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Sample records for advanced pancreas cancer

  1. Induction Gemcitabine and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Nonmetastatic Pancreas Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Miksad, Rebecca; Goldstein, Michael; Sullivan, Ryan; Bullock, Andrea; Buchbinder, Elizabeth; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Kent, Tara; Vollmer, Charles; Callery, Mark

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been used successfully to treat patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer. However, many patients develop metastatic disease soon after diagnosis and may receive little benefit from such therapy. We therefore retrospectively analyzed a planned strategy of initial chemotherapy with restaging and then treatment for those patients with no evidence of metastatic progression with SBRT. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients received gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} per week for 3 weeks then 1 week off) until tolerance, at least six cycles, or progression. Patients without metastases after two cycles were treated with SBRT (tolerance-based dose of 24-36 Gy in 3 fractions) between the third and fourth cycles without interrupting the chemotherapy cycles. Results: Eight of the 47 patients (17%) were found to have metastatic disease after two cycles of gemcitabine; the remaining 39 patients received SBRT. The median follow-up for survivors was 21 months (range, 6-36 months). The median overall survival for all patients who received SBRT was 20 months, and the median progression-free survival was 15 months. The local control rate was 85% (33 of 39 patients); and 54% of patients (21 of 39) developed metastases. Late Grade III toxicities such as GI bleeding and obstruction were observed in 9% (3/39) of patients. Conclusion: For patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer, this strategy uses local therapy for those who are most likely to benefit from it and spares those patients with early metastatic progression from treatment. SBRT delivers such local therapy safely with minimal interruption to systemic chemotherapy, thereby potentially improving the outcome in these patients.

  2. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy reduces gastrointestinal toxicity in locally advanced pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Shreya; Cambridge, Lajhem; Huguet, Florence; Chou, Joanne F.; Zhang, Zhigang; Wu, Abraham J.; O'Reilly, Eileen M.; Allen, Peter; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared gastrointestinal (GI) and hematologic toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer (LAPC) undergoing definitive chemoradiation using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning. Methods and Materials We retrospectively studied 205 patients with LAPC undergoing IMRT (n=134) and 3D-CRT (n=71) between 05/03 and 03/12. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics and acute GI/hematology toxicity according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 were recorded. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to test association between acute grade 2+ GI and hematologic toxicity outcomes and predictors. Propensity score analysis for grade 2+ GI toxicity was performed to reduce bias for confounding variables: age, gender, radiation dose, field size, and chemotherapy type. Results Median follow-up time for survivors was 22 months, similar between groups. Median RT dose was significantly higher for IMRT vs. 3D-CRT (5600 cGy vs 5040 cGy, P<.001); concurrent chemotherapy was mainly gemcitabine (56%) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, 38%). Grade 2+ GI toxicity occurred in 34% (n=24) of 3D-CRT compared with 16% (n=21) of IMRT patients. Using propensity-score analysis, 3D-CRT had significantly higher grade 2+ GI toxicity (odds ratio, 1.26 [95%CI, 1.08-1.45], P=.001). Grade 2+ hematologic toxicity was similar between IMRT and 3D-CRT groups but was significantly greater in recipients of concurrent gemcitabine over 5-FU (62% vs 29%, P<.0001). Conclusions IMRT is associated with significant lower grade 2+ GI toxicity versus 3D-CRT for patients undergoing definitive chemoradiotherapy for LAPC. Since IMRT is better tolerated at higher doses and may allow further dose escalation, potentially improving local control for this aggressive disease. Further prospective studies of dose-escalated chemoradiation using IMRT are warranted. PMID:26577010

  3. Cancer of the Pancreas: Molecular Pathways and Current Advancement in Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Polireddy, Kishore; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers among all malignances, with a median overall survival of <1 year and a 5-year survival of ~5%. The dismal survival rate and prognosis are likely due to lack of early diagnosis, fulminant disease course, high metastasis rate, and disappointing treatment outcome. Pancreatic cancers harbor a variety of genetic alternations that render it difficult to treat even with targeted therapy. Recent studies revealed that pancreatic cancers are highly enriched with a cancer stem cell (CSC) population, which is resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs, and therefore escapes chemotherapy and promotes tumor recurrence. Cancer cell epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is highly associated with metastasis, generation of CSCs, and treatment resistance in pancreatic cancer. Reviewed here are the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer, the major signaling pathways regulating pancreatic cancer EMT and CSCs, and the advancement in current clinical and experimental treatments for pancreatic cancer. PMID:27471566

  4. A Dose Escalation and Pharmacodynamic Study of Triapine and Radiation in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreas Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Ludmila Katherine; Grecula, John; Jia, Guang; Wei Lai; Yang Xiangyu; Otterson, Gregory A.; Wu Xin; Harper, Erica; Kefauver, Cheryl; Zhou Bingsen; Yen Yun; Bloomston, Mark; Knopp, Michael; Ivy, S. Percy; Grever, Michael; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Triapine, a novel inhibitor of the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RR), is a potent radiosensitizer. This phase 1 study, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, assessed the safety and tolerability of triapine in combination with radiation (RT) in patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer (LAPCA). Methods and Materials: We evaluated 3 dosage levels of triapine (24 mg/m{sup 2}, 48 mg/m{sup 2}, 72 mg/m{sup 2}) administered with 50.4 Gy of RT in 28 fractions. Patients with LAPCA received triapine thrice weekly, every other week during the course of RT. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was assessed during RT and for 4 weeks after its completion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and serum RR levels were evaluated as potential predictors for early response. Results: Twelve patients were treated. Four patients (1 nonevaluable) were enrolled at dosage level 1 (DL1), 3 patients at DL2, and 5 patients (2 nonevaluable) at DL3. No DLTs were observed, and the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Two patients (17%) achieved partial response, and 6 patients (50%) had stable disease. One patient underwent R0 resection after therapy. Ninety-two percent of patients (100% at DL3) experienced freedom from local tumor progression. In 75% of patients who eventually experienced progression, metastases developed without local progression. RR levels did not seem to predict outcome. In 4 patients with available data, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging may predict early response or resistance to therapy. Conclusion: The combination of triapine at 72 mg/m{sup 2} 3 times weekly every other week and standard RT is tolerable with interesting activity in patients with LAPCA.

  5. Advances in the Surgical Management of Resectable and Borderline Resectable Pancreas Cancer.

    PubMed

    Helmink, Beth A; Snyder, Rebecca A; Idrees, Kamran; Merchant, Nipun B; Parikh, Alexander A

    2016-04-01

    Successful surgical resection offers the only chance for cure in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, pancreatic resection is feasible in less than 20% of the patients. In this review, the current state of surgical management of pancreatic cancer is discussed. The definition of resectability based on cross-sectional imaging and the technical aspects of surgery, including vascular resection and/or reconstruction, management of aberrant vascular anatomy and extent of lymphadenectomy, are appraised. Furthermore, common pancreatic resection-specific postoperative complications and their management are reviewed.

  6. {sup 18}Fluorodeoxyglucose PET Is Prognostic of Progression-Free and Overall Survival in Locally Advanced Pancreas Cancer Treated With Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Quon, Andy; Minn, A. Yuriko; Graves, Edward E.; Kunz, Pamela; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) for locally advanced pancreas cancer patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Patients and Methods: Fifty-five previously untreated, unresectable pancreas cancer patients received a single fraction of 25-Gy SBRT sequentially with gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. On the preradiation PET-CT, the tumor was contoured and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and metabolic tumor burden (MTB) were calculated using an in-house software application. High-SUVmax and low-SUVmax subgroups were created by categorizing patients above or below the median SUVmax. The analysis was repeated to form high-MTB and low-MTB subgroups as well as clinically relevant subgroups with SUVmax values of <5, 5-10, or >10. Multivariate analysis analyzing SUVmax, MTB, age, chemotherapy cycles, and pretreatment carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9 was performed. Results: For the entire population, median survival was 12.7 months. Median survival was 9.8 vs.15.3 months for the high- and low- SUVmax subgroups (p <0.01). Similarly, median survival was 10.1 vs. 18.0 months for the high MTB and low MTB subgroups (p <0.01). When clinical SUVmax cutoffs were used, median survival was 6.4 months in those with SUVmax >10, 9.5 months with SUVmax 5.0-10.0, and 17.7 months in those with SUVmax <5 (p <0.01). On multivariate analysis, clinical SUVmax was an independent predictor for overall survival (p = 0.03) and progression-free survival (p = 0.03). Conclusion: PET scan parameters can predict for length of survival in locally advanced pancreas cancer patients.

  7. Enlarged pancreas: not always a cancer.

    PubMed

    Calculli, Lucia; Festi, Davide; Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic fat accumulation has been described with various terms including pancreatic lipomatosis, pancreatic steatosis, fatty replacement, fatty infiltration, fatty pancreas, lipomatous pseudohypertrophy and nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease. It has been reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, acute pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and the formation of pancreatic fistula. The real incidence of this condition is still unknown. We report a case of pancreatic steatosis in a non-obese female patient initially diagnosed with a mass in the head of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out to define the characteristics of the pancreatic mass. MRI confirmed the diagnosis of fat pancreas. Enlarged pancreas is not always a cancer, but pancreatic steatosis is characterized by pancreatic enlargement. MRI could give a definite diagnosis of pancreatic steatosis or cancer.

  8. What You Need to Know about Cancer of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Need To Know About™ Cancer of the Pancreas This booklet is about cancer of the pancreas, also called pancreatic cancer. There are two main ... care. This booklet covers: The anatomy of the pancreas and basics about cancer of the pancreas Treatments ...

  9. Imaging of the pancreas: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of anomalies of pancreas and the pancreatic duct system are commonly encountered at radiological evaluation. Diagnosing pancreatic lesions generally requires a multimodality approach. This review highlights the new advances in pancreatic imaging and their applications in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic pathologies. The mainstay techniques include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), radionuclide imaging (RNI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). PMID:21847450

  10. Epidemiology of pancreas cancer in Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, T.M.; Paganini-Hill, A.

    1981-03-15

    The characteristics of the 3614 Los Angeles County residents in whom cancer of the exocrine pancreas was diagnosed during the period 1972-1977 were compared with those of all county residents and patients in whom any cancer was diagnosed during the same period. Seventy-nine percent of the diagnoses had been pathologically verified. This disease still preferentially afflicts the old, the black, and men, although the differences in risk with factors other than age are modest. The disease is not evenly distributed by social class, or over time, although it is not clear that the observed differences reflect etiology. The distributions with respect to important categories of occupation and industry, religion, marital status, geography of residence, and birthplace were rather uniform. Although there is no obvious explanation for any of several unexpected minor inequities in the pattern of incidence, there is no compelling evidence to support any specific environmental cause. There is substantial evidence which is inconsistent with those environmental hypotheses that have been proposed previously.

  11. Pancreas cancer in Mississippi: present challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Helling, Thomas S

    2010-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a deadly disease. Currently, the only hope for cure is surgical resection at an early stage of the disease. However, there is evidence that many individuals do not receive this treatment, perhaps because of health care disparities. Mississippi, because of its socioeconomic composition, has been the focus of concern for health care disparities. In order to determine whether such disparities exist in Mississippi for pancreatic cancer, a retrospective analysis was done from 2000 2006 of case diagnosis, treatment, and mortality from this disease. The Mississippi Cancer Registry, the American College of Surgeons (ACS) National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program were surveyed. Outcomes at all 12 ACS Commission on Cancer (CoC) accredited hospitals within the state were compared to the NCDB nationwide (n=1331 hospitals). In 2006 Mississippi had the highest death rate from pancreas cancer in the nation (12.7/100,000). Age-adjusted incidence by county ranged to a high of 26.91/100,000. Fifty-one percent of patients who died from pancreatic cancer in the state were treated at ACS CoC hospitals. The fate of the other 49% is not known. Of the patients tracked at CoC hospitals, there was essentially no significant difference with respect to age distribution, stage at diagnosis, or first treatment modalities when compared to NCDB nationwide CoC data. There were fewer patients surviving two years with locally advanced disease compared to national figures. Of concern was the large number of patients whose treatment for pancreatic cancer is unknown. It is incumbent on health care providers in the state to develop a system of care for pancreatic cancer that is accessible, inclusive, and comprehensive.

  12. Treatment of cancer of the pancreas by intraoperative electron beam therapy: physical and biological aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Bagne, F.R.; Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Milligan, A.J.; Bronn, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation therapy has had a significant and an expanded role in the management of cancer of the pancreas during the last decade. In particular, for locally advanced disease, radiation therapy has improved the median survival of patients to 1 year. Intraoperative electron beam therapy has been applied to unresectable and resectable pancreatic cancer in an attempt to enhance local control of disease and to improve patient survival. This paper presents a survey of the role of radiation therapy in treatment of cancer of the pancreas, provides information on the radiobiological aspects of this treatment modality and details the physical and dosimetric characteristics of intraoperative radiation therapy with electrons. Presented are the design specifics of an applicator system, central axis beam data, applicator parameters, dose distribution data, shielding, treatment planning and means of verification. Emphasis is placed on the collaboration and cooperation necessary for all members of the intraoperative radiation therapy team including surgeons, radiation therapists, medical physicists, anesthesiologists, technologists, and nurses.29 references.

  13. LGR5 and Nanog identify stem cell signature of pancreas beta cells which initiate pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Polin, Nava; Givol, David

    2013-04-05

    Pancreas cancer, is the fourth leading cause of cancer death but its cell of origin is controversial. We compared the localization of stem cells in normal and cancerous pancreas using antibodies to the stem cell markers Nanog and LGR5. Here we show, for the first time, that LGR5 is expressed in normal pancreas, exclusively in the islets of Langerhans and it is co-localized, surprisingly, with Nanog and insulin in clusters of beta cells. In cancerous pancreas Nanog and LGR5 are expressed in the remaining islets and in all ductal cancer cells. We observed insulin staining among the ductal cancer cells, but not in metastases. This indicates that the islet's beta cells, expressing LGR5 and Nanog markers are the initiating cells of pancreas cancer, which migrated from the islets to form the ductal cancerous tissue, probably after mutation and de-differentiation. This discovery may facilitate treatment of this devastating cancer.

  14. [Ectopic pancreas mimicking advanced gastric malignancy--case report].

    PubMed

    Zawada, Iwona; Lewosiuk, Agnieszka; Hnatyszyn, Krzysztof; Patalan, Michał; Woyke, Stanisław; Kostyrka, Roman; Marlicz, Krzysztof; Starzyńska, Teresa

    2012-04-01

    Ectopic pancreas is the most common type of ectopic tissue in gastrointestinal tract. It is typically asymptomatic, presenting as a small submucosal lesion in prepyloric region of stomach. The diagnosis is usually incidental, during gastroscopy. The patient with symptomatic heterotropic pancreas, mimicking gastric malignancy was described.

  15. Concise Review: Pancreas Regeneration: Recent Advances and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lysy, Philippe A.; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The replacement of functional pancreatic β-cells is seen as an attractive potential therapy for diabetes, because diabetes results from an inadequate β-cell mass. Inducing replication of the remaining β-cells and new islet formation from progenitors within the pancreas (neogenesis) are the most direct ways to increase the β-cell mass. Stimulation of both replication and neogenesis have been reported in rodents, but their clinical significance must still be shown. Because human islet transplantation is limited by the scarcity of donors and graft failure within a few years, efforts have recently concentrated on the use of stem cells to replace the deficient β-cells. Currently, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells achieve high levels of β-cell differentiation, but their clinical use is still hampered by ethical issues and/or the risk of developing tumors after transplantation. Pancreatic epithelial cells (duct, acinar, or α-cells) represent an appealing alternative to stem cells because they demonstrate β-cell differentiation capacities. Yet translation of such capacity to human cells after significant in vitro expansion has yet to be achieved. Besides providing new β-cells, cell therapy also has to address the question on how to protect the transplanted cells from destruction by the immune system via either allo- or autoimmunity. Encouraging developments have been made in encapsulation and immunomodulation techniques, but many challenges still remain. Herein, we discuss recent advances in the search for β-cell replacement therapies, current strategies for circumventing the immune system, and mandatory steps for new techniques to be translated from bench to clinics. PMID:23197762

  16. National Pancreas Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... NPF Centers Animated Pancreas Patient About the Pancreas Pancreatic Cancer Chronic Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis Children/Pediatric Other Pancreas ... Providing hope to those suffering from pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Support Pancreatic Research Slide2 Providing hope to those ...

  17. Improving Goals of Care Discussion in Advanced Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-20

    Primary Stage IV Hepatobiliary; Esophageal; Colorectal Cancer; Glioblastoma; Cancer of Stomach; Cancer of Pancreas; Melanoma; Head or Neck Cancer; Stage III; Stage IV; Lung Cancers; Pancreatic Cancers

  18. Expression patterns of epiplakin1 in pancreas, pancreatic cancer and regenerating pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tetsu; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Baba, Hideo; Goto, Mizuki; Fujiwara, Sakuhei; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2008-07-01

    Epiplakin1 (Eppk1) is a plakin family gene with its function remains largely unknown, although the plakin genes are known to function in interconnecting cytoskeletal filaments and anchoring them at plasma membrane-associated adhesive junction. Here we analyzed the expression patterns of Eppk1 in the developing and adult pancreas in the mice. In the embryonic pancreas, Eppk1+/Pdx1+ and Eppk1+/Sox9+ pancreatic progenitor cells were observed in early pancreatic epithelium. Since Pdx1 expression overlapped with that of Sox9 at this stage, these multipotent progenitor cells are Eppk1+/Pdx1+/Sox9+ cells. Then Eppk1 expression becomes confined to Ngn3+ or Sox9+ endocrine progenitor cells, and p48+ exocrine progenitor cells, and then restricted to the duct cells and a cells at birth. In the adult pancreas, Eppk1 is expressed in centroacinar cells (CACs) and in duct cells. Eppk1 is observed in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), previously identified as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) precursor lesions. In addition, the expansion of Eppk1-positive cells occurs in a caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, an acinar cell regeneration model. Furthermore, in the partial pancreatectomy (Px) regeneration model using mice, Eppk1 is expressed in "ducts in foci", a tubular structure transiently induced. These results suggest that Eppk1 serves as a useful marker for detecting pancreatic progenitor cells in developing and regenerating pancreas.

  19. Personalising pancreas cancer treatment: When tissue is the issue

    PubMed Central

    Sjoquist, Katrin M; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; O’Connor, Chelsie; Hemmings, Chris; Chang, David K; Chou, Angela; Pajic, Marina; Johns, Amber L; Nagrial, Adnan M; Biankin, Andrew V; Yip, Desmond

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer has not moved much beyond single agent gemcitabine until recently when protocols such as FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan and oxaliplatin) and nab-paclitaxel-gemcitabine have demonstrated some improved outcomes. Advances in technology especially in massively parallel genome sequencing has progressed our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer especially the candidate signalling pathways that are involved in tumourogenesis and disease course. This has allowed identification of potentially actionable mutations that may be targeted by new biological agents. The heterogeneity of pancreatic cancer makes tumour tissue collection important with the aim of being able to personalise therapies for the individual as opposed to a one size fits all approach to treatment of the condition. This paper reviews the developments in this area of translational research and the ongoing clinical studies that will attempt to move this into the everyday oncology practice. PMID:24976722

  20. Enteric duplication cyst of the pancreas associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Bluhm, David; Xiao, Shu-Yan; Waxman, Irving; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2014-05-01

    Pancreas-associated enteric duplication cysts are rare developmental anomalies that communicate with the main pancreatic duct and may be associated with recurrent acute and chronic abdominal pain in children. In adults, these lesions may masquerade as pancreatic pseudocysts or pancreatic cystic neoplasms. An adult patient with a pancreas-associated enteric duplication is described which represents the first reported instance of association with both chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The clinical spectrum of pancreas-associated enteric duplication cyst, including diagnostic and therapeutic options, is reviewed.

  1. [Pancreatic cancer in a patient with congenital agenesis of the dorsal pancreas].

    PubMed

    Oki, Yusuke; Onoyama, Hirohiko; Nikaido, Mitsuhiro; Iinuma, Shoji; Endo, Koji; Tomita, Yumi; Mizuno, Katsuhiko; Yasui, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    A 65-year-old man with back pain showed a hypovascular lesion of the head of the pancreas on dynamic computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography. The distal portion of the pancreas was not visible. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed pancreatic duct obstruction, and the duodenal minor papilla was not visible. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient's condition as stage IVa pancreatic cancer with congenital agenesis of the dorsal pancreas. The patient underwent successful chemotherapy with 3 courses of gemcitabine and S-1, which was followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy. Pathological staging revealed invasive ductal carcinoma, pT3, pN0, pM0, stage III. We report a rare case of pancreatic cancer with congenital agenesis of the dorsal pancreas.

  2. Preoperative chemoradiation and IOERT for unresectable or borderline resectable pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Adyr A.; Rule, William G.; Callister, Matthew G.; Reddy, K. Sudhakar; Mulligan, David C.; Collins, Joseph M.; De Petris, Giovanni; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Borad, Mitesh

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Pre-operative chemoradiation (preop CRT) plus intraoperative electron irradiation (IOERT) has been used in the multidisciplinary treatment for patients with locally advanced unresectable or borderline resectable pancreas cancer. This review was performed to evaluate survival, relapse patterns and prognostic factors in patients treated with curative intent. Methods Between January 2002 and December 2010, 48 patients with locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma received preop CRT prior to an attempt at resection and IOERT. 31/48 (65%) patients proceeded to curative-intent surgical resection. Resection status prior to preop CRT was locally unresectable (20 patients) and borderline resectable (11 patients). Preop CRT (45-50.4 Gy/25-28 Fx in 27/31) was delivered with concurrent 5FU or gemcitabine-based regimens. Subsequent gross total resection was achieved in 16 patients (R0, 11; R1, 5). IOERT was delivered in 28 patients (dose, 10-20 Gy). 16 patients also received adjuvant post-operative systemic chemotherapy. Outcomes evaluated include survival, local failure in the EBRT field (LF), central failure in the IOERT field (CF), and distant metastases. Results Resection status was predictive for survival and for patterns of relapse. For patients with at least a gross total resection after preop CRT (R0/R1; n=16) vs. no resection (n=15), both median and overall survival were improved (median 23 vs. 10 months; 2-year, 40% vs. 17%; 3-year, 40% vs. 0%; P=0.002). Liver or peritoneal relapse was documented in 22/31 patients (71%); LF/CF in 5/26 (16%). Conclusions Long term survival and disease control are achievable in select patients with borderline resectable or locally unresectable pancreas cancer when gross total surgical resection is achieved after preop CRT. Continued evaluation of curative-intent combined modality therapy is warranted in this high risk population, but additional strategies are needed to improve resectability and disease

  3. [Resection of the remnant pancreas for recurrent pancreatic cancer after distal pancreatectomy-a case report].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Shoichi; Sho, Masayuki; Akahori, Takahiro; Nomi, Takeo; Yamato, Ichiro; Hokutoh, Daisuke; Yasuda, Satoshi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2012-11-01

    The standard treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy. The effect of surgical resection for localized recurrence in the remnant pancreas after pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer is unknown, but is reported to have a moderately good outcome in a few reports. We herein report a case of curative resection for recurrence in the remnant pancreas, 24 months after distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer. A 71-year-old man was diagnosed with pancreas tail cancer. Neoadjuvant treatment with chemoradiotherapy[ weekly full-dose gemcitabine(GEM) and radiation therapy 50 Gy/25 Fr] was followed by distal pancreatectomy. Postoperative adjuvant therapy with hepatic arterial infusion of 5-FU and systemic GEM therapy was completed. Twenty-four months after surgery, follow-up computed tomography scan results showed a lesion of 15-mm diameter in the remnant pancreas. Resection of the remnant pancreas was performed. The pathological findings showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, morphologically similar to the primary pancreatic cancer. Six months following surgery, there are no signs of recurrence at present.

  4. Biomarker validation for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): A critical component to successful cancer screening is the identification of a lesion for which intervention will result in prolonged survival or cure.The five-year survival of patients with resected stage IA pancreas cancer (the earliest identifiable lesion and |

  5. Small pancreatic cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology.

    PubMed

    Obana, Takashi; Fujita, Naotaka; Noda, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Go; Ito, Kei; Horaguchi, Jun; Takasawa, Osamu; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sawai, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of small pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology. A 60-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for evaluation of a dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD). A small and poorly reproducible low-echoic lesion in the pancreas was suspected by ultrasonography (US) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) failed to visualize the ventral pancreatic duct, and the upstream dorsal pancreatic duct was dilated. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was indicative of pancreas divisum, and complete obstruction of the MPD in the pancreatic head was seen. Cytology of pancreatic juice obtained from the dorsal pancreas after minor papilla sphincterotomy revealed the presence of adenocarcinoma cells. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed under the diagnosis of pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum. Histological examination revealed moderately-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma 20 mm in diameter, located in the pancreatic head. Dilatation of the dorsal pancreatic duct is sometimes observed in cases with pancreas divisum without the presence of tumors. When pancreatic duct stenosis also exists in such cases, even if a tumor is not clearly visualized by diagnostic imaging, vigorous examinations such as pancreatic juice cytology are recommended to establish an accurate diagnosis.

  6. Advancement of the artificial pancreas through the development of interoperability standards.

    PubMed

    Picton, Peter E; Yeung, Melanie; Hamming, Nathaniel; Desborough, Lane; Dassau, Eyal; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2013-07-01

    Despite advancements in the development of the artificial pancreas, barriers in the form of proprietary data and communication protocols of diabetes devices have made the integration of these components challenging. The Artificial Pancreas Standards and Technical Platform Project is an initiative funded by the JDRF Canadian Clinical Trial Network with the goal of developing device communication standards for the interoperability of diabetes devices. Stakeholders from academia, industry, regulatory agencies, and medical and patient communities have been engaged in advancing this effort. In this article, we describe this initiative along with the process involved in working with the standards organizations and stakeholders that are key to ensuring effective standards are developed and adopted. Discussion from a special session of the 12th Annual Diabetes Technology Meeting is also provided.

  7. What Is the Pancreas?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Database Supporting Research Raising Awareness Our Blog Patient Education Pancreas News Basics of Pancreatic Cancer FAQs The ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer The Pancreas Parts of ...

  8. Lack of functioning intratumoral lymphatics in colon and pancreas cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Waldemar L; Stanczyk, Marek; Gewartowska, Magdalena; Domaszewska-Szostek, Anna; Durlik, Marek

    2012-09-01

    There are controversial views as to whether intratumoral or peritumoral lymphatics play a dominant role in the metastatic process. Most clinical observations originate from studies of colon cancer. Colon contains mucosa and submucosa rich in lymphatics and with high lymph formation rate. This seems to be a prerequisite for easy metastasis of cancer cells to regional lymph nodes. However, there are other tissues as pancreas with a rudimentary lymphatic network where cancer metastasis formation is as intensive as in colon cancer. This contradicts the common notion that intratumor lymphatics play major role in metastases. We visualized interstitial space and lymphatics in the central and peripheral regions of colon and pancreas tumors using the color stereoscopic lymphography and simultaneously immunohistochemical performed stainings specific for lymphatic and blood endothelial cells. The density of open and compressed lymphatic and blood vessels was measured in the tumor core and edge. There were very few lymphatics in the colon and pancreas tumor core but numerous minor fluid "lakes" with no visible connection to the peritumoral lymphatics. Lining of "lakes" did not express molecular markers specific for lymphatic endothelial cells. Dense connective tissue surrounding tumor foci did not contain lymphatics. Peritumoral lymphatics were irregularly distributed in both types of tumor and only sporadically contained cells that might be tumor cells. Similar lymphoscintigraphic and histological pictures were seen in colon and pancreas cancer despite of different structure of both tissues. This suggests a uniform reaction of tissues to the growing cancer irrespective of the affected organ.

  9. Advances in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Levin, Mark

    2003-06-01

    From May 29 to June 5, 2003, the American Society of Clinical Oncology held its 39th Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. The meeting was devoted to the presentation of advances in clinical sciences, diagnosis, prevention and management of malignant disorders, and brings together investigators, clinicians, policy makers and other professionals interested in the science and impact of cancer worldwide. This report will be presented in two parts, the first focusing of colon cancer, and the second on breast cancer will be published in the next issue of Drug News & Perspectives.

  10. Artifical Pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Jiangfeng

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, JDRF launched the Artificial Pancreas Project (APP) to accelerate the development of a commercially-viable artificial pancreas system to closely mimic the biological function of the pancreas individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes, particularly type 1 diabetes. By automating detection of blood sugar levels and delivery of insulin in response to those levels, an artificial pancreas has the potential to transform the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. The 6-step APP development pathway serves as JDRF's APP strategic funding plan and defines the priorities of product research and development. Each step in the plan represents incremental advances in automation beginning with devices that shut off insulin delivery to prevent episodes of low blood sugar and progressing ultimately to a fully automated ``closed loop'' system that maintains blood glucose at a target level without the need to bolus for meals or adjust for exercise.

  11. Smokeless tobacco use and risk of cancer of the pancreas and other organs.

    PubMed

    Boffetta, Paolo; Aagnes, Bjarte; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Andersen, Aage

    2005-05-10

    Limited data are available on the carcinogenicity of smokeless tobacco products in organs other than the mouth. Snus is a smokeless tobacco product widely used in Norway. We studied 10,136 Norwegian men enrolled since 1966 in a prospective cohort study, 31.7% of whom were exposed to snus. The relative risk of pancreatic cancer for snus use was 1.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.12, 2.50); that of oral and pharyngeal cancer was 1.10 (95% CI = 0.50, 2.41), that of esophageal cancer was 1.40 (95% CI = 0.61, 3.24), and that of stomach cancer was 1.11 (95% CI = 0.83, 1.48). The relative risks of cancers of the lung (either all histological types or adenocarcinoma), urinary bladder and kidney were not increased among snus users. The increase in the relative risk of pancreatic cancer was similar in former and current snus users and was restricted to current tobacco smokers. Our study suggests that smokeless tobacco products may be carcinogenic on the pancreas. Tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines are plausible candidates for the carcinogenicity of smokeless tobacco products in the pancreas.

  12. Engagement of Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-15

    End of Life; Advanced Cancer; Lung Neoplasm; Gastric Cancer; Colon Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Rectum Cancer; Melanoma; Kidney Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Neoplasms; Liver Cancer; Cancer of Unknown Origin

  13. Comparative evaluation of cancer stem cell markers in normal pancreas and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vizio, Barbara; Mauri, Francesco A; Prati, Adriana; Trivedi, Pritesh; Giacobino, Alice; Novarino, Anna; Satolli, Maria Antonietta; Ciuffreda, Libero; Camandona, Michele; Gasparri, Guido; Bellone, Graziella

    2012-01-01

    Chemoresistance and self-renewal of cancer stem cells (CSC), found in many tumors including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), are believed to underlie tumor mass regrowth. The distribution of cells carrying the putative stem-cell markers CD133, Nestin, Notch1-4, Jagged1 and 2, ABCG2 and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH1) was assessed immunohistochemically using PDAC and normal pancreas tissue microarrays. The immunoreactivity was semi-quantitatively graded against the normal pancreas and was correlated with the differentiation grade and disease stage. No statistical significant differences were found between normal pancreas and PDAC in the expression of Nestin, Notch1, 3 and 4, ABCG2 or ALDH1. Notch2 and Jagged1 and 2 expression were increased in PDAC. CD133-positive cells were above-normal in PDAC, but the difference was not statistically significant. Nestin, Notch1-4, Jagged1, ABCG2 and ALDH1 immunostaining scores were not correlated with tumor grade or disease stage. CD133 and Notch2 expression was significantly inversely correlated with tumor grade, but not disease stage. Notch3 immunostaining positively correlated with tumor stage, but not with differentiation grade. Jagged2 protein expression correlated inversely with disease stage, but not with tumor grade. From the clinical standpoint, improved delineation of the tumor CSC signature, putatively responsible for tumor initiation and recurrence after initial response to chemotherapy, may offer novel therapeutic targets for this highly lethal cancer.

  14. Cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract: epidemiological considerations.

    PubMed

    Fraumeni, J F

    1975-11-01

    The epidemiological patterns for pancreatic and biliary cancers reveal more differences than similarities. Pancreatic carcinoma is common in western countries, although 2 Polynesian groups (New Zealand Maoris and native Hawaiians) have the highest rates internationally. In the United States the disease is rising in frequency, predominating in males and in blacks. The rates are elevated in urban areas, but geographic analysis uncovered no clustering of contiguous counties except in southern Louisiana. The origin of pancreatic cancer is obsure, but a twofold increased risk has been documented for cigarette smokers and diabetic patients. Alcohol, occupational agents, and dietary fat have been suspected, but not proven to be risk factors. Except for the rare hereditary form of pancreatitis, there are few clues to genetic predisposition. In contrast, the reported incidence of biliary tract cancer is highest in Latin American populations and American Indians. The tumor predominates in females around the world, except for Chinese and Japanese who show a male excess. In the United States the rates are higher in whites than blacks, and clusters of high-risk counties have been found in the north central region, the southwest, and Appalachia. The distribution of biliary tumors parallels that of cholesterol gallstones, the major risk factor for biliary cancer. Insights into biliary carcinogenesis depend upon clarification of lithogenic influences, such as pregnancy, obesity, and hyperlipoproteinemia, exogenous estrogens, familial tendencies, and ethnic-geographic factors that may reflect dietary habits. Noncalculous risk factors for biliary cancer include ulcerative colitis, clonorchiasis, Gardner's syndrome, and probably certain industrial exposures. Within the biliary tract, tumors of the gallbladder and bile duct show epidemiological distinctions. In contrast to gallbladder cancer, bile duct neoplasms predominate in males; they are less often associated with stones and more

  15. [Radiation therapy of patients with inoperable cancer of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Ankudinov, V A; Morozov, A I; Barkanov, A I; Zverev, M P; Karleshenko, N I

    1976-01-01

    Radiotherapy was employed in 60 patients, symptomatic treatment--in 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, 9 of them had the disease in stage III. Radiotherapy, using betatron 25 Mev, was conducted by a longitudinal method, distant gammatherapy--through a wolfram and the radiation source focused grid. Single focal dosage was 150--200 rad, total--5000--8000 rad. The treatment proved to be uneffective in 31.7 per cent of patients.

  16. A case study of a collision tumor composed of cancers of the bile duct and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hideki; Furukawa, Daisuke; Yazawa, Naoki; Masuoka, Yoshihito; Yamada, Misuzu; Tobita, Kosuke; Kawashima, Yohei; Ogawa, Masami; Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Nakagohri, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    In this case report, we describe the extremely rare case of a collision tumor comprising cancers of the bile duct and the pancreas. A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of obstructive jaundice. He was diagnosed with pancreatic head cancer, and we performed a pancreaticoduodenectomy with lymph node dissection. At laparotomy, there were two palpable masses in the vicinity of the confluence of the cystic duct and the head of the pancreas. The resected specimen demonstrated tumors at the confluence of the cystic duct and in the pancreatic head. Histopathological examination demonstrated a moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma in the pancreatic head and a well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma at the confluence of the cystic duct. Immunostaining was negative for p53 and MUC6 in the pancreatic head tumor; however, immunostaining was positive for both in the tumor located at the confluence of the cystic duct. The two tumors were histologically different and were diagnosed as collision cancer caused by the collision of the bile duct and pancreatic cancers.

  17. Germline Mutation of the CCK Receptor: A Novel Biomarker for Pancreas Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alsubai, Jelal; Matters, Gail L; McGovern, Christopher O; Liao, Jiangang; Gilius, Evan L; Smith, Jill P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Today, genetic biomarkers have been demonstrated to play an important role in identifying at-risk subjects for familial or inherited cancers. We have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that results in missplicing of the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor gene and expressing a larger mutated receptor in pancreatic cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance and specificity of this SNP as a potential biomarker in patients with pancreatic cancer compared with other gastrointestinal (GI) cancers that also have CCK receptors. Methods: DNA was isolated and genotyped for the CCK receptor SNP from frozen tumor tissue from banked specimens of patients with pancreas, gastric, or colon cancer and from human cancer cell lines. Genotype and allelic frequencies were compared between the cancer cohort and two normal control databases using Fisher's exact test and odds ratio (OR). The Kaplan–Meier method was used to estimate the survival for patients with the CCK-B receptor SNP compared with those with the wild-type genotype. Immunohistochemical staining of cancer cells was done to detect the mutated receptor. Results: Colon and gastric cancer patients had similar genotype frequencies for the CCK receptor SNP as that reported in the normal population. In contrast, the prevalence of the SNP in subjects with pancreatic cancer was twice that of controls and other GI cancers. Survival was adversely affected by the presence of the SNP only in those with pancreatic cancer. Immunoreactivity for the mutated receptor was positive in pancreatic cancer tissues with the SNP but absent in other GI cancers. Conclusions: A SNP of the CCK receptor is significantly increased in patients with pancreatic cancer but not in those with other GI malignancies. Therefore, this SNP may be a potential biomarker for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26741064

  18. De novo expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, CD54) in pancreas cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwaeble, W; Kerlin, M; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H; Dippold, W

    1993-01-21

    We examined the expression of intercellular--adhesion molecule-I (ICAM-I, CD54) in 6 surgically removed pancreatic tumors and 8 pancreatic tumor cell lines. Immunohistochemistry revealed a varying percentage of ICAM-I-positive pancreas tumor cells, while normal pancreatic tissue (except for slight reactivity of endothelial cells) was not stained. The presence of the ICAM-I molecule on the cell surface and the expression of ICAM-I mRNA were investigated for 8 different pancreatic tumor cell lines. Three of these (Capan-I, Capan-2, QGP-I) expressed ICAM-I constitutively. In 4 of the ICAM-I-negative pancreas cancer cell lines, it was possible to induce a remarkable expression of ICAM-I by incubating the cells in the presence of inflammatory cytokines, whereas one cell line, 818-4, remained ICAM-I-negative. The responsiveness to either IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, or IL-I beta treatment was shown to vary from cell line to cell line, indicating complex mechanisms that regulate the expression of ICAM-I at both, the transcriptional and the post-transcriptional level. Interestingly, ICAM-I is shed by pancreatic tumor cells, since soluble sICAM-I was detected in the cell-culture supernatants. In comparison with normal sera, the mean level of sICAM-I in sera of patients with pancreas carcinoma is elevated 2-fold.

  19. Precision radiotherapy for cancer of the pancreas: technique and results. [Photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Borgelt, B.B.; Strubler, K.A.; Kutcher, G.J.; Suntharalingam, N.

    1980-09-01

    Forty patients with locally extensive, unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas received precision high dose (PHD) radiation therapy with a 45 MeV betatron. PHD radiotherapy was generally well tolerated. During treatment, only 7 patients experienced significant nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or anorexia. Late gastrointestinal radiation reactions were observed in 7 patients. Twelve patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. The projected survival of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer treated with PHD radiotherapy is comparable to that of patients with resectable disease operated on for cure. The projected one year survival rate is 49%.

  20. Recent Advances in Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Arthur-Quan; Gehrig, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the United States, with yearly rates continuing to increase. Most women present with early stage disease; however, advanced disease carries a grave prognosis. As a result, novel therapies are currently under investigation for the treatment of endometrial cancer. These advances include a better understanding of the genetic basis surrounding the development of endometrial cancer, novel surgical therapies, and new molecular targets for the treatment of this disease. This review explores the literature regarding these advancements in endometrial cancer. PMID:28184290

  1. Non-functional neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas: Advances in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Cloyd, Jordan M; Poultsides, George A

    2015-08-28

    Nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (NF-PNETs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms. Although rare, the incidence of NF-PNETs is increasing significantly. The classification of PNETs has evolved over the past decades and is now based on a proliferation grading system. While most NF-PNETs are slow growing, tumors with more aggressive biology may become incurable once they progress to unresectable metastatic disease. Tumors of higher grade can be suspected preoperatively based on the presence of calcifications, hypoenhancement on arterial phase computed tomography, positron emission technology avidity and lack of octreotide scan uptake. Surgery is the only curative treatment and is recommended for most patients for whom complete resection is possible. Liver-directed therapies (thermal ablation, transarterial embolization) can be useful in controlling unresectable hepatic metastatic disease. In the presence of unresectable progressive disease, somatostatin analogues, everolimus and sunitinib can prolong progression-free survival. This article provides a comprehensive review of NF-PNETs with special emphasis on recent advances in diagnosis and management.

  2. Dexcom G4AP: an advanced continuous glucose monitor for the artificial pancreas.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Arturo; Rack-Gomer, Anna Leigh; Bhavaraju, Naresh C; Hampapuram, Haripriyan; Kamath, Apurv; Peyser, Thomas; Facchinetti, Andrea; Zecchin, Chiara; Sparacino, Giovanni; Cobelli, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Input from continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) is a critical component of artificial pancreas (AP) systems, but CGM performance issues continue to limit progress in AP research. While G4 PLATINUM has been integrated into AP systems around the world and used in many successful AP controller feasibility studies, this system was designed to address the needs of ambulatory CGM users as an adjunctive use system. Dexcom and the University of Padova have developed an advanced CGM, called G4AP, to specifically address the heightened performance requirements for future AP studies. The G4AP employs the same sensor and transmitter as the G4 PLATINUM but contains updated denoising and calibration algorithms for improved accuracy and reliability. These algorithms were applied to raw data from an existing G4 PLATINUM clinical study using a simulated prospective procedure. The results show that mean absolute relative difference (MARD) compared with venous plasma glucose was improved from 13.2% with the G4 PLATINUM to 11.7% with the G4AP. Accuracy improvements were seen over all days of sensor wear and across the plasma glucose range (40-400 mg/dl). The greatest improvements occurred in the low glucose range (40-80 mg/dl), in euglycemia (80-120 mg/dl), and on the first day of sensor use. The percentage of sensors with a MARD <15% increased from 69% to 80%. Metrics proposed by the AP research community for addressing specific AP requirements were also computed. The G4AP consistently exhibited improved sensor performance compared with the G4 PLATINUM. These improvements are expected to enable further advances in AP research.

  3. An Experimental Study of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound on Pig's Pancreas and the Early Clinical Experience on Pancreatic Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, LiuLin; Huang, XiaoBo; Yao, SongSen; Yu, JinSheng; Hwang, JooHa; Fei, XingBo; Yu, QiuHong; Xue, WeiCheng; Zheng, ZhuYing; Wang, XiaoFeng

    2007-05-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility and safety of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of in vivo pig pancreases, and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of HIFU in the clinical treatment of pancreatic cancer in humans. Methods: HIFU was performed in 12 domestic pig pancreases in vivo with varying acoustic energies. The safety of HIFU treatments was assessed by necropsy. The pathology and microstructure of the treated pancreases were evaluated using standard histology and transmission electron microscopy. Following the animal studies 62 patients with advanced pancreas cancer were treated with 250 - 420 W of acoustic power. There were 3 patients with stage II, 23 patients with stage III, and 36 patients with stage IV disease. Results: In animal studies, precise regions of coagulation necrosis were identified on pathology in 8 specimens that were treated with 420 W or 645 W acoustic power. Treatment effects were unable to be identified in 4 specimens treated with 300˜340 W acoustic power; however, damages to the cells microstructure and apoptosis were identified on electron microscopy. Damage to the stomach and colon were seen in some animals treated with 645 W. In the clinical treatments in humans the following were seen: local tumor control: complete response (CR) 0%, partial response (PR) 17.7%, no change (NC) 54.8%, progressive disease (PD) 27.5%. Pain relief was achieved in 87.1% of patients. The median survival for stage II and III patients was 11.2 months and median survival for stage IV patients was 5.6 months. The total median survival was 8.6 months. The survival rate at 1 year was as follows: stage II and III 42.3%, stage IV 5.6%. The survival rate at 2 years was as follows: stage II and III 15.4%, stage IV 0%. There were no severe complications or adverse events related to HIFU therapy seen in any of the patients treated. Conclusions: This study supports the feasibility of HIFU in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. The clinical

  4. Environmental exposure to xenoestrogens and oestrogen related cancers: reproductive system, breast, lung, kidney, pancreas, and brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The role of steroids in carcinogenesis has become a major concern in environmental protection, biomonitoring, and clinical research. Although historically oestrogen has been related to development of reproductive system, research over the last decade has confirmed its crucial role in the development and homeostasis of other organ systems. As a number of anthropogenic agents are xenoestrogens, environmental health research has focused on oestrogen receptor level disturbances and of aromatase polymorphisms. Oestrogen and xenoestrogens mediate critical points in carcinogenesis by binding to oestrogen receptors, whose distribution is age-, gender-, and tissue-specific. This review brings data about cancer types whose eatiology may be found in environmental exposure to xenoestrogens. Cancer types that have been well documented in literature to be related with environmental exposure include the reproductive system, breast, lung, kidney, pancreas, and brain. The results of our data mining show (a) a significant correlation between exposure to xenoestrogens and increased, gender-related, cancer risk and (b) a need to re-evaluate agents so far defined as endocrine disruptors, as they are also key molecules in carcinogenesis. This revision may be used to further research of cancer aetiology and to improvement of related legislation. Investigation of cancers caused by xenoestrogens may elucidate yet unknown mechanisms also valuable for oncology and the development of new therapies. PMID:22759508

  5. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces the juices that ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. A pancreas transplant is surgery to place a healthy pancreas ...

  6. Advanced Glycation End Products Evolution after Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation: Plasmatic and Cutaneous Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, José C.; Vizcaíno, José Ramón; Gouveia, Carlos; Silva, Donzília; Henriques, António C.; Noronha, Irene L.; Rodrigues, Anabela

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus leads to increased Advanced Glycation End Products (AGE) production, which has been associated with secondary diabetic complications. Type 1 diabetic patients undergoing pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT) can restore normoglycemia and renal function, eventually decreasing AGE accumulation. We aimed to prospectively study AGE evolution after SPKT. Circulating AGE were assessed in 20 patients, at time 0 (T0), 3 months (T3), 6 months (T6), and 12 months (T12) after successful SPKT. Global AGE and carboxymethyllysine (CML) were analyzed, as well as advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP). Skin biopsies were obtained at T0 and T12. Immunohistochemistry with anti-AGE antibody evaluated skin AGE deposition. AGE mean values were 16.8 ± 6.4 μg/mL at T0; 17.1 ± 3.8 μg/mL at T3; 17.5 ± 5.6 μg/mL at T6; and 16.0 ± 5.2 μg/mL at T12. CML mean values were 0.94 ± 0.36 ng/mL at T0; 1.11 ± 0.48 ng/mL at T3; 0.99 ± 0.42 ng/mL at T6; and 0.78 ± 0.38 ng/mL at T12. AOPP mean values were 130.1 ± 76.8 μMol/L at T0; 137.3 ± 110.6 μMol/L at T3; 116.4 ± 51.2 μMol/L at T6; and 106.4 ± 57.9 μMol/L at T12. CML variation was significant (P = 0.022); AOPP variation was nearly significant (P = 0.076). Skin biopsies evolved mostly from a cytoplasmic diffuse to a peripheral interkeratinocytic immunoreaction pattern; in 7 cases, a reduction in AGE immunoreaction intensity was evident at T12. In conclusion, glycoxidation markers decrease, plasmatic and on tissues, may start early after SPKT. Studies with prolonged follow-up may confirm these data. PMID:26881017

  7. Pancreas preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Yasuhiro; Sutherland, David E.R.; Harmon, James V.; Papas, Klearchos K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize advances and limitations in pancreas procurement and preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation, and review advances in islet protection and preservation. Recent findings Pancreases procured after cardiac death, with in-situ regional organ cooling, have been successfully used for islet transplantation. Colloid-free Celsior and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate preservation solutions are comparable to University of Wisconsin solution when used for cold storage before pancreas transplantation. Colloid-free preservation solutions are inferior to University of Wisconsin solution for pancreas preservation prior to islet isolation and transplantation. Clinical reports on pancreas and islet transplants suggest that the two-layer method may not offer significant benefits over cold storage with the University of Wisconsin solution: improved oxygenation may depend on the graft size; benefits in experimental models may not translate to human organs. Improvements in islet yield and quality occurred from pancreases treated with inhibitors of stress-induced apoptosis during procurement, storage, isolation or culture. Pancreas perfusion may be desirable before islet isolation and transplantation and may improve islet yields and quality. Methods for real-time, noninvasive assessment of pancreas quality during preservation have been implemented and objective islet potency assays have been developed and validated. These innovations should contribute to objective evaluation and establishment of improved pancreas preservation and islet isolation strategies. Summary Cold storage may be adequate for preservation before pancreas transplants, but insufficient when pancreases are processed for islets or when expanded donors are used. Supplementation of cold storage solutions with cytoprotective agents and perfusion may improve pancreas and islet transplant outcomes. PMID:18685343

  8. Cancer Screening Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Camelia S.; Panageas, Katherine S.; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Context Cancer screening has been integrated into routine primary care but does not benefit patients with limited life expectancy. Objective To evaluate the extent to which patients with advanced cancer continue to be screened for new cancers. Design, Setting, and Participants Utilization of cancer screening procedures (mammography, Papanicolaou test, prostate-specific antigen [PSA], and lower gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) was assessed in 87 736 fee-for-service Medicare enrollees aged 65 years or older diagnosed with advanced lung, colorectal, pancreatic, gastroesophageal, or breast cancer between 1998 and 2005, and reported to one of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries. Participants were followed up until death or December 31, 2007, whichever came first. A group of 87 307 Medicare enrollees without cancer were individually matched by age, sex, race, and SEER registry to patients with cancer and observed over the same period to evaluate screening rates in context. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with screening were also investigated. Main Outcome Measure For each cancer screening test, utilization rates were defined as the percentage of patients who were screened following the diagnosis of an incurable cancer. Results Among women following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, at least 1 screening mammogram was received by 8.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.6%-9.1%) vs 22.0% (95% CI, 21.7%-22.5%); Papanicolaou test screening was received by 5.8% (95% CI, 5.6%-6.1%) vs 12.5% (95% CI, 12.2%-12.8%). Among men following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, PSA test was received by 15.0% (95% CI, 14.7%-15.3%) vs 27.2% (95% CI, 26.8%-27.6%). For all patients following advanced diagnosis compared with controls, lower GI endoscopy was received by 1.7% (95% CI, 1.6%-1.8%) vs 4.7% (95% CI, 4.6%-4.9%). Screening was more frequent among patients with a recent history of screening (16.2% [95

  9. Monacolin K and monascin attenuated pancreas impairment and hyperglycemia induced by advanced glycation endproducts in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Lu, Si-Shi; Lee, Bao-Hong; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Several lines of evidence have implicated high levels of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in diabetes. Pancreas impairment caused by AGEs has been found in recent studies. Monascin (MS) and monacolin K (MK) are active compounds identified from Monascus-fermented products, which have been reported to inhibit inflammation and improve insulin resistance. In order to confirm the protective effects of MS and MK on pancreatic function, BALB/c mice were treated with AGEs via intraperitoneal injection for 22 weeks to induce hyperglycemia, and the pancreas-protecting mechanism of MS and MK from AGE-induced damage was investigated. We found that the expression of pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) was recovered by MS or MK administration to AGE-treated mice. In addition, MS strongly improved performance in the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and the insulin tolerance test (ITT), suggesting that MS sensitized to insulin in AGE-treated mice. Both MS and MK elevated pancreatic insulin expression when compared to the AGE-treated group, suggesting that MS and MK attenuated AGE-induced pancreatic dysfunction. Histopathology studies showed that intraperitoneal injection of AGEs did not result in pancreas damage. These findings confirm that the potential mechanism of AGEs on pancreatic dysfunction involves the induction of inflammation and the suppression of PDX-1 and GLUT2 expression. Taken together, MS and MK may be developed as an anti-diabetic agent in the future.

  10. Irradiation with X-rays phase-advances the molecular clockwork in liver, adrenal gland and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mareike Hildegard; Rödel, Franz; Rüb, Udo; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-02-01

    The circadian clock of man and mammals shows a hierarchic organization. The master clock, located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), controls peripheral oscillators distributed throughout the body. Rhythm generation depends on molecular clockworks based on transcriptional/translational interaction of clock genes. Numerous studies have shown that the clockwork in peripheral oscillators is capable to maintain circadian rhythms for several cycles in vitro, i.e. in the absence of signals from the SCN. The aim of the present study is to analyze the effects of irradiation with X-rays on the clockwork of liver, adrenal and pancreas. To this end organotypic slice cultures of liver (OLSC) and organotypic explant cultures of adrenal glands (OAEC) and pancreas (OPEC) were prepared from transgenic mPer2(luc) mice which express luciferase under the control of the promoter of an important clock gene, Per2, and allow to study the dynamics of the molecular clockwork by bioluminometry. The preparations were cultured in a membrane-based liquid-air interface culturing system and irradiated with X-rays at doses of 10 Gy and 50 Gy or left untreated. Bioluminometric real-time recordings show a stable oscillation of all OLSC, OAEC and OPEC for up to 12 days in vitro. Oscillations persist after irradiation with X-rays. However, a dose of 50 Gy caused a phase advance in the rhythm of the OLSC by 5 h, in the OPEC by 7 h and in the OAEC by 6 h. Our study shows that X-rays affect the molecular clockwork in liver, pancreas and adrenal leading to phase advances. Our results confirm and extend previous studies showing a phase-advancing effect of X-rays at the level of the whole animal and single cells.

  11. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Cancer Treatment Affecting the Central Nervous System (HLMCC 0707) • Melatonin and sleep hygiene for the treatment of insomnia following cancer...Determinants of Diabetes in the Young. (PI: Jeffrey Krischer, Ph.D.) Moffitt Community Clinical Oncology Program Research Base (PI: Jeffrey Krischer

  12. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  13. Advanced Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... if it has spread to: • Bones • Lungs • Liver • Brain • Lymph nodes outside the pelvis • Other organs You may be diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer when you are first diagnosed, after having completed ...

  14. Coping with Advanced Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  15. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma of pancreas: an unusual site of relapse from early-stage lung cancer: 12-month postsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anand; Alfa-Wali, Maryam; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Polychronis, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A 57-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and backache, weight loss of 10 kg and irregular bowel movements. He was previously diagnosed with Stage IB squamous cell carcinoma of lung and had undergone lobectomy 12 months previously. Investigations including imaging revealed a cystic mass in the body and tail of the pancreas which was biopsied and it was confirmed to be a recurrence of the squamous lung cancer involving the pancreas. He was treated with systemic chemotherapy and has shown a partial response on repeat imaging. This case illustrates a rare and unusual site of relapse in lung cancer after adjuvant therapy and a key message for follow-up surveillance for these patients. PMID:23608858

  17. Advances in pancreatic cancer research: moving towards early detection.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang-Yi; Yuan, Yao-Zong

    2014-08-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal forms of cancer. Substantial progress has been made in the understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patient management have been significant. However, most patients (nearly 80%) who present with locally advanced or metastatic disease have an extremely poor prognosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localized to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Therefore, the early detection of pancreatic cancer may benefit patients with PDAC. However, its low rate of incidence and the limitations of current screening strategies make early detection difficult. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of PDAC suggest that it is possible to detect PDAC in early stages and even identify precursor lesions. The presence of new-onset diabetes mellitus in the early phase of pancreatic cancer may provide clues for its early diagnosis. Advances in the identification of novel circulating biomarkers including serological signatures, autoantibodies, epigenetic markers, circulating tumor cells and microRNAs suggest that they can be used as potential tools for the screening of precursors and early stage PDAC in the future. However, proper screening strategies based on effective screening methodologies need to be tested for clinical application.

  18. Advances in cancer immunology and cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    After decades of setbacks, cancer immunology is living its Golden Age. Recent advances in cancer immunology have provided new therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. The objective clinical response observed in patients treated with antibodies that block the immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1)/programmed cell-death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways, has led to their FDA approval for the treatment of melanoma in 2011 and in 2014, respectively. The anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab has received the FDA-approval in March 2015 for squamous lung cancer treatment. In addition, antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 have demonstrated their efficacy and safety in additional tumors, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Almost at the same time, the field of adoptive cell transfer has exploded. The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T technology has provided strong evidence of efficacy in the treatment of B cell malignancies, and different T cell based treatments are currently under investigation for different types of tumors. In this review we will discuss the latest advances in cancer immunology and immunotherapy as well as new treatments now under development in the clinic and potential strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical models.

  19. Spatiotemporal proteomic analyses during pancreas cancer progression identifies serine/threonine stress kinase 4 (STK4) as a novel candidate biomarker for early stage disease.

    PubMed

    Mirus, Justin E; Zhang, Yuzheng; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Solan, Joell L; Lampe, Paul D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-12-01

    Pancreas cancer, or pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, is the deadliest of solid tumors, with a five-year survival rate of <5%. Detection of resectable disease improves survival rates, but access to tissue and other biospecimens that could be used to develop early detection markers is confounded by the insidious nature of pancreas cancer. Mouse models that accurately recapitulate the human condition allow disease tracking from inception to invasion and can therefore be useful for studying early disease stages in which surgical resection is possible. Using a highly faithful mouse model of pancreas cancer in conjunction with a high-density antibody microarray containing ∼2500 antibodies, we interrogated the pancreatic tissue proteome at preinvasive and invasive stages of disease. The goal was to discover early stage tissue markers of pancreas cancer and follow them through histologically defined stages of disease using cohorts of mice lacking overt clinical signs and symptoms and those with end-stage metastatic disease, respectively. A panel of seven up-regulated proteins distinguishing pancreas cancer from normal pancreas was validated, and their levels were assessed in tissues collected at preinvasive, early invasive, and moribund stages of disease. Six of the seven markers also differentiated pancreas cancer from an experimental model of chronic pancreatitis. The levels of serine/threonine stress kinase 4 (STK4) increased between preinvasive and invasive stages, suggesting its potential as a tissue biomarker, and perhaps its involvement in progression from precursor pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry of STK4 at different stages of disease revealed a dynamic expression pattern further implicating it in early tumorigenic events. Immunohistochemistry of a panel of human pancreas cancers confirmed that STK4 levels were increased in tumor epithelia relative to normal tissue. Overall, this integrated approach

  20. [Therapeutic advances in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C

    2006-04-01

    The treatment of breast cancer has made significant improvements during the past ten years. For early breast cancer with a clinically negative axilla sentinel node biopsy has become the preferred approach. For endocrine therapy of postmenopausal patients the selective aromatase inhibitors have become standard in metastatic as well as in early breast cancer. Trastuzumab (Herceptin) plays an important role in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer in the metastatic and since 2005 also in the adjuvant setting. When chemotherapy is used to treat metastatic breast cancer drug combinations are superior to monotherapy only in terms of response rates. By contrast, in the adjuvant setting combination drug therapy is the standard. New methods of tissue analysis including expression patterns of mRNA and proteins are promising research strategies to further advance the field.

  1. Irreversible electroporation in the treatment of locally advanced pancreas and liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wichtowski, Mateusz; Nowaczyk, Piotr; Kocur, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Irreversible electroporation is a new, non-thermal ablation technique in the treatment of parenchymal organ tumors which uses short high voltage pulses of electricity in order to induce apoptosis of targeted cells. In this paper the application of this method of treatment in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and liver cancer is analyzed. Material and methods Between 04.2014 and 09.2014 two patients with LAPC and one with colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) were qualified for treatment with irreversible electroporation. Both patients remained under constant observation and control. PubMed/Medline, Embase and Google Scholar databases were searched and eight original reports on irreversible electroporation of pancreatic and liver tumors based on the biggest groups of patients were found. Results Two patients with LAPC and one with CRLM were qualified for ablation with irreversible electroporation. In all three patients a successful irreversible electroporation (IRE) procedure of the whole tumor was conducted. In the minimum seven-month follow-up 100% local control was achieved – without progression. In the literature review the local response to treatment ranged from 41% to 100%. The event-free survival rate in six-month observation was 94%. Conclusions Ablation with irreversible electroporation is a new non-thermal ablation technique which has been demonstrated, both in the previously published studies and in the cases described in this paper, as a safe and efficient therapeutic method for patients with LAPC and CRLM. PMID:27095938

  2. EBM-based Clinical Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) issued by the Japan Pancreas Society: a synopsis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Koji; Okusaka, Takuji; Shimizu, Kyoko; Furuse, Junji; Ito, Yoshinori; Hanada, Keiji; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2014-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines for pancreatic cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2006) were published by the Japan Pancreas Society (Committee for revision of clinical guidelines for pancreatic cancer) in March 2009 in Japanese, revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2009) in July 2009 in Japanese and further revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) in October 2013 in Japanese. These guidelines were established according to evidence-based medicine. A total of 629 papers were collected from among 4612 reports concerning pancreatic cancer listed in PubMed and Igakuchuo Zasshi between May 2007 and January 2011. This new set of guidelines was written by members of the Committee for the Revision of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer in the Japan Pancreas Society. The guidelines provide an algorithm for the diagnosis (Fig. 1) and treatment (Fig. 2) of pancreatic cancer and address six subjects (Diagnosis, Surgery, Adjuvant therapy, Radiation therapy, Chemotherapy and stent therapy), with 35 clinical questions and 57 recommendations.

  3. Recent Advances in Management of Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Laryngeal cancers account for approximately 1.5% (1~2%) of the total cancers in Korea, and 30% of all head and neck cancers, not including thyroid cancer. Early laryngeal cancer is treated by operation, including transoral laser excision or radiotherapy. Advanced laryngeal cancer has been treated with mutilating operations, such as a total laryngectomy. However, a laryngeal preserving approach, which can improve the quality of life, has recently been tried with advanced laryngeal cancer. PMID:20396561

  4. EGF targeted fluorescence molecular tomography as a predictor of PDT outcomes in pancreas cancer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Davis, Scott C.; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Isabelle, Martin E.; O'Hara, Julia; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-02-01

    Verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising adjuvant therapy for pancreas cancer and investigations for its use are currently underway in both orthotopic xenograft mouse models and in human clinical trials. The mouse models have been studied extensively using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as a measure of surrogate response to verteporfin PDT and it was found that tumor lines with different levels of aggression respond with varying levels to PDT. MR imaging was successful in determining the necrotic volume caused by PDT but there was difficultly in distinguishing inflamed tissues and regions of surviving tumor. In order to understand the molecular changes within the tumor immediately post-PDT we propose the implementation of MR-guided fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) in conjunction with an exogenously administered fluorescently labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF-IRDye800CW, LI-COR Biosciences). We have previously shown that MR-guided FMT is feasible in the mouse abdomen when multiple regions of fluorescence are considered from contributing internal organs. In this case the highly aggressive AsPC-1 (+EGFR) orthotopic tumor was implanted in SCID mice, interstitial verteporfin PDT (1mg/kg, 20J/cm) was performed when the tumor reached ~60mm3 and both tumor volume and EGF binding were followed with MR-guided FMT.

  5. TRAIL-engineered pancreas-derived mesenchymal stem cells: characterization and cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Moniri, M R; Sun, X-Y; Rayat, J; Dai, D; Ao, Z; He, Z; Verchere, C B; Dai, L-J; Warnock, G L

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted great interest in cancer therapy owing to their tumor-oriented homing capacity and the feasibility of autologous transplantation. Currently, pancreatic cancer patients face a very poor prognosis, primarily due to the lack of therapeutic strategies with an effective degree of specificity. Anticancer gene-engineered MSCs specifically target tumor sites and can produce anticancer agents locally and constantly. This study was performed to characterize pancreas-derived MSCs and investigate the effects of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-engineered MSCs on pancreatic cancer cells under different culture conditions. Pancreas-derived MSCs exhibited positive expression on CD44, CD73, CD95, CD105, negative on CD34 and differentiated into adipogenic and osteogenic cells. TRAIL expression was assessed by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis. Different patterns of TRAIL receptor expression were observed on the pancreatic cancer cell lines, including PANC1, HP62, ASPC1, TRM6 and BXPC3. Cell viability was assessed using a real-time monitoring system. Pancreatic cancer cell death was proportionally related to conditioned media from MSC(nsTRAIL) and MSC(stTRAIL). The results suggest that MSCs exhibit intrinsic inhibition of pancreatic cancer cells and that this effect can be potentiated by TRAIL-transfection on death receptor-bearing cell types.

  6. Polycystic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Amarapurkar, Deepak N.; Amarapurkar, Anjali D.

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic disease of the pancreas is a very rare entity with very few cases reported in the literature. We report a symptomatic case of polycystic pancreas associated with pheochromocytoma that was treated surgically. PMID:27144204

  7. Cost description of chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of metastatic pancreas cancer.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Daniel A; Krishna, Kavya; Flowers, Christopher R; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Noonan, Anne M

    2016-05-01

    Multiple chemotherapy regimens are available for the treatment of metastatic pancreas cancer (mPCA). Choice of regimen is based on the patient's performance status and toxicity profile of the regimen. The objective of this study was to analyze the costs of first-line regimens to further aid in decision-making and develop a platform upon which to assess value. We calculated the monthly cost for individual standard regimens (gemcitabine, gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel, gemcitabine/erlotinib and FOLFIRINOX) and the overall treatment cost for a course of therapy based on the median progression-free survival achieved in published studies. In addition to cost of drugs, we included administration costs and costs of toxicities (including growth factor support, blood product transfusion and hospitalization for toxicities). Costs for administration and management of adverse events were based on Medicare reimbursement rates for hospital and physician services. Drug costs were based on Medicare average sale prices (all 2014 US$). The monthly costs for gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, gemcitabine/erlotinib and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel were $1363, $7234, $8007 and $12,221, respectively. The overall treatment costs for a course of the same regimens based on median PFS were $5043, $46,298, $51,004 and $67,216, respectively. The choice of chemotherapy regimen for mPCA should be based on tolerability and efficacy of the regimen individualized to patient's performance status. Healthcare systems have finite resources; thus, there is increasing emphasis on metrics to define value in health care when outcomes of therapy are similar or produce marked differences in value. These data provide useful financial information to incorporate into the decision-making process.

  8. Biomarker-driven trial in metastatic pancreas cancer: feasibility in a multicenter study of saracatinib, an oral Src inhibitor, in previously treated pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Arcaroli, John; Quackenbush, Kevin; Dasari, Arvind; Powell, Rebecca; McManus, Martine; Tan, Aik-Choon; Foster, Nathan R; Picus, Joel; Wright, John; Nallapareddy, Sujatha; Erlichman, Charles; Hidalgo, Manuel; Messersmith, Wells A

    2012-10-01

    Src tyrosine kinases are overexpressed in pancreatic cancers, and the oral Src inhibitor saracatinib has shown antitumor activity in preclinical models of pancreas cancer. We performed a CTEP-sponsored Phase II clinical trial of saracatinib in previously treated pancreas cancer patients, with a primary endpoint of 6-month survival. A Simon MinMax two-stage phase II design was used. Saracatinib (175 mg/day) was administered orally continuously in 28-day cycles. In the unselected portion of the study, 18 patients were evaluable. Only two (11%) patients survived for at least 6 months, and three 6-month survivors were required to move to second stage of study as originally designed. The study was amended as a biomarker-driven trial (leucine rich repeat containing protein 19 [LRRC19] > insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 [IGFBP2] "top scoring pairs" polymerase chain reaction [PCR] assay, and PIK3CA mutant) based on preclinical data in a human pancreas tumor explant model. In the biomarker study, archival tumor tissue or fresh tumor biopsies were tested. Biomarker-positive patients were eligible for the study. Only one patient was PIK3CA mutant in a 3' untranslated region (UTR) portion of the gene. This patient was enrolled in the study and failed to meet the 6-month survival endpoint. As the frequency of biomarker-positive patients was very low (<3%), the study was closed. Although we were unable to conclude whether enriching for a subset of second/third line pancreatic cancer patients treated with a Src inhibitor based on a biomarker would improve 6-month survival, we demonstrate that testing pancreatic tumor samples for a biomarker-driven, multicenter study in metastatic pancreas cancer is feasible.

  9. Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, David ER

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is generally treated with oral diabetic drugs and/or insulin. However, the morbidity and mortality associated with this condition increases over time, even in patients receiving intensive insulin treatment, and this is largely attributable to diabetic complications or the insulin therapy itself. Pancreas transplantation in humans was first conducted in 1966, since when there has been much debate regarding the legitimacy of this procedure. Technical refinements and the development of better immunosuppressants and better postoperative care have brought about marked improvements in patient and graft survival and a reduction in postoperative morbidity. Consequently, pancreas transplantation has become the curative treatment modality for diabetes, particularly for type I diabetes. An overview of pancreas transplantation is provided herein, covering the history of pancreas transplantation, indications for transplantation, cadaveric and living donors, surgical techniques, immunosuppressants, and outcome following pancreas transplantation. The impact of successful pancreas transplantation on the complications of diabetes will also be reviewed briefly. PMID:21253293

  10. Advances in paediatric cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Saletta, Federica; Seng, Michaela S; Lau, Loretta M S

    2014-04-01

    Four out of five children diagnosed with cancer can be cured with contemporary cancer therapy. This represents a dramatic improvement since 50 years ago when the cure rate of childhood cancer was <25% in the pre-chemotherapy era. Over the past ten years, while improvement in overall survival (OS) has been marginal, progress in pediatric oncology lies with adopting risk-adapted therapeutic approach. This has been made possible through identifying clinical and biologic prognostic factors with rigorous research and stratifying patients using these risk factors, and subsequently modifying therapy according to risk group assignment. This review provides a perspective for eight distinct pediatric malignancies, in which significant advances in treatment were made in the last decade and are leading to changes in standard of care. This includes four hematologic malignancies [acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL)] and four solid tumors [medulloblastoma (MB), low grade glioma (LGG), neuroblastoma (NB) and Ewing sarcoma (ES)]. Together, they comprise 60% of childhood cancer. Improved patient outcome is not limited to better survival, but encompasses reducing both short and long-term treatment-related complications which is as important as cure, given the majority of childhood cancer patients will become long-term survivors. Risk-adapted approach allows treatment intensification in the high-risk cohort while therapy can be de-escalated in the low-risk to minimize toxicity and late sequelae without compromising survival. Advances in medical research technology have also led to a rapid increase in the understanding of the genetics of childhood cancer in the last decade, facilitating identification of molecular targets that can potentially be exploited for therapeutic benefits. As we move into the era of targeted therapeutics, searching for novel agents that target specific genetic lesions becomes a

  11. Genetically Engineered Immunotherapy for Advanced Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, doctors will collect T lymphocytes from patients with advanced mesothelin-expressing cancer and genetically engineer them to recognize mesothelin. The gene-engineered cells will be multiplied and infused into the patient to fight the cancer

  12. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  13. Common symptoms in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth L; Davis, Mellar P; LeGrand, Susan B; Walsh, Declan

    2005-04-01

    The key points of this article are anorexia and cachexia are: A major cause of cancer deaths. Several drugs are available to treat anorexia and cachexia. Dyspnea in cancer usually is caused by several factors. Treatment consists of reversing underlying causes, empiric bronchodilators, cortico-steroids--and in the terminally ill patients-opioids, benzodiazepines,and chlorpromazine. Delirium is associated with advanced cancer. Empiric treatment with neuroleptics while evaluating for reversible causes is a reasonable approach to management. Nausea and vomiting are caused by extra-abdominal factors (drugs,electrolyte abnormalities, central nervous system metastases) or intra-abdominal factors (gastroparesis, ileus, gastric outlet obstruction, bowel obstruction). The pattern of nausea and vomiting differs depending upon whether the cause is extra- or intra-abdominal. Reversible causes should be sought and empiric metoclopramide or haloperidol should be initiated. Fatigue may be caused by anemia, depression, endocrine abnormalities,or electrolyte disturbances that should be treated before using empiric methylphenidate. Constipation should be treated with laxatives and stool softeners. Both should start with the first opioid dose.

  14. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  15. MR imaging of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Erin; Hammond, Nancy; Miller, Frank H

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pancreas is useful as both a problem-solving tool and an initial imaging examination of choice. With newer imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging, MR offers improved ability to detect and characterize lesions and identify and stage tumors and inflammation. MR cholangiopancreatography can be used to visualize the pancreatic and biliary ductal system. In this article, the use of MR to evaluate the pancreas, including recent advances, is reviewed and the normal appearance of the pancreas on different imaging sequences, as well as inflammatory diseases, congenital abnormalities, and neoplasms of the pancreas, are discussed.

  16. A study of MRI-guided diffuse fluorescence molecular tomography for monitoring PDT effects in pancreas cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Davis, Scott C.; Srinivasan, Subhadra; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-06-01

    Over the last several decades little progress has been made in the therapy and treatment monitoring of pancreas adenocarcinoma, a devastating and aggressive form of cancer that has a 5-year patient survival rate of 3%. Currently, investigations for the use of interstitial Verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) are being undertaken in both orthotopic xenograft mouse models and in human clinical trials. In the mouse models, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been used as a measure of surrogate response to Verteporfin PDT; however, MR imaging alone lacks the molecular information required to assess the metabolic function and growth rates of the tumor immediately after treatment. We propose the implementation of MR-guided fluorescence tomography in conjunction with a fluorescently labeled (IR-Dye 800 CW, LI-COR) epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a molecular measure of surrogate response. To demonstrate the effectiveness of MR-guided diffuse fluorescence tomography for molecular imaging, we have used the AsPC-1 (+EGFR) human pancreatic adenocarcinoma in an orthotopic mouse model. EGF IRDye 800CW was injected 48 hours prior to imaging. MR image sequences were collected simultaneously with the fluorescence data using a MR-coupled diffuse optical tomography system. Image reconstruction was performed multiple times with varying abdominal organ segmentation in order to obtain a optimal tomographic image. It is shown that diffuse fluorescence tomography of the orthotopic pancreas model is feasible, with consideration of confounding fluorescence signals from the multiple organs and tissues surrounding the pancreas. MR-guided diffuse fluorescence tomography will be used to monitor EGF response after photodynamic therapy. Additionally, it provide the opportunity to individualize subsequent therapies based on response to PDT as well as to evaluate the success of combination therapies, such as PDT with chemotherapy, antibody therapy or even radiation.

  17. [Chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Bazaeva, I Ia; Gorbunova, V A; Kravets, O A; Khokhlova, S V; Limareva, S V; Panov, V O; Strel'tsova, O N; Tarachkova, E V

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer takes second place in morbidity and third place in mortality from gynecological cancer. Advanced stages among newly diagnosed cases is still large. The "gold standard" of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer is chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin that results in a lower risk of death. Improvement of radiotherapy methods allowed to bring optimal dose to the primary tumor with the inclusion of regional metastasis areas with less risk of damage to surrounding healthy tissue and organs. The search for alternative combinations of cytostatics, modes of drug administration, adjuvant chemotherapy after chemoradiotherapy showed an increase in survival of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

  18. Aminoglutethimide in advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ceci, G; Passalacqua, R; Bisagni, G; Bella, M; Cocconi, G

    1985-10-31

    From July 1980 to June 1983, 61 postmenopausal women with progressive metastatic breast cancer were treated with aminoglutethimide, 250 mg 4 times daily, plus cortisone acetate, 25 mg twice daily. Of 51 evaluable patients, an objective remission was observed in 22 (43%) (partial remission in 19, complete in 3), stable disease in 14 (27%), and progressive disease in 15 (30%). The median duration of response was 60 weeks (range 12+; 94+). The response rate was higher when the dominant disease site was soft tissue (50%) or bone (56%) rather than viscera (29%). Side effects were common but usually slight and transient. Somnolence (69%), dizziness (41%), nausea (35%) and skin rash (27%) were the most frequent. Serum levels of gamma-GT, alkaline phosphatase and total cholesterol rose during aminoglutethimide treatment, whereas levels of uric acid and indirect bilirubin decreased. Aminoglutethimide plus cortisone acetate appears to be an active and relatively safe treatment in advanced breast cancer and may be recommended as second-line endocrine treatment.

  19. Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    therapy for drug resistant prostate cancer cells. In addition the findings from this study can be extended to the combinatorial therapy involving...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0571 TITLE: “Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer ...29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0571 5b

  20. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical Therapy . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:511-5. Gruessner AC, Gruessner RWG. Pancreas and kidney transplantation for diabetic nephropathy. In: Morris PJ, Knechtle SJ, eds. Kidney Transplantation: ...

  1. Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas in a patient with cervical cancer: relation of E-cadherin/β-catenin adhesion complex in their carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Adarsh; Ram, Lakshmi; Mathew, Renol Koshy; Chawdhery, Muhammad Zafar

    2015-04-05

    Solid pseudopapillary tumor (SPT) of the pancreas is one of the most uncommon histotypes of all exocrine pancreatic neoplasms. Disorganization of E-cadherin and β-catenin mutations, two key components of the Wnt signal transduction pathway, has been implicated in the development of SPT, but not other pancreatic tumors. Loss of E-cadherin/β-catenin proteins and tyrosine phosphorylation of E-cadherin/β-catenin have been postulated in cervical carcinogenesis and cancer invasion. A 38-year-old married woman, who had undergone brachytherapy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy for cervical cancer in Philippines in 2011, was admitted to our hospital after follow-up CT scan of abdomen in 2012 revealed a lesion in the tail of pancreas. The patient underwent distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. The pathological diagnosis was SPT of pancreas. We suspect that the concurrent SPT pancreas and cervical cancer in this woman were triggered by a primary insult, a process in which E-cadherin/β-catenin/Wnt-signaling pathway played important roles.

  2. Gemcitabine-Based Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation With Capecitabine as Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreas Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Sameer; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Griffith, Kent A.; Simeone, Diane; Greenson, Joel K.; Francis, Isaac R.; Hampton, Janet; Colletti, Lisa; Chang, Alfred E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Zalupski, Mark M.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes for patients with resected pancreas cancer treated with an adjuvant regimen consisting of gemcitabine-based combination chemotherapy followed by capecitabine and radiation. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective review of a series of patients treated at a single institution with a common postoperative adjuvant program. Between January 2002 and August 2006, 43 resected pancreas cancer patients were offered treatment consisting of 4, 21-day cycles of gemcitabine 1 g/m{sup 2} intravenously over 30 min on Days 1 and 8, with either cisplatin 35 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously on Days 1 and 8 or capecitabine 1500 mg/m{sup 2} orally in divided doses on Days 1-14. After completion of combination chemotherapy, patients received a course of radiotherapy (54 Gy) with concurrent capecitabine (1330 mg/m{sup 2} orally in divided doses) day 1 to treatment completion. Results: Forty-one patients were treated. Median progression-free survival for the entire group was 21.7 months (95% confidence interval 13.9-34.5 months), and median overall survival was 45.9 months. In multivariate analysis a postoperative CA 19-9 level of >=180 U/mL predicted relapse and death. Toxicity was mild, with only two hospitalizations during adjuvant therapy. Conclusions: A postoperative adjuvant program using combination chemotherapy with gemcitabine and either cisplatin or capecitabine followed by radiotherapy with capecitabine is tolerable and efficacious and should be considered for Phase III testing in this group of patients.

  3. Organ Facts: Kidney / Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Kidney/Pancreas Facts The kidneys are a pair of reddish- ... the chemical (electrolyte) composition of the blood. The pancreas is a five to six inch gland located ...

  4. Targeted therapies in advanced differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Raquel M; Carneiro, Benedito A; Agulnik, Mark; Kopp, Peter A; Giles, Francis J

    2015-09-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, and its incidence has been rising rapidly over the past 10 years. Although most patients with this disease have an excellent prognosis, a subset develops a more aggressive disease phenotype refractory to conventional therapies. Until recently, there was no effective therapy for these patients. With increasing knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer, novel targeted therapies are being developed for this group of patients. Sorafenib and lenvatinib, small-molecule multikinase inhibitors, were approved for the treatment of progressive, symptomatic, radioactive iodine refractory, advanced differentiated thyroid cancer in 2013 and 2015, respectively. This represents a major innovation in the therapy of patients with advanced thyroid cancer. However, these therapies still have many limitations and further research needs to be pursued with the ultimate goal of providing safe and effective personalized therapy for patients with advanced thyroid cancer.

  5. Novel agents for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinleye, Akintunde; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Furqan, Muhammad; Cang, Shundong; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is relatively insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, novel agents targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, EGFR, TGF-β, HEDGEHOG, NOTCH, IGF, PARP, PI3K/AKT, RAS, and Src) are being explored in clinical trials as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. This review summarizes the most recent advances with the targeted therapies in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26369833

  6. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  7. Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert C G

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis for locally advanced pancreatic cancer is based on high-quality cross-sectional imaging, which shows tumor invasion into the celiac/superior mesenteric arteries and/or superior mesenteric/portal venous system that is not reconstructable. The optimal management of these patients is evolving quickly with the advent of newer chemotherapeutics, radiation, and nonthermal ablation modalities. This article presents the current status of initial chemotherapy, surgical therapy, ablative therapy, and radiation therapy for patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection offers the best chance of long-term disease control and the only chance for cure for patients with nonmetastatic exocrine pancreatic cancer.

  8. Porphysome nanoparticles for enhanced photothermal therapy in a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft cancer model: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.; Ding, Lili; Jin, Cheng; Cao, Pingjiang; Siddiqui, Iram; Hwang, David M.; Chen, Juan; Wilson, Brian C.; Zheng, Gang; Hedley, David W.

    2016-08-01

    Local disease control is a major challenge in pancreatic cancer treatment, because surgical resection of the primary tumor is only possible in a minority of patients and radiotherapy cannot be delivered in curative doses. Despite the promise of photothermal therapy (PTT) for focal ablation of pancreatic tumors, this approach remains underinvestigated. Using photothermal sensitizers in combination with laser light irradiation for PTT can result in more efficient conversion of light energy to heat and improved spatial confinement of thermal destruction to the tumor. Porphysomes are self-assembled nanoparticles composed mainly of pyropheophorbide-conjugated phospholipids, enabling the packing of ˜80,000 porphyrin photosensitizers per particle. The high-density porphyrin loading imparts enhanced photonic properties and enables high-payload tumor delivery. A patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft model was used to evaluate the feasibility of porphysome-enhanced PTT for pancreatic cancer. Biodistribution and tumor accumulation were evaluated using fluorescence intensity measurements from homogenized tissues and imaging of excised organs. Tumor surface temperature was recorded using IR optical imaging during light irradiation to monitor treatment progress. Histological analyses were conducted to determine the extent of PTT thermal damage. These studies may provide insight into the influence of heat-sink effect on thermal therapy dosimetry for well-perfused pancreatic tumors.

  9. Visualization of cancer-related chemical components in mouse pancreas tissue by tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yoichi; Satoh, Shuya; Naito, Junpei; Kyogaku, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is an informative approach for the comprehensive analysis of multiple components inside biological specimens. We used novel tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method to visualize cancer-related chemical components in the mouse pancreas tissue section at a sampling pitch of 100 µm. Positive ion mode measurements from m/z 100 to 1500 resulted in the visualization of multiple components that are tentatively assigned as polyamines, lipids and proteins. Their signal intensities inside the cancerous and the non-cancerous regions were found to be significantly different by the two-sample t-test.

  10. Advances in personalized cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Karasaki, Takahiro; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Sugie, Tomoharu

    2017-01-01

    There are currently three major approaches to T cell-based cancer immunotherapy, namely, active vaccination, adoptive cell transfer therapy and immune checkpoint blockade. Recently, this latter approach has demonstrated remarkable clinical benefits, putting cancer immunotherapy under the spotlight. Better understanding of the dynamics of anti-tumor immune responses (the "Cancer-Immunity Cycle") is crucial for the further development of this form of treatment. Tumors employ multiple strategies to escape from anti-tumor immunity, some of which result from the selection of cancer cells with immunosuppressive activity by the process of cancer immunoediting. Apart from this selective process, anti-tumor immune responses can also be inhibited in multiple different ways which vary from patient to patient. This implies that cancer immunotherapy must be personalized to (1) identify the rate-limiting steps in any given patient, (2) identify and combine strategies to overcome these hurdles, and (3) proceed with the next round of the "Cancer-Immunity Cycle". Cancer cells have genetic alterations which can provide the immune system with targets by which to recognize and eradicate the tumor. Mutated proteins expressed exclusively in cancer cells and recognizable by the immune system are known as neoantigens. The development of next-generation sequencing technology has made it possible to determine the genetic landscape of human cancer and facilitated the utilization of genomic information to identify such candidate neoantigens in individual cancers. Future immunotherapies will need to be personalized in terms of the identification of both patient-specific immunosuppressive mechanisms and target neoantigens.

  11. Advances in Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    will be scheduled in Q3 2010 Agustin Garcia, MD University of Southern California / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center 1441 Eastlake Avenue Los...A 6 6 Agustin Garcia, MD USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center • Q3 Approval by DoD Expected • June -- December Accrual Anticipated at 12

  12. Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy in A-92-older Chinese patient for cancer of head of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiayu; Xin, Chang; Xia, Tao; Mou, Yiping; Xu, Xiaowu; Zhang, Renchao; Zhou, Yucheng; Jin, Weiwei; Lu, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy (LPD) is one of the most complex gastrointestinal procedures performed in laparoscopic abdominal surgery. However, the concern for elderly undergoing LPD remains. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports describing LPD for A-92-older patient. This study aimed to share the experience of a tertiary pancreatic center and confirm the safety, feasibility of LPD for the elderly. Method: The patient had complained of 6-months history of abdominal discomfort and progressive jaundice. Abdominal computed tomography CT/MR imaging revealed a 3 × 3 cm solid hypovascular mass in the head of the pancreas. LPD was successfully performed after multidisciplinary team (MDT). Operation time was 450 minutes, and blood loss was 120 mL. Histological examination of the resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Outcomes: The patient was discharged on POD13 following an uneventful postoperative period. She was followed up 4 months without any sign of recurrence. Conclusion: LPD can be performed safely in patients of any age who are fit for surgery in specialist centers. PMID:28099362

  13. Advances in cryoablation for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Mei; Niu, Li-Zhi; Chen, Ji-Bing; Xu, Ke-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a common cancer of the digestive system with a poor prognosis. It is characterized by insidious onset, rapid progression, a high degree of malignancy and early metastasis. At present, radical surgery is considered the only curative option for treatment, however, the majority of patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed too late to undergo surgery. The sensitivity of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy or radiotherapy is also poor. As a result, there is no standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Cryoablation is generally considered to be an effective palliative treatment for pancreatic cancer. It has the advantages of minimal invasion and improved targeting, and is potentially safe with less pain to the patients. It is especially suitable in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. However, our initial findings suggest that cryotherapy combined with 125-iodine seed implantation, immunotherapy or various other treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer can improve survival in patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Although these findings require further in-depth study, the initial results are encouraging. This paper reviews the safety and efficacy of cryoablation, including combined approaches, in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26811625

  14. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  15. Photodynamic Cancer Therapy - Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2011-09-22

    The basic principle of the photodynamic effect was discovered over a hundred years ago leading to the pioneering work on PDT in Europe. It was only during the 1980s, however, when 'photoradiation therapy' was investigated as a possible treatment modality for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemotherapeutic process which requires the use of a photosensitizer (PS) that, upon entry into a cancer cell is targeted by laser irradiation to initiate a series of events that contribute to cell death. PSs are light-sensitive dyes activated by a light source at a specific wavelength and can be classified as first or second generation PSs based on its origin and synthetic pathway. The principle of PS activation lies in a photochemical reaction resulting from excitation of the PS producing singlet oxygen which in turn reacts and damages cell organelles and biomolecules required for cell function and ultimately leading to cell destruction. Several first and second generation PSs have been studied in several different cancer types in the quest to optimize treatment. PSs including haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), aminolevulinic acid (ALA), chlorins, bacteriochlorins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, pheophorbiedes and purpurins all require selective uptake and retention by cancer cells prior to activation by a light source and subsequent cell death induction. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the fluorescence effect exhibited by PSs upon irradiation and is often used concurrently with PDT to detect and locate tumours. Both laser and light emitting diodes (LED) have been used for PDT depending on the location of the tumour. Internal cancers more often require the use of laser light delivery using fibre optics as delivery system while external PDT often make use of LEDs. Normal cells have a lower uptake of the PS in comparison to tumour cells, however the acute cytotoxic effect of the compound on the recovery rate of normal cells is not known. Subcellular

  16. Emerging role of LOXL2 in the promotion of pancreas cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon Seong; Lee, Ji-hae; Lee, Yun Sun; Kim, Jae Keun; Dong, Seung Myung; Yoon, Dong Sup

    2016-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) is associated with invasiveness and metastasis in cancer. We analyzed the prognostic impact of LOXL2 in pancreatic cancer patients and investigated the role of LOXL2 in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed in samples from 80 patients and showed LOXL2 expression in 81.2% of patients with pancreatic cancer. Regarding recurrence patterns, LOXL2-positive tumors showed a significantly higher rate of distant recurrence. The 1-year and 3-year disease-free survival rates were 84.6% and 0.0%, respectively, for LOXL2-negative patients, and 27.8 % and 0.0 %, respectively, for LOXL2-positive patients. On univariate analysis, combined resection of major vessels, depth of invasion, tumor stage, and LOXL2- positive status were significant factors for poor prognosis. After identification of LOXL2 expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines, LOXL2-silenced and LOXL2-overexpressed cell lines were used to perform transwell invasion and transendothelial migration assays. In vitro studies indicated that LOXL2 silencing in MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells induced a mesenchymal–epithelial transition (MET)-like process associated with decreased invasive and migratory properties. LOXL2 overexpression in AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells enhanced the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like process and increased migratory and invasive activity. These clinical and preclinical data confirm that higher LOXL2 expression is associated with the invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells and the low survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients. Our results suggest the clinical value of LOXL2 as a therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27285767

  17. New possibilities for cancer therapy with advances in cancer immunology.

    PubMed

    MacLean, G D; Longenecker, B M

    1994-04-01

    There has been progress over the last decade in addressing three questions: Are there cancer-associated antigens that could be targets for immunotherapy? Can the human immune system recognize cancer-associated antigens? Can an anti-cancer immune response affect cancer cells and lead to increased survival? Results from animal model studies have been interpreted by optimists as encouraging, and by pessimists as being irrelevant to human cancer. Earlier studies on "cancer vaccines" utilized heterogeneous cell extracts of cell components. Monoclonal antibodies have enabled identification of relevant cancer-associated antigens or epitopes, such as the ganglioside GM2, the carbohydrates TF and STn, and the peptide sequences of MUC-1. In parallel with research on immune adjuvants and measures designed to inhibit suppressor activity, these epitopes are being tested for their potential in the immunotherapy of solid tumors. It is clear that some of these cancer-associated epitopes are immunogenic in humans. Mixed responses may relate to cancer heterogeneity and may indicate the importance of multi-epitopic vaccines. Responses are encouraging, but are they relevant? Prolonged disease stability challenges us to re-think the goals of cancer therapy. Recent advances in the knowledge of the effect of cytokines on tumor antigen expression and the regulation of the immune response, coupled with advances in active specific immunotherapy, provide hope that biomodulation may become an important part of the therapy of solid tumors in the next century.

  18. Complete Response after Treatment with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation with Prolonged Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced, Unresectable Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Pompa, Tiffany A.; Jeurkar, Chetan; Li, Hui; Soundararajan, Suganthi; Poli, Jaganmohan; Styler, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Surgery is the only chance for cure in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. In unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) suggests chemotherapy and consideration for radiation in cases of unresectable LAPC. Here we present a rare case of unresectable LAPC with a complete histopathological response after chemoradiation followed by surgical resection. A 54-year-old female presented to our clinic in December 2013 with complaints of abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. An MRI demonstrated a mass in the pancreatic body measuring 6.2 × 3.2 cm; biopsy revealed proven ductal adenocarcinoma. Due to splenic vein/artery and contiguous celiac artery encasement, she was deemed surgically unresectable. She was started on FOLFIRINOX therapy (three cycles), intensity modulated radiation to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions concurrent with capecitabine, followed by FOLFIRI, and finally XELIRI. After 8 cycles of ongoing XELIRI completed in March 2015, restaging showed a remarkable decrease in tumor size, along with PET-CT revealing no FDG-avid uptake. She was reevaluated by surgery and taken for definitive resection. Histopathological evaluation demonstrated a complete R0 resection and no residual tumor. Based on this patient and literature review, this strategy demonstrates potential efficacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with prolonged chemotherapy, followed by surgery, which may improve outcomes in patients deemed previously unresectable. PMID:28373919

  19. Breast cancer. Part 3: advanced cancer and psychological implications.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Victoria

    This is the last article in this 3-part series on breast cancer. The previous two articles have outlined the principles behind breast awareness and breast health, detailing common benign breast diseases, types of breast cancer and staging, and treatment for breast cancer, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and endocrine treatment. The series concludes by giving information on advanced disease, including when a patient presents late with a fungating breast lesion, or if the disease has metastasized from the breast to other organs. Lymphoedema is also described and discussed, and the latter half of this article discusses psychological implications of breast cancer, from diagnosis through the individual treatments.

  20. Porphyrin lipid nanoparticles for enhanced photothermal therapy in a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.; Ding, Lili; Jin, Cheng; Cao, Pingjiang; Siddiqui, Iram; Hwang, David M.; Chen, Juan; Wilson, Brian C.; Zheng, Gang; Hedley, David W.

    2016-03-01

    Local disease control is a major problem in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, because curative-intent surgery is only possible in a minority of patients, and radiotherapy cannot be delivered in curative doses. Despite the promise of photothermal therapy (PTT) for ablation of pancreatic tumors, this approach remains under investigated. Using photothermal sensitizers in combination with laser light for PTT can result in more efficient conversion of light energy to heat, and confinement of thermal destruction to the tumor, thus sparing adjacent organs and vasculature. Porphyrins have been previously employed as photosensitizers for PDT and PTT, however their incorporation in to "porphysomes", lipid-based nanoparticles each containing ~80,000 porphyrins through conjugation of pyropheophorbide to phospholipids, carries two distinct advantages: 1) high-density porphyrin packing imparts the nanoparticles with enhanced photonic properties for imaging and phototherapy; 2) the enhanced permeability and retention effect may be exploited for optimal delivery of porphysomes to the tumor region thus high payload porphyrin delivery. The feasibility of porphysome-enhanced PTT for pancreatic cancer treatment was investigated using a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft tumor model. Uptake of porphysomes at the orthotopic tumor site was validated using ex vivo fluorescence imaging of intact organs of interest. The accumulation of porphysomes in orthotopic tumor microstructure was also confirmed by fluorescence imaging of excised tissue slices. PTT progress was monitored as changes in tumor surface temperature using IR optical imaging. Histological analyses were conducted to examine microstructure changes in tissue morphology, and the viability of remaining tumor tissues following exposure to heat. These studies may also provide insight as to the contribution of heat sink in application of thermal therapies to highly vascularized pancreatic tumors.

  1. Generating new pancreas from old.

    PubMed

    Hardikar, Anandwardhan A

    2004-07-01

    Pancreas regeneration after tissue damage is a key response to pancreatic injury, involving pancreatic duct progenitor cells and intra-islet precursor cells. Surgical removal of the pancreas, duct obstruction by cellophane wrapping and bone marrow-derived stem cell transplantation act as inductive stimuli, leading to pancreas regeneration. The exact role of growth and differentiation factors regulating pancreatic beta-cell mass remains unknown. Here, I will attempt to integrate recent findings and speculate on the factors that trigger this fascinating response, wherein the pancreas responds to a deficit in cell mass and undergoes new islet formation, leading to restoration of normal beta-cell mass. I will also discuss recent advances in regenerating endocrine pancreatic cells, which could affect stem cell-based approaches to treating diabetes mellitus.

  2. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    SciTech Connect

    Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Kramer, Robin M.; Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve; Ulmert, David; Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L.; Russell, James

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response.

  3. Recent advances in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chessum, Nicola; Jones, Keith; Pasqua, Elisa; Tucker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the past 20 years, cancer therapeutics has undergone a paradigm shift away from the traditional cytotoxic drugs towards the targeting of proteins intimately involved in driving the cancer phenotype. The poster child for this alternative approach to the treatment of cancer is imatinib, a small-molecule kinase inhibitor designed to target chronic myeloid leukaemia driven by the BCR-ABL translocation in a defined patient population. The improvement in survival achieved by treatment of this patient cohort with imatinib is impressive. Thus, the aim is to provide efficacy but with low toxicity. The role of the medicinal chemist in oncology drug discovery is now closely aligned with the role in most other therapeutic areas with high-throughput and/or fragment-based screening, structure-based design, selectivity, pharmacokinetic optimisation and pharmacodynamic biomarker modulation, all playing a familiar part in the process. In this chapter, we selected four areas in which compounds are either approved drugs or in clinical trials. These are chaperone inhibitors, kinase inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors and inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Even within these areas, we have been selective, particularly for kinase inhibitors, and our aim has been to exemplify newer approaches and novel aspects of medicinal chemistry.

  4. Overexpression of Id-1 is significantly associated with tumour angiogenesis in human pancreas cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, K T; Lee, Y W; Lee, J K; Choi, S H; Rhee, J C; Paik, S S; Kong, G

    2004-03-22

    It has been suggested that Id-1 has a critical role in the tumour progression and aggressiveness of several human cancers. However, the clinicopathological and biological significance of Id-1 overexpression remains unclear in human primary cancer. To investigate the association between Id-1 expression and cell proliferation or tumour angiogenesis, we examined the cell cycle kinetic indices (the proliferation and apoptotic indices, PI and AI) and intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) in 65 human pancreatic cancers. We also investigated the relationship between its expression and various clinicopathological factors to determine the clinical significance of Id-1 overexpression. Out of a total 65 cases, 32 (49.3%) showed overexpression of Id-1 vs normal tissues. Id-1 expression was found to be significantly associated with MVD (P=0.002). In further analysis of subgroups with higher and lower Id-1 expression, tumours with higher Id-1 expression (scores 4 and 5) showed significantly higher MVD than tumours with lower expression of Id-1 (scores 2 and 3) (111.18+/-57.14 vs 64.13+/-28.19, P<0.001). However, no significant association was found between Id-1 overexpression and patient survival rate. No significant association was also found between Id-1 expression and cell cycle kinetic indices (PI or AI) in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, the overexpression of Id-1 protein was not correlated with any significant clinicopathologic factors. These findings indicate that Id-1 overexpression is closely related with tumour angiogenesis and a higher density of intratumoral vessel, but that it is not associated with a poorer prognosis of survival or a higher cell proliferative potential in human pancreatic cancer.

  5. Recent advances in transport of water-soluble vitamins in organs of the digestive system: a focus on the colon and the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and regulation of water-soluble vitamin (WSV) transport in the large intestine and pancreas, two important organs of the digestive system that have only recently received their fair share of attention. WSV, a group of structurally unrelated compounds, are essential for normal cell function and development and, thus, for overall health and survival of the organism. Humans cannot synthesize WSV endogenously; rather, WSV are obtained from exogenous sources via intestinal absorption. The intestine is exposed to two sources of WSV: a dietary source and a bacterial source (i.e., WSV generated by the large intestinal microbiota). Contribution of the latter source to human nutrition/health has been a subject of debate and doubt, mostly based on the absence of specialized systems for efficient uptake of WSV in the large intestine. However, recent studies utilizing a variety of human and animal colon preparations clearly demonstrate that such systems do exist in the large intestine. This has provided strong support for the idea that the microbiota-generated WSV are of nutritional value to the host, and especially to the nutritional needs of the local colonocytes and their health. In the pancreas, WSV are essential for normal metabolic activities of all its cell types and for its exocrine and endocrine functions. Significant progress has also been made in understanding the mechanisms involved in the uptake of WSV and the effect of chronic alcohol exposure on the uptake processes. PMID:23989008

  6. Normal Pancreas Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreas Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 761x736 ... View Download Large: 3172x3068 View Download Title: Pancreas Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pancreas; drawing shows the ...

  7. New Treatment in Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Dario; Prestifilippo, Angela; Scarfia, Alessia; Martino, Daniela; Marchisotta, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine tumor. Thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine, and TSH suppression represent the standard treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer. Since chemotherapy has been shown to be unsuccessful in case of advanced thyroid carcinomas, the research for new therapies is fundamental. In this paper, we reviewed the recent literature reports (pubmed, medline, EMBASE database, and abstracts published in meeting proceedings) on new treatments in advanced nonmedullary and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Studies of many tyrosine kinase inhibitors as well as antiangiogenic inhibitors suggest that patients with thyroid cancer could have an advantage with new target therapy. We summarized both the results obtained and the toxic effects associated with these treatments reported in clinical trials. Reported data in this paper are encouraging, but further trials are necessary to obtain a more effective result in thyroid carcinoma treatment. PMID:23133451

  8. A randomized phase III study of radiotherapy alone or with 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin-C in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study E8282

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Steven J. . E-mail: S_Cohen@fccc.edu; Dobelbower, Ralph; Lipsitz, Stuart; Catalano, Paul J.; Sischy, Benjamin; Smith, Thomas J.; Haller, Daniel G.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: The median survival time of patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is 8-10 months. Radiation therapy has been used to improve local control and palliate symptoms. This randomized study was undertaken to determine whether the addition of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin-C (MMC) to radiation therapy improves outcome in this patient population. Patients and Methods: One hundred fourteen patients were randomized to receive 59.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy in 1.8 Gy fractions alone or in combination with 5-FU (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 4 days by continuous infusion Days 2-5 and 28-31) and MMC (10 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 2). Results: One hundred four patients were evaluable for efficacy. Hematologic and nonhematologic toxicities were more common in the combination arm. The response rates were 6% in the radiation therapy arm and 9% in the combination arm. There were no differences in median disease-free survival time (DFS) or overall survival time (OS) between the combination and radiation therapy alone arms: 5.1 vs. 5.0 months, respectively, for DFS (p = 0.19) and 8.4 vs. 7.1 months, respectively, for OS (p = 0.16). Conclusion: The addition of 5-FU and MMC to radiotherapy increased toxicity without improving DFS or OS in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Alternative drugs for radiosensitization may improve outcome.

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Patient Survival Correlates with DNA Methylation of Pancreas Development Genes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michael J.; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Dawson, David W.; Donahue, Timothy R.; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mark associated with regulation of transcription and genome structure. These markers have been investigated in a variety of cancer settings for their utility in differentiating normal tissue from tumor tissue. Here, we examine the direct correlation between DNA methylation and patient survival. We find that changes in the DNA methylation of key pancreatic developmental genes are strongly associated with patient survival. PMID:26039411

  10. Pancreatic cancer patient survival correlates with DNA methylation of pancreas development genes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael J; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Dawson, David W; Donahue, Timothy R; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mark associated with regulation of transcription and genome structure. These markers have been investigated in a variety of cancer settings for their utility in differentiating normal tissue from tumor tissue. Here, we examine the direct correlation between DNA methylation and patient survival. We find that changes in the DNA methylation of key pancreatic developmental genes are strongly associated with patient survival.

  11. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  12. Afatinib in Advanced Refractory Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Ureter Cancer

  13. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-12-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression. (JMT)

  14. Important drugs for cough in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Homsi, J; Walsh, D; Nelson, K A

    2001-11-01

    Cough is a defense mechanism that prevents the entry of noxious materials into the respiratory system and clears foreign materials and excess secretions from the lungs and respiratory tract. In advanced cancer, it is a common symptom that interferes with the patient's daily activity and quality of life. Empiric treatment with antitussive agents is often needed. Two classes of antitussive drugs are available: (1) centrally acting: (a) opioids and (b) non-opioids; (2) peripherally acting: (a) directly and (b) indirectly. Antitussive availability varies widely around the world. Many antitussives, such as benzonatate, codeine, hydrocodone, and dextromethorphan, were extensively studied in the acute and chronic cough settings and showed relatively high efficacy and safety profiles. Benzonatate, clobutinol, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, and levodropropizine were the only antitussives specifically studied in cancer and advanced cancer cough. They all have shown to be effective and safe in recommended daily dose for cough. In advanced cancer the patient's current medications, previous antitussive use, the availability of routes of administration, any history of drug abuse, the presence of other symptoms and other factors, all have a role in the selection of antitussives for prescription. A good knowledge of the pharmacokinetics, dosage, efficacy, and side effects of the available antitussives provides for better management.

  15. New advances in targeted gastric cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lazăr, Daniela Cornelia; Tăban, Sorina; Cornianu, Marioara; Faur, Alexandra; Goldiş, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Despite a decrease in incidence over past decades, gastric cancer remains a major global health problem. In the more recent period, survival has shown only minor improvement, despite significant advances in diagnostic techniques, surgical and chemotherapeutic approaches, the development of novel therapeutic agents and treatment by multidisciplinary teams. Because multiple genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, and aberrant molecular signalling pathways are involved in the development of gastric cancers, recent research has attempted to determine the molecular heterogeneity responsible for the processes of carcinogenesis, spread and metastasis. Currently, some novel agents targeting a part of these dysfunctional molecular signalling pathways have already been integrated into the standard treatment of gastric cancer, whereas others remain in phases of investigation within clinical trials. It is essential to identify the unique molecular patterns of tumours and specific biomarkers to develop treatments targeted to the individual tumour behaviour. This review analyses the global impact of gastric cancer, as well as the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and the efficacy of bacterial eradication in preventing gastric cancer development. Furthermore, the paper discusses the currently available targeted treatments and future directions of research using promising novel classes of molecular agents for advanced tumours. PMID:27570417

  16. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kokelaar, RF; Evans, MD; Davies, M; Harris, DA; Beynon, J

    2016-01-01

    Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer). Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0) resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. PMID:27785074

  17. A dosimetric comparison of proton and photon therapy in unresectable cancers of the head of pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Reid F.; Zhai, Huifang; Both, Stefan; Metz, James M.; Plastaras, John P.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Mayekar, Sonal U.; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Uncontrolled local growth is the cause of death in ∼30% of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancers. The addition of standard-dose radiotherapy to gemcitabine has been shown to confer a modest survival benefit in this population. Radiation dose escalation with three-dimensional planning is not feasible, but high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been shown to improve local control. Still, dose-escalation remains limited by gastrointestinal toxicity. In this study, the authors investigate the potential use of double scattering (DS) and pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy in limiting dose to critical organs at risk. Methods: The authors compared DS, PBS, and IMRT plans in 13 patients with unresectable cancer of the pancreatic head, paying particular attention to duodenum, small intestine, stomach, liver, kidney, and cord constraints in addition to target volume coverage. All plans were calculated to 5500 cGy in 25 fractions with equivalent constraints and normalized to prescription dose. All statistics were by two-tailed paired t-test. Results: Both DS and PBS decreased stomach, duodenum, and small bowel dose in low-dose regions compared to IMRT (p < 0.01). However, protons yielded increased doses in the mid to high dose regions (e.g., 23.6–53.8 and 34.9–52.4 Gy for duodenum using DS and PBS, respectively; p < 0.05). Protons also increased generalized equivalent uniform dose to duodenum and stomach, however these differences were small (<5% and 10%, respectively; p < 0.01). Doses to other organs-at-risk were within institutional constraints and placed no obvious limitations on treatment planning. Conclusions: Proton therapy does not appear to reduce OAR volumes receiving high dose. Protons are able to reduce the treated volume receiving low-intermediate doses, however the clinical significance of this remains to be determined in future investigations.

  18. Characterization of cholecystokinin receptors (CCK-R) in normal and cancerous human pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, P.; Townsend, C.M. Jr.; Upp, J.; Laridjani, A.; Thompson, J.C.

    1986-03-01

    In this report is described, for the first time, the binding characteristics of CCK-R on normal (NOR) and cancerous (CAN) human pancreatic (P) membranes. NOR-P was collected from cadavers and CAN-P was collected at time of operation. CCK-R was measured from Scatchard plot of multi-point-binding-analysis, using I/sup 125/-BH-CCK-8-SO/sub 4/ (Amersham). The optimal binding conditions were similar for NOR and CAN-P. Maximum binding was observed at 30/sup 0/ after 45-60 min of incubation, in presence of 1.5 mM Ca/sup + +/. CCK-R in NOR-P ranged from 11.9 to 200.0 fmoles/mg protein, which probably reflects the degree of tissue deterioration before storage. Two classes of CCK-R were clearly definable with 10X difference in their binding affinities (K/sub d(1)/ = 0.04 nM and K/sub d(2)/ = 0.2-0.5 nM). Out of 5 PAN-C, 4 were +ve for CCK-R, with values ranging from 1.5-120 fmoles/mg protein, which probably reflects differences in hormone dependence or dedifferentiation, in situ, itself. In only one PAN-C, was there retention of both types of NOR-binding sites, with similar binding affinities. In other PAN-C the types and binding affinity of CCK-R underwent significant changes, indicating dedifferentiation or hormone independence of PAN-C, which may be either the cause or result of development of cancer.

  19. Advances in the treatment of testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Margel, David; Lubin, Marc Alan; Baniel, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCT) are relatively uncommon, accounting for only 1% of male malignancies in the United States. It has become an important oncological disease for several reasons. It is the most common malignancy in young men 15-35 years old. GCTs are among a unique numbers of neoplasms where biochemical markers play a critical role. Finally, it is a model of curable cancer. In this review we discuss cancer epidemiology, genetics, and therapeutic principles. Recent advances in the management of stage I GCT and controversies in the management of post chemotherapy residual mass are presented. PMID:26816836

  20. Gradual telomere shortening and increasing chromosomal instability among PanIN grades and normal ductal epithelia with and without cancer in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoko; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Izumiyama-Shimomura, Naotaka; Hamayasu, Hideki; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Tomita, Ken-Ichiro; Hiraishi, Naoki; Nakamura, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Naoshi; Aida, Junko; Takubo, Kaiyo; Arai, Tomio

    2015-01-01

    A large body of evidence supports a key role for telomere dysfunction in carcinogenesis due to the induction of chromosomal instability. To study telomere shortening in precancerous pancreatic lesions, we measured telomere lengths using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization in the normal pancreatic duct epithelium, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs), and cancers. The materials employed included surgically resected pancreatic specimens without cancer (n = 33) and with invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 36), as well as control autopsy cases (n = 150). In comparison with normal ducts, telomere length was decreased in PanIN-1, -2 and -3 and cancer. Furthermore, telomeres were shorter in cancer than in PanIN-1 and -2. Telomere length in cancer was not associated with histological type, lesion location, or cancer stage. PanINs with or without cancer showed similar telomere lengths. The incidences of atypical mitosis and anaphase bridges, which are morphological characteristics of chromosomal instability, were negatively correlated with telomere length. The telomeres in normal duct epithelium became shorter with aging, and those in PanINs or cancers were shorter than in age-matched controls, suggesting that telomere shortening occurs even when histological changes are absent. Our data strongly suggest that telomere shortening occurs in the early stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis and progresses with precancerous development. Telomere shortening and chromosomal instability in the duct epithelium might be associated with carcinogenesis of the pancreas. Determination of telomere length in pancreatic ductal lesions may be valuable for accurate detection and risk assessment of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Management of dysphagia in advanced oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Penner, Jamie L; McClement, Susan E; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V

    2007-05-01

    Individuals with advanced oropharyngeal cancer often experience dysphagia as a result of their illness and its treatment. Research consistently demonstrates that dysphagia and difficulty with oral intake have many implications, including a negative impact on quality of life. Nurses are in a key position to provide support and initiate appropriate interventions for individuals with dysphagia. Using the Human Response to Illness model (Mitchell et al, 1991) as an organising framework, this paper presents a critical review of the empirical literature regarding dysphagia in individuals with advanced oropharyngeal cancer that will: i) provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of dysphagia; ii) identify current gaps in our knowledge; and iii) establish the foundation for appropriate evidence-based interventions to optimise functioning and quality of life in this patient population.

  2. Polarization gating spectroscopy of normal-appearing duodenal mucosa to detect pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mihir; Gomes, Andrew; Ruderman, Sarah; Hardee, Darla; Crespo, Sergio; Raimondo, Massimo; Woodward, Timothy; Backman, Vadim; Roy, Hemant; Wallace, Michael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND According to field effect theory, by detecting microvasculature changes in the early increase of blood supply (EIBS) in the surrounding tissue neoplastic lesions can be identified from a distance. OBJECTIVE To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a fiberoptic probe containing novel Polarization Gating Spectroscopy (PGS) technology to identify patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) by field effect theory. DESIGN Prospective cohort (pilot) study SETTING Outpatient tertiary care center PATIENTS Adult (≥18 years) patients undergoing EGD-EUS were screened. Patients with PAC were included in the “cancer” group and patients without PAC were included in the “control” group. We excluded patients with other known malignancies and gastro-duodenal premalignant lesions. INTERVENTIONS and MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Spectroscopic measurements of EIBS variables, such as deoxyhemoglobin concentration (DHb) and mean blood vessel radius (BVR), were obtained from five peri-ampullary locations. The Mann-Whitney rank sum test was used for the statistical analysis (p≤0.05). RESULTS Fourteen patients (mean age: 72 years,79% male) in the cancer group and 15 patients (mean age 63 years,60% male) in the control group were included in the final analysis. At the ampullary site, both DHb (p=0.001) and BVR (p=0.03) were higher in PAC patients than in the controls. The DHb alone (92% sensitivity,86% specificity) or in combination with BVR (92% sensitivity,71% specificity) can differentiate PAC from controls with high accuracy. LIMITATIONS Small sample size, Unmatched controls CONCLUSIONS Spectroscopic measurements of EIBS by fiberoptic probes are feasible. Preliminary evidence suggests that in vivo measurement of normal-appearing duodenal tissue can differentiate PAC patients from a distance with high accuracy. PMID:24861243

  3. Advances for Studying Clonal Evolution in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Benjamin J.; Chen, Feng; Wendl, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The “clonal evolution” model of cancer emerged and “evolved” amid ongoing advances in technology, especially in recent years during which next generation sequencing instruments have provided ever higher resolution pictures of the genetic changes in cancer cells and heterogeneity in tumors. It has become increasingly clear that clonal evolution is not a single sequential process, but instead frequently involves simultaneous evolution of multiple subclones that co-exist because they are of similar fitness or are spatially separated. Co-evolution of subclones also occurs when they complement each other’s survival advantages. Recent studies have also shown that clonal evolution is highly heterogeneous: different individual tumors of the same type may undergo very different paths of clonal evolution. New methodological advancements, including deep digital sequencing of a mixed tumor population, single cell sequencing, and the development of more sophisticated computational tools, will continue to shape and reshape the models of clonal evolution. In turn, these will provide both an improved framework for the understanding of cancer progression and a guide for treatment strategies aimed at the elimination of all, rather than just some, of the cancer cells within a patient. PMID:23353056

  4. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  5. Surgery for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Neville F; Rao, Archana

    2016-10-20

    Cytoreductive surgery for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer has been practised since the pioneering work of Tom Griffiths in 1975. Further research has demonstrated the prognostic significance of the extent of metastatic disease pre-operatively, and of complete cytoreduction post-operatively. Patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer should be referred to high volume cancer units, and managed by multidisciplinary teams. The role of thoracoscopy and resection of intrathoracic disease is presently investigational. In recent years, there has been increasing use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval cytoreductive surgery in patients with poor performance status, which is usually due to large volume ascites and/or large pleural effusions. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy reduces the post-operative morbidity, but if the tumour responds well to the chemotherapy, the inflammatory response makes the surgery more difficult. Post-operative morbidity is generally tolerable, but increases in older patients, and in those having multiple, aggressive surgical procedures, such as bowel resection or diaphragmatic stripping. Primary cytoreductive surgery should be regarded as the gold standard for most patients until a test is developed which would allow the prediction of platinum resistance pre-operatively.

  6. Contemporary Management of Borderline Resectable and Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Andrew; Cardona, Kenneth; Alese, Olatunji B.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Kooby, David; Landry, Jerome; El-Rayes, Bassel F.

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas remains a highly lethal disease, with less than 5% survival at 5 years. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) and locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) account for approximately 30% of newly diagnosed cases of PC. The objective of BRPC therapy is to downstage the tumor to allow resection; the objective of LAPC therapy is to control disease and improve survival. There is no consensus on the definitions of BRPC and LAPC, which leads to major limitations in designing clinical trials and evaluating their results. A multimodality approach is always needed to ensure proper utilization and timing of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery in the management of this disease. Combination chemotherapy regimens (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, and gemcitabine [FOLFIRINOX] and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel) have improved overall survival in metastatic disease. The role of combination chemotherapy regimens in BRPC and LAPC is an area of active investigation. There is no consensus on the dose, modality, and role of radiation therapy in the treatment of BRPC and LAPC. This article reviews the literature and highlights the areas of controversy regarding management of BRPC and LAPC. Implications for Practice: Pancreatic cancer is one of the worst cancers with regard to survival, even at early stages of the disease. This review evaluates all the evidence for the stages in which the cancer is not primarily resectable with surgery, known as borderline resectable or locally advanced unresectable. Recently, advancements in radiation techniques and use of better combination chemotherapies have improved survival and tolerance. There is no consensus on description of stages or treatment sequences (chemotherapy, chemoradiation, radiation), nor on the best chemotherapy regimen. The evidence behind the treatment paradigm for these stages of pancreatic cancer is summarized. PMID:26834159

  7. Getting a New Pancreas: Facts about Pancreas Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2003 December 2006 March 2012 Getting A New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants American Society of Transplantation 1120 Route 73, ... the views of the Society. _________________________________________________________________ Getting a New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants When you get a ...

  8. Splenic vein thrombosis is associated with an increase in pancreas-specific complications and reduced survival in patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic exocrine cancer.

    PubMed

    Dedania, Nishi; Agrawal, Nidhi; Winter, Jordan M; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Rosato, Ernest L; Sauter, Patricia K; Leiby, Ben; Pequignot, Edward; Yeo, Charles J; Lavu, Harish

    2013-08-01

    Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy (DPS) is the procedure of choice for the surgical treatment of pancreatic exocrine cancer localized to the body and tail of the pancreas. Splenic vein thrombosis (SVT) can occur in patients with malignant pancreatic exocrine tumors secondary to direct tumor invasion or compression of the splenic vein by mass effect. This study examines the effect of preoperative SVT on postoperative outcomes. In this retrospective cohort study, we queried our pancreatic surgery database to identify patients who underwent DPS from October 2005 to June 2011. These cases were evaluated for evidence of preoperative SVT on clinical records and cross-sectional imaging (CT,MRI, endoscopic US). Outcomes for patients with and without SVT were compared. From an overall cohort of 285 consecutive patients who underwent DPS during the study period, data were evaluated for 70 subjects who underwent surgery for pancreatic exocrine cancer (27 with SVT, 43 without SVT). The preoperative demographics and co-morbidities were similar between the groups, except the average age was higher for those without SVT (p<0.05). The median estimated blood loss was significantly higher in the SVT group (675 versus 250 ml, p=<0.001).While the overall morbidity rates were similar between the two groups (48 % SVT versus 56% no SVT, p=NS), the group with SVT had a significantly higher rate of pancreas-specific complications, including pancreatic fistula (33 versus 7 %,p<0.01) and delayed gastric emptying (15 versus 0%, p<0.02). Hospital readmission rates were similar between the groups(30 versus 28 %, p=NS). Patients without SVT had a trend toward longer median survival (40 versus 20.8 months),although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.1). DPS for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma can be performed safely in patients with SVT, but with higher intraoperative blood loss, increased pancreas-specific complications, and a trend towards lower long-term survival rates

  9. Epigenetics Advancing Personalized Nanomedicine in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shujun

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine aims to deliver the right drug to a right patient at the right time. It offers unique opportunities to integrate new technologies and concepts to disease prognosis, diagnosis and therapeutics. While selective personalized therapies are conceptually impressive, the majority of cancer therapies have dismal outcome. Such therapeutic failure could result from no response, drug resistance, disease relapse or severe side effect from improper drug delivery. Nanomedicine, the application of nanotechnology in medicine, has a potential to advance the identification of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and the delivery of right drug to disease sites. Epigenetic aberrations dynamically contribute to cancer pathogenesis. Given the individualized traits of epigenetic biomarkers, epigenetic considerations would significantly refine personalized nanomedicine. This review aims to dissect the interface of personalized medicine with nanomedicine and epigenetics. I will outline the progress and highlight challenges and areas that can be further explored perfecting the personalized health care. PMID:22921595

  10. Radiation therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukiyama, I.; Akine, Y.; Kajiura, Y.; Ogino, T.; Yamashita, K.; Egawa, S.; Hijikata, J.; Kitagawa, T.

    1988-07-01

    A retrospective study of 75 patients with advanced inoperable gastric cancers, referred to the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1962 and 1982, was performed. According to the Borrmann classification based on X ray findings, Type 1 was found in 3 patients, Type 2 in 5, Type 3 in 40, and Type 4 in 15. Twelve patients could not be classified. The histological type was papillary adenocarcinoma in 7 patients, tubular adenocarcinoma in 23, mucinous carcinoma in 6, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in 14, signet ring cell carcinoma in 12 and others in 13. The site of remote metastasis in 19 patients was Virchow's lymph node in 8 patients, Douglas pouch in 3, liver and lung in 2 each and others in 4. All patients were treated by a either telecobalt 60 unit or a linear accelerator using 6 Mv photon and the total dose to primary lesion was 4000 cGy in 5 weeks to 7000 cGy in 8-9 weeks. Complete response (CR) was achieved in 6 patients or 8.0%, partial response (PR) in 46 or 61.3%, and no change (NC) in 23 or 30.7%. The response rate based on the sum of CR and PR was about 70%. The 50% survival period in months was 26.5, 7.3, and 3.2, respectively for patients with CR, PR, and NC. For the response of advanced gastric cancer to chemotherapy in the National Cancer Center Hospital, the combined use of UFT and Mitomycin C gave the highest rate, 46%. As for as local response is concerned, the response rate to radiation was 70%, a better result than that of chemotherapy alone.

  11. Advances in Radiotherapy Management of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Moreno, Amy C.; Lin, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) as part of multidisciplinary oncologic care has been marked by profound advancements over the past decades. As part of multimodality therapy for esophageal cancer (EC), a prime goal of RT is to minimize not only treatment toxicities, but also postoperative complications and hospitalizations. Herein, discussion commences with the historical approaches to treating EC, including seminal trials supporting multimodality therapy. Subsequently, the impact of RT techniques, including three-dimensional conformal RT, intensity-modulated RT, and proton beam therapy, is examined through available data. We further discuss existing data and the potential for further development in the future, with an appraisal of the future outlook of technological advancements of RT for EC. PMID:27775643

  12. Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chun, Stephen G; Skinner, Heath D; Minsky, Bruce D

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer is controversial. For patients who are candidates for surgical resection, multiple prospective clinical trials have demonstrated the advantages of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. For patients who are medically inoperable, definitive chemoradiation is an alternative approach with survival rates comparable to trimodality therapy. Although trials of dose escalation are ongoing, the standard radiation dose remains 50.4 Gy. Modern radiotherapy techniques such as image-guided radiation therapy with motion management and intensity-modulated radiation therapy are strongly encouraged with a planning objective to maximize conformity to the intended target volume while reducing dose delivered to uninvolved normal tissues.

  13. Systematic review of novel ablative methods in locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Keane, Margaret G; Bramis, Konstantinos; Pereira, Stephen P; Fusai, Giuseppe K

    2014-03-07

    Unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer with or without metastatic disease is associated with a very poor prognosis. Current standard therapy is limited to chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Few regimens have been shown to have a substantial survival advantage and novel treatment strategies are urgently needed. Thermal and laser based ablative techniques are widely used in many solid organ malignancies. Initial studies in the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Modifications to the various applications, in particular combining the techniques with high quality imaging such as computed tomography and intraoperative or endoscopic ultrasound has enabled real time treatment monitoring and significant improvements in safety. We conducted a systematic review of the literature up to October 2013. Initial studies suggest that ablative therapies may confer an additional survival benefit over best supportive care but randomised studies are required to validate these findings.

  14. [Markers of prostate cancer stem cells: research advances].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shun-Qi; Huang, Sheng-Song

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most seriously malignant diseases threatening men's health, and the mechanisms of its initiation and progression are not yet completely understood. Recent years have witnessed distinct advances in researches on prostate cancer stem cells in many aspects using different sources of materials, such as human prostate cancer tissues, human prostate cancer cell lines, and mouse models of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer stem cell study offers a new insight into the mechanisms of the initiation and progression of prostate cancer and contributes positively to its treatment. This article presents an overview on the prostate cancer stem cell markers utilized in the isolation and identification of prostate cancer stem cells.

  15. Recent Advances in Understanding, Diagnosing, and Treating Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Kathryn; Fuh, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer, a term that encompasses ovarian, fallopian, and peritoneal cancers, is the leading cause of gynecologic cancer mortality. To improve patient outcomes, the field is currently focused on defining the mechanisms of cancer formation and spread, early diagnosis and prevention, and developing novel therapeutic options. This review summarizes recent advances in these areas. PMID:28184293

  16. Endoscopic palliation of advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mocanu, A; Bârla, R; Hoara, P; Constantinoiu, S

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer represents one of the most aggressive digestive tumors, with a survival rate at 5 years of only 10%. Globally, during the last three decades, there has been an increasing incidence of the esophageal cancer, approx. 400,000 new esophageal cancers being currently diagnosed annually. This represents the eighth leading cause of cancer incidence and the sixth leading cause of cancer death overall. Taking into account the population’s global aging and thus, the increase in the number of patients who will not bear surgery, PCT and radiation, or the fact that they do not want it especially because of deficiencies and associated pathology, the endoscopic ablative techniques with palliation purposes represent the alternative. If we refer to the Western Europe countries and North America, we notice an increase of esophageal adenocarcinoma rate versus squamous cancer. As for the Asian region, referring in particular to China and Japan, 9 out of 10 esophageal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. For at least half of the patients with EC (esophageal cancer) there is no hope of healing because of the advanced regional malignant invasion (T3-4, N+, M+) with no chemo and radiotherapy response, poor preoperative patients’ conditions or systemic metastasis. The low life expectancy does not justify the risky medical procedures, the goal of the therapy consisting in the improvement of the quality of life by eliminating dysphagia (reestablishing oral feeding) which represents the most common complication of EC, the respiratory tract complication caused by eso-tracheal fistulas or by eliminating chest pain. To treat dysphagia, which is the main target of palliation, combined methods like endoscopic, chemo and radio-therapy, can be used, each one with indications, benefits and risks. Abbreviations: SEPS = self expanding plastic stent, SREMS = self expanding metal stent, EBRT = Endoscopic brachy radiotherapy, EUS = Ultra sound endoscopy, CT = Computer tomograph, UGE

  17. Pancreas transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100129.htm Pancreas transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 6 out of 6 Overview The pancreas resides in the back of the abdomen. It ...

  18. Annular pancreas (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Annular pancreas is an abnormal ring or collar of pancreatic tissue that encircles the duodenum (the part of the ... intestine that connects to stomach). This portion of pancreas can constrict the duodenum and block or impair ...

  19. Dietary intake of advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T D; Bowman, K B; Jackson, G P

    1983-02-01

    A state registered dietitian assessed the voluntary dietary intake of 13 advanced cancer inpatients on one ward of St. Christopher's Hospice for five consecutive days. There were 11 females, two males; median age 74 years (range 56 to 83). Two patients died on the fourth day of the study. A partially individualised weighed technique was used. Standard sized scoops and spoons were used to serve the food in small, medium or large standard portions (depending on appetite) and were weighed as served. Individual plate waste (by weight) was subtracted to give estimated individual intake. Foods provided by visitors was not included. The median and range of individual mean daily intakes (estimated) were: energy 5760 (938-8945) kJ, 1376 (224-2137) kcal; protein 44 (11-86) g; fat 52 (9-93) g; carbohydrate 169 (21-194) g; calcium 748 (268-1457) mg; iron 4.8 (0.5-21.0) mg; dietary fibre 5.0 (0.5-21.0) g. Compared to recommended amounts, energy, iron and dietary fibre intakes were low; calcium intake was high. Nutritional status may affect prognosis and/or subjective well-being in advanced cancer. The value of nutritional supplementation and the role of appetite stimulants in improving nutritional status needs investigation.

  20. Advanced Gastric Cancer Perforation Mimicking Abdominal Wall Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinbeom; Park, Ilyoung; Lee, Dosang; Sung, Kiyoung; Baek, Jongmin

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons occasionally encounter a patient with a gastric cancer invading an adjacent organ, such as the pancreas, liver, or transverse colon. Although there is no established guideline for treatment of invasive gastric cancer, combined resection with radical gastrectomy is conventionally performed for curative purposes. We recently treated a patient with a large gastric cancer invading the abdominal wall, which was initially diagnosed as a simple abdominal wall abscess. Computed tomography showed that an abscess had formed adjacent to the greater curvature of the stomach. During surgery, we made an incision on the abdominal wall to drain the abscess, and performed curative total gastrectomy with partial excision of the involved abdominal wall. The patient received intensive treatment and wound management postoperatively with no surgery-related adverse events. However, the patient could not receive adjuvant chemotherapy and expired on the 82nd postoperative day. PMID:26468420

  1. Pancreas transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone. PMID:26154551

  2. Is there a standard of care for the management of advanced pancreatic cancer?. Highlights from the Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. Orlando, FL, USA. January 25-27, 2008.

    PubMed

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2008-03-08

    Despite advances in our understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of pancreatic cancer, the outcome for this disease remains dismal. Gemcitabine, the standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer, offers modest improvement of tumor-related symptoms and marginal advantage of survival. Many chemotherapeutic and targeted agents have been pitted against or combined with gemcitabine in randomized phase III trials and no drug was shown to be superior to single-agent gemcitabine except two gemcitabine-containing combinations: capecitabine plus gemcitabine vs. gemcitabine and erlotinib. In this article, the author debates: "Is there a standard of care for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer?". In addition, he summarizes the key studies presented at the "Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium" held in Orlando, FL, USA on January 25-27, 2008. The studies discussed here include the following: i) a phase I study of a chemotherapy doublet gemcitabine plus capecitabine, combined with a biologic doublet (bevacizumab plus erlotinib) in patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (abstract #141); ii) a phase II study of gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib in locally advanced and metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (abstract #151); iii) final results of the multicenter phase II study on gemcitabine, capecitabine, and bevacizumab in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (abstract #198); iv) interim results from a phase II study of volociximab in combination with gemcitabine in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer (abstract #142); v) a pilot study of combination chemotherapy with S-1 and irinotecan for advanced pancreatic cancer (abstract #155); vi) a multicenter phase II study of gemcitabine and S-1 combination chemotherapy in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer (abstract #212); vii) a phase I/II study of PHY906 plus capecitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma (abstract #260); and viii) the final results of a phase II trial of

  3. Palbociclib and Letrozole in Advanced Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Finn, Richard S; Martin, Miguel; Rugo, Hope S; Jones, Stephen; Im, Seock-Ah; Gelmon, Karen; Harbeck, Nadia; Lipatov, Oleg N; Walshe, Janice M; Moulder, Stacy; Gauthier, Eric; Lu, Dongrui R; Randolph, Sophia; Diéras, Véronique; Slamon, Dennis J

    2016-11-17

    Background A phase 2 study showed that progression-free survival was longer with palbociclib plus letrozole than with letrozole alone in the initial treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced breast cancer. We performed a phase 3 study that was designed to confirm and expand the efficacy and safety data for palbociclib plus letrozole for this indication. Methods In this double-blind study, we randomly assigned, in a 2:1 ratio, 666 postmenopausal women with ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, who had not had prior treatment for advanced disease, to receive palbociclib plus letrozole or placebo plus letrozole. The primary end point was progression-free survival, as assessed by the investigators; secondary end points were overall survival, objective response, clinical benefit response, patient-reported outcomes, pharmacokinetic effects, and safety. Results The median progression-free survival was 24.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.1 to not estimable) in the palbociclib-letrozole group, as compared with 14.5 months (95% CI, 12.9 to 17.1) in the placebo-letrozole group (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.46 to 0.72; P<0.001). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (occurring in 66.4% of the patients in the palbociclib-letrozole group vs. 1.4% in the placebo-letrozole group), leukopenia (24.8% vs. 0%), anemia (5.4% vs. 1.8%), and fatigue (1.8% vs. 0.5%). Febrile neutropenia was reported in 1.8% of patients in the palbociclib-letrozole group and in none of the patients in the placebo-letrozole group. Permanent discontinuation of any study treatment as a result of adverse events occurred in 43 patients (9.7%) in the palbociclib-letrozole group and in 13 patients (5.9%) in the placebo-letrozole group. Conclusions Among patients with previously untreated ER-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer, palbociclib

  4. Fatigue in advanced cancer: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Katherine; Walsh, Declan; Rybicki, Lisa A; Davis, Mellar P; Seyidova-Khoshknabi, Dilara

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue is a common advanced cancer symptom. Clinical features are not well known. The authors surveyed consecutive patients admitted to a palliative medicine program to identify clinical correlates of fatigue. Data collected included age, sex, performance status, primary site, prior chemotherapy/radiation therapy, and blood transfusions. Visual analogue scales assessed fatigue, quality of life, and ability to perform daily activities. Weight change was estimated. Laboratory results including lactate dehydrogenase and hemoglobin were recorded. Fatigue severity was associated with brain metastases, poor performance status, poor quality of life, and reduced ability to perform activities. Prior radiation therapy was associated with less severe fatigue. Age, sex, and hemoglobin level were not associated with fatigue. Fatigue was universal on referral. Brain metastases and poor quality of life independently predicted severity. Hemoglobin level did not predict fatigue. Further studies are necessary to define the clinical features and relationships of fatigue.

  5. Who needs an artificial pancreas? (?).

    PubMed

    Winikoff, Janet; Drexler, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    The development of a closed-loop "artificial pancreas" would be a welcome advance for both endocrinologists and diabetic patients struggling to attain near normal glycemic control. While great strides in automatically controlling blood sugar in the fasting, sedentary state have been made through complex mathematical modeling, management of blood sugar excursions due to food and exercise have been more problematic. An artificial pancreas is not feasible at this time because of limitations inherent in the currently available technology.

  6. Advances in Cancer Immunotherapy in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Smitha; Shin, Sarah; Dy, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is heralded as one of the most important advances in oncology. Until recently, only limited immunotherapeutic options were available in selected immunogenic cancers like melanoma and renal cell carcinomas. Nowadays, there is an improved understanding that anti-tumor immunity is controlled by a delicate balance in the tumor microenvironment between immune stimulatory and immune inhibitory pathways. Either by blocking the inhibitory pathways or stimulating the activating pathways that regulate cytotoxic lymphocytes, anti-tumor immunity can be enhanced leading to durable anti-tumor responses. Drugs which block the immune regulatory checkpoints namely the PD-1/PDL1 and CTLA 4 pathway have shown tremendous promise in a wide spectrum of solid and hematological malignancies, significantly improving overall survival in newly diagnosed and heavily pretreated patients alike. Hence there is renewed enthusiasm in the field of immune oncology with current research focused on augmenting responses to checkpoint inhibitors by combination therapy as well as studies looking at other immune modulators and adoptive T cell therapy. In this article, we highlight the key clinical advances and concepts in immunotherapy with particular emphasis on checkpoint inhibition as well as the future direction in this field. PMID:27886124

  7. Targeted Approach to Overcoming Treatment Resistance in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    therapy -­‐resistant   prostate   cancer  cells  and  in  combination   therapy  (SOW...treatment resistance in advanced prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Karin Scarpinato CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgia Southern...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to determine if rescinnamine is effective against prostate cancer and

  8. Transcriptional control of mammalian pancreas organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cano, David A; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Francisco; Rojas, Anabel

    2014-07-01

    The field of pancreas development has markedly expanded over the last decade, significantly advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control pancreas organogenesis. This growth has been fueled, in part, by the need to generate new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of diabetes. The creation of sophisticated genetic tools in mice has been instrumental in this progress. Genetic manipulation involving activation or inactivation of genes within specific cell types has allowed the identification of many transcription factors (TFs) that play critical roles in the organogenesis of the pancreas. Interestingly, many of these TFs act at multiple stages of pancreatic development, and adult organ function or repair. Interaction with other TFs, extrinsic signals, and epigenetic regulation are among the mechanisms by which TFs may play context-dependent roles during pancreas organogenesis. Many of the pancreatic TFs directly regulate each other and their own expression. These combinatorial interactions generate very specific gene regulatory networks that can define the different cell lineages and types in the developing pancreas. Here, we review recent progress made in understanding the role of pancreatic TFs in mouse pancreas formation. We also summarize our current knowledge of human pancreas development and discuss developmental pancreatic TFs that have been associated with human pancreatic diseases.

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas, common hepatic artery, and portal vein. Also shown ... and superior mesenteric artery. Stage III pancreatic cancer. Cancer ... near the pancreas. These include the superior mesenteric artery, celiac axis, ...

  10. 3rd Pavia international symposium on advanced kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Porta, Camillo; Bracarda, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    Kidney cancers' natural history has radically changed in the past few years, due to the development of novel targeted agents. Despite these improvements, several unanswered questions still remain on the table, regarding the best first-line treatment, the ideal sequence of treatments, the management of specific subgroups of patients (e.g., elderly patients or those with comorbidities) and the relevance of prognostic factors, among many others. To foster discussions among clinicians and investigators working in this field, and to exchange different viewpoints concerning the newest advances in kidney cancer pathogenesis and treatment, the 3rd Pavia International Symposium on Advanced Kidney cancer was held in Pavia (Italy) between 30 June and 1 July 2011. The aim of this report is to summarize the most significant advances in the different disciplines applied to advanced kidney cancer, which were presented and discussed during the meeting, and how these advances will be changing the perspective of patients with this disease.

  11. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2015

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, fourteen topics were selected as major research advances in gynecologic oncology. For ovarian cancer, high-level evidence for annual screening with multimodal strategy which could reduce ovarian cancer deaths was reported. The best preventive strategies with current status of evidence level were also summarized. Final report of chemotherapy or upfront surgery (CHORUS) trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced stage ovarian cancer and individualized therapy based on gene characteristics followed. There was no sign of abating in great interest in immunotherapy as well as targeted therapies in various gynecologic cancers. The fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference which was held in November 7–9 in Tokyo was briefly introduced. For cervical cancer, update of human papillomavirus vaccines regarding two-dose regimen, 9-valent vaccine, and therapeutic vaccine was reviewed. For corpus cancer, the safety concern of power morcellation in presumed fibroids was explored again with regard to age and prevalence of corpus malignancy. Hormone therapy and endometrial cancer risk, trabectedin as an option for leiomyosarcoma, endometrial cancer and Lynch syndrome, and the radiation therapy guidelines were also discussed. In addition, adjuvant therapy in vulvar cancer and the updated of targeted therapy in gynecologic cancer were addressed. For breast cancer, palbociclib in hormone-receptor-positive advanced disease, oncotype DX Recurrence Score in low-risk patients, regional nodal irradiation to internal mammary, supraclavicular, and axillary lymph nodes, and cavity shave margins were summarized as the last topics covered in this review. PMID:27775259

  12. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2015.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Miseon; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung Hun; Kim, Jae Weon

    2016-11-01

    In 2015, fourteen topics were selected as major research advances in gynecologic oncology. For ovarian cancer, high-level evidence for annual screening with multimodal strategy which could reduce ovarian cancer deaths was reported. The best preventive strategies with current status of evidence level were also summarized. Final report of chemotherapy or upfront surgery (CHORUS) trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced stage ovarian cancer and individualized therapy based on gene characteristics followed. There was no sign of abating in great interest in immunotherapy as well as targeted therapies in various gynecologic cancers. The fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference which was held in November 7-9 in Tokyo was briefly introduced. For cervical cancer, update of human papillomavirus vaccines regarding two-dose regimen, 9-valent vaccine, and therapeutic vaccine was reviewed. For corpus cancer, the safety concern of power morcellation in presumed fibroids was explored again with regard to age and prevalence of corpus malignancy. Hormone therapy and endometrial cancer risk, trabectedin as an option for leiomyosarcoma, endometrial cancer and Lynch syndrome, and the radiation therapy guidelines were also discussed. In addition, adjuvant therapy in vulvar cancer and the updated of targeted therapy in gynecologic cancer were addressed. For breast cancer, palbociclib in hormone-receptor-positive advanced disease, oncotype DX Recurrence Score in low-risk patients, regional nodal irradiation to internal mammary, supraclavicular, and axillary lymph nodes, and cavity shave margins were summarized as the last topics covered in this review.

  13. Recent advances in the medical treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vorobiof, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the systemic therapy of breast cancer (early and advanced) has changed considerably. For the past 40-50 years, and since the discovery and further therapeutic use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, breast cancer treatment has become the model for the development and success of tailored medical treatment. Much still needs to be done in improving outcomes for all patients with breast cancer, and especially for those who have advanced breast cancer, a challenging area for medical oncologists. Ongoing international clinical trials are currently evaluating new therapeutic approaches and identifying specific biological subsets that could determine a patient's ability to respond to particular chemotherapeutic drugs.

  14. Improving management of patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drudge-Coates, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Development of bone metastases in patients with advanced cancer is associated with skeletal-related events (SREs) such as pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, the requirement for surgery or palliative radiotherapy to bone, and hypercalcemia of malignancy. Skeletal morbidity may reduce patient mobility, limit functional independence, and impair quality of life (QOL). Proactive management of new or worsening bone pain or motor impairment is crucial because of the potential for rapid progression of symptoms. Administration of bisphosphonate therapy as a monthly infusion to patients with bone metastases prevents or delays the onset and reduces the frequency of SREs and provides clinically meaningful improvements in bone pain and QOL. In addition to administration of therapy, the monthly infusion visit allows a dedicated team of healthcare professionals to regularly assess SREs, response to therapy, adverse events (AEs), QOL, and adherence to oral medications and supplements. The continuity of care that occurs during the monthly infusion visit provides oncology nurses with an opportunity to educate patients about effective strategies to manage SREs and AEs. In addition, regular interaction provides oncology nurses with an opportunity to recognize and proactively address subtle changes in the patients’ medical condition. Using a multidisciplinary medical team also eliminates barriers between the various healthcare professionals involved in patient management. Consequently, the monthly infusion visit can result in effective patient management and improved clinical outcomes in patients with malignant bone disease. PMID:21206517

  15. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer) cells form in the tissues of the pancreas. The pancreas is a gland about 6 inches ... spleen , and bile ducts . Tests that examine the pancreas are used to detect (find), diagnose, and stage ...

  16. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  17. Crizotinib for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III clinical trial that compared crizotinib versus chemotherapy in previously treated patients with advanced lung cancer whose tumors have an EML4-ALK fusion gene.

  18. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  19. Blocking DNA Repair in Advanced BRCA-Mutated Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cancer and confirmed BRCA mutations who have not previously been treated with a PARP inhibitor will be given BMN 673 by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles.

  20. Combination Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Adding the drug everolimus (Afinitor®) to exemestane helped postmenopausal women whose advanced breast cancer had stopped responding to hormonal therapy live about 4 months longer without the disease progressing than women who received exemestane alone.

  1. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Pancreas: Mystery and Facts.

    PubMed

    Raghavapuram, Saikiran; Vaid, Arjun; Rego, Rayburn F

    2015-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is very rare as pancreas does not have any squamous cells. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature so far. We describe such a case where in the patient presented with painless jaundice. CT and EUS confirmed the pancreatic mass biopsy of which showed squamous cell cancer.

  2. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2014.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Lee, Kyung Hun; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Jae Weon

    2015-04-01

    In 2014, 9 topics were selected as major advances in clinical research for gynecologic oncology: 2 each in cervical and corpus cancer, 4 in ovarian cancer, and 1 in breast cancer. For cervical cancer, several therapeutic agents showed viable antitumor clinical response in recurrent and metastatic disease: bevacizumab, cediranib, and immunotherapies including human papillomavirus (HPV)-tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and Z-100. The HPV test received FDA approval as the primary screening tool of cervical cancer in women aged 25 and older, based on the results of the ATHENA trial, which suggested that the HPV test was a more sensitive and efficient strategy for cervical cancer screening than methods based solely on cytology. For corpus cancers, results of a phase III Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) 249 study of early-stage endometrial cancer with high-intermediate risk factors are followed by the controversial topic of uterine power morcellation in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. Promising results of phase II studies regarding the effectiveness of olaparib in various ovarian cancer settings are summarized. After a brief review of results from a phase III study on pazopanib maintenance therapy in advanced ovarian cancer, 2 outstanding 2014 ASCO presentations cover the topic of using molecular subtypes in predicting response to bevacizumab. A review of the use of opportunistic bilateral salpingectomy as an ovarian cancer preventive strategy in the general population is presented. Two remarkable studies that discussed the effectiveness of adjuvant ovarian suppression in premenopausal early breast cancer have been selected as the last topics covered in this review.

  3. Biliopancreatic fistula and abscess formation in the bursa omentalis associated with intraductal papillary mucinous cancer of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Hideki; Koneri, Kenji; Honda, Kei; Murakami, Makoto; Hirono, Yasuo; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Goi, Takanori; Iida, Atsushi; Katayama, Kanji; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2009-10-01

    We describe an unusual case of biliopancreatic fistula, free perforation, and subsequent abscess formation within the lesser peritoneal sac associated with intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma (IPMC). A 71-year-old man presented with general fatigue and loss of appetite that had persisted for 1 month. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed findings consistent with an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas, accompanied by abscess formation in the bursa omentalis. Gastrointestinal fiberscopy revealed a swollen papilla of Vater expanded by sticky mucus, and a communication between the pancreatic duct and bile duct was demonstrated by the injection of indigo carmine solution into the pancreatic duct. Percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD) was performed on the day of admission. After this procedure, the patient was managed for 1 month and supported nutritionally with glycemic control for diabetes mellitus. After admission, the patient had an episode of obstructive jaundice that was treated by retrograde biliary drainage. Pancreaticoduodenectomy with lymph node dissection was then performed. Pathological examination revealed IPMN with patchy, scattered carcinoma of the pancreatic head and uncinate process with the formation of a biliopancreatic fistula. Bile duct epithelium in the area of the biliopancreatic fistula demonstrated atypical papillary epithelium suggestive of tumor invasion.

  4. Ulex Europaeus-I: a marker for differentiation of (pre)cancerous lesions induced in the rat pancreas by azaserine.

    PubMed

    Takiyama, Y; Woutersen, R A; Pour, P M

    1988-11-01

    The binding patterns of the lectin Ulex Europaeus-I (UEA-I) to pancreatic cells of Wistar rats from TNO, in azaserine-induced acinar cell lesions, was examined by peroxidase-conjugated UEA-I. In the normal rat, acinar cells showed this lectin binding to luminal and intracytoplasmic cell membranes. Four different types of acinar cell nodules could be distinguished in this rat treated with azaserine. Acinar cell lesions, types 1-3, showed stronger lectin binding than was seen in normal tissue, whereas in type 4 lesions acinar cells showed similar or weaker binding than did the normal cells. In type 1 lesions, UEA-I binding was restricted to the luminal and intracytoplasmic cell membranes. Strong basolateral cell membrane binding not seen in the normal and type 1 or type 4 lesions was characteristic for type 2 lesions. Type 3 lesions were considered as the intermediate between type 1 and type 2. Comparison of histocytologic and UEA-I binding patterns demonstrated that type 1 lesions correspond to 'acidophilic nodules', type 2 to 'well- to moderately differentiated carcinoma', type 3 to 'in situ carcinoma' and type 4 to 'basophilic nodules'. Based on this classification, all 'nodules within nodules' observed in the pancreases of azaserine-treated rats were of malignant types. The present study indicates that UEA-I binding is a useful marker to differentiate between the benign and malignant lesions induced in rat pancreas by azaserine.

  5. Chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer: an overview of randomised clinical trials. Advanced Ovarian Cancer Trialists Group.

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To consider the role of platinum and the relative merits of single agent and combination chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer. DESIGN--Formal quantitative overview using updated individual patient data from all available randomised trials (published and unpublished). SUBJECTS--8139 patients (6408 deaths) included in 45 different trials. RESULTS--No firm conclusions could be reached. Nevertheless, the results suggest that in terms of survival immediate platinum based treatment was better than non-platinum regimens (overall relative risk 0.93; 95% confidence interval 0.83 to 1.05); platinum in combination was better than single agent platinum when used in the same dose (overall relative risk 0.85; 0.72 to 1.00); and cisplatin and carboplatin were equally effective (overall relative risk 1.05; 0.94 to 1.18). CONCLUSIONS--In the past, randomised clinical trials of chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer have been much too small to detect the degree of benefit which this overview suggests is realistic for currently available chemotherapeutic regimens. Hence a new trial comparing cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (CAP) with carboplatin has been launched and plans to accrue 2000 patients. PMID:1834291

  6. Synthetic Lethality as a Targeted Approach to Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    target for therapy of prostate cancer , but approaches aimed at Ras itself, or its critical signaling pathways, which are required in normal tissues...Impact: Current therapies for prostate cancer are inadequate, and aberrant activation of Ras or Ras pathways are common. A novel therapeutic modality...to Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Douglas V. Faller, PhD, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Trustees of Boston University

  7. Sipuleucel-T for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, Mark W

    2012-06-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response to prostate cancer that prolongs the overall survival of men with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The clinical development program and key efficacy, safety, and immune response findings from the phase III studies are presented. The integration of sipuleucel-T into the treatment paradigm of advanced prostate cancer and future directions for research are discussed.

  8. Drug discovery in advanced prostate cancer: translating biology into therapy.

    PubMed

    Yap, Timothy A; Smith, Alan D; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Workman, Paul; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-10-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is associated with a poor prognosis and poses considerable therapeutic challenges. Recent genetic and technological advances have provided insights into prostate cancer biology and have enabled the identification of novel drug targets and potent molecularly targeted therapeutics for this disease. In this article, we review recent advances in prostate cancer target identification for drug discovery and discuss their promise and associated challenges. We review the evolving therapeutic landscape of CRPC and discuss issues associated with precision medicine as well as challenges encountered with immunotherapy for this disease. Finally, we envision the future management of CRPC, highlighting the use of circulating biomarkers and modern clinical trial designs.

  9. Advances in the Management of Biliary Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ciombor, Kristen Keon; Goff, Laura Williams

    2013-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTC), though uncommon, are highly fatal malignancies, and current treatments fail to cure or control the majority of tumors. Given the complexity of the anatomy and often aggressive nature of the disease, multidisciplinary treatment, including palliation, is often required. However, systemic therapy with cytotoxics and/or targeted agents are routinely the mainstay of treatment for patients with advanced biliary tract cancers, and new targets and agents provide hope for this disease. This article focuses on recent advances in the management of biliary tract cancers, with a special focus on the molecular basis for current therapeutic investigation in this disease. PMID:23416860

  10. Pyroxamide in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Precancerous Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Advances of Cancer Therapy by Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Wang, Yiqing; Chen, Zhuo Georgia

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in nanotechnology offer researchers opportunities to significantly transform cancer therapeutics. This technology has enabled the manipulation of the biological and physicochemical properties of nanomaterials to facilitate more efficient drug targeting and delivery. Clinical investigations suggest that therapeutic nanoparticles can enhance efficacy and reduced side effects compared with conventional cancer therapeutic drugs. Encouraged by rapid and promising progress in cancer nanotechnology, researchers continue to develop novel and efficacious nanoparticles for drug delivery. The use of therapeutic nanoparticles as unique drug delivery systems will be a significant addition to current cancer therapeutics. PMID:19688065

  12. Localization of thymidine phosphorylase in advanced gastric and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiya; Okamoto, Ken; Akimori, Toyokazu; Tochika, Naoshige; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Sugimoto, Takeki; Araki, Keijiro

    2004-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is known to be more concentrated in human cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue based on findings using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry. However, the ultrastructural localization of TP in cancer tissues has not previously been demonstrated. We investigated the localization of TP in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer tissue by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Between April 1997 and May 2000, we obtained surgically resected specimens from 42, 46, and 36 cases of advanced gastric, colon, and rectal cancer, respectively. ELISA demonstrated that the TP level was higher in cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue. Immunohistochemically, cancer cells were positive for the enzyme in some cases. However, in a number of cases immunopositive inflammatory cells were also present in cancerous tissues. At the electron microscope level, TP was diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm of cancer cells and in the mitochondria of the neutrophil in gastric cancer tissue. In rectal cancer tissues, cytoplasmic granules in macrophages in cancer tissues were immunoreactive for the TP. These findings suggest that TP is produced by macrophages and exists in neutrophils and cancer cells.

  13. Advancing Breast Cancer Survivorship among African American Women

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Steven S.; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary S.; Smith, Selina A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Advances have occurred in breast cancer survivorship but, for many African American women, challenges and gaps in relevant information remain. Methods This article identifies opportunities to address disparities in breast cancer survival and quality of life, and thereby to increase breast cancer survivorship among African American women. Results For breast cancer survivors, common side effects, lasting for long periods after cancer treatment, include fatigue, loss of strength, difficulty sleeping, and sexual dysfunction. For addressing physical and mental health concerns, a variety of interventions have been evaluated, including exercise and weight training, dietary interventions, yoga and mindfulness-based stress reduction, and support groups or group therapy. Obesity has been associated with breast cancer recurrence and poorer survival. Relative to white survivors, African American breast cancer survivors are more likely to be obese and less likely to engage in physical activity, although exercise improves overall quality of life and cancer-related fatigue. Considerable information exists about the effectiveness of such interventions for alleviating distress and improving quality of life among breast cancer survivors, but few studies have focused specifically on African American women with a breast cancer diagnosis. Studies have identified a number of personal factors that are associated with resilience, increased quality of life, and positive adaptation to a breast cancer diagnosis. Conclusions There is a need for a better understanding of breast cancer survivorship among African American women. Additional evaluations of interventions for improving the quality of life and survival of African American breast cancer survivors are desirable. PMID:26303657

  14. HR-MAS MRS of the pancreas reveals reduced lipid and elevated lactate and taurine associated with early pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Alan S; Lodi, Alessia; Rivera, Lee B; Izquierdo-Garcia, Jose L; Firpo, Matthew A; Mulvihill, Sean J; Tempero, Margaret A; Bergers, Gabriele; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2014-11-01

    The prognosis for patients with pancreatic cancer is extremely poor, as evidenced by the disease's five-year survival rate of ~5%. New approaches are therefore urgently needed to improve detection, treatment, and monitoring of pancreatic cancer. MRS-detectable metabolic changes provide useful biomarkers for tumor detection and response-monitoring in other cancers. The goal of this study was to identify MRS-detectable biomarkers of pancreatic cancer that could enhance currently available imaging approaches. We used (1) H high-resolution magic angle spinning MRS to probe metabolite levels in pancreatic tissue samples from mouse models and patients. In mice, the levels of lipids dropped significantly in pancreata with lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, in pancreata with pre-cancerous metaplasia (4 week old p48-Cre;LSL-Kras(G12D) mice), and in pancreata with pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, which precedes invasive pancreatic cancer (8 week old p48-Cre LSL-Kras(G12D) mice), to 26 ± 19% (p = 0.03), 19 ± 16% (p = 0.04), and 26 ± 10% (p = 0.05) of controls, respectively. Lactate and taurine remained unchanged in inflammation and in pre-cancerous metaplasia but increased significantly in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to 266 ± 61% (p = 0.0001) and 999 ± 174% (p < 0.00001) of controls, respectively. Importantly, analysis of patient biopsies was consistent with the mouse findings. Lipids dropped in pancreatitis and in invasive cancer biopsies to 29 ± 15% (p = 0.01) and 26 ± 38% (p = 0.02) of normal tissue. In addition, lactate and taurine levels remained unchanged in inflammation but rose in tumor samples to 244 ± 155% (p = 0.02) and 188 ± 67% (p = 0.02), respectively, compared with normal tissue. Based on these findings, we propose that a drop in lipid levels could serve to inform on pancreatitis and cancer-associated inflammation, whereas elevated lactate and taurine could serve to identify the presence of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and

  15. [Tuberculosis of the pancreas--a clinical rarity].

    PubMed

    Heitmann, P; Kratsch, B; Löschke, S; Klempa, I

    2001-06-01

    Pancreas tuberculosis is a rare diagnosis and is usually associated with miliary spread. Only a few cases are reported in the literature. A female patient was admitted with a history of uncharacteristic abdominal pain, weight loss, weakness, and intermittent fever. CA 19-9 was increased and the CT scan showed an irregular mass in the pancreatic tail. Suspecting the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, a pancreas tail resection with splenectomy was performed. The histological examination showed pancreas tuberculosis. Mimicking pancreatic cancer or presenting with acute/chronic pancreatitis or obstructive jaundice, the diagnosis of pancreas tuberculosis is very difficult to make and is usually established after surgical treatment. Although pancreas tuberculosis is rare, it should be considered when evaluating a pancreatic mass.

  16. Current advances in T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingjun; Yin, Bingnan; Wang, Helen Y; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide; due to the lack of ideal cancer biomarkers for early detection or diagnosis, most patients present with late-stage disease at the time of diagnosis, thus limiting the potential for successful treatment. Traditional cancer treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, have demonstrated very limited efficacy for patients with late-stage disease. Therefore, innovative and effective cancer treatments are urgently needed for cancer patients with late-stage and refractory disease. Cancer immunotherapy, particularly adoptive cell transfer, has shown great promise in the treatment of patients with late-stage disease, including those who are refractory to standard therapies. In this review, we will highlight recent advances and discuss future directions in adoptive cell transfer based cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Recent advances in lung cancer biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of carcinogenesis, especially as related to lung cancers. Various growth factors and their mutated forms as oncogenes are discussed with respect to gene location and their role in the oncogenic process. Finally the data is related to lung cancer induction in uranium miners and exposure to radon.

  18. Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Advances in Immunotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    New treatments for lung cancer and aspects of joining a clinical trial are discussed in this 30-minute Facebook Live event, hosted by NCI’s Dr. Shakun Malik, head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, and Janet Freeman-Daily, lung cancer patient activist and founding member of #LCSM.

  19. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  20. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  1. Assessment of pancreas cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanoss, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Pancreatic islets were obtained from guinea pig pancreas by the collagenase method and kept alive in tissue culture prior to further studies. Pancreas cell morphology was studied by standard histochemical techniques using light microscopy. Preparative vertical electrophoresis-levitation of dispersed fetal guinea pig pancreas cells was conducted in phosphate buffer containing a heavy water (D20) gradient which does not cause clumping of cells or alter the osmolarity of the buffers. The faster migrating fractions tended to be enriched in beta-cell content. Alpha and delta cells were found to some degree in most fractions. A histogram showing the cell count distribution is included.

  2. [Evaluation of American Joint Commission on Cancer(8(th) edition) and Japanese Pancreas Society(7(th) edition)changes for T and N staging in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Yang, Y M

    2017-01-01

    Accurate staging for cancer is the basis for clinical practice, individualized treatment strategy, and prognosis determination.Recently, the T and N staging systems for pancreatic adenocarcinoma were updated by both American Joint Commission on Cancer(AJCC)8(th) edition and Japanese Pancreas Society 7(th) edition, in which more objective parameters were applied.When a large number of patients within the test set were staged, AJCC 8(th) edition has showed more reproducible and helped to predict the patient prognosis more accurately.

  3. Conceptualizing prognostic awareness in advanced cancer: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, Allison J; Kolva, Elissa A; Kulikowski, Julia R; Jacobs, Jordana D; DeRosa, Antonio; Lichtenthal, Wendy G; Olden, Megan E; Rosenfeld, Barry; Breitbart, William

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review synthesizes the complex literature on prognostic awareness in cancer. A total of 37 studies examining cancer patients’ understanding of their prognosis were included. Prognostic awareness definitions and assessment methods were inconsistent across studies. A surprisingly high percentage of patients (up to 75%) were unaware of their poor prognosis, and in several studies, even their cancer diagnosis (up to 96%), particularly in studies conducted outside of North America. This review highlights surprisingly low rates of prognostic awareness in patients with advanced cancer as well as discrepancies in prognostic awareness assessment, suggesting the need for empirically validated measures of prognostic awareness. PMID:24157936

  4. Conceptualizing prognostic awareness in advanced cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Applebaum, Allison J; Kolva, Elissa A; Kulikowski, Julia R; Jacobs, Jordana D; DeRosa, Antonio; Lichtenthal, Wendy G; Olden, Megan E; Rosenfeld, Barry; Breitbart, William

    2014-09-01

    This systematic review synthesizes the complex literature on prognostic awareness in cancer. A total of 37 studies examining cancer patients' understanding of their prognosis were included. Prognostic awareness definitions and assessment methods were inconsistent across studies. A surprisingly high percentage of patients (up to 75%) were unaware of their poor prognosis, and in several studies, even their cancer diagnosis (up to 96%), particularly in studies conducted outside of North America. This review highlights surprisingly low rates of prognostic awareness in patients with advanced cancer as well as discrepancies in prognostic awareness assessment, suggesting the need for empirically validated measures of prognostic awareness.

  5. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  6. Colorectal, prostate and pancreas Human cancers targeted bioassay-guided isolations and characterization of chemical constituents from Tephrosia apollinea.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Loiy Elsir A; Iqbal, Muhammad Adnan; Dahham, Saad S; Tabana, Yasser M; Ahamed, Mohamed B Khadeer; Majid, Amin M S Abdul

    2016-09-26

    Cancer is characterized by uncontrolled cell division caused by dysregulation of cell proliferation. Therefore, agents that impair cancer cell proliferation could have potential therapeutic value. Higher plants are considered to be a good source of anticancer agents, and several clinically tested chemotherapeutic agents have been isolated from plants or derived from constituents of plant origin. In the present study, a prenylated flavone (isoglabratephrin) was isolated from aerial parts of Tephrosia apollinea using a bioassay-guided technique. Chemical structure of the isolated compound was elucidated using spectroscopic techniques (NMR, IR, and LC-MC), elemental analysis and confirmed by using single crystal X-ray analysis. The antiproliferative effect of isoglabratephrin was tested using three human cancer cell lines (prostate (PC3), pancreatic (PANC-1), and colon (HCT-116) and one normal cell line (human fibroblast). Isoglabratephrin displayed selective inhibitory activity against proliferation of PC3 and PANC-1 cells with median inhibitory concentration values of 20.4 and 26.6 μg/ml, respectively. Isoglabratephrin demonstrated pro-apoptotic features, as it induced chromatin dissolution, nuclear condensation, and fragmentation. It also disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential in the treated cancer cells. Thus, isoglabratephrin could be a new lead to treat human prostate (PC3) and pancreatic (PANC-1) malignancies.

  7. Vitamin D and pancreas: the role of sunshine vitamin in the pathogenesis of Diabetes Mellitus and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Barbara; Grant, William B; Casa, Silvia Della; Orio, Francesco; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Colao, Annamaria; Sarno, Gerardo; Muscogiuri, Giovanna

    2016-03-31

    Increasing evidence suggests that vitamin D exerts multiple effects beyond bone and calcium metabolism. Vitamin D seems to play a role in pancreatic disease, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as pancreatic cancer. Vitamin D's immune-modulatory action suggests that it could help prevent type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, vitamin D may influence β-cell function, insulin sensitivity, and systematic inflammation-all characteristic pathways of that disease. Data from observational studies correlated vitamin D deficiency with risk of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Prospective and ecological studies of pancreatic cancer incidence generally support a beneficial effect of higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration as well as inverse correlations between UVB dose or exposure and incidence and/or mortality rate of pancreatic cancer. This review discusses the literature regarding vitamin D's role in risk of diabetes and pancreatic cancer. The results to date generally satisfy Hill's criteria for causality regarding vitamin D and incidence of these pancreatic diseases. However, large randomized, blinded, prospective studies are required to more fully evaluate the potential therapeutic role of vitamin D in preventing pancreatic diseases.

  8. Advanced gastric cancer: Current treatment landscape and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Digklia, Antonia; Wagner, Anna Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer currently ranks fourth in cancer-related mortality worldwide. In the western world, it is most often diagnosed at an advanced stage, after becoming metastatic at distant sites. Patients with advanced disease (locally advanced or metastatic) have a somber prognosis, with a median overall survival of 10-12 mo, and palliative chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. In recent years, novel approaches using inhibition of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have demonstrated significant improvements in progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in first-line treatment of patients with overexpression of HER2. In addition, both second-line chemotherapy and treatment with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-inhibitor ramucirumab demonstrated significant benefits in terms of overall survival, compared with best supportive care, in randomized studies. Moreover, ramucirumab in combination with chemotherapy demonstrated further significant benefits in terms of progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in second-line treatment for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. A recently published molecular classification of gastric cancer is expected to improve patient stratification and selection for clinical trials and provide a roadmap for future drug development. Nevertheless, despite these developments the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer remains poor. In this review we discuss current standards of care and outline major topics of drug development in gastric cancer. PMID:26937129

  9. Sipuleucel-T: immunotherapy for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2011-05-03

    Prostate cancer continues to be one of the most serious afflictions of men of advanced age, remaining the most commonly diagnosed and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men. The treatment options for patients with incurable metastatic, castrate-resistant disease have long focused on various chemotherapeutic approaches, which provide a slight survival benefit while being associated with potentially significant side effects. However, the recent approval of sipuleucel-T has given patients with advanced disease an additional treatment option that has demonstrated benefit without the side effects associated with chemotherapy. Sipuleucel-T is an antigen-presenting cell-based active immunotherapy that utilizes a patient's own immune cells, presumably to activate an antigen-specific immune response against tumor cells. This review focuses on the development and implementation of sipuleucel-T as a therapy for prostate cancer. Specifically, we present some of the issues associated with the management of advanced prostate cancer, the research and development that led to the approval of sipuleucel-T, how the approval of sipuleucel-T could change the clinical management of prostate cancer, and current and future areas of investigation that are being pursued with regard to sipuleucel-T and other treatments for advanced prostate cancer.

  10. Deconstructing Pancreas Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Cecil M.; Goodyer, William R.

    2012-01-01

    The relentless nature and increasing prevalence of human pancreatic diseases, in particular, diabetes mellitus and adenocarcinoma, has motivated further understanding of pancreas organogenesis. The pancreas is a multifunctional organ whose epithelial cells govern a diversity of physiologically vital endocrine and exocrine functions. The mechanisms governing the birth, differentiation, morphogenesis, growth, maturation, and maintenance of the endocrine and exocrine components in the pancreas have been discovered recently with increasing tempo. This includes recent studies unveiling mechanisms permitting unexpected flexibility in the developmental potential of immature and mature pancreatic cell subsets, including the ability to interconvert fates. In this article, we describe how classical cell biology, genetic analysis, lineage tracing, and embryological investigations are being complemented by powerful modern methods including epigenetic analysis, time-lapse imaging, and flow cytometry-based cell purification to dissect fundamental processes of pancreas development. PMID:22587935

  11. Radium-223 for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a phase III trial that compared radium-223 dichloride plus the best standard of care versus a placebo plus the best standard of care in men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  12. Recent advances in personalized lung cancer medicine

    PubMed Central

    Okimoto, Ross A; Bivona, Trever G

    2014-01-01

    The identification of molecular subtypes of non-small-cell lung cancer has transformed the clinical management of this disease. This is best exemplified by the clinical success of targeting the EGFR or ALK with tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the front-line setting. Our ability to further improve patient outcomes with biomarker-based targeted therapies will depend on a more comprehensive genetic platform that can rationally interrogate the cancer genome of an individual patient. Novel technologies, including multiplex genotyping and next-generation sequencing are rapidly evolving and will soon challenge the oncologist with a wealth of genetic information for each patient. Although there are many barriers to overcome, the integration of these genetic platforms into clinical care has the potential to transform the management of lung cancer through improved molecular categorization, patient stratification, and drug development, thereby, improving clinical outcomes through personalized lung cancer medicine. PMID:25506379

  13. Partial annular pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Gunjan; Mittal, Amit; Singal, Rikki; Singal, Samita

    2016-01-01

    Annular pancreas is a developmental anomaly that can be associated with other conditions such as Down syndrome, duodenal atresia, and Hirschsprung disease. A band of pancreatic tissue, in continuity with the pancreatic head, completely or incompletely encircles the descending duodenum, sometimes assuming a “crocodile jaw” configuration. We present the case of an adult who presented with epigastric pain and vomiting and was found to have annular pancreas. PMID:27695176

  14. [Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of pancreas].

    PubMed

    Davies, Nestor R; Kasparian, Andres C; Viotto, Lucas E; Moreno, Walter A; Gramática, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas represents around 6-36% of mucinous cystic neoplasm. The lesions are usually found in the body and tail of the pancreas and are generally solitary with a size range of 6-36 cm. We present a clinical case of a 63 years old patient with abdominal pain and weight loss. We used radiographic imaging studies. It was treated with surgery by distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and transverse colectomy. Patient was not post operative complications.

  15. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  16. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer) cells form in the tissues of the pancreas. The pancreas is a gland about 6 inches ... spleen , and bile ducts . Tests that examine the pancreas are used to detect (find), diagnose, and stage ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer) cells form in the tissues of the pancreas. The pancreas is a gland about 6 inches ... spleen , and bile ducts . Tests that examine the pancreas are used to detect (find), diagnose, and stage ...

  18. Neoplasms of the Stomach, Liver & Pancreas: Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment among High-Risk Populations | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Agenda - Day 1, September 18, 2015 08:00 am - Registration 08:30 am - Welcome remarks and overview of the Conference Dr. Leslie Ford (NCI) – 5 min Dr. Edgar Colon (RCM and UPRCCC) - 5 min Luz Maria Rodriguez – Conference objectives & structure  Global Cancer Burden: An Overview and State of the Problem Moderators: Dr. Luz Maria Rodriguez and Dr. Victor Jose Carlo (PR Gastroenterology Association) |

  19. Evolving treatment paradigms for locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dorff, Tanya B; Quek, Marcus L; Daneshmand, Siamak; Pinski, Jacek

    2006-11-01

    While men with early stage prostate cancer typically enjoy long-term survival after definitive management, for those who present with locally advanced or metastatic disease, survival is compromised. Multimodality therapy can prolong survival in these patients, with state-of-the-art options including intensity-modulated radiation or brachytherapy in conjunction with androgen ablation, adjuvant androgen ablation and/or chemotherapy with radical retropubic prostatectomy. In addition, novel biological therapies are being explored to target the unique molecular changes in prostate cancer cells and their interactions with the microenvironment. With these advances the outlook will undoubtedly improve, even for patients presenting with advanced disease. Careful application of these emerging therapies to a select group of prostate cancer patients most likely to obtain benefit from them is the challenge for urologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists for the future.

  20. Nanovector-based therapies in advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chang-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Systemic therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer has been largely disappointing owing to the unfavorable pharmacokinetic profile and poor penetration of current chemotherapeutic agents ,as well as the fragile patient population with compromised tolerance to toxic chemotherapies. Nanovectors can provide passive drug delivery through abnormal tumor neo-vasculature microanatomy or active targeting via binding to receptors or macromolecules associated with the tumor. In such a manner, nanovector-based therapy may not only modulate the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic index of chemotherapeutic agents but also provide new treatment options in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. In this article, we present the rationale and currently available clinical results of nanovector-based therapies to highlight the potential use of this class of agent in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:22811849

  1. Photodynamic Cancer Therapy—Recent Advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2011-09-01

    The basic principle of the photodynamic effect was discovered over a hundred years ago leading to the pioneering work on PDT in Europe. It was only during the 1980s, however, when "photoradiation therapy" was investigated as a possible treatment modality for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemotherapeutic process which requires the use of a photosensitizer (PS) that, upon entry into a cancer cell is targeted by laser irradiation to initiate a series of events that contribute to cell death. PSs are light-sensitive dyes activated by a light source at a specific wavelength and can be classified as first or second generation PSs based on its origin and synthetic pathway. The principle of PS activation lies in a photochemical reaction resulting from excitation of the PS producing singlet oxygen which in turn reacts and damages cell organelles and biomolecules required for cell function and ultimately leading to cell destruction. Several first and second generation PSs have been studied in several different cancer types in the quest to optimize treatment. PSs including haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), aminolevulinic acid (ALA), chlorins, bacteriochlorins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, pheophorbiedes and purpurins all require selective uptake and retention by cancer cells prior to activation by a light source and subsequent cell death induction. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the fluorescence effect exhibited by PSs upon irradiation and is often used concurrently with PDT to detect and locate tumours. Both laser and light emitting diodes (LED) have been used for PDT depending on the location of the tumour. Internal cancers more often require the use of laser light delivery using fibre optics as delivery system while external PDT often make use of LEDs. Normal cells have a lower uptake of the PS in comparison to tumour cells, however the acute cytotoxic effect of the compound on the recovery rate of normal cells is not known. Subcellular

  2. Recent advances in the medical treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vorobiof, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the systemic therapy of breast cancer (early and advanced) has changed considerably. For the past 40–50 years, and since the discovery and further therapeutic use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, breast cancer treatment has become the model for the development and success of tailored medical treatment. Much still needs to be done in improving outcomes for all patients with breast cancer, and especially for those who have advanced breast cancer, a challenging area for medical oncologists. Ongoing international clinical trials are currently evaluating new therapeutic approaches and identifying specific biological subsets that could determine a patient’s ability to respond to particular chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27990275

  3. Advances in molecular imaging for breast cancer detection and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Advances in our ability to assay molecular processes, including gene expression, protein expression, and molecular and cellular biochemistry, have fueled advances in our understanding of breast cancer biology and have led to the identification of new treatments for patients with breast cancer. The ability to measure biologic processes without perturbing them in vivo allows the opportunity to better characterize tumor biology and to assess how biologic and cytotoxic therapies alter critical pathways of tumor response and resistance. By accurately characterizing tumor properties and biologic processes, molecular imaging plays an increasing role in breast cancer science, clinical care in diagnosis and staging, assessment of therapeutic targets, and evaluation of responses to therapies. This review describes the current role and potential of molecular imaging modalities for detection and characterization of breast cancer and focuses primarily on radionuclide-based methods. PMID:22423895

  4. Photodynamic therapy of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (VERTPAC study): final clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, M. T.; Jermyn, M.; Gillams, A.; Mosse, S.; Kent, E.; Bown, S. G.; Hasan, T.; Pogue, B. W.; Pereira, S. P.

    2013-03-01

    We undertook a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) in 15 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Needle placement and laser delivery were technically successful in all patients. Thirteen patients were treated with a single laser fibre. Three treatments were carried out each at 5, 10 and 20 J/cm2; and 5 treatments (4 patients) at 40 J/cm2. A further 2 patients were treated with 2 or 3 laser fibres at 40 J/cm2. Tumour necrosis was measured on CT (computed tomography) by two radiologists 5 days after treatment. There was a clear dosedependent increase in necrosis with a median area of 20 x 16 mm (range 18 x 16 to 35 x 30 mm) at 40 J/cm2. In the 2 patients treated with multiple fibres, necrosis was 40 x 36 mm and 30 x 28 mm, respectively. There were no early complications in patients treated with a single fibre. Both patients treated with multiple fibres had evidence on CT of inflammatory change occurring anterior to the pancreas but without clinical deterioration. These results suggest that single fibre verteporfin PDT is safe in a clinical setting up to 40J/cm2 and produces a dose-dependent area of pancreatic necrosis.

  5. [Advances in measles virus for cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Duo; Zhao, Zheng-yan

    2015-07-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a novel cancer therapy. Vaccine-attenuated strains of measles virus(MV)is an ideal candidate for oncolytic virotherapy which has an excellent safety record. Vaccine-attenuated MV uses CD46 and Nectin-4 molecule as major entry receptors into cells. Vaccine-attenuated MV can selectively infect and kill a wide variety of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. With the development of molecular cloning, scientists have successfully rescued cDNA of vaccine-attenuated MV and increased its oncolytic efficiency with molecular engineering techniques. Phase I clinical trials of virotherapy for ovarian cancer and multiple myeloma with vaccine-attenuated MV are underway. The preliminary results indicate the promising antitumor potential of vaccine-attenuated MV.

  6. Advancement in treatment and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Conventional imaging modalities show limited accuracy for reliable assessment of the tumor. Recent researches suggest that molecular imaging techniques with tracers provide more biologically relevant information and are benefit for the diagnosis of the cancer. In addition, radiopharmaceuticals also play more important roles in treatment of the disease. This review summaries the advancement of the radiolabeled compounds in the theranostics of PC. PMID:26909131

  7. Emerging challenges of advanced squamous cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Chen; Zhou, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC) is an aggressive type of lung cancer and most are diagnosed at advanced stage. Patients with advanced SQCLC tend to be older, current or former smoker, with central type tumour located near large blood vessels and seldom with druggable genetic alternations. Consequently, progress of targeted therapy and antivascular agents available in lung adenocarcinoma could not be duplicated in this subset of patients. The treatment paradigms have long been dominant by cytotoxic agents and posed many therapeutic challenges. Until recent years, immune checkpoint inhibitors, other monoclonal antibodies and afatinib have been approved for treatment of advanced SQCLC, presenting a novel treatment landscape and initiating the era of precision medicine in this subset of patients. This review will summarise the recent treatment progresses in advanced SQCLC with a focus on checkpoint inhibitors of programmed cell death-1 receptor or its ligand, and discuss the emerging challenges in this new era. PMID:28255454

  8. [New advances in hereditary colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Leticia

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most frequent malignancy in both sexes in Spain. Between 20% and 25% of affected individuals have a family history of the disease, and 5% to 6% have a germ mutation, i.e. the disease develops in the context of a hereditary syndrome. The importance of identifying patients with hereditary syndromes predisposing them to colorectal cancer lies in the possibility of applying preventive measures, screening, and more appropriate management of both patients and their families. The present article outlines the most important studies presented at the congress of the American Gastroenterological Association.

  9. New Insight into the Treatment of Advanced Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Arash; Vijayasekaran, Aparna; Guerrero, Marlon A.

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) are treated successfully with surgery and radioactive iodine ablation, yet the treatment of advanced cases is frustrating and largely ineffective. Systemic treatment with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy is basically ineffective in most patients with advanced DTC. However, a better understanding of the genetics and biologic basis of thyroid cancers has generated opportunities for innovative therapeutic modalities, resulting in several clinical trials. We aim to delineate the latest knowledge regarding the biologic characteristics of DTC and to describe the available data related to novel targeted therapies that have demonstrated clinical effectiveness. PMID:23326755

  10. Multipotent pancreas progenitors: Inconclusive but pivotal topic

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of multipotent pancreas progenitors (MPP) should have a significant impact not only on the ontology of the pancreas, but also for the translational research of glucose-responding endocrine β-cells. Deficiency of the latter may lead to the pandemic type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder. An ideal treatment of which would potentially be the replacement of destroyed or failed β-cells, by restoring function of endogenous pancreatic endocrine cells or by transplantation of donor islets or in vitro generated insulin-secreting cells. Thus, considerable research efforts have been devoted to identify MPP candidates in the pre- and post-natal pancreas for the endogenous neogenesis or regeneration of endocrine insulin-secreting cells. In order to advance this inconclusive but critical field, we here review the emerging concepts, recent literature and newest developments of potential MPP and propose measures that would assist its forward progression. PMID:26730269

  11. Progress and challenges of the bioartificial pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Patrick T. J.; Shah, Dishant K.; Garcia, Jacob A.; Bae, Chae Yun; Lim, Dong-Jin; Huiszoon, Ryan C.; Alexander, Grant C.; Jun, Ho-Wook

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation has been validated as a treatment for type 1 diabetes since it maintains consistent and sustained type 1 diabetes reversal. However, one of the major challenges in pancreatic islet transplantation is the body's natural immune response to the implanted islets. Immunosuppressive drug treatment is the most popular immunomodulatory approach for islet graft survival. However, administration of immunosuppressive drugs gives rise to negative side effects, and long-term effects are not clearly understood. A bioartificial pancreas is a therapeutic approach to enable pancreatic islet transplantation without or with minimal immune suppression. The bioartificial pancreas encapsulates the pancreatic islets in a semi-permeable environment which protects islets from the body's immune responses, while allowing the permeation of insulin, oxygen, nutrients, and waste. Many groups have developed various types of the bioartificial pancreas and tested their efficacy in animal models. However, the clinical application of the bioartificial pancreas still requires further investigation. In this review, we discuss several types of bioartificial pancreases and address their advantages and limitations. We also discuss recent advances in bioartificial pancreas applications with microfluidic or micropatterning technology.

  12. Medical Advances and Racial/ethnic Disparities in Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tehranifar, Parisa; Neugut, Alfred I.; Phelan, Jo C.; Link, Bruce G.; Liao, Yuyan; Desai, Manisha; Terry, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although advances in early detection and treatment of cancer improve overall population survival, these advances may not benefit all population groups equally, and may heighten racial/ethnic (R/E) differences in survival. METHODS We identified cancer cases in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, who were ≥ 20 years and diagnosed with one invasive cancer in 1995–1999 (n=580,225). We used 5-year relative survival rates (5Y-RSR) to measure the degree to which mortality from each cancer is amenable to medical interventions (amenability index). We used Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate survival differences between each R/E minority group relative to whites, by the overall amenability index, and three levels of amenability (non-amenable, partly and mostly amenable cancers, corresponding to cancers with 5Y-RSR <40%, 40–69% and ≥ 70%, respectively), adjusting for gender, age, disease stage and county-level poverty concentration. RESULTS As amenability increased, R/E differences in cancer survival increased for African Americans, American Indians/Native Alaskans and Hispanics relative to whites. For example, the hazard rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) for African Americans vs. whites from non-amenable, partly amenable and mostly amenable cancers were 1.05 (1.03, 1.07), 1.38 (1.34,1.41), and 1.41 (1.37, 1.46), respectively. Asians/Pacific Islanders had similar or longer survival relative to whites across amenability levels; however, several subgroups experienced increasingly poorer survival with increasing amenability. CONCLUSIONS Cancer survival disparities for most R/E minority populations widen as cancers become more amenable to medical interventions. Efforts in developing cancer control measures must be coupled with specific strategies for reducing the expected disparities. PMID:19789367

  13. Advances in cancer research: Volume 47

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.; Weinhouse, S.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight chapters. Some of the titles are: Genetic Epidemiology of Familial Aggregation of Cancer; Terminal Transferase in Normal and Leukemic Cells; Malignant Metamorphosis: Developmental Genes as Culprits for Oncogenesis in Xiphophorus; and Transcription Activation by Viral and Cellular Oncogenes.

  14. Current advances in esophageal cancer proteomics.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Norihisa; Kondo, Tadashi

    2015-06-01

    We review the current status of proteomics for esophageal cancer (EC) from a clinician's viewpoint. The ultimate goal of cancer proteomics is the improvement of clinical outcome. The proteome as a functional translation of the genome is a straightforward representation of genomic mechanisms that trigger carcinogenesis. Cancer proteomics has identified the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and tumor progression, detected biomarker candidates for early diagnosis, and provided novel therapeutic targets for personalized treatments. Our review focuses on three major topics in EC proteomics: diagnostics, treatment, and molecular mechanisms. We discuss the major histological differences between EC types, i.e., esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, and evaluate the clinical significance of published proteomics studies, including promising diagnostic biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets, which should be further validated prior to launching clinical trials. Multi-disciplinary collaborations between basic scientists, clinicians, and pathologists should be established for inter-institutional validation. In conclusion, EC proteomics has provided significant results, which after thorough validation, should lead to the development of novel clinical tools and improvement of the clinical outcome for esophageal cancer patients. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics.

  15. Advances in cancer research. Volume 48

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.; Weinhouse, S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the following five selections: Oncotrophoblast Gene Expression: Placental Alkaline Phosphatase; Cellular Events during Hepatocarcinogenesis in Rats and the Questions of Premalignancy; Human Papillomaviruses and Genital Cancer; Herpes Simplex Type 2 Virus and Cervical Neoplasia; and Transforming Genes and Target Cells of Murine Spleen Focus-Forming Viruses.

  16. Integrative clinical genomics of advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Robinson; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Wu, Yi-Mi; Schultz, Nikolaus; Lonigro, Robert J.; Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Montgomery, Bruce; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Pritchard, Colin C; Attard, Gerhardt; Beltran, Himisha; Abida, Wassim M.; Bradley, Robert K.; Vinson, Jake; Cao, Xuhong; Vats, Pankaj; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Hussain, Maha; Feng, Felix Y.; Tomlins, Scott A.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Smith, David C.; Brennan, Christine; Siddiqui, Javed; Mehra, Rohit; Chen, Yu; Rathkopf, Dana E.; Morris, Michael J.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Reuter, Victor E.; Gopalan, Anuradha; Gao, Jianjiong; Loda, Massimo; Lis, Rosina T.; Bowden, Michaela; Balk, Stephen P.; Gaviola, Glenn; Sougnez, Carrie; Gupta, Manaswi; Yu, Evan Y.; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Cheng, Heather H.; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; True, Lawrence D.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Dvinge, Heidi; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Flohr, Penny; Miranda, Susana; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Tunariu, Nina; Mateo, Joaquin; Lopez, Raquel Perez; Demichelis, Francesca; Robinson, Brian D.; Schiffman, Marc A.; Nanus, David M.; Tagawa, Scott T.; Sigaras, Alexandros; Eng, Kenneth W.; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Heath, Elisabeth I.; Scher, Howard I.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Kantoff, Philip; de Bono, Johann S.; Rubin, Mark A.; Nelson, Peter S.; Garraway, Levi A.; Sawyers, Charles L.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Toward development of a precision medicine framework for metastatic, castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), we established a multi-institutional clinical sequencing infrastructure to conduct prospective whole exome and transcriptome sequencing of bone or soft tissue tumor biopsies from a cohort of 150 mCRPC affected individuals. Aberrations of AR, ETS genes, TP53 and PTEN were frequent (40–60% of cases), with TP53 and AR alterations enriched in mCRPC compared to primary prostate cancer. We identified novel genomic alterations in PIK3CA/B, R-spondin, BRAF/RAF1, APC, β-catenin and ZBTB16/PLZF. Aberrations of BRCA2, BRCA1 and ATM were observed at substantially higher frequencies (19.3% overall) than seen in primary prostate cancers. 89% of affected individuals harbored a clinically actionable aberration including 62.7% with aberrations in AR, 65% in other cancer-related genes, and 8% with actionable pathogenic germline alterations. This cohort study provides evidence that clinical sequencing in mCRPC is feasible and could impact treatment decisions in significant numbers of affected individuals. PMID:26000489

  17. Recent Advances in Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sollip

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease that occurs most often in female cancer patients. Early detection can significantly reduce the mortality rate. Microwave breast imaging, which is noninvasive and harmless to human, offers a promising alternative method to mammography. This paper presents a review of recent advances in microwave imaging for breast cancer detection. We conclude by introducing new research on a microwave imaging system with time-domain measurement that achieves short measurement time and low system cost. In the time-domain measurement system, scan time would take less than 1 sec, and it does not require very expensive equipment such as VNA. PMID:28096808

  18. Purinergic signalling in the pancreas in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, G; Novak, I

    2012-05-01

    Pancreatic cells contain specialised stores for ATP. Purinergic receptors (P2 and P1) and ecto-nucleotidases are expressed in both endocrine and exocrine calls, as well as in stromal cells. The pancreas, especially the endocrine cells, were an early target for the actions of ATP. After the historical perspective of purinergic signalling in the pancreas, the focus of this review will be the physiological functions of purinergic signalling in the regulation of both endocrine and exocrine pancreas. Next, we will consider possible interaction between purinergic signalling and other regulatory systems and their relation to nutrient homeostasis and cell survival. The pancreas is an organ exhibiting several serious diseases - cystic fibrosis, pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and diabetes - and some are associated with changes in life-style and are increasing in incidence. There is upcoming evidence for the role of purinergic signalling in the pathophysiology of the pancreas, and the new challenge is to understand how it is integrated with other pathological processes.

  19. Systematic review of the relation between smokeless tobacco and cancer of the pancreas in Europe and North America

    PubMed Central

    Sponsiello-Wang, Zheng; Weitkunat, Rolf; Lee, Peter N

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent reviews claiming smokeless tobacco increases pancreatic cancer risk appear not to have considered all available epidemiological evidence; nor were meta-analyses included. We present a systematic review of studies from North America and Europe, since data are lacking from other continents. Risk is also difficult to quantify elsewhere due to the various products, compositions and usage practices involved. Methods Epidemiological studies were identified that related pancreatic cancer to use of snuff, chewing tobacco or unspecified smokeless tobacco. Study details and effect estimates (relative risks or odds ratios) were extracted, and combined by meta-analyses. Results Nine North American and two Scandinavian studies were identified. Reporting was limited in four studies, so only seven were included in meta-analyses, some providing results for never smokers, some for the overall population of smokers and non-smokers, and some for both. Giving preference to study-specific estimates for the overall population, if available, and for never smokers otherwise, the random-effects estimate for ever smokeless tobacco use was 1.03 (95% confidence interval 0.71–1.49) based on heterogeneous estimates from seven studies. The estimate varied little by continent, study type, or type of smokeless tobacco. Giving preference to estimates for never smokers, if available, and overall population estimates otherwise, the estimate was 1.14 (0.67–1.93), again based on heterogeneous estimates. Estimates varied (p = 0.014) between cohort studies (1.75, 1.20–2.54) and case-control studies (0.84, 0.36–1.97). The value for cohort studies derived mainly from one study, which reported an increase for never smokers (2.0, 1.2–3.3), but not overall (0.9, 0.7–1.2). This study also contributed to increases seen for snuff use and for European studies, significant only in fixed-effect analyses. The studies have various weaknesses, including few exposed cases, reliance in

  20. Ixabepilone and Liposomal Doxorubicin in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  1. Recent advances and future challenges in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Namiko; Tamada, Koji; Tamura, Hideto

    Remarkable advances have been made in cancer immunotherapy. Recent treatment strategies, especially chimeric antigen receptor-T (CAR-T) cell therapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors, reportedly achieve higher objective responses and better survival rates than previous immunotherapies for patients with treatment-resistant malignancies, creating a paradigm shift in cancer treatment. Several clinical trials of cancer immunotherapy for patients with various malignancies are ongoing. However, those with certain malignancies, such as low-immunogenic cancers, cannot be successfully treated with T-cell immunotherapy, and subsets of immunotherapy-treated patients relapse, meaning that more effective immunotherapeutic strategies are needed for such patients. Furthermore, the safety, convenience, and cost of cancer immunotherapy need to be improved in the near future. Herein, we discuss recent advances and future challenges in cancer immunotherapy, i.e., the identification of neoantigens for the development of individualized immunotherapies, the development of new CAR-T cell therapies, including so-called armored CAR-T cells that can induce greater clinical effects and thereby achieve longer survival, the development of off-the-shelf treatment regimens using non-self cells or cell lines, and effective cancer immunotherapy combinations.

  2. Recent advances in the field of anti-cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Henrique; Kwok, Hang Fai

    2015-01-01

    Background The main goal of anti-cancer therapy is to specifically inhibit the malignant activity of cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. As such, for every proposed therapy, it is important to keep in mind the therapeutic index — the ratio of the toxic dose over the therapeutic dose. The use of immunotherapy has allowed a means to both specifically block protein–protein interaction and deliver cytotoxic events to a tumor-specific antigen. Review scope It is the objective of this review to give an overview on current immunotherapy treatment for cancers using monoclonal antibodies. We demonstrate three exciting targets for immunotherapy, TNF-α Converting Enzyme (TACE), Cathepsin S and Urokinase Plasmogen Activator and go over the advances made with one of the most used monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy, Rituximab; as well as Herceptin, which is used for breast cancer therapy. Furthermore, we touch on other venues of immunotherapy, such as adaptive cell transfer, the use of nucleic acids and the use of dendritic cells. Finally, we summarize some ongoing studies that spell tentative advancements for anti-cancer immunotherapy. General significance Immunotherapy is at the forefront of anti-cancer therapies, allying both a high degree of specificity to general high effectiveness and fewer side-effects. PMID:26673349

  3. Chinese Herbal Formulation PHY906 and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage B Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  4. Prostate cancer: 9. Treatment of advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleave, M E; Bruchovsky, N; Moore, M J; Venner, P

    1999-01-01

    A 70-year-old man is referred to a urologist for recommendations on the management of metastatic prostate cancer. His cancer was diagnosed 5 years ago, and he underwent radical prostatectomy at that time. The tumour was confined to the prostate gland (Gleason score 7), and during surgery the lymph nodes were assessed as being clear of cancer. Before the surgery, the patient's prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level had been 8 ng/mL. After the prostatectomy, PSA was at first undetectable, but recently the PSA level rose to 2 ng/mL and then, at the most recent test, to 16 ng/mL. A bone scan was ordered to investigate back discomfort, which has been persistent but easily controlled with acetaminophen. Unfortunately, the bone scan shows several sites of metastatic disease. The man's medical history includes type 2 diabetes, which has developed during the past 3 years and which is controlled by diet, as well as asymptomatic hypertension, which is managed by means of a thiazide diuretic. The patient asks what treatments are available, what impact they are likely to have on his disease and what risks are associated with the therapies. PMID:9951446

  5. Advances in the understanding of cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shore, Neal D

    2015-09-01

    The principal role of the immune system is to prevent and eradicate pathogens and infections. The key characteristics or features of an effective immune response include specificity, trafficking, antigen spread and durability (memory). The immune system is recognised to have a critical role in controlling cancer through a dynamic relationship with tumour cells. Normally, at the early stages of tumour development, the immune system is capable of eliminating tumour cells or keeping tumour growth abated; however, tumour cells may evolve multiple pathways over time to evade immune control. Immunotherapy may be viewed as a treatment designed to boost or restore the ability of the immune system to fight cancer, infections and other diseases. Immunotherapy manifests differently from traditional cancer treatments, eliciting delayed response kinetics and thus may be more effective in patients with lower tumour burden, in whom disease progression may be less rapid, thereby allowing ample time for the immunotherapy to evolve. Because immunotherapies may have a different mechanism of action from traditional cytotoxic or targeted biological agents, immunotherapy techniques have the potential to combine synergistically with traditional therapies.

  6. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  7. Treatment advances in liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Steven R; Poston, Graeme J

    2011-12-01

    Over the last several decades advances in the management and treatment of patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) has changed a disease with a dismal prognosis to one with a potential for cure in some patients. Advances have been made through coordinated management of patients by surgeons, medical oncologists, radiologists, and other health care professionals coupled with advances in treatment options. Although these advances have clearly impacted patient outcomes, it is clear that the benefit of traditional surgical approaches and the use of cytoxic chemotherapy are reaching a plateau. Continued research to develop new and more active therapies, including targeted or biologic agents, is needed. This review discusses the advances made in management of patients with liver-limited metastatic disease.

  8. Dietary patterns of patients with advanced lung or colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Prado, Carla M M; Lieffers, Jessica R; Bergsten, Gabriella; Mourtzakis, Marina; Baracos, Vickie E; Reiman, Tony; Sawyer, Michael B; McCargar, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify dietary patterns among patients with advanced cancer. Differences between cancer groups are described, and food groups contributing higher proportions to overall caloric intake are identified. Patients with advanced cancer (n=51) were recruited from a regional cancer centre and completed a three-day dietary record. Food items were categorized according to macronutrient content. After adjustment for body weight, substantial variation in energy intake was observed (range: 13.7 to 55.4 kcal/kg/day). For 49% of patients, protein intake was below recommendations. Overall, patients consumed the largest proportion of their calories from meat (16%), other foods (11%), dessert (9%), fruit (9%), white bread (7%), and milk (7%). Only 5% of patients consumed meal replacement supplements. The results of this descriptive study provide important insights into the dietary habits of patients with advanced cancer. These insights could be translated into the development of effective recommendations for maintaining or improving health and quality of life.

  9. Concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Deng, Weiye; Cao, Xiaoci; Shi, Xiaoming; Zhao, Huanfen; Duan, Zheping; Lv, Bonan; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Apatinib is a novel anti-angiogenic agent targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, which is effective in patients with chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer. There are no reports of concurrent apatinib with local radiation therapy in elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: we present the first published report of a 70-year-old male patient with advanced gastric cancer who received concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy after failure of oxaliplatin and S-1 chemotherapy. Interventions and Outcomes: The patient received concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy and was followed up 7 months after therapy without disease progress, 14 months later indicated extensive metastasis and this patient died of pulmonary infection. Lessons: Elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer may benefit from concurrent apatinib with local radiation therapy when chemotherapy is not tolerated or successful. Further studies are needed to investigate the clinical outcomes and toxicities associated with concurrent apatinib and radiation therapy in gastric cancer. PMID:28248891

  10. Advances in Medical Management of Early Stage and Advanced Breast Cancer: 2015.

    PubMed

    Witherby, Sabrina; Rizack, Tina; Sakr, Bachir J; Legare, Robert D; Sikov, William M

    2016-01-01

    Standard management of early stage and advanced breast cancer has been improved over the past few years by knowledge gained about the biology of the disease, results from a number of eagerly anticipated clinical trials and the development of novel agents that offer our patients options for improved outcomes or reduced toxicity or both. This review highlights recent major developments affecting the systemic therapy of breast cancer, broken down by clinically relevant patient subgroups and disease stage, and briefly discusses some of the ongoing controversies in the treatment of breast cancer and promising therapies on the horizon.

  11. Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    delivery of eIF4E siRNA and DTX using dendrimer as a nanocarrier. To this end the objective of this study is to prepare, characterize and test the...multifunctional delivery system by conjugating DTX to dendrimer and complexing eIF4E siRNA to the resulting conjugate. The DTX- dendrimer conjugate...formed complex with siRNA at 20:1 ratio. The dendrimer - siRNA complex was taken up by the prostate cancer cells while the free siRNA was not taken up by

  12. Common Disorders of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Up About Us Board of Directors Newsletter Partners Financial & Privacy Policy Contact Us Patient Information About the Pancreas NPF ... here . About Us Board of Directors Newsletter Partners Financial & Privacy Policy Contact Us Patient Information About the Pancreas Genetics & ...

  13. [Management of pregnant women with advanced cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Vincens, C; Dupaigne, D; de Tayrac, R; Mares, P

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to update the management of pregnant women with advanced cervical cancer, thanks to a literature review indexed in Medline((R)) (from 1980 till 2006 using those keywords: advanced cervix cancer, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and pregnancy), ScienceDirect (from 1990 till 2006) and the French Encyclopédie Médico-Chirurgicale. It occurs that pregnancy is a privileged period to diagnose cervical cancer, particularly in early stages. We ought to beware of symptoms such as vaginal bleeding, which could be underestimated during pregnancy. Colposcopically selected biopsies are reference techniques to confirm the diagnostic. The assessment of extension includes an abdominal and pelvic MRI and echography and a radiography of the chest for locally advanced stages. The decision to interrupt pregnancy should be based on a collegial evaluation and depends on state and histology of disease, patient's desire for pregnancy, as well as gestational age and disease evolution. Cesarean is preferred to natural delivery even though survival rates are the same. The cesarean section prevents from short-term complications and recurrence on the episiotomy, but the hysterotomy type is controversial throughout literature. The prognosis of cervical cancer does not seem to be influenced by pregnancy. Management is the same, even though we have to adapt the treatment from the pregnancy state. No study could show the benefit and the safety of neoadjuvant chemotherapy during pregnancy, due to few cases, but it could be a solution with patients suffering from an advanced cancer and not willing to stop pregnancy. To conclude, the detection by cervical smears should be systematic during pregnancy. When cancer is diagnosed, cesarean section is the favourite way to deliver. Pregnancy does not modify disease's prognosis and the therapeutic choice depends on the stage of the disease.

  14. Pharmacotherapy options for advanced thyroid cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Christian; Richter, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Poor prognosis of anaplastic thyroid cancer and advanced disease in differentiated and medullary thyroid cancer, together with absence of effective therapeutic measures, has induced recent intensified basic and clinical research in this area. The aim of this article is to assess the effects of new drug treatment for advanced thyroid cancer. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE until the end of September 2011 for relevant data. Further sources were reference lists of original publications and review articles. We included prospective studies that investigated drug interventions for advanced thyroid cancer published in any language. We did not include trials solely communicated as abstracts. For inclusion, studies had to report overall survival, progression-free survival or similar, or response outcomes. Data were extracted by one author and checked by the other. All tables are part of this publication. Because only non-comparative studies were included, we had to focus on descriptive analysis. Twenty-four studies with 715 patients were included; 18 studies investigated kinase inhibitors, the remainder various drugs. All studies reported response (only one complete response was observed; proportions of partial response were up to 49%). Median progression-free survival was about 12 months, ranging from 3.7 to 27.9 months. Adverse events (at least grade 3) of kinase inhibitors included hypertension, hand foot syndrome and diarrhoea (10%, 16% and 9%, respectively). Due to bias-prone data, any interpretation of newer pharmacotherapy options for advanced thyroid cancer is limited because only non-comparative studies could be included. Therefore, we strongly argue the need for adequate randomized controlled trials that should provide a better basis for therapeutic decision making in thyroid cancer.

  15. Single high dose intraoperative electrons for advanced stage pancreatic cancer: Phase I pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Goldson, A.L.; Ashaveri, E.; Espinoza, M.C.

    1981-07-01

    Phase I toxicity studies with intraoperative radiotherapy proved to be a feasible adjunct to surgery for unresectable malignancies of the pancreas at Howard University Hospital. There have been minimal side effects or complications related to the combination of limited surgical decompression and intraoperative radiotherapy alone. The toxic effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on normal tissues is being assessed on a dose volume basis. Doses of 2000 to 2500 rad in a single exposure to include the pancreas, regional nodes and duodenum are acceptable if the total treatment volume is less than or equal to 100 cm. The tumoricidal effects on the cancer are demonstratable when one reviews the pathological specimens that illustrate massive tumor necrosis and fibros replacement, but in all cases reviewed, viable cancer was noted. Intraoperative radiotherapy, therefore, represents a significant boost dose for resectable, partially resectable or non-resectable tumors when added to conventional external beam irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Preliminary clinical data and minimal toxicity justifies further investigation.

  16. Advances and Implications in Nanotechnology for Lung Cancer Management.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sana; Osama, Khwaja; Jamal, Qazi Mohammad Sajid; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Sayeed, Usman; Khan, M Kalim A; Siddiqui, Mohd Haris; Akhtar, Salman

    2016-11-14

    Lung cancer is one of the most important chronic diseases in the field of respiratory medicine. Conventional treatment strategies for lung cancer include chemotherapy, surgery and radiation therapy. These current therapies lack specificity and are limited by undesirable toxicities in normal cells, as well as a high rate of recurrence.Nanotechnological intervention has greatly revolutionized the therapy of lung cancer by surmounting the current limitations in conventional therapies. Nanoparticles (NPs) achieve preferential accumulation in the tumor cells by employing two mechanisms: passive and active targeting. Several nanoscale drug delivery systems for lung cancer treatment are currently in clinical trials and few of them are already commercially available. Recently, the interest to develop pulmonary delivery system of nano-based drug formulations suitable for lung cancer has been also increased which have resulted in more effective and advanced treatment of Lung cancer. However, although nanotechnology based drug carriers for lung cancer treatment have established outstanding therapeutic potential at both preclinical and clinical Phases, but there are still many limitations to be solved. This review details the till date drug nanocarriers researches performed for lung cancer therapy.

  17. Annual Advances in Cancer Prevention Lecture | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    2016 Keynote Lecture Polyvalent Vaccines Targeting Oncogenic Driver Pathways A special keynote lecture became part of the NCI Summer Curriculum in Cancer Prevention in 2000. This lecture will be held on Thursday, July 21, 2016 at 1:30pm at Masur Auditorium, Building 10, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD. This year’s keynote speaker is Dr. Mary L. (Nora) Disis, MD. |

  18. Annual Advances in Cancer Prevention Lecture | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    2015 Keynote Lecture HPV Vaccination: Preventing More with Less A special keynote lecture became part of the NCI summer Curriculum in Cancer Prevention in 2000. This lecture will be held on Thursday, July 23, 2015 at 3:00pm at Masur Auditorium, Building 10, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD. This year’s keynote speaker is Dr. Douglas Lowy, NCI Acting Director. |

  19. Advances in the treatment of advanced oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nicholas C; Neven, Patrick; Loibl, Sibylle; Andre, Fabrice

    2016-12-06

    Oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer is the most common subtype of breast cancer. Endocrine therapies that target the dependence of this subtype on the oestrogen receptor have substantial activity, yet the development of resistance to therapy is inevitable in advanced cancer. Major progress has been made in identifying the drivers of oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer and the mechanisms of resistance to endocrine therapy. This progress has translated into major advances in the treatment of advanced breast cancer, with several targeted therapies that enhance the efficacy of endocrine therapy; inhibitors of mTOR and inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 substantially improve progression-free survival. A new wave of targeted therapies is being developed, including inhibitors of PI3K, AKT, and HER2, and a new generation of oestrogen-receptor degraders. Considerable challenges remain in patient selection, deciding on the most appropriate order in which to administer therapies, and establishing whether cross-resistance occurs between therapies.

  20. Digital PCR Improves Mutation Analysis in Pancreas Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Court, Colin M.; Kim, Stephen; Braxton, David R.; Hou, Shuang; Muthusamy, V. Raman; Watson, Rabindra R.; Sedarat, Alireza; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Tomlinson, James S.

    2017-01-01

    Applications of precision oncology strategies rely on accurate tumor genotyping from clinically available specimens. Fine needle aspirations (FNA) are frequently obtained in cancer management and often represent the only source of tumor tissues for patients with metastatic or locally advanced diseases. However, FNAs obtained from pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are often limited in cellularity and/or tumor cell purity, precluding accurate tumor genotyping in many cases. Digital PCR (dPCR) is a technology with exceptional sensitivity and low DNA template requirement, characteristics that are necessary for analyzing PDAC FNA samples. In the current study, we sought to evaluate dPCR as a mutation analysis tool for pancreas FNA specimens. To this end, we analyzed alterations in the KRAS gene in pancreas FNAs using dPCR. The sensitivity of dPCR mutation analysis was first determined using serial dilution cell spiking studies. Single-cell laser-microdissection (LMD) was then utilized to identify the minimal number of tumor cells needed for mutation detection. Lastly, dPCR mutation analysis was performed on 44 pancreas FNAs (34 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and 10 fresh (non-fixed)), including samples highly limited in cellularity (100 cells) and tumor cell purity (1%). We found dPCR to detect mutations with allele frequencies as low as 0.17%. Additionally, a single tumor cell could be detected within an abundance of normal cells. Using clinical FNA samples, dPCR mutation analysis was successful in all preoperative FNA biopsies tested, and its accuracy was confirmed via comparison with resected tumor specimens. Moreover, dPCR revealed additional KRAS mutations representing minor subclones within a tumor that were not detected by the current clinical gold standard method of Sanger sequencing. In conclusion, dPCR performs sensitive and accurate mutation analysis in pancreas FNAs, detecting not only the dominant mutation subtype, but also the additional rare

  1. Advances in Lipidomics for Cancer Biomarkers Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Perrotti, Francesca; Rosa, Consuelo; Cicalini, Ilaria; Sacchetta, Paolo; Del Boccio, Piero; Genovesi, Domenico; Pieragostino, Damiana

    2016-01-01

    Lipids play critical functions in cellular survival, proliferation, interaction and death, since they are involved in chemical-energy storage, cellular signaling, cell membranes, and cell–cell interactions. These cellular processes are strongly related to carcinogenesis pathways, particularly to transformation, progression, and metastasis, suggesting the bioactive lipids are mediators of a number of oncogenic processes. The current review gives a synopsis of a lipidomic approach in tumor characterization; we provide an overview on potential lipid biomarkers in the oncology field and on the principal lipidomic methodologies applied. The novel lipidomic biomarkers are reviewed in an effort to underline their role in diagnosis, in prognostic characterization and in prediction of therapeutic outcomes. A lipidomic investigation through mass spectrometry highlights new insights on molecular mechanisms underlying cancer disease. This new understanding will promote clinical applications in drug discovery and personalized therapy. PMID:27916803

  2. Nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy: Recent advances, challenges, and strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Zhang, Miqin

    2016-12-01

    Compared to conventional treatments, gene therapy offers a variety of advantages for cancer treatment including high potency and specificity, low off-target toxicity, and delivery of multiple genes that concurrently target cancer tumorigenesis, recurrence, and drug resistance. In the past decades, gene therapy has undergone remarkable progress, and is now poised to become a first line therapy for cancer. Among various gene delivery systems, nanoparticles have attracted much attention because of their desirable characteristics including low toxicity profiles, well-controlled and high gene delivery efficiency, and multi-functionalities. This review provides an overview on gene therapeutics and gene delivery technologies, and highlight recent advances, challenges and insights into the design and the utility of nanoparticles in gene therapy for cancer treatment.

  3. Clinical Implementation of Novel Targeted Therapeutics in Advanced Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Mary D; Bernhardt, Erica B; Miller, Todd W

    2016-11-01

    The majority of advanced breast cancers have genetic alterations that are potentially targetable with drugs. Through initiatives such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), data can be mined to provide context for next-generation sequencing (NGS) results in the landscape of advanced breast cancer. Therapies for targets other than estrogen receptor alpha (ER) and HER2, such as cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6, were recently approved based on efficacy in patient subpopulations, but no predictive biomarkers have been found, leaving clinicians to continue a trial-and-error approach with each patient. Next-generation sequencing identifies potentially actionable alterations in genes thought to be drivers in the cancerous process including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT, fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs), and mutant HER2. Epigenetically directed and immunologic therapies have also shown promise for the treatment of breast cancer via histone deacetylases (HDAC) 1 and 3, programmed T cell death 1 (PD-1), and programmed T cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Identifying biomarkers to predict primary resistance in breast cancer will ultimately affect clinical decisions regarding adjuvant therapy in the first-line setting. However, the bulk of medical decision-making is currently made in the secondary resistance setting. Herein, we review the clinical potential of PI3K, AKT, FGFRs, mutant HER2, HDAC1/3, PD-1, and PD-L1 as therapeutic targets in breast cancer, focusing on the rationale for therapeutic development and the status of clinical testing. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2454-2463, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Advances of molecular targeted therapy in squamous cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Shucai

    2013-12-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC) is one of the most prevalent subtypes of lung cancer worldwide, about 400,000 persons die from squamous-cell lung cancer around the world, and its pathogenesis is closely linked with tobacco exposure. Unfortunately, squamous-cell lung cancer patients do not benefit from major advances in the development of targeted therapeutics such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors that show exquisite activity in lung adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations or echinoderm microtubule associated protein like-4 (EML4)-ALK fusions, respectively. Major efforts have been launched to characterize the genomes of squamous-cell lung cancers. Among the new results emanating from these efforts are amplifications of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene, the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) gene mutation as potential novel targets for the treatment of SQCLCs. Researchers find that there are many specific molecular targeted genes in the genome of squamous-cell lung cancer patients. These changes play a vital role in cell cycle regulation, oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, squamous epithelium differentiation, may be the candidate targeted moleculars in SQCLCs. Here, we provide a review on these discoveries and their implications for clinical trials in squamous-cell lung cancer assessing the value of novel therapeutics addressing these targets.

  5. Next-generation sequencing: advances and applications in cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Serratì, Simona; De Summa, Simona; Pilato, Brunella; Petriella, Daniela; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Tommasi, Stefania; Pinto, Rosamaria

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances have led to the introduction of next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms in cancer investigation. NGS allows massive parallel sequencing that affords maximal tumor genomic assessment. NGS approaches are different, and concern DNA and RNA analysis. DNA sequencing includes whole-genome, whole-exome, and targeted sequencing, which focuses on a selection of genes of interest for a specific disease. RNA sequencing facilitates the detection of alternative gene-spliced transcripts, posttranscriptional modifications, gene fusion, mutations/single-nucleotide polymorphisms, small and long noncoding RNAs, and changes in gene expression. Most applications are in the cancer research field, but lately NGS technology has been revolutionizing cancer molecular diagnostics, due to the many advantages it offers compared to traditional methods. There is greater knowledge on solid cancer diagnostics, and recent interest has been shown also in the field of hematologic cancer. In this review, we report the latest data on NGS diagnostic/predictive clinical applications in solid and hematologic cancers. Moreover, since the amount of NGS data produced is very large and their interpretation is very complex, we briefly discuss two bioinformatic aspects, variant-calling accuracy and copy-number variation detection, which are gaining a lot of importance in cancer-diagnostic assessment. PMID:27980425

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas. PMID:26839647

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-25

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas.

  8. Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Rapamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer With mTOR Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-20

    Advanced Malignant Neoplasm; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Carcinoma; Malignant Uterine Neoplasm; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Bladder Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Bladder Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  9. Anaplastic Carcinoma Possibly Arising from a Heterotopic Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yasushi; Mita, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hideaki; Akino, Kimishige; Kikuchi, Takefumi; Ishii, Yoshifumi; Endo, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic carcinoma is a rare pancreatic cancer, and the malignant transformation of a heterotopic pancreas is also rare. We herein report a case of an elderly woman with a mass of unknown origin in the abdominal cavity. Computed tomography identified the extent of the tumor but not the organ of origin. The abdominal tumor eventually metastasized to the liver and lung. An autopsy and immunohistochemical examination revealed an anaplastic carcinoma possibly originating in an ectopic pancreas.

  10. Recent advances in immunotherapy for hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2007-02-10

    There is a continuing need for innovative, alternative therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Immunotherapy of cancer is attractive because of the exquisite specificity of the immune response. Activation of an HCC-specific response can be accomplished by strategies targeting tumour-associated antigens (for example: alpha fetoprotein (AFP)) or viral antigens in those patients infected with hepatitis B or C. Uncharacterised and mutated antigens can also be targeted with whole tumour cell or tumour lysate-based immunisation strategies. Viral vectors coding for genes which make the patient's tumour immunogenic can allow the immune system to naturally evolve specificity against immunogenic target antigens. Strategies which have been tested in human clinical trials include adoptive transfer of lymphocytes, cytokine injections, autologous tumour-pulsed dendritic cells (DC) as well as AFP-derived peptides in adjuvant and pulsed onto autologous DC. These trials, testing novel immune-based interventions in HCC subjects, have resulted in immunological responses and some have impacted recurrence and survival of HCC subjects.

  11. Chemotherapy Resistance Mechanisms in Advanced Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalal, Bhuvanesh Sukhlal; Upadhya, Dinesh; Pai, Vinitha Ramanath

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma is a most dangerous and deadly type of skin cancer, and considered intrinsically resistant to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. It has become a major public health concern as the incidence of melanoma has been rising steadily over recent decades with a 5-year survival remaining less than 5%. Detection of the disease in early stage may be curable, but late stage metastatic disease that has spread to other organs has an extremely poor prognosis with a median survival of less than 10 months. Since metastatic melanoma is unresponsive to therapy that is currently available, research is now focused on different treatment strategies such as combinations of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The molecular basis of resistance to chemotherapy seen in melanoma is multifactorial; defective drug transport system, altered apoptotic pathway, deregulation of apoptosis and/or changes in enzymatic systems that mediate cellular metabolic machinery. Understanding of alterations in molecular processes involved in drug resistance may help in developing new therapeutic approaches to treatment of malignant melanoma. PMID:28382191

  12. Glucagon in the Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of glucagon, in conjunction with insulin, in a dual chamber pump (artificial pancreas, AP) is a working goal for multiple companies and researchers. However, capital investment to create, operate, and maintain facilities with sufficient scale to produce enough glucagon to treat millions of patients, at a level of profit that makes it feasible, will be substantial. It can be assumed that the marketplace will expect the daily cost of glucagon (to the consumer) to be similar to the daily cost of insulin. After one subtracts wholesaler and pharmacy markup, there may be very few dollars remaining for the drug company to cover profit, capital expenditures, marketing, burden, and other costs. Without the potential for adequate margins, manufacturers may not be willing to take the risk. Assuming that the projections discussed in this article are in the right ballpark, advance planning for the supply for glucagon needs to start today and not wait for the AP to come to market. PMID:25139825

  13. Reducing Toxicity of Radiation Treatment of Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    malignant tissues. A major effort focused on the effects these drugs on myeloid (bone marrow-derived) cells. This is based on our finding that...the last progress report we further presented data supporting the notion that the radioprotecive effect of RTA 408 is a ‘class’ effect of drugs that...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Toxicity is a major impediment to effective radiation therapy of locally advanced prostate cancer

  14. Definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yoo-Kang; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Myung-Ah; Chun, Hoo-Geun; Kim, Dong-Goo; You, Young Kyoung; Hong, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Survival outcome of locally advanced pancreatic cancer has been poor and little is known about prognostic factors of the disease, especially in locally advanced cases treated with concurrent chemoradiation. This study was to analyze overall survival and prognostic factors of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods Medical records of 34 patients diagnosed with unresectable pancreatic cancer and treated with definitive CCRT, from December 2003 to December 2012, were reviewed. Median prescribed radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 41.4 to 55.8 Gy), once daily, five times per week, 1.8 to 3 Gy per fraction. Results With a mean follow-up of 10 months (range, 0 to 49 months), median overall survival was 9 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 40% and 10%, respectively. Median and mean time to progression were 5 and 7 months, respectively. Prognostic parameters related to overall survival were post-CCRT CA19-9 (p = 0.02), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status (p < 0.01), and radiation dose (p = 0.04) according to univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, post-CCRT CA19-9 value below 180 U/mL and ECOG status 0 or 1 were statistically significant independent prognostic factors associated with improved overall survival (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). Conclusion Overall treatment results in locally advanced pancreatic cancer are relatively poor and few improvements have been accomplished in the past decades. Post-treatment CA19-9 below 180 U/mL and ECOG performance status 0 and 1 were significantly associated with an improved overall survival. PMID:25061572

  15. Navigating the evolving therapeutic landscape in advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Crawford, E David; Petrylak, Daniel; Sartor, Oliver

    2017-03-07

    Prostate cancer is the most common cause of cancer in men, with 137.9 new cases per 100,000 men per year. The overall 5-year survival rate for prostate cancer is very high. Up to 20% of men who undergo state-of-the art treatment for prostate cancer will develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within 5 years, with median survival for those with metastatic CRPC ranging from approximately 15 to 36 months in recent studies. With the advent of several new drugs in the past 5 years to treat CRPC, the challenge facing clinicians is how to best sequence or combine therapies or both to optimize outcomes. A better understanding of the disease process and the role of the androgen receptor as a target for both therapy and resistance have led to the consideration of biomarkers as an approach to aid in selecting the appropriate agent for a given patient as patients respond to or tolerate different drugs differently. Research to identify new prognostic biomarkers, which are associated with outcome measures, as well as predictive biomarkers, which predict response or resistance to therapy is ongoing. The treatment of advanced prostate cancer and the research related to biomarkers are discussed.

  16. Glucose Addiction in Cancer Therapy: Advances and Drawbacks.

    PubMed

    Granja, Sara; Pinheiro, Céline; Reis, Rui Manuel; Martinho, Olga; Baltazar, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    While normal differentiated cells primarily use mitochondrial respiration to generate the required energy for cellular processes, most cancer cells rely on glycolysis, even in sufficient oxygen conditions. This phenomenon is known as the "Warburg effect" or aerobic glycolysis and the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells towards this altered energy metabolism is currently recognized as one of the "hallmarks of cancer". Aerobic glycolysis underlies the rapid growth of tumor cells, with high rates of glucose consumption and lactic acid production, leading to cellular acidosis. Metabolic reprogramming renders cancer cells dependent on specific metabolic enzymes or pathways that could be exploited in cancer therapy. The development of treatments that target tumor glucose metabolism is receiving renewed attention, with several drugs targeting metabolic pathways currently in clinical trials. The search for suitable targets, however, is limited by the high plasticity of the metabolic network that can induce compensatory routes. Deregulated glucose metabolism is a prominent feature associated with resistance to classical chemotherapy or oncogene-targeted therapies, strengthening the clinical potential of combining these therapies with glycolysis inhibitors. The aim of this review is to compare the advances of different therapeutic strategies targeting the glucose "addiction" of tumor cells, highlighting their potential as effective weapons against cancer. We further discuss recent evidence for the involvement of glucose metabolism as a compensatory response to the use of drugs that target different signaling pathways, where the combination with glycolysis inhibitors could prove extraordinarily useful.

  17. Recent Advances in Metabolic Profiling And Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Titus, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a metabolic disease. Cancer cells, being highly proliferative, show significant alterations in metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, respiration, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism. Metabolites like peptides, nucleotides, products of glycolysis, the TCA cycle, fatty acids, and steroids can be an important read out of disease when characterized in biological samples such as tissues and body fluids like urine, serum, etc. The cancer metabolome has been studied since the 1960s by analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Current research is focused on the identification and validation of biomarkers in the cancer metabolome that can stratify high-risk patients and distinguish between benign and advanced metastatic forms of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current state of prostate cancer metabolomics, the biomarkers that show promise in distinguishing indolent from aggressive forms of the disease, the strengths and limitations of the analytical techniques being employed, and future applications of metabolomics in diagnostic imaging and personalized medicine of prostate cancer. PMID:25632377

  18. Advancing cancer control research in an emerging news media environment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine C; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Blake, Kelly D; Cappella, Joseph N

    2013-12-01

    Cancer is both highly feared and highly newsworthy, and there is a robust body of research documenting the content and effects of cancer news coverage on health behaviors and policy. Recent years have witnessed ongoing, transformative shifts in American journalism alongside rapid advances in communication technology and the public information environment. These changes create a pressing need to consider a new set of research questions, sampling strategies, measurement techniques, and theories of media effects to ensure continued relevance and adaptation of communication research to address critical cancer control concerns. This paper begins by briefly reviewing what we know about the role of cancer news in shaping cancer-related beliefs, attitudes, behaviors, and policies. We then outline challenges and opportunities, both theoretical and methodological, posed by the rapidly changing news media environment and the nature of audience engagement. We organize our discussion around three major shifts associated with the emerging news media environment as it relates to health communication: 1) speed and dynamism of news diffusion, 2) increased narrowcasting of media content for specialized audiences, and 3) broadened participation in shaping media content. In so doing, we articulate a set of questions for future theory and research, in an effort to catalyze innovative communication scholarship to improve cancer prevention and control.

  19. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research.

  20. Advancing Cancer Control Through Research and Cancer Registry Collaborations in the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Banydeen, Rishika; Rose, Angela M.C.; Martin, Damali; Aiken, William; Alexis, Cheryl; Andall-Brereton, Glennis; Ashing, Kimlin; Avery, J. Gordon; Avery, Penny; Deloumeaux, Jacqueline; Ekomaye, Natasha; Gabriel, Owen; Hassell, Trevor; Hughes, Lowell; Hutton, Maisha; Jyoti, Shravana Kumar; Layne, Penelope; Luce, Danièle; Patrick, Alan; Prussia, Patsy; Smith-Ravin, Juliette; Veronique-Baudin, Jacqueline; Blackman, Elizabeth; Roach, Veronica; Ragin, Camille

    2016-01-01

    Background Few national registries exist in the Caribbean, resulting in limited cancer statistics being available for the region. Therefore, estimates are frequently based on the extrapolation of mortality data submitted to the World Health Organization. Thus, regional cancer surveillance and research need promoting, and their synergy must be strengthened. However, differences between countries outweigh similarities, hampering registration and availability of data. Methods The African-Caribbean Cancer Consortium (AC3) is a broad-based resource for education, training, and research on all aspects of cancer in populations of African descent. The AC3 focuses on capacity building in cancer registration in the Caribbean through special topics, training sessions, and biannual meetings. We review the results from selected AC3 workshops, including an inventory of established cancer registries in the Caribbean region, current cancer surveillance statistics, and a review of data quality. We then describe the potential for cancer research surveillance activities and the role of policymakers. Results Twelve of 30 Caribbean nations have cancer registries. Four of these nations provide high-quality incidence data, thus covering 14.4% of the population; therefore, regional estimates are challenging. Existing research and registry collaborations must pave the way and are facilitated by organizations like the AC3. Conclusions Improved coverage for cancer registrations could help advance health policy through targeted research. Capacity building, resource optimization, collaboration, and communication between cancer surveillance and research teams are key to obtaining robust and complete data in the Caribbean. PMID:26678981

  1. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Sung Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Choi, Chul Won; Lee, Dong Han; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, YoungHan

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical application of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a focus on local efficacy and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with locally advanced and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer who had been treated between 2004 and 2006. Follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 41 months (median, 14.5 months). A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered in 20 fractions using a conventional three-field technique, and then a single fraction of 14, 15, 16, or 17 Gy SBRT was administered as a boost without a break. Twenty-one patients received chemotherapy. Overall and local progression-free survival were calculated and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: One-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rates were 60.0% and 70.2%, respectively. One patient (3%) developed Grade 4 toxicity. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a SBRT boost provides a safe means of increasing radiation dose. Based on the results of this study, we recommend that a well controlled Phase II study be conducted on locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  2. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered. PMID:25053938

  3. Drugging Chromatin in Cancer: Recent Advances and Novel Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Sheng F.; Chen, Chun-Wei; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin regulatory mechanisms play a major role in the control of gene expression programs during normal development and are disrupted in specific disease states, particularly in cancer. Important mediators of chromatin regulatory processes can broadly be classified into writers, erasers, and readers of covalent chromatin modifications that modulate eukaryotic gene transcription and maintain the integrity of the genome. The reversibility and disease-specific nature of these chromatin states make these regulators attractive therapeutic targets. As such, there is an ever-increasing number of candidate therapies aimed at targeting cancer-associated chromatin states that are in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. In this review, we discuss recent advances that have been made in the rational therapeutic targeting of chromatin regulatory mechanisms and highlight certain cancers where there is a specific rationale to assess these therapeutic approaches. PMID:26590715

  4. Evidence-based approaches to other symptoms in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Dy, Sydney Morss; Apostol, Colleen C

    2010-01-01

    Dyspnea, nausea and vomiting, anorexia, fatigue, and sleep disturbances are common and distressing in advanced cancer. We updated previous systematic reviews of how these symptoms can be alleviated with targeted literature searches. The approach to these symptoms requires comprehensive symptom assessment; treating underlying causes when benefits exceed risks; prioritizing treatment, as patients usually have many symptoms; and addressing psychosocial and spiritual distress. For dyspnea, evidence supports systemic opioids and nonpharmacological treatments such as a fan. The strongest evidence supports metoclopramide for cancer-related nausea and octreotide for bowel obstruction. For anorexia, enteral or parenteral nutrition is indicated with obstruction and expected prognosis of at least 6 weeks. Evidence supports several drugs for appetite affecting quality of life. For fatigue, evidence supports psychosocial interventions and methylphenidate. For insomnia, evidence supports cognitive-behavioral therapy in cancer; no sleep agents have superior effectiveness.

  5. Radiotherapy combined with surgery as treatment for advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Perches, R D; Lobaton, A T; Garcia, M C

    1983-12-01

    Experience obtained in a group of 44 patients with advanced cervical cancer is reported here. In this study, patients with residual cancer underwent laparotomy eight weeks after one or two different radiotherapy protocols. Sixty-eight percent of patients underwent radical surgery, 85% of patients pelvic exenterations, and 15% radical hysterectomies. In 27% of patients, no evidence of residual cancer was found in surgical specimens. Radical surgery was well tolerated, and one-third of patients were free of disease for one year or more. Control of disease was obtained in 50% of pelvic exenterations and in 60% of radical hysterectomies, regardless of prognosis, clinical stage or radiotherapy scheme. Although results show an improvement of up to 22% when comparing this to other more conventional treatments, we have concluded that we must obtain a wider experience in order to support our findings.

  6. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  7. Evaluation of rational extent lymphadenectomy for local advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Han; Deng, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Based upon studies from randomized clinical trials, the extended (D2) lymph node dissection is now recommended as a standard procedure for local advanced gastric cancer worldwide. However, the rational extent lymphadenectomy for local advanced gastric cancer has remained a topic of debate in the past decades. Due to the limitation of low metastatic rate in para-aortic nodes (PAN) in JCOG9501, the clinical benefit of D2+ para-aortic nodal dissection (PAND) for patients with stage T4 and/or stage N3 disease, which is very common in China and other countries except Japan and Korea, cannot be determined. Furthermore, the role of splenectomy for complete resection of No.10 and No.11 nodes has been controversial, and however, the final results from the randomized trial of JCOG0110 have yet to be completed. Gastric cancer with the No.14 and No.13 lymph node metastasis is defined as M1 stage in the current version of the Japanese classification. We propose that D2+No.14v and +No.13 lymphadenectomy may be an option in a potentially curative gastrectomy for tumors with apparent metastasis to the No.6 nodes or infiltrate to duodenum. The examined lymph node and extranodal metastasis are significantly associated with the survival of gastric cancer patients. PMID:27647967

  8. Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Advanced Urinary Tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  9. Dasatinib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride Alone in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-12

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  10. Confocal microscopy of skin cancers: Translational advances toward clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in translational research in and technology for confocal microscopy of skin cancers, toward clinical applications, are described. Advances in translational research are in diagnosis of melanoma in vivo, pre-operative mapping of lentigo maligna melanoma margins to guide surgery and intra-operative imaging of residual basal cell carcinomas to guide shave-biopsy. Advances in technology include mosaicing microscopy for detection of basal cell carcinomas in large areas of excised tissue, toward rapid pathology-at-the-bedside, and development of small, simple and low-cost line-scanning confocal microscopes for worldwide use in diverse primary healthcare settings. Current limitations and future opportunities and challenges for both clinicians and technologists are discussed. PMID:19964286

  11. Practical use of advanced mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Meuwissen, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    To date a variety of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) mouse models have been developed that mimic human lung cancer. Chemically induced or spontaneous lung cancer in susceptible inbred strains has been widely used, but the more recent genetically engineered somatic mouse models recapitulate much better the genotype-phenotype correlations found in human lung cancer. Additionally, improved orthotopic transplantation of primary human cancer tissue fragments or cells into lungs of immune-compromised mice can be valuable tools for preclinical research such as antitumor drug tests. Here we give a short overview of most somatic mouse models for lung cancer that are currently in use. We accompany each different model with a description of its practical use and application for all major lung tumor types, as well as the intratracheal injection or direct injection of fresh or freeze-thawed tumor cells or tumor cell lines into lung parenchyma of recipient mice. All here presented somatic mouse models are based on the ability to (in) activate specific alleles at a time, and in a tissue-specific cell type, of choice. This spatial-temporal controlled induction of genetic lesions allows the selective introduction of main genetic lesions in an adult mouse lung as found in human lung cancer. The resulting conditional somatic mouse models can be used as versatile powerful tools in basic lung cancer research and preclinical translational studies alike. These distinctively advanced lung cancer models permit us to investigate initiation (cell of origin) and progression of lung cancer, along with response and resistance to drug therapy. Cre/lox or FLP/frt recombinase-mediated methods are now well-used techniques to develop tissue-restricted lung cancer in mice with tumor-suppressor gene and/or oncogene (in)activation. Intranasal or intratracheal administration of engineered adenovirus-Cre or lentivirus-Cre has been optimized for introducing Cre

  12. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas in a Patient with Germline BRCA2 Mutation-Response to Neoadjuvant Radiochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schultheis, Anne M.; Nguyen, Gia Phuong; Ortmann, Monika; Kruis, Wolfgang; Büttner, Reinhard; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Markiefka, Birgid

    2014-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignant neoplasia, accounting for approximately 0.5–2% of all malignant pancreatic tumors. These lesions are characterized by poor prognosis. Here we report on a case of a 57-year-old female patient with known BRCA2 germline mutation presenting with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas as the only malignancy. The tumor was locally advanced at the first presentation but responded almost completely to neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy. Our case highlights the facts (i) that pancreatic carcinomas belong to the tumor spectrum of patients with the BRCA2-associated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and (ii) that tumors of the pancreas can represent the first or even the only manifestation of HBOC. Furthermore, this case of a nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma indicates that HBOC-associated carcinomas of the pancreas might be characterized by a broader morphological spectrum than was previously thought. Since BRCA mutations cause deficiency of DNA double-strand breakage repair in tumors, neoadjuvant treatment regimens might become a reasonable option in HBOC-associated pancreatic carcinomas. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a primary pancreatic squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with this particular genetic background of BRCA2-associated HBOC. PMID:24959366

  13. Retinoids in the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Pierre-Jacques; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids (vitamin A and its natural and synthetic analogs) are required by most tissues for maintaining the normal health of the tissue. This is certainly true for the pancreas. The recent literature is convincing that retinoids are needed by the adult to assure normal pancreatic endocrine functions, especially those of the α- and β-cells. It is also well established that retinoids are required to insure normal pancreas development in utero, including the development of the endocrine pancreas. The actions of retinoids for maintaining normal pancreatic islet functions has drawn considerable research interest from investigators interested in understanding and treating metabolic disease. Pancreatic retinoids are also of interest to investigators studying the origins of pancreatic disease, including the development of pancreatic fibrosis and its sequelae. This research interest is focused on pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) which store retinoids and possess the metabolic machinery needed to metabolize retinoids. The literature on pancreatic disease and retinoids suggests that there is an association between impairments in pancreatic retinoid storage and metabolism and the development of pancreatic disease. These topics will be considered in this review. PMID:26904552

  14. Clinical trials update: Medical management of advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Major, Maureen A

    2003-12-01

    Selection of treatment for metastatic breast cancer depends on several factors: the status of estrogen receptors or progesterone receptors on breast cancer cells and the expression levels of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2. The presence of estrogen or progesterone receptors typically indicates slower-growing tumors that may be amenable to hormonal manipulation, which provides significant disease control while offering a better toxicity profile than conventional chemotherapy. The understanding of hormonal therapies in patients with postmenopausal metastatic breast cancer has advanced greatly in the past several decades. Aromatase inhibitors, although used initially as second-line therapy, recently have proved to be as effective as tamoxifen, if not superior to it, as first-line therapy for metastatic breast cancer. New data also suggest that letrozole provides significantly better objective responses than anastrozole as second-line therapy. Exemestane, a steroidal aromatase inhibitor, is an effective third-line therapy. Fulvestrant, an estrogen receptor antagonist with no known agonist effect, provides a new option for hormonal therapy. For patients with metastatic breast cancer and overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 on tumor cells, the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab is the preferred option, either in combination with paclitaxel as first-line treatment, or as a single agent for second-line therapy. By extending the sequence of hormonal therapy, disease progression and the need for chemotherapy may be significantly delayed, potentially extending patient survival rates and improving quality of life.

  15. Control of Advanced Cancer: The Road to Chronicity

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Agustin; Crombet, Tania

    2011-01-01

    Despite the recent trend toward a slight decrease in age-adjusted cancer mortality in some countries, crude mortality rates will continue to increase, driven by the demographic shift towards an aged population. Small molecules (small molecules and biologics) are not only a new therapeutic acquisition, but the tools of a more fundamental transition: the transformation of cancer from a rapidly fatal disease into a chronic condition. Antibodies and cancer vaccines can be used for a long time, even beyond progressive disease, and in aged patients, usually unfit for more aggressive conventional treatments. However, this transition to chronicity will require novel developmental guidelines adequate to this kind of drugs, for which optimal dose is not usually the maximal tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics does not define treatment schedule, and tumor shrinkage is not a good correlate of survival. The ongoing cancer immunotherapy program (including several monoclonal antibodies and therapeutic vaccines) at the Centre of Molecular Immunology can illustrate the issues to be addressed, both biological and social, along the path to transform advanced cancer into a chronic non-communicable disease compatible with years of quality life. PMID:21556173

  16. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer: recommendations of the St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) 2015

    PubMed Central

    Gillessen, S.; Omlin, A.; Attard, G.; de Bono, J. S.; Efstathiou, E.; Fizazi, K.; Halabi, S.; Nelson, P. S.; Sartor, O.; Smith, M. R.; Soule, H. R.; Akaza, H.; Beer, T. M.; Beltran, H.; Chinnaiyan, A. M.; Daugaard, G.; Davis, I. D.; De Santis, M.; Drake, C. G.; Eeles, R. A.; Fanti, S.; Gleave, M. E.; Heidenreich, A.; Hussain, M.; James, N. D.; Lecouvet, F. E.; Logothetis, C. J.; Mastris, K.; Nilsson, S.; Oh, W. K.; Olmos, D.; Padhani, A. R.; Parker, C.; Rubin, M. A.; Schalken, J. A.; Scher, H. I.; Sella, A.; Shore, N. D.; Small, E. J.; Sternberg, C. N.; Suzuki, H.; Sweeney, C. J.; Tannock, I. F.; Tombal, B.

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion, and not based on a critical review of the available evidence, are presented. The various recommendations carried differing degrees of support, as reflected in the wording of the article text and in the detailed voting results recorded in supplementary Material, available at Annals of Oncology online. Detailed decisions on treatment as always will involve consideration of disease extent and location, prior treatments, host factors, patient preferences as well as logistical and economic constraints. Inclusion of men with APC in clinical trials should be encouraged. PMID:26041764

  17. Utility of preoperative dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas in diagnosing tumor-forming pancreatitis that mimics pancreatic cancer: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Tamotsu; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Tsuneoka, Noritsugu; Adachi, Tomohiko; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and tumor-forming pancreatitis remains difficult, and this situation can cause serious problems because the management and prognosis of these two focal pancreatic masses are entirely different. We herein report a case of tumor-forming pancreatitis that mimics pancreatic carcinoma in an 80-year-old woman. Computed tomography showed a solid mass in the head of the pancreas, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed a complete obstruction of the main pancreatic duct in the head of the pancreas. Dynamic contrastenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a time-signal intensity curve (TIC) with a slow rise to a peak (1 min after the administration of the contrast material), followed by a slow decline at the pancreatic mass, indicating a fibrotic pancreas. Under the diagnosis of tumor-forming pancreatitis, the patient underwent a segmental pancreatectomy instead of a pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histopathology of the pancreatic mass was chronic pancreatitis without malignancy. The pancreatic TIC obtained from dynamiccontrast MRI can be helpful to differentiate tumor-forming pancreatitis from pancreatic carcinoma and to avoid any unnecessary major pancreatic surgery.

  18. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  19. Cancer Pain Control for Advanced Cancer Patients by Using Autonomic Nerve Pharmacopuncture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hwi-joong; Yoon, Jung-won; Park, Ji-hye; Cho, Chong-kwan; Yoo, Hwa-seung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to report a case series of advanced cancer patients whose cancer pain was relieved by using autonomic nerve pharmacopuncture (ANP) treatment. ANP is a subcutaneous injection therapy of mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP) along the acupoints on the spine (Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue; 0.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous processes of vertebrae) to enhance the immune system and to balance autonomic nerve function. Methods: Patients with three different types of cancer (gastric cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer with distant metastases) with cancer pain were treated with ANP. 1 mL of MGP was injected into the bilateral Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue on the T1-L5 sites (total 12 ─ 20 mL injection) of each patient’s dorsum by using the principle of symptom differentiation. During ANP treatment, the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain was used to assess their levels of cancer pain; also, the dosage and the frequency of analgesic use were measured. Results: The cancer pain levels of all three patients improved with treatment using ANP. The VAS scores of the three patients decreased as the treatment progressed. The dosage and the frequency of analgesics also gradually decreased during the treatment period. Significantly, no related adverse events were found. Conclusion: ANP has shown benefit in controlling cancer pain for the three different types of cancer investigated in this study and in reducing the dosage and the frequency of analgesics. ANP is expected to be beneficial for reducing cancer pain and, thus, to be a promising new treatment for cancer pain. PMID:25780711

  20. The left-sided pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, G.D.; Gibson, R.N.

    1986-06-01

    Ultrasonography (US) performed in nine patients (two with pancreatic carcinoma, one with hepatomegaly), six with no relevant abdominal disease) showed the pancreas to lie wholly to the left of the aorta. This not uncommon location may give rise to difficulty in demonstrating the pancreas on real-time US scans. The superior mesenteric vessels and splenic vein remain useful land-marks for locating the head of the pancreas in this position.

  1. Motexafin Gadolinium and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-30

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Colorectal Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Leukemia; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Diseases; Prostate Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  2. Cancer immunotherapy via combining oncolytic virotherapy with chemotherapy: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Guy R; Relph, Kate; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan; Pandha, Hardev

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are multifunctional anticancer agents with huge clinical potential, and have recently passed the randomized Phase III clinical trial hurdle. Both wild-type and engineered viruses have been selected for targeting of specific cancers, to elicit cytotoxicity, and also to generate antitumor immunity. Single-agent oncolytic virotherapy treatments have resulted in modest effects in the clinic. There is increasing interest in their combination with cytotoxic agents, radiotherapy and immune-checkpoint inhibitors. Similarly to oncolytic viruses, the benefits of chemotherapeutic agents may be that they induce systemic antitumor immunity through the induction of immunogenic cell death of cancer cells. Combining these two treatment modalities has to date resulted in significant potential in vitro and in vivo synergies through various mechanisms without any apparent additional toxicities. Chemotherapy has been and will continue to be integral to the management of advanced cancers. This review therefore focuses on the potential for a number of common cytotoxic agents to be combined with clinically relevant oncolytic viruses. In many cases, this combined approach has already advanced to the clinical trial arena.

  3. Organ Preservation for Advanced Larynx Cancer: Issues and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Forastiere, Arlene A.; Weber, Randal S.; Trotti, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide a review of the clinical data, controversies, and limitations that underpin current recommendations for approaches to larynx preservation for locally advanced larynx cancer requiring total laryngectomy. Methods The key findings from pivotal randomized controlled trials are discussed, including quality of life, late effects, and function assessments. Trials investigating taxane inclusion in induction chemotherapy and trials of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition for radiosensitization are put into perspective for larynx cancer. Controversies in the management of T4 primaries and the opportunities for conservation laryngeal surgery are reviewed. Results There are data from clinical trials to support induction chemotherapy, followed by radiotherapy (preferred approach in Europe) and concomitant cisplatin plus radiotherapy (preferred in North America) for nonsurgical preservation of the larynx. Treatment intensification by a sequential approach of induction, followed by concomitant treatment, is investigational. Transoral laryngeal microsurgery and transoral robotic partial laryngectomy have application in selected patients. Conclusion The management of locally advanced larynx cancer is challenging and requires an experienced multidisciplinary team for initial evaluation, response assessment, and support during and after treatment to achieve optimal function, quality of life, and overall survival. Patient expectations, in addition to tumor extent, pretreatment laryngeal function, and coexisting chronic disease, are critical factors in selecting surgical or nonsurgical primary treatment. PMID:26351339

  4. Advanced Cancer Genomics Institute: Genetic Signatures and Therapeutic Targets in Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    Covaris E210: DNA shearer used to produce next-gen libraries v) Caliper Sciclone: liquid handling robotic station vi) Autoloader-2: robotic platform...the NGS capabilities funded through the NFGC/TATRC mechanism have been published: 1. Hennon MW, Yendamuri S. Advances in lung cancer surgery . J

  5. Locally advanced prostate cancer: current controversies and optimisation opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, S; Dal Pra, A; Catton, C; Bristow, R G; Warde, P

    2013-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men worldwide. The rate of patients presenting with locally advanced prostate cancer has declined in recent decades, mainly due to prostate-specific antigen screening, but the management of these patients still remains controversial. Current literature suggests that the standard of care for these patients is a combination approach with radiation therapy and androgen deprivation therapy. However, there remain many unresolved issues, including the role of dose-escalated radiation therapy, the additional benefit of surgery and the role of systemic therapy, both standard chemotherapeutic agents and novel agents. Furthermore, in the era of personalised medicine, additional research is needed to evaluate the role of biomarkers to better predict the risk of local and systemic relapse in this population.

  6. [Satisfaction with immunotherapy in patients with advanced cancer].

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Yoshiaki; Fujisawa, Fumika; Kotani, Junko; Ohnishi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Toru

    2015-04-01

    Patient satisfaction with cancer immunotherapy, which is not covered by health insurance in Japan, was evaluated among 65 patients with advanced cancer who had received immunotherapy in our hospital for 2 years. Satisfaction measures were based on patients' expectations for medical care, cost, and staff services, and involved a questionnaire consisting of 25 items. Results of the questionnaire analysis showed that most patients, who expected much of antigen-specific vaccination such as dendritic cells (DC) pulsed tumor-associated antigens, were dissatisfied with the high cost of private immunotherapy(i. e., not covered by medical insurance), and were unable to perceive the effectiveness of the treatment because there was no quantitative analysis of killer T cells induced by immunotherapy. Therefore, it is critically important for us to confirm the safety and efficiency of cancer immunotherapy, before introducing medical insurance for cancer patients in Japan. In addition, the quantitative measurement of killer T cells induced by DC peptide vaccines should be considered, to meet patients' expectations.

  7. Locally advanced rectal cancer: the importance of a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Rossana; Maccaroni, Elena; Onofri, Azzurra; Morgese, Francesca; Torniai, Mariangela; Tiberi, Michela; Ferrini, Consuelo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-12-14

    Rectal cancer accounts for a relevant part of colorectal cancer cases, with a mortality of 4-10/100000 per year. The development of locoregional recurrences and the occurrence of distant metastases both influences the prognosis of these patients. In the last two decades, new multimodality strategies have improved the prognosis of locally advanced rectal cancer with a significant reduction of local relapse and an increase in terms of overall survival. Radical surgery still remains the principal curative treatment and the introduction of total mesorectal excision has significantly achieved a reduction in terms of local recurrence rates. The employment of neoadjuvant treatment, delivered before surgery, also achieved an improved local control and an increased sphincter preservation rate in low-lying tumors, with an acceptable acute and late toxicity. This review describes the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, focusing on the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and of post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy both in the standard combined modality treatment programs and in the ongoing research to improve these regimens.

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with {>=}12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  9. An integrated psychological strategy for advanced colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Pugliese, Patrizia; Perrone, Maria; Nisi, Enrica; Garufi, Carlo; Giannarelli, Diana; Bottomley, Andrew; Terzoli, Edmondo

    2006-01-01

    Background There is evidence regarding the usefulness of psychosocial intervention to improve health related quality of life (HRQOL) in adult cancer patients. The aim of this report is to describe an integrated approach and to evaluate its feasibility in routine clinical practice in 98 advanced colorectal cancer (ACC) patients during chronomodulated chemotherapy. Methods A prospective non-randomised design was developed and applied in a cancer out-patient setting. The intervention consisted of an integrated approach, whereby the psycho-oncologist had an active role in the health care team with the physician and routinely included psychological understanding in the medical treatment program. The psychological evaluation assessed: a) adaptation, awareness, psychopathological disorders through a psychodynamic interview; b) anxiety and depression using the HAD scale; c) subjective perception of care quality through a structured interview and d) HRQOL evaluation assessment with the EORTC QLQ C30. Outcomes data were collected before and after 18 weeks of chemotherapy. Results After 18 weeks of chemotherapy a significant improvement of adaptation and awareness was observed. The HADs results showed a significant decrease in anxiety when compared to pre-treatment. The structured interview showed a significant increase of patients who positively experienced the impact of medical treatment on HRQOL, anxiety, depression, interpersonal relationships, free-time and who positively experienced the care quality. Indeed, a majority of patients positively experienced the team relationship modality during the whole treatment. All scales on the EORTC questionnaire remained unchanged during the entire treatment. Conclusion Our results suggest that it is feasible to carry out an integrated approach during chemotherapy. These results seem to support the integrated approach as a tool in aiding advanced colorectal cancer patients' ability to cope with their diagnosis and treatment although

  10. [Locally advanced prostate cancer: definition, prognosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Plantade, Anne; Massard, Christophe; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Fizazi, Karim

    2007-07-01

    According to d'Amico's criteria, high-risk localized prostate cancer are defined either by an extracapsular extension (T3 or T4), either by a high Gleason score (> 7) or a PSA rate higher than 20 ng/ml. Pelvic lymph node involvement also corresponds to locally advanced prostate cancer. Statistical models called nomograms have been developed to predict the probability of prostate cancer recurrence and are also used to define locally advanced patients. Prostate MRI may help to detect an extracapsular extension or a seminal vesicles involvement but remains still discussed. A bone scan, an abdominal and pelvic CT scan have to be performed in order to detect metastases. A pelvic lymph node dissection is recommended in order to adapt the treatment of these patients. Standard treatment for high-risk localized prostate cancer without lymph node involvement is now well defined. The association of both local radiation and a long androgen deprivation (GnHR agonist) showed an overall survival benefit (more than 10%). The radiation dose of 74 Gy is recommended. Other questions are still debating : the optimal duration of the hormonotherapy , the use of the bicalutamide 150 mg instead of GnRH agonists, the optimal radiation dose. Radical prostatectomy is no more considered as a standard treatment for these patients. Since the use of chemotherapy for metastatic patients showed a benefit in overall survival, the place of chemotherapy as adjuvant or neo-adjuvant treatment is questionned in several randomized phase III studies. Sometimes high-risk disease is diagnosed after performance of a radical prostatectomy. A postoperative radiation may be performed in order to decrease clinical and biochemical progression. The use of bicalutamide 150 mg in this situation may have a positive impact too on progression free survival. In case of lymph node involvement, androgen deprivation is the standard treatment with an overall survival benefit. The place of local radiation therapy is still

  11. [Audit: medical record documentation among advanced cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Elise; Chirac, Anne; Rhondali, Wadih; Ruer, Murielle; Chabloz, Claire; Filbet, Marilène

    2014-02-01

    Medical record documentation of cancer inpatients is a core component of continuity of care. The main goal of the study was an assessment of medical record documentation in a palliative care unit (PCU) using a targeted clinical audit based on deceased inpatients' charts. Stage 1 (2010): a clinical audit of medical record documentation assessed by a list of items (diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, power of attorney directive, advance directives). Stage 2 (2011): corrective measures. Stage 3 (2012): re-assessment with the same items' list after six month. Forty cases were investigated during stage 1 and 3. After the corrective measures, inpatient's medical record documentation was significantly improved, including for diagnosis (P = 0.01), diseases extension and treatment (P < 0.001). Our results highlighted the persistence of a weak rate of medical record documentation for advanced directives (P = 0.145).

  12. Targeted nanosystems: Advances in targeted dendrimers for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Dendrimers possess discrete highly compact nanostructures constituted of successive branched layers. Soon after the inception of dendrimers, recognition of their tunable structures and biologically favorable properties provoked a great enthusiasm in delving deeply into the utility of dendrimers for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. One of the most important nanotechnology applications is the development of nanomedicines for targeted cancer therapies. Tremendous success in targeted therapies has been achieved with the use of dendrimer-based nanomedicines. This article provides a concise review on latest advances in the utility of dendrimers in immunotherapies and hormone therapies. PMID:26706410

  13. Cancer-related Fatigue in Patients with Advanced Cancer Treated with Autonomic Nerve Pharmacopuncture.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-hye; Jeon, Hyung-jun; Kang, Hwi-joong; Jeong, In-Sook; Cho, Chong-kwan; Yoo, Hwa-seung

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of autonomic nerve pharmacopuncture (ANP) treatment on cancer-related fatigue (CRF) in patients with advanced cancer. This observational case study was conducted at the East West Cancer Center of Daejeon University's Dunsan Korean Medical Hospital. Two patients were observed. One patient was diagnosed with left thymic cancer metastatic to the left pleura. The other patient had terminal-stage cervical cancer with iliac bone and lumbar 5 metastases. We injected mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP) into acupoints alongside the spine (Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue, EX B2). We examined the patients for CRF using the Korean version of the Revised Piper Fatigue Scale (RPFS-K), which is a self-assessment tool. The scores on the RPFS-K for both patients tended to decrease during the treatment. Laboratory findings, including hematological changes, were also checked. Liver and renal function tests showed that the treatment was safe. Although further large-population studies are necessary, this case study suggests that ANP has a favorable effect on CRF in patients with advanced cancer.

  14. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes.

  15. KRAS mutant allele-specific imbalance is associated with worse prognosis in pancreatic cancer and progression to undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Moser, A James; Saka, Burcu; Adsay, N Volkan; Chiosea, Simion I

    2013-10-01

    KRAS codon 12 mutations are present in about 90% of ductal adenocarcinomas and in undifferentiated carcinomas of the pancreas. The role of KRAS copy number changes and resulting KRAS mutant allele-specific imbalance (MASI) in ductal adenocarcinoma (n=94), and its progression into undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas (n=25) was studied by direct sequencing and KRAS fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Semi-quantitative evaluation of sequencing electropherograms showed KRAS MASI (ie, mutant allele peak higher than or equal to the wild-type allele peak) in 22 (18.4%) cases. KRAS FISH (performed on 45 cases) revealed a trend for more frequent KRAS amplification among cases with KRAS MASI (7/20, 35% vs 3/25, 12%, P=0.08). KRAS amplification by FISH was seen only in undifferentiated carcinomas (10/24, 42% vs 0/21 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, 0%, P=0.0007). In 6 of 11 cases with both undifferentiated and well-differentiated components, transition to undifferentiated carcinoma was associated with an increase in KRAS copy number, due to amplification and/or chromosome 12 hyperploidy. Pancreatic carcinomas with KRAS MASI (compared to those without MASI) were predominantly undifferentiated (16/22, 73% vs 9/97, 9%, P<0.001), more likely to present at clinical stage IV (5/22, 23% vs 7/97, 7%, P=0.009), and were associated with shorter overall survival (9 months, 95% confidence interval, 5-13, vs 22 months, 95% confidence interval, 17-27; P=0.015) and shorter disease-free survival (5 months, 95% confidence interval, 2-8 vs 13 months, 95% confidence interval, 10-16; P=0.02). Our findings suggest that in a subset of ductal adenocarcinomas, KRAS MASI correlates with the progression to undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas.

  16. Improvements in diagnosis have changed the incidence of histological types in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Y.; Mori, M.; Kamakura, T.; Haraguchi, Y.; Saku, M.; Sugimachi, K.

    1995-01-01

    The data on 912 patients with early cancer and 1245 with advanced cancer who were seen between 1971 and 1990 were compared. The incidence of undifferentiated-type cancer increased significantly in patients with advanced gastric cancer, but not in patients with early gastric cancer. When the histological types were compared with regard to sex, age and location in patients with early gastric cancer the undifferentiated type was found to increase only in males, while in patients with advanced gastric cancer the undifferentiated type increased in both sexes as well as in younger patients and in both the upper and middle third of the stomach. These differences in the trends between early and advanced cancers are probably due to the different degrees of diagnostic accuracy for the early detection of histological types. PMID:7640228

  17. Effect of Obesity and Chronic Inflammation on TRAIL-Based Immunotherapy for Advanced Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation on TRAIL-Based Immunotherapy for Advanced Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas S. Griffith, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...CONTRACT NUMBER Immunotherapy for Advanced Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0271 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Thomas...increased risk of developing cancers , including breast cancer . The reasons for this are likely complex and multi- factorial, but a state of generalized

  18. Clinical cancer advances 2006: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Ozols, Robert F; Herbst, Roy S; Colson, Yolonda L; Gralow, Julie; Bonner, James; Curran, Walter J; Eisenberg, Burton L; Ganz, Patricia A; Kramer, Barnett S; Kris, Mark G; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert J; Raghavan, Derek; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schilsky, Richard L; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Winn, Rodger J

    2007-01-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO's PRESIDENT For the second consecutive year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant cancer research presented or published over the past year. ASCO developed this report to demonstrate the enormous progress being made on the front lines of cancer research today. The report is intended to give all those with an interest in cancer care-the general public, cancer patients and physicians, policymakers, oncologists, and other medical professionals-an accessible summary of the year's most important cancer research advances. These pages report on new targeted therapies that are improving survival and response rates in hard-to-treat cancers such as kidney cancer, HER-2-positive breast cancer, head and neck cancer, and chronic myelogenous leukemia; the FDA's approval of the world's first preventive vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), which has the potential to dramatically reduce the global burden of cervical cancer; and advances in the fast-growing field of personalized medicine, including a new lung cancer test that could help physicians better target treatments and predict prognosis. These advances are only part of the landscape. Survival rates are on the rise, the number of cancer deaths in the United States began declining for the first time since 1930, and new research is showing that the rates of certain common cancers, such as those of the breast and colon, have stabilized, and may have even begun to decline. However, cancer research still faces a number of major obstacles. At a time of extraordinary scientific potential, declining federal funding of cancer research threatens to stall or even reverse recent progress. Such funding cuts have already led to fewer clinical trials, fewer talented young physicians entering the field, and a growing bottleneck of basic science discoveries

  19. Locally advanced rectal cancer: time for precision therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Martin R; Zhang, Zhen; Schrag, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The year 2015 marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of NSABP-R01, a landmark trial demonstrating the benefit of adding pelvic radiation to the treatment regimen for locally advanced rectal cancer with a resultant decrease in local recurrence from 25% to 16%. These results ushered in the era of multimodal therapy for rectal cancer, heralding modern treatment and changing the standard of care in the United States. We have seen many advances over the past 3 decades, including optimization of the administration and timing of radiation, widespread adoption of total mesorectal excision (TME), and the implementation of more effective systemic chemotherapy. The current standard is neoadjuvant chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and a radiosensitizer, TME, and adjuvant chemotherapy including 5-FU and oxaliplatin. The results of this regimen have been impressive, with a reported local recurrence rate of less than 10%. However, the rates of distant relapse remain 30% to 40%, indicating room for improvement. In addition, trimodality therapy is arduous and many patients are unable to complete the full course of treatment. In this article we discuss the current standard of care and alternative strategies that have evolved in an attempt to individualize therapy according to risk of recurrence.

  20. [Vital prognosis in advanced cancer patients: a systematic literature review].

    PubMed

    Tavares, Teresa; Gonçalves, Edna

    2013-01-01

    Prognostication is a critical medical task for the adequacy of treatment and management of priorities and expectations of patients and families. In 2005, the European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) published recommendations on the formulation of vital prognosis in advanced cancer patients. The aim of this study is to analyze the literature subsequent to this review and to update the presented recommendations. Using the same strategy of the EAPC group, we performed a systematic literature search in the electronic databases PubMed and Scopus, which included original studies in adults with advanced cancer, without tumor-directed treatment, with a median survival of less than 90 days. The articles were analyzed and classified according to the level of evidence by two independent reviewers. The 41 articles analyzed allowed to keep grade A recommendations for clinical estimation of survival and Palliative Prognostic score and now also for Palliative Prognostic Index, performance status, dyspnea, lymphopenia and lactate dehydrogenase. Recommendations regarding the use of C-reactive protein, leukocytosis, azotemia, hypoalbuminemia and male gender as predictors reached grade B. To formulate the vital prognosis and to communicate it properly to the patient and family are core competencies of physicians, particularly of those who deal with end of life patients. The clinical impression combined with scientific evidence allows us to estimate more accurately the survival, allowing prioritizing and managing more appropriately the existing resources.

  1. Therapeutic implication of HER2 in advanced biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yongjun; Ha, Hyerim; Park, Ji Eun; Bang, Ju-Hee; Jin, Mei Hua; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Tae-Yong; Han, Sae-Won; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Oh, Do-Youn; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no validated therapeutic target for biliary tract cancer (BTC). This study aimed to investigate the pre-clinical and clinical implication of HER2 as a therapeutic target in BTC. We established two novel HER2-amplified BTC cell lines, SNU-2670 and SNU-2773, from gallbladder cancer patients. SNU-2670 and SNU-2773 cells were sensitive to trastuzumab, dacomitinib, and afatinib compared with nine HER2-negative BTC cell lines. Dacomitinib and afatinib led to G1 cell cycle arrest in SNU-2773 cells and apoptosis in SNU-2670 cells. Furthermore, dacomitinib, afatinib, and trastuzumab showed synergistic cytotoxicity when combined with some cytotoxic drugs including gemcitabine, cisplatin, paclitaxel, and 5-fluorouracil. In a SNU-2670 mouse xenograft model, trastuzumab demonstrated a good anti-tumor effect as a monotherapy and in combination with gemcitabine increasing apoptosis. In our clinical data, 13.0% of patients with advanced BTC were defined as HER2-positive. Of these, three patients completed HER2-targeted chemotherapy. Two of them demonstrated a partial response, and the other one showed stable disease for 18 weeks. In summary, these pre-clinical and clinical data suggest that HER2 could be a therapeutic target, and that a HER2-targeting strategy should be developed further in patients with HER2-positive advanced BTC. PMID:27517322

  2. Pembrolizumab and XL888 in Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Non-Resectable Cholangiocarcinoma; Non-Resectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma; Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Intestinal Carcinoma; Small Intestinal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma; Unresectable Small Intestinal Carcinoma

  3. Operative management of locally advanced, differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Laura Y.; Nixon, Iain J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Palmer, Frank L.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Ganly, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of differentiated thyroid cancer tends to present with limited locoregional disease, leading to excellent long-term survival after operative treatment. Even patients with advanced local disease may survive for long periods with appropriate treatment. The aim of this study is to present our institutional experience of the management of locally advanced differentiated thyroid cancer and to analyze factors predictive of outcome. Methods We reviewed our institutional database of 3,664 previously untreated patients with differentiated thyroid cancer operated between 1986 and 2010. A total of 153 patients had tumor extension beyond the thyroid capsule that invaded the subcutaneous soft tissues, recurrent laryngeal nerve, larynx, trachea, or esophagus. Details on extent of operation and adjuvant therapy were recorded. Disease-specific survival and locoregional recurrence-free probability were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Factors predictive of outcome were determined by multivariate analysis. Results The median age of the 153 patients with tumor extension beyond the thyroid capsule was 55 years (range 11–91 years). Eighty-nine patients (58.2%) were female. Twenty-three patients (15.0%) were staged as M1 at presentation, and 122 (79.7%) had pathologically involved lymph nodes. The most common site of extrathyroidal extension was the recurrent laryngeal nerve (51.0%) followed by the trachea (46.4%) and esophagus (39.2%). Sixty-three patients (41%) required resection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve due to tumor involvement. After surgery, 20 patients (13.0%) had gross residual disease (R2), 63 (41.2%) had a positive margin of resection (R1), and 70 (45.8%) had complete resection with negative margins (R0). With a median follow-up of 63.9 months, 5-year, disease-specific survival, when stratified by R0/R1/R2 resection, was 94.4%, 87.6%, and 67.9%, respectively (P = .030). The data do not demonstrate a statistical difference in survival

  4. [A case of early gastric cancer completely responding to adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryo; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Nakano, Mae; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Hanyu, Takaaki; Nakano, Masato; Ishikawa, Takashi; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shinichi; Minagawa, Masahiro; Koyama, Yu; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2014-11-01

    A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital with ascending colon cancer (cT3N1M0, Stage IIIa), which was found during examinations following a positive fecal occult blood test. The patient was also diagnosed with early gastric cancer (cT1a, N0, M0, Stage IA)during a preoperative gastroscopy examination. A laparoscopically assisted right colectomy and D3 lymphadenectomy was performed for the ascending colon cancer. The postoperative pathological diagnosis was Stage IIIb (pT3N2), he was administered in combination with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CapeOX) as adjuvant chemotherapy before the treatment for the colon cancer. After 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy, we were unable to detect any gastric lesions at the same location using gastroscopy, and so diagnosed a clinical complete response. A follow-up gastroscopy 6 months later showed the same findings. The patient has had no recurrence of gastric cancer for 18 months after the initial operation. He will continue to be followed up closely using gastroscopy. In this case, CapeOX as adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer was also effective for early gastric cancer.

  5. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  6. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Advanced Lung Cancer Patients During Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębski, D; Maksymiak, M; Kostorz, S; Bezubka, B; Osmanska, I; Młynczak, T; Rutkowska, A; Baczek, Z; Ziora, D; Kozielski, J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of pulmonary rehabilitation for improving of exercises efficiency, dyspnea, and quality of life of patients with lung cancer during chemotherapy. After the enrollment selection, the study included 20 patients with newly diagnosed advanced lung cancer and performance status 0-2. There were 12 patients randomly allocated to the pulmonary rehabilitation group and another 8 constituted the control group that did not undergo physical rehabilitation. Both groups of patients had continual cycles of chemotherapy. Data were analyzed before and after 8 weeks of physical rehabilitation, and before and after 8 weeks of observation without rehabilitation in controls. The inpatient rehabilitation program was based on exercise training with ski poles and respiratory muscle training. We found a tendency for enhanced mobility (6 Minute Walk Test: 527.3 ± 107.4 vs. 563.9 ±64.6 m; p > 0.05) and a significant increase in forced expired volume in 1 s (66.9 ± 13.2 vs. 78.4 ± 17.7 %predicted; p = 0.016), less dyspnea (p = 0.05), and a tendency for improvement in the general quality of life questionnaire after completion of pulmonary rehabilitation as compared with the control group. This report suggests that pulmonary rehabilitation in advanced lung cancer patients during chemotherapy is a beneficial intervention to reduce dyspnea and enhance the quality of life and mobility.

  7. [Contemporary methods of treatment in local advanced prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Anna; Mazurkiewicz, Maria; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Stasiewicz, Dominika; Mocarska, Agnieszka; Burdan, Franciszek

    2012-10-01

    The prostate cancer is one of the most often cancers amongst males. Its frequency is increasing with age. Thanks to widespread of screening denomination of specific prostate specific antigen (PSA), ultrasonography including the one in transrectal (TRUS), computed tomography, magnetic resonance and especially the awareness of society, the number of patients with low local advance of illness is increasing. The basic method of treatment in such cases is still the surgical removal of prostate with seminal bladder or radiotherapy. To this purpose tele-(IMRT, VMAT) or brachytherapy (J125, Ir192, Pa103) is used. In patients with higher risk of progression the radiotherapy may be associated with hormonotherapy (total androgen blockage-LH-RH analog and androgen). Despite numerous clinical researches conducted there is still no selection of optimal sequence of particular methods. Moreover, no explicit effectiveness was determined. The general rule of treatment in patients suffering from prostate cancer still remains individual selection of therapeutic treatment depending on the age of a patient, general condition and especially patient's general preferences. In case of elderly patients and patients with low risk of progression, recommendation of direct observation including systematical PSA denomination, clinical transrectal examination, TRUS, MR of smaller pelvis or scintigraphy of the whole skeleton may be considered.

  8. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3–17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer. PMID:27594911

  9. Outcomes of temporal bone resection for locally advanced parotid cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Saral; Morris, Luc G; Shah, Jatin; Bilsky, Mark; Selesnick, Samuel; Kraus, Dennis H

    2011-11-01

    This study was conducted to report outcomes and identify factors predictive of survival and recurrence in patients undergoing lateral temporal bone resection (LTBR) as part of an extended radical parotidectomy for parotid cancer. This is a retrospective cohort study which includes all patients undergoing LTBR for parotid cancer between 1994 and 2010 at two affiliated academic centers. Survival and recurrence rates were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox multivariate regression. A total of 12 patients with median follow-up duration of 30.6 months were included: 6 de novo cases and 6 patients referred after local recurrence. Actuarial locoregional control at 2 years was 73%. Most patients (11; 92%) developed disease recurrence with distant metastases the most common site of first failure (83%). Overall and disease-specific survival rates were 80% at 2 years and 22.5% at 5 years. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 67% at 2 years and 8.3% at 5 years. On multivariate analysis, surgical margin status was an independent predictor of RFS (hazard ratio = 3.85, p = 0.045). In advanced parotid cancer, LTBR with a goal of gross total resection offers good locoregional control with an acceptable complication rate. The benefits of this surgery must be balanced with the morbidity and low likelihood of long-term survival, with most patients ultimately experiencing disease recurrence and death.

  10. Outcomes of Temporal Bone Resection for Locally Advanced Parotid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Saral; Morris, Luc G.; Shah, Jatin; Bilsky, Mark; Selesnick, Samuel; Kraus, Dennis H.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to report outcomes and identify factors predictive of survival and recurrence in patients undergoing lateral temporal bone resection (LTBR) as part of an extended radical parotidectomy for parotid cancer. This is a retrospective cohort study which includes all patients undergoing LTBR for parotid cancer between 1994 and 2010 at two affiliated academic centers. Survival and recurrence rates were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox multivariate regression. A total of 12 patients with median follow-up duration of 30.6 months were included: 6 de novo cases and 6 patients referred after local recurrence. Actuarial locoregional control at 2 years was 73%. Most patients (11; 92%) developed disease recurrence with distant metastases the most common site of first failure (83%). Overall and disease-specific survival rates were 80% at 2 years and 22.5% at 5 years. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 67% at 2 years and 8.3% at 5 years. On multivariate analysis, surgical margin status was an independent predictor of RFS (hazard ratio = 3.85, p = 0.045). In advanced parotid cancer, LTBR with a goal of gross total resection offers good locoregional control with an acceptable complication rate. The benefits of this surgery must be balanced with the morbidity and low likelihood of long-term survival, with most patients ultimately experiencing disease recurrence and death. PMID:22547966

  11. Assessing needs of family members of inpatients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Bužgová, R; Špatenková, N; Fukasová-Hajnová, E; Feltl, D

    2016-07-01

    To provide high-quality and effective cancer care, problems and unmet needs of family members during their relatives' hospitalisation have to be identified as well. The aims were to determine how needs of family members of patients with terminal cancer are met and to analyse factors that influence them. The needs were assessed with the Family Inventory of Needs. Each item (n = 20) represents one need of family members, for which the importance and satisfaction are rated. The study comprised 270 family members of hospitalised advanced cancer patients staying in the University Hospital Ostrava who were receiving palliative care. The family members preferred sufficient basic information and patient comfort. The unmet needs were support of hope (73%) and provision of information (65%). The unmet needs were more frequently identified by women, individuals with lower education, younger persons, unemployed, patients' children and family members of patients with generally unfavourable health status (P < 0.05). There was a correlation between lower quality of life and higher numbers of unmet needs. Targeted interventions aimed at meeting important needs of the family members may improve their quality of life.

  12. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  13. Genotype-guided Dosing of mFOLFIRINOX Chemotherapy in Patients With Previously Untreated Advanced Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of Unknown Primary; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Newly Diagnosed Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  14. FOREWORD: Conference on Advanced Metrology for Cancer Therapy 2011 Conference on Advanced Metrology for Cancer Therapy 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankerhold, Ulrike

    2012-10-01

    Although physical treatments play a central role in cancer therapy, SI-traceable metrology has only been established for some of them. Several forms of treatment currently used (particularly intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hadron therapy, high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) and brachytherapy) suffer from the limited metrological support, which restricts the success of these techniques. Recognizing this deficit, the European Union identified metrology for health as one of the first four Targeted Programmes in the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) running from 2008 to 2011. This programme included two EMRP projects addressing metrology for cancer therapy: project T2.J06 dealing with brachytherapy project T2.J07 dealing with external beam cancer therapy using ionizing radiation and high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound. Primary measurement standards applicable to modern treatment conditions were developed under both projects, together with measurement techniques which are meant as a basis for future protocols for dosimetry, treatment planning and monitoring. In order to provide a platform for the presentation of current developments in clinical measurement techniques for cancer therapy, together with the achievements of both projects, an international Conference on Advanced Metrology for Cancer Therapy (CAMCT) was held from 29 November to 1 December 2011 at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig, Germany. The main sessions of the conference: Primary and secondary standards of absorbed dose to water for IMRT and brachytherapy, 3D dose distributions and treatment planning for IMRT and brachytherapy, Hadron therapy (protons and carbon ions), High-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU), were geared to the main foci of the projects. Metrologists and medical physicists from countries all over the world attended the conference and made it into a forum for the exchange of information and expertise

  15. Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the abdomen. The surgeon can look at the pancreas and other organs for tumors and take biopsy ... pancreatic cancers appear to be confined to the pancreas at the time they are found. Even then, ...

  16. Megestrol acetate for the palliation of anorexia in advanced, incurable cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mateen, Farrah; Jatoi, Aminah

    2006-10-01

    Anorexia, or loss of appetite, is a troubling symptom for many patients with advanced cancer. The early observation that breast cancer patients, who were prescribed megestrol acetate as a cancer treatment, went on to increase their appetite and gain weight has given rise to a large number of clinical trials that have tested this progestational drug as a palliative agent for the cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome. This review focuses on these trials, summarizing their findings and providing a practical approach for prescribing megestrol acetate to advanced cancer patients who suffer from the cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome.

  17. Pathological Complete Response and Long-Term Survival in a Very Elderly Patient after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced, Unresectable Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Mitsuyoshi; Mori, Hirohito; Ebara, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We address the pathological complete response and long-term survival of elderly patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced, unresectable gastric cancer. An 83-year-old man was hospitalized for upper abdominal pain. Gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a large tumor spanning from the gastric angle to the antrum, and extending to the duodenum. Histological analysis of the biopsy specimen revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Computed tomography images showed thickening of the gastric wall and invasion of the body and head of the pancreas, but did not show distant metastases. The patient was diagnosed with unresectable gastric cancer, and was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy using S-1 (80 mg/m2) and paclitaxel (60 mg/m2). After the third course of chemotherapy, gastrointestinal endoscopy and abdominal computed tomography revealed a remarkable reduction in tumor size. This reduction allowed distal gastrectomy to be conducted. Histological examination of the specimen revealed no cancer cells in the primary lesion or lymph nodes. The patient was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy of oral tegafur-uracil (300 mg/day) for one year after surgery. He lived for five years after surgery without recurrence. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy using S-1 and paclitaxel is a potent strategy for improving survival in very elderly patients with unresectable gastric cancer. PMID:25298899

  18. Surgery for pancreas divisum.

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Subodh; Johnson, Colin D.

    2002-01-01

    We present our experience of open surgical treatment in 5 patients with symptomatic pancreas divisum (PD). Choice of therapy was based on allocation of patients to one of five clinical presentation groups: (i) with minor symptoms (no operation); (ii) with recurrent acute pancreatitis or upper abdominal pain (RAP/RUAP)--3 patients; (iii) with radiological evidence of chronic pancreatitis (CP)--1 patient; (iv) chronic pancreatic pain without radiological evidence of chronic pancreatitis (CPP); and (v) other pancreatic complications--1 patient. This classification helps to decide management and predict possible outcome. Various types of operation were performed as indicated (open surgical accessory sphincteroplasty [2 also had distal pancreatectomy], n = 3; Puestow's operation, n = 1; or Beger's pancreatectomy, n = 1). All patients improved significantly and are now leading normal personal, professional, and social lives. We conclude that, with careful selection of patients and appropriate therapy, the response to surgical treatment is good. PMID:12092866

  19. Palliative Care Improves Survival, Quality of Life in Advanced Lung Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Results from the first randomized clinical trial of its kind have revealed a surprising and welcome benefit of early palliative care for patients with advanced lung cancer—longer median survival. Although several researchers said that the finding needs to be confirmed in other trials of patients with other cancer types, they were cautiously optimistic that the trial results could influence oncologists’ perceptions and use of palliative care. |

  20. Cancer Related Fatigue and Quality of Life in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Charalambous, Andreas; Kouta, Christiana

    2016-01-01

    Cancer related fatigue (CRF) is a common and debilitating symptom that can influence quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients. The increase in survival times stresses for a better understanding of how CRF affects patients' QoL. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study with 148 randomly recruited prostate cancer patients aiming to explore CRF and its impact on QoL. Assessments included the Cancer Fatigue Scale, EORTC QLQ-C30, and EORTC QLQ-PR25. Additionally, 15 in-depth structured interviews were performed. Quantitative data were analyzed with simple and multiple regression analysis and independent samples t-test. Qualitative data were analyzed with the use of thematic content analysis. The 66.9% of the patients experienced CRF with higher levels being recorded for the affective subscale. Statistically significant differences were found between the patients reporting CRF and lower levels of QoL (mean = 49.1) and those that did not report fatigue and had higher levels of QoL (mean = 72.1). The interviews emphasized CRF's profound impact on the patients' lives that was reflected on the following themes: “dependency on others,” “loss of power over decision making,” and “daily living disruption.” Cancer related fatigue is a significant problem for patients with advanced prostate cancer and one that affects their QoL in various ways. PMID:26981530

  1. Fluconazole Penetration into the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Shrikhande, Shailesh; Friess, Helmut; Issenegger, Claudia; Martignoni, Marcus E.; Yong, Huang; Gloor, Beat; Yeates, Rodney; Kleeff, Jörg; Büchler, Markus W.

    2000-01-01

    Because of antibiotic prophylaxis for necrotizing pancreatitis, the frequency of fungal superinfection in patients with pancreatic necrosis is increasing. In this study we analyzed the penetration of fluconazole into the human pancreas and in experimental acute pancreatitis. In human pancreatic tissues, the mean fluconazole concentration was 8.19 ± 3.38 μg/g (96% of the corresponding concentration in serum). In experimental edematous and necrotizing pancreatitis, 88 and 91% of the serum fluconazole concentration was found in the pancreas. These data show that fluconazole penetration into the pancreas is sufficient to prevent and/or treat fungal contamination in patients with pancreatic necrosis. PMID:10952621

  2. Evaluation of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Greek Patients with Advanced Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Parpa, Efi; Tsilika, Eleni; Panagiotoua, Irene; Roumeliotou, Anna; Symeonidi, Matina; Galanos, Antonis; Kouvaris, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Translation of the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) was carried out and its psychometric properties were assessed in a Greek sample of patients with advanced cancer. The scale was translated with the forward-backward procedure into the Greek language. It was initially administered to 136 advanced cancer patients. To assess…

  3. Advances in Breast Cancer – Looking Back over the Year

    PubMed Central

    Lüftner, D.; Lux, M. P.; Maass, N.; Schütz, F.; Schwidde, I.; Fasching, P. A.; Fehm, T.; Janni, W.; Kümmel, S.; Kolberg, H.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment options as well as the characteristics for therapeutic decisions in patients with primary and advanced breast cancer are increasing in number and variety. New targeted therapies in combination with established chemotherapy schemes are broadening the spectrum, yet not every new, promising combination achieves a better result. New data from the field of pharmacogenomics point to prognostic and predictive factors that take not only the properties of the tumour but also the genetic disposition of the patient into consideration. Current therapeutic decision-making is thus based on a combination of classical clinical and modern molecular biomarkers. Health-economic concerns are also being taken into consideration more frequently, meaning political decisions may also become a factor. This review presents the trends over the past year. PMID:26640285

  4. Recent advances in oral anticancer agents for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Raj Kumar

    2013-12-01

    To provide therapeutic alternatives to intravenous colon chemotherapy major recent research is focusing on the development of oral chemotherapeutic agents with the intention to improve the quality of life of patients. Initially 5-fluorouracil was most commonly used for the treatment of colorectal cancer but currently oxaliplatin and irinotecan are also available. The majority of these new drugs are pyrimidines and their analogs. The rationale for using oral anticancer agents is discussed and new drugs, such as farnesyl protein transferase inhibitor S-1, rubitecan, ZD9331, MMI-166, eflornithine, sulindac, and oral camptothecin analogs, among others, are presented with the results of their preclinical and clinical developments. This article focuses on the advancement of clinical development and also discusses the relative merits and demerits of these agents. The accelerated approval of these agents by regulatory authorities is supported by survival benefit, response rate and time to progression.

  5. Letrozole in advanced breast cancer: the PO25 trial

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Tamoxifen has been a standard first-line endocrine therapy for post-menopausal women with hormone-responsive advanced breast cancer, but more than half of patients fail to respond and time to progression is less than 12 months in responders. The third-generation aromatase inhibitors were developed to provide more effective alternatives to tamoxifen. In the Femara Study PO25, post-menopausal women with advanced breast cancer were randomized to receive letrozole 2.5 mg (n = 453) or tamoxifen 20 mg (n = 454) given orally daily until progressive disease occurred. Patients were permitted to cross over to the other treatment at progression. In the primary efficacy analysis, median time to progression (TTP) was significantly longer with letrozole than with tamoxifen (9.4 months vs. 6.0 months, respectively; P < 0.0001). The objective response rate (ORR) was significantly higher for letrozole than for tamoxifen (32% vs. 21%; P = 0.0002). Prospectively planned analyses of the intent-to-treat population showed that letrozole significantly improved overall survival (OS) compared with tamoxifen over the first 24 months of the trial. An exploratory analysis of patients, who did not cross over, indicated a median OS benefit of 14 months for letrozole compared with tamoxifen. Letrozole is the only third-generation aromatase inhibitor that has demonstrated significant improvements in ORR, TTP, and early OS. PMID:17333340

  6. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  7. Recent advances in the development of breast cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Andrea; Sangiolo, Dario; Aglietta, Massimo; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    The manipulation of the immune system through the administration of a vaccine to direct an effective and long-lasting immune response against breast cancer (BC) cells is an attractive strategy. Vaccines would have several theoretical advantages over standard therapies, including low toxicities, high specificity, and long-lasting efficacy due to the establishment of immunological memory. However, BC vaccines have failed to demonstrate meaningful results in clinical trials so far. This reflects the intrinsic difficulty in breaking the complex immune-escaping mechanisms developed by cancer cells. New vaccines should be able to elicit complex immunologic response involving multiple immune effectors such as cytotoxic and antibody-secreting B cells, innate immunity effectors, and memory cells. Moreover, especially in patients with large tumor burdens and metastatic disease, combining vaccines with other strategies, such as systemic BC therapies, passive immunotherapy, or immunomodulatory agents, could increase the effectiveness of each approach. Here, we review recent advances in BC vaccines, focusing on suitable targets and innovative strategies. We report results of most recent trials investigating active immunotherapy in BC and provide possible future perspectives in this field of research. PMID:25339848

  8. [Laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Gürlich, R; Sixta, B; Oliverius, M; Kment, M; Rusina, R; Spicák, J; Sváb, J

    2005-09-01

    During the last two years, reports on laparoscopic procedures of the pancreas have been on increase. Laparoscopic resection of the pancreatic cauda is indicated, primarily, for benign cystic lesions of the cauda of the pancreas and for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (mainly insulinomas). We have not recorded any report on the above procedure in the Czech literature. Therefore, in our case review, we have described laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas with splenectomy for a pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas.

  9. Brain metastasis reirradiation in patients with advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhou; Sun, Bing; Shen, Ge; Cha, Lei; Meng, Xiangying; Wang, Junliang; Zhou, Zhenshan; Wu, Shikai

    2017-01-01

    The outcome of recurrent brain metastasis is dismal. This study aims to assess the clinical outcomes and toxicity of reirradiation as a salvage treatment for progressive brain metastasis in patients with advanced breast cancer. Between July 2005 and September 2014, the medical records of 56 patients with brain metastasis from breast cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Of these patients, 39 received whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) followed by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) reirradiation (Group 1), and 17 received SRS followed by WBRT reirradiation (Group 2). Overall survival (OS) and brain progression-free survival rates/times were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Prognostic factors were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Change in neurologic function was also assessed. The median OS was 10.8 months (range, 1.3–56.8 months). In Group 1, the median PFS time (PFS-1) was 6.5 months and the OS time was 11.4 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that longer OS was significantly associated with a high Karnofsky performance score (KPS) (P = 0.004), controlled extracranial metastasis (P = 0.001) and a good response to reirradiation (P = 0.034). In Group 2, the median PFS time (PFS-2) after reirradiation was 8.5 months and the OS time was 10.8 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that longer OS was significantly associated with a high KPS (P = 0.018). The majority of the patients had improved or stable neurological function. Reirradiation is an effective and a safe treatment for patients with brain metastases from breast cancer. It might delay the progression of intracranial disease and improve neurological function. A suitable patient selection for reirradiation was suggested. PMID:27707842

  10. Liquid biopsy: ready to guide therapy in advanced prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Hegemann, Miriam; Stenzl, Arnulf; Bedke, Jens; Chi, Kim N; Black, Peter C; Todenhöfer, Tilman

    2016-12-01

    The identification of molecular markers associated with response to specific therapy is a key step for the implementation of personalised treatment strategies in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Only in a low proportion of patients biopsies of metastatic tissue are performed. Circulating tumour cells (CTC), cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and RNA offer the potential for non-invasive characterisation of disease and molecular stratification of patients. Furthermore, a 'liquid biopsy' approach permits longitudinal assessments, allowing sequential monitoring of response and progression and the potential to alter therapy based on observed molecular changes. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration using the CellSearch© platform correlates with survival. Recent studies on the presence of androgen receptor (AR) variants in CTC have shown that such molecular characterisation of CTC provides a potential for identifying patients with resistance to agents that inhibit the androgen signalling axis, such as abiraterone and enzalutamide. New developments in CTC isolation, as well as in vitro and in vivo analysis of CTC will further promote the use of CTC as a tool for retrieving molecular information from advanced tumours in order to identify mechanisms of therapy resistance. In addition to CTC, nucleic acids such as RNA and cfDNA released by tumour cells into the peripheral blood contain important information on transcriptomic and genomic alterations in the tumours. Initial studies have shown that genomic alterations of the AR and other genes detected in CTC or cfDNA of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer correlate with treatment outcomes to enzalutamide and abiraterone. Due to recent developments in high-throughput analysis techniques, it is likely that CTC, cfDNA and RNA will be an important component of personalised treatment strategies in the future.

  11. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Omer; Gastman, Brian; Zhang, Alexandra

    2014-11-01

    The incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is rising. Research in the field of these tumors is aimed toward developing earlier and less invasive diagnostic methods and more effective, more accessible therapeutic options. Although there is much advancement in the diagnosis and treatment of NMSC, there are few literatures cataloging these developments. The aim of this review was to present the sensitivity and specificity of new imaging modalities, the dosing regimen and clearance rates of topical treatments, newer systemic treatment modalities, and discuss developments in the use of radiation as a mode of therapy. Recent developments in the diagnosis of NMSC include imaging modalities such as reflectance confocal microscopy, elastic scattering spectroscopy, and spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis. Recent advances in the treatment of these tumors include systemic therapies such as epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, and topical immunomodulating drugs such as imiquimod. The progress in the diagnosis and treatment of these tumors is a gradual but fruitful growth. Scientists and clinicians alike must continue their exploration and study to address these tumors and, hopefully in the future, prevent their occurrence.

  12. Lesions of the avian pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert E; Reavill, Drury R

    2014-01-01

    Although not well described, occasional reports of avian exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease are available. This article describes the lesions associated with common diseases of the avian pancreas reported in the literature and/or seen by the authors.

  13. Common Disorders of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... States is chronic alcohol consumption. Additional causes include cystic fibrosis and other hereditary disorders ofthe pancreas. For a ... inherited disorder that leads to chronic pancreatitis is cystic fibrosis. Recent research demonstrates genetic testing can be a ...

  14. Molecular Engineering of Vector-Based Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lily Wu, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...SUBTITLE Molecular Engineering of Vector-based Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Advanced Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT...reproductions will be in black and white. 14. ABSTRACT Hormone refractory and metastatic prostate cancer are not well understood. Better animal models

  15. Modeling Combined Chemotherapy and Particle Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Marco; Tommasino, Francesco; Yamada, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the only cancer for which deaths are predicted to increase in 2014 and beyond. Combined radiochemotherapy protocols using gemcitabine and hypofractionated X-rays are ongoing in several clinical trials. Recent results indicate that charged particle therapy substantially increases local control of resectable and unresectable pancreas cancer, as predicted from previous radiobiology studies considering the high tumor hypoxia. Combination with chemotherapy improves the overall survival (OS). We compared published data on X-ray and charged particle clinical results with or without adjuvant chemotherapy calculating the biological effective dose. We show that chemoradiotherapy with protons or carbon ions results in 1 year OS significantly higher than those obtained with other treatment schedules. Further hypofractionation using charged particles may result in improved local control and survival. A comparative clinical trial using the standard X-ray scheme vs. the best current standard with carbon ions is crucial and may open new opportunities for this deadly disease. PMID:26217585

  16. Advances and perspectives in lung cancer imaging using multidetector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel

    2012-10-01

    The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (CT) into clinical practice has revolutionized many aspects of the clinical work-up. Lung cancer imaging has benefited from various breakthroughs in computing technology, with advances in the field of lung cancer detection, tissue characterization, lung cancer staging and response to therapy. Our paper discusses the problems of radiation, image visualization and CT examination comparison. It also reviews the most significant advances in lung cancer imaging and highlights the emerging clinical applications that use state of the art CT technology in the field of lung cancer diagnosis and follow-up.

  17. Impact of Metformin on Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Survival: Too Little, Too Late?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Xiao; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Metformin offers no survival advantage in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. Despite promising experimental evidence suggesting an anti-tumor effect of metformin, its impact on the survival of advanced pancreatic cancer is likely very limited. Future studies may need to consider its role in early-stage pancreatic cancer. PMID:26637275

  18. Cisplatin and Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Epithelial Cancer or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-06

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  19. Palliative Surgical Approach in Advanced Nonresponsive Mucinous Ovarian Cancer: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Manika; Kumar, Ritesh; Topno, Noor; Mishra, Shweta; Dhirasaria, Ashish; Singh, A Santa

    2016-01-01

    Advanced mucinous ovarian cancer is a separate entity and has different biological behaviour. There is a wide range of therapeutic challenges and dilemmas in the management of these patients. The authors present a case of advanced ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma with pseudomyxoma peritonei who had poor response to standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This case is highlighted to emphasize the challenges in the decision making for the management of advanced mucinous ovarian cancer. PMID:27162429

  20. The changing hope trajectory in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Judith Brown; Seda, Julie S; Kardinal, Carl G

    2012-06-01

    As patients with advanced-stage cancer move from the initial diagnosis through treatment, remission, recurrence, and advanced-stage disease, the hope trajectory undergoes a dynamic transformation. By identifying the hope trajectory, nurses can help patients focus on obtainable hope objects while balancing the need to present a realistic prognosis. This, in turn, may help patients find meaning and purpose in advanced-stage cancer and facilitate realistic hope when faced with a life-threatening illness.

  1. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and colonization in patients with advanced lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    TOGASHI, YOSUKE; MASAGO, KATSUHIRO; ITO, YUTAKA; SAKAMORI, YUICHI; OKUDA, CHIYUKI; FUKUHARA, AKIKO; NAGAI, HIROKI; KIM, YOUNG HAK; MISHIMA, MICHIAKI

    2013-01-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) has long been recognized as a cause of mortality in immuno-compromised populations, including those with advanced lung cancer. Although Pneumocystis colonization has only recently been described due to the development of more sensitive molecular techniques, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), it is unknown whether Pneumocystis colonization leads to the development of PCP. In the present study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of Pneumocystis colonization in advanced lung cancer patients. Furthermore, the association between PCP and Pneumocystis colonization was also investigated. Advanced lung cancer patients with no indication of PCP were evaluated to determine the prevalence of Pneumocystis colonization. We analyzed their oral wash (OW) samples and retrospectively evaluated advanced lung cancer patients with PCP by analyzing their sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung tissues obtained following a diagnosis of lung cancer. Pneumocystis colonization was determined by a PCR test for Pneumocystis jiroveci (P. jiroveci). No P. jiroveci was detected by PCR in the OW samples of 47 advanced lung cancer patients with no indication of PCP, or in the lung tissues of four advanced lung cancer patients with PCP. These results indicate that PCP is not associated with Pneumocystis colonization in advanced lung cancer patients, although this study is limited since this was a cross-sectional and retrospective study. PMID:23420670

  2. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  3. Molecular pathogenesis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Thosani, Nirav; Dasari, Chandra S; Bhutani, Manoop S; Raimondo, Massimo; Guha, Sushovan

    2010-11-01

    Over the last 3 decades, there have been substantial improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques to evaluate pancreatic diseases. The modern technology has helped us to recognize premalignant conditions of pancreas including mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). Differentiation between benign and malignant lesions and early detection of any malignant transformation in premalignant lesion are extremely important for further management decisions. Diagnostic cytology has limited sensitivity to further differentiate between benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions of the pancreas. There is limited information about the epidemiological risk factors and molecular mechanisms leading to development and further progression to malignancy of IPMNs. Several studies have shown that pancreatic juice and pancreatic tissue from the lesion can be tested for molecular markers including K-ras, p53, and p16 to differentiate between cancer and chronic inflammatory process. We review cellular signaling pathways that contribute to pathogenesis of IPMNs of the pancreas to further identify potential biomarkers and molecular targets.

  4. Pancreas Transplantation—Registry Report and a Commentary

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, David E. R.; Kendall, David M.

    1985-01-01

    From December 1966 through December 1984, there were 561 pancreas transplants reported to the American College of Surgeons/National Institutes of Health Organ Transplant Registry, including 60 from 1966 through June 1977, 206 from July 1977 through December 1982 and 295 from January 1983 through December 1984. One-year graft function-survival rates (insulin-independent) in each of the three periods were 3%, 20% and 40%, and the corresponding patient survival rates were 40%, 72% and 77%. Currently 140 patients have functioning grafts, 76 for more than one year. Of the transplants since July 1977, one-year graft survival rates according to technique are 41% for enteric drainage (N = 155), 30% for polymer injection (N = 260) and 29% for urinary drainage (N = 47). Pancreas graft survival rates at one year according to whether or not the recipients have had a kidney transplant were 35% for recipients of simultaneous grafts (N = 281), 28% in recipients of a pancreas after a kidney (N = 112) and 26% in recipients of a pancreas only who did not have uremia (N = 106); corresponding patient survival rates were 69%, 83% and 83%. Overall, one-year pancreas graft survival rates according to whether the patients did or did not have end-stage diabetic nephropathy were 33% versus 25% and the corresponding patient survival rates were 73% versus 84% (P < .01). Patient survival rates were significantly higher in those without than in those with end-stage diabetic nephropathy. An analysis of technically successful grafts according to principal immunosuppressant showed one-year function rates of 46% in 258 cyclosporine-treated recipients and 26% in 143 azathioprine-treated recipients. Pancreas graft survival rates have progressively improved and the procedure has become safer with advances in surgical technique and immunosuppression. Pancreas transplantation is currently applicable to patients with diabetes mellitus whose complications are, or predictably will be, more serious than the

  5. Pancreatic stellate cells--multi-functional cells in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a pivotal role in pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In addition, we have seen great progress in our understanding of the cell biology of PSCs and the interactions between PSCs and other cell types in the pancreas. In response to pancreatic injury or inflammation, quiescent PSCs are activated to myofibroblast-like cells. Recent studies have shown that the activation of intracellular signaling pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinases plays a role in the activation of PSCs. microRNAs might also play a role, because the microRNA expression profiles are dramatically altered in the process of activation. In addition to producing extracellular matrix components such as type I collagen, PSCs have a wide variety of cell functions related to local immunity, inflammation, angiogenesis, and exocrine and endocrine functions in the pancreas. From this point of view, the interactions between PSCs and other cell types such as pancreatic exocrine cells, endocrine cells, and cancer cells have attracted increasing attention of researchers. PSCs might regulate exocrine functions in the pancreas through the cholecystokinin-induced release of acetylcholine. PSCs induce apoptosis and decrease insulin expression in β-cells, suggesting a novel mechanism of diabetes in diseased pancreas. PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by multiple mechanisms. Recent studies have shown that PSCs induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition and enhance the stem-cell like features of pancreatic cancer cells. In conclusion, PSCs should now be recognized as not only profibrogenic cells but as multi-functional cells in the pancreas.

  6. Association of the innate immunity and inflammation pathway with advanced prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Kazma, Rémi; Mefford, Joel A; Cheng, Iona; Plummer, Sarah J; Levin, Albert M; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Casey, Graham; Witte, John S

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent and second most lethal cancer in men in the United States. Innate immunity and inflammation may increase the risk of prostate cancer. To determine the role of innate immunity and inflammation in advanced prostate cancer, we investigated the association of 320 single nucleotide polymorphisms, located in 46 genes involved in this pathway, with disease risk using 494 cases with advanced disease and 536 controls from Cleveland, Ohio. Taken together, the whole pathway was associated with advanced prostate cancer risk (P = 0.02). Two sub-pathways (intracellular antiviral molecules and extracellular pattern recognition) and four genes in these sub-pathways (TLR1, TLR6, OAS1, and OAS2) were nominally associated with advanced prostate cancer risk and harbor several SNPs nominally associated with advanced prostate cancer risk. Our results suggest that the innate immunity and inflammation pathway may play a modest role in the etiology of advanced prostate cancer through multiple small effects.

  7. Current preclinical models for the advancement of translational bladder cancer research.

    PubMed

    DeGraff, David J; Robinson, Victoria L; Shah, Jay B; Brandt, William D; Sonpavde, Guru; Kang, Yibin; Liebert, Monica; Wu, Xue-Ru; Taylor, John A

    2013-02-01

    Bladder cancer is a common disease representing the fifth most diagnosed solid tumor in the United States. Despite this, advances in our understanding of the molecular etiology and treatment of bladder cancer have been relatively lacking. This is especially apparent when recent advances in other cancers, such as breast and prostate, are taken into consideration. The field of bladder cancer research is ready and poised for a series of paradigm-shifting discoveries that will greatly impact the way this disease is clinically managed. Future preclinical discoveries with translational potential will require investigators to take full advantage of recent advances in molecular and animal modeling methodologies. We present an overview of current preclinical models and their potential roles in advancing our understanding of this deadly disease and for advancing care.

  8. [New Classification for Advanced Colorectal Cancer Using CancerPlex®Genomic Tests].

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Hitoshi; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Nogami, Hitoshi; Maruyama, Satoshi; Takii, Yasumasa; Okuda, Shujiro; Ling, Yiwei; Izutsu, Hiroshi; Kodama, Keisuke; Nakada, Mitsutaka; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-11-01

    Recently, targeted drugs have been developed for the treatment of colorectal cancer(CRC). Among targets, it is well known that KRAS mutations are associated with resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)monoclonal antibodies. However, response rates using anti-EGFR monotherapy for CRC were less than 20-30% in previous clinical studies. Thus, because the RAS/MAP2K/MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways are associated with CRC resistance to chemotherapy, we analyzed gene mutations in Stage IV CRC patients using a genomic test(CancerPlex®). Medical records were reviewed for 112 patients who received treatment for CRC between 2007 and 2015 in Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital or Niigata Cancer Center Hospital. There were 66 male and 46 female patients, and their median age was 62.5(range, 30-86) years. Cluster analyses were performed in 110 non-hypermutated Japanese CRC patients using Euclidean distance and Ward's clustering method, and 6 typical groups were identified. Among these, patients with all wild-type actionable genes benefited from anti-EGFR therapies. The expense of targeted drugs warrants consideration of cost-effectiveness during treatment decision-making for advanced CRC patients. To this end, based on the genetic information on CRC, it is possible to develop precision medicine using CancerPlex®.

  9. Controversies in the management of advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, C J

    1999-01-01

    For advanced prostate cancer, the main hormone treatment against which other treatments are assessed is surgical castration. It is simple, safe and effective, however it is not acceptable to all patients. Medical castration by means of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) analogues such as goserelin acetate provides an alternative to surgical castration. Diethylstilboestrol, previously the only non-surgical alternative to orchidectomy, is no longer routinely used. Castration reduces serum testosterone by around 90%, but does not affect androgen biosynthesis in the adrenal glands. Addition of an anti-androgen to medical or surgical castration blocks the effect of remaining testosterone on prostate cells and is termed combined androgen blockade (CAB). CAB has now been compared with castration alone (medical and surgical) in numerous clinical trials. Some trials show advantage of CAB over castration, whereas others report no significant difference. The author favours the view that CAB has an advantage over castration. No study has reported that CAB is less effective than castration. Of the anti-androgens which are available for use in CAB, bicalutamide may be associated with a lower incidence of side-effects compared with the other non-steroidal anti-androgens and, in common with nilutamide, has the advantage of once-daily dosing. Only one study has compared anti-androgens within CAB: bicalutamide plus LH-RH analogue and flutamide plus LH-RH analogue. At 160-week follow-up, the groups were equivalent in terms of survival and time to progression. However, bicalutamide caused significantly less diarrhoea than flutamide. Withdrawal and intermittent therapy with anti-androgens extend the range of treatment options. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408706

  10. [A Case of Advanced Esophageal Cancer and Tongue Cancer Treated with Induction DCF Chemotherapy Followed by Radical Surgery].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motomu; Koyanagi, Kazuo; Sugiura, Hitoshi; Kakefuda, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 60s was admitted for the treatment of advanced cervical esophageal cancer with metastasis to the lymph nodes and advanced tongue cancer with metastasis to the lymph nodes. Esophageal cancer was suspected to have invaded the trachea. The tongue cancer was located on the left side and had invaded beyond the median line of the tongue. Both cancers were pathologically diagnosed as squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, it was determined that pharyngo-laryngo- esophagectomy and total glossectomy were required prior to the treatment. However, after 2 courses of docetaxel/cisplatin/ 5-FU combined induction chemotherapy, both cancers remarkably decreased; consequently, an esophagectomy to preserve laryngeal function and partial glossectomy could be performed simultaneously. The patient is well without recurrence 1 year post-surgery.

  11. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-17

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  12. Clinical Cancer Advances 2017: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Harold J; Krilov, Lada; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Baxter, Nancy N; Chiorean, E Gabriela; Chow, Warren Allen; De Groot, John Frederick; Devine, Steven Michael; DuBois, Steven G; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Epstein, Andrew S; Heymach, John; Jones, Joshua Adam; Mayer, Deborah K; Miksad, Rebecca A; Pennell, Nathan A; Sabel, Michael S; Schilsky, Richard L; Schuchter, Lynn Mara; Tung, Nadine; Winkfield, Karen Marie; Wirth, Lori J; Dizon, Don S

    2017-02-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT I am pleased to present Clinical Cancer Advances 2017, which highlights the most promising advances in patient-oriented cancer research over the past year. The report gives us an opportunity to reflect on what an exciting time it is for cancer research and how swiftly our understanding of cancer has improved. One year ago, the White House announced the national Cancer Moonshot program to accelerate progress against cancer. This shared vision of progress has reinvigorated the research community, identified new areas of scientific collaboration, and raised our ambitions regarding what may be possible beyond the progress we have already made. When I entered the field 35 years ago, I could not have imagined where we would be today. We can now detect cancer earlier, target treatments more effectively, and manage adverse effects more effectively to enable patients to live better, more fulfilling lives. Today, two of three people with cancer live at least 5 years after diagnosis, up from roughly one of two in the 1970s. This progress has resulted from decades of incremental advances that have collectively expanded our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of cancer. There is no better current example of this than ASCO's 2017 Advance of the Year: Immunotherapy 2.0. Over the last year, there has been a wave of new successes with immunotherapy. Research has proven this approach can be effective against a wide range of hard-to-treat advanced cancers previously considered intractable. Researchers are now working to identify biologic markers that can help increase the effectiveness of treatment and determine who is most likely to benefit from immunotherapy. This knowledge will enable oncologists to make evidence-based decisions so as many patients as possible might benefit from this new type of treatment. Each successive advance builds on the previous hard work of generations of basic, translational, and clinical cancer researchers

  13. Clinical cancer advances 2007: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gralow, Julie; Ozols, Robert F; Bajorin, Dean F; Cheson, Bruce D; Sandler, Howard M; Winer, Eric P; Bonner, James; Demetri, George D; Curran, Walter; Ganz, Patricia A; Kramer, Barnett S; Kris, Mark G; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert J; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Davidson, Nancy E; Schilsky, Richard L; Lichter, Allen S

    2008-01-10

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT: For the third year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant cancer research presented or published over the past year. ASCO publishes this report to demonstrate the important progress being made on the front lines of clinical cancer research today. The report is intended to give all those with an interest in cancer care-the general public, cancer patients and organizations, policymakers, oncologists, and other medical professionals-an accessible summary of the year's most important cancer research advances. These pages report on the use of magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening, the association between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer incidence, the link between human papillomavirus and head and neck cancers, and the use of radiation therapy to prevent lung cancer from spreading. They also report on effective new targeted therapies for cancers that have been historically difficult to treat, such as liver cancer and kidney cancer, among many others. A total of 24 advances are featured in this year's report. These advances and many more over the past several years show that the nation's long-term investment in cancer research is paying off. But there are disturbing signs that progress could slow. We are now in the midst of the longest sustained period of flat government funding for cancer research in history. The budgets for the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have been unchanged for four years. When adjusted for inflation, cancer research funding has actually declined 12% since 2004. These budget constraints limit the NCI's ability to fund promising cancer research. In the past several years the number of grants that the NCI has been able to fund has significantly decreased; this year, in response to just the

  14. New Players for Advanced Prostate Cancer and the Rationalisation of Insulin-Sensitising Medication

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Jennifer H.; Sarkar, Phoebe L.; Lubik, Amy A.; Nelson, Colleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are recognised risk factors for the development of some cancers and, increasingly, predict more aggressive disease, treatment failure, and cancer-specific mortality. Many factors may contribute to this clinical observation. Hyperinsulinaemia, dyslipidaemia, hypoxia, ER stress, and inflammation associated with expanded adipose tissue are thought to be among the main culprits driving malignant growth and cancer advancement. This observation has led to the proposal of the potential utility of “old players” for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome as new cancer adjuvant therapeutics. Androgen-regulated pathways drive proliferation, differentiation, and survival of benign and malignant prostate tissue. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) exploits this dependence to systemically treat advanced prostate cancer resulting in anticancer response and improvement of cancer symptoms. However, the initial therapeutic response from ADT eventually progresses to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which is currently incurable. ADT rapidly induces hyperinsulinaemia which is associated with more rapid treatment failure. We discuss current observations of cancer in the context of obesity, diabetes, and insulin-lowering medication. We provide an update on current treatments for advanced prostate cancer and discuss whether metabolic dysfunction, developed during ADT, provides a unique therapeutic window for rapid translation of insulin-sensitising medication as combination therapy with antiandrogen targeting agents for the management of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:23573093

  15. Organ Facts: Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Groups Patient Resources Newsroom Minorities AFTER THE TRANSPLANT Medications Staying Healthy Recovery Resources Lifestyle Changes Pregnancy Cancer PEDIATRIC Addressing Children's Needs Coping With Anxiety Helping Your Child Adjust Camps Resources LIVING DONATION ...

  16. Living Fully in the Shadow of Mortal Time: Psychosocial Assets in Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Meg; Marchand, Lucille

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize the strategies and psychosocial conditions that influence how resilient people live in the face of advanced cancer. Methods Grounded theory interviews and surveys of ten resilient people with advanced cancer were collected and analyzed. Findings Personal assets including positive relationships, purpose in life, faith, and a sense of mastery contributed to living fully in “mortal time.” Strategies included embracing paradox, reframing time, deepening connections, and aligning actions with priorities. Open-ended interviews yielded rich illness and life stories; many participants requested a copy of the transcript. Conclusions Resilient people use a range of strategies to thrive in the face of advanced cancer. PMID:23923470

  17. Diagnosis and management of solid pseudopapillary tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, M M; Khan, Z R; Hossain, M S

    2010-10-01

    The finding of a solid or cystic mass in the pancreas is becoming more common secondary to the increasing use of cross-sectional imaging and the improved sensitivity of such studies for the detection of pancreatic abnormalities. Because of the aggressive natural history of pancreatic cancer, this has caused concern that all pancreatic abnormalities may be cancer as well as confusion over proper diagnostic and treatment algorithms. This review provides an overview of the natural history, diagnostic considerations, and treatment recommendations for the less common tumor of the pancreas which can be misinterpreted as pancreatic cancer: solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPT). A Medline search was conducted to identify studies investigating the clinicopath-ologic features, molecular genetics, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of SPT. It is often possible to obtain an accurate pretreatment diagnosis for this unusual pancreatic tumor and to successfully differentiate them from the more common pancreatic malignancies.

  18. Pig Pancreas Anatomy: Implications for Pancreas Procurement, Preservation, and Islet Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Joana; Scott, William E; Weegman, Bradley P; Suszynski, Thomas M; Sutherland, David E R; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2009-01-01

    Background Islet transplantation is emerging as a treatment option for selected patients with type 1 diabetes. The limited human islet supply from cadavers and poor islet yield and quality remain substantial impediments to progress in the field. Use of porcine islets holds great promise for large-scale application of islet transplantation. Consistent isolation of porcine islets is dependent on advances in pancreas procurement and preservation, and islet isolation requiring detailed knowledge of the porcine pancreatic anatomy. The primary aim of this study was to describe the vascular and ductal anatomy of the porcine pancreas in order to guide and improve organ preservation and enzyme perfusion. Methods Pancreata were removed by en bloc viscerectomy from 65 female Landrace pigs. Results 15% of organs exhibited inconsistent vascular branching from the celiac trunk. All organs had uniform patterns of branching at the superior mesenteric artery. The superior and inferior mesenteric veins (IMV) merged to become the portal vein in all but one case in which the IMV drained into the splenic vein. 97% of pancreata had three lobes: duodenal (DL), connecting (CL), and splenic (SL); 39% demonstrated ductal communication between the CL and the other two lobes; 50% had ductal communication only between the CL and DL; and 11% presented other types of ductal delineation. Conclusions Accounting for the variations in vascular and ductal anatomy, as detailed in this study, will facilitate development of protocols for preservation, optimal enzyme administration, and pancreas distention and digestion, and ultimately lead to substantial improvements in isolation outcomes. PMID:19077881

  19. Hospitalists caring for patients with advanced cancer: An experience-based guide

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Douglas J.; Tonorezos, Emily S.; Kumar, Chhavi B.; Goring, Tabitha N.; Salvit, Cori; Egan, Barbara C.

    2016-01-01

    Every year, nearly five million adults with cancer are hospitalized. Limited evidence suggests that hospitalization of the cancer patient is associated with adverse morbidity and mortality. Hospitalization of the patient with advanced cancer allows for an intense examination of health status in the face of terminal illness and an opportunity for defining goals of care. This experience-based guide reports what is currently known about the topic and outlines a systematic approach to maximizing opportunities, improving quality, and enhancing the well-being of the hospitalized patient with advanced cancer. PMID:26588430

  20. Natural Products as Adjunctive Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer: Recent Trends and Advancements

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guogang; Zou, Gangyong; Yu, Haiqing

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a type of common malignant tumors with high occurrence in the world. Most patients presented in clinic had pancreatic cancer at advanced stages. Furthermore, chemotherapy or radiotherapy had very limited success in treating pancreatic cancer. Complementary and alternative medicines, such as natural products/herbal medicines, represent exciting adjunctive therapies. In this review, we summarize the recent advances of using natural products/herbal medicines, such as Chinese herbal medicine, in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic agents to treat pancreatic cancer in preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:28232946

  1. Surgical treatment of advanced colorectal cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Antonio; Zbar, Andrew P; Bertani, Emilio; Biffi, Roberto; Luca, Fabrizio; Pace, Ugo; Viale, Giuseppe; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Orecchia, Roberto; Lazzari, Roberta; Biella, Francesca; Grassi, Carmine; Zampino, Giulia; Fazio, Nicola; Della Vigna, Paolo; Andreoni, Luca; Andreoni, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the short and long-term outcomes of older and younger colorectal cancer patients with advanced disease resected with a curative intent. Six hundred and ninety-two patients were analysed. Four hundred and seventy-nine patients were younger than 70 years (Group 1), and 213 were 70 years of age or above (Group 2). The overall perioperative mortality rate in the younger group was 0.8% (n = 7), as against 1.4% (n = 3) in the elderly group (p = NS). The morbidity rates were 35% and 42%, respectively (p = NS). At univariate analysis, the elderly patients had a worse overall survival compared to the younger group, when only patients undergoing postoperative chemo-radiotherapy were considered (54% vs 67% overall survival at 5 years; p = 0.03). Using logistic regression analysis, tumour stage (p < 0.0001) and radicality of surgery (p < 0.0001) correlated significantly with overall survival rates in the elderly. Colorectal surgery for malignancy can be performed safely in the elderly with acceptable morbidity and mortality rates and long-term survival.

  2. Selective Mastectomy in the Management of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahern, Verity . E-mail: verity.ahern@swahs.healthnsw.gov.au; Boyages, John; Gebski, Val M. Stat; Moon, Dominic; Wilcken, Nicholas

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate local control for patients with locally advanced noninflammatory breast cancer (LABC) managed by selective mastectomy. Methods and Materials: Between 1979 and 1996, 176 patients with LABC were prospectively managed by chemotherapy (CT)-irradiation (RT)-CT without routine mastectomy. All surviving patients were followed for a minimum of 5 years. Results: A total of 132 patients (75%) had a T4 tumor and 22 (12.5%) supraclavicular nodal disease. The clinical complete response rate was 91% (160/176), which included 13 patients who underwent mastectomy and 2 an iridium wire implant. The first site of failure was local for 43 patients (breast {+-} axilla for 38); 27 of these patients underwent salvage mastectomy and 11 did not for an overall mastectomy rate of 23% (40/176). If all 176 patients had undergone routine mastectomy (136 extra mastectomies), 11 additional patients may have avoided an unsalvageable first local relapse. The others would have either have not had a local relapse or would have suffered local relapse after distant disease. No tumor or treatment related factor was found to predict local disease at death. Median disease-free and overall survival for all patients was 26 and 52 months, respectively. Conclusions: Selective mastectomy in LABC may not jeopardize local control or survival.

  3. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  4. Gemcitabine for the treatment of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Toschi, Luca; Cappuzzo, Federico

    2009-02-18

    Gemcitabine is a pyrimidine nucleoside antimetabolite agent which is active in several human malignancies, including nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Because of its acceptable toxicity profile, with myelosuppression being the most common adverse event, gemcitabine can be safely combined with a number of cytotoxic agents, including platinum derivatives and new-generation anticancer compounds. In fact, the combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin is a first-line treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC, pharmacoeconomic data indicating that it represents the most cost-effective regimen among platinum-based combinations with third-generation cytotoxic drugs. The drug has been investigated in the context of nonplatinum-based regimens in a number of prospective clinical trials, and might provide a suitable alternative for patients with contraindications to platinum. Recently, gemcitabine-based doublets have been successfully tested in association with novel targeted agents with encouraging results, providing further evidence for the role of the drug in the treatment of NSCLC. In the last few years several attempts have been pursued in order to identify molecular predictors of gemcitabine activity, and recent data support the feasibility of genomic-based approaches to customize treatment with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcome.

  5. [Novelties in the treatment for advanced renal-cell cancer].

    PubMed

    Maráz, Anikó

    2011-04-24

    Therapeutic options in advanced renal-cell cancer have expanded through better understanding of molecular pathology and development of novel targeted therapeutics. Vascular endothelial growth factor, the key ligand of angiogenesis, has a major role in the progression of vascularized kidney tumors and this is the target molecule of modern medications. The three types of the mechanism of action of current therapies are: monoclonal antibodies blocking directly vascular endothelial growth factor ligand (bevacizumab), tyrosine-kinase inhibitors blocking vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (sorafenib, sunitinib, pazopanib) and inhibitors of the intracellular mTOR-kinase (temsirolimus, everolimus). Based on randomized studies, sunitinib, pazopanib or interferon-α-bevacizumab combination should be the first-line therapy in patients with good/moderate prognosis, while temsirolimus is recommended in those with poor prognosis. Following an ineffective cytokine therapy sorafenib or pazopanib are the second-line treatment. In case of tyrosine-kinase inhibitor inefficacy, current evidence favors everolimus. Patient outcome can further be improved by the involvement of more modern and effective target products.

  6. Clinical Cancer Advances 2005: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Roy S; Bajorin, Dean F; Bleiberg, Harry; Blum, Diane; Hao, Desirée; Johnson, Bruce E; Ozols, Robert F; Demetri, George D; Ganz, Patricia A; Kris, Mark G; Levin, Bernard; Markman, Maurie; Raghavan, Derek; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Vokes, Everett E; Winn, Rodger J; Mayer, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    This year, for the first time, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances 2005: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant clinical research presented or published over the past year across all cancer types. ASCO embarked on this project to provide the public, patients, policymakers, and physicians with an accessible summary of the year's most important research advances. While not intended to serve as a comprehensive review, this report provides a year-end snapshot of research that will have the greatest impact on patient care. As you will read, there is much good news from the front lines of cancer research. These pages report on new chemotherapy regimens that sharply reduce the risk of recurrence for very common cancers; the "coming of age" of targeted cancer therapies; promising studies of drugs to prevent cancer; and improvements in quality of life for people living with the disease, among many other advances. Survival rates for cancer are on the rise, increasing from 50% to 64% over the last 30 years. Cancer still exacts an enormous toll, however. Nearly 1.4 million Americans will be diagnosed this year, and some 570,000 will die of the disease. Clearly, more research is needed to find effective therapies for the most stubborn cancer types and stages. We need to know more about the long-term effects of newer, more targeted cancer therapies, some of which need to be taken over long periods of time. And we need to devote far greater attention to tracking and improving the care of the nearly 10 million cancer survivors in the United States today. Despite these and other challenges, the message of this report is one of hope. Through the dedicated, persistent pursuit of clinical research and participation in clinical trials by people with cancer, we steadily uncover new and better ways of treating, diagnosing, and preventing a disease that touches the

  7. Design of a bioartificial pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Pareta, Rajesh A; Farney, Alan C; Opara, Emmanuel C

    2013-01-01

    Summary Islet transplantation has been shown to be a viable treatment option for patients afflicted with Type 1 diabetes. However, the severe shortage of human pancreas and the need to use risky immunosuppressive drugs to prevent transplant rejection remain two major obstacles to routine use of islet transplantation in diabetic patients. Successful development of a bioartificial pancreas using the approach of microencapsulation with perm-selective coating of islets in hydrogels for graft immunoisolation holds tremendous promise for diabetic patients because it has great potential to overcome these two barriers. In this review article, we will discuss the need for bioartificial pancreas, provide a detailed description of the microencapsulation process, and review the status of the technology in clinical development. We will also critically review the various factors that need to be taken into consideration in order to achieve the ultimate goal of routine clinical application. PMID:23652283

  8. Alisertib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. Possible link between ectopic pancreas and holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Kin, Tatsuya; Korbutt, Gregory S; Shapiro, A M James

    2012-01-01

    We report on the incidental observation of ectopic pancreas in a donor for islet cell transplantation. The donor's clinical and imaging presentation was definitive for holoprosencephaly. This case report discusses a possible link between ectopic pancreas and holoprosencephaly.

  10. Lymphoepithelial Cyst of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Prabhu; Fletcher, Natalie; Kyriakides, Charis; Mears, Lisa; Kocher, Hemant M.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst (LEC) of the pancreas is an extremely rare, benign pancreatic cystic lesion that is difficult to differentiate preoperatively from other cystic pancreatic lesions. LEC may have malignant potential. Here, we describe a case of LEC of the pancreas – initially suspected to be a mucinous cyst neoplasm – in an elderly man presenting with abdominal pain, who went on to have a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. We also review the relevant literature and discuss implications for the diagnosis and management of this rare lesion. PMID:27403123

  11. The economics of pancreas surgery.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Charles M

    2013-06-01

    Pancreas surgery is a paradigm for high-acuity surgical specialization. Given the current intrigue over containing health care expenditures, pancreas surgery provides an ideal model to investigate the cost of care. This article explores the economics of this field from literature accrued over the last 2 decades. The cost of performing a pancreatic resection is established and then embellished with a discussion of the effects of clinical care paths. Then the influence of complications on costs is explored. Next, cost is investigated as an emerging outcome metric regarding variations in pancreatic surgical care. Finally, the societal-level fiscal impact is considered.

  12. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  13. Powerful Drug for Advanced Cancers May Need Less Frequent Dosing

    MedlinePlus

    ... clinical affairs at Northwell Health Cancer Institute in Lake Success, N.Y. According to Carleton, zoledronic acid ... associate chief, clinical affairs, Northwell Health Cancer Institute, Lake Success, N.Y.; Journal of the American Medical ...

  14. Characterizing the Hypermutated Subtype of Advanced Prostate Cancer as a Predictive Biomarker for Precision Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    hypermutated advanced prostate cancers. Using a targeted deep sequencing assay that includes intronic and flanking regions we discovered DNA mismatch...subtype of advanced prostate cancer, most likely mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. To test this hypothesis we performed targeted deep ...have adapted the mSINGS method to both the BROCA and UW-OncoPlex genomic deep sequencing platforms to accurately detect both phenotypic MSI and

  15. Discriminating cancer-related and cancer-unrelated chemoradiation-response genes for locally advanced rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, You; Cheng, Jun; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Zhang, Juan; Yan, Haidan; Cai, Hao; Gao, Qiao; Jiang, Weizhong; Guo, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    For patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with preoperation chemoradiation (pCRT), identifying differentially expressed (DE) genes between non-responders and responders is a common approach for investigating mechanisms of chemoradiation resistance. However, some of such DE genes might be irrelevant to cancer itself but simply reflect the pharmacokinetic differences of the normal tissues. In this study, we adopted the RankComp algorithm to identify DE genes for each of LARC sample compared with its own normal state. Then, we identified genes with significantly different deregulation frequencies between the non-responders and responders, defined as cancer-related pCRT-response genes. Pathway enrichment and protein-protein interaction analyses showed that these genes specifically and intensively interacted with currently known effective genes of pCRT, involving in DNA replication, cell cycle and DNA repair. In contrast, after excluding the cancer-related pCRT-response genes, the other DE genes between non-responders and responders were enriched in many pathways of drug and protein metabolisms and transports, and interacted with both the known effective genes and pharmacokinetic genes. Hence, these two types of DE genes should be distinguished for investigating mechanisms of pCRT response in LARCs. PMID:27845363

  16. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Esophageal Cancer or Stomach Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer

  17. A phase I trial investigating pulsatile erlotinib in combination with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin in advanced biliary tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Goff, Laura W; Cardin, Dana B; Whisenant, Jennifer G; Du, Liping; Koyama, Tatsuki; Dahlman, Kimberly B; Salaria, Safia N; Young, Ruth T; Ciombor, Kristen K; Gilbert, Jill; Smith, Stephen James; Chan, Emily; Berlin, Jordan

    2017-02-01

    Advanced biliary tract cancers (ABTC) are among the deadliest malignancies with limited treatment options after progression on standard-of-care chemotherapy, which includes gemcitabine (GEM) and oxaliplatin (OX). The epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib has been explored in ABTC with modest efficacy. Erlotinib given continuously may antagonize the action of chemotherapy against cycling tumor cells, but pulsatile dosing of erlotinib with chemotherapy may improve efficacy. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of pulsatile erlotinib with GEMOX. This was a single-institution phase Ib study that enrolled adult patients with unresectable or metastatic biliary tract, pancreas, duodenal, or ampullary carcinomas that have not received any prior treatment for their disease. Dose escalation followed a standard 3 + 3 design, and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were any treatment-related, first course non-hematologic grade ≥ 3 toxicity, except nausea/vomiting, or grade 4 hematologic toxicity. A dose expansion cohort in ABTC was treated at the MTD. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled and 4 dose levels were explored. The MTD was erlotinib 150 mg + GEM 800 mg/m(2) + OX 85 mg/m(2). DLTs were diarrhea and anemia. Most frequent toxicities were nausea (78 %), fatigue (71 %), neuropathy (68 %), and diarrhea (61 %), predominantly grade 1-2. In the ABTC patients, the objective response and disease control rates were 29 % and 94 %, respectively, and median overall survival was 18 months. Erlotinib plus GEMOX was well tolerated. Encouraging anti-tumor activity was seen as evidenced by a high disease control rate and longer median OS than standard chemotherapy in the patients with ABTC.

  18. Artificial Pancreas Project at Cambridge 2013.

    PubMed

    Hovorka, R

    2015-08-01

    The development and clinical testing of closed-loop systems (the artificial pancreas) is underpinned by advances in continuous glucose monitoring and benefits from concerted academic and industry collaborative efforts. This review describes the progress of the Artificial Pancreas Project at the University of Cambridge from 2006 to 2014. Initial studies under controlled laboratory conditions, designed to collect representative safety and performance data, were followed by short to medium free-living unsupervised outpatient studies demonstrating the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery using a model predictive control algorithm. Accompanying investigations included assessment of the psychosocial impact and key factors affecting glucose control such as insulin kinetics and glucose absorption. Translation to other disease conditions such as critical illness and Type 2 diabetes took place. It is concluded that innovation of iteratively enhanced closed-loop systems will provide tangible means to improve outcomes and quality of life in people with Type 1 diabetes and their families in the next decade.

  19. Targeting monoamine oxidase A in advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Flamand, Vincent; Zhao, Hongjuan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), a mitochondrial enzyme that degrades neurotransmitters including serotonin and norepinephrine, are commonly used to treat neurological conditions including depression. Recently, we and others identified high expression of MAOA in normal basal prostatic epithelium and high-grade primary prostate cancer (PCa). In contrast, MAOA is low in normal secretory prostatic epithelium and low-grade PCa. An irreversible inhibitor of MAOA, clorgyline, induced secretory differentiation in primary cultures of normal basal epithelial cells and high-grade PCa. Furthermore, clorgyline inhibited several oncogenic pathways in PCa cells, suggesting clinical value of MAOA inhibitors as a pro-differentiation and anti-oncogenic therapy for high-risk PCa. Here, we extended our studies to a model of advanced PCa, VCaP cells, which were derived from castration-resistant metastatic PCa and express a high level of MAOA. Methods Growth of VCaP cells in the presence or absence of clorgyline was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Gene expression changes in response to clorgyline were determined by microarray and validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Treatment with clorgyline in vitro inhibited growth and altered the transcriptional pattern of VCaP cells in a manner consistent with the pro-differentiation and anti-oncogenic effects seen in treated primary PCa cells. Src, beta-catenin, and MAPK oncogenic pathways, implicated in androgen-independent growth and metastasis, were significantly downregulated. Clorgyline treatment of mice bearing VCaP xenografts slowed tumor growth and induced transcriptome changes similar to those noted in vitro. Conclusion Our results support the possibility that anti-depressant drugs that target MAOA might find a new application in treating PCa. PMID:20204405

  20. Concept and Viability of Androgen Annihilation for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, James L.

    2014-01-01

    There remains no standard of care for patients with a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy but who have no radiographic metastases, even though this is the second largest group of prostate cancer (CaP) patients in the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) may cure some men with advanced CaP based on single institution series and a randomized clinical trial of immediate versus delayed ADT for men found to have pelvic lymph node metastasis at the time of radical prostatectomy. ADT may be more effective when initiated for minimal disease burden, which can be detected using PSA after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy, and if more complete disruption of the androgen axis using newer agents decreases the chance that androgen-sensitive cells survive to adapt to a low androgen environment. Androgens may be “annihilated” sing simultaneously a luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) antagonist or agonist to inhibit testicular production of testosterone, a cytochrome P45017A1 (CYP17A1) inhibitor to diminish metabolism of testosterone via the adrenal pathway and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) via the backdoor pathway, a 5α-reductase inhibitor to diminish testosterone reduction to DHT and backdoor metabolism of progesterone substrates to DHT, and a newer anti-androgen to compete better with DHT for the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain. Early initiation of androgen annihilation for induction as part of planned intermittent ADT should be safe, may reduce tumor burden below a threshold that allows eradication by the immune system, and may cure many men who have failed definitive local therapy. PMID:24771515

  1. Nausea and vomiting in advanced cancer: the Cleveland Clinic protocol.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mona; Davis, Mellar; LeGrand, Susan; Walsh, Declan; Lagman, Ruth

    2013-03-01

    Nausea and vomiting are common and distressing symptoms in advanced cancer. Both are multifactorial and cause significant morbidity, nutritional failure, and reduced quality of life. Assessment includes a detailed history, physical examination and investigations for reversible causes. Assessment and management will be influenced by performance status, prognosis, and goals of care. Several drug classes are effective with some having the added benefit of multiple routes of administration. It is our institution's practice to recommend metoclopramide as the first drug with haloperidol as an alternative antiemetic. Dexamethasone should be used for patients with central nervous system metastases or bowel obstruction. If your patient is near death, empiric metoclopramide, haloperidol or chlorpromazine is used without further investigation. For patients with a better prognosis, we exclude reversible causes and use the same first-line antiemetics, metoclopramide and haloperidol. For those who do not respond to first-line single antiemetics, olanzapine is second line and ondansetron is third. Rarely do we use combination therapy or cannabinoids. Olanzapine as a single agent has a distinct advantage over antiemetic combinations. It improves compliance, reduces drug interactions and has several routes of administration. Antiemetics, anticholinergics, octreotide and dexamethasone are used in combination to treat bowel obstruction. In opiod-na'ive patients, we prefer haloperidol, glycopyrrolate and an opioid as the first-line treatment and add or substitute octreotide and dexamethasone in those who do not respond. Non-pharmacologic interventions (mechanical stents and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes) are used when nausea is refractory to medical management or for home-going management to relieve symptoms, reduce drug costs and rehospitalization.

  2. Optimizing CIGB-300 intralesional delivery in locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarduy, M R; García, I; Coca, M A; Perera, A; Torres, L A; Valenzuela, C M; Baladrón, I; Solares, M; Reyes, V; Hernández, I; Perera, Y; Martínez, Y M; Molina, L; González, Y M; Ancízar, J A; Prats, A; González, L; Casacó, C A; Acevedo, B E; López-Saura, P A; Alonso, D F; Gómez, R; Perea-Rodríguez, S E

    2015-01-01

    Background: We conducted a phase 1 trial in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer by injecting 0.5 ml of the CK2-antagonist CIGB-300 in two different sites on tumours to assess tumour uptake, safety, pharmacodynamic activity and identify the recommended dose. Methods: Fourteen patients were treated with intralesional injections containing 35 or 70 mg of CIGB-300 in three alternate cycles of three consecutive days each before standard chemoradiotherapy. Tumour uptake was determined using 99Tc-radiolabelled peptide. In situ B23/nucleophosmin was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: Maximum tumour uptake for CIGB-300 70-mg dose was significantly higher than the one observed for 35 mg: 16.1±8.9 vs 31.3±12.9 mg (P=0.01). Both, AUC24h and biological half-life were also significantly higher using 70 mg of CIGB-300 (P<0.001). Unincorporated CIGB-300 diffused rapidly to blood and was mainly distributed towards kidneys, and marginally in liver, lungs, heart and spleen. There was no DLT and moderate allergic-like reactions were the most common systemic side effect with strong correlation between unincorporated CIGB-300 and histamine levels in blood. CIGB-300, 70 mg, downregulated B23/nucleophosmin (P=0.03) in tumour specimens. Conclusion: Intralesional injections of 70 mg CIGB-300 in two sites (0.5 ml per injection) and this treatment plan are recommended to be evaluated in phase 2 studies. PMID:25880012

  3. Histopathological effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on pancreas and adjacent tissues: a postmortem analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, H.J.; Restrepo, C.; Kinsella, T.J.; Sindelar, W.F.

    1988-02-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) has been utilized in the treatment of resectable and unresectable pancreatic carcinoma at the National Cancer Institute. Detailed autopsy analyses of the radiation effects on the pancreas and adjacent tissues were performed on 13 patients dying at various times following therapy. IORT can induce a progressive retroperitoneal fibrosis and fibrosis of the porta hepatis in patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma. In unresectable pancreatic carcinoma, the major expression of intraoperative irradiation with external beam irradiation is a progressive fibrosis of the pancreas with vascular sclerosis, nerve degeneration, atrophy of acinar cells, and atypical changes in the ducts of the pancreas, as well as degenerative changes of the pancreatic tumor.

  4. Individualised 3D printed vaginal template for MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Madsen, Mikkel Lænsø; Traberg, Anders; Meisner, Bjarne; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Tanderup, Kari; Spejlborg, Harald; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Nørrevang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Intracavitary-interstitial applicators for MRI guided brachytherapy are becoming increasingly important in locally advanced cervical cancer. The 3D printing technology enables a versatile method for obtaining a high degree of individualisation of the implant. Our clinical workflow is presented and exemplified by a stage IVA cervical cancer with superior dose distribution.

  5. Role of Advanced Laryngeal Imaging in Glottic Cancer: Early Detection and Evaluation of Glottic Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tibbetts, Kathleen M; Tan, Melin

    2015-08-01

    Laryngeal cancer accounts for approximately 2.4% of new malignancies worldwide each year. Early identification of laryngeal neoplasms results in improved prognosis and functional outcomes. Imaging plays an integral role in the diagnosis, staging, and long-term follow-up of laryngeal cancer. This article highlights advanced laryngeal imaging techniques and their application to early glottic neoplasms.

  6. The increased echogenicity of the pancreas in infants and children: the white pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schneider, K; Harms, K; Fendel, H

    1987-09-01

    An increased echogenicity of the pancreas ("white pancreas") was sonographically found in 25 children with various pancreatic and systemic diseases. Fifteen patients with cystic fibrosis had a small white pancreas. Five patients with haemosiderosis, two with pancreatitis and one with Shwachman-syndrome presented with a normal-sized or slightly enlarged pancreas. Fatty infiltration and calcifications of the pancreas can also increase its echogenicity.

  7. Genetic and molecular alterations in pancreatic cancer: Implications for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yantian; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Zongyou; Xiang, Jianbin; William, Fisher E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Chen, Changyi

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in human genomics and biotechnologies have profound impacts on medical research and clinical practice. Individual genomic information, including DNA sequences and gene expression profiles, can be used for prediction, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment for many complex diseases. Personalized medicine attempts to tailor medical care to individual patients by incorporating their genomic information. In a case of pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, alteration in many genes as well as molecular profiles in blood, pancreas tissue, and pancreas juice has recently been discovered to be closely associated with tumorigenesis or prognosis of the cancer. This review aims to summarize recent advances of important genes, proteins, and microRNAs that play a critical role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, and to provide implications for personalized medicine in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24172537

  8. Clinical Cancer Advances 2008: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening—A Report From the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Eric; Gralow, Julie; Diller, Lisa; Karlan, Beth; Loehrer, Patrick; Pierce, Lori; Demetri, George; Ganz, Patricia; Kramer, Barnett; Kris, Mark; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert; Pfister, David; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory; Sandler, Howard; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn; Sweetenham, John; Vahdat, Linda; Schilsky, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT Nearly 40 years ago, President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act, mobilizing the country's resources to make the “conquest of cancer a national crusade.” That declaration led to a major investment in cancer research that has significantly improved cancer prevention, treatment, and survival. As a result, two thirds of people diagnosed with cancer today will live at least 5 years after diagnosis, compared with just half in the 1970s. In addition, there are now more than 12 million cancer survivors in the United States—up from 3 million in 1971. Scientifically, we have never been in a better position to advance cancer treatment. Basic scientific research, fueled in recent years by the tools of molecular biology, has generated unprecedented knowledge of cancer development. We now understand many of the cellular pathways that can lead to cancer. We have learned how to develop drugs that block those pathways; increasingly, we know how to personalize therapy to the unique genetics of the tumor and the patient. Yet in 2008, 1.4 million people in the United States will still be diagnosed with cancer, and more than half a million will die as a result of the disease. Some cancers remain stubbornly resistant to treatment, whereas others cannot be detected until they are in their advanced, less curable stages. Biologically, the cancer cell is notoriously wily; each time we throw an obstacle in its path, it finds an alternate route that must then be blocked. To translate our growing basic science knowledge into better treatments for patients, a new national commitment to cancer research is urgently needed. However, funding for cancer research has stagnated. The budgets of the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute have failed to keep pace with inflation, declining up to 13% in real terms since 2004. Tighter budgets reduce incentives to support high-risk research that could have the largest payoffs. The

  9. Clinical cancer advances 2008: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Winer, Eric; Gralow, Julie; Diller, Lisa; Karlan, Beth; Loehrer, Patrick; Pierce, Lori; Demetri, George; Ganz, Patricia; Kramer, Barnett; Kris, Mark; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert; Pfister, David; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory; Sandler, Howard; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn; Sweetenham, John; Vahdat, Linda; Schilsky, Richard L

    2009-02-10

    A message from ASCO'S president: Nearly 40 years ago, President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act, mobilizing the country's resources to make the "conquest of cancer a national crusade." That declaration led to a major investment in cancer research that has significantly improved cancer prevention, treatment, and survival. As a result, two thirds of people diagnosed with cancer today will live at least 5 years after diagnosis, compared with just half in the 1970s. In addition, there are now more than 12 million cancer survivors in the United States--up from 3 million in 1971. Scientifically, we have never been in a better position to advance cancer treatment. Basic scientific research, fueled in recent years by the tools of molecular biology, has generated unprecedented knowledge of cancer development. We now understand many of the cellular pathways that can lead to cancer. We have learned how to develop drugs that block those pathways; increasingly, we know how to personalize therapy to the unique genetics of the tumor and the patient. Yet in 2008, 1.4 million people in the United States will still be diagnosed with cancer, and more than half a million will die as a result of the disease. Some cancers remain stubbornly resistant to treatment, whereas others cannot be detected until they are in their advanced, less curable stages. Biologically, the cancer cell is notoriously wily; each time we throw an obstacle in its path, it finds an alternate route that must then be blocked. To translate our growing basic science knowledge into better treatments for patients, a new national commitment to cancer research is urgently needed. However, funding for cancer research has stagnated. The budgets of the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute have failed to keep pace with inflation, declining up to 13% in real terms since 2004. Tighter budgets reduce incentives to support high-risk research that could have the largest payoffs. The most

  10. [Pancreatic-duodenectomy for invasive colon cancer in a patient with Lynch syndrome. Case report.].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Fernández, O; Zamora-Valdés, D; Rodríguez-Zentner, H A; Tapia, H; Sánchez-Fernández, N; Gamboa-Domínguez, A; Medina-Franco, H; Chan-Núñez, C

    2009-01-01

    Despite the screening efforts in the general population and particularly in families with hereditary colon cancer, locally advanced colon cancer remains a common clinical problem. In block resection is considered mainstay therapy in these patients. The aim of this report is to present a case of right-sided colon cancer with a medullar phenotype invading the duodenum treated through in block resection. A case of a 54-year-old male with a family history of colon and pancreatic cancer with lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding is presented. Colonoscopy and computed tomography scan showed a tumor in the colonic hepatic flexure invading the duodenum. The patient underwent an in block resection of the right colon, duodenum, pancreas and antrum. The histopathological study showed a T4N0M0 adenocarcinoma invading the duodenum, pancreas and antrum with negative margins. His postoperative evolution was complicated with a pancreatic fistula, which resolved with conservative measures. In conclusion, in block resection is the treatment of choice for locally advanced colon cancer with invasion to duodenum and pancreas and should be performed in high-volume centers familiar with this type of procedures. Key words: pancreaticoduodenectomy, colon cancer, Lynch syndrome, pancreas, surgery, Mexico.

  11. Distinguishing Symptoms of Grief and Depression in a Cohort of Advanced Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Juliet C.; Zhang, Baohui; Block, Susan D.; Maciejewski, Paul K.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the symptoms of grief are different from symptoms of depression among bereaved family members. This study is an attempt to replicate this finding among advanced cancer patients and examine clinical correlates of patient grief and depression. Analyses were conducted on data from interviews with 123 advanced cancer…

  12. Coping Well with Advanced Cancer: A Serial Qualitative Interview Study with Patients and Family Carers

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Diane; Appleton, Lynda; Calman, Lynn; Large, Paul; Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Grande, Gunn

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To understand successful strategies used by people to cope well when living with advanced cancer; to explore how professionals can support effective coping strategies; to understand how to support development of effective coping strategies for patients and family carers. Design Qualitative serial (4–12 week intervals) interview study with people with advanced cancer and their informal carers followed by focus groups. The iterative design had a novel focus on positive coping strategies. Interview analysis focused on patients and carers as individuals and pairs, exploring multiple dimensions of their coping experiences. Focus group analysis explored strategies for intervention development. Participants 26 people with advanced (stage 3–4) breast, prostate, lung or colorectal cancer, or in receipt of palliative care, and 24 paired nominated informal/family carers. Setting Participants recruited through outpatient clinics at two tertiary cancer centres in Merseyside and Manchester, UK, between June 2012 and July 2013. Results 45 patient and 41 carer interviews were conducted plus 4 focus groups (16 participants). People with advanced cancer and their informal/family carers develop coping strategies which enable effective management of psychological wellbeing. People draw from pre-diagnosis coping strategies, but these develop through responding to the experience of living with advanced cancer. Strategies include being realistic, indulgence, support, and learning from others, which enabled participants to regain a sense of wellbeing after emotional challenge. Learning from peers emerged as particularly important in promoting psychological wellbeing through the development of effective ‘everyday’, non-clinical coping strategies. Conclusions Our findings challenge current models of providing psychological support for those with advanced cancer which focus on professional intervention. It is important to recognise, enable and support peoples’ own

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung, liver, and peritoneal cavity. An inset shows cancer cells spreading from the pancreas, through the blood and lymph system, to another ... abdomen that contains the intestines, stomach, and liver). Cancer may also have spread to ... pancreas or to lymph nodes. Stage IV pancreatic cancer. ...

  14. Advancing Cancer Prevention and Behavior Theory in the Era of Big Data.

    PubMed

    Atienza, Audie A; Serrano, Katrina J; Riley, William T; Moser, Richard P; Klein, William M

    2016-09-01

    The era of "Big Data" presents opportunities to substantively address cancer prevention and control issues by improving health behaviors and refining theoretical models designed to understand and intervene in those behaviors. Yet, the terms "model" and "Big Data" have been used rather loosely, and clarification of these terms is required to advance the science in this area. The objectives of this paper are to discuss conceptual definitions of the terms "model" and "Big Data", as well as examine the promises and challenges of Big Data to advance cancer prevention and control research using behavioral theories. Specific recommendations for harnessing Big Data for cancer prevention and control are offered.

  15. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Controlling Severe Bleeding From Recurrent Locally-Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Şefika; Akçe, Bülent; Kılıçkesmez, Özgür; Gürsü, Rıza Umar; Çakır, Mehmet Semih; Nazlı, Mehmet Ali; Aren, Acar

    2016-01-01

    One of the rare but most challenging issues in the management of the locally-advanced breast cancer (LABC) is life-threatening bleeding from the fungating and/or ulcerating focus (foci) of these tumors. Breast surgeons may need the assistance of interventional radiologists to solve this urgent condition if surgery cannot provide sufficient benefit. Herein, we report a case of recurrent locally-advanced breast cancer that presented with sudden severe bleeding, which was stopped by an interventional radiologist via transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). In addition, we evaluate the role of interventional radiology in patients with breast cancer who present with bleeding from the breast by reviewing the relevant literature.

  16. Biomimetic tissue-engineered systems for advancing cancer research: NCI Strategic Workshop report.

    PubMed

    Schuessler, Teresa K; Chan, Xin Yi; Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Ji, Kyungmin; Park, Kyung Min; Roshan-Ghias, Alireza; Sethi, Pallavi; Thakur, Archana; Tian, Xi; Villasante, Aranzazu; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Moore, Nicole M; Nagahara, Larry A; Kuhn, Nastaran Z

    2014-10-01

    Advanced technologies and biomaterials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine present tractable biomimetic systems with potential applications for cancer research. Recently, the National Cancer Institute convened a Strategic Workshop to explore the use of tissue biomanufacturing for development of dynamic, physiologically relevant in vitro and ex vivo biomimetic systems to study cancer biology and drug efficacy. The workshop provided a forum to identify current progress, research gaps, and necessary steps to advance the field. Opportunities discussed included development of tumor biomimetic systems with an emphasis on reproducibility and validation of new biomimetic tumor models, as described in this report.

  17. Clinical Management of Pain in Advanced Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Claribel P.L.; MacLeod, Nicholas; Laird, Barry J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in the world and pain is its most common symptom. Pain can be brought about by several different causes including local effects of the tumor, regional or distant spread of the tumor, or from anti-cancer treatment. Patients with lung cancer experience more symptom distress than patients with other types of cancer. Symptoms such as pain may be associated with worsening of other symptoms and may affect quality of life. Pain management adheres to the principles set out by the World Health Organization’s analgesic ladder along with adjuvant analgesics. As pain can be caused by multiple factors, its treatment requires pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures from a multidisciplinary team linked in with specialist palliative pain management. This review article examines pain management in lung cancer. PMID:23115483

  18. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  19. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  20. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  1. Treatment for Chronic Pain in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-25

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Pain; Precancerous/Nonmalignant Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  2. Anti-angiogenic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Gastric and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Tzong; Oh, Do-Youn; Ryu, Min-Hee; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Yeo, Winnie; Carlesi, Roberto; Cheng, Rebecca; Kim, Jongseok; Orlando, Mauro; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2017-01-03

    Despite advancements in therapy for advanced gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancers, their prognosis remains dismal. Tumor angiogenesis plays a key role in cancer growth and metastasis, and recent studies indicate that pharmacologic blockade of angiogenesis is a promising approach to therapy. In this systematic review, we summarize current literature on the clinical benefit of anti-angiogenic agents in advanced gastric cancer. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed and conference proceedings including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress. Included studies aimed to prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-angiogenic agents in advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer. Each trial investigated at least one of the following endpoints: overall survival, progression-free survival/time to progression, and/or objective response rate. Our search yielded 139 publications. Forty-two met the predefined inclusion criteria. Included studies reported outcomes with apatinib, axitinib, bevacizumab, orantinib, pazopanib, ramucirumab, regorafenib, sorafenib, sunitinib, telatinib, and vandetanib. Second-line therapy with ramucirumab and third-line therapy with apatinib are the only anti-angiogenic agents so far shown to significantly improve survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer. Overall, agents that specifically target the vascular endothelial growth factor ligand or receptor have better safety profile compared to multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  3. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Database Supporting Research Raising Awareness Our Blog Patient Education Pancreas News Basics of Pancreatic Cancer FAQs The ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? ...

  4. [Health-related quality of life among patients with advanced cancer: an integrative review].

    PubMed

    Freire, Maria Eliane Moreira; Sawada, Namie Okino; de França, Inácia Sátiro Xavier; da Costa, Solange Fátima Geraldo; Oliveira, Cecília Danielle Bezerra

    2014-04-01

    This integrative literature review aimed to characterize scientific articles on health-related quality of life - HRQoL - among patients with advanced cancer from national and international literature, and summarize those factors evidenced in the literature that contributed to the improvement or worsening of HRQoL among patients with advanced cancer. The search for materials was conducted in the following databases: CINAHL, EMBASE, PubMed, SciELO and LILACS. Among the 21 articles in the sample, 13 showed an improvement of HRQoL among patients with advanced cancer related to the development of physical, emotional and spiritual interventions. In eight studies, we identified predictive symptoms of low HRQoL, such as pain, fatigue, sleep disorders, depression, nutritional changes, and others. The results showed that clinical manifestations, which many times were inherent in cancer, such as factors that can lower patients' HRQoL, while physical, psychological and spiritual benefits resulting from therapeutic interventions may promote its improvement.

  5. Targeted genetic and viral therapy for advanced head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pin-I; Chang, Ju-Fang; Kirn, David H; Liu, Ta-Chiang

    2009-06-01

    Head and neck cancers usually present with advanced disease and novel therapies are urgently needed. Genetic therapy aims at restoring malfunctioned tumor suppressor gene(s) or introducing proapoptotic genes. Oncolytic virotherapeutics induce multiple cycles of cancer-specific virus replication, followed by oncolysis, virus spreading and infection of adjacent cancer cells. Oncolytic viruses can also be armed to express therapeutic transgene(s). Recent advances in preclinical and clinical studies are revealing the potential of both therapeutic classes for advanced head and neck cancers, including the approval of two products (Gendicine and H101) by a governmental agency. This review summarizes the available clinical data to date and discusses the challenges and future directions.

  6. Future of bisphosphonates and denosumab for men with advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iranikhah, Maryam; Stricker, Steve; Freeman, Maisha Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer occurring in American men of all races. It is also the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the USA. Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in men with advanced prostate cancer, with skeletal-related events being a common complication and having negative consequences, leading to severe pain, increased health care costs, increased risk of death, and decreased quality of life for patients. Bone loss can also result from antiandrogen therapy, which can further contribute to skeletal-related events. Treatment with antiresorptive agents bisphosphonates, and the newly approved denosumab, a receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANK-L) inhibitor, has been shown to reduce the risk of skeletal-related complications and prevent treatment-induced bone loss in patients with advanced prostate cancer. This review discusses the role of antiresorptive agents bisphosphonates and RANK-L inhibitor in the current treatment of advanced prostate cancer by examining the primary literature and also focuses on the likely role of the bisphosphonates in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer in the future. PMID:24833918

  7. Exploring the metabolic syndrome: Nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease

    PubMed Central

    Catanzaro, Roberto; Cuffari, Biagio; Italia, Angelo; Marotta, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    After the first description of fatty pancreas in 1933, the effects of pancreatic steatosis have been poorly investigated, compared with that of the liver. However, the interest of research is increasing. Fat accumulation, associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome (MetS), has been defined as “fatty infiltration” or “nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease” (NAFPD). The term “fatty replacement” describes a distinct phenomenon characterized by death of acinar cells and replacement by adipose tissue. Risk factors for developing NAFPD include obesity, increasing age, male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, alcohol and hyperferritinemia. Increasing evidence support the role of pancreatic fat in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, MetS, atherosclerosis, severe acute pancreatitis and even pancreatic cancer. Evidence exists that fatty pancreas could be used as the initial indicator of “ectopic fat deposition”, which is a key element of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and/or MetS. Moreover, in patients with fatty pancreas, pancreaticoduodenectomy is associated with an increased risk of intraoperative blood loss and post-operative pancreatic fistula. PMID:27678349

  8. Exploring the metabolic syndrome: Nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Roberto; Cuffari, Biagio; Italia, Angelo; Marotta, Francesco

    2016-09-14

    After the first description of fatty pancreas in 1933, the effects of pancreatic steatosis have been poorly investigated, compared with that of the liver. However, the interest of research is increasing. Fat accumulation, associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome (MetS), has been defined as "fatty infiltration" or "nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease" (NAFPD). The term "fatty replacement" describes a distinct phenomenon characterized by death of acinar cells and replacement by adipose tissue. Risk factors for developing NAFPD include obesity, increasing age, male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, alcohol and hyperferritinemia. Increasing evidence support the role of pancreatic fat in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, MetS, atherosclerosis, severe acute pancreatitis and even pancreatic cancer. Evidence exists that fatty pancreas could be used as the initial indicator of "ectopic fat deposition", which is a key element of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and/or MetS. Moreover, in patients with fatty pancreas, pancreaticoduodenectomy is associated with an increased risk of intraoperative blood loss and post-operative pancreatic fistula.

  9. The next steps in improving the outcomes of advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Mark R; Fotopoulou, Christina; Blagden, Sarah; Gabra, Hani

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide ovarian cancer affects over 200,000 women per year. Overall survival rates are poor due to two predominate reasons. First, the majority of patients present with advanced disease creating significant difficulty with effecting disease eradication. Second, acquisition of chemotherapy resistance results in untreatable progressive disease. Advances in treatment of advanced ovarian cancer involve a spectrum of interventions including improvements in frontline debulking surgery and combination chemotherapy. Anti-angiogenic factors have been shown to have activity in frontline and recurrent disease while novel chemotherapeutic agents and targeted treatments are in development particularly for disease that is resistant to platinum-based chemotherapy. These developments aim to improve the progression-free and overall survival of women with advanced ovarian cancer.

  10. Detection of circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Andrew D; Thege, Fredrik I; Santana, Steven M; Lannin, Timothy B; Saha, Trisha N; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Lieb, John G; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-03-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors are detected, which might be used in risk assessment.

  11. A profile of enzalutamide for the treatment of advanced castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greasley, Rosa; Khabazhaitajer, Mohammad; Rosario, Derek J

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of castration resistant prostate cancer from androgen-sensitive prostate cancer have provided new avenues exploring efficacious therapies in a disease which is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the western world. In the evolution of second generation anti-androgens, enzalutamide, a novel androgen-receptor signaling inhibitor, has emerged targeting multiple steps within the androgenic stimulation pathway. This review discusses what is currently known of the mechanisms surrounding castration resistant prostate cancer development and the current human clinical trials to determine whether enzalutamide presents a new hope for men with advanced prostate cancer. The issues of therapy resistance, withdrawal effects and cross-resistance are briefly touched upon. PMID:26109877

  12. Physical activity in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tara A; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2012-06-01

    The importance of physical activity for chronic disease prevention and management has become generally well accepted. The number of research interventions and publications examining the benefits of physical activity for patients with cancer has been rising steadily. However, much of that research has focused on the impact of physical activity either prior to or early in the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship process. Research focusing on the effects of physical activity, specifically for patients with advanced-stage cancer and poorer prognostic outcomes, has been addressed only recently. The purpose of this article is to examine the state of the science for physical activity in the advanced-stage disease subset of the cancer population. Exercise in a variety of intensities and forms, including yoga, walking, biking, and swimming, has many health benefits for people, including those diagnosed with cancer. Research has shown that, for people with cancer (including advanced-stage cancer), exercise can decrease anxiety, stress, and depression while improving levels of pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, constipation, and insomnia. People diagnosed with cancer should discuss with their oncologist safe, easy ways they can incorporate exercise into their daily lives.

  13. [Targeted molecular therapy based on advanced cancer stem cell model].

    PubMed

    Hirao, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    Improvement of cell purification and transplantation techniques have contributed to the identification of cell populations known as tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Although it was hypothesized that tumors are organized as hierarchies of tumor cells that are sustained by rare TICs, like normal tissue stem cells, there are several controversies towards such cancer stem cell model, e.g. reversible change of stem cell like population based on epigenetic changes, clonal genetic evolution and problems in xenotransplantation system. Despite complexity in cancer stem cell models, studies in cancer stem cell field have revealed that there are close relationship between cancer malignancy and stem cell properties, called "stemness". Understanding molecular mechanisms for controlling stemness would contribute to establishment of novel diagnostics or therapeutics for cancer.

  14. [Advances in Research on miR-21 and Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, He; Zhang, Yulong; Zou, Linglin

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer is a malignant tumor from normal breast epithelial. In recent years, many literature reports sought to determine the expression of predicted target genes of microRNA and their potential function, pathways and networks, which are involved in the tumorigenesis, metastasis and prognosis of breast cancer. The miR-21 has recently been found to be highly expressed in solid tumors than normal tissue, and it has exposed some layers of gene expression regulation that becomes a hot topic of breast cancer. This paper briefly reviews advances in research on miR-21 in breast cancer.

  15. Potential therapeutic applications of plant toxin-ricin in cancer: challenges and advances.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Nikhil; Tyagi, Monika; Pachauri, Manendra; Ghosh, Prahlad C

    2015-11-01

    Cancer is one of the most common devastating disease affecting millions of people per year worldwide. To fight against cancer, a number of natural plant compounds have been exploited by researchers to discover novel anti-cancer therapeutics with minimum or no side effects and plants have proved their usefulness in anti-cancer therapy in past few years. Ricin, a cytotoxic plant protein isolated from castor bean seeds, is a ribosome-inactivating protein which destroys the cells by inhibiting proteins synthesis. Ricin presents great potential as anti-cancer agent and exerts its anti-cancer activity by inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. In this review, we summarize the current information on anti-cancer properties of plant toxin ricin, its potential applications in cancer therapy, challenges associated with its use as therapeutic agent and the recent advances made to overcome these challenges. Nanotechnology could open the doors for quick development of ricin-based anti-cancer therapeutics. Conceivably, ricin may serve as a chemotherapeutic agent against cancer by utilizing nanocarriers for its targeted delivery to cancer cells.

  16. Selumetinib and Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Advanced Gallbladder or Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia of the Gallbladder; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage II Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  17. Caring for older cancer patients: practical decision-making guidelines with a focus on advance directives.

    PubMed

    Sachs, G A

    1992-02-01

    There are no simple solutions to difficult ethical problems. Advance directives, however, offer a way to help prevent ethical dilemmas from occurring in the care of older cancer patients. Studies show that there is overwhelming support from both older patients and physicians for advance treatment planning through the use of living wills, durable powers of attorney for health care, and less formal means. Despite this support, few physicians and patients discuss advance directives. This paper discusses potential barriers to this dialogue and suggests specific ways to incorporate advance directive into routine cancer care of older patients. The Patient Self-Determination Act of 1990 represents additional pressure from society on the medical profession to carry out advance directive discussions.

  18. Towards personalized perioperative treatment for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ru-Lin; Wu, Ai-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide. Although the rate of gastric cancer has declined dramatically over the past decades in most developed Western countries, it has not declined in East Asia. Currently, a radical gastrectomy is still the only curative treatment for gastric cancer. Over the last twenty years, however, surgery alone has been replaced by a multimodal perioperative approach. To achieve the maximum benefit from the perioperative treatment, a thorough evaluation of the tumor must first be performed. A complete assessment of gastric cancer is divided into two parts: staging and histology. According to the stage and histology of the cancer, perioperative chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy can be implemented, and perioperative targeted therapies such as trastuzumab may also play a role in this field. However, perioperative treatment approaches have not been widely accepted until a series of clinical trials were performed to evaluate the value of perioperative treatment. Although multimodal perioperative treatment has been widely applied in clinical practice, personalization of perioperative treatment represents the next stage in the treatment of gastric cancer. Genomic-guided treatment and efficacy prediction using molecular biomarkers in perioperative treatment are of great importance in the evolution of treatment and may become an ideal treatment method. PMID:25206266

  19. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2012.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Ten topics were chosen among major clinical research achievements in gynecologic oncology in 2012. For ovarian cancer, comprehensive review of the history of bevacizumab studies was followed by poly adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and other molecular targeted agents such as epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and AMG 386. For the development of genomic study in gynecologic cancers, BRCA and DICER1 mutations were covered in epithelial and nonepithelial ovarian cancer, respectively. For endometrial cancer, targeted agents including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and bevacizumab were discussed. Radiation therapy "sandwiched" between combination chemotherapy schedules for the treatment of uterine papillary serous carcinoma was also reviewed. Preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis, definition of low-risk group, and recurrence and survival outcomes of laparoscopic approaches were addressed. For cervical cancer, we reviewed long-term benefit of human papillomavirus test and efficacy of paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/cisplatin in stage IVB, persistent or recurrent disease. In addition, the effect of three dimensional image-based high-dose rate brachytherapy was also reviewed. For vulvar cancer, the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was discussed. For breast cancer, positive results of three outstanding phase III randomized clinical trials, CLEOPATRA, EMILIA, and BOLERO-2 were introduced. Lastly, updates of major practice guidelines were summarized.

  20. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Ten topics were chosen among major clinical research achievements in gynecologic oncology in 2012. For ovarian cancer, comprehensive review of the history of bevacizumab studies was followed by poly adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and other molecular targeted agents such as epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and AMG 386. For the development of genomic study in gynecologic cancers, BRCA and DICER1 mutations were covered in epithelial and nonepithelial ovarian cancer, respectively. For endometrial cancer, targeted agents including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and bevacizumab were discussed. Radiation therapy "sandwiched" between combination chemotherapy schedules for the treatment of uterine papillary serous carcinoma was also reviewed. Preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis, definition of low-risk group, and recurrence and survival outcomes of laparoscopic approaches were addressed. For cervical cancer, we reviewed long-term benefit of human papillomavirus test and efficacy of paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/cisplatin in stage IVB, persistent or recurrent disease. In addition, the effect of three dimensional image-based high-dose rate brachytherapy was also reviewed. For vulvar cancer, the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was discussed. For breast cancer, positive results of three outstanding phase III randomized clinical trials, CLEOPATRA, EMILIA, and BOLERO-2 were introduced. Lastly, updates of major practice guidelines were summarized. PMID:23346316

  1. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreas carcinoma occurring in the annular pancreas: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kawaida, Hiromichi; Kono, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Maki, Akira; Amemiya, Hidetake; Matsuda, Masanori; Fujii, Hideki; Fukasawa, Mitsuharu; Takahashi, Ei; Sano, Katsuhiro; Inoue, Tomohiro

    2015-08-01

    The annular pancreas is a rare congenital anomaly in which a ring of the pancreas parenchyma surrounds the second part of the duodenum. Malignant tumors are extremely rare in patients with an annular pancreas. A 64-year-old man presented with appetite loss and vomiting. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) indicated pancreas parenchyma surrounding the second part of the duodenum, and a hypovascular area occupying lesion in the annular pancreas. Subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Histopathology showed pancreatic carcinoma occurring in the complete annular pancreas.

  2. Phase I Study of Daily Irinotecan as a Radiation Sensitizer for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fouchardiere, Christelle de la; Negrier, Sylvie; Labrosse, Hugues; Martel Lafay, Isabelle; Desseigne, Francoise; Meeus, Pierre; Tavan, David; Petit-Laurent, Fabien; Rivoire, Michel; Perol, David; Carrie, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose of daily irinotecan given with concomitant radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and March 2008, 36 patients with histologically proven unresectable pancreas adenocarcinoma were studied prospectively. Irinotecan was administered daily, 1 to 2 h before irradiation. Doses were started at 6 mg/m{sup 2} per day and then escalated by increments of 2 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 patients. Radiotherapy was administered in 2-Gy fractions, 5 fractions per week, up to a total dose of 50 Gy to the tumor volume. Inoperability was confirmed by a surgeon involved in a multidisciplinary team. All images and responses were centrally reviewed by radiologists. Results: Thirty-six patients were enrolled over a period of 8 years through eight dose levels (6 mg/m{sup 2} to 20 mg/m{sup 2} per day). The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 18 mg/m{sup 2} per day. The dose-limiting toxicities were nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, dehydration, and hypokalemia. The median survival time was 12.6 months with a median follow-up of 53.8 months. The median progression-free survival time was 6.5 months, and 4 patients (11.4%) with very good responses could undergo surgery. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose of irinotecan is 18 mg/m{sup 2} per day for 5 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicities are mainly gastrointestinal. Even though efficacy was not the aim of this study, the results are very promising, with a median survival time of 12.6 months.

  3. Clinical cancer advances 2011: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Benowitz, Steven I; Adams, Sylvia; Aghajanian, Carol; Chang, Susan Marina; Dreyer, Zoann Eckert; Janne, Pasi A; Ko, Andrew H; Masters, Greg A; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Patel, Jyoti D; Roth, Bruce J; Samlowski, Wolfram E; Seidman, Andrew D; Tap, William D; Temel, Jennifer S; Von Roenn, Jamie H; Kris, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    A message from ASCO'S President. It has been forty years since President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act of 1971, which many view as the nation's declaration of the "War on Cancer." The bill has led to major investments in cancer research and significant increases in cancer survival. Today, two-thirds of patients survive at least five years after being diagnosed with cancer compared with just half of all diagnosed patients surviving five years after diagnosis in 1975. The research advances detailed in this year's Clinical Cancer Advances demonstrate that improvements in cancer screening, treatment, and prevention save and improve lives. But although much progress has been made, cancer remains one of the world's most serious health problems. In the United States, the disease is expected to become the nation's leading cause of death in the years ahead as our population ages. I believe we can accelerate the pace of progress, provided that everyone involved in cancer care works together to achieve this goal. It is this viewpoint that has shaped the theme for my presidential term: Collaborating to Conquer Cancer. In practice, this means that physicians and researchers must learn from every patient's experience, ensure greater collaboration between members of a patient's medical team, and involve more patients in the search for cures through clinical trials. Cancer advocates, insurers, and government agencies also have important roles to play. Today, we have an incredible opportunity to improve the quality of cancer care by drawing lessons from the real-world experiences of patients. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is taking the lead in this area, in part through innovative use of health information technology. In addition to our existing quality initiatives, ASCO is working with partners to develop a comprehensive rapid-learning system for cancer care. When complete, this system will provide physicians with personalized, real

  4. Recent Advances on Inorganic Nanoparticle-Based Cancer Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fenglin; Li, Chengyao; Cheng, Jing; Yuan, Zhiqin

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles have been widely investigated as therapeutic agents for cancer treatments in biomedical fields due to their unique physical/chemical properties, versatile synthetic strategies, easy surface functionalization and excellent biocompatibility. This review focuses on the discussion of several types of inorganic nanoparticle-based cancer therapeutic agents, including gold nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, upconversion nanoparticles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Several cancer therapy techniques are briefly introduced at the beginning. Emphasis is placed on how these inorganic nanoparticles can provide enhanced therapeutic efficacy in cancer treatment through site-specific accumulation, targeted drug delivery and stimulated drug release, with elaborations on several examples to highlight the respective strategies adopted. Finally, a brief summary and future challenges are included. PMID:27898016

  5. Research advances in traditional Chinese medicine syndromes in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qing; Luo, Yun-quan; Wang, Wen-hai; Liu, Xuan; Li, Qi; Su, Shi-bing

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, also known as TCM ZHENG or TCM pattern, is an integral and essential part of TCM theory that helps to guide the design of individualized treatments. A TCM syndrome, in essence, is a characteristic profile of all clinical manifestations in one patient that can be readily identified by a TCM practitioner. In this article, the authors reviewed the presentations of TCM syndromes in seven common malignancies (liver, lung, gastric, breast, colorectal, pancreatic and esophageal cancers), the objectivity and the standardization of TCM syndrome differentiation, the evaluation of TCM syndrome modeling in cancer research, and syndrome differentiation-guided TCM treatment of cancers. A better understanding of TCM syndrome theory, as well as its potential biological basis, may contribute greatly to the clinical TCM diagnosis and the treatment of cancer.

  6. Nal-IRI With 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and Leucovorin or Gemcitabine Plus Cisplatin in Advanced Biliary-tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-03

    Adenocarcinoma Metastatic; Biliary Tract Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of the Biliary Tract; Adenocarinoma Locally Advanced; Non-Resectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Intrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma

  7. Advance Care Planning: Experience of Women With Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    as missing data. A test of the full model with all independent variables against the unconditional model was statistically reliable—chi square (11, N... statistical methods were tested to better examine the symptom trajectory among women with breast cancer over time by embedding an Item Response...the model . This con- straint reflects the belief that, given a symptom experience, random samples of women with breast cancer will experi- log a mijk

  8. New Action of Inhibin Alpha Subunit in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Preetika. Final Report Award: W81XWH-07-1-0112 25 Christofori, G., and Pepper , M. S. Vascular endothelial growth factor-C-mediated...prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res., 10: 5137-5144, 2004. 13. Risbridger, G. P., Shibata, A., Ferguson , K. L., Stamey, T. A., McNeal, J. E., and Peehl, D...Christofori G, Pepper MS (2001) Vascular endothelial growth factor-C-mediated lymphangiogenesis promotes tumour metastasis. EMBO J 20: 672 – 682

  9. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  10. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Wu, Xiaohua; Cheng, Xi

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases.

  11. Targeted delivery of albumin bound paclitaxel in the treatment of advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Costanzo, Francesco; Gasperoni, Silvia; Rotella, Virginia; Di Costanzo, Federica

    2009-02-18

    Taxanes are chemotherapeutic agents with a large spectrum of antitumor activity when used as monotherapy or in combination regimens. Paclitaxel and docetaxel have poor solubility and require a complex solvent system for their commercial formulation, Cremophor EL(R) (CrEL) and Tween 80(R) respectively. Both these biological surfactants have recently been implicated as contributing not only to the hypersensitivity reactions, but also to the degree of peripheral neurotoxicity and myelosuppression, and may antagonize the cytotoxicity. Nab-paclitaxel, or nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (ABI-007; Abraxane(R)), is a novel formulation of paclitaxel that does not employ the CrEL solvent system. Nab-paclitaxel demonstrates greater efficacy and a favorable safety profile compared with standard paclitaxel in patients with advanced disease (breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, ovarian cancer). Clinical studies in breast cancer have shown that nab-paclitaxel is significantly more effective than standard paclitaxel in terms of overall objective response rate (ORR) and time to progression. Nab-paclitaxel in combination with gemcitabine, capecitabine or bevacizumab has been shown to be very active in patients with advanced breast cancer. An economic analysis showed that nab-paclitaxel would be an economically reasonable alternative to docetaxel or standard paclitaxel in metastatic breast cancer. Favorable tumor ORR and manageable toxicities have been reported for nab-paclitaxel as monotherapy or in combination treatment in advanced breast cancer.

  12. Toward a hybrid artificial pancreas.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E A

    1989-06-01

    Management of insulinopenic diabetic individuals centers on administration of insulin by means of multiple injections, a wearable or implantable insulin-infusion pump, or a whole-organ or segmental-pancreas transplant. Preliminary trials indicate that surgical implantation of a hybrid device containing living insulin-secreting tissue may function as a combined glucose sensor and insulin-infusion pump. By means of a chamber composed of a semipermeable membrane shaped into hollow fibers or a box surrounding endocrine tissue, pilot studies have shown that isolated islets of Langerhans, fragments of insulinoma, or a fetal pancreas retains function for days to weeks, as judged by the ability to sustain euglycemic conditions in chemically induced diabetic rats. Lacking clear proof that normalizing blood glucose levels will prevent vascular complications of diabetes in humans, the case for further development of a hybrid (tissue plus fabricated components) device rests mainly on optimistic extrapolation of results attained in the chemically induced diabetic rat and dog. For the minority of diabetic patients who have insulin-dependent diabetes, the benefit afforded by a bionic device establishing internal insulin release regulated by silently sensed blood glucose level is more than enough payoff for the discomfort and surgery involved in its implantation. Further trials of a hybrid artificial pancreas in the dog appear warranted as a logical extension of preliminary studies with this species.

  13. Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management.

    PubMed

    Mulshine, James L; Avila, Rick; Yankelevitz, David; Baer, Thomas M; Estépar, Raul San Jose; Ambrose, Laurie Fenton; Aldigé, Carolyn R

    2015-05-01

    The Prevent Cancer Foundation Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management was held in New York, NY on May 16 and 17, 2014. The two goals of the Workshop were to define strategies to drive innovation in precompetitive quantitative research on the use of imaging to assess new therapies for management of early lung cancer and to discuss a process to implement a national program to provide high quality computed tomography imaging for lung cancer and other tobacco-induced disease. With the central importance of computed tomography imaging for both early detection and volumetric lung cancer assessment, strategic issues around the development of imaging and ensuring its quality are critical to ensure continued progress against this most lethal cancer.

  14. Phase I study of a new cancer vaccine of ten mixed peptides for advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Satoru; Yamada, Yasuhide; Heike, Yuji; Shoji, Hirokazu; Honma, Yoshitaka; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Matsueda, Satoko; Yamada, Akira; Morita, Michi; Yamaguchi, Rin; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kawahara, Akihiko; Kage, Masayoshi; Shichijo, Shigeki; Sasada, Tetsuro; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-05-01

    A phase I study of a new cancer vaccine (KRM-10), consisting of a mixture of 10 different short peptides, was conducted for patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancers. Primary or secondary endpoints included the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), or safety and immune responses, respectively. Peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), together with soluble inflammatory factors, were measured before and after vaccination. Twenty-one patients were vaccinated with KRM-10 at dose levels of 10 (n = 6), 20 (n = 8) or 30 mg (n = 7) of peptides every week for 6 weeks. No DLT were observed in the dose range evaluated. Common treatment-related adverse events were a grade 1 injection site reaction in 15 patients, and fever in three patients (grade 1 in two patients and grade 2 in one patient). CTL activity to at least one peptide at the time of the third and sixth vaccination increased in 2 and 3 of 6 (10 mg), 2 of 8 and 4 of 6 (20 mg), or 2 and 1 of 6 (30 mg) patients, respectively. IgG levels, at the third and sixth vaccination, were also increased in 1 and 1 of 6 (10 mg), 2 of 8 and 4 of 6 (20 mg), or 1 and 3 of 6 (30 mg) patients, respectively. The KRM-10 vaccine consisting of 20 mg of peptides was determined as the optimal dose for a coming phase II trial because of its safety, and also for demonstrating the most potent activity for augmenting the immune response of the three doses tested. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000008820.

  15. Imaging heterogeneous absorption distribution of advanced breast cancer by optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2010-01-01

    Tumor vascular patterns of advanced breast cancers are complex and heterogeneous. Two typical light absorption patterns of periphery enhancement and posterior shadowing have been observed when imaging these advanced cancers using optical tomography guided by ultrasound. We perform a series simulation and phantom experiments to systemically evaluate the effects of target parameters, target locations, and target optical properties on imaging periphery enhancement absorption distribution using reflection geometry. Large tumors are modeled as concentric semiellipsoidal targets of different outer shell and inner core optical properties. We show that larger targets of more than 3 to 4 cm diameter with outer shell thicknesses less than 1 cm can be resolved at a depth less than 3 cm. A clinical example is given to show the complex vasculature distributions seen from an advanced cancer. PMID:21198181

  16. 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer: locally advanced stage III non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, W E E; De Ruysscher, D; Weder, W; Le Péchoux, C; De Leyn, P; Hoffmann, H; Westeel, V; Stahel, R; Felip, E; Peters, S

    2015-08-01

    To complement the existing treatment guidelines for all tumour types, ESMO organises consensus conferences to focus on specific issues in each type of tumour. The 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference on Lung Cancer was held on 11-12 May 2013 in Lugano. A total of 35 experts met to address several questions on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in each of four areas: pathology and molecular biomarkers, first-line/second and further lines of treatment in advanced disease, early-stage disease and locally advanced disease. For each question, recommendations were made including reference to the grade of recommendation and level of evidence. This consensus paper focuses on locally advanced disease.

  17. Recent advances in robotic surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Soichiro; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    Robotic technology, which has recently been introduced to the field of surgery, is expected to be useful, particularly in treating rectal cancer where precise manipulation is necessary in the confined pelvic cavity. Robotic surgery overcomes the technical drawbacks inherent to laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer through the use of multi-articulated flexible tools, three-dimensional stable camera platforms, tremor filtering and motion scaling functions, and greater ergonomic and intuitive device manipulation. Assessments of the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have reported similar operation times, blood loss during surgery, rates of postoperative morbidity, and circumferential resection margin involvement when compared with laparoscopic surgery. Furthermore, rates of conversion to open surgery are reportedly lower with increased urinary and male sexual functions in the early postoperative period compared with laparoscopic surgery, demonstrating the technical advantages of robotic surgery for rectal cancer. However, long-term outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have not been fully evaluated yet; therefore, large-scale clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of this new technology.

  18. Advances and perspectives of colorectal cancer stem cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Dou, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is essentially an environmental and genetic disease featured by uncontrolled cell growth and the capability to invade other parts of the body by forming metastases, which inconvertibly cause great damage to tissues and organs. It has become one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in the developed countries such as United States, and approximately 1.2 million new cases are yearly diagnosed worldwide, with the death rate of more than 600,000 annually and incidence rates are increasing in most developing countries. Apart from the generally accepted theory that pathogenesis of colorectal cancer consists of genetic mutation of a certain target cell and diversifications in tumor microenvironment, the colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) theory makes a different explanation, stating that among millions of colon cancer cells there is a specific and scanty cellular population which possess the capability of self-renewal, differentiation and strong oncogenicity, and is tightly responsible for drug resistance and tumor metastasis. Based on these characteristics, CCSCs are becoming a novel target cells both in the clinical and the basic studies, especially the study of CCSCs vaccines due to induced efficient immune response against CCSCs. This review provides an overview of CCSCs and preparation technics and targeting factors related to CCSCs vaccines in detail.

  19. Expression of receptors for gut peptides in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma and tumour-free pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, C.; Biemond, I.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Verspaget, W.; Lamers, C. B.

    1997-01-01

    Gut hormones that modulate the growth of normal pancreas may also modulate the growth of cancers originating from pancreas. This study visualized and compared the receptors for cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin (BBS), secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in tumour-free tissue sections of human pancreas (n = 10) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (n = 12) with storage phosphor autoradiography using radioligands. CCK-B receptors, present in control pancreata, were not detected in any of the pancreatic cancers. BBS receptors were visualized in control pancreata, but they were absent in 10 of 12 pancreatic cancers. In 5 of 12 pancreatic cancers, receptors for secretin were visualized, while binding for secretin was present in all tumour-free pancreata. Conversely, no specific binding of VIP was detected in control pancreata but was identified in 3 of 12 pancreatic cancer specimens. It is concluded that the expression of gut peptide receptors in pancreatic cancer differs from that in tumour-free pancreas. Receptors for these peptides are present in only a minority of pancreatic cancer specimens. Images Figure 1 PMID:9166939

  20. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Changwon; Lee, Yejin; Lee, J Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed remarkable technological advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The development of proteomics techniques has enabled the reliable analysis of complex proteomes, leading to the identification and quantification of thousands of proteins in gastric cancer cells, tissues, and sera. This quantitative information has been used to profile the anomalies in gastric cancer and provide insights into the pathogenic mechanism of the disease. In this review, we mainly focus on the advances in mass spectrometry and quantitative proteomics that were achieved in the last five years and how these up-and-coming technologies are employed to track biochemical changes in gastric cancer cells. We conclude by presenting a perspective on quantitative proteomics and its future applications in the clinic and translational gastric cancer research. PMID:27729735

  1. Treatment planning in the radiation therapy of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vaeth, J.M.; Meyer, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an overview of aspects involved in the most advanced radiotherapy techniques, and examines in detail their application in planning and delivering optimal treatments in a large number of different forms of cancer. Coverage is given to squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, carcinoma of the lung, breast cancer, cancers of the genitourinary system, tumors of the central nervous system, cancer of the esophagus, pancreas, stomach and rectum, soft tissue sarcomas, pediatric radiotherapy, Hodgkin's disease, and finally non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. A general discussion concludes the text.

  2. Role of STAT3 in Cancer Metastasis and Translational Advances

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Prachi; Gude, Rajiv P.

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a latent cytoplasmic transcription factor, originally discovered as a transducer of signal from cell surface receptors to the nucleus. It is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation at position 705 leading to its dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and activation of gene transcription. Under normal physiological conditions, STAT3 activation is tightly regulated. However, compelling evidence suggests that STAT3 is constitutively activated in many cancers and plays a pivotal role in tumor growth and metastasis. It regulates cellular proliferation, invasion, migration, and angiogenesis that are critical for cancer metastasis. In this paper, we first describe the mechanism of STAT3 regulation followed by how STAT3 is involved in cancer metastasis, then we summarize the various small molecule inhibitors that inhibit STAT3 signaling. PMID:24199193

  3. [Status and advances of RGD molecular imaging in lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Yue, Ning; Yuan, Shuanghu; Yang, Guoren

    2014-12-01

    Lung cancer has been one of the most common and the highest mortality rates malignant tumors at home and abroad. Sustained angiogenesis was not only the characteristic of malignant tumors, but also the foundation of tumor proliferation, invasion, recurrence and metastasis, it was also one of the hot spots of treatments in lung cancer biology currently. Integrins played an important part in tumor angiogenesis. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides could combine with integrins specifically, and the application of radionuclide-labeled RGD molecular probes enabled imaging of tumor blood vessels to reflect its changes. The lung cancer imaging of RGD peptides at home and abroad in recent years was reviewed in this article.

  4. Pancreas Transplantation in the Modern Era.

    PubMed

    Redfield, Robert R; Rickels, Michael R; Naji, Ali; Odorico, Jon S

    2016-03-01

    The field of pancreas transplantation has evolved from an experimental procedure in the 1980s to become a routine transplant in the modern era. With short- and long-term outcomes continuing to improve and the significant mortality, quality-of-life, and end-organ disease benefits, pancreas transplantation should be offered to more patients. In this article, we review current indications, patient selection, surgical considerations, complications, and outcomes in the modern era of pancreas transplantation.

  5. Substantial Medicare savings may result if insurers cover 'artificial pancreas' sooner for diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Michael J; John, Priya; Winn, Aaron

    2012-08-01

    Technologies to improve diabetes care have advanced considerably with the introduction of the insulin pump and continuous glucose monitoring. These two technologies are now being joined and enhanced to create an artificial pancreas. The current study models the impact of the artificial pancreas on clinical results and costs over time, based on early results from clinical trials. The modeling shows that insurers' coverage of the cost of an artificial pancreas at a relatively early point in the life of a patient with diabetes would greatly reduce future complications of the disease and spending needed to treat such complications. Projected Medicare savings are $937 million in nominal dollars after twenty-five years. The results of this analysis support conducting a more comprehensive trial to assess the long-term impact of the artificial pancreas on glucose levels and the technology's related costs.

  6. Decreased immunoreactivity of visfatin in the pancreas and liver of rats with renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Ż; Janiuk, I; Lewandowska, A; Kasacka, I

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the major endocrine and metabolic disorders, in which visfatin plays a significant role. The objective of this study was to evaluate the immunoreactivity of visfatin in pancreas and liver of “two kidney, one clip” (2K1C) renovascular hypertension model in rats. The studies were carried out on the pancreas and liver of rats. After a 6-week period of the renal artery clipping procedure, 2K1C rats developed a stable hypertension. Paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (for general histological examination) and processed for immunolocalization of visfatin. The intensity of immunohistochemical reaction was measured using Nikon NIS-Elements Advanced Research software. The hypertension significantly weakened the immunohistochemical reaction exhibiting visfatin in the pancreas and liver of hypertensive rats, compared to control animals. The changes induced by hypertension in the visfatin-containing cells in the pancreas and liver of the rats are discussed and needs further study.

  7. A Novel Therapeutic Modality for Advanced-Stage Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    There is an urgent need to develop effective therapies for the treatment of advanced stage prostate cancer (PrCa) due to their limited or no response to...metastatic PrCa. Our results illustrated that ORM treatment effectively inhibited invasion and motility of PrCa cells. Further, we observed that ORM... effectively inhibits metastasis associated protein 1 (MTA1) in PrCa cells. MTA1 has been reported to be very tightly associated with cancer metastasis in

  8. Independent contributors to overall quality of life in people with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    M Rodríguez, A; Mayo, N E; Gagnon, B

    2013-01-01

    Background: The definition of health for people with cancer is not focused solely on the physiology of illness and the length of life remaining, but is also concerned with improving the well-being and the quality of the life (QOL) remaining to be lived. This study aimed to identify the constructs most associated with QOL in people with advanced cancer. Methods: Two hundred three persons with recent diagnoses of different advanced cancers were evaluated with 65 variables representing individual and environmental factors, biological factors, symptoms, function, general health perceptions and overall QOL at diagnosis. Three independent stepwise multiple linear regressions identified the most important contributors to overall QOL. R2 ranking and effect sizes were estimated and averaged by construct. Results: The most important contributor of overall QOL for people recently diagnosed with advanced cancer was social support. It was followed by general health perceptions, energy, social function, psychological function and physical function. Conclusions: We used effect sizes to summarise multiple multivariate linear regressions for a more manageable and clinically interpretable picture. The findings emphasise the importance of incorporating the assessment and treatment of relevant symptoms, functions and social support in people recently diagnosed with advanced cancer as part of their clinical care. PMID:23591199

  9. Caring for Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer: The Experiences of Zambian Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Maree, Johanna Elizabeth; Mulonda, Jennipher Kombe

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the experiences of Zambian nurses caring for women with advanced breast cancer. Methods: We used a qualitative descriptive design and purposive sampling. Seventeen in-depth interviews were conducted with registered nurses practicing in the Cancer Diseases Hospital and the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia, and analyzed using thematic analyses. Results: Two themes emerged from the data - caring for women with advanced breast cancer is challenging and the good outweighs the bad. The majority of the participants agreed that caring for women with advanced breast cancer and witnessing their suffering were challenging. Not having formal education and training in oncology nursing was disempowering, and one of the various frustrations participants experienced. The work environment, learning opportunities, positive patient outcomes, and the opportunity to establish good nurse–patient experiences were positive experiences. Conclusions: Although negative experiences seemed to be overwhelming, participants reported some meaningful experiences while caring for women with advanced breast cancer. The lack of formal oncology nursing education and training was a major factor contributing to their negative experiences and perceived as the key to rendering the quality of care patients deserved. Ways to fulfill the educational needs of nurses should be explored and instituted, and nurses should be remunerated according to their levels of practice. PMID:28217726

  10. Statin as a Combined Therapy for Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer: A Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong-Yu; Wang, Qian; Xu, Qiu-Hong; Yan, Li; Gao, Xue-Feng; Lu, Yan-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite the great achievements in the treatment of advanced-stage ovarian cancer, it is still a severe condition with an unfavorable 5-year survival rate. Statins have been suggested to reduce the risk of several cancers beyond their cholesterol-lowing effects. However, the prognostic significance of statins in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer remains controversial. Methods. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the association between statin intake and overall survival (OS) among patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery followed by courses of intravenous chemotherapy were matched through a propensity score analysis. Results. A total of 60 propensity-matched patients were included. Women in statin group showed a similar OS than the nonstatin counterparts (P = 0.966), whereas residual tumor was significantly associated with better OS (P = 0.013) and was an independent factor that associated with OS (P = 0.002, hazard ratio = 5.460, and 95% confidence interval: 1.894 to 15.742) in multivariable analysis. Conclusions. Our results suggested that statin usage was not associated with improved OS in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer undergoing surgery and chemotherapy. Considering the retrospective nature and the relative small sample size of the study, further prospective studies and random control trials are needed. PMID:27975064

  11. Plasma and neutrophil fatty acid composition in advanced cancer patients and response to fish oil supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pratt, V C; Watanabe, S; Bruera, E; Mackey, J; Clandinin, M T; Baracos, V E; Field, C J

    2002-12-02

    Metabolic demand and altered supply of essential nutrients is poorly characterised in patients with advanced cancer. A possible imbalance or deficiency of essential fatty acids is suggested by reported beneficial effects of fish oil supplementation. To assess fatty acid status (composition of plasma and neutrophil phospholipids) in advanced cancer patients before and after 14 days of supplementation (12+/-1 g day(-1)) with fish (eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid) or placebo (olive) oil. Blood was drawn from cancer patients experiencing weight loss of >5% body weight (n=23). Fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids and the major phospholipid classes of isolated neutrophils were determined using gas liquid chromatography. At baseline, patients with advanced cancer exhibited low levels (<30% of normal values) of plasma phospholipids and constituent fatty acids and elevated 20 : 4 n-6 content in neutrophil phospholipids. High n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratios in neutrophil and plasma phospholipids were inversely related to body mass index. Fish oil supplementation raised eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid content in plasma but not neutrophil phospholipids. 20 : 4 n-6 content was reduced in neutrophil PI following supplementation with fish oil. Change in body weight during the supplementation period related directly to increases in eicosapentaenoic acid in plasma. Advanced cancer patients have alterations in lipid metabolism potentially due to nutritional status and/or chemotherapy. Potential obstacles in fatty acid utilisation must be addressed in future trials aiming to improve outcomes using nutritional intervention with fish oils.

  12. Present and future evolution of advanced breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although the introduction of novel therapies and drug combinations has improved the prognosis of metastatic breast cancer, the disease remains incurable. Increased knowledge of the biology and the molecular alterations in breast cancer has facilitated the design of targeted therapies. These agents include receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (epidermal growth factor receptor family), intracellular signaling pathways (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, AKT, mammalian target of rapamycin) angiogenesis inhibitors and agents that interfere with DNA repair (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors). In the present review, we present the most promising studies of these new targeted therapies and novel combinations of targeted therapies with cytotoxic agents. PMID:21050422

  13. Advances in glucose metabolism research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sitian; Fang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells uptake glucose at a higher rate and produce lactic acid rather than metabolizing pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This adaptive metabolic shift is termed the Warburg effect. Recently progress had been made regarding the mechanistic understanding of glucose metabolism and associated diagnostic and therapeutic methods, which have been investigated in colorectal cancer. The majority of novel mechanisms involve important glucose metabolism associated genes and miRNA regulation. The present review discusses the contribution of these research results to facilitate with the development of novel diagnosis and anticancer treatment options. PMID:27602209

  14. Multifunctional nanomaterials for advanced molecular imaging and cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Prasad

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for use in biomedical applications, including cancer and stem cell imaging, disease diagnosis and drug delivery. The development of nanosystems has aided in understanding the molecular mechanisms of many diseases and permitted the controlled nanoscale manipulation of biological phenomena. In recent years, many studies have focused on the use of several kinds of nanomaterials for cancer and stem cell imaging and also for the delivery of anticancer therapeutics to tumor cells. However, the proper diagnosis and treatment of aggressive tumors such as brain and breast cancer requires highly sensitive diagnostic agents, in addition to the ability to deliver multiple therapeutics using a single platform to the target cells. Addressing these challenges, novel multifunctional nanomaterial-based platforms that incorporate multiple therapeutic and diagnostic agents, with superior molecular imaging and targeting capabilities, has been presented in this work. The initial part of this work presents the development of novel nanomaterials with superior optical properties for efficiently delivering soluble cues such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into brain cancer cells with minimal toxicity. Specifically, this section details the development of non-toxic quantums dots for the imaging and delivery of siRNA into brain cancer and mesenchymal stem cells, with the hope of using these quantum dots as multiplexed imaging and delivery vehicles. The use of these quantum dots could overcome the toxicity issues associated with the use of conventional quantum dots, enabled the imaging of brain cancer and stem cells with high efficiency and allowed for the delivery of siRNA to knockdown the target oncogene in brain cancer cells. The latter part of this thesis details the development of nanomaterial-based drug delivery platforms for the co-delivery of multiple anticancer drugs to brain tumor cells. In particular, this part of the thesis focuses on

  15. [Corticosteroids in the management of advanced prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kübler, H

    2017-02-01

    Corticosteroids have been widely used for decades in cancer therapy, predominantly due to their anti-inflammatory activity. In the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), corticosteroids play an important role both in the management of tumor-related symptoms, especially bone metastasis-related pain, and as concomitant treatment to counteract side effects associated with approved active prostatic anticancer agents such as docetaxel, cabazitaxel, and abiraterone acetate. In association with abiraterone acetate, low-dose corticosteroids (prednisone or prednisolone) reduce the mineralocorticoid side effects of abiraterone. In addition, corticosteroids may exert direct antitumoral activities, resulting in PSA decline.

  16. Management of symptoms associated with advanced cancer: olanzapine and mirtazapine. A World Health Organization project.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P; Khawam, Elias; Pozuelo, Leo; Lagman, Ruth

    2002-08-01

    Advanced cancer patients are polysymptomatic and often receive multiple medications for symptom relief. Common symptoms include anorexia, weight loss, delirium and depression. Olanzapine and mirtazapine may have several advantages over older agents despite increased acquisition costs. Both medications can treat several symptoms with a low risk for drug-drug interactions and with only once- or twice-daily dosing. Drug side effects are low, compared with more conventionally used agents. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of both agents are unique and explain many of the benefits. More research and clinical experience will be necessary to define their role in the palliation of advanced cancer.

  17. Advanced new strategies for metastatic cancer treatment by therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Geon-Tae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-09-06

    The field of therapeutic stem cell and oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment has rapidly expanded over the past decade. Oncolytic viruses constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent because of their ability to selectively infect and destroy tumor cells. Engineering of viruses to express anticancer genes and specific cancer targeting molecules has led to the use of these systems as a novel platform of metastatic cancer therapy. In addition, stem cells have a cancer specific migratory capacity, which is available for metastatic cancer targeting. Prodrug activating enzyme or anticancer cytokine expressing stem cells successfully inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. Preclinical models have clearly demonstrated anticancer activity of these two platforms against a number of different cancer types and metastatic cancer. Several systems using therapeutic stem cells or oncolytic virus have entered clinical trials, and promising results have led to late stage clinical development. Consequently, metastatic cancer therapies using stem cells and oncolytic viruses are extremely promising. The following review will focus on the metastatic cancer targeting mechanism of therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic viruses, and potential challenges ahead for advancing the field.

  18. Advanced new strategies for metastatic cancer treatment by therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geon-Tae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    The field of therapeutic stem cell and oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment has rapidly expanded over the past decade. Oncolytic viruses constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent because of their ability to selectively infect and destroy tumor cells. Engineering of viruses to express anticancer genes and specific cancer targeting molecules has led to the use of these systems as a novel platform of metastatic cancer therapy. In addition, stem cells have a cancer specific migratory capacity, which is available for metastatic cancer targeting. Prodrug activating enzyme or anticancer cytokine expressing stem cells successfully inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. Preclinical models have clearly demonstrated anticancer activity of these two platforms against a number of different cancer types and metastatic cancer. Several systems using therapeutic stem cells or oncolytic virus have entered clinical trials, and promising results have led to late stage clinical development. Consequently, metastatic cancer therapies using stem cells and oncolytic viruses are extremely promising. The following review will focus on the metastatic cancer targeting mechanism of therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic viruses, and potential challenges ahead for advancing the field. PMID:27494901

  19. Implication of epigenetics in pancreas development and disease.

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Evans; Haumaitre, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    Pancreas development is controlled by a complex interaction of signaling pathways and transcription factor networks that determine pancreatic specification and differentiation of exocrine and endocrine cells. Epigenetics adds a new layer of gene regulation. DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs recently appeared as important epigenetic factors regulating pancreas development. In this review, we report recent findings obtained by analyses in model organisms as well as genome-wide approaches that demonstrate the role of these epigenetic regulators in the control of exocrine and endocrine cell differentiation, identity, function, proliferation and regeneration. We also highlight how altered epigenetic processes contribute to pancreatic disorders: diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Uncovering these epigenetic events can help to better understand these diseases, provide novel therapeutical targets for their treatment, and improve cell-based therapies for diabetes.

  20. Endoscopic Ultrasound Elastography: Current Clinical Use in Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Patel, Sandeep; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Elastography is a newer technique for the assessment of tissue elasticity using ultrasound. Cancerous tissue is known to be stiffer (hence, less elastic) than corresponding healthy tissue, and as a result, could be identified in an elasticity-based imaging. Ultrasound elastography has been used in the breast, thyroid, and cervix to differentiate malignant from benign neoplasms and to guide or avoid unnecessary biopsies. In the liver, elastography has enabled a noninvasive and reliable estimate of fibrosis. Endoscopic ultrasound has become a robust diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the management of pancreatic diseases. The addition of elastography to endoscopic ultrasound enabled further characterization of pancreas lesions, and several European and Asian studies have reported encouraging results. The current clinical role of endoscopic ultrasound elastography in the management of pancreas disorders and related literature are reviewed.

  1. SU-E-T-539: Maximum Energy of Helium and Carbon Ions Clinically Needed for Spine, Lung, Prostate and Pancreas Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pompos, A; Choy, H; Jia, X; Jiang, S; Timmerman, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Maximum available kinetic energy of accelerated heavy ions is a critical parameter to consider during the establishment of a heavy ion therapy center. It dictates the maximum range in tissue and determines the size and cost of ion gantry. We have started planning our heavy ion therapy center and we report on the needed ion range. Methods: We analyzed 50 of random SBRT-spine, SBRT- lung, prostate and pancreatic cancer patients from our photon clinic. In the isocentric axial CT cut we recorded the maximum water equivalent depth (WED4Field) of PTV’s most distal edge in four cardinal directions and also in a beam direction that required the largest penetration, WEDGantry. These depths were then used to calculate the percentage of our patients we would be able to treat as a function of available maximum carbon and helium beam energy. Based on the Anterior-Posterior WED for lung patients and the maximum available ion energy we estimated the largest possible non-coplanar beam entry angle φ (deviation from vertical) in the isocentric vertical sagittal plane. Results: We found that if 430MeV/u C-12, equivalently 220MeV/u He-4, beams are available, more than 96% (98%) of all patients can be treated without any gantry restrictions (in cardinals angles only) respectively. If the energy is reduced to 400MeV/u C-12, equivalently 205MeV/u He-4, the above fractions reduce to 80% (87%) for prostate and 88% (97%) for other sites. This 7% energy decrease translates to almost 5% gantry size and cost decrease for both ions. These energy limits in combination with the WED in the AP direction for lung patients resulted in average non-coplanar angles of φ430MeV/u = 68°±8° and φ400MeV/u = 65°±10° if nozzle clearance permits them. Conclusion: We found that the two worldwide most common maximum carbon beam energies will treat above 80% of all our patients.

  2. Management of locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Kurniali, Peter C; Hrinczenko, Borys; Al-Janadi, Anas

    2014-02-28

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Sixty percent are diagnosed over the age of 65 years and 36% are 75 years or older. At diagnosis, approximately 58% of patients will have locally advanced and metastatic disease, for which systemic chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival. Treatment of cancer in elderly patients is more challenging due to multiple factors, including disabling co-morbidities as well as a decline in organ function. Cancer treatment of elderly patients is often associated with more toxicities that may lead to frequent hospitalizations. In locally advanced disease, fewer older patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy despite survival benefit and similar toxicity when compared to their younger counterparts. A survival benefit is also observed in the palliative chemotherapy setting for elderly patients with metastatic disease. When treating elderly patients with colon cancer, one has to consider drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Since chronological age is a poor marker of a patient's functional status, several methods of functional assessment including performance status and activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental ADL, or even a comprehensive geriatric assessment, may be used. There is no ideal chemotherapy regimen that fits all elderly patients and so a regimen needs to be tailored for each individual. Important considerations when treating elderly patients include convenience and tolerability. This review will discuss approaches to the management of elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer.

  3. Drug Response and Resistance in Advanced NF1-Associated Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) and other types of myeloproliferative neoplasms ...these cancers remain ineffective. Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) and other types of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) progress to acute...myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), an aggressive myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) characterized by over-production of differentiated myeloid lineage

  4. Anti-angiogenic therapies for advanced esophago-gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Elisa; Sclafani, Francesco; Cunningham, David

    2014-01-01

    Neo-vascularization is a vital process for tumor growth and development which involves the interaction between tumor cells and stromal endothelial cells through several growth factors and membranous receptors which ultimately activate pro-angiogenic intracellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of angiogenesis has become a standard treatment option for several tumor types including colorectal cancer, glioblastoma and ovarian cancer. In gastric cancer, the therapeutic role of anti-angiogenic agents is more controversial. Bevacizumab and ramucirumab, two monoclonal antibodies, which target vascular endothelial growth factor-A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, respectively, have been demonstrated antitumor activity in patients with tumors of the stomach or esophagogastric junction. However, especially for bevacizumab, this antitumor activity has not consistently translated into a survival advantage over standard treatment in randomized trials. In this article, we provide an overview of the role of angiogenesis in gastric cancer and discuss the results of clinical trials that investigated safety and effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapies in this disease. A review of the literature has been done using PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov website and the ASCO Annual Meeting Library. PMID:25538401

  5. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge): active cellular immunotherapy for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McKarney, I

    2007-09-01

    (1) Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is an active cellular immunotherapy (therapeutic vaccine) that is designed to stimulate the patient's T-cells to recognize and attack prostate cancer cells that express prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) antigen. (2) Sipuleucel-T demonstrated a survival benefit in men with advanced androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC), although this preliminary finding requires confirmation in larger trials. (3) Mild to moderate myalgia, chills, fever, and tremor are the most commonly reported adverse events for patients receiving sipuleucel-T. These events generally resolve quickly. (4) More studies are needed to evaluate sipuleucel-T in the earlier stages of prostate cancer and in combination with conventional therapies.

  6. Advances in the use of nanocarriers for cancer diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Débora Braga; Gamarra, Lionel Fernel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of nanocarriers as drug delivery systems for therapeutic or imaging agents can improve the pharmacological properties of commonly used compounds in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Advances in the surface engineering of nanoparticles to accommodate targeting ligands turned nanocarriers attractive candidates for future work involving targeted drug delivery. Although not targeted, several nanocarriers have been approved for clinical use and they are currently used to treat and/or diagnosis various types of cancers. Furthermore, there are several formulations, which are now in various stages of clinical trials. This review examined some approved formulations and discussed the advantages of using nanocarriers in cancer therapy. PMID:27074238

  7. Tests for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... be useful if the surgeon is concerned the cancer has spread beyond the pancreas and wants to look at (and possibly biopsy) ... on someone who has a tumor in the pancreas if imaging tests show the tumor is very likely to be cancer and if it looks like surgery can remove ...

  8. Advanced glycation end products increase carbohydrate responsive element binding protein expression and promote cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanbei; Wu, Lifang; Li, Yakui; Meng, Jian; Lin, Ning; Yang, Dianqiang; Zhu, Yemin; Li, Xiaoyong; Li, Minle; Xu, Ye; Wu, Yuchen; Tong, Xuemei; Su, Qing

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic patients have increased levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the role of AGEs in regulating cancer cell proliferation is unclear. Here, we found that treating colorectal and liver cancer cells with AGEs promoted cell proliferation. AGEs stimulated both the expression and activation of a key transcription factor called carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) which had been shown to promote glycolytic and anabolic activity as well as proliferation of colorectal and liver cancer cells. Using siRNAs or the antagonistic antibody for the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) blocked AGEs-induced ChREBP expression or cell proliferation in cancer cells. Suppressing ChREBP expression severely impaired AGEs-induced cancer cell proliferation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AGEs-RAGE signaling enhances cancer cell proliferation in which AGEs-mediated ChREBP induction plays an important role. These findings may provide new explanation for increased cancer progression in diabetic patients.

  9. Quantitation of TIMP-1 in plasma of healthy blood donors and patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holten-Andersen, M N; Murphy, G; Nielsen, H J; Pedersen, A N; Christensen, I J; Høyer-Hansen, G; Brünner, N; Stephens, R W

    1999-01-01

    A kinetic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 was developed in order to examine the potential diagnostic and prognostic value of TIMP-1 measurements in cancer patients. The ELISA enabled specific detection of total TIMP-1 in EDTA, citrate and heparin plasma. The assay was rigorously tested and requirements of sensitivity, specificity, stability and good recovery were fulfilled. TIMP-1 levels measured in citrate plasma (mean 69.2 ± 13.1 μg l−1) correlated with TIMP-1 measured in EDTA plasma (mean 73.5 ± 14.2 μg l−1) from the same individuals in a set of 100 healthy blood donors (Spearman's rho = 0.62, P < 0.0001). The mean level of TIMP-1 in EDTA plasma from 143 patients with Dukes' stage D colorectal cancer was 240 ± 145 μg l−1 and a Mann–Whitney test demonstrated a highly significant difference between TIMP-1 levels in healthy blood donors and colorectal cancer patients (P < 0.0001). Similar findings were obtained for 19 patients with advanced breast cancer (mean 292 ± 331 μg l−1). The results show that TIMP-1 is readily measured in plasma samples by ELISA and that increased levels of TIMP-1 are found in patients with advanced cancer. It is proposed that plasma measurements of TIMP-1 may have value in the management of cancer patients. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408859

  10. Exercise and relaxation intervention for patients with advanced lung cancer: a qualitative feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Adamsen, L; Stage, M; Laursen, J; Rørth, M; Quist, M

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancer patients experience loss of physical capacity, dyspnea, pain, reduced energy and psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore feasibility, health benefits and barriers of exercise in former sedentary patients with advanced stage lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (III-IV) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (ED), undergoing chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of a hospital-based, supervised, group exercise and relaxation program comprising resistance-, cardiovascular- and relaxation training 4 h weekly, 6 weeks, and a concurrent unsupervised home-based exercise program. An explorative study using individual semi-structured interviews (n=15) and one focus group interview (n=8) was conducted among the participants. Throughout the intervention the patients experienced increased muscle strength, improvement in wellbeing, breathlessness and energy. The group exercise and relaxation intervention showed an adherence rate of 76%, whereas the patients failed to comply with the home-based exercise. The hospital-based intervention initiated at time of diagnosis encouraged former sedentary lung cancer patients to participation and was undertaken safely by cancer patients with advanced stages of disease, during treatment. The patients experienced physical, functional and emotional benefits. This study confirmed that supervised training in peer-groups was beneficial, even in a cancer population with full-blown symptom burden and poor prognosis.

  11. [Advanced and Metastatic Lung Cancer – What is new in the Diagnosis and Therapy?].

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Sacha I

    2015-07-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common types of malignancies worldwide. The majority of patients are diagnosed with an incurable advanced/metastatic stage disease. Palliative treatment approaches improve the survival and the quality of life of these patients. Lung cancer is subdivided according to histology and molecular biology. The most important classification separates small cell from non-small cell lung cancer. In the subgroup of non-small cell lung cancer novel treatment approaches coming along with an improved prognosis have been established during the last decade. The current manuscript provides an overview on current treatment options for metastatic lung cancer. Furthermore, an outlook on promising future treatment options is provided.

  12. An observational study of insomnia and nightmare treated with trazodone in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanimukai, Hitoshi; Murai, Tasuku; Okazaki, Namiko; Matsuda, Yoichi; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Kabeshita, Yasunobu; Ohno, Yumiko; Tsuneto, Satoru

    2013-06-01

    Patients with cancer often experience insomnia. Nightmares are also a strong factor that interferes with the maintenance of comfortable and satisfying sleep. However, the prevalence and standard treatment of nightmares in patients with cancer have not been established yet. We aimed to treat insomnia and nightmares with trazodone. From 2008 to 2011, trazodone was prescribed to 30 patients with cancer who reported experiencing insomnia with or without nightmares to the palliative care team in Osaka University Hospital. Effective treatment was seen in 15 patients (50%). Four patients with cancer reported having severe nightmares and 2 patients had beneficial effects, with frightening dreams transformed into acceptable ones. Trazodone may be an effective drug for the treatment of insomnia and nightmares in patients with advanced cancer.

  13. Antiangiogenic Agents in Combination with Chemotherapy in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ulahannan, Susanna V; Brahmer, Julie R

    2011-01-01

    Most patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) present with advanced disease requiring systemic chemotherapy. Treatment with the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab in combination with standard platinum-based doublet chemotherapy has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with advanced NSCLC. Several multitargeted antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e.g., sorafenib, sunitinib, cediranib, vandetanib, BIBF 1120, pazopanib, and axitinib) are also being evaluated in combination with standard chemotherapy. Here we review current clinical data with combination therapy involving antiangiogenic agents and cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:21469981

  14. Plant coumestans: recent advances and future perspectives in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Nehybová, Tereza; Šmarda, Jan; Beneš, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Natural products are often used in drug development due to their ability to form unique and diverse chemical structures. Coumestans are polycyclic aromatic plant secondary metabolites containing a coumestan moiety, which consists of a benzoxole fused to a chromen-2-one to form 1-Benzoxolo[3,2-c]chromen-6-one. These natural compounds are known for large number of biological activities. Many of their biological effects can be attributed to their action as phytoestrogens and polyphenols. In the last decade, anticancer effects of these compounds have been described in vitro but there is only limited number of studies based on models in vivo. More information concerning their in vivo bioavailability, stability, metabolism, toxicity, estrogenicity, cellular targets and drug interactions is therefore needed to proceed further to clinical studies. This review focuses on coumestans exhibiting anticancer properties and summarizes mechanisms of their toxicity to cancer cells. Moreover, the possible role of coumestans in cancer prevention is discussed.

  15. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Derek T; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-09-01

    Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity.

  16. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Derek T.; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  17. New Action of Inhibin Alpha Subunit in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    LYVE-1 on the primary prostate tumors will determine lymph vessel density ( LVD ) in the intratumoral, peritumoral and normal regions in the tissues...Changes to LVD and lymphangiogenesis are often associated with metastatic spread of cancer cells to the LNs (1, 2). To understand the mechanisms and...and human mitochondrial antibody to determine LVD and the degree of invasion of tumor cells into lymphatic vessels (lymphatic invasion) in the

  18. New Action of Inhibin Alpha Subunit in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    metastatic ability. Increase in metastasis was further evident by increase lymph vessel density ( LVD ) and lymphatic invasion by the cancer cells. This...primary prostate tumors will determine lymph vessel density ( LVD ) in the intratumoral, peritumoral and normal regions in the tissues. We have...completed the aims of Task 1a during the first six months of the project. Changes to LVD and lymphangiogenesis are often associated with metastatic spread of

  19. Advanced Lung Cancer Screening: An Individualized Molecular Nanotechnology Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    bivalent genes in stem and progenitor cells that form clusters within NSCLC, genes which may also predict clinical outcomes in resected patients. The...the specificity of lung cancer detection. In the first year of this proposal, we have developed an improved panel of genes hypermethylated in lung...the United States. These novel genes have been used to develop sensitive methylation specific PCR assays suitable for biologic fluid testing (sputum

  20. Advanced Lung Cancer Screening: An Individualized Molecular Nanotechnology Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    improved panel of genes hypermethylated in lung cancer, with extraordinarily high specificity and sensitivity, we combined the improved methods of MOB ...final results using this approach is provided in figure 3. Figure 2. Overview of the Methylation- on-Beads ( MOB ) Process. Circulating DNA from up...magnetic decantation, and removal of supernatant. Figure 3 ß-Actin Ct values for MOB processed vs. Phenol Chloroform extracted and traditionally

  1. Advanced Lung Cancer Screening: An Individualized Molecular Nanotechnology Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    majority of them (38 of 48) interpreted as nonsus- picious by our radiologists due to active infection such as tuberculosis and pneumonia, scarring from...references 8 752 Journal of Thoracic Oncology ®  •  Volume 9, Number 6, June 2014 Background: Epidemiological evidence suggests that HIV- infected ... infected participants. Methods: From 2006 to 2013, we conducted the world’s first lung cancer screening trial of 224 HIV- infected current/former smokers to

  2. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenzhen; Yang, Ning; Li, Xiangkai

    2016-01-01

    With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic) contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1) Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage. (2) Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3) Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4) Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective.

  3. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wenzhen; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic) contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1) Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage. (2) Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3) Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4) Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective. PMID:27803929

  4. Quality of life in Chinese home-based advanced cancer patients: does awareness of cancer diagnosis matter?

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoping; Huang, Hua; Luo, Qiong; Zhou, Jiying; Tan, Ge; Yong, Na

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life (QOL) of Chinese home-based advanced-stage cancer patients and to evaluate the association between the disclosure of cancer diagnosis and QOL. An interview-based survey was conducted from December 2009 to June 2010 in the home-based hospice of the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, China. The principal finding of this study demonstrated that patients who did not have knowledge of their diagnosis exhibited better physical and emotional QOL compared with those who had knowledge of their diagnosis.

  5. Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Team About Pancreatic Cancer? Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Found Early? Pancreatic cancer is hard to find early. The pancreas is deep inside the body, so early tumors ...

  6. Why a D2 gastrectomy plus adjuvant chemotherapy is insufficient in locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián Solé, Z; Larsen, Francisco E; Solé, Claudio V

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses all the important published evidence regarding adjuvant treatments in locally advanced gastric cancer. In this process it revealed facts that demonstrate the superiority of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone. Some outstanding work that has not yet been published is also discussed. PMID:28105077

  7. Eligibility of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer for phase III chemotherapy trials

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidence that chemotherapy improves survival and quality of life in patients with stage IIIB & IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is based on large randomized controlled trials. The purpose of this study was to determine eligibility of patients with advanced NSCLC for major chemotherapy trials. Methods Physicians treating stage IIIB/IV NSCLC at Sydney Cancer Centre assessed patient eligibility for the E1594, SWOG9509 and TAX326 trials for patients presenting from October 2001 to December 2002. A review of the centre's registry was used to obtain missing data. Results 199 patients with advanced NSCLC were registered during the 14-month period. Characteristics of 100 patients were defined prospectively, 85 retrospectively: 77% males, median age 68 (range 32–88), 64% stage IV disease. Only 35% met trial eligibility for E1594 and 28% for SWOG9509 and TAX326. Common reasons for ineligibility were: co-morbidities 75(40%); ECOG Performance Status ≥2 72(39%); symptomatic brain metastasis 15(8%); and previous cancers 21(11%). Many patients were ineligible by more than one criterion. Conclusion The majority of patients with advanced NSCLC were ineligible for the large chemotherapy trials. The applicability of trial results to advanced lung cancer populations may be limited. Future trials should be conducted in a more representative population. PMID:19402889

  8. Why a D2 gastrectomy plus adjuvant chemotherapy is insufficient in locally advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sebastián Solé, Z; Larsen, Francisco E; Solé, Claudio V

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses all the important published evidence regarding adjuvant treatments in locally advanced gastric cancer. In this process it revealed facts that demonstrate the superiority of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone. Some outstanding work that has not yet been published is also discussed.

  9. [Suprapapilar puncture for biliary access to advanced cancer of the papilla and severe coagulopathy].

    PubMed

    Artifon, E; Couto, D S; Navarro, A

    2009-01-01

    Biliary cannulation to perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) may be difficult in patients with advanced papillary cancer, due to anatomical and technical reasons. Sphincterotomy may be contraindicated in severe coagulopathy. We report a recently described technique of suprapapillary puncture for biliary access with use of an Artifon's catheter for biliary access in a high-risk patient with coagulopathy and periampullary neoplasm.

  10. Effectiveness of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese Patients with Advanced Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ando, Michiyo; Kira, Haruko; Hayashida, Shigeru; Ito, Sayoko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese patients with advanced cancer. Patients learned mindfulness practices and then made art to express their feelings in the first session. After receiving instruction on practicing mindfulness 2 weeks later, they participated in a second…

  11. Effect of pravastatin on the survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; Rodríguez-González, Araceli; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Eizaguirre, Emma; Hijona, Elizabeth; Marín, José J.G.; Perugorria, María J.; Banales, Jesús M.; Cosme, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A fluoropyrimidine plus cisplatin combined with surgery is standard first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer. We evaluated the effect of pravastatin on overall survival in patients with advanced gastric cancer in a prospective cohort study. Methods At the time of surgery, we assigned 60 patients with advanced gastric cancer (stage III or IV) to receive standard first-line treatment (control group) or standard first-line treatment plus pravastatin at a dose of 40 mg once daily (pravastatin group). The minimum follow-up period was 4 years and the maximum of 6 years. Results The mean of age was 66 years and the TNM stage was III and IV in 65% and 35% of patients, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (control vs pravastatin) in median overall survival (15 vs 14 months; P = 0.8). Predictors of survival were the stage (hazard ratio of death stage IV (III stage as reference): 4.4; 95% CI: 2–9.7; p < 0.05) and older age (hazard ratio of death ≥ 65 years (< 65 years as reference): 2.8; 95% CI: 1.3–6; p < 0.05). Conclusions Pravastatin did not improve outcome in patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26735890

  12. A Case of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Complicated by Pulmonary Tumor Thrombotic Microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Jin; Kwak, Mi Hyang; Kong, Sun-Young; Seong, Moon-Woo; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Keun Seok

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a rare, malignancy-related complication that causes marked pulmonary hypertension, right heart failure, and death. We report on a patient with locally advanced breast cancer whose course was complicated by fatal PTTM based on clinical and laboratory findings. PMID:23341791

  13. The accuracy of clinicians' predictions of survival in advanced cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Stephanie; Agarwal, Arnav; Popovic, Marko; Milakovic, Milica; Lam, Michael; Fu, Wayne; DiGiovanni, Julia; Lam, Henry; Lechner, Breanne; Pulenzas, Natalie; Chow, Ronald; Chow, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The process of formulating an accurate survival prediction is often difficult but important, as it influences the decisions of clinicians, patients, and their families. The current article aims to review the accuracy of clinicians' predictions of survival (CPS) in advanced cancer patients. A literature search of Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, and MEDLINE was conducted to identify studies that reported clinicians' prediction of survival in advanced cancer patients. Studies were included if the subjects consisted of advanced cancer patients and the data reported on the ability of clinicians to predict survival, with both estimated and observed survival data present. Studies reporting on the ability of biological and molecular markers to predict survival were excluded. Fifteen studies that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were identified. Clinicians in five studies underestimated patients' survival (estimated to observed survival ratio between 0.5 and 0.92). In contrast, 12 studies reported clinicians' overestimation of survival (ratio between 1.06 and 6). CPS in advanced cancer patients is often inaccurate and overestimated. Given these findings, clinicians should be aware of their tendency to be overoptimistic. Further investigation of predictive patient and clinician characteristics is warranted to improve clinicians' ability to predict survival.

  14. Hispanics and Pancreatic Cancer: Things to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... These include: • What You Need to Know About Cancer of the Pancreas – an online publication about exocrine pancreatic cancer – at www. cancer. gov/ cancertopics/ wyntk/ pancreas • NCI’s summary page about pancreatic cancer – including links ...

  15. Continuous subcutaneous infusion of lidocaine for persistent hiccup in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaneishi, Keisuke; Kawabata, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Persistent hiccup can cause anorexia, weight loss, disabling sleep deprivation, anxiety, and depression. Therefore, relief of persistent hiccup is important for advanced cancer patients and their family. Most reports on this condition are case series reports advocating the use of baclofen, haloperidol, gabapentin, and midazolam. However, these medications are occasionally ineffective or accompanied by intolerable side effects. The sodium channel blocker lidocaine has been shown to be effective in treating a variety of disorders thought to involve neuropathic mechanisms. Intravenous administration of lidocaine is common but efficacy has also been reported for subcutaneous infusion. In advanced cancer patients, subcutaneous infusion is easy, advantageous, and accompanied by less discomfort. We report a case of severe and sustained hiccup caused by gastric cancer that was successfully treated with a continuous subcutaneous infusion of lidocaine (480 mg (24 ml)/day) without severe side effects.

  16. Microvessel density and p53 mutations in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Niyati J; Geest, Koen De; Neff, Traci; Young, Barry De; Bender, David P; Ahmed, Amina; Smith, Brian J; Button, Anna; Goodheart, Michael J

    2013-04-30

    We planned to determine the relationship between angiogenesis and p53 mutational status in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer. Using 190 tumor samples from patients with stage III and IV ovarian cancer we performed p53 sequencing, immunohistochemistry, and CD31 microvessel density (MVD) determination. MVD was elevated in tumors with p53 null mutations compared to p53 missense mutation or no mutation. Disease recurrence was increased with higher MVD in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. In adjusted analysis, p53 null mutation was associated with increased recurrence and worse overall survival. Worse overall survival and increased recurrence risk were also associated with the combination of CD31 MVD values >25 vessels/HPF and any p53 mutation. P53 mutation status and MVD may have prognostic significance in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Tumors with p53 null mutations are likely to be more vascular, contributing to decreased survival and increased recurrence probability.

  17. Nivolumab, anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1) monoclonal antibody immunotherapy: Role in advanced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Arun; Kim, Chul; Heery, Christopher R; Guha, Udayan; Gulley, James L

    2016-09-01

    The development of immune checkpoint inhibitors has altered the landscape of treatment of advanced cancers. These drugs are well tolerated and have shown clinical activity against a wide variety of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. The durability of response is particularly impressive when compared to other forms of systemic therapy. Nivolumab (Opdivo) is an IgG4 antibody that causes immune checkpoint blockade by diminishing inhibitory signaling through the programmed death receptor-1 pathway. It is approved for treatment of recurrent non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, and renal cell carcinoma. Efforts to identify biomarkers of response to nivolumab are ongoing. Clinical trials are also being conducted to determine the benefits of combining nivolumab with other forms of treatment including chemotherapy, molecular-targeted therapy, radiation therapy, and other forms of immune therapy. This review outlines the clinical trials that have led to the emergence of nivolumab as a treatment option for patients with advanced cancers.

  18. Advancing Cancer Prevention and Behavior Theory in the Era of Big Data

    PubMed Central

    Atienza, Audie A.; Serrano, Katrina J.; Riley, William T.; Moser, Richard P.; Klein, William M.

    2016-01-01

    The era of “Big Data” presents opportunities to substantively address cancer prevention and control issues by improving health behaviors and refining theoretical models designed to understand and intervene in those behaviors. Yet, the terms “model” and “Big Data” have been used rather loosely, and clarification of these terms is required to advance the science in this area. The objectives of this paper are to discuss conceptual definitions of the terms “model” and “Big Data”, as well as examine the promises and challenges of Big Data to advance cancer prevention and control research using behavioral theories. Specific recommendations for harnessing Big Data for cancer prevention and control are offered. PMID:27722147

  19. Advanced Strategies in Immune Modulation of Cancer Using Lipid-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mizrahy, Shoshy; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Landesman-Milo, Dalit; Ng, Brandon D.; Peer, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy has a great potential in advancing cancer treatment, especially in light of recent discoveries and therapeutic interventions that lead to complete response in specific subgroups of melanoma patients. By using the body’s own immune system, it is possible not only to specifically target and eliminate cancer cells while leaving healthy cells unharmed but also to elicit long-term protective response. Despite the promise, current immunotherapy is limited and fails in addressing all tumor types. This is probably due to the fact that a single treatment strategy is not sufficient in overcoming the complex antitumor immunity. The use of nanoparticle-based system for immunotherapy is a promising strategy that can simultaneously target multiple pathways with the same kinetics to enhance antitumor response. Here, we will highlight the recent advances in the field of cancer immunotherapy that utilize lipid-based nanoparticles as delivery vehicles and address the ongoing challenges and potential opportunities. PMID:28220118

  20. SU-E-J-65: Motion Difference Between the Pancreas and Nearby Veins for Pancreas Motion Monitoring Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Omari, E; Erickson, B; Li, X; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As it is generally difficult to outline the pancreas on an ultrasound b-mode image, visualized structures such as the portal or the splenic veins are assumed to have the same motion as the pancreas. These structures can be used as a surrogate for monitoring pancreas motion during radiation therapy (RT) delivery using ultrasound. To verify this assumption, we studied the motion difference between the head of the pancreas, the portal vein, the tail of the pancreas, and splenic vein. Methods: 4DCT data acquired during RT simulation were analyzed for a total of 5 randomly selected patients with pancreatic cancer. The data was sorted into 10 respiratory phases from 0% to 90% (0%: end of the inspiration, 50%: end of expiration) . The head of the pancreas (HP), tail of the pancreas (TP), portal vein (PV), and splenic vein (SV) were contoured on all 10 phases. The volume change and motion were measured in the left-right (LR), anterior-superior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions. Results: The volume change for all patients/phases were: 1.2 ± 3% for HP, 0.78 ± 1.6% for PV, 2.5 ± 2.9% for TP, and 0.53 ± 2.1% for SV. Motion for each structure was estimated from the centroid displacements due to the uniformity of the structures and the small volume change. The measured motion between HP and PV was: LR: 0.1 ± 0.17 mm, AP: 0.04 ± 0.1 mm, SI: 0.17 ± 0.16 mm and between TP and the PV was: LR: 0.05 ± 0.3 mm, AP: 0.1 ± 0.4 mm, SI: 0.01 ± 0.022 mm. Conclusion: There are small motion differences between the portal vein and the head of the pancreas, and the splenic vein and the tail of the pancreas. This suggests the feasibility of utilizing these features for monitoring the pancreas motion during radiation therapy.