detected in 7/49 (14.3%) cases, but only one case was positive for both p16, and HPV DNA. A total of 36 cases yielded sufficient RNA for RT-PCR (18 verrucous carcinomas, 13 atypical verrucous carcinomas, and 5 SCC arising in verrucous carcinoma). All 36 were negative, including the four p16-positive and three HPV DNA-positive tumors tested. Although a minority of verrucous carcinoma lesions are p16 and HPV DNA positive, transcriptionally active high-risk HPV is uniformly absent. These findings argue that verrucous carcinoma and its related squamous cell carcinomas are not HPV-driven tumors.

  19. The Oropharyngeal Airway in Young Adults with Skeletal Class II and Class III Deformities: A 3-D Morphometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jayaratne, Yasas Shri Nalaka; Zwahlen, Roger Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Objectives 1) To determine the accuracy and reliability of an automated anthropometric measurement software for the oropharyngeal airway and 2) To compare the anthropometric dimensions of the oropharyngeal airway in skeletal class II and III deformity patients. Methods Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans of 62 patients with skeletal class II or III deformities were used for this study. Volumetric, linear and surface area measurements retroglossal (RG) and retropalatal (RP) compartments of the oropharyngeal airway was measured with the 3dMDVultus software. Accuracy of automated anthropometric pharyngeal airway measurements was assessed using an airway phantom. Results The software was found to be reasonably accurate for measuring dimensions of air passages. The total oropharyngeal volume was significantly greater in the skeletal class III deformity group (16.7 ± 9.04 mm3) compared with class II subjects (11.87 ± 4.01 mm3). The average surface area of both the RG and RP compartments were significantly larger in the class III deformity group. The most constricted area in the RG and RP airway was significantly larger in individuals with skeletal class III deformity. The anterior-posterior (AP) length of this constriction was significantly greater in skeletal class III individuals in both compartments, whereas the width of the constriction was not significantly different between the two groups in both compartments. The RP compartment was larger but less uniform than the RG compartment in both skeletal deformities. Conclusion Significant differences were observed in morphological characteristics of the oropharyngeal airway in individuals with skeletal class II and III deformities. This information may be valuable for surgeons in orthognathic treatment planning, especially for mandibular setback surgery that might compromise the oropharyngeal patency. PMID:26901313

  20. Fluorescence detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma using Hyperflav

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Rawicz, Andrew H.; Zhang, Lewei

    2000-05-01

    A novel hypericin-based drug HyperflavTM has been evaluated for light-induced fluorescence detection of oral cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma was induced with carcinogenic agent in right pouches of forty hamsters (20/20 males/females). Solution of HyperflavTM was sprinkled into stomach with a single dose 0.2 - 4 mg of pure hypericin per kg b.w. and 4 - 8 hours before fluorescence analysis. In two animal groups with cancer symptoms the autofluorescence and hypericin-induced fluorescence were taken under 442 nm excitation. The buccal mucosa and adjacent areas were measured fiberoptically in-vivo and in-vitro using orange/green ratio (610/540). The in-vivo fluorescence imaging of malignant areas was conducted to assist the biopsy guidance and to compare with white-light images. Histological and morphological analyses were performed from biopsies. Oral squamous cell carcinoma in its early stage demonstrated specific higher 610/540 ratio for 37 tested hamsters. Advanced state involved another higher fluorescence maximum around 640 nm that in our opinion caused by strong porphyrin-induced native fluorescence. Such deformation of fluorescence spectra may lead to inadequate perception of diseased tissue area. To avoid this problem the autofluorescence spectra & images were added. HyperflavTM application is promising for demarcation of early oral cancer when combined with autofluorescence measurements.

  1. Comprehensive multiplatform biomarker analysis of 199 anal squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Smaglo, Brandon G.; Tesfaye, Anteneh; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Meyer, Joshua E.; Wang, Jue; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep; Arguello, David; Boland, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) is a rare, HPV-associated malignancy typically diagnosed in early stages and definitively treated with chemoradiation. In situations where patients exhibit metastatic or recurrent disease, treatment options are severely limited. In this study, molecular alterations were identified that could be used to aid in therapeutic decisions for patients with metastatic or recurrent anal squamous cell carcinoma. Specimens from patients with this cancer were tested via a multiplatform profiling service (Caris Life Sciences, Phoenix, AZ) consisting of gene sequencing, protein expression by immunohistochemistry, and gene amplification with in situ hybridization. Utilizing these techniques, novel treatment strategies that could be explored were identified, including potential benefit with anti-EGFR therapies, immune checkpoint inhibitors, topoisomerase inhibitors, and taxanes. The frequency of overexpression of proteins that mark resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, such as MRP1 (chemotherapy efflux pump), ERCC1 (resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy), and thymidylate synthase (resistance to fluoropyrimidines) were also identified, suggesting a lack of benefit. This multiplatform strategy could be explored for its potential to generate a personalized treatment selection for patients with advanced ASCC, provide a guide for future therapeutic development for this cancer, and be extended to other rare cancer types as well. PMID:26498363

  2. Radiation management of squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Prempree, T; Amornmarn, R

    1984-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 52 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder treated by irradiation between 1958 and 1978. There were 28 males and 24 females with hematuria being the leading symptom. At the time of initial presentation, 2 patients were evaluated to be stage B1, 34 patients to be B2C and 16 patients stage D. Nineteen patients were treated by preoperative irradiation (50 Gy/5 weeks) plus cystectomy and 33 patients were treated by irradiation alone (60-65 Gy/6-6 1/2 weeks). From our study, it appears that in stage B2C , irradiation plus cystectomy offered a better disease-free survival (40%) than irradiation alone (16%). Local failures occurred less frequently in the group treated by preoperative irradiation and surgery than those treated by irradiation alone. However, the majority of failures occurring in the preoperative group were distant failures. Factors determining the success and failures appear to include: stage of the disease, type of treatment, tumor size, degree of tumor necrosis, depth of muscle involvement, and tumor grade. It is suggested that the treatment of choice for this disease be a combined approach--preoperative irradiation and cystectomy whenever possible to minimize the loco-regional failures. Chemotherapeutic agents or radiation sensitizers combined with radiation should be further studied to minimize the distant metastases and loco-regional failures in most advanced inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder.

  3. Comprehensive multiplatform biomarker analysis of 199 anal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Smaglo, Brandon G; Tesfaye, Anteneh; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; Meyer, Joshua E; Wang, Jue; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep; Arguello, David; Boland, Patrick M

    2015-12-22

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) is a rare, HPV-associated malignancy typically diagnosed in early stages and definitively treated with chemoradiation. In situations where patients exhibit metastatic or recurrent disease, treatment options are severely limited. In this study, molecular alterations were identified that could be used to aid in therapeutic decisions for patients with metastatic or recurrent anal squamous cell carcinoma. Specimens from patients with this cancer were tested via a multiplatform profiling service (Caris Life Sciences, Phoenix, AZ) consisting of gene sequencing, protein expression by immunohistochemistry, and gene amplification with in situ hybridization. Utilizing these techniques, novel treatment strategies that could be explored were identified, including potential benefit with anti-EGFR therapies, immune checkpoint inhibitors, topoisomerase inhibitors, and taxanes. The frequency of overexpression of proteins that mark resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, such as MRP1 (chemotherapy efflux pump), ERCC1 (resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy), and thymidylate synthase (resistance to fluoropyrimidines) were also identified, suggesting a lack of benefit. This multiplatform strategy could be explored for its potential to generate a personalized treatment selection for patients with advanced ASCC, provide a guide for future therapeutic development for this cancer, and be extended to other rare cancer types as well. PMID:26498363

  4. Effects of enhanced bolus flavors on oropharyngeal swallow in patients treated for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pauloski, Barbara Roa; Logemann, Jerilyn A.; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Lundy, Donna; Sullivan, Paula A.; Newman, Lisa A.; Lazarus, Cathy; Bacon, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment for head and neck cancer can reduce peripheral sensory input and impair oropharyngeal swallow. This study examined the effect of enhanced bolus flavor on liquid swallows in these patients. Methods Fifty-one patients treated for head and neck cancer with chemoradiation or surgery and 64 healthy adult control subjects served as subjects. All were randomized to receive sour, sweet, or salty bolus flavor. Patients were evaluated at 7–10 days, 1 month, and 3 months after completion of tumor treatment. Control subjects received 1 assessment. Results All bolus flavors affected oropharyngeal swallow; sour flavor significantly shortened pharyngeal transit time across all evaluations. Conclusions Sour flavor influenced the swallow of patients treated for head and neck cancer, as well as that of control subjects in a manner similar to those with neurologic impairment observed in an earlier study. Sour flavor may improve the speed of pharyngeal transit regardless of whether a patient has suffered peripheral or central sensory damage. PMID:22907789

  5. Chemoradiotherapy-induced upregulation of PD-1 antagonizes immunity to HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Falguni; Duluc, Dorothée; Imai, Naoko; Clark, Amelia; Misiukiewicz, Krzys; Bonomi, Marcello; Gupta, Vishal; Patsias, Alexis; Parides, Michael; Demicco, Elizabeth G; Zhang, David Y; Kim-Schulze, Seunghee; Kao, Johnny; Gnjatic, Sacha; Oh, Sangkon; Posner, Marshall R; Sikora, Andrew G

    2014-12-15

    While viral antigens in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal cancer (HPVOPC) are attractive targets for immunotherapy, the effects of existing standard-of-care therapies on immune responses to HPV are poorly understood. We serially sampled blood from patients with stage III-IV oropharyngeal cancer undergoing concomitant chemoradiotherapy with or without induction chemotherapy. Circulating immunocytes including CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, regulatory T cells (Treg), and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were profiled by flow cytometry. Antigen-specific T-cell responses were measured in response to HPV16 E6 and E7 peptide pools. The role of PD-1 signaling in treatment-related immunosuppression was functionally defined by performing HPV-specific T-cell assays in the presence of blocking antibody. While HPV-specific T-cell responses were present in 13 of 18 patients before treatment, 10 of 13 patients lost these responses within 3 months after chemoradiotherapy. Chemoradiotherapy decreased circulating T cells and markedly elevated MDSCs. PD-1 expression on CD4(+) T cells increased by nearly 2.5-fold after chemoradiotherapy, and ex vivo culture with PD-1-blocking antibody enhanced HPV-specific T-cell responses in 8 of 18 samples tested. Chemoradiotherapy suppresses circulating immune responses in patients with HPVOPC by unfavorably altering effector:suppressor immunocyte ratios and upregulating PD-1 expression on CD4(+) T cells. These data strongly support testing of PD-1-blocking agents in combination with standard-of-care chemoradiotherapy for HPVOPC.

  6. Exposure to cigarette smoke causes DNA damage in oropharyngeal tissue in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Natalia; Berrío, Alina; Jaramillo, Jairo Enrique; Urrego, Rodrigo; Arias, María Patricia

    2014-07-15

    More than 40 mutagenic and carcinogenic agents present in cigarette smoke have been identified as causative factors of human cancer, but no relation has been clearly documented in companion animals. In dogs, in addition to smoke inhalation and transdermic absorption, exposure to smoke includes oral ingestion of particles adhered to the animal's fur. This study evaluates the presence and type of histological alterations and DNA integrity in oropharyngeal tissue in dogs exposed and non-exposed to household cigarette smoke by means of histopathology and comet assay studies on biopsy and swab samples. A non-probabilistic convenience sample of 12 dogs were selected and classified in two groups: exposed and non-exposed to cigarette smoke. Non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test was carried out on biopsy and swab data and a Chi(2) test was performed on the information obtained by histopathology. A significance level was set at P<0.05. Statistically significant differences were found between groups in comet assays carried out on biopsy samples. No differences (P>0.05) were found between groups based on comet assays swab samples and histopathology assessment. In conclusion, exposure to cigarette smoke causes DNA damage in dog oropharyngeal tissue. The use of dogs as sentinels for early DNA damage caused by exposure to environmental genotoxic agents like cigarette smoke is reported for the first time.

  7. Evolution of oropharyngeal patterning mechanisms involving Dlx and endothelins in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Takio, Yoko; Sugahara, Fumiaki; Takechi, Masaki; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2010-05-01

    In jawed vertebrates, the Dlx code, or nested expression patterns of Dlx genes, specify the dorsoventral polarity of pharyngeal arches, downstream of endothelin-1 (Edn-1) and its effectors, Bapx1 (Nkx3.2) and dHand (Hand2). To elucidate the evolution of the specification mechanism of the oropharyngeal skeletal system, lamprey homologs of Dlx, Edn, endothelin receptor (Ednr), Bapx1, and dHand were identified. Our analysis suggested that the Edn gene family emerged at the advent of vertebrates, and that gene duplications leading to the different Edn gnathostome subtypes (Edn1-3) occurred before the cyclostome-gnathostome split. This timing of gene duplications, giving rise to multiple subtypes, was also implied for Dlx, Ednr, Hand, and Bapx. In lamprey embryos, nested expressions of Dlx genes were not observed in pharyngeal arches, nor was any focal expression of Bapx1, known in gnathostomes to specify the jaw joint. The dHand homolog, however, was expressed more intensively ventrally, as in gnathostomes. Lamprey homologs of Edn-1 and EdnrA were also shown to be expressed as described in mice, indicating involvement of this signaling pathway in the craniofacial patterning early in vertebrate evolution. These results suggest that the last common ancestor of all the extant vertebrates would have possessed basic gene repertoires involved in oropharyngeal patterning in gnathostomes, but the elaborate genetic program leading to the Dlx code is likely to have been acquired uniquely in gnathostomes. PMID:20171204

  8. Serological studies of patients with cutaneous and oral-oropharyngeal anthrax from northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sirisanthana, T; Nelson, K E; Ezzell, J W; Abshire, T G

    1988-12-01

    An outbreak of 52 cases of cutaneous anthrax and 24 cases of oral-oropharyngeal anthrax occurred in rural Northern Thailand in 1982, caused by contaminated water buffalo meat. Microbiologic diagnosis of many of these cases was hindered by delayed presentation for care and by prior antibiotic therapy. In a retrospective investigation, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to measure antibody titers to components of anthrax edema toxin (edema factor [EF] and protective antigen [PA]), lethal toxin (lethal factor [LF] and PA), and poly-D-glutamic acid capsule. Electrophoretic-immunotransblots (EITB, Western blot) were used to detect antibodies to PA and LF. Nine patients with cutaneous anthrax, 10 patients with oral-oropharyngeal anthrax, and 43 healthy unexposed Thai control villagers were studied. Over all, EITB was positive in 13/18 patients (sensitivity 72%) and 0/43 controls (specificity 100%). The sensitivity of the ELISA was 72% for PA, 42% for LF, 26% for EF, and 95-100% for capsule. Although a few control sera had apparent false positive titers to PA, the specificity of the ELISA confirmed by EITB (100%) demonstrated the applicability of these tests for the diagnosis of anthrax.

  9. A Case of Acantholytic Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji Yeon; Do, Mi Ok; Kim, Seong Hyun; Hahm, Jeong Hee

    2008-01-01

    Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma is a well-defined variant of squamous cell cancer in which significant portions of the neoplastic proliferation show a pseudoglandular or tubular microscopic pattern. It usually presents as a nodule with various colors, and it is accompanied by scaling, crusting, and ulceration on the sun-exposed areas of older aged individuals. Histologically, the tumor consists of a nodular, epidermal-derived proliferation that forms island-like structures. At least focally or sometimes extensively, the tumor cells shows a loss of cohesion within the central gland-like or tubular spaces. This tumor resembles the structure of eccrine neoplasms, but it is negative for dPAS, CEA and mucicarmine and it is only positive for EMA and cytokeratins. Herein we report a case of acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma that occurred on the face of an 82-year-old woman. PMID:27303210

  10. Molecular mechanisms of ethanol-associated oro-esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Chen, Hao; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol drinking is a major etiological factor of oro-esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OESCC). Both local and systemic effects of ethanol may promote carcinogenesis, especially among chronic alcoholics. However, molecular mechanisms of ethanol-associated OESCC are still not well understood. In this review, we summarize current understandings and propose three mechanisms of ethanol-associated OESCC: (1) Disturbance of systemic metabolism of nutrients: during ethanol metabolism in the liver, systemic metabolism of retinoids, zinc, iron and methyl groups is altered. These nutrients are known to be associated with the development of OESCC. (2) Disturbance of redox metabolism in squamous epithelial cells: when ethanol is metabolized in oro-esophageal squamous epithelial cells, reactive oxygen species are generated and produce oxidative damage. Meanwhile, ethanol may also disturb fatty-acid metabolism in these cells. (3) Disturbance of signaling pathways in squamous epithelial cells: due to its physico-chemical properties, ethanol changes cell membrane fluidity and shape, and may thus impact multiple signaling pathways. Advanced molecular techniques in genomics, epigenomics, metabolomics and microbiomics will help us elucidate how ethanol promotes OESCC. PMID:25766659

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Ethanol-associated Oro-esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Chen, Hao; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol drinking is a major etiological factor of oro-esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OESCC). Both local and systemic effects of ethanol may promote carcinogenesis, especially among chronic alcoholics. However, molecular mechanisms of ethanol-associated OESCC are still not well understood. In this review, we summarize current understandings and propose three mechanisms of ethanol-associated OESCC: (1) Disturbance of systemic metabolism of nutrients: during ethanol metabolism in the liver, systemic metabolism of retinoids, zinc, iron and methyl groups is altered. These nutrients are known to be associated with the development of OESCC. (2) Disturbance of redox metabolism in squamous epithelial cells: when ethanol is metabolized in oro-esophageal squamous epithelial cells, reactive oxygen species are generated and produce oxidative damage. Meanwhile, ethanol may also disturb fatty-acid metabolism in these cells. (3) Disturbance of signaling pathways in squamous epithelial cells: due to its physico-chemical properties, ethanol changes cell membrane fluidity and shape, and may thus impact multiple signaling pathways. Advanced molecular techniques in genomics, epigenomics, metabolomics and microbiomics will help us elucidate how ethanol promotes OESCC. PMID:25766659

  12. Capecitabine and Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Head and Neck Cancer; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  13. HPV genotypes detected in the oropharyngeal mucosa of HIV-infected men who have sex with men in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, M; Mazza, F; Frati, E R; Fasolo, M M; Colzani, D; Bianchi, S; Fasoli, E; Amendola, A; Orlando, G; Tanzi, E

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiological profile of HPV oropharyngeal infections in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. A total of 135 subjects were enrolled at the L. Sacco University Hospital (Milan, Italy) to evaluate their HPV oropharyngeal infection status at baseline and at a follow-up visit at least 12 months later. HPV DNA was detected from oropharyngeal swabs using an in-house nested PCR that amplifies a segment of the L1 gene. The PCR products were then sequenced and genotyped. A greater percentage of high-risk genotypes was identified compared to low-risk genotypes (13·7% vs. 6·9%, P < 0·05), and two uncommon alpha-HPV genotypes were detected, i.e. HPV-102 and HPV-114. HPV infection prevalence was 24·4% and the cumulative incidence was 24·1%. During the follow-up period, one case of HPV infection (HPV-33) persisted, while the overall rate of infection clearance was 58·3%. HPV oropharyngeal infection was widespread in the cohort examined, and most of the infections were transient and cleared within 12 months. These results may help to clarify the role of HPV in the oropharynx and may also improve our understanding of the need to implement preventive strategies in at-risk populations.

  14. Human papillomavirus in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Loke, S L; Ma, L; Wong, M; Srivastava, G; Lo, I; Bird, C C

    1990-01-01

    Thirty seven cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma were studied by applying DNA slot blot analysis and in situ hybridisation using type specific probes for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18. Cases of condyloma accuminata, cervical carcinoma, and laryngeal papilloma were used as controls. Blocks including areas of invasive carcinoma, intraepithelial neoplasia, and normal epithelium were studied in each case. No HPV genome was detectable in any of the oesophageal cases. It is concluded that these types of HPV do not have an association with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Images PMID:2175754

  15. Anterior Segment Imaging in Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Gargi K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in anterior segment imaging have transformed the way ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) is diagnosed and monitored. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) has been reported to be useful primarily in the assessment of intraocular invasion and metastasis. In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) shows enlarged and irregular nuclei with hyperreflective cells in OSSN lesions and this has been found to correlate with histopathology findings. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) demonstrates thickened hyperreflective epithelium with an abrupt transition between abnormal and normal epithelium in OSSN lesions and this has also been shown to mimic histopathology findings. Although there are limitations to each of these imaging modalities, they can be useful adjunctive tools in the diagnosis of OSSN and could greatly assist the clinician in the management of OSSN patients. Nevertheless, anterior segment imaging has not replaced histopathology's role as the gold standard in confirming diagnosis. PMID:27800176

  16. Hypopharyngeal Dose Is Associated With Severe Late Toxicity in Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: An RTOG Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Machtay, Mitchell; Moughan, Jennifer; Farach, Andrew; Galvin, James; Garden, Adam S.; Weber, Randal S.; Cooper, Jay S.; Forastiere, Arlene; Ang, K. Kian

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) increases local tumor control but at the expense of increased toxicity. We recently showed that several clinical/pretreatment factors were associated with the occurrence of severe late toxicity. This study evaluated the potential relationship between radiation dose delivered to the pharyngeal wall and toxicity. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of long-term survivors from 3 previously reported Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials of CCRT for locally advanced SCCHN (RTOG trials 91-11, 97-03, and 99-14). Severe late toxicity was defined in this secondary analysis as chronic grade 3-4 pharyngeal/laryngeal toxicity and/or requirement for a feeding tube {>=}2 years after registration and/or potential treatment-related death (eg, pneumonia) within 3 years. Radiation dosimetry (2-dimensional) analysis was performed centrally at RTOG headquarters to estimate doses to 4 regions of interest along the pharyngeal wall (superior oropharynx, inferior oropharynx, superior hypopharynx, and inferior hypopharynx). Case-control analysis was performed with a multivariate logistic regression model that included pretreatment and treatment potential factors. Results: A total of 154 patients were evaluable for this analysis, 71 cases (patients with severe late toxicities) and 83 controls; thus, 46% of evaluable patients had a severe late toxicity. On multivariate analysis, significant variables correlated with the development of severe late toxicity, including older age (odds ratio, 1.062 per year; P=.0021) and radiation dose received by the inferior hypopharynx (odds ratio, 1.023 per Gy; P=.016). The subgroup of patients receiving {<=}60 Gy to the inferior hypopharynx had a 40% rate of severe late toxicity compared with 56% for patients receiving >60 Gy. Oropharyngeal dose was not associated with this outcome. Conclusions: Severe late toxicity following CCRT is

  17. Evolving Evidence of the Efficacy and Safety of nab-Paclitaxel in the Treatment of Cancers with Squamous Histologies

    PubMed Central

    Loong, Herbert H.; Chan, Alvita C.Y.; Wong, Ashley C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Taxanes, such as paclitaxel and docetaxel, are well-established cytotoxic chemotherapeutics used in the treatment of a variety of cancers, including those of squamous histology. In their formulation, both agents require solvents, which have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions, peripheral neuropathy, hepatic toxicities, and impaired drug delivery. nab-Paclitaxel is a novel, albumin-bound form of paclitaxel with improved tolerability, bioavailability, and efficacy compared with solvent-based paclitaxel. Currently, nab-paclitaxel is approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, locally advanced/metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and metastatic pancreatic cancer. Clinical studies suggest that nab-paclitaxel may be particularly effective in cancers with squamous histology, including NSCLC. This article reviews the emerging evidence supporting nab-paclitaxel as an effective agent in the treatment of malignancies of squamous histology. PMID:26918039

  18. A patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome treated with chemoradiotherapy for an oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew K; Teoh, Daren; Matthews, Paul; Fresco, Lydia

    2013-09-17

    We present the first published case of a patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) who was treated with radical chemoradiotherapy for an oropharyngeal carcinoma. In view of this newly recognised connective tissue disease, the uncertainty of severe toxicity from chemoradiotherapy to treat a potentially curative cancer posed a management challenge. The patient was treated with chemoradiotherapy and remains well with no evidence of recurrence at 3 years. Furthermore, we have observed minimal late effects secondary to chemoradiotherapy at 3 years following the completion of treatment suggesting that the underlying pathogenesis of LDS may provide an interesting human model to further elucidate the complex interactions of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and tissue fibrosis secondary to chemoradiotherapy. A review of LDS as well as the association of TGF-β1 expression and tissue fibrosis is presented.

  19. Detection of rhabdovirus viral RNA in oropharyngeal swabs and ectoparasites of Spanish bats.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Lopez, Carolina; Vazquez-Moron, Sonia; Marston, Denise A; Juste, Javier; Ibáñez, Carlos; Berciano, Jose Miguel; Salsamendi, Egoitz; Aihartza, Joxerra; Banyard, Ashley C; McElhinney, Lorraine; Fooks, Anthony R; Echevarria, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses infect a variety of hosts, including mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, insects and plants. As bats are the natural host for most members of the genus Lyssavirus, the specificity of the amplification methods used for active surveillance is usually restricted to lyssaviruses. However, the presence of other rhabdoviruses in bats has also been reported. In order to broaden the scope of such methods, a new RT-PCR, able to detect a diverse range of rhabdoviruses, was designed. The method detected 81 of 86 different rhabdoviruses. In total, 1488 oropharyngeal bat swabs and 38 nycteribiid samples were analysed, and 17 unique rhabdovirus-related sequences were detected. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that those sequences detected in bats did not constitute a monophyletic group, even when originating from the same bat species. However, all of the sequences detected in nycteribiids and one sequence obtained from a bat did constitute a monophyletic group with Drosophila melanogaster sigma rhabdovirus.

  20. A patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome treated with chemoradiotherapy for an oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew K; Teoh, Daren; Matthews, Paul; Fresco, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    We present the first published case of a patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) who was treated with radical chemoradiotherapy for an oropharyngeal carcinoma. In view of this newly recognised connective tissue disease, the uncertainty of severe toxicity from chemoradiotherapy to treat a potentially curative cancer posed a management challenge. The patient was treated with chemoradiotherapy and remains well with no evidence of recurrence at 3 years. Furthermore, we have observed minimal late effects secondary to chemoradiotherapy at 3 years following the completion of treatment suggesting that the underlying pathogenesis of LDS may provide an interesting human model to further elucidate the complex interactions of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and tissue fibrosis secondary to chemoradiotherapy. A review of LDS as well as the association of TGF-β1 expression and tissue fibrosis is presented. PMID:24045763

  1. The physiology of deglutition and the pathophysiology and complications of oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Steele, Catriona M

    2012-01-01

    The opening session of the 2nd International Conference on Oropharyngeal Dysphagia featured a series of invited talks reviewing the definition of dysphagia, its prevalence and its pathophysiology. The discussion arising from these talks focused heavily on the current underrecognition of dysphagia as a significant concern for older adults, particularly those over 75. The burdens associated with dysphagia in this sector of the population were recognized to be substantial, both in social/psychological terms and in terms of economic consequences for the healthcare system. The importance of developing swallow screening protocols as a routine method for the early identification of dysphagia and aspiration was explored. The idea of launching political initiatives aimed at increasing awareness and the utilization of appropriate dysphagia healthcare codes was also discussed.

  2. Gingival Squamous Cell Carcinoma: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Luiz Antonio Guimarães; de Carvalho, Luis Felipe das Chagas e Silva; Salgado, José Antônio Pereira; Brandão, Adriana Aigotti Haberbeck

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Squamous cell carcinoma is a malignant epithelial neoplasm characterized by variable clinical manifestations. When located in the gingiva, this neoplasm may mimic common inflammatory lesions. The aim of this study was to report a case of atypical squamous cell carcinoma, in which the patient had no risk factors for the development of this neoplasm. Methods A 61 year old Caucasian female was seen with a 3 month history of a rapidly growing, painful nodule in the gingiva adjacent to tooth #11. Clinical examination revealed a proliferative lesion in the vestibular marginal gingiva of teeth #11 and #12, presenting with purulent exudation. Thus, in view of the clinical symptoms and differential diagnosis of an infectious granulomatous process and malignant neoplasm, an incisional biopsy was obtained from the lesion. Results The diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma was made and fourteen days after incisional biopsy, healing was found to be unsatisfactory. The patient was referred for treatment consisting of surgical excision of the tumour. A removable partial denture was fabricated for rehabilitation, one month after surgery of the maxilla; the patient was submitted to dissection of the regional lymph nodes and radiotherapy for an additional 3 months. Three years after the end of treatment, the patient continues to be followed-up and does not show any sign of recurrence. Conclusions Gingival squamous cell carcinoma is a condition which chance of cure is higher when carcinomatous lesions are diagnosed and treated early. In this instance dentists play an important role in early detection of gingival squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:24421976

  3. Psychometric characteristics of health-related quality-of-life questionnaires in oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Angelique A; Speyer, Renée; Heijnen, Bas J; Klijn-Zwijnenberg, Iris R

    2014-04-01

    Dysphagia can have severe consequences for the patient's health, influencing health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Sound psychometric properties of HRQoL questionnaires are a precondition for assessing the impact of dysphagia, the focus of this study, resulting in recommendations for the appropriate use of these questionnaires in both clinical practice and research contexts. We performed a systematic review starting with a search for and retrieval of all full-text articles on the development of HRQoL questionnaires related to oropharyngeal dysphagia and/or their psychometric validation from the electronic databases PubMed and Embase published up to June 2011. Psychometric properties were judged according to quality criteria proposed for health status questionnaires. Eight questionnaires were included in this study. Four are aimed solely at HRQoL in oropharyngeal dysphagia: the deglutition handicap index (DHI), dysphagia handicap index (DHI'), M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI), and SWAL-QOL, while the EDGQ, EORTC QLQ-STO 22, EORTC QLQ-OG 25 and EORTC QLQ-H&N35 focus on other primary diseases resulting in dysphagia. The psychometric properties of the DHI, DHI', MDADI, and SWAL-QOL were evaluated. For appropriate applicability of HRQoL questionnaires, strong scores on the psychometric criteria face validity, criterion validity, and interpretability are prerequisites. The SWAL-QOL has the strongest ratings for these criteria, while the DHI' is the most easy to apply given its 25 items and the use of a uniform scoring format. For optimal use of HRQoL questionnaires in diverse settings, it is necessary to combine psychometric and utility approaches.

  4. Central cholinergic dysfunction could be associated with oropharyngeal dysphagia in early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Duck; Koo, Jung Hoi; Song, Sun Hong; Jo, Kwang Deog; Lee, Moon Kyu; Jang, Wooyoung

    2015-11-01

    Dysphagia is an important issue in the prognosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although several studies have reported that oropharyngeal dysphagia may be associated with cognitive dysfunction, the exact relationship between cortical function and swallowing function in PD patients is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between an electrophysiological marker of central cholinergic function, which reflected cognitive function, and swallowing function, as measured by videofluoroscopic studies (VFSS). We enrolled 29 early PD patients. Using the Swallowing Disturbance Questionnaire (SDQ), we divided the enrolled patients into two groups: PD with dysphagia and PD without dysphagia. The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) was applied to explore the nature of the dysphagia. To assess central cholinergic dysfunction, short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was evaluated. We analyzed the relationship between central cholinergic dysfunction and oropharyngeal dysphagia and investigated the characteristics of the dysphagia. The SAI values were significantly different between the two groups. The comparison of each VFSS component between the PD with dysphagia group and the PD without dysphagia group showed statistical significance for most of the oral phase components and for a single pharyngeal phase component. The total score on the VDS was higher in the PD with dysphagia group than in the PD without dysphagia group. The Mini-Mental State Examination and SAI values showed significant correlations with the total score of the oral phase components. According to binary logistic regression analysis, SAI value independently contributed to the presence of dysphagia in PD patients. Our findings suggest that cholinergic dysfunction is associated with dysphagia in early PD and that an abnormal SAI value is a good biomarker for predicting the risk of dysphagia in PD patients.

  5. Incidence trends in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in Slovenia, 1983-2009: role of human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Strojan, Primož; Zadnik, Vesna; Šifrer, Robert; Lanišnik, Boštjan; Didanović, Vojislav; Jereb, Sara; Poljak, Mario; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Gale, Nina

    2015-12-01

    An increase in the incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) was observed in several population-based registries and has been attributed to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. In the present study, we aimed to assess the contribution of HPV infection to the burden of mucosal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in Slovenia. For this purpose, data from the nationwide Cancer Registry of Slovenia for cases diagnosed between 1983 and 2009 were analyzed to determine time trends of age-adjusted incidence rates and survival in terms of annual percentage change (APC) for HNSCC in potentially HPV-related and HPV-unrelated sites. In addition, determination of p16 protein, HPV DNA and E6/E7 mRNA was performed in a cohort of OPSCC patients identified from the prospective database for the years 2007-2008. In total, 2,862 cases of HNSCC in potentially HPV-related sites and 7,006 cases in potentially HPV-unrelated sites were identified with decreased incidence observed over the time period in both groups (-0.58; 95 % CI -1.28 to -0.13 and -0.90; 95 % CI -1.23 to -0.57). Regardless of the group, incidence trends for both genders showed a significant decrease in men and increase in women. In a cohort of 99 OPSCC patients diagnosed between 2007 and 2008, 20 (20.2 %) patients had HPV positive tumors and exhibited a superior outcome compared to HPV-negative patients. In conclusion, results of the epidemiologic and histopathologic study confirmed that HPV infection had no major impact on the incidence trends in the Slovenian patients with HNSCC and, specifically, OPSCC during the studied period.

  6. Biological evidence for a causal role of HPV16 in a small fraction of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Halec, G; Holzinger, D; Schmitt, M; Flechtenmacher, C; Dyckhoff, G; Lloveras, B; Höfler, D; Bosch, F X; Pawlita, M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a causal factor in virtually all cervical and a subset of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP-SCC), whereas its role in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (L-SCC) is unclear. Methods: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (N=154) and deep-frozen tissues (N=55) of 102 L-SCC patients were analysed for the presence of 51 mucosal HPV types. HPV DNA-positive (HPV DNA+) cases were analysed for E6*I mRNA transcripts of all high risk (HR)/probably/possibly (p)HR-HPV identified, and for HPV type 16 (HPV16) viral load. Expression of p16INK4a, pRb, cyclin D1 and p53 was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Ninety-two patients were valid in DNA analysis, of which 32 (35%) had at least one HPV DNA+ sample. Among the 29 single infections, 22 (76%) were HPV16, 2 (7%) HPV56 and 1 each (4%) HPV45, HPV53, HPV70, HPV11 and HPV42. Three cases harboured HPV16 with HPV33 (twice) or HPV45. Only 32% of HPV DNA+ findings were reproducible. Among HPV16 DNA+ L-SCC, 2 out of 23 (9%) had high viral loads, 5 out of 25 (21%) expressed E6*I mRNA and 3 out of 21 (14%) showed high p16INK4a and low pRb expression (all three HPV16 RNA-positive), immunohistochemical marker combination not identified in any other HPV DNA+ or HPV DNA-negative (HPV DNA−) L-SCC, respectively. Conclusion: HPV type 16 has a causative role in a small subgroup of L-SCC (<5% in this German hospital series). PMID:23778529

  7. Radiotherapy and Concomitant Intra-Arterial Docetaxel Combined With Systemic 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Preliminary Report-Improvement of Locoregional Control of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Oikawa, Hirobumi Nakamura, Ryuji; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Kohji; Sato, Hiroaki; Ehara, Shigeru

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To confirm the advantage of chemoradiotherapy using intra-arterial docetaxel with intravenous cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. Patients and Methods: A total of 26 oropharyngeal cancer patients (1, 2, 2, and 21 patients had Stage I, II, III, and IVa-IVc, respectively) were treated with two sessions of this chemoradiotherapy regimen. External beam radiotherapy was delivered using large portals that included the primary site and the regional lymph nodes initially (range, 40-41.4 Gy) and the metastatic lymph nodes later (60 or 72 Gy). All tumor-supplying branches of the carotid arteries were cannulated, and 40 mg/m{sup 2} docetaxel was individually infused on Day 1. The other systemic chemotherapy agents included 60 mg/m{sup 2} cisplatin on Day 2 and 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil on Days 2-6. Results: The primary response of the tumor was complete in 21 (81%), partial in 4 (15%), and progressive in 1 patient. Grade 4 mucositis, leukopenia, and dermatitis was observed in 3, 2, and 1 patients, respectively. During a median follow-up of 10 months, the disease recurred at the primary site and at a distant organ in 2 (8%) and 3 (12%) patients, respectively. Three patients died because of cancer progression. Two patients (8%) with a partial response were compromised by lethal bleeding from the tumor bed or chemotherapeutic toxicity. The 3-year locoregional control rate and the 3-year overall survival rate was 73% and 77%, respectively. Conclusion: This method resulted in an excellent primary tumor response rate (96%) and moderate acute toxicity. Additional follow-up is required to ascertain the usefulness of this modality.

  8. Inactivation of the Mismatch Repair System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Attenuates Virulence but Favors Persistence of Oropharyngeal Colonization in Cystic Fibrosis Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Ana; Maciá, María D.; Borrell, Nuria; Moya, Bartolomé; de Francisco, Teresa; Pérez, José L.; Oliver, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The inactivation of the mismatch repair (MMR) system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa modestly reduced in vitro fitness, attenuated virulence in murine models of acute systemic and respiratory infections, and decreased the initial oropharyngeal colonization potential. In contrast, the inactivation of the MMR system favored long-term persistence of oropharyngeal colonization in cystic fibrosis mice. These results may help in understanding the reasons for the low and high prevalences, respectively, of hypermutable P. aeruginosa strains in acute and chronic infections. PMID:17307847

  9. A rare case of aggressive squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dieh, A

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare case of an aggressive squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder in a young primigravid woman with recurrent urinary tract infections and microscopic haematuria. An emergency caesarean section was performed at 37 weeks gestation for suspected placental abruption; however, she was found to have frank haematuria. Postnatally, an advanced bladder tumour was diagnosed. She required renal dialysis, a radical cystectomy and radiotherapy but sadly died seven months after diagnosis. This case illustrates the importance of thorough investigation of haematuria in pregnancy. Cystoscopy and even tumour resection can be safely performed in pregnancy. Although squamous cell carcinomas account for only 2% of bladder tumours in developed countries, they tend to be large and deeply invasive, requiring radical surgery and chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Management should be multidisciplinary and treatment individualized due to the significant clinical and emotional challenges which arise when a woman develops a malignancy in pregnancy or the puerperium.

  10. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis, A Rare Site for a Commonly Known Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Nachiappan, Murugappan; Litake, Manjusha Madhusudhan; Paravatraj, Varun Gautam; Sharma, Navil; Narasimhan, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nephrolithiasis predisposes to squamous metaplasia and subsequently SCC which is a rare malignancy of the upper urinary tract. A 60-year-old woman with a long standing history of renal calculi presented with flank pain and fever. Investigations revealed a mass in the superior pole of a non functioning left kidney while the right kidney was sub optimally functioning, hydronephrotic and there was presence of bilateral staghorn calculi. Patient underwent decompression of right kidney by double j stenting and left radical nephrectomy that revealed well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of renal pelvis. Most SCC of the renal pelvis present with advanced disease and dismal prognosis while our patient presented with localized disease without lymphatic and distant metastasis. Thus radical nephrectomy can be curative if the disease can be diagnosed at an earlier stage. This emphasizes the need of early treatment of nephrolithiasis to prevent the development of SCC and screening of patients with long standing staghorn calculi.

  11. Immunohistochemical and oncogenetic analyses of the esophageal basaloid squamous cell carcinoma in comparison with conventional squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Imamhasan, Abdukadir; Mitomi, Hiroyuki; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Takuo; Takahashi, Michiko; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Yao, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is a rare variant of squamous cell carcinoma. We reviewed 878 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and detected 22 cases (3%) of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. These tumors and stage-matched paired conventional squamous cell carcinomas were investigated for clinicopathologic features and immunoreactivity of cytokeratin subtypes, p53, B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl-2), β-catenin, and epidermal growth factor receptor. Molecular aberrations in p53, CTNNB1 (the gene encoding β-catenin), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were also determined. Patients with basaloid squamous cell carcinomas demonstrated a 5-year survival rate of 42%, significantly worse than those with well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (P<.01). Histologically, solid nests with central necrosis and a cribriform pattern were identified in almost all (≥95%) cases, and ductal differentiation was less frequent (45%) but associated with significantly better survival (P<.05). Compared with conventional squamous cell carcinomas, the basaloid squamous cell carcinomas were less immunoreactive for cytokeratin 14, cytokeratin 903, and membranous β-catenin (P<.01-.001) but more reactive for bcl-2, nuclear β-catenin, epidermal growth factor receptor, and Ki-67 (P<.05-.001). Direct sequencing showed mutations of p53 (36%), EGFR (14%), but not CTNNB1; fluorescent in situ hybridization detected amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (22%). In basaloid squamous cell carcinomas, low-level expression of cytokeratin 14/cytokeratin 903 and mutations of p53 and EGFR had a significant influence on worse survival (P<.05-.001). We conclude that the esophageal basaloid squamous cell carcinoma, a neoplasm with particularly aggressive biologic behavior, should be differentiated from conventional squamous cell carcinomas. In this context, immunohistochemical assessment of several markers might provide a useful adjunct diagnostic tool

  12. Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Young: A Spectrum or a Distinct Group? Part 1

    PubMed Central

    O’Regan, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    While most head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC) occurs in older people, an increasing number of young patients are being affected worldwide, with up to 5.5% <40. These are predominantly oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Some patients have heavy exposure to the usual risk factors, but an increasing number do not. Part of this trend appears to be due to rising numbers of HPV associated tonsil carcinoma, particularly in males (smokers and non-smokers). A subset of young patients, however, is non-smoking females usually with tongue cancers, not related to HPV, the aetiology of which is unclear. Various mechanisms may be at work here: the variation in ability to detoxify the products of smoke and alcohol varies in individuals, which may explain why environmental exposure to smoke seems to play a role in some non-smokers with HNSCC. The role of marijuana remains possible but uncertain, and it may be that anaemia is a co-factor. There is an increased risk of HNSCC in first degree relatives of HNSCC patients, and while inherited syndromes associated with HNSCC are rare, elucidation of their genetics may help to develop our understanding the disease in these young patients without recognised risk factors. PMID:20596979

  13. Adjuvant immunotherapy with BCG in squamous cell bronchial carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, H M; The, T H; Orie, N G

    1980-01-01

    Fifty-four patients with evidence of locally advanced primary squamous cell bronchial carcinoma (SCC), and three patients with adenocarcinoma (AC) had lung resection to remove all the visible tumour. After operation an randomly chosen group of 20 SCC patients received adjuvant BCG immunostimulation by scarifications (BCG-A). An additional group of 14 SCC patients, and three AC patients received initially intrapleural BCG treatment and subsequently scarifications (BCG-B). A control group of 20 SCC patients received no adjuvant treatment. Follow-up studies were done from three to 51 months. Immune reactivity was monitored in vivo with PPD skin tests in 33 treated and in 18 untreated patients. In both the BCG-treated SCC groups recurrence rates decreased statistically significant during follow-up (BCG-A; six to 51 months, p less than 0.001; BCG: 6-9 months, p less than 0.01 and nine to 24 months, p less than 0.001). However, no difference could be demonstrated between systemic and combined systemic and intrapleural treatment. The three BCG-treated AC patients all relapsed within nine months of follow-up. A pronounced increase in skin reactivity to PPD was seen six months after surgery in the BCG-treated patients (BCG-A, p less than 0.001; BCG-B, p less than 0.01), whereas the control patients remained anergic after surgery. This improved immune reactivity went in parallel with a more favourable outcome of the individual patients (BCG-A, p less than 0.02; BCG-B, p less than 0.05). It is concluded that adjuvant BCG immunotherapy used in strongly selected patients with minimal residual squamous cell bronchial carcinoma improves the prognosis. Intrapleural treatment did not improve the prognosis further. A favourable clinical outcome was mirrored by an increase in cellular immune reactivity. PMID:7466726

  14. Immunotherapy With MK-3475 in Surgically Resectable Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Cancer of Head and Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Head and Neck

  15. Squamous cell carcinoma at maxillary sinus: clinicopathologic data in a single Brazilian institution with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marcello Roter M; Servato, João Paulo S; Cardoso, Sérgio Vitorino; de Faria, Paulo Rogério; Eisenberg, Ana Lúcia A; Dias, Fernando Luiz; Loyola, Adriano Mota

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma arising at maxillary sinus is a rare neoplasm, characterized by aggressive growth pattern and glooming prognosis. There are no studies describing specifically its epidemiology in the South America. The aim of the current paper is to characterize a Brazilian maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma sample and to compare such data with others worldwide relevant series. The records of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (1997-2006) were gathered and plotted. Additionally, an extensive literature review was carry out using electronic database (PUBMED/MEDLINE and LILACS) over a period of 54 years. A descriptive statistics and univariate survival test (log rank) were employed. Maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma was the commonest malignancy of sinonasal epithelium found. It affected mainly mid-age white men and most of them were diagnosed at advanced stage. Surgery combined with radiotherapy was the most therapeutic modalities given. The overall mortality rate in our sample was of 65.5%. Overall 1-, 2- and 5-year survival rate was 57.9%, 44.8%, and 17.7%, respectively. Maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma is an aggressive tumor normally diagnosed at the advanced stage and most patients present an unfavorable prognosis and reduced survival rate. PMID:25674251

  16. Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Ravinder S; Kufuor-Mensah, Eric

    2007-02-01

    A 7-year-old, spayed female Persian cat was referred for evaluation of progressive paraplegia. The cat was thin, cachectic and paraplegic on presentation. The survey radiographs showed a left caudal pulmonary lesion and lytic skeletal lesions at the right iliac crest and left distal scapula. Due to a poor prognosis for complete recovery, the owner opted for euthanasia. Post-mortem examination revealed bilaterally small and irregular kidneys, lysis of the left iliac crest and left distal scapula and a dilated left ventricular lumen with a thin interventricular septum. Histologically, all the lesions were determined to be squamous cell carcinoma. It appears that the origin or the primary site of the malignancy in this case is pulmonary as cardiac and skeletal tissues are primarily mesenchymal in origin and are less likely to develop a primary epithelial malignancy. To the best of our knowledge, there is no description of cardiac or skeletal metastatic squamous cell carcinoma in a cat. PMID:16859943

  17. Squamous cell carcinoma in a capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Hamano, Takahisa; Terasawa, Fumio; Tachikawa, Yoshiharu; Murai, Atsuko; Mori, Takashi; El-Dakhly, Khaled; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma

    2014-09-01

    A 4-year and 2-month-old male capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) was diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma on the buttocks after chronic recurrent dermatosis. The capybara was euthanized, examined by computed tomography and necropsied; the tumor was examined histologically. Computed tomography showed a dense soft tissue mass with indistinct borders at the buttocks. Histological examination of the tumor revealed islands of invasive squamous epithelial tumor cells with a severe desmoplastic reaction. Based on the pathological findings, the mass was diagnosed as a squamous cell carcinoma. This is the first study to report squamous cell carcinoma in a capybara.

  18. Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris)

    PubMed Central

    HAMANO, Takahisa; TERASAWA, Fumio; TACHIKAWA, Yoshiharu; MURAI, Atsuko; MORI, Takashi; EL-DAKHLY, Khaled; SAKAI, Hiroki; YANAI, Tokuma

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 4-year and 2-month-old male capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) was diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma on the buttocks after chronic recurrent dermatosis. The capybara was euthanized, examined by computed tomography and necropsied; the tumor was examined histologically. Computed tomography showed a dense soft tissue mass with indistinct borders at the buttocks. Histological examination of the tumor revealed islands of invasive squamous epithelial tumor cells with a severe desmoplastic reaction. Based on the pathological findings, the mass was diagnosed as a squamous cell carcinoma. This is the first study to report squamous cell carcinoma in a capybara. PMID:24909968

  19. Effect of IQoro® training on impaired postural control and oropharyngeal motor function in patients with dysphagia after stroke.

    PubMed

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion All patients with dysphagia after stroke have impaired postural control. IQoro® screen (IQS) training gives a significant and lasting improvement of postural control running parallel with significant improvement of oropharyngeal motor dysfunction (OPMD). Objectives The present investigation aimed at studying the frequency of impaired postural control in patients with stroke-related dysphagia and if IQS training has any effect on impaired postural control in parallel with effect on OPMD. Method A prospective clinical study was carried out with 26 adult patients with stroke-related dysphagia. The training effect was compared between patients consecutively investigated at two different time periods, the first period with 15 patients included in the study more than half a year after stroke, the second period with 11 patients included within 1 month after stroke. Postural control tests and different oropharyngeal motor tests were performed before and after 3 months of oropharyngeal sensorimotor training with an IQS, and at a late follow-up (median 59 weeks after end of training). Result All patients had impaired postural control at baseline. Significant improvement in postural control and OPMD was observed after the completion of IQS training in both intervention groups. The improvements were still present at the late follow-up.

  20. Rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review of the speech therapy approach

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Gisela Carmona; Santos, Rosane Sampaio

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: There are an estimated 30,000–40,000 new cases of cerebral palsy per year in Brazil. Motor disorders caused by cerebral palsy can lead to dysphagia as they may alter the preparatory, oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal phases. Aim: To identify existing rehabilitation methods of swallowing disorders in cerebral palsy, with emphasis on the pursuit of research using the Bobath concept, the Castillo Morales concept, oral sensorimotor therapy, and continuing education. Summary of the findings: We performed a systematic review of the medical and speech therapy literature on the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy spanning 1977–2010 and from all languages and nations. Among the 310 articles retrieved, only 22 (7.09%) addressed therapeutic rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy. Of the 22 reports, 12 (54.5%) were from Canada, 3 (13.6%) were from Japan, 2 (9%) were from Brazil, 2 (9%) were from Germany, 1 (4.5%) was from the USA, 1 (4.5%) was from the United Kingdom, and 1 (4.5%) was from Poland. Of these reports, 63.6% used oral sensorimotor therapy as a therapeutic method, 36.3% reported continuing education as a therapeutic approach, and only 18.1% and 9% used the Bobath concept and Castillo Morales concept, respectively. Conclusion: Even with a constantly increasing cerebral palsy population, few studies include (re)habilitation in the treatment of oropharyngeal dysphagia in these children. PMID:25991964

  1. Squamous Cell Lung Cancer: From Tumor Genomics to Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gandara, David R.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Sos, Martin L.; Lara, Primo N.; Hirsch, Fred R.

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) represents an area of unmet need in lung cancer research. For the last several years, therapeutic progress in SCC has lagged behind the now more common NSCLC histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma. However, recent efforts to define the complex biology underlying SCC have begun to bear fruit in a multitude of ways, including characterization of previously unknown genomic and signaling pathways, delineation of new potentially actionable molecular targets, and subsequent development of a large number of agents directed against unique SCC-associated molecular abnormalities. For the first time, SCC-specific prognostic gene signatures and predictive biomarkers of new therapeutic agents are emerging. In addition, recent and ongoing clinical trials, including the Lung-MAP master protocol, have been designed to facilitate approval of targeted therapy-biomarker combinations. In this comprehensive review we describe the current status of SCC therapeutics, recent advances in the understanding of SCC biology and prognostic gene signatures, and the development of innovative new clinical trials, all of which offer new hope for patients with advanced SCC. PMID:25979930

  2. Squamous cell lung cancer: from tumor genomics to cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gandara, David R; Hammerman, Peter S; Sos, Martin L; Lara, Primo N; Hirsch, Fred R

    2015-05-15

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) represents an area of unmet need in lung cancer research. For the past several years, therapeutic progress in SCC has lagged behind the now more common non-small cell lung cancer histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma. However, recent efforts to define the complex biology underlying SCC have begun to bear fruit in a multitude of ways, including characterization of previously unknown genomic and signaling pathways, delineation of new, potentially actionable molecular targets, and subsequent development of a large number of agents directed against unique SCC-associated molecular abnormalities. For the first time, SCC-specific prognostic gene signatures and predictive biomarkers of new therapeutic agents are emerging. In addition, recent and ongoing clinical trials, including the Lung-MAP master protocol, have been designed to facilitate approval of targeted therapy-biomarker combinations. In this comprehensive review, we describe the current status of SCC therapeutics, recent advances in the understanding of SCC biology and prognostic gene signatures, and the development of innovative new clinical trials, all of which offer new hope for patients with advanced SCC.

  3. Surgical management for squamous cell carcinoma of vulva.

    PubMed

    Amavi, Ayi Kossigan; Kouadio, Laurent; Adabra, Komlan; Tengue, Kodjo; Tijami, Fouad; Jalil, Abdelouahed

    2016-01-01

    To analyze our surgical management and the result of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of vulva. Retrospectively, we collected 38 cases of SCC; 17 cases of them were early SCC and 21 cases were locally advanced. The patients underwent primary surgery. The survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log rank test. The mean age was 60.78 years. Total vulvectomy was performed in all patients. Superficial and deep incision of bilateral inguinal lymphadenectomy was performed by separates incisions for SCC infiltrating more than 1mm. The average tumor size was 53 mm (10 to 140mm). Morbidity was 42.1%. Lateral resection margin ≥8mm was obtained in 57.1%. Eighteen patients benefited from adjuvant radiotherapy. The follow-up median was 19.4 months (6 to 61.5 month) with 05 recurrences in 12 months. The survival using the Kaplan-Meyer analysis at 5 years, was 62.1% (71.2%N(-) vs 46.7%N(+); p = 0.13). We identified two groups for locally advanced vulva cancer. Primary surgery keeps its place. Neo adjuvant radio chemotherapy followed by surgery is the alternative treatment for locally extensive lesions. PMID:27642483

  4. Surgical management for squamous cell carcinoma of vulva

    PubMed Central

    Amavi, Ayi Kossigan; Kouadio, Laurent; Adabra, Komlan; Tengue, Kodjo; Tijami, Fouad; Jalil, Abdelouahed

    2016-01-01

    To analyze our surgical management and the result of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of vulva. Retrospectively, we collected 38 cases of SCC; 17 cases of them were early SCC and 21 cases were locally advanced. The patients underwent primary surgery. The survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log rank test. The mean age was 60.78 years. Total vulvectomy was performed in all patients. Superficial and deep incision of bilateral inguinal lymphadenectomy was performed by separates incisions for SCC infiltrating more than 1mm. The average tumor size was 53 mm (10 to 140mm). Morbidity was 42.1%. Lateral resection margin ≥8mm was obtained in 57.1%. Eighteen patients benefited from adjuvant radiotherapy. The follow-up median was 19.4 months (6 to 61.5 month) with 05 recurrences in 12 months. The survival using the Kaplan-Meyer analysis at 5 years, was 62.1% (71.2%N- vs 46.7%N+; p = 0.13). We identified two groups for locally advanced vulva cancer. Primary surgery keeps its place. Neo adjuvant radio chemotherapy followed by surgery is the alternative treatment for locally extensive lesions. PMID:27642483

  5. Concordance of Two Endoscopic Procedures for Diagnosis of Carcinoma of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-15

    Upper Aerodigestive Tract Lesions; Neoplasms, Oropharyngeal; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Neoplasms, Hypopharyngeal; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Head and Neck Neoplasms; UADT Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell; Papilloma

  6. Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy With Mitomycin C and Cisplatin in Advanced Unresectable Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Phase I-II Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Strojan, Primoz Karner, Katarina; Smid, Lojze; Soba, Erika; Fajdiga, Igor; Jancar, Boris; Anicin, Aleksandar; Budihna, Marjan; Zakotnik, Branko

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of concomitant chemoradiotherapy with mitomycin C and cisplatin in the treatment of advanced unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: Treatment consisted of conventional radiotherapy (70 Gy in 35 fractions), mitomycin C 15 mg/m{sup 2} IV, applied after the delivery of 10 Gy, and cisplatin at an initial dose of 10 mg/m{sup 2}/d IV, applied during the last 10 fractions of irradiation ('chemoboost'). The cisplatin dose was escalated with respect to the toxic side effects by 2 mg/m{sup 2}/d up to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or at the most 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d (Phase I study), which was tested in the subsequent Phase II study. Results: All 36 patients had Stage T4 and/or N3 disease, and the majority had oropharyngeal (50%) or hypopharyngeal (39%) primary tumors. Six patients were treated at each of the three cisplatin dose levels tested (Phase I study). Dose-limiting toxicity was not reached even at 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d of cisplatin, which was determined as the MTD and tested in an additional 18 patients (Phase II study). After a median follow-up time of 48 months, 4-year locoregional control, failure-free, and overall survival rates were 30%, 14%, and 20%, respectively. In 24 patients treated at the cisplatin dose level of 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d, the corresponding rates were 40%, 20%, and 22%, respectively. Conclusion: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with mitomycin C and cisplatin 'chemoboost' at 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d is feasible, with encouraging survival results if the extremely poor disease profile of the treated patients is considered.

  7. Telomerase activity of the Lugol-stained and -unstained squamous epithelia in the process of oesophageal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Inai, M; Kano, M; Shimada, Y; Sakurai, T; Chiba, T; Imamura, M

    2001-09-28

    Up-regulation of telomerase has been reported in many cancers. Our aim was to characterize telomerase activity in various states of the oesophagus to facilitate better understanding of carcinogenesis of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. During endoscopic examinations, we obtained 45 Lugol-stained normal epithelia, 31 Lugol-unstained epithelia (14 oesophagitis, 7 mild dysplasia, 5 severe dysplasia and 5 intramucosal cancer) and 9 advanced cancer. Telomerase activity was semi-quantified by a telomeric repeat amplification protocol using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA was examined by in situ hybridization. In the Lugol-stained normal epithelia, telomerase activity increased in proportion to the increase of severity of the accompanying lesions, with a rank order of advanced cancer, intramucosal cancer, mild dysplasia and oesophagitis. In the Lugol-unstained lesions and advanced cancer, telomerase activity was highest in advanced cancer. Up-regulation of telomerase in normal squamous epithelium may be a marker of progression of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  8. Oropharyngeal Aspiration of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schully, Kevin L.; Bell, Matthew G.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Keane-Myers, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are potentially lethal pathogens categorized as biothreat agents due, in part, to their ability to be disseminated via aerosol. There are no protective vaccines against these pathogens and treatment options are limited and cumbersome. Since disease severity is greatest when these agents are inhaled, efforts to develop pre- or post-exposure prophylaxis focus largely on inhalation models of infection. Here, we demonstrate a non-invasive and technically simple method for affecting the inhalational challenge of BALB/c mice with B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. In this model, two investigators utilized common laboratory tools such as forceps and a micropipette to conduct and characterize an effective and reproducible inhalational challenge of BALB/c mice with B. mallei and B. pseudomallei. Challenge by oropharyngeal aspiration resulted in acute disease. Additionally, 50% endpoints for B. pseudomallei K96243 and B. mallei ATCC 23344 were nearly identical to published aerosol challenge methods. Furthermore, the pathogens disseminated to all major organs typically targeted by these agents where they proliferated. The pro-inflammatory cytokine production in the proximal and peripheral fluids demonstrated a rapid and robust immune response comparable to previously described murine and human studies. These observations demonstrate that OA is a viable alternative to aerosol exposure. PMID:25503969

  9. Functional outcome in acute stroke patients with oropharyngeal Dysphagia after swallowing therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun-Ling; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Chi; Leong, Chau-Peng; Lin, Wei-Che; Pong, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia after stroke is associated with mortality and increased pulmonary complications. Swallowing therapies may decrease pulmonary complications and improve patients' quality of life after stroke. This study used clinical swallowing assessments and videofluoroscopy (VFS) to assess the functional recovery of acute stroke patients with dysphagia after different swallowing therapies. We enrolled 29 acute stroke patients with dysphagia and randomly divided them into 3 therapy groups: traditional swallowing (TS), oropharyngeal neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), and combined NMES/TS. All patients were assessed using the clinical functional oral intake scale (FOIS), 8-point penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), and functional dysphagia scale (FDS) of VFS before and after treatment. There were no differences in the clinical parameters and swallowing results of the FOIS and VFS before swallowing treatment among the 3 groups (P > .05). TS therapy and combined therapy both had significant swallowing improvement after therapy according to the FOIS and 8-point PAS (P < .05). When comparing the results of the VFS among the 3 groups, we found significant improvements in patients eating cookies and thick liquid after combined NMES/TS therapy (P < .05). In acute stroke patients with dysphagia, combined NMES/TS therapy is the most effective swallowing therapy in taking solid diets and thick liquids.

  10. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-03-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata.

  11. Management of the node-positive neck in the patient with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garden, Adam S.; Gunn, Gary B.; Hessel, Amy; Beadle, Beth M.; Ahmed, Salmaan; El-naggar, Adel; Fuller, Clifton D.; Byers, Lauren A.; Phan, Jack; Frank, Steven J.; Morrison, William H.; Kies, Merill S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to assess the rates of recurrence in the neck for node-positive patients with HPV-associated oropharynx cancer treated with definitive radiation (with or without chemotherapy). Methods This is a single institutional retrospective study. Methodology included database search, and statistical testing including frequency analysis, Kaplan-Meier tests, and comparative tests including chi-square, logistic regression and log-rank. Results The cohort consisted of 401 node-positive patients irradiated between 2006 – June 2012. Three hundred eighty eight patients had CT restaging, and 251 had PET and/or US as a component of their post radiation staging. Eighty patients (20%) underwent neck dissection, and 21 (26%) had a positive specimen. The rate of neck dissection increased with increasing nodal stage, and was lower in patients who had PET scans or ultrasound in addition to CT restaging. The median follow-up was 30 months. The 2-year actuarial neck recurrence rate was 7% and 5% in all patients and those with local control, respectively. Nodal recurrence rates were greater in current smokers (p=.008). There was no difference in nodal recurrences rates in patients who did or did not have a neck dissection (p = .4) Conclusions A treatment strategy of (chemo)radiation with neck dissection performed based on response resulted in high rates of regional disease control in patients with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:24898672

  12. Metagenomic Sequencing Indicates That the Oropharyngeal Phageome of Individuals With Schizophrenia Differs From That of Controls

    PubMed Central

    Yolken, Robert H.; Severance, Emily G.; Sabunciyan, Sarven; Gressitt, Kristin L.; Chen, Ou; Stallings, Cassie; Origoni, Andrea; Katsafanas, Emily; Schweinfurth, Lucy A. B.; Savage, Christina L. G.; Banis, Maria; Khushalani, Sunil; Dickerson, Faith B.

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal sites such as the oropharynx contain a wide range of microorganisms, collectively designated as the microbiome. The microbiome can affect behavior through a number of neurobiological and immunological mechanisms. Most previous studies have focused on the bacterial components of the microbiome. However, the microbiome also includes viruses such as bacteriophages, which are viruses that infect bacteria and alter their metabolism and replication. We employed metagenomic analysis to characterize bacteriophage genomes in the oral pharynx of 41 individuals with schizophrenia and 33 control individuals without a psychiatric disorder. This analysis was performed by the generation of more than 100000000 sequence reads from each sample and the mapping of these reads to databases. We identified 79 distinct bacteriophage sequences in the oropharyngeal samples. Of these, one bacteriophage genome, Lactobacillus phage phiadh, was found to be significantly different in individuals with schizophrenia (P < .00037, q < 0.03 adjusted for multiple comparisons). The differential levels of Lactobacillus phage phiadh remained significant when controlling for age, gender, race, socioeconomic status, or cigarette smoking (P < .006). Within the group of individuals with schizophrenia, the level of Lactobacillus phage phiadh correlated with the prevalence of immunological disorders as well as with the administration of valproate, which has been shown in animal models to alter the microbiome. The bacteriophage composition of the oropharynx in individuals with schizophrenia differs from that of controls. The biological consequences of this difference and the potential effects of altering bacteriophage levels through therapeutic interventions are worthy of further investigation. PMID:25666826

  13. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G.; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata. PMID:27029023

  14. Vocal Variability Post Swallowing in Individuals with and without Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Karoline Weber dos; Scheeren, Betina; Maciel, Antonio Carlos; Cassol, Mauriceia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Voice modification after swallowing may indicate changes in the transit of the bolus. Objective The aim of this study is to verify the use of perceptual voice analysis to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia. Study Design Case series. Methods Twenty-seven patients with dysphagia as diagnosed by videofluoroscopy and 25 without were evaluated. The sustained vowel /a/ was recorded before this exam and after swallowing different consistencies (pasty, liquid and solid). For the voice evaluation, the GRBAS scale (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia and strain) and the parameter “wet voice” were used. Three judges blinded to study group and time of emission performed voice analysis. Results Individuals with dysphagia showed significant decrease in grade of voice and asthenia and increase in strain after swallowing pasty substances, differing from individuals without dysphagia who showed no modification of the parameters after swallowing. The wet voice parameter showed no difference after swallowing in both study groups. Conclusion The decrease in grade and asthenia and increased strain are indicative of a swallowing disorder, indicating increased vocal strain to clean the vocal tract of food. The modification of vocal production after swallowing proved to be a trusted resource for detection of swallowing disorders. PMID:25992153

  15. Prevalence and Treatment Management of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Cancer Patients: Results of the French Candidoscope Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gligorov, Joseph; Bastit, Laurent; Gervais, Honorine; Henni, Mehdi; Kahila, Widad; Lepille, Daniel; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Sasso, Giuseppe; Varette, Charles; Azria, David

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pharmaco-epidemiological study was to evaluate the prevalence of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Signs and symptoms of OPC were noted for all patients. Antifungal therapeutic management was recorded in OPC patients. Patients receiving local antifungal treatments were monitored until the end of treatment. Results: Enrolled in the study were 2,042 patients with solid tumor and/or lymphoma treated with chemotherapy and/or another systemic cancer treatment and/or radiotherapy. The overall prevalence of OPC was 9.6% (95% confidence interval, 8.4%-11.0%]in this population. It was most frequent in patients treated with combined chemoradiotherapy (22.0%) or with more than two cytotoxic agents (16.9%). Local antifungal treatments were prescribed in 75.0% of OPC patients as recommended by guidelines. The compliance to treatment was higher in patients receiving once-daily miconazole mucoadhesive buccal tablet (MBT; 88.2%) than in those treated with several daily mouthwashes of amphotericin B (40%) or nystatin (18.8%). Conclusion: OPC prevalence in treated cancer patients was high. Local treatments were usually prescribed as per guidelines. Compliance to local treatments was better with once-daily drugs.

  16. Constraining the brachial plexus does not compromise regional control in oropharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that brachial plexopathy following head and neck cancer radiotherapy may be underreported and that this toxicity is associated with a dose–response. Our purpose was to determine whether the dose to the brachial plexus (BP) can be constrained, without compromising regional control. Methods The radiation plans of 324 patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were reviewed. We identified 42 patients (13%) with gross nodal disease <1 cm from the BP. Normal tissue constraints included a maximum dose of 66 Gy and a D05 of 60 Gy for the BP. These criteria took precedence over planning target volume (PTV) coverage of nodal disease near the BP. Results There was only one regional failure in the vicinity of the BP, salvaged with neck dissection (ND) and regional re-irradiation. There have been no reported episodes of brachial plexopathy to date. Conclusions In combined-modality therapy, including ND as salvage, regional control did not appear to be compromised by constraining the dose to the BP. This approach may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing the long-term risk of brachial plexopathy. PMID:23835205

  17. A Dose Escalation Study in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-19

    Advanced Solid Tumors With Alterations of FGFR1, 2 and/or 3;; Squamous Lung Cancer With FGFR1 Amplification;; Bladder Cancer With FGFR3 Mutation or Fusion; Advanced Solid Tumors With FGFR1 Amplication,; Advanced Solid Tumors With FGFR2 Amplication,; Advanced Solid Tumors With FGFR3 Mutation

  18. P16(INK4A) immunostaining is a strong indicator for high-risk-HPV-associated oropharyngeal carcinomas and dysplasias, but is unreliable to predict low-risk-HPV-infection in head and neck papillomas and laryngeal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Mooren, Jeroen J; Gültekin, Sibel E; Straetmans, Jos M J A A; Haesevoets, Annick; Peutz-Kootstra, Carine J; Huebbers, Christian U; Dienes, Hans P; Wieland, Ulrike; Ramaekers, Frans C S; Kremer, Bernd; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Klussmann, Jens P

    2014-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a risk factor for the development of benign and malignant mucosal head and neck lesions. P16(INK4A) is often used as a surrogate marker for HPV-infection, although there is still controversy with respect its reliability. Our aim was to determine if p16(INK4A) overexpression can accurately predict both high-risk and low-risk-HPV-presence in (pre)malignant and benign head and neck lesions. P16(INK4A) immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 162 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC), 14 tonsillar and 23 laryngeal dysplasias, and 20 tonsillar and 27 laryngeal papillomas. PCR, enzyme-immunoassay and FISH analysis were used to assess HPV-presence and type. Of the 162 OPSCC and 14 tonsillar dysplasias, 51 (31%) and 10 (71%) were HPV16-positive, respectively. All tonsillar papillomas were HPV-negative and four laryngeal dysplasias and 26 laryngeal papillomas were positive for HPV6 or -11. P16(INK4A) immunohistochemistry revealed a strong nuclear and cytoplasmic staining in 50 out of 51 HPV16-positive and 5 out of 111 HPV-negative OPSCC (p < 0.0001) and in all HPV16-positive tonsillar dysplasias, whereas highly variable staining patterns were detected in the papillomas and laryngeal dysplasias, irrespective of the HPV-status. In addition, the latter lesions generally showed a higher nuclear than cytoplasmic p16(INK4A) immunostaining intensity. In conclusion, our data show that strong nuclear and cytoplasmic p16(INK4A) overexpression is a reliable surrogate indicator for HPV16 in OPSCC and (adjacent) dysplasias. For HPV6 or -11-positive and HPV-negative benign and premalignant lesions of the tonsil and larynx, however, p16(INK4A) immunostaining is highly variable and cannot be recommended to predict HPV-presence. PMID:24127203

  19. How Are Squamous and Basal Cell Skin Cancers Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... often enough to cure basal and squamous cell skin cancers without further treatment. There are different types of skin biopsies. The ... and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Skin Cancer - ... Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Skin Cancer - Basal and Squamous ...

  20. "Intercellular bridges" in a case of well differentiated squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michaela; Mikita, Geoffrey; Hoda, Rana S

    2016-02-01

    Intercellular bridges may aide in definitive identification of malignant cell origin, especially in squamous cell carcinoma. They are difficult to identify in routine cytologic specimens and are especially rare in smear preparations. Herein, we present images of intercellular bridges from a case of well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus in a cytologic specimen obtained from FNA of a paraesophageal lymph node.

  1. Squamous metaplasia of the rete ovarii in a Zebu cow

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stratified keratinizing squamous epithelium in the ovary has been associated with the diagnosis of ovarian teratoma in cows. Recently, the diagnosis of “epidermoid cyst” has been proposed. A case of squamous metaplasia of the rete ovarii in a Zebu cow is described in this report. Case presentation A crossbreed Zebu cow had both ovaries enlarged with multiple cysts. Most cysts were lined by well differentiated keratinizing stratified squamous epithelium and filled with keratinized lamellar material. Some cysts were lined by an epithelial layer that ranged from single cuboidal, double cuboidal epithelium, stratified non keratinized epithelium, and areas of keratinizing stratified squamous epithelium. Single or double layered cuboidal epithelia of the cysts expressed low molecular weight cytokeratin 7, whose expression was absent in the keratinizing stratified squamous epithelia of same cysts. Conversely, high molecular weight cytokeratins 1, 5, 10, and 14 were strongly expressed by the keratinizing stratified epithelium. Conclusion Squamous metaplasia of the rete ovarii was diagnosed. Squamous metaplasia of the rete ovarii, may account for some of the previously described squamous lesions in the ovary, which may have been misinterpreted as teratoma or epidermoid cysts. PMID:23217175

  2. Phase 2 Study of Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and Concurrent Radiation for Technically Resectable Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Inohara, Hidenori; Takenaka, Yukinori; Yoshii, Tadashi; Nakahara, Susumu; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Tomiyama, Yoichiro; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Suzuki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Sumida, Iori; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: We investigated the efficacy and safety of weekly low-dose docetaxel and cisplatin therapy concurrent with conventionally fractionated radiation in patients with technically resectable stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and October 2011, we enrolled 117 patients, of whom 116 were analyzable (43 had oropharyngeal cancer, 54 had hypopharyngeal cancer, and 19 had laryngeal cancer), and 85 (73%) had stage IV disease. Radiation consisted of 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Docetaxel, 10 mg/m{sup 2}, followed by cisplatin, 20 mg/m{sup 2}, administered on the same day were given once a week for 6 cycles. The primary endpoint was overall complete response (CR) rate after chemoradiation therapy. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in oropharyngeal cancer was examined by PCR. Results: Of 116 patients, 82 (71%) completed treatment per protocol; 102 (88%) received the full radiation therapy dose; and 90 (78%) and 12 (10%) patients received 6 and 5 chemotherapy cycles, respectively. Overall CR rate was 71%. After median follow-up of 50.9 months (range: 15.6-113.9 months for surviving patients), 2-year and 4-year overall survival rates were 82% and 68%, respectively. Cumulative 2-year and 4-year local failure rates were 27% and 28%, respectively, whereas distant metastasis rates were 15% and 22%, respectively. HPV status in oropharyngeal cancer was not associated with treatment efficacy. Acute toxicity included grade 3 and 4 in-field mucositis in 73% and 5% of patients, respectively, whereas myelosuppression and renal injury were minimal. No patients died of toxicity. Feeding tube dependence in 8% and tracheostomy in 1% of patients were evident at 2 years postchemoradiation therapy in patients who survived without local treatment failure. Conclusions: Local control and survival with this regimen were satisfactory. Although acute toxicity, such as mucositis, was common, late toxicity, such as laryngoesophageal

  3. Cutaneous tuberculosis and squamous-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ljubenovic, Milanka S; Ljubenovic, Dragisa B; Binic, Ivana I; Jankovic, Aleksandar S; Jancic, Snezana A

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of all forms of cutaneous tuberculosis, including lupus vulgaris (the most common form) decreased progressively in developed countries during the twentieth century, this change being attributed to improved living standards and specific therapy. Despite the decrease in cutaneous tuberculosis, some cases are still found and correct diagnosis and management are fundamental, both for the patients and for public health. Long lasting, misdiagnosed or untreated cutaneous tuberculosis may lead to different forms of cancer. This case report involves a 74-year old male farmer with lupus vulgaris on his face. During anti-tuberculosis treatment he developed a tumor on his forehead, which was histologically confirmed as a squamous cell carcinoma.

  4. Squamous morules are functionally inert elements of premalignant endometrial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Chieh; Lomo, Lesley; Baak, Jan P A; Eng, Charis; Ince, Tan A; Crum, Christopher P; Mutter, George L

    2009-02-01

    Squamous morules are a common component of premalignant glandular lesions that are followed by glandular, rather than squamous, carcinomas. We tested the hypothesis that the appearance of glands associated with morules predicts cancer risk, and undertook molecular testing to determine the clonal and hormonal response properties of admixed squamous and glandular elements. A total of 66 patients with squamous morules in an index endometrial biopsy had follow-up clinical data (average follow-up: interval 31 months, 2.5 biopsies) showing development of carcinoma in 11% (7/66) of cases. The histological appearance of morule-associated glands in the index biopsy was significantly associated with this clinical outcome, with the majority (71%, 5/7) of cancer occurrences following an overtly premalignant lesion (endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia) with squamous morules. Eight endometrial intraepithelial neoplasias with squamous morules were examined by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptors and mitotic activity (Ki-67 antigen percent stained). Glandular components had abundant estrogen and progesterone receptors, and high levels of mitotic activity in all cases. In sharp contrast, all squamous morules were devoid of sex hormone receptors and had undetectable or extremely low-proliferation rates. When mutated, the same specific PTEN mutation was detected in squamous and glandular elements, indicating that both are of common lineage. The clinical and laboratory data are consistent with a model of morule biology in which squamous morules are a hormonally incompetent subpopulation of endometrial glandular lesions. Isolated morules might result from artifactual displacement from their native glandular context, or selective hormonally induced regression of the glandular but not squamous components over time. Subsequent cancer risk, as promoted by estrogens, is greatest when the glandular component has the appearance of endometrial intraepithelial

  5. Squamous Morules Are Functionally Inert Elements of Premalignant Endometrial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Chieh; Lomo, Lesley; Baak, Jan P. A.; Eng, Charis; Ince, Tan A.; Crum, Christopher P.; Mutter, George L.

    2008-01-01

    Squamous morules are a common component of premalignant glandular lesions that are followed by glandular, rather than squamous, carcinomas. We tested the hypothesis that the appearance of glands associated with morules predicts cancer risk, and undertook molecular testing to determine the clonal and hormonal response properties of admixed squamous and glandular elements. 66 patients with squamous morules in an index endometrial biopsy had followup clinical data (average followup: interval 31 months, 2.5 biopsies) showing development of carcinoma in 11% (7/66) of cases. The histological appearance of morule-associated glands in the index biopsy was significantly associated with this clinical outcome, with the majority (71%, 5/7) of cancer occurrences following an overtly premalignant lesion (Endometrial Intraepithelial Neoplasia) with squamous morules. Eight endometrial intraepithelial neoplasias with squamous morules were examined by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptors and mitotic activity (Ki-67 antigen percent stained). Glandular components had abundant estrogen and progesterone receptors, and high levels of mitotic activity in all cases. In sharp contrast, all squamous morules were devoid of sex hormone receptors and had undetectable or extremely low proliferation rates. When mutated, the same specific PTEN mutation was detected in squamous and glandular elements, indicating that both are of common lineage. The clinical and laboratory data are consistent with a model of morule biology in which squamous morules are a hormonally incompetent subpopulation of endometrial glandular lesions. Isolated morules might result from artifactual displacement from their native glandular context, or selective hormonally induced regression of the glandular but not squamous components over time. Subsequent cancer risk, as promoted by estrogens, is greatest when the glandular component has the appearance of endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia. Even

  6. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas in a Patient with Germline BRCA2 Mutation-Response to Neoadjuvant Radiochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schultheis, Anne M.; Nguyen, Gia Phuong; Ortmann, Monika; Kruis, Wolfgang; Büttner, Reinhard; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Markiefka, Birgid

    2014-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignant neoplasia, accounting for approximately 0.5–2% of all malignant pancreatic tumors. These lesions are characterized by poor prognosis. Here we report on a case of a 57-year-old female patient with known BRCA2 germline mutation presenting with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas as the only malignancy. The tumor was locally advanced at the first presentation but responded almost completely to neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy. Our case highlights the facts (i) that pancreatic carcinomas belong to the tumor spectrum of patients with the BRCA2-associated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and (ii) that tumors of the pancreas can represent the first or even the only manifestation of HBOC. Furthermore, this case of a nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma indicates that HBOC-associated carcinomas of the pancreas might be characterized by a broader morphological spectrum than was previously thought. Since BRCA mutations cause deficiency of DNA double-strand breakage repair in tumors, neoadjuvant treatment regimens might become a reasonable option in HBOC-associated pancreatic carcinomas. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a primary pancreatic squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with this particular genetic background of BRCA2-associated HBOC. PMID:24959366

  7. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas in a Patient with Germline BRCA2 Mutation-Response to Neoadjuvant Radiochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Anne M; Nguyen, Gia Phuong; Ortmann, Monika; Kruis, Wolfgang; Büttner, Reinhard; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Markiefka, Birgid

    2014-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignant neoplasia, accounting for approximately 0.5-2% of all malignant pancreatic tumors. These lesions are characterized by poor prognosis. Here we report on a case of a 57-year-old female patient with known BRCA2 germline mutation presenting with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas as the only malignancy. The tumor was locally advanced at the first presentation but responded almost completely to neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy. Our case highlights the facts (i) that pancreatic carcinomas belong to the tumor spectrum of patients with the BRCA2-associated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and (ii) that tumors of the pancreas can represent the first or even the only manifestation of HBOC. Furthermore, this case of a nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma indicates that HBOC-associated carcinomas of the pancreas might be characterized by a broader morphological spectrum than was previously thought. Since BRCA mutations cause deficiency of DNA double-strand breakage repair in tumors, neoadjuvant treatment regimens might become a reasonable option in HBOC-associated pancreatic carcinomas. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a primary pancreatic squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with this particular genetic background of BRCA2-associated HBOC.

  8. Afatinib in the treatment of squamous non-small cell lung cancer: a new frontier or an old mistake?

    PubMed Central

    Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Proto, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma represents approximately 20% of all non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and is associated with a very poor prognosis. In the randomized phase III LUX-Lung 8 trial afatinib showed a statistical significant efficacy advantage compared to erlotinib as second-line treatment of advanced/metastatic squamous NSCLC. Despite its well-built design and the statistical significant results, in our opinion the study is still far from being clinically relevant for this subset of patients. Moreover, during the last years other drugs have shown encouraging activity with low toxicity in pretreated lung squamous cell carcinomas. In particular, nivolumab in the treatment of platinum-pretreated squamous NSCLC has recently radically changed the treatment paradigms in this histology. Sure, LUX-Lung 8 trial achieved its primary endpoint progression-free survival showing some afatinib activity in one of the most difficult-to treat and genetically complex neoplasm but we haven’t found the most active drug in this subset of patients yet. The purpose of this editorial is to discuss some of the most controversial aspects of the LUX-Lung 8 trial focusing especially on its rational and design. PMID:26958504

  9. Renal calculus complicated with squamous cell carcinoma of renal pelvis: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiantao; Lei, Jun; He, Leye; Yin, Guangming

    2015-01-01

    Longstanding renal calculus is a risk factor of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the renal pelvis. It is highly aggressive and usually diagnosed at advanced stages with a poor prognosis. We present two cases of kidney stone complications with renal pelvic SCC. These two patients had a radical nephrectomy and the dissected tissues were renal pelvic SCC. Our cases further emphasize that renal pelvic SCC should be considered in patients with longstanding renal calculus. These cases contribute greatly to an early diagnosis and early treatment, both of which will significantly minimize the damage of, and markedly improve the prognosis of, renal pelvic SCC.

  10. Squamous cell carcinoma of kidney co-existing with renal calculi: a rare tumour.

    PubMed

    Verma, Nidhi; Yadav, Gulabdhar; Dhawan, Nishi; Kumar, Awanish

    2011-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of urinary tract is a very rare tumour known to be associated with chronic renal calculi and infection. This tumour is highly aggressive and often detected at advanced stage with poor outcome. The authors describe a case report of a 62-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with right nephrolithiasis with non-functioning kidney. Histopathology revealed an unexpected co-existing SCC in renal pelvis. The present case highlights the careful search and use of newer imaging modalities in cases of long-standing renal calculi as they may have co-existing hidden malignancy which may change the treatment plan and prognosis.

  11. Urothelial and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Renal Pelvis – A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hippargi, Surekha B.; Kumar, Mayank

    2016-01-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the renal pelvis are relatively rare. Urothelial carcinoma of renal pelvis accounts for 7% of all renal neoplasms, with Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) forming a very small percentage of these cases. Urothelial and SCC of renal pelvis is still a rarer entity. This malignancy of the renal pelvis lacks the characteristic presentation of common renal cell carcinoma and usually presents at an advanced disease stage. We report a case of urothelial and SCC of renal pelvis in a 61-year-old male who presented with non-specific clinical complaints like dysuria and right flank pain. PMID:27790450

  12. Variability of the thymidine labeling index in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, B.; Woo, L.; Blatchford, S.; Aguirre, M.; Garewal, H.

    1988-06-01

    Tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/HTdR) labeling is the standard technique for determining the kinetic activity of tumors. This method has been used to label multiple sections of tumor specimens obtained from seven patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Considerable variability was observed in the labeling index in different sites from the same specimen. To reduce the large sampling error due to heterogeneity, we recommend that an average value be determined from multiple sections when employing this technique.

  13. A comprehensive evaluation of human papillomavirus positive status and p16INK4a overexpression as a prognostic biomarker in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zeyi; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Aoki, Kazuo; Matayoshi, Sen; Kiyuna, Asanori; Yamashita, Yukashi; Uehara, Takayuki; Agena, Shinya; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Xie, Minqiang; Suzuki, Mikio

    2014-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection have better prognosis than those without HPV infection. Although p16(INK4a) expression is used as a surrogate marker for HPV infection, there is controversy as to whether p16(INK4a) reliably indicates HPV infection. Here, to evaluate the accuracy of p16(INK4a) expression for determining HPV infection and the prognostic value of HPV infection and p16(INK4a) expression for HNSCC survival, especially oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) survival, 150 fresh-frozen HNSCC samples were analyzed for HPV DNA, E6/E7 mRNA and p16(INK4a) expression by polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. p16(INK4a) expression was scored from 0 to 4 according to the percentage of p16(INK4a)-positive cells, with overexpression defined as >40% positive cells. Of the 150 tumor samples tested, 10 tumors were nasopharyngeal, 53 oropharyngeal, 39 hypopharyngeal, 24 laryngeal and 24 were located in the oral cavity. HPV DNA was detected in 47 (31.3%) samples, but only 21 also exhibited HPV mRNA expression. Inter-rater agreement was low between p16(INK4a) expression and HPV DNA presence and between p16(INK4a) expression and HPV mRNA expression, but was good between the combination of HPV DNA status and p16(INK4a) overexpression and HPV mRNA expression. Three-year recurrence-free survival was significantly higher for OPSCC patients who were HPV DNA-positive than for OPSCC patients who were HPV DNA-negative (P=0.008) and for OPSCC patients overexpressing p16(INK4a) than for without overexpressing p16(INK4a) (P=0.034). Multivariate analysis revealed that T1-3 stage and the combination of HPV DNA positivity and p16(INK4a) overexpression predicted significantly better recurrence-free survival. This combination is a more accurate marker for active HPV infection in HNSCC than HPV DNA status or general p16(INK4a)-positive status alone and offers a useful and reliable method for detecting and

  14. [Evaluation of the oropharyngeal tularemia cases admitted to our hospital from the provinces of Central Anatolia].

    PubMed

    Uyar, Melek; Cengiz, Buğra; Unlü, Murat; Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk; Eryılmaz, Adil

    2011-01-01

    Tularemia caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic infection which has re-emerged in Turkey in recent years as water-borne endemics. Oropharyngeal form is the most frequently reported form of the disease from Turkey. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory findings of oropharyngeal tularemia patients admitted to ear, nose & throat outpatient clinic between January-March 2010. A total of 10 patients (age range: 16-80 years, mean age: 43.9 years; nine were male) inhabiting in the provinces in Central Anatolia, Turkey, were admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever, sore throat and painful cervical lump. They have been previously diagnosed as tonsillo-pharyngitis at different medical centers and empirical antibiotic therapy has initiated, however, their complaints have not recovered. Endoscopic laryngoscopic examination revealed that oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx were normal. Physical examination of the neck yielded localized fixed masses with diameters between 2-7 cm. The lesions were localized at right submandibular (n= 4), upper jugular (n=3) and one of each at left posterior cervical, left submandibular and left jugulodigastric regions. The patients were hospitalized with the pre-diagnosis of "neck mass with unknown origin" for further investigation and treatment. The mean white blood cell count of the cases was 9730 (7500-15.100) cells/µl; the mean erythrocyte sedimantation rate was 68.7 (46-85) mm3/hours and the mean C-reactive protein level was 4.3 (1.5-7.4) µg/dl. Salmonella, Brucella, Toxoplasma gondii, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus and viral hepatitis serology did not indicate acute infections. Serum and tissue samples were sent to Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency in order to test for tularemia, namely culture, microagglutination test (MAT), direct fluorescence antibody (DFA) test and in-house polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All of the patients

  15. Dysphagia in stroke, neurodegenerative disease, and advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Altman, Kenneth W; Richards, Amanda; Goldberg, Leanne; Frucht, Steven; McCabe, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Aspiration risk from dysphagia increases with central and peripheral neurologic disease. Stroke, microvascular ischemic disease, a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases, and advancing dementia all have unique aspects. However, there are distinct commonalities in this population. Increasing nutritional requirements to stave off oropharyngeal muscular atrophy and a sedentary lifestyle further tax the patient's abilities to safely swallow. This article reviews stroke, muscular dystrophy, myasthenia gravis, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and advanced dementia. Approaches to screening and evaluation, recognizing sentinel indicators of decline that increase aspiration risk, and options for managing global laryngeal dysfunction are also presented. PMID:24262965

  16. Dysphagia in stroke, neurodegenerative disease, and advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Altman, Kenneth W; Richards, Amanda; Goldberg, Leanne; Frucht, Steven; McCabe, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Aspiration risk from dysphagia increases with central and peripheral neurologic disease. Stroke, microvascular ischemic disease, a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases, and advancing dementia all have unique aspects. However, there are distinct commonalities in this population. Increasing nutritional requirements to stave off oropharyngeal muscular atrophy and a sedentary lifestyle further tax the patient's abilities to safely swallow. This article reviews stroke, muscular dystrophy, myasthenia gravis, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and advanced dementia. Approaches to screening and evaluation, recognizing sentinel indicators of decline that increase aspiration risk, and options for managing global laryngeal dysfunction are also presented.

  17. Squamous cell carcinoma of the extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Lifeso, R.M.; Bull, C.A.

    1985-06-15

    Between January 1976 and January 1983, 37 cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the extremities have been treated at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre by the authors. Each case has arisen in an area of preexisting scar or sinus. Twenty-nine cases were treated by definitive amputation, with 2 local recurrences and 12 nodal metastases. Seven cases had local excision, with three local recurrences and two nodal metastases. Recurrence rate was highest in Grade II and Grade III lesions, and 11 of 15 cases with Grade II disease had metastases to the regional lymph nodes an average of 5 months after surgery. With Grade I disease patients, 4 of 15 had nodal metastases an average of 5 months after surgery. Prophylactic regional nodal irradiation or node dissection was performed in seven cases. None of these cases have shown nodal metastases at an average of 24 months following definitive surgery and radiation. Routine prophylactic regional node irradiation is recommended in all cases of peripheral squamous cell carcinoma.

  18. Genetic landscape of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi-Bo; Chen, Zhao-Li; Li, Jia-Gen; Hu, Xue-Da; Shi, Xue-Jiao; Sun, Zeng-Miao; Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Zi-Ran; Li, Zi-Tong; Liu, Zi-Yuan; Zhao, Yu-Da; Sun, Jian; Zhou, Cheng-Cheng; Yao, Ran; Wang, Su-Ya; Wang, Pan; Sun, Nan; Zhang, Bai-Hua; Dong, Jing-Si; Yu, Yue; Luo, Mei; Feng, Xiao-Li; Shi, Su-Sheng; Zhou, Fang; Tan, Feng-Wei; Qiu, Bin; Li, Ning; Shao, Kang; Zhang, Li-Jian; Zhang, Lan-Jun; Xue, Qi; Gao, Shu-Geng; He, Jie

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the deadliest cancers. We performed exome sequencing on 113 tumor-normal pairs, yielding a mean of 82 non-silent mutations per tumor, and 8 cell lines. The mutational profile of ESCC closely resembles those of squamous cell carcinomas of other tissues but differs from that of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis regulation were mutated in 99% of cases by somatic alterations of TP53 (93%), CCND1 (33%), CDKN2A (20%), NFE2L2 (10%) and RB1 (9%). Histone modifier genes were frequently mutated, including KMT2D (also called MLL2; 19%), KMT2C (MLL3; 6%), KDM6A (7%), EP300 (10%) and CREBBP (6%). EP300 mutations were associated with poor survival. The Hippo and Notch pathways were dysregulated by mutations in FAT1, FAT2, FAT3 or FAT4 (27%) or AJUBA (JUB; 7%) and NOTCH1, NOTCH2 or NOTCH3 (22%) or FBXW7 (5%), respectively. These results define the mutational landscape of ESCC and highlight mutations in epigenetic modulators with prognostic and potentially therapeutic implications. PMID:25151357

  19. Refining Risk Stratification for Locoregional Failure after Chemoradiotherapy in Human Papillomavirus-Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Spector, Matthew E.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Wong, Ka Kit; Walline, Heather M.; Byrd, Serena A.; Komarck, Christine M.; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Prince, Mark E.; Bradford, Carol R.; Wolf, Gregory T.; McLean, Scott; Worden, Francis P.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Carey, Thomas; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine whether the addition of molecular and imaging biomarkers to established clinical risk factors could help predict locoregional failure (LRF) after chemoradiation in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related(+) oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) and improve patient selection for locoregional treatment de-intensification. Methods HPV status was determined for 198 consecutive patients with Stage III/IV OPC treated with definitive chemoradiation from 5/2003–10/2010. The impact of pre-therapy epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression; imaging biomarkers including primary tumor and nodal maximum standardized uptake values on FDG-PET, gross tumor volumes, and matted nodes; and clinical factors on LRF (including residual disease at adjuvant neck dissection) was assessed. Results Primary tumors were HPV+ in 184 patients and HPV-negative in 14. EGFR overexpression was related to HPV-negative status and was univariately associated with LRF in the overall population, but was neither retained in the multivariate model after adjustment for HPV status, nor associated with LRF in HPV+ patients. Similarly, imaging biomarkers were univariately associated with LRF, but correlated with T-stage and/or N-stage and did not remain predictive in HPV+ patients after adjustment for T4- and N3-stages, which were the only significant predictors of LRF on multivariate analysis. Among HPV+ patients with non-T4- or N3-stages, only minimal smoking was associated with decreased LRF. Conclusion(s) The prognostic impact of EGFR overexpression and imaging biomarkers on LRF was predominantly related to their association with HPV-negative status and T- or N-stage, respectively. . Among HPV+ OPC patients treated with uniform chemoradiation, only T4-stage, N3-stage, and smoking contributed to risk-stratification for LRF. PMID:24565983

  20. Oropharyngeal dysphagia, free water protocol and quality of life: an update from a prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Martha; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia, typically associated with older adults, represents a spectrum of swallowing disorders with potentially serious complications and a negative impact on quality of life. A major complication of dysphagia is caused by aspiration, predominantly of thin liquids, which may cause aspiration pneumonia. Given that thin liquids are typically aspirated, the conventional therapy involves altering the diet to one consisting of modified solid consistencies and thickened fluids. While it is well known that this approach is appropriate for aspiration, it does represent difficulties with compliancy and quality of life. We have undertaken a relatively large scale clinical trial to investigate the relationships between the effects of free access to water and the development of aspiration, aspects of hydration and issues related to quality in people with dysphagia. Along with clinical observations and findings from others we have previously stratified people with dysphagia, namely those that are immobile or who have low mobility and severe degenerative neurological dysfunction, at highest risk of developing aspiration pneumonia following intake of water. In the present study, we have extended our previous clinical results. Our findings indicate that following purposeful selection of people with dysphagia with their own mobility and relatively healthy cognitive function, free access to water did not result in aspiration pneumonia, improved measures of hydration and in particular, significantly increased quality of life when compared to a diet consisting of thickened fluids only. Overall, we conclude that in people with good mobility and cognitive ability, there is no need to deviate from the Frazier Rehabilitation Centre free water protocol, which allows for the provision of water to people with dysphagia with strict guidelines particularly in relation to good physical ability.

  1. Osteoradionecrosis and Radiation Dose to the Mandible in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chiaojung Jillian; Hofstede, Theresa M.; Sturgis, Erich M.; Garden, Adam S.; Lindberg, Mary E.; Wei Qingyi; Tucker, Susan L.; Dong Lei

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the association between radiation doses delivered to the mandible and the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 402 oropharyngeal cancer patients with stage T1 or T2 disease treated with definitive radiation between January 2000 and October 2008 for the occurrence of ORN. Demographic and treatment variables were compared between patients with ORN and those without. To examine the dosimetric relationship further, a nested case-control comparison was performed. One to 2 ORN-free patients were selected to match each ORN patient by age, sex, radiation type, treatment year, and cancer subsite. Detailed radiation treatment plans for the ORN cases and matched controls were reviewed. Mann-Whitney test and conditional logistic regression were used to compare relative volumes of the mandible exposed to doses ranging from 10 Gy-60 Gy in 10-Gy increments. Results: In 30 patients (7.5%), ORN developed during a median follow-up time of 31 months, including 6 patients with grade 4 ORN that required major surgery. The median time to develop ORN was 8 months (range, 0-71 months). Detailed radiation treatment plans were available for 25 of the 30 ORN patients and 40 matched ORN-free patients. In the matched case-control analysis, there was a statistically significant difference between the volumes of mandible in the 2 groups receiving doses between 50 Gy (V50) and 60 Gy (V60). The most notable difference was seen at V50, with a P value of .02 in the multivariate model after adjustment for the matching variables and dental status (dentate or with extraction). Conclusions: V50 and V60 saw the most significant differences between the ORN group and the comparison group. Minimizing the percent mandibular volume exposed to 50 Gy may reduce ORN risk.

  2. Variations in the Contouring of Organs at Risk: Test Case From a Patient With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Robinson, Greg; Wheeler, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Anatomy contouring is critical in radiation therapy. Inaccuracy and variation in defining critical volumes will affect everything downstream: treatment planning, dose-volume histogram analysis, and contour-based visual guidance used in image-guided radiation therapy. This study quantified: (1) variation in the contouring of organs at risk (OAR) in a clinical test case and (2) corresponding effects on dosimetric metrics of highly conformal plans. Methods and Materials: A common CT data set with predefined targets from a patient with oropharyngeal cancer was provided to a population of clinics, which were asked to (1) contour OARs and (2) design an intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan. Thirty-two acceptable plans were submitted as DICOM RT data sets, each generated by a different clinical team. Using those data sets, we quantified: (1) the OAR contouring variation and (2) the impact this variation has on dosimetric metrics. New technologies were employed, including a software tool to quantify three-dimensional structure comparisons. Results: There was significant interclinician variation in OAR contouring. The degree of variation is organ-dependent. We found substantial dose differences resulting strictly from contouring variation (differences ranging from -289% to 56% for mean OAR dose; -22% to 35% for maximum dose). However, there appears to be a threshold in the OAR comparison metric beyond which the dose differences stabilize. Conclusions: The effects of interclinician variation in contouring organs-at-risk in the head and neck can be large and are organ-specific. Physicians need to be aware of the effect that variation in OAR contouring can play on the final treatment plan and not restrict their focus only to the target volumes.

  3. Forecasting longitudinal changes in oropharyngeal tumor morphology throughout the course of head and neck radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yock, Adam D.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To create models that forecast longitudinal trends in changing tumor morphology and to evaluate and compare their predictive potential throughout the course of radiation therapy. Methods: Two morphology feature vectors were used to describe 35 gross tumor volumes (GTVs) throughout the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal tumors. The feature vectors comprised the coordinates of the GTV centroids and a description of GTV shape using either interlandmark distances or a spherical harmonic decomposition of these distances. The change in the morphology feature vector observed at 33 time points throughout the course of treatment was described using static, linear, and mean models. Models were adjusted at 0, 1, 2, 3, or 5 different time points (adjustment points) to improve prediction accuracy. The potential of these models to forecast GTV morphology was evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation, and the accuracy of the models was compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: Adding a single adjustment point to the static model without any adjustment points decreased the median error in forecasting the position of GTV surface landmarks by the largest amount (1.2 mm). Additional adjustment points further decreased the forecast error by about 0.4 mm each. Selection of the linear model decreased the forecast error for both the distance-based and spherical harmonic morphology descriptors (0.2 mm), while the mean model decreased the forecast error for the distance-based descriptor only (0.2 mm). The magnitude and statistical significance of these improvements decreased with each additional adjustment point, and the effect from model selection was not as large as that from adding the initial points. Conclusions: The authors present models that anticipate longitudinal changes in tumor morphology using various models and model adjustment schemes. The accuracy of these models depended on their form, and the utility of these models

  4. Review of the Complications Associated with Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Guide to the Dental Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Lena; Mupparapu, Muralidhar; Akintoye, Sunday O

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Focus on risk factors, improved diagnostic methods and effective management strategies have made it possible to successfully treat OPC. However, the 5-year survival rate has not improved for several years due to multiple treatment complications, tissue morbidity, loss of function and diminished quality of life. Survivors are faced with complications like oral mucositis, hyposalivation, osteoradionecrosis; tissue fibrosis, morbidity from jaw resection; disfigurement and loss of function that further diminish quality of life. The aim of this review is to highlight major complications associated with treatment of OPC via a literature search and review of available options for identification and management of these complications. Data Sources Relevant publications on oral complications of OPC therapy were thoroughly reviewed from the literature published between the years 1988 and 2012. Material and Method We evaluated reported incidence, prevalence and risk factors for oral complications of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for OPC. The authors conducted electronic search using English language databases namely PubMed Plus, Medline (Pre-Medline and Medline), Cochrane Database of systematic reviews (evidence-based medicine), Dentistry & Oral sciences source, AccessScience, Embase, Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews Multifile, Google Scholar, ISI Journal Citation Reports, Ovid Multi-Database. Conclusion We identified the most common complications associated with the treatment of oral cancers. Based on the information gathered, there is evidence that survival of OPC extends beyond eradication of the diseased tissue. Understanding the potential treatment complications and utilizing available resources to prevent and minimize them are important. Caring for OPC survivors should be a multidisciplinary team approach involving the dentist, oncologist, internist and social worker to improve the currently

  5. Quantitation of Human Papillomavirus DNA in Plasma of Oropharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Hongbin; Banh, Alice; Kwok, Shirley; Shi Xiaoli; Wu, Simon; Krakow, Trevor; Khong, Brian; Bavan, Brindha; Bala, Rajeev; Pinsky, Benjamin A.; Colevas, Dimitrios; Pourmand, Nader; Koong, Albert C.; Kong, Christina S.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA can be detected in the plasma of patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) and to monitor its temporal change during radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We used polymerase chain reaction to detect HPV DNA in the culture media of HPV-positive SCC90 and VU147T cells and the plasma of SCC90 and HeLa tumor-bearing mice, non-tumor-bearing controls, and those with HPV-negative tumors. We used real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to quantify the plasma HPV DNA in 40 HPV-positive OPC, 24 HPV-negative head-and-neck cancer patients and 10 non-cancer volunteers. The tumor HPV status was confirmed by p16{sup INK4a} staining and HPV16/18 polymerase chain reaction or HPV in situ hybridization. A total of 14 patients had serial plasma samples for HPV DNA quantification during radiotherapy. Results: HPV DNA was detectable in the plasma samples of SCC90- and HeLa-bearing mice but not in the controls. It was detected in 65% of the pretreatment plasma samples from HPV-positive OPC patients using E6/7 quantitative polymerase chain reaction. None of the HPV-negative head-and-neck cancer patients or non-cancer controls had detectable HPV DNA. The pretreatment plasma HPV DNA copy number correlated significantly with the nodal metabolic tumor volume (assessed using {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography). The serial measurements in 14 patients showed a rapid decline in HPV DNA that had become undetectable at radiotherapy completion. In 3 patients, the HPV DNA level had increased to a discernable level at metastasis. Conclusions: Xenograft studies indicated that plasma HPV DNA is released from HPV-positive tumors. Circulating HPV DNA was detectable in most HPV-positive OPC patients. Thus, plasma HPV DNA might be a valuable tool for identifying relapse.

  6. Molecular profiling of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gatalica, Zoran; Knezetic, Joseph; Reddy, Sandeep; Nathan, Cherie‐Ann; Javadi, Nader; Teknos, Theodoros

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) exhibits high rates of recurrence, and with few approved targeted agents, novel treatments are needed. We analyzed a molecular profiling database for the distribution of biomarkers predictive of chemotherapies and targeted agents. Methods Seven hundred thirty‐five patients with advanced HNSCC (88 with known human papillomavirus [HPV] status), were profiled using multiple platforms (gene sequencing, gene copy number, and protein expression). Results Among the entire patient population studied, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was the protein most often overexpressed (90%), TP53 gene most often mutated (41%), and phosphatidylinositol 3‐kinase (PIK3CA) most often amplified (40%; n = 5). With the exception of TP53 mutation, other biomarker frequencies were not significantly different among HPV‐positive or HPV‐negative patients. PIK3CA mutations and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss are frequent events, independent of HPV status. The immune response‐modulating programmed cell death 1 (PD1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PDL1) axis was active across sites, stages, and HPV status. Conclusion Molecular profiling utilizing multiple platforms provides a range of therapy options beyond standard of care. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1625–E1638, 2016 PMID:26614708

  7. Apollon modulates chemosensitivity in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si; Tang, Wenqing; Weng, Shuqiang; Liu, Xijun; Rao, Benqiang; Gu, Jianxin; Chen, She; Wang, Qun; Shen, Xizhong; Xue, Ruyi; Dong, Ling

    2014-08-30

    Patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are often diagnosed with advanced diseases that respond poorly to chemotherapy. Here we reported that Apollon, a membrane-associated inhibitor of apoptosis protein, was overexpressed in ESCC cell lines and clinical ESCC tissues, and Apollon overexpression clinically correlated with poor response to chemotherapy (P = 0.001), and short overall survival (P = 0.021). Apollon knockdown increased cisplatin/docetaxel-induced apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and cytochrome c release in two ESCC cell lines. Apollon knockdown potentiated cisplatin/docetaxel-induced long-term cell growth inhibition, and enhanced chemosensitivity of ESCC cells to cisplatin/docetaxel in xenograft tumor models. Apollon knockdown also enhanced cisplatin/docetaxel-induced activation of caspase-8 (extrinsic pathway) and caspase-9 (intrinsic pathway) in ESCC cells and xenograft tumor models. Mechanism studies revealed that the effect of Apollon on chemosensitivity is mainly mediated by Smac. Apollon expression strongly and negatively correlated with Smac expression in clinical ESCC tissues (P = 0.001). Apollon targeted Smac for degradation in ESCC cells. The effect of Apollon on chemosensitivity was reversed by Smac knockdown in ESCC cells. Taken together, our data show association of Apollon expression with chemotherapeutic response in ESCC, and provide a strong rationale for combining Apollon antagonism with chemotherapy to treat ESCC.

  8. Feline Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Clinical Manifestations and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Bilgic, Ozgur; Duda, Lili; Sánchez, Melissa D; Lewis, John R

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most commonly encountered malignant oral tumor in cats. The etiology of this locally invasive tumor is likely multifactorial. Several risk factors have been identified, including the use of flea collars, and a history of feeding canned food and canned tuna. Clinical signs vary depending on tumor location. The tumor commonly arises from the gingiva and mucosa of the maxilla, mandible, tongue, sublingual area, or tonsillar region. Maxillary SCC commonly presents clinically as an ulcerative lesion, whereas mandibular SCC is commonly proliferative, expansile, and firm. Lingual/sublingual SCC may be ulcerative, necrotic, infiltrative, or proliferative. In general, feline oral SCC is an invasive and malignant neoplasm regardless of its location. Surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and combinations thereof have been attempted with rarely a satisfactory response. Currently, cures are obtained only in a small subset of cats whose tumors are amenable to complete resection, or where resection with microscopic residual disease is followed by definitive radiation therapy. A multimodal treatment approach likely offers the best chance of success. For cats with advanced disease, palliative care may improve patients' quality of life, albeit transiently. Sequelae associated with tumor progression and local tissue destruction often result in euthanasia of feline patients with oral SCC. PMID:26197688

  9. European Society for Swallowing Disorders – European Union Geriatric Medicine Society white paper: oropharyngeal dysphagia as a geriatric syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baijens, Laura WJ; Clavé, Pere; Cras, Patrick; Ekberg, Olle; Forster, Alexandre; Kolb, Gerald F; Leners, Jean-Claude; Masiero, Stefano; Mateos-Nozal, Jesús; Ortega, Omar; Smithard, David G; Speyer, Renée; Walshe, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This position document has been developed by the Dysphagia Working Group, a committee of members from the European Society for Swallowing Disorders and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, and invited experts. It consists of 12 sections that cover all aspects of clinical management of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) related to geriatric medicine and discusses prevalence, quality of life, and legal and ethical issues, as well as health economics and social burden. OD constitutes impaired or uncomfortable transit of food or liquids from the oral cavity to the esophagus, and it is included in the World Health Organization’s classification of diseases. It can cause severe complications such as malnutrition, dehydration, respiratory infections, aspiration pneumonia, and increased readmissions, institutionalization, and morbimortality. OD is a prevalent and serious problem among all phenotypes of older patients as oropharyngeal swallow response is impaired in older people and can cause aspiration. Despite its prevalence and severity, OD is still underdiagnosed and untreated in many medical centers. There are several validated clinical and instrumental methods (videofluoroscopy and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing) to diagnose OD, and treatment is mainly based on compensatory measures, although new treatments to stimulate the oropharyngeal swallow response are under research. OD matches the definition of a geriatric syndrome as it is highly prevalent among older people, is caused by multiple factors, is associated with several comorbidities and poor prognosis, and needs a multidimensional approach to be treated. OD should be given more importance and attention and thus be included in all standard screening protocols, treated, and regularly monitored to prevent its main complications. More research is needed to develop and standardize new treatments and management protocols for older patients with OD, which is a challenging mission for our societies

  10. Oropharyngeal Carriage of Meningococcus in Portugal by Group and Clonal Complex 6 Years After Adolescent Vaccine Campaign.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernanda; Morales-Aza, Begonia; Christensen, Hannah; Giles, Jessica; Ferreira, Muriel; Sikora, Paulina; Madanelo, Ines; Lucidarme, Jay; Januário, Luis; Finn, Adam

    2015-11-01

    Portugal introduced (2+1) conjugate Meningococcal group C vaccine in 2006 with high coverage catch up to 18 years and has given only 1 dose at 1 year since 2012. Among 601 student oropharyngeal swabs, meningococcal carriage rate was 13.3% (A-0%, B-5.3%, C-0.3%, W-0.2%, X-0.2% and Y-1.7%). C and W strains were of potentially disease-causing clonal complexes (cc) but not the hyperinvasive cc11. PMID:26222062

  11. Importance of colonoscopy in patients undergoing endoscopic resection for superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, Kei; Doyama, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Naohiro; Takeda, Yasuhito; Ota, Ryosuke; Tsuji, Kunihiro; Matsunaga, Kazuhiro; Tsuji, Shigetsugu; Takemura, Kenichi; Yamada, Shinya; Katayanagi, Kazuyoshi; Kurumaya, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to clarify the frequency of colorectal neoplasm (CRN) complicating superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and the need for colonoscopy. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 101 patients who had undergone initial endoscopic resection (ER) for superficial ESCC. Control group participants were age- and sex-matched asymptomatic subjects screened at our hospital over the same period of time. Advanced adenoma was defined as an adenoma ≥10 mm, with villous features, or high-grade dysplasia. Advanced CRN referred to advanced adenoma or cancer. We measured the incidence of advanced CRN in superficial ESCC and controls, and we compared the characteristics of superficial ESCC patients with and without advanced CRN. Results In the superficial ESCC group, advanced CRNs were found in 17 patients (16.8%). A history of smoking alone was found to be a significant risk factor of advanced CRN [odds ratio 6.02 (95% CI 1.30-27.8), P=0.005]. Conclusion The frequency of synchronous advanced CRN is high in superficial ESCC patients subjected to ER. Colonoscopy should be highly considered for most patients who undergo ER for superficial ESCC with a history of smoking, and is recommended even in superficial ESCC patients. PMID:27366032

  12. Human papillomavirus detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vietía, Dayahindara; Liuzzi, Juan; Ávila, Maira; De Guglielmo, Zoraya; Prado, Yrneh; Correnti, María

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with benign and malignant lesions in different epitheliums. The relationship between specific genotypes of high-risk HPV and some human cancers is well established. The aim of this work was to detect the HPV genotypes present in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods We evaluated 71 samples of patients with histopathological diagnosis of HNSCC. The DNA extraction was conducted with the QIAGEN commercial kit. HPV detection and genotyping were performed by reverse hybridisation (INNO-LiPA) following the commercial specifications. Results The mean age of the patients evaluated was 60.7 ± 13.11 years. The distribution of the lesions included 25 (35.20%) cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity, 23 (32.39%) of larynx, 16 (22.50%) of the oropharynx, 4 (5.63%) of paranasal sinus, and 2 (2. 80%) cases of SCC of the nostril. Of the patients, 78.9% were males, and of these 76% were tobacco users and 67.6% were alcohol consumers. The viral DNA was detected in 67.6% of the samples. The oral cavity and the larynx were the highest HPV-positivity sites with 35.40% and 29.10% respectively. The most frequent genotype was 16 as single infection (18.70%), or in combination with another HPV types. In the oral cavity and larynx the genotypes 16 or the combination 6 and 51 were present in 11.76% and 14.28%, respectively; and in the oropharynx the most frequent genotype was 16 in 22.50% of the cases, and in the paranasal sinus 50% presented infection with HPV-6. We observed that tumours with most advanced size and stage presented greater HPV positivity. Conclusions This study shows a high percentage of HPV positivity in SCC is mainly associated with high-risk HPV. It is important to highlight that viral infection, especially HPV-16, could be a risk factor in HNSCC progression. PMID:25374623

  13. MANDIBULAR SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA IN A BOBCAT (LYNX RUFUS).

    PubMed

    Sladakovic, Izidora; Burnum, Anne; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Kelly, Lisa S; Garner, Bridget C; Holmes, Shannon P; Divers, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    A 23-yr-old female spayed bobcat (Lynx rufus) presented with a 1-wk history of hypersalivation. On examination, the right mandible was markedly thickened, the right mandibular dental arcade was missing, and the oral mucosa over the right mandible was ulcerated and thickened. Skull radiographs and fine needle aspirate cytology were supportive of squamous cell carcinoma. The bobcat was euthanized as a result of its poor prognosis. Necropsy confirmed a diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma of the mandible. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of oral squamous cell carcinoma in a bobcat.

  14. MANDIBULAR SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA IN A BOBCAT (LYNX RUFUS).

    PubMed

    Sladakovic, Izidora; Burnum, Anne; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Kelly, Lisa S; Garner, Bridget C; Holmes, Shannon P; Divers, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    A 23-yr-old female spayed bobcat (Lynx rufus) presented with a 1-wk history of hypersalivation. On examination, the right mandible was markedly thickened, the right mandibular dental arcade was missing, and the oral mucosa over the right mandible was ulcerated and thickened. Skull radiographs and fine needle aspirate cytology were supportive of squamous cell carcinoma. The bobcat was euthanized as a result of its poor prognosis. Necropsy confirmed a diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma of the mandible. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of oral squamous cell carcinoma in a bobcat. PMID:27010306

  15. Entolimod in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer Receiving Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-10

    Mucositis; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  16. Lupus vulgaris with squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Motswaledi, Mojakgomo Hendrick; Doman, Chantal

    2007-12-01

    Tuberculosis is still a significant problem in developing countries. Cutaneous forms of tuberculosis account for approximately 10% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Cutaneous tuberculosis may be because of true infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or because of tuberculids. Tuberculids are immunological reactions to haematogenously spread antigenic components of M. tuberculosis. True cutaneous tuberculosis may be because of inoculation or haematogenous spread of M. tuberculosis to the skin. Lupus vulgaris is the commonest form of true cutaneous tuberculosis. Other forms of true cutaneous tuberculosis are tuberculous chancre, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis, scrofuloderma, periorificial tuberculosis and miliary tuberculosis of the skin. Lupus vulgaris is usually chronic and progressive. It occurs in patients with moderate to high immunity against M. tuberculosis as evidenced by strongly positive tuberculin test. Long-standing cases of lupus vulgaris may be complicated by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We describe a patient who had undiagnosed lupus vulgaris for 35 years until she developed SCC on the lesion of lupus vulgaris.

  17. Effects of age and non-oropharyngeal proprioceptive and exteroceptive sensation on the magnitude of anticipatory mouth opening during eating.

    PubMed

    Shune, S E; Moon, J B

    2016-09-01

    To best prevent and treat eating/swallowing problems, it is essential to understand how components of oral physiology contribute to the preservation and/or degradation of eating/swallowing in healthy ageing. Anticipatory, pre-swallow motor movements may be critical to safe and efficient eating/swallowing, particularly for older adults. However, the nature of these responses is relatively unknown. This study compared the magnitude of anticipatory mouth opening during eating in healthy older (aged 70-85) and younger (aged 18-30) adults under four eating conditions: typical self-feeding, typical assisted feeding (being fed by a research assistant resulting in proprioceptive loss), sensory loss self-feeding (wearing blindfold/headphones resulting in exteroceptive loss) and sensory loss assisted feeding (proprioceptive and exteroceptive loss). Older adults opened their mouths wider than younger adults in anticipation of food intake under both typical and most non-oropharyngeal sensory loss conditions. Further, the loss of proprioceptive and exteroceptive cues resulted in decreased anticipatory mouth opening for all participants. Greater mouth opening in older adults may be a protective compensation, contributing to the preservation of function associated with healthy ageing. Our finding that the loss of non-oropharyngeal sensory cues resulted in decreased anticipatory mouth opening highlights how important proprioception, vision, and hearing are in pre-swallow behaviour. Age- and disease-related changes in vision, hearing, and the ability to self-feed may reduce the effectiveness of these pre-swallow strategies. PMID:27377757

  18. Effects of age and non-oropharyngeal proprioceptive and exteroceptive sensation on the magnitude of anticipatory mouth opening during eating.

    PubMed

    Shune, S E; Moon, J B

    2016-09-01

    To best prevent and treat eating/swallowing problems, it is essential to understand how components of oral physiology contribute to the preservation and/or degradation of eating/swallowing in healthy ageing. Anticipatory, pre-swallow motor movements may be critical to safe and efficient eating/swallowing, particularly for older adults. However, the nature of these responses is relatively unknown. This study compared the magnitude of anticipatory mouth opening during eating in healthy older (aged 70-85) and younger (aged 18-30) adults under four eating conditions: typical self-feeding, typical assisted feeding (being fed by a research assistant resulting in proprioceptive loss), sensory loss self-feeding (wearing blindfold/headphones resulting in exteroceptive loss) and sensory loss assisted feeding (proprioceptive and exteroceptive loss). Older adults opened their mouths wider than younger adults in anticipation of food intake under both typical and most non-oropharyngeal sensory loss conditions. Further, the loss of proprioceptive and exteroceptive cues resulted in decreased anticipatory mouth opening for all participants. Greater mouth opening in older adults may be a protective compensation, contributing to the preservation of function associated with healthy ageing. Our finding that the loss of non-oropharyngeal sensory cues resulted in decreased anticipatory mouth opening highlights how important proprioception, vision, and hearing are in pre-swallow behaviour. Age- and disease-related changes in vision, hearing, and the ability to self-feed may reduce the effectiveness of these pre-swallow strategies.

  19. Profile of nivolumab in the treatment of metastatic squamous non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Yvonne LE; Lim, Joline SJ; Soo, Ross A

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, the prognosis and treatment of patients with advanced-stage squamous cell lung cancers have been limited. An improvement in the understanding of the role of the immune system in tumor immunosurveillance has led to the development of the programmed death-1 (PD-1) immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab (Opdivo). Nivolumab is the first PD-1 inhibitor approved for the treatment of advanced-stage squamous cell non-small-cell lung cancer following platinum-based chemotherapy. In the key Phase III trial CHECKMATE 017, a better overall survival and progression-free survival were seen in patients treated with second-line nivolumab compared with docetaxel. Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression did not predict for outcome. In addition, nivolumab had better safety and tolerability, and led to better patient reported outcomes. Further research on the role of PD-L1 expression as a predictive biomarker should be performed, and other biomarkers that can predict the efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors should also be pursued. Further studies on the combination treatment are ongoing to determine the optimal role of nivolumab as monotherapy or nivolumab with other agents in non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:27313464

  20. [An oropharyngeal tularemia case diagnosed by the isolation of Francisella tularensis on human blood agar].

    PubMed

    Ozel, Gönül; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Yeşilyurt, Murat; Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk

    2010-10-01

    Tularemia which is a multisystem disease of humans and some animals, is endemic in North America, some parts of Europe and Asia. The causative agent, Francisella tularensis, is a fastidious gram-negative, intracellular bacterium which requires supplementation with sulphydryl compounds (cysteine, cystine, thiosulphate, isoVitaleX) for growth on common laboratory media. In this report, a case of oropharyngeal tularemia diagnosed by the isolation of the causative agent on non-selective-common microbiological agar, has been presented. The patient was from Yozgat located in central Anatolia where tularemia has not been reported so far. Forty-two years old male was admitted to the hospital with two weeks history of sudden onset fever, headache, generalized aches, sore throat, and cervical tender lump on the left. Physical examination revealed bilateral exudative tonsillitis and tender posterior cervical lymphadenopathy. He has been empirically treated with amoxicilin-clavulanic acid for 7 days with initial diagnosis of acute tonsillopharyngitis. However, he was admitted to the hospital since the symptoms persisted and swelling increased despite antibiotic therapy. Microscopical examination of the Gram and Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen stained smears prepared from the surgically drained lymph node revealed PMNL, with no evidence of bacteria. Routine cultures of the lymph node material yielded growth of gram-negative coccobacilli only on human blood agar and the cultures were negative for pyogenic bacteria, acid-fast organisms and fungi. Pathologic examination of the drainage material revealed suppurative inflammation. Lymph node aspirate and serum samples of the patient together with the isolated strain were sent to reference laboratory for further investigation in accordance to the clinical and laboratory findings compatible with tularemia. The isolate was confirmed as F.tularensis by slide agglutination and direct immunofluorescence antibody tests, and identified as F

  1. [An oropharyngeal tularemia case diagnosed by the isolation of Francisella tularensis on human blood agar].

    PubMed

    Ozel, Gönül; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Yeşilyurt, Murat; Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk

    2010-10-01

    Tularemia which is a multisystem disease of humans and some animals, is endemic in North America, some parts of Europe and Asia. The causative agent, Francisella tularensis, is a fastidious gram-negative, intracellular bacterium which requires supplementation with sulphydryl compounds (cysteine, cystine, thiosulphate, isoVitaleX) for growth on common laboratory media. In this report, a case of oropharyngeal tularemia diagnosed by the isolation of the causative agent on non-selective-common microbiological agar, has been presented. The patient was from Yozgat located in central Anatolia where tularemia has not been reported so far. Forty-two years old male was admitted to the hospital with two weeks history of sudden onset fever, headache, generalized aches, sore throat, and cervical tender lump on the left. Physical examination revealed bilateral exudative tonsillitis and tender posterior cervical lymphadenopathy. He has been empirically treated with amoxicilin-clavulanic acid for 7 days with initial diagnosis of acute tonsillopharyngitis. However, he was admitted to the hospital since the symptoms persisted and swelling increased despite antibiotic therapy. Microscopical examination of the Gram and Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen stained smears prepared from the surgically drained lymph node revealed PMNL, with no evidence of bacteria. Routine cultures of the lymph node material yielded growth of gram-negative coccobacilli only on human blood agar and the cultures were negative for pyogenic bacteria, acid-fast organisms and fungi. Pathologic examination of the drainage material revealed suppurative inflammation. Lymph node aspirate and serum samples of the patient together with the isolated strain were sent to reference laboratory for further investigation in accordance to the clinical and laboratory findings compatible with tularemia. The isolate was confirmed as F.tularensis by slide agglutination and direct immunofluorescence antibody tests, and identified as F

  2. Sialorrhea: a review of a vexing, often unrecognized sign of oropharyngeal and esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Boyce, H Worth; Bakheet, Michael R

    2005-02-01

    Saliva is produced by the major salivary glands (parotid, submandibular, and sublingual), as well as several smaller glands. Salivary flow can be altered by multiple entities. There is much written regarding xerostomia ("dry mouth"), the condition related to inhibited or decreased salivary flow. This condition is widely recognized in certain systemic diseases, particularly Sjögren syndrome, diabetes mellitus, after anticholinergic, antihistamine, and decongestant medications, as well as states of enhanced sympathetic drive, such as anxiety or emotional disturbances and various other psychosocial conditions. On the other hand, sialorrhea or ptyalism, the condition of increased salivary flow, is rarely discussed in the clinical literature. Sialorrhea can occur with various neurologic disorders, infections, the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle, heavy metal poisoning, Wilson disease, Angelman syndrome, as well as a relatively unknown condition called idiopathic paroxysmal sialorrhea. Normal salivation may be altered by drugs (such as clozapine, risperidone, nitrazepam, lithium, and bethanecol) that have a cholinergic effect that induces sialorrhea. This report focuses on sialorrhea as it relates to disorders of the oropharynx and esophagus. The patient typically recognizes a problem with excessive "foamy mucus" but does not understand its origin. Infections and obstruction are the most common oropharyngeal causes. Increased salivary flow occurs as a typically subtle manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease. This occurrence is referred to as water brash. Idiopathic achalasia and megaesophagus due to the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi are regularly associated with sialorrhea. Esophageal obstruction (foreign body, cancer, or stricture formation), infection, and nasogastric intubation are the more common conditions associated with the symptomatic sequelae of sialorrhea. Sialorrhea-related respiratory and pulmonary complications are greatest in those with a

  3. Target Volume Delineation in Oropharyngeal Cancer: Impact of PET, MRI, and Physical Examination

    SciTech Connect

    Thiagarajan, Anuradha; Caria, Nicola; Schoeder, Heiko; Iyer, N. Gopalakrishna; Wolden, Suzanne; Wong, Richard J.; Sherman, Eric; Fury, Matthew G.; Lee, Nancy

    2012-05-01

    Introduction: Sole utilization of computed tomography (CT) scans in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation for head-and-neck cancers is subject to inaccuracies. This study aims to evaluate contributions of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and physical examination (PE) to GTV delineation in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods: Forty-one patients with OPC were studied. All underwent contrast-enhanced CT simulation scans (CECTs) that were registered with pretreatment PETs and MRIs. For each patient, three sets of primary and nodal GTV were contoured. First, reference GTVs (GTVref) were contoured by the treating radiation oncologist (RO) using CT, MRI, PET, and PE findings. Additional GTVs were created using fused CT/PET scans (GTVctpet) and CT/MRI scans (GTVctmr) by two other ROs blinded to GTVref. To compare GTVs, concordance indices (CI) were calculated by dividing the respective overlap volumes by overall volumes. To evaluate the contribution of PE, composite GTVs derived from CT, MRI, and PET (GTVctpetmr) were compared with GTVref. Results: For primary tumors, GTVref was significantly larger than GTVctpet and GTVctmr (p < 0.001). Although no significant difference in size was noted between GTVctpet and GTVctmr (p = 0.39), there was poor concordance between them (CI = 0.62). In addition, although CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) was low, it was significantly higher than CI (ctpet vs. ref) and CI (ctmr vs. ref) (p < 0.001), suggesting that neither modality should be used alone. Qualitative analyses to explain the low CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) revealed underestimation of mucosal disease when GTV was contoured without knowledge of PE findings. Similar trends were observed for nodal GTVs. However, CI (ctpet vs. ref), CI (ctmr vs. ref), and CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) were high (>0.75), indicating that although the modalities were complementary, the added benefit was small in the context of CECTs. In addition, PE did not aid greatly in nodal GTV delineation

  4. Larynx-sparing techniques using intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bar Ad, Voichita; Lin, Haibo; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Deville, Curtiland; Dutta, Pinaki R.; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore whether the laryngeal dose can be reduced by using 2 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques: whole-neck field IMRT technique (WF-IMRT) vs. junctioned IMRT (J-IMRT). The effect on planning target volumes (PTVs) coverage and laryngeal sparing was evaluated. WF-IMRT technique consisted of a single IMRT plan, including the primary tumor and the superior and inferior neck to the level of the clavicular heads. The larynx was defined as an organ at risk extending superiorly to cover the arytenoid cartilages and inferiorly to include the cricoid cartilage. The J-IMRT technique consisted of an IMRT plan for the primary tumor and the superior neck, matched to conventional antero-posterior opposing lower neck fields at the level of the thyroid notch. A central block was used for the anterior lower neck field at the level of the larynx to restrict the dose to the larynx. Ten oropharyngeal cancer cases were analyzed. Both the primary site and bilateral regional lymphatics were included in the radiotherapy targets. The averaged V95 for the PTV57.6 was 99.2% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 97.4% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT. The averaged V95 for the PTV64 was 99.9% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 98.9% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT and the averaged V95 for the PT70 was 100.0% for WF-IMRT technique compared with 99.5% (p = 0.04) for J-IMRT. The averaged mean laryngeal dose was 18 Gy with both techniques. The averaged mean doses within the matchline volumes were 69.3 Gy for WF-MRT and 66.2 Gy for J-IMRT (p = 0.03). The WF-IMRT technique appears to offer an optimal coverage of the target volumes and a mean dose to the larynx similar with J-IMRT and should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  5. Clinical, epidemiological and histopathological prognostic factors in oral squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dragomir, L P; Simionescu, Cristiana; Dăguci, Luminiţa; Searpe, Monica; Dragomir, Manuela

    2010-10-01

    The study that was carried out was comprised of 117 cases of oral squamous carcinomas, selected in two years interval, between 2007-2008. The tumors were diagnosed especially at patients between the ages of 50 and 79 years, 96,6% being over 40 years old. It came out a clear predominance of the male sex in approximatively 90% of the cases. The main localisation was the lower lip and the tongue ( 67,5% ), in approximatively equal proportions ( 35% and 32,5% ). The histopathologically analisys releaved that 37,6% were well differentiated squamous carcinomas, 27,4% were moderately differentiated squamous carcinomas and 35% were poorly differentiated squamous carcinomas. Out of these 3,3% were microcarcinomas, 91,9% were non-metastatic invasive carcinomas and 4,8% were invasive carcinomas with metastatic adenopathy. PMID:24778830

  6. General Information about Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Occult Primary Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  7. Clinical, Epidemiological And Histopathological Prognostic Factors In Oral Squamous Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dragomir, L.P.; Simionescu, Cristiana; Dăguci, Luminiţa; Şearpe, Monica; Dragomir, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    The study that was carried out was comprised of 117 cases of oral squamous carcinomas, selected in two years interval, between 2007-2008. The tumors were diagnosed especially at patients between the ages of 50 and 79 years, 96,6% being over 40 years old. It came out a clear predominance of the male sex in approximatively 90% of the cases. The main localisation was the lower lip and the tongue ( 67,5% ), in approximatively equal proportions ( 35% and 32,5% ). The histopathologically analisys releaved that 37,6% were well differentiated squamous carcinomas, 27,4% were moderately differentiated squamous carcinomas and 35% were poorly differentiated squamous carcinomas. Out of these 3,3% were microcarcinomas, 91,9% were non-metastatic invasive carcinomas and 4,8% were invasive carcinomas with metastatic adenopathy. PMID:24778830

  8. Detection of squamous carcinoma cells using gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei-Yun; Lee, Sze-tsen; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this study is to use gold nanoparticle as a diagnostic agent to detect human squamous carcinoma cells. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized and the gold nanoparticle size was 34.3 ± 6.2 nm. Based on the over-expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) biomarkers in squamous carcinoma cells, we hypothesized that EGFR could be a feasible biomarker with a target moiety for detection. We further modified polyclonal antibodies of EGFR on the surface of gold nanoparticles. We found selected squamous carcinoma cells can be selectively detected using EGFR antibody-modified gold nanoparticles via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Cell death was also examined to determine the survival status of squamous carcinoma cells with respect to gold nanoparticle treatment and EGFR polyclonal antibody modification.

  9. Incidentally detected squamous cell carcinoma of renal pelvis in patients with staghorn calculi: case series with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ayushi; Mittal, Deepti; Jindal, Arpita; Solanki, Ranjana; Khatri, Suman; Parikh, Archana; Yadav, Kamlesh

    2011-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis is a rare neoplasm, often unsuspected clinically due to its rarity and ambiguous clinical and radiological features, and hence patients present at advanced stages resulting in poor prognosis. We report here four cases of incidentally diagnosed primary renal squamous cell carcinoma, treated at our hospital over a short span of one year, and review the relevant literature. Mean age of the patients (3 males, 1 female) was 60 years. All suffered from staghorn stones. Interestingly, renal carcinoma was unsuspected clinically in all patients. In one case, a computerised tomography scan showed a suspicious nodule. All underwent nephrectomy for nonfunctioning kidney. In just two cases, tumor was identified on gross examination, while the other two only showed thickened pelvis. Our series emphasises the need for pelvicalyceal biopsy during treatment for long-standing nephrolithiasis, and thorough sampling of the renal pelvis in nephrectomy specimen of such patients.

  10. Photodynamic Therapy With HPPH in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  11. Sorafenib Tosylate, Cisplatin, and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  12. A Phase I Study of LJM716 in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck, or HER2+ Breast Cancer or Gastric Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    HER2 + Breast Cancer, HER2 + Gastric Cancer, Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck, Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2 + Breast Cancer; HER2 + Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck; Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  13. Pain and dysphagia in patients with squamous carcinomas of the head and neck: the role of perineural spread1

    PubMed Central

    Carter, R L; Pittam, M R; Tanner, N S B

    1982-01-01

    Clinical and pathological features of perineural spread have been investigated in patients with squamous carcinomas at several sites in the head and neck. In 100 surgical cases, the clinical and pathological findings were congruent in 76%. Combined clinical and histological evidence of perineural invasion was recorded in 33% and the overall incidence of nerve involvement detected morphologically was 44%. Perineural infiltration was demonstrated histologically in 51% of major excisions from the buccal cavity and in 34% of resections from the oropharynx, hypopharynx and cervical oesophagus. The neurological findings were dominated by hypoaesthesia, dysaesthesia and referred pain – mainly in the territories of cranial nerves V and IX. Multiple and/or sequential nerve involvement was occasionally seen. No correlation was established between nerve invasion and metastasis to regional lymph nodes. Long-distance infiltration of nerve trunks, and multiple involvement, are grave prognostic features. In 17 terminal patients submitted to autopsy, 65% had combined clinical and pathological evidence of perineural spread and the overall incidence of nerve involvement detected morphologically was 88%. Sensory changes again predominated. Multiple nerve involvement was observed in 35%. An apparently new `dysphagia syndrome' is described in 4 patients with oropharyngeal carcinomas in whom gross mechanical obstruction was simulated by a combination of perineural spread of tumour into the ipsilateral vagal trunk, sometimes accompanied by segmental infarction, variable invasion of the sympathetic chain, and `splinting' of the pharynx by local fibrosis and tumour in the soft tissues of the neck. Short-term palliation was achieved in these patients with high-dose steroids. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:7108879

  14. [Human papillomavirus and squamous cell cancer of the head and neck region : Prognostic, therapeutic and prophylactic implications].

    PubMed

    Reuschenbach, M; Wagner, S; Würdemann, N; Sharma, S J; Prigge, E-S; Sauer, M; Wittig, A; Wittekindt, C; von Knebel Doeberitz, M; Klussmann, J P

    2016-07-01

    Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are responsible for approximately half of all oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) and incidence rates of HPV-associated OPSCC continue to increase substantially. The defined viral carcinogenesis permits development of specific diagnostic, therapeutic, and prophylactic approaches. Laboratory identification of HPV-associated OPSCC may be achieved by p16(INK4a) immunohistochemistry combined with HPV DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using tumor tissue. Patients with HPV-associated OPSCC have a relatively good prognosis; therefore, the HPV status plays an important role in patient guidance. Due to the relatively favorable prognosis, ongoing studies are evaluating whether less rigorous therapy for HPV-positive patients results in equally good cure rates. The criteria for patient selection are, however, still uncertain. Particularly markers for detection of HPV-positive patients with a high risk of treatment failure are lacking. Besides tumor stage and comorbidities, distinct genomic, epigenetic, and immunologic alterations are prognostically relevant for HPV-associated OPSCC, and might be of predictive value. Furthermore, the characteristic molecular alterations suggest the possibility of novel vigilant and specific therapy approaches. These may be inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase (PI3K) pathway, which is frequently activated in HPV-associated OPSCC, and immunotherapeutic methods, e. g., therapeutic vaccination. Although prophylactic HPV vaccinations may also prevent development of HPV-associated OPSCC, foreseeable effects on OPSCC incidence will be low, given the low vaccination rates in Germany. This highlights the fact that interdisciplinary research networks should enhance the necessary activities related to HPV-associated OPSCC. PMID:26864190

  15. The Relationship Between Human Papillomavirus Status and Other Molecular Prognostic Markers in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Christina S.; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian; Cao Hongbin; Kwok, Shirley; Erickson, Julianna P.; Koong, Albert; Pourmand, Nader; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) status and known prognostic makers for head and neck cancers including tumor hypoxia, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and intratumoral T-cell levels and to determine the prognostic impact of these markers by HPV status. Methods and Materials: HPV status in 82 evaluable head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients was determined by pyrosequencing and related to p16{sup INK4a} staining and treatment outcomes. It was correlated with tumor hypoxia (tumor pO{sub 2} and carbonic anhydrase [CAIX] staining), EGFR status, and intratumoral lymphocyte expression (CD3 staining). Results: Forty-four percent of evaluable tumors had strong HPV signal by pyrosequencing. There was a significant relationship between strong HPV signal and p16{sup INK4a} staining as well as oropharynx location. The strong HPV signal group fared significantly better than others, both in time to progression (TTP, p = 0.008) and overall survival (OS, p = 0.004) for all patients and for the oropharyngeal subset. Positive p16{sup INK4a} staining was associated with better TTP (p = 0.014) and OS (p = 0.00002). There was no relationship between HPV status and tumor pO{sub 2} or CAIX staining. However, HPV status correlated inversely with EGFR reactivity (p = 0.0006) and directly with CD3(+) T-lymphocyte level (p = 0.03). Whereas CAIX and EGFR overexpression were negative prognostic factors regardless of HPV status, CD3(+) T-cell levels was prognostic only in HPV(-) tumors. Conclusion: HPV status was a prognostic factor for progression and survival. It correlated inversely with EGFR expression and directly with T-cell infiltration. The prognostic effect of CAIX and EGFR expression was not influenced by HPV status, whereas intratumoral T-cell levels was significant only for HPV(-) tumors.

  16. [Human papillomavirus and squamous cell cancer of the head and neck region : Prognostic, therapeutic and prophylactic implications].

    PubMed

    Reuschenbach, M; Wagner, S; Würdemann, N; Sharma, S J; Prigge, E-S; Sauer, M; Wittig, A; Wittekindt, C; von Knebel Doeberitz, M; Klussmann, J P

    2016-07-01

    Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are responsible for approximately half of all oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) and incidence rates of HPV-associated OPSCC continue to increase substantially. The defined viral carcinogenesis permits development of specific diagnostic, therapeutic, and prophylactic approaches. Laboratory identification of HPV-associated OPSCC may be achieved by p16(INK4a) immunohistochemistry combined with HPV DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using tumor tissue. Patients with HPV-associated OPSCC have a relatively good prognosis; therefore, the HPV status plays an important role in patient guidance. Due to the relatively favorable prognosis, ongoing studies are evaluating whether less rigorous therapy for HPV-positive patients results in equally good cure rates. The criteria for patient selection are, however, still uncertain. Particularly markers for detection of HPV-positive patients with a high risk of treatment failure are lacking. Besides tumor stage and comorbidities, distinct genomic, epigenetic, and immunologic alterations are prognostically relevant for HPV-associated OPSCC, and might be of predictive value. Furthermore, the characteristic molecular alterations suggest the possibility of novel vigilant and specific therapy approaches. These may be inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase (PI3K) pathway, which is frequently activated in HPV-associated OPSCC, and immunotherapeutic methods, e. g., therapeutic vaccination. Although prophylactic HPV vaccinations may also prevent development of HPV-associated OPSCC, foreseeable effects on OPSCC incidence will be low, given the low vaccination rates in Germany. This highlights the fact that interdisciplinary research networks should enhance the necessary activities related to HPV-associated OPSCC.

  17. Evaluation for High-risk HPV in Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Precursor Lesions Arising in the Conjunctiva and Lacrimal Sac.

    PubMed

    Afrogheh, Amir H; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Hammon, Rebecca; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Rocco, James; Lindeman, Neal I; Sadow, Peter M; Faquin, William C

    2016-04-01

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) is a well-established causative agent of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In addition, HR-HPV has occasionally been reported to be present in dysplastic and malignant lesions of the conjunctiva and lacrimal sac, although its overall incidence and etiological role in periocular SCC are controversial. Sequential surgical samples of 52 combined cases of invasive SCC (I-SCC) and SCC in situ (SCCIS) from 2 periocular sites (conjunctiva and lacrimal sac) diagnosed over a 14-year period (2000 to 2014) were selected for evaluation, and relevant patient characteristics were documented. p16 immunohistochemistry was performed as a screening test. All p16-positive cases were further evaluated for HR-HPV using DNA in situ hybridization (DNA ISH), and a subset was also analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 43 ocular surface squamous neoplasias (OSSNs), 30% (n=13; 8 SCCIS and 5 I-SCC cases) were positive for HR-HPV. HPV-positive OSSNs occurred in 8 men and 5 women with a mean age of 60 years (range, 39 to 94 y). HPV type-16 was detected in all conjunctival cases evaluated by PCR. All 5 conjunctival I-SCCs were nonkeratinizing (n=4) or partially keratinizing (n=1) and managed by simple excision. In contrast, HPV-negative conjunctival I-SCCs were predominantly keratinizing (11 keratinizing and 2 nonkeratinizing). Of 9 lacrimal sac I-SCCs (LSSCCs), 66.7% (n=6) were positive for HR-HPV by p16 and DNA ISH; HPV subtypes were HPV-16 (n=5) and HPV-58 (n=1). In addition, 2 p16-positive cases with negative DNA ISH results were HR-HPV positive (HPV-16 and HPV-33) when evaluated by PCR, suggesting that the rate of HR-HPV positivity among the LSSCCs may be as high as 89% (n=8). The combined group of HR-HPV-positive LSSCCs was seen in 4 men and 4 women with a mean age of 60 years (range, 34 to 71 y). Seven of the 8 HPV-positive LSSCCs (87.5%) had a nonkeratinizing or partially keratinizing histomorphology, whereas 1 case (12

  18. Evaluation for High-risk HPV in Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Precursor Lesions Arising in the Conjunctiva and Lacrimal Sac.

    PubMed

    Afrogheh, Amir H; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Hammon, Rebecca; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Rocco, James; Lindeman, Neal I; Sadow, Peter M; Faquin, William C

    2016-04-01

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) is a well-established causative agent of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In addition, HR-HPV has occasionally been reported to be present in dysplastic and malignant lesions of the conjunctiva and lacrimal sac, although its overall incidence and etiological role in periocular SCC are controversial. Sequential surgical samples of 52 combined cases of invasive SCC (I-SCC) and SCC in situ (SCCIS) from 2 periocular sites (conjunctiva and lacrimal sac) diagnosed over a 14-year period (2000 to 2014) were selected for evaluation, and relevant patient characteristics were documented. p16 immunohistochemistry was performed as a screening test. All p16-positive cases were further evaluated for HR-HPV using DNA in situ hybridization (DNA ISH), and a subset was also analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 43 ocular surface squamous neoplasias (OSSNs), 30% (n=13; 8 SCCIS and 5 I-SCC cases) were positive for HR-HPV. HPV-positive OSSNs occurred in 8 men and 5 women with a mean age of 60 years (range, 39 to 94 y). HPV type-16 was detected in all conjunctival cases evaluated by PCR. All 5 conjunctival I-SCCs were nonkeratinizing (n=4) or partially keratinizing (n=1) and managed by simple excision. In contrast, HPV-negative conjunctival I-SCCs were predominantly keratinizing (11 keratinizing and 2 nonkeratinizing). Of 9 lacrimal sac I-SCCs (LSSCCs), 66.7% (n=6) were positive for HR-HPV by p16 and DNA ISH; HPV subtypes were HPV-16 (n=5) and HPV-58 (n=1). In addition, 2 p16-positive cases with negative DNA ISH results were HR-HPV positive (HPV-16 and HPV-33) when evaluated by PCR, suggesting that the rate of HR-HPV positivity among the LSSCCs may be as high as 89% (n=8). The combined group of HR-HPV-positive LSSCCs was seen in 4 men and 4 women with a mean age of 60 years (range, 34 to 71 y). Seven of the 8 HPV-positive LSSCCs (87.5%) had a nonkeratinizing or partially keratinizing histomorphology, whereas 1 case (12

  19. Genome-Wide Loss of Heterozygosity and DNA Copy Number Aberration in HPV-Negative Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Their Associations with Disease-Specific Survival.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Loomis, Melissa M; Upton, Melissa P; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Houck, John R; Doody, David R; Mendez, Eduardo; Futran, Neal; Schwartz, Stephen M; Wang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx (OSCC) is associated with high case-fatality. For reasons that are largely unknown, patients with the same clinical and pathologic staging have heterogeneous response to treatment and different probability of recurrence and survival, with patients with Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal tumors having the most favorable survival. To gain insight into the complexity of OSCC and to identify potential chromosomal changes that may be associated with OSCC mortality, we used Affymtrix 6.0 SNP arrays to examine paired DNA from peripheral blood and tumor cell populations isolated by laser capture microdissection to assess genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and DNA copy number aberration (CNA) and their associations with risk factors, tumor characteristics, and oral cancer-specific mortality among 75 patients with HPV-negative OSCC. We found a highly heterogeneous and complex genomic landscape of HPV-negative tumors, and identified regions in 4q, 8p, 9p and 11q that seem to play an important role in oral cancer biology and survival from this disease. If confirmed, these findings could assist in designing personalized treatment or in the creation of models to predict survival in patients with HPV-negative OSCC.

  20. Genome-Wide Loss of Heterozygosity and DNA Copy Number Aberration in HPV-Negative Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Their Associations with Disease-Specific Survival.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Loomis, Melissa M; Upton, Melissa P; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Houck, John R; Doody, David R; Mendez, Eduardo; Futran, Neal; Schwartz, Stephen M; Wang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx (OSCC) is associated with high case-fatality. For reasons that are largely unknown, patients with the same clinical and pathologic staging have heterogeneous response to treatment and different probability of recurrence and survival, with patients with Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal tumors having the most favorable survival. To gain insight into the complexity of OSCC and to identify potential chromosomal changes that may be associated with OSCC mortality, we used Affymtrix 6.0 SNP arrays to examine paired DNA from peripheral blood and tumor cell populations isolated by laser capture microdissection to assess genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and DNA copy number aberration (CNA) and their associations with risk factors, tumor characteristics, and oral cancer-specific mortality among 75 patients with HPV-negative OSCC. We found a highly heterogeneous and complex genomic landscape of HPV-negative tumors, and identified regions in 4q, 8p, 9p and 11q that seem to play an important role in oral cancer biology and survival from this disease. If confirmed, these findings could assist in designing personalized treatment or in the creation of models to predict survival in patients with HPV-negative OSCC. PMID:26247464

  1. The prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in oral squamous cell carcinomas: a retrospective analysis of 88 patients and literature overview.

    PubMed

    Krüger, M; Pabst, A M; Walter, C; Sagheb, K; Günther, C; Blatt, S; Weise, K; Al-Nawas, B; Ziebart, T

    2014-10-01

    In addition to tobacco and alcohol consumption, the two main risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), recent studies have revealed infections with human papilloma virus (HPV) as an additional risk factor for OSCC development. In the field of head and neck malignancies, the prevalence of HPV infections in oropharyngeal cancer (OC) ranges in different studies up to 84%. While HPV infection is discussed as an independent risk factor in this region, its distinguished role in carcinogenesis of tumours localized to the oral cavity remains still uncertain. In this study, we analysed the HPV status in 88 consecutive patients with OSCCs localized anterior of the palatoglossal arch who were treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Medical Center Mainz. The HPV status analysis was performed using DNA-PCR and immunostaining of p16 protein. The prevalence of HPV-positive OSCCs was about 6% (5 patients). In 3 patients the HPV subtypes 16/18 were found. No significant differences between the HPV positive and negative patients regarding age, gender, smoking and alcohol consumption, localization and TNM level could be detected. Contrary to other studies focussing on cancers of the lingual and palatine tonsil, the prevalence of HPV infections was much lower in the oral cavity. Therefore HPV infection might play a less important role in oral carcinogenesis.

  2. The prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in oral squamous cell carcinomas: a retrospective analysis of 88 patients and literature overview.

    PubMed

    Krüger, M; Pabst, A M; Walter, C; Sagheb, K; Günther, C; Blatt, S; Weise, K; Al-Nawas, B; Ziebart, T

    2014-10-01

    In addition to tobacco and alcohol consumption, the two main risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), recent studies have revealed infections with human papilloma virus (HPV) as an additional risk factor for OSCC development. In the field of head and neck malignancies, the prevalence of HPV infections in oropharyngeal cancer (OC) ranges in different studies up to 84%. While HPV infection is discussed as an independent risk factor in this region, its distinguished role in carcinogenesis of tumours localized to the oral cavity remains still uncertain. In this study, we analysed the HPV status in 88 consecutive patients with OSCCs localized anterior of the palatoglossal arch who were treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Medical Center Mainz. The HPV status analysis was performed using DNA-PCR and immunostaining of p16 protein. The prevalence of HPV-positive OSCCs was about 6% (5 patients). In 3 patients the HPV subtypes 16/18 were found. No significant differences between the HPV positive and negative patients regarding age, gender, smoking and alcohol consumption, localization and TNM level could be detected. Contrary to other studies focussing on cancers of the lingual and palatine tonsil, the prevalence of HPV infections was much lower in the oral cavity. Therefore HPV infection might play a less important role in oral carcinogenesis. PMID:24947612

  3. Genome-Wide Loss of Heterozygosity and DNA Copy Number Aberration in HPV-Negative Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Their Associations with Disease-Specific Survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Loomis, Melissa M.; Upton, Melissa P.; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Houck, John R.; Doody, David R.; Mendez, Eduardo; Futran, Neal; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Wang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx (OSCC) is associated with high case-fatality. For reasons that are largely unknown, patients with the same clinical and pathologic staging have heterogeneous response to treatment and different probability of recurrence and survival, with patients with Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal tumors having the most favorable survival. To gain insight into the complexity of OSCC and to identify potential chromosomal changes that may be associated with OSCC mortality, we used Affymtrix 6.0 SNP arrays to examine paired DNA from peripheral blood and tumor cell populations isolated by laser capture microdissection to assess genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and DNA copy number aberration (CNA) and their associations with risk factors, tumor characteristics, and oral cancer-specific mortality among 75 patients with HPV-negative OSCC. We found a highly heterogeneous and complex genomic landscape of HPV-negative tumors, and identified regions in 4q, 8p, 9p and 11q that seem to play an important role in oral cancer biology and survival from this disease. If confirmed, these findings could assist in designing personalized treatment or in the creation of models to predict survival in patients with HPV-negative OSCC. PMID:26247464

  4. Expression of p16 in squamous cell carcinoma of the mobile tongue is independent of HPV infection despite presence of the HPV-receptor syndecan-1

    PubMed Central

    Sgaramella, N; Coates, P J; Strindlund, K; Loljung, L; Colella, G; Laurell, G; Rossiello, R; Muzio, L L; Loizou, C; Tartaro, G; Olofsson, K; Danielsson, K; Fåhraeus, R; Nylander, K

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is increasing in incidence, especially among young patients and preferably females. Infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) has been suggested as a cause of SCC in the head and neck, and the proportion of oropharyngeal cancers caused by HPV has steadily increased. Methods: Samples from 109 patients with primary TSCC were analysed for the presence of HPV16 by in situ hybridisation and for expression of its surrogate marker p16 and the HPV receptor syndecan-1 by immunhistochemistry. Results: No evidence of HPV16 DNA was observed in the tumours, although one-third showed p16 staining. There was no difference in the expression of the primary HPV receptor, syndecan-1, between TSCC and a group of tonsil SCC. Conclusion: Whereas p16 is expressed in some TSCCs, HPV16 is undetectable, therefore, p16 cannot be used as a surrogate marker for high-risk HPV-infection in this tumour. Despite presence of the HPV-receptor syndecan-1 in TSCC, HPV prefers the tonsillar environment. Lack of p16 associates with worse prognosis primarily in patients aged ⩽40 years with tongue SCC. The improved prognosis seen in p16-positive TSCC can be due to induction of a senescent phenotype or an inherent radiosensitivity due to the ability of p16 to inhibit homologous recombination repair. PMID:26057450

  5. TMEM16A/ANO1 is differentially expressed in HPV-negative versus HPV-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma through promoter methylation

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Ronak; Kemp, Carolyn; Kulich, Scott; Seethala, Raja; Chiosea, Simion; Ling, Shizhang; Ha, Patrick K.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has a variety of causes. Recently, the human papilloma virus (HPV) has been implicated in the rising incidence of oropharyngeal cancer and has led to variety of studies exploring the differences between HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC. The calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A is overexpressed in a variety of cancers, including HNSCC, but whether or not it plays different roles in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that TMEM16A is preferentially overexpressed in HPV-negative HNSCC and that this overexpression of TMEM16A is associated with decreased patient survival. We also show that TMEM16A expression is decreased in HPV-positive HNSCC at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels in patient samples as well as cell lines. We demonstrate that the lower levels of TMEM16A expression in HPV-positive tumors can be attributed to both a combination of copy number alteration and promoter methylation at the DNA level. Additionally, our cellular data show that HPV-negative cell lines are more dependent on TMEM16A for survival than HPV-positive cell lines. Therefore, we suspect that the down-regulation of TMEM16A in HPV-positive HNSCC makes TMEM16A a poor therapeutic target in HPV-positive HNSCC, but a potentially useful target in HPV-negative HNSCC. PMID:26563938

  6. TMEM16A/ANO1 is differentially expressed in HPV-negative versus HPV-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma through promoter methylation.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Ronak; Kemp, Carolyn; Kulich, Scott; Seethala, Raja; Chiosea, Simion; Ling, Shizhang; Ha, Patrick K; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar

    2015-11-13

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has a variety of causes. Recently, the human papilloma virus (HPV) has been implicated in the rising incidence of oropharyngeal cancer and has led to variety of studies exploring the differences between HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC. The calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A is overexpressed in a variety of cancers, including HNSCC, but whether or not it plays different roles in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that TMEM16A is preferentially overexpressed in HPV-negative HNSCC and that this overexpression of TMEM16A is associated with decreased patient survival. We also show that TMEM16A expression is decreased in HPV-positive HNSCC at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels in patient samples as well as cell lines. We demonstrate that the lower levels of TMEM16A expression in HPV-positive tumors can be attributed to both a combination of copy number alteration and promoter methylation at the DNA level. Additionally, our cellular data show that HPV-negative cell lines are more dependent on TMEM16A for survival than HPV-positive cell lines. Therefore, we suspect that the down-regulation of TMEM16A in HPV-positive HNSCC makes TMEM16A a poor therapeutic target in HPV-positive HNSCC, but a potentially useful target in HPV-negative HNSCC.

  7. [Afatinib in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung: current context and the option of oral treatment].

    PubMed

    Cobo, Manuel; Gutiérrez, Vanesa; Rodelo, Luis; López, Omar; Ruiz, María; Godoy, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung represents 30% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). Docetaxel and the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), erlotinib, are the only two drugs approved for second-line treatment of advanced SCC. The sensitivity of SCC to TKIs can be explained by EGFR overexpression. Erlotinib demonstrated a significant benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) in successive lines in NSCLC, including squamous histology. The magnitude of this benefit is similar to that of chemotherapy. Afatinib is an irreversible inhibitor of the entire ErbB family (EGFR, HER2-4) that has recently been approved for its current indication, advanced EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC and has well-defined and manageable toxicity, mainly gastrointestinal and cutaneous. The LUX-Lung 8 study was a phase III randomized trial in patients with NSCLC with squamous histology that compared erlotinib versus afatinib as second-line treatment. A total of 795 patients were included and a significant benefit was observed for afatinib in progression-free survival (2.7 vs 1.9 months (HR 0.79 [95%CI 0.68-0.91]; p=0.0012) and in OS (7.9 vs 6.8 months (HR 0.81 [95%CI 0.69-0.95]; p=0.0077), as well as a significant improvement in OS at 12 and 18 months. More diarrhoea and stomatitis was observed with afatinib and more rash with erlotinib, but the overall proportion of toxicity was similar in each group. Afatinib offered better results in quality of life. In summary, afatinib is a second-line treatment option in squamous NSCLC based on its survival advantage over erlotinib. PMID:27426245

  8. [Afatinib in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung: current context and the option of oral treatment].

    PubMed

    Cobo, Manuel; Gutiérrez, Vanesa; Rodelo, Luis; López, Omar; Ruiz, María; Godoy, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung represents 30% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). Docetaxel and the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), erlotinib, are the only two drugs approved for second-line treatment of advanced SCC. The sensitivity of SCC to TKIs can be explained by EGFR overexpression. Erlotinib demonstrated a significant benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) in successive lines in NSCLC, including squamous histology. The magnitude of this benefit is similar to that of chemotherapy. Afatinib is an irreversible inhibitor of the entire ErbB family (EGFR, HER2-4) that has recently been approved for its current indication, advanced EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC and has well-defined and manageable toxicity, mainly gastrointestinal and cutaneous. The LUX-Lung 8 study was a phase III randomized trial in patients with NSCLC with squamous histology that compared erlotinib versus afatinib as second-line treatment. A total of 795 patients were included and a significant benefit was observed for afatinib in progression-free survival (2.7 vs 1.9 months (HR 0.79 [95%CI 0.68-0.91]; p=0.0012) and in OS (7.9 vs 6.8 months (HR 0.81 [95%CI 0.69-0.95]; p=0.0077), as well as a significant improvement in OS at 12 and 18 months. More diarrhoea and stomatitis was observed with afatinib and more rash with erlotinib, but the overall proportion of toxicity was similar in each group. Afatinib offered better results in quality of life. In summary, afatinib is a second-line treatment option in squamous NSCLC based on its survival advantage over erlotinib.

  9. The rationale for HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer de-escalation treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Szyfter, Krzysztof; Milecki, Piotr; Składowski, Krzysztof; Ramlau, Rodryg

    2015-01-01

    The treatment paradigms for head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) are changing due to the emergence of human papillomavirus-associated tumors (HPV-related), possessing distinct molecular profiles and responses to therapy. Retrospective studies have suggested that HPV-related HNSCCs are more frequently cured than those caused by tobacco. Current clinical trials focus on the reduction of treatment-related toxicity and the development of HPV-targeted therapies. New treatment strategies include: 1) dose reduction of radiotherapy, 2) the use of cetuximab instead of cisplatin for chemo-radiation 3) less invasive surgical options, i.e. trans-oral robotic surgery and trans-oral laser microlaryngoscopy, and 4) more specific treatment attempts, including immunotherapeutic strategies, thanks to increasing comprehension of the molecular background of HPV-related HNSCC. Whereas recently published data shed light on immune mechanisms, other studies have focused on specific vaccination against HPV-related HNSCC. A crucial problem is patient selection to the chosen bias. Truly HPV-related cancers (p16-positive and HPV DNA-positive) with biomarkers for good response to therapy could be included in randomized trials aiming for less severe and better tailored therapy. PMID:26557780

  10. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  11. Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-20

    Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  12. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-10-30

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  13. Molecular Classification of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika Manoj; Konda, Paremala; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Makarla, Soumya

    2016-01-01

    Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is the commonest tumour in the oro-facial region with increasing incidence in the recent years. The disease is challenging as it still depicts a high morbidity and mortality rate. Clinico-pathological data, tumour site, pathologic site tumor, lymphnode, metastasis (TNM) staging, histological grade, invasion, perineural invasion and metastasis have been evaluated to a great depth in relation to OSCC. Co-morbidity factors like use of tobacco, alcohol consumption and various other factors including genetic predisposition have been looked at for finding a suitable treatment protocol. The crux of the matter in understanding the complexity of oral cancer lies in the biological heterogeneity of the tumour. Similar heterogeneity is seen in clinical presentation, histopathology and molecular changes at the cellular level. In spite of the disease being diagnosed, a prediction of the same related to behaviour has remained elusive. Hence, it is time to look beyond at the genetic and epigenetic events leading to molecular and cytogenetic changes that elucidate the pathogenesis and help in design and implementation of targeted drug therapy. A molecular classification of OSCC needs to be put in place much before a clinician can design the treatment protocol of the same and predict the prognosis. PMID:27790599

  14. Temporal bone squamous cell carcinoma - Penang experience.

    PubMed

    Ng, S Y; Pua, K C; Zahirrudin, Z

    2015-12-01

    Temporal bone squamous cell carcinoma (TBSCC) is rare and poses difficulties in diagnosing, staging and management. We describe a case series with six patients who were diagnosed TBSCC, from January 2009 to June 2014, with median age of 62 years old. All patients presented with blood-stain discharge and external auditory canal mass, showing that these findings should highly alert the diagnosis of TBSCC. Three patients staged T3 and another three with T4 disease. High-resolution CT (HRCT) temporal findings were noted to be different from intraoperative findings and therefore we conclude that MRI should be done to look for middle ear involvement or other soft tissue invasion for more accurate staging. Lateral temporal bone resection (LTBR) and parotidectomy was done for four patients with or without neck dissection. Patients with positive margin, perineural invasion or parotid and glenoid involvement carry poorer prognosis and postoperative radiotherapy may improve the survival rate. One patient had successful tumor resection via piecemeal removal approach in contrast with the recommended en bloc resection shows that with negative margin achieved, piecemeal removal approach can be a good option for patients with T2-3 disease. In general, T4 tumor has dismal outcome regardless of surgery or radiotherapy given.

  15. Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D E; Schoenwald, M B; Ayala, A G; Miller, L S

    1976-05-01

    Clinical and morphological features of 90 cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder have been reviewed. The lesions were solitary in 90 per cent of the patients, developed without a history of vesical malignant disease in 82 per cent and were invasive at the time of diagnosis in all cases. Ureteral obstruction was demonstrated in 42 per cent of the group. The over-all survival rate at 5 years was only 10.6 per cent. There were 17 patients who received no therapy, all of whom were dead before 2 years. Unassisted supervoltage radiation therapy for patients with stages B2 and C lesions yielded a 5-year survival rate only 17.7 per cent. However, preoperative radiotherapy followed by simple total cystectomy and urinary diversion in a small number of patients with stages B2 and C lesions resulted in a 5-year survival rate in excess of 34 per cent. We are encouraged by this finding and believe that combination therapy warrants further clinical trial.

  16. Three-Dimensional Dose Addition of External Beam Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy for Oropharyngeal Patients Using Nonrigid Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez Osorio, Eliana M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Teguh, David N.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Bondar, Luiza; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a method for adding dose distributions of combined external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (BT) for oropharyngeal patients. Methods and Materials: Two computed tomography (CT) scans were used for 5 patients: the EBRT CT, used for EBRT planning, and the BT CT, acquired after catheter implantation. For each scan, the salivary glands and the chewing and swallowing muscles were contoured, and a dose distribution was calculated. A nonrigid transformation was obtained by registering the organs' surfaces. Then the BT dose distribution was mapped onto the EBRT dose distribution by applying the transformation obtained. To account for differences in fractionation, the physical doses were converted to equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD{sub 2}), and the total dose was found by adding dose voxel by voxel. The robustness of the dose addition was investigated by varying delineations and input parameters of the registration method and by varying the {alpha}/{beta} parameter for EQD{sub 2}. The effect of the perturbations was quantified using dose-volume histograms (DVH) and gamma analyses (distance-to-agreement/dose-difference = 1 mm/1 Gy). Results: The variations in input parameters and delineations caused only small perturbations in the DVH of the added dose distributions. For most organs the gamma index was low, and it was moderately elevated for organs lying in areas with a steep gradient (median gamma index {<=}2.3 for constrictor muscles, {<=}0.7 for all other organs). Conclusions: The presented method allows adding dose distributions of combined EBRT and BT for oropharyngeal patients. In general, the method is reliable and robust with respect to uncertainties in organ delineation, perturbations in input parameters of the method, and {alpha}/{beta} values.

  17. Drinking-induced thermoregulatory panting in rehydrated sheep: influences of oropharyngeal/esophageal signals, core temperature, and thirst satiety.

    PubMed

    McKinley, M J; Weissenborn, F; Mathai, M L

    2009-06-01

    Dehydrated mammals conserve body water by reducing thermoregulatory evaporative cooling responses e.g., panting and sweating. Increased core temperature (Tc) may result. Following rehydration and correction of fluid deficits, panting and sweating commence. We investigated the role of oropharyngeal/esophageal, postabsorptive and thermal signals in the panting response, and reduced Tc that occurs when unshorn sheep drink water following water deprivation for 2 days (ambient temperature 20 degrees C). Ingestion of water (at body temperature) resulted in increased respiratory rate (panting) and reduced Tc within 4 min that persisted for at least 90 min. Initially, a similar panting response and reduced Tc occurred following rehydration by drinking isotonic saline solution, but panting was not sustained after 20 min, and Tc began to rise again. Rehydration by intraruminal administration of water, without any drinking, resulted in delayed panting and fall in Tc. Intraruminal infusion of saline was ineffective. Rehydration by drinking cool water (20 degrees C) resulted in a rapid fall in Tc without increased panting. Shorn sheep had lower basal Tc that did not increase during 2 days of water deprivation, and they did not pant on rehydration by drinking water. Our results indicate that signals from the oropharyngeal and/or esophageal region associated with the act of drinking play a crucial role in the initial 20-30 min of the panting response to rehydration. Postabsorptive factors most likely reduced plasma tonicity and cause continued panting and further reduction in Tc. Tc also influences rehydration-induced panting. It occurs only if sheep incur a heat load during bodily dehydration.

  18. What's New in Research and Treatment of Basal and Squamous Cell Skin Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for basal and squamous cell skin cancers What’s new in basal and squamous cell skin cancer research? ... cancer cells. Researchers are working to apply this new information to strategies for preventing and treating skin ...

  19. Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers.

    PubMed

    2012-09-27

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in squamous cell lung cancers have not been comprehensively characterized, and no molecularly targeted agents have been specifically developed for its treatment. As part of The Cancer Genome Atlas, here we profile 178 lung squamous cell carcinomas to provide a comprehensive landscape of genomic and epigenomic alterations. We show that the tumour type is characterized by complex genomic alterations, with a mean of 360 exonic mutations, 165 genomic rearrangements, and 323 segments of copy number alteration per tumour. We find statistically recurrent mutations in 11 genes, including mutation of TP53 in nearly all specimens. Previously unreported loss-of-function mutations are seen in the HLA-A class I major histocompatibility gene. Significantly altered pathways included NFE2L2 and KEAP1 in 34%, squamous differentiation genes in 44%, phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase pathway genes in 47%, and CDKN2A and RB1 in 72% of tumours. We identified a potential therapeutic target in most tumours, offering new avenues of investigation for the treatment of squamous cell lung cancers. PMID:22960745

  20. Occult esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with metastases to the spine and central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Roballo, Carla Adriane; de Campos, Pompeu Tomé Ribeiro; Teixeira, Carlos Osvaldo; Teixeira, Maria Aparecida Barone

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal malignancy encompasses a group of diseases that are mostly represented by the squamous cell carcinoma and the adenocarcinoma. Quite frequently, these neoplasms present aggressive behavior; therefore, the diagnosis is often made when the condition is in advanced stages. Dysphagia is the typical clinical complaint, although it is present only when most of the lumen is obstructed. Therefore, quite often, the metastatic disease is first diagnosed, which contributes to the patient's poor survival expectancy. The authors report the case of a 58-year-old man who looked for medical care complaining of a long-term history of scapular pain. The diagnostic work-up disclosed a cervical spine lytic lesion surrounded by a tumoral mass shown by computed tomography. The cervical tumor was sampled by fine needle aspiration, revealing an undifferentiated carcinoma. The outcome was unfavorable and the patient died. The autopsy findings revealed metastatic disease to the spine and central nervous system, and the primary tumor was found to be an esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, which had progressed without typical dysphagia. PMID:26484322

  1. A minimally invasive immunocytochemical approach to early detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma and dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Scott, I S; Odell, E; Chatrath, P; Morris, L S; Davies, R J; Vowler, S L; Laskey, R A; Coleman, N

    2006-01-01

    Squamous dysplasia of the oral cavity indicates increased risk of progression to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). An important advance would be the development of a minimally invasive assay for identification of oral SCC and dysplasia. We have investigated the suitability in this context of immunostaining oral smears for minichromosome maintainance proteins (MCMs), sensitive and specific biomarkers of cell cycle entry. Immunohistochemical examination of 66 oral tissue samples showed a greater frequency of Mcm-2 expression in surface layers of moderate/severe dysplasia and SCC compared to benign keratosis/mild dysplasia. Immunocytochemistry for Mcm-2/Mcm-5 was performed on 101 oral smears. Conventional smears included 23 from normal mucosa, benign proliferative disease and mild dysplasia, all of which were MCM negative. Of 52 conventional smears of SCC tissue samples, 18 were inadequate. However, MCM-positive cells were present in 33/34 adequate samples. Of 26 liquid-based cytology smears, 19 out of 20 smears from SCC were adequate and all were MCM positive. Six smears from benign lesions were adequate and MCM negative. We conclude that MCMs are promising markers for early detection of oral SCC and dysplasia, particularly in a liquid-based cytology platform. Detection of MCMs would be amenable to automation and potentially applicable in the developing world. Further studies are now warranted. PMID:16622441

  2. Desmosomal component expression in normal, dysplastic, and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Nagamani; Gist, Julie; Smith, Tyler; Tylka, Daniel; Trogdon, Gavin; Wahl, James K

    2010-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (oral SCC) is the most common oral cancer in the U.S., affecting nearly 30,000 Americans each year. Despite recent advances in detection and treatment, there has been little improvement in the five-year survival rate for this devastating disease. Oral cancer may be preceded by premalignant disease that appears histologically as dysplasia. Identification of molecular markers for cellular change would assist in determining the risk of dysplasia progressing to oral squamous cell carcinoma. The goal of this study was to determine if any correlation exists between histological diagnosed dys