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Sample records for advanced pancreatic carcinoma

  1. Immunotherapy for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma: a promising treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Lian, Zhouyang; Liang, Long; Chen, Wenbo; Luo, Xiaoning; Pei, Shufang; Mo, Xiaokai; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Wenhui; Ouyang, Fusheng; Guo, Baoliang; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2017-01-01

    There are limited data on the safety and efficacy of immunotherapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC). A meta-analysis of single-arm trials is proposed to assess the efficacy and safety of immunotherapy for APC. Eighteen relevant studies involving 527 patients were identified. The pooled disease control rate (DCR), overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), and 1-year survival rate were estimated as 59.32%, 7.90 months, 4.25 months, and 30.12%, respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that the pooled OS, PFS, and 1-year survival rate were significantly higher for autologous activated lymphocyte therapy compared with peptide-based vaccine therapy (OS: 8.28 months vs. 7.40 months; PFS: 6.04 months vs. 3.86 months; 1-year survival rate: 37.17% vs. 19.74%). Another subgroup analysis demonstrated that the pooled endpoints were estimated as obviously higher for immunotherapy plus chemotherapy compared with immunotherapy alone (DCR: 62.51% vs. 47.63%; OS: 8.67 months vs. 4.91 months; PFS: 4.91 months vs. 3.34 months; 1-year survival rate: 32.32% vs. 21.43%). Of the included trials, seven trials reported no treatment related adverse events , five trials reported (16.6 3.9) % grade 3 adverse events and no grade 4 adverse events. In conclusion, immunotherapy is safe and effective in the treatment of APC. PMID:27992378

  2. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma Using the Dorsal Approach: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffer, Hester J. Melenhorst, Marleen C. A. M.; Vogel, Jantien A.; Tilborg, Aukje A. J. M. van; Nielsen, Karin Kazemier, Geert; Meijerink, Martijn R.

    2015-06-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively.

  3. A Single-institution Experience with Open Irreversible Electroporation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li; Chen, Yong-Liang; Su, Ming; Liu, Tian; Xu, Kai; Liang, Feng; Gu, Wan-Qing; Lu, Shi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC) is characterized by poor prognosis despite recommended concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) has emerged as a potential option for the management of unresectable pancreatic cancer. This study was conducted to evaluate the safety and short-term efficacy of open IRE for the treatment of LAPC. Methods: Retrospective data of 25 consecutive patients receiving IRE for T3 lesions from July 2015 to June 2016 at a single center were analyzed. The perioperative and long-term IRE-related complications were reviewed to evaluate the safety of the procedure. The tumor reduction and biological response were analyzed through computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging; the serum level of CA19-9 was measured as a secondary endpoint to evaluate the short-term efficacy of IRE. Results: All patients were successfully treated; the median tumor size was 4.2 cm and the median IRE time was 36 min. Four intraoperative procedure-related complications were observed (16%): two transient hypertensive episodes, one hypotension case, and one transient supraventricular tachycardia case. Nine postoperative complications were described, including three Grade A pancreatic fistulas, three delayed gastric emptying, one acute pancreatitis, one upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and one portal vein thrombosis. The overall rate of stable disease was 28%, 36% achieved partial response, and lower serum CA19-9 levels were recorded in all patients at discharge. Conclusions: IRE is feasible for the treatment of LAPC and is a reasonable intervention strategy owing to its combined attributes of safety and efficacy. PMID:27958223

  4. Pancreatic carcinoma: results with fast neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, R.; Cohen, L.; Hendrickson, F.; Awschalom, M.; Hrejsa, A.F.; Rosenberg, I.

    1981-02-01

    Results of therapy in 31 of 50 patients who were treated for advanced pancreatic carcinoma at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are presented here. To date, six patients are alive and four are free of disease. Since the main reason for failure was lack of control of primary tumor, the tumor dose has been increased by 15%. Based on our results, a nationwide study has been launched to assess the effectiveness of neutrons vs photons in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  5. Transplantable pancreatic acinar carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.R.; Reddy, J.K.

    1981-03-15

    Fragments of the nafenopin-induced pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma of rat have been examined in vitro for patterns of intracellular protein transport and carbamylcholine-induced protein discharge. Continuous incubation of the fragments with (3H)-leucine for 60 minutes resulted in labeling of rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi cisternae, and mature zymogen granules, revealed by electron microscope autoradiography. This result indicates transport of newly synthesized protein from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to mature zymogen granules in approximately 60 minutes. The secretagogue carbamylcholine induced the discharge of radioactive protein by carcinoma fragments pulse-chase labeled with (3H)-leucine. A maximal effective carbamylcholine concentration of 10(-5) M was determined. The acinar carcinoma resembles normal exocrine pancreas in the observed rate of intracellular protein transport and effective secretagogue concentration. However, the acinar carcinoma fragments demonstrated an apparent low rate of carbamylcholine-induced radioactive protein discharge as compared with normal pancreatic lobules or acinar cells. It is suggested that the apparent low rate of radioactive protein discharge reflects functional immaturity of the acinar carcinoma. Possible relationships of functional differentiation to the heterogeneous cytodifferentiation of the pancreatic acinar carcinoma are discussed.

  6. Phase II study of paclitaxel plus the protein kinase C inhibitor bryostatin-1 in advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lam, Anthony P; Sparano, Joseph A; Vinciguerra, Vincent; Ocean, Allyson J; Christos, Paul; Hochster, Howard; Camacho, Fernando; Goel, Sanjay; Mani, Sridhar; Kaubisch, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    To determine the efficacy and toxicity of the protein kinase C inhibitor bryostatin-1 plus paclitaxel in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Each treatment cycle consisted of paclitaxel 90 mg/m by intravenous infusion over 1 hour on days 1, 8, and 16, plus bryostatin 25 mcg/m as a 1-hour intravenous infusion on days 2, 9, and 15, given every 28 days. Patients were evaluated for response after every 2 treatment cycles, and continued therapy until disease progression or prohibitive toxicity. The primary objective was to determine whether the combination produced a response rate of at least 30%. Nineteen patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma received a total of 52 cycles of therapy (range: 1-10). Patients received the combination as first-line therapy for advanced disease (N = 5) or after prior chemotherapy used alone or in combination with local therapy. No patients had a confirmed objective response. The median time to treatment failure was 1.9 months (95% confidence intervals: 1.2, 2.6 months). Reasons for discontinuing therapy included progressive disease or death in 14 patients (74%) or because of adverse events or patient choice in 5 patients (26%). The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities included leukopenia in 26%, anemia in 11%, myalgias in 11%, gastrointestinal bleeding in 11%, infection in 10%, and thrombosis in 10%. The combination of weekly paclitaxel and bryostatin-1 is not an effective therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  7. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, O. Kusunoki, S.; Kudoh, K.; Takamori, H.; Tsuji, T.; Kanemitsu, K.; Yamashita, Y.

    2006-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Methods. CTAI was performed in 17 patients with stage IV pancreatic cancer with (n = 11) or without (n = 6) liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The inferior pancreatic artery (IPA) was embolized to achieve delivery of the pancreatic blood supply through only the celiac artery. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the primary tumor size, liver metastasis, and survival time and factors such as tumor size, tumor location, and stage of pancreatic carcinoma; the embolized arteries were analyzed with respect to treatment effects and prognosis. Results. A catheter was fixed in the gastroduodenal artery and splenic artery in 10 and 7 patients, respectively. Complete peripancreatic arterial occlusion was successful in 10 patients. CT showed a decrease in tumor size in 6 of 17 (35%) patients and a decrease in liver metastases in 6 of 11 (55%) patients. The survival time ranged from 4 to 18 months (mean {+-} SD, 8.8 {+-} 1.5 months). Complete embolization of arteries surrounding the pancreas was achieved in 10 patients; they manifested superior treatment effects and prognoses (p < 0.05). Conclusion. In patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, long-term CTAI with systemic chemotherapy appeared to be effective not only against the primary tumor but also against liver metastases. Patients with successfully occluded peripancreatic arteries tended to survive longer.

  8. [Carcinoma and acute pancreatitis--case reports].

    PubMed

    Snarska, Jadwiga; Puchalski, Zbigniew; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Hady, Razak H; Kamiński, Fabian; Dadan, Jacek

    2007-10-01

    The coexistence of pancreatic carcinoma with severe form of acute pancreatitis (AP) is not only an extremely rare phenomenon described in literature but also a real problem in the aspect of differential diagnostics of neoplastic and inflammatory morphological changes in this organ. The study objective was the analysis of clinical material obtained from patients with inflammatory and neoplastic lesions, treated surgically in I Department of General and Endocrinological Surgery, Medical University of Bialystok in the years 1980-2005. Of these patients, 7 had pancreatic carcinoma at various stages of advancement diagnosed in the late postoperative period after severe form of AP. Patients' history, physical examination as well as biochemical tests and imaging diagnostic procedures (ultrasonography, CT) of the abdominal cavity explicitly showed severe form of acute pancreatitis. In every case, CA19-9 antigen values were substantially elevated (mean 780 +/-325 IU/ml, norm 0-37 IU/ml). Histopathological analyses of samples collected during laparotomy revealed the presence of necrotic-purulent tissues. In the late postoperative period, i.e. 3-24 months, all these patients were reoperated on for pancreatic carcinoma or its metastases. Only in one case, radical Whipple surgery was performed. All the remaining patients underwent palliative procedures or samples for histopathological examinations were only collected. In all the seven cases, metastatic carcinoma was diagnosed, including pancreatic carcinoma in 6 patients. These observations seem to indicate that severe AP may be insidiously accompanied by pancreatic carcinoma and that this coexistence should always be taken into consideration.

  9. Afatinib Dimaleate and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Pancreatic Cancer or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-04

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  10. Immunotherapy of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Märten, Angela

    2008-05-01

    Patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas have especially poor prognosis with a five-year survival rate of <1% and a median survival of 4-6 months. Pancreatic carcinoma is a systemic disease, insensitive to radiotherapy and mostly to chemotherapy. Accordingly, new treatment modalities are worth being investigated. One of the promising approaches is immunotherapy. Several phase I/II trials that have been published show interesting results, whereupon antibody-based strategies seem to fail and unspecific stimulation or vaccination with peptides look encouraging. Furthermore, phase II trials dealing with combination therapies are highly promising. One of them, a combination of chemoradiotherapy plus interferon-alpha is currently tested in a randomized phase III trial. As most of the trials had enrolled only limited numbers of patients and most of the trials were not conducted and/or reported according to the new standards it is difficult to draw final conclusions from the discussed trials. Immuno-monitoring was performed only in 40% of the discussed publications. In all cases immune responses were observed and correlation with the clinical outcome is discussed. Immunotherapy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and especially combination therapies including immunotherapy is an up-and-coming approach and needs to be investigated in well conducted phase III randomized controlled trials accompanied by appropriate immuno-monitoring.

  11. Advances in diagnosis, treatment and palliation of pancreatic carcinoma: 1990-2010

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chakshu; Eltawil, Karim M; Renfrew, Paul D; Walsh, Mark J; Molinari, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Several advances in genetics, diagnosis and palliation of pancreatic cancer (PC) have occurred in the last decades. A multidisciplinary approach to this disease is therefore recommended. PC is relatively common as it is the fourth leading cause of cancer related mortality. Most patients present with obstructive jaundice, epigastric or back pain, weight loss and anorexia. Despite improvements in diagnostic modalities, the majority of cases are still detected in advanced stages. The only curative treatment for PC remains surgical resection. No more than 20% of patients are candidates for surgery at the time of diagnosis and survival remains quite poor as adjuvant therapies are not very effective. A small percentage of patients with borderline non-resectable PC might benefit from neo-adjuvant chemoradiation therapy enabling them to undergo resection; however, randomized controlled studies are needed to prove the benefits of this strategy. Patients with unresectable PC benefit from palliative interventions such as biliary decompression and celiac plexus block. Further clinical trials to evaluate new chemo and radiation protocols as well as identification of genetic markers for PC are needed to improve the overall survival of patients affected by PC, as the current overall 5-year survival rate of patients affected by PC is still less than 5%. The aim of this article is to review the most recent high quality literature on this topic. PMID:21412497

  12. Comparison of Intrahepatic and Pancreatic Perfusion on Fusion Images Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Assessment of Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osama Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro; Baba, Hideo

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images using a combined single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT system and to evaluate the efficacy of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Materials and Methods. CTAI was performed in 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; age range, 35-77 years; mean age, 60 years) with stage IV pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. In all patients we obtained fusion images using a combined SPECT/CT system. Pancreatic perfusion on fusion images was classified as perfusion presence or as perfusion absent in the pancreatic cancer. Using WHO criteria we recorded the tumor response after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the pancreatic cancer, liver metastasis, and factors such as intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images. For statistical analysis we used the chi-square test; survival was evaluated by the Kaplan Meier method (log-rank test). Results. On fusion images, pancreatic and intrahepatic perfusion was recorded as hot spot and as homogeneous distribution, respectively, in 18 patients (55%) and as cold spot and heterogeneous distribution, respectively, in 15 (45%). Patients with hot spot in the pancreatic tumor and homogeneous distribution in the liver manifested better treatment results (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Patients with hot spot both in the pancreatic cancer and in the liver survived longer than those with cold spot in the pancreatic cancer and heterogeneous distribution in the liver (median {+-} SD, 16.0 {+-} 3.7 vs. 8.0 {+-} 1.4 months; p < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that in patients with advanced

  13. Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Enrique Domínguez-Muñoz, J

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the definition of the disease, the etiological diagnosis of idiopathic disease, the correlation between fibrosis degree and pancreatic secretion in the early stages of chronic pancreatitis, the treatment of the disease and of pain, the clinical relevance of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. A new mechanistic definition of chronic pancreatitis has been proposed. Genetic testing is mainly of help in patients with relapsing idiopathic pancreatitis. A significant correlation has been shown between the degree of pancreatic fibrosis as evaluated by elastography and pancreatic secretion of bicarbonate. New data supports the efficacy of antioxidants and simvastatin for the therapy of chronic pancreatitis. The pancreatoscopy-guided intraductal lithotripsy is an effective alternative to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis. The presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant risk of cardiovascular events. Fine needle biopsy and contrast enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography are of help for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and its differential diagnosis with pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis.

  15. Resectable pancreatic small cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jordan M.; Narang, Amol K.; Mansfield, Aaron S.; Herman, Joseph M.; Cameron, John L.; Laheru, Dan; Eckhauser, Fred E.; Olson, Mathew T.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Miller, Robert C.; Andersen, Dana K.

    2011-01-01

    Primary pancreatic small cell carcinoma (SCC) is rare, with just over 30 cases reported in the literature. Only 7 of these patients underwent surgical resection with a median survival of 6 months. Prognosis of SCC is therefore considered to be poor, and the role of adjuvant therapy is uncertain. Here we report two institutions' experience with resectable pancreatic SCC. Six patients with pancreatic SCC treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (4 patients) and the Mayo Clinic (2 patients) were identified from prospectively collected pancreatic cancer databases and re-reviewed by pathology. All six patients underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Clinicopathologic data were analyzed, and the literature on pancreatic SCC was reviewed. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 27–60). All six tumors arose in the head of the pancreas. Median tumor size was 3 cm, and all cases had positive lymph nodes except for one patient who only had five nodes sampled. There were no perioperative deaths and three patients had at least one postoperative complication. All six patients received adjuvant therapy, five of whom were given combined modality treatment with radiation, cisplatin, and etoposide. Median survival was 20 months with a range of 9–173 months. The patient who lived for 9 months received chemotherapy only, while the patient who lived for 173 months was given chemoradiation with cisplatin and etoposide and represents the longest reported survival time from pancreatic SCC to date. Pancreatic SCC is an extremely rare form of cancer with a poor prognosis. Patients in this surgical series showed favorable survival rates when compared to prior reports of both resected and unresectable SCC. Cisplatin and etoposide appears to be the preferred chemotherapy regimen, although its efficacy remains uncertain, as does the role of combined modality treatment with radiation. PMID:21464878

  16. Adenoviral p53 gene transfer and gemcitabine in three patients with liver metastases due to advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, Christian; Fischer, Rainer; Ehninger, Gerhard; Haag, Cornelie

    2007-01-01

    Background. Current therapies for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas do not improve the life expectancy of patients. Methods. In a non-randomized pilot trail we tested whether a local therapy based upon an adenoviral gene transfer of wild type p53 in combination with gemcitabine administration would be safe in patients with liver metastases due to pancreatic carcinoma. We report on the clinical course of three patients with respect to safety, tolerability and tumor response. Results. Transient grade III toxicities occurred with fever, leucopenia, elevation of AP, ALT, AST, GGT, while grade IV toxicity occurred for bilirubin only. Laboratory tests suggested disseminated intravascular coagulation in all three patients, but fine needle biopsies of liver did not show any histological evidence of thrombus or clot formation. Progression of liver metastases was documented in one and stable disease in another patient two months after treatment. However, a major improvement with regression of the indexed lesion by 80% occurred in a third patient after a single administration of 7.5×1012 viral particles, and time to progression was extended to six months. Conclusion. The combination therapy of viral gene transfer and chemotherapy temporarily controls and diminishes tumor burden. Improvement of the toxicity profile is necessary. Further trials are warranted to improve treatment and life expectancy of patients suffering from fatal diseases such as pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:18333108

  17. Inflammatory pancreatic masses: problems in differentiating focal pancreatitis from carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, C.C.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.; Mueller, P.R.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The authors studied 19 patients with focal inflammatory masses of the pancreas over an 18-month period. In 13 cases, transhepatic cholangiography and/or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were unsuccessful in differentiating pancreatitis from carcinoma. Eighteen patients had a history of alcohol abuse, and 12 had had pancreatitis previously. Pre-existing glandular injury appears to be a prerequisite to formation of focal inflammatory pancreatic masses.

  18. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of the disease, the pharmacological treatment of pain, and knowledge of the natural history of autoimmune pancreatitis. New evidence supports the relatively low prevalence of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, and the role of tobacco in triggering the etiopathogenic mechanisms of chronic pancreatitis is better understood. Some studies have identified certain factors that are associated with having a positive genetic test in adults with chronic idiopathic pancreatitis, which should help to select those patients who should undergo genetic studies. Antioxidant therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Finally, the development of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency is a very common finding during the long-term follow-up of patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. Smoking also seems to play a role in this type of pancreatitis.

  20. Treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma with 90Y-Clivatuzumab Tetraxetan: a phase I single-dose escalation trial.

    PubMed

    Gulec, Seza A; Cohen, Steven J; Pennington, Kenneth L; Zuckier, Lionel S; Hauke, Ralph J; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Teoh, Nick; Gold, David V; Sharkey, Robert M; Goldenberg, David M

    2011-06-15

    Humanized antibody hPAM4 specifically binds a mucin glycoprotein expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. This phase I study evaluated a single dose of (90)Y-clivatuzumab tetraxetan ((90)Y-labeled hPAM4) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Twenty-one patients (4 stage III; 17 stage IV) received (111)In-hPAM4 for imaging and serum sampling before (90)Y-hPAM4. Study procedures evaluated adverse events, safety laboratories, computed tomography (CT) scans, biomarkers, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry, and immunogenicity (HAHA). (111)In-hPAM4 showed normal biodistribution with radiation dose estimates to red marrow and solid organs acceptable for radioimmunotherapy and with tumor targeting in 12 patients. One patient withdrew before (90)Y-hPAM4; otherwise, 20 patients received (90)Y doses of 15 (n = 7), 20 (n = 9), and 25 mCi/m(2) (n = 4). Treatment was well tolerated; the only significant drug-related toxicities were (NCI CTC v.3) grade 3 to 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia increasing with (90)Y dose. There were no bleeding events or serious infections, and most cytopenias recovered to grade 1 within 12 weeks. Three patients at 25 mCi/m(2) encountered dose-limiting toxicity with grade 4 cytopenias more than 7 days, establishing 20 mCi/m(2) as the maximal tolerated (90)Y dose. Two patients developed HAHA of uncertain clinical significance. Most patients progressed rapidly and with CA19-9 levels increasing within 1 month of therapy, but 7 remained progression-free by CT for 1.5 to 5.6 months, including 3 achieving transient partial responses (32%-52% tumor diameter shrinkage). (90)Y-Clivatuzumab tetraxetan was well tolerated with manageable hematologic toxicity at the maximal tolerated (90)Y dose, and is a potential new therapeutic for advanced pancreatic cancer. ©2011 AACR.

  1. Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma with 90Y-Clivatuzumab Tetraxetan: A Phase I Single-Dose Escalation Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Seza A.; Cohen, Steven J.; Pennington, Kenneth L.; Zuckier, Lionel S.; Hauke, Ralph J.; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A.; Teoh, Nick; Gold, David V.; Sharkey, Robert M.; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Humanized antibody hPAM4 specifically binds a mucin glycoprotein expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. This phase I study evaluated a single dose of 90Y-clivatuzumab tetraxetan (90Y-labeled hPAM4) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Experimental Design Twenty-one patients (4 stage III; 17 stage IV) received 111In-hPAM4 for imaging and serum sampling before 90Y-hPAM4. Study procedures evaluated adverse events, safety laboratories, computed tomography (CT) scans, biomarkers, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry, and immunogenicity (HAHA). Results 111In-hPAM4 showed normal biodistribution with radiation dose estimates to red marrow and solid organs acceptable for radioimmunotherapy and with tumor targeting in 12 patients. One patient withdrew before 90Y-hPAM4; otherwise, 20 patients received 90Y doses of 15 (n = 7), 20 (n = 9), and 25 mCi/m2 (n = 4). Treatment was well tolerated; the only significant drug-related toxicities were (NCI CTC v.3) grade 3 to 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia increasing with 90Y dose. There were no bleeding events or serious infections, and most cytopenias recovered to grade 1 within 12 weeks. Three patients at 25 mCi/m2 encountered dose-limiting toxicity with grade 4 cytopenias more than 7 days, establishing 20 mCi/m2 as the maximal tolerated 90Y dose. Two patients developed HAHA of uncertain clinical significance. Most patients progressed rapidly and with CA19-9 levels increasing within 1 month of therapy, but 7 remained progression-free by CT for 1.5 to 5.6 months, including 3 achieving transient partial responses (32%–52% tumor diameter shrinkage). Conclusion 90Y-Clivatuzumab tetraxetan was well tolerated with manageable hematologic toxicity at the maximal tolerated 90Y dose, and is a potential new therapeutic for advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:21527562

  2. Computed tomographic appearance of resectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Araki, T.; Tasaka, A.; Maruyama, M.

    1982-06-01

    Thirteen patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma were examined by computed tomography (CT). Nine had a mass, 2 had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, 1 appeared to have ductal dilatation, and 1 had no sign of abnormality. Resectable carcinoma was diagnosed retrospectively in 8 cases, based on the following criteria: a mass with a distinct contour, frequently containing a tiny or irregular low-density area and accompanied by dilatation of the caudal portion of the main pancreatic duct without involvement of the large vessels, liver, or lymph nodes. Including unresectable cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and obstructive jaundice from causes other than cancer, the false-positive rate was less than 6%. However, a small cancer without change in pancreatic contour is difficult to detect with CT.

  3. A dosimetric analysis of dose escalation using two intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques in locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael W.; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara; Albert, Paul S.; Poggi, Matthew; Camphausen, Kevin; Citrin, Deborah . E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To perform an analysis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), sequential boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRTs), and integrated boost IMRT (IMRTi) for dose escalation in unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography images from 15 patients were used. Treatment plans were generated using 3D-CRT, IMRTs, and IMRTi for dose levels of 54, 59.4, and 64.8 Gy. Plans were analyzed for target coverage, doses to liver, kidneys, small bowel, and spinal cord. Results: Three-dimensional-CRT exceeded tolerance to small bowel in 1 of 15 (6.67%) patients at 54 Gy, and 4 of 15 (26.7%) patients at 59.4 and 64.8 Gy. 3D-CRT exceeded spinal cord tolerance in 1 of 15 patients (6.67%) at 59.4 Gy and liver constraints in 1 of 15 patients (6.67%) at 64.8 Gy; no IMRT plans exceeded tissue tolerance. Both IMRT techniques reduced the percentage of total kidney volume receiving 20 Gy (V20), the percentage of small bowel receiving 45 Gy (V45), and the percentage of liver receiving 35 Gy (V35). IMRTi appeared superior to IMRTs in reducing the total kidney V20 (p < 0.0001), right kidney V20 (p < 0.0001), and small bowel V45 (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Sequential boost IMRT and IMRTi improved the ability to achieve normal tissue dose goals compared with 3D-CRT. IMRTi allowed dose escalation to 64.8 Gy with acceptable normal tissue doses and superior dosimetry compared with 3D-CRT and IMRTs.

  4. The role of radiotherapy in multimodal treatment of pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma is one of the most lethal malignancies, but in recent years a number of positive developments have occurred in the management of pancreatic carcinoma. This article aims to give an overview of the current knowledge regarding the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The results of meta-analyses, phase III-studies, and phase II-studies using chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy for resectable and non-resectable PDAC were reviewed. The use of radiotherapy is discussed in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings as well as in the locally advanced situation. Whenever possible, radiotherapy should be performed as simultaneous chemoradiotherapy. Patients with PDAC should be offered entry into clinical trials to identify optimal treatment results. PMID:20615227

  5. Irinotecan plus bolus/infusional 5-Fluorouracil and leucovorin in patients with pretreated advanced pancreatic carcinoma: a multicenter experience of the Gruppo Oncologico Italia Meridionale.

    PubMed

    Gebbia, Vittorio; Maiello, Evaristo; Giuliani, Francesco; Borsellino, Nicolò; Arcara, Carlo; Colucci, Giuseppe

    2010-10-01

    Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer failing gemcitabine-based first-line chemotherapy are still in relatively good clinical conditions and may still require second-line chemotherapy, which is frequently administered in daily clinical practice given to without solid scientific support. A retrospective survey was carried out including 40 patients with stage III or IV gemcitabine-refractory pancreatic carcinoma. Patients received standard FOLFIRI regimen biweekly until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and National Cancer Institute common toxicity criteria were employed respectively for response and toxicity assessment. Six partial responses (15%) and 14 stabilizations of disease (35%) were recorded for a tumor growth control rate of 50%. The median time to progression was 3.7 (range, 1-6.5 months), and median overall survival was 6 months (range, 2-8.2 months). A stabilization of performance status and a subjective improvement of cancer-related symptoms were recorded in 21 patients (52.5%). No correlation has been found between length of time to progression during first-line chemotherapy and length of that reported in the second-line setting or objective response. Grade 3-4 diarrhea and mucositis was observed in 15% and 10% of cases, respectively. Data presented in this article demonstrate that the second-line FOLFIRI regimen are able to induce an objective response in a relatively small fraction of patients with gemcitabine-refractory adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The use of second-line chemotherapy should be carefully proposed to patients with good performance status or those who had a good response to first-line therapy.

  6. CT guided interstitial therapy of pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Haaga, J.R.; Owens, D.B.; Kellermeyer, R.W.; Shina, D.; Pilai, K.; Began, N.

    1987-11-01

    We describe the use of percutaneous CT guidance for localization and placement of /sup 192/Ir sources into a patient with pancreatic carcinoma. We have shown the feasibility of this procedure and the lack of complications which are probably due to minimal damage to tissue involved. Computed tomography is ideally suited for percutaneous implantation because it provides the most accurate method for needle placement within the abdomen.

  7. Latest advances in pancreatic tumours.

    PubMed

    Lariño Noia, José

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to have a bleak prognosis. Hardly any therapeutic advances have been made in the last few years and consequently most efforts have focused on preventing its development and on diagnosing precursor lesions. In this regard, the use of statins as a preventive factor and the implementation of screening programmes in high-risk patients are gaining ground. In the field of treatment, there is greater focus on the role of neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer and on a multimodal approach to the disease, with few advances in effective novel therapies. Most studies concerned cystic tumours of the pancreas, especially intraductal mucinous papillary tumour, with its known potential for malignant transformation. Multiple studies were devoted to validation of the 2012 Fukuoka international guidelines and the highly controversial 2015 AGA guidelines. Notable among these studies were those demonstrating the suboptimal positive predictive value and questioning important aspects of the guidelines, such as discontinuation of follow-up or the criteria for surgical referral. Notable among diagnostic procedures were cystoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy as the most promising techniques due to their high efficacy and negative predictive value in detecting mucinous cystic lesions. There were also a large number of studies on the natural history of intraductal papillary mucinous tumours, which help deepen knowledge of these entities and the search for predictive factors of cancer development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 for differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Si-Biao; Qin, Shan-Yu; Chen, Wen; Luo, Wei; Jiang, Hai-Xing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the utility of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) for differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: We searched the literature for studies reporting the sensitivity, specificity, and other accuracy measures of serum CA19-9 levels for differentiating pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Pooled analysis was performed using random-effects models, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated. Study quality was assessed using Standards for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy and Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy tools. RESULTS: A total of 34 studies involving 3125 patients with pancreatic carcinoma and 2061 patients with chronic pancreatitis were included. Pooled analysis of the ability of CA19-9 level to differentiate pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis showed the following effect estimates: sensitivity, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.80-0.83); specificity, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.79-0.82); positive likelihood ratio, 4.08 (95%CI: 3.39-4.91); negative likelihood ratio, 0.24 (95%CI: 0.21-0.28); and diagnostic odds ratio, 19.31 (95%CI: 14.40-25.90). The area under the ROC curve was 0.88. No significant publication bias was detected. CONCLUSION: Elevated CA19-9 by itself is insufficient for differentiating pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis, however, it increases suspicion of pancreatic carcinoma and may complement other clinical findings to improve diagnostic accuracy. PMID:25892884

  9. Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil or Capecitabine With or Without Zoledronic Acid in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-23

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  10. Phase II trial of dacarbazine (DTIC) in advanced pancreatic islet cell carcinoma. Study of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-E6282.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, R K; Cnaan, A; Hahn, R G; Carbone, P P; Haller, D G

    2001-08-01

    A phase II study of dacarbazine (DTIC), was conducted to determine the response rate, duration of response, toxicity and overall survival of patients with advanced pancreatic islet cell tumors. Fifty patients with advanced pancreatic islet cell tumors, having progressive symptoms or evidence of rapidly advancing disease were entered on this study. DTIC was given by IV infusion at a dose of 850 mg/m2, over 60-90 minutes, repeated every four weeks. The response rate was 33% in 42 patients who had measurable tumor, and 34% in the 50 patients (90% confidence interval (90% CI): 23%-47%). The majority of the responses were seen in patients without prior chemotherapy. Median overall survival was 19.3 months. There were two lethal toxicities on the study, one septic shock and one myocardial infarction. Grade 4 toxicities were, hematological (5 patients), sepsis, neurological (depression and paranoid behavior) and bleeding (1 patient each). The most common toxicity was vomiting, grade 3 in 13% of patients. DTIC has activity in advanced previously untreated pancreatic islet cell tumors.

  11. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated. PMID:20617020

  12. Beer and its non-alcoholic compounds: role in pancreatic exocrine secretion, alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

    2010-03-01

    In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated.

  13. Bacteriolytic therapy of experimental pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maletzki, Claudia; Gock, Michael; Klier, Ulrike; Klar, Ernst; Linnebacher, Michael

    2010-07-28

    To investigate the effectiveness of Clostridium novyi (C. novyi)-NT spores for the treatment of established subcutaneous pancreatic tumor in the syngeneic, immunocompetent Panc02/C57Bl/6 model. C. novyi-NT spores were applied intravenously to animals carrying established pancreatic tumors of three different sizes. Systemic immune responses in peripheral blood and spleen were examined by flow cytometry. Supplementary, cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes against syngeneic tumor targets was analyzed. Application of spores identified, that (1) small tumors (< 150 mm(3)) were completely unaffected (n = 10); (2) very large tumors (> 450 mm(3)) responded with substantial necrosis followed by shrinkage and significant lethality most likely due to tumor lysis syndrome (n = 6); and (3) an optimal treatment window exists for tumors of approximately 250 mm(3) (n = 21). In this latter group, all tumor-bearing animals had complete tumor regression and remained free of tumor recurrence. In subsequent tumor rechallenge experiments a significant delay in tumor growth compared to the initial tumor cell inoculation was observed (tumor volume at day 28: 197.8 +/- 87.3 mm(3) vs 500.1 +/- 50.9 mm(3), P < 0.05). These effects were accompanied by systemic activation of immune response mechanisms predominantly mediated by the innate arm of the immune system. The observed complete tumor regression is encouraging and shows that immunotherapy with C. novyi-NT is an interesting strategy for the treatment of pancreatic carcinomas of defined sizes.

  14. Bacteriolytic therapy of experimental pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maletzki, Claudia; Gock, Michael; Klier, Ulrike; Klar, Ernst; Linnebacher, Michael

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of Clostridium novyi (C. novyi)-NT spores for the treatment of established subcutaneous pancreatic tumor in the syngeneic, immunocompetent Panc02/C57Bl/6 model. METHODS: C. novyi-NT spores were applied intravenously to animals carrying established pancreatic tumors of three different sizes. Systemic immune responses in peripheral blood and spleen were examined by flow cytometry. Supplementary, cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes against syngeneic tumor targets was analyzed. RESULTS: Application of spores identified, that (1) small tumors (< 150 mm3) were completely unaffected (n = 10); (2) very large tumors (> 450 mm3) responded with substantial necrosis followed by shrinkage and significant lethality most likely due to tumor lysis syndrome (n = 6); and (3) an optimal treatment window exists for tumors of approximately 250 mm3 (n = 21). In this latter group, all tumor-bearing animals had complete tumor regression and remained free of tumor recurrence. In subsequent tumor rechallenge experiments a significant delay in tumor growth compared to the initial tumor cell inoculation was observed (tumor volume at day 28: 197.8 ± 87.3 mm3 vs 500.1 ± 50.9 mm3, P < 0.05). These effects were accompanied by systemic activation of immune response mechanisms predominantly mediated by the innate arm of the immune system. CONCLUSION: The observed complete tumor regression is encouraging and shows that immunotherapy with C. novyi-NT is an interesting strategy for the treatment of pancreatic carcinomas of defined sizes. PMID:20653063

  15. Study of Efficacy and Safety of PDR001 in Patients With Advanced or Metastatic, Well-differentiated, Non-functional Neuroendocrine Tumors of Pancreatic, Gastrointestinal (GI), or Thoracic Origin or Poorly-differentiated Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma (GEP-NEC)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-05

    Well-differentiated Non-functional NET of Thoracic Origin; Well-differentiated Non-functional NET of Gastrointestinal Origin; Well-differentiated Non-functional NET of Pancreatic Origin; Poorly-differentiated Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

  16. Novel agents for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinleye, Akintunde; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Furqan, Muhammad; Cang, Shundong; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is relatively insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, novel agents targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, EGFR, TGF-β, HEDGEHOG, NOTCH, IGF, PARP, PI3K/AKT, RAS, and Src) are being explored in clinical trials as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. This review summarizes the most recent advances with the targeted therapies in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26369833

  17. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Oregovomab Followed by Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Nelfinavir Mesylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-28

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Resectable Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  18. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. CT pancreatogram in carcinoma of the pancreas and chronic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Karasawa, E.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Federle, M.P.; London, S.S.

    1983-08-01

    CT has made it possible to determine the contour of the pancreatic duct, to measure its caliber, and to detect dilatation of the duct. CT scans of 75 patients with pancreatic carcinoma and of 45 patients with chronic pancreatitis were obtained. Dilatation of the pancreatic duct was seen in 56% of patients with carcinoma, and in 70% of those with tumors confined to the pancreatic head and body. Smooth dilatation (43%) or beaded dilatation (40%) were most commonly associated with carcinoma. Ductal dilatation was present in 58% of the patients with chronic pancreatitis, and irregular dilatation was seen in 73% of the patients in this group. About half of the patients who had irregular dilatation had calculi within the ducts. Eight cases of dilatation of the duct with no detectible pancreatic mass were seen in a subgroup of 13 patients who had small carcinomas of the pancreas (tumor size of 3 cm or less). Our findings indicate that a dilated pancreatic duct with a smooth contour and a ratio of duct to total gland width of 0.50 or greater suggests carcinoma as the underlying pathology.

  20. Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert C G

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis for locally advanced pancreatic cancer is based on high-quality cross-sectional imaging, which shows tumor invasion into the celiac/superior mesenteric arteries and/or superior mesenteric/portal venous system that is not reconstructable. The optimal management of these patients is evolving quickly with the advent of newer chemotherapeutics, radiation, and nonthermal ablation modalities. This article presents the current status of initial chemotherapy, surgical therapy, ablative therapy, and radiation therapy for patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection offers the best chance of long-term disease control and the only chance for cure for patients with nonmetastatic exocrine pancreatic cancer.

  1. Epidermal growth factor and its receptors in human pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.F.; Pan, G.Z.; Hou, X.; Liu, T.H.; Chen, J.; Yanaihara, C.; Yanaihara, N. )

    1990-05-01

    The role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in oncogenesis and progression of malignant tumors is a subject of vast interest. In this study, radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay of EGF were established. EGF contents in malignant and benign pancreatic tumors, in normal pancreas tissue, and in culture media of a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line were determined. EGF receptor binding studies were performed. It was shown that EGF contents in pancreatic carcinomas were significantly higher than those in normal pancreas or benign pancreatic tumors. EGF was also detected in the culture medium of a pancreatic carcinoma cell line. The binding of 125I-EGF to the pancreatic carcinoma cells was time and temperature dependent, reversible, competitive, and specific. Scatchard analysis showed that the dissociation constant of EGF receptor was 2.1 X 10(-9) M, number of binding sites was 1.3 X 10(5) cell. These results indicate that there is an over-expression of EGF/EGF receptors in pancreatic carcinomas, and that an autocrine regulatory mechanism may exist in the growth-promoting effect of EGF on tumor cells.

  2. Advances in Hereditary Colorectal and Pancreatic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Meghan L; Germansky, Katharine A; Yurgelun, Matthew B

    2016-07-01

    Innovations in genetic medicine have led to improvements in the early detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer for patients with inherited risks of gastrointestinal cancer, particularly hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. This review provides an update on recent data and key advances that have improved the identification, understanding, and management of patients with hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. This review details recent and emerging data that highlight the developing landscape of genetics in hereditary colorectal and pancreatic cancer risk. A summary is provided of the current state-of-the-art practices for identifying, evaluating, and managing patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer risk. The impact of next-generation sequencing technologies in the clinical diagnosis of hereditary gastrointestinal cancer and also in discovery efforts of new genes linked to familial cancer risk are discussed. Emerging targeted therapies that may play a particularly important role in the treatment of patients with hereditary forms of colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer are also reviewed. Current approaches for pancreatic cancer screening and the psychosocial impact of such procedures are also detailed. Given the availability of new diagnostic, risk-reducing, and therapeutic strategies that exist for patients with hereditary risk of colorectal or pancreatic cancer, it is imperative that clinicians be vigilant about evaluating patients for hereditary cancer syndromes. Continuing to advance genetics research in hereditary gastrointestinal cancers will allow for more progress to be made in personalized medicine and prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-24

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; PALB2 Gene Mutation; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  4. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Phil A; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a form of chronic pancreatitis that is characterized clinically by frequent presentation with obstructive jaundice, histologically by a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with fibrosis, and therapeutically by a dramatic response to corticosteroid therapy. Two distinct diseases, type 1 and type 2 AIP, share these features. However, these 2 diseases have unique pancreatic histopathologic patterns and differ significantly in their demographic profiles, clinical presentation, and natural history. Recognizing the popular and long-standing association of the term "AIP" with what is now called "type 1 AIP," we suggest using "AIP" solely for type 1 AIP and to acknowledge its own distinct disease status by using "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis" (IDCP) for type 2 AIP. AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The etiopathogenesis of AIP and IgG4-RD is largely unknown. However, the remarkable effectiveness of B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab in patients with AIP and IgG4-RD highlights the crucial role of B cells in its pathogenesis. IDCP is less commonly recognized, and little is known about its pathogenesis. IDCP has no biomarker but is associated with inflammatory bowel disease in ~25% of patients. Recently, the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP identified combinations of features that are diagnostic of both diseases. Both AIP and IDCP are corticosteroid responsive; however, relapses are common in AIP and rare in IDCP. Therefore, maintenance therapy with either an immunomodulator (eg, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or mycophenolate mofetil) or rituximab is often necessary for patients with AIP. Long-term survival is excellent for both patients with AIP and patients with IDCP.

  5. [Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma: diagnostic and surgical treatment strategy].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-chao; Zhan, Han-xiang; Zhang, Tai-ping; Zhao, Yu-pei

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the clinical features, diagnostic and therapeutic strategy of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma. The data of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma patients who underwent surgical operations from January 2002 to January 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Six cases of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma, identified with pathology were collected, including 3 males and 3 females with the average of 47.8 yeas old. Upper abdominal pain was present in 5 cases, weight loss was present in 4 cases with the average of 12.5 kg. Other symptoms included nausea/vomiting, back pain and obstructive jaundice. The serum CA19-9 and CA24-2 level were significantly elevated in 2 cases. CT scan, MRI and DSA were the main imaging methods to diagnose this disease. However, no case was diagnosed as pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma before operation. All cases were confirmed by the pathological examination. Relatively high rates of surgical resection, long operative time, more blood loss and combined multi-organ resection were the characteristics of this disease's operative surgical procedures. The average period of postoperative follow-up process was 60 months, and the mean survival time was (32 ± 8) months. The clinical features and biological behavior of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma are different from those of ductal adenocarcinoma, while the relatively specific clinical manifestations and imaging changes will be helpful for qualitative diagnosis before operation. As it has high rate of resection and better prognosis, more radical surgical strategies should be carried out for patients of this disease.

  6. Systemic Therapies for Advanced Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Nitya; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a rare tumor type, and comprise 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. When nonfunctional (i.e. nonhormone secreting), these tumors generally cause few symptoms and often go unnoticed for several years; for this reason, they are rarely localized at presentation, and are typically diagnosed in the presence of metastatic disease, most commonly to the liver. Although pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors can be less aggressive than other tumor types, the management poses a significant challenge because of the heterogeneous clinical presentations and varying degrees of aggressiveness. The therapy of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors includes a multimodality approach and can often include surgery, liver-directed therapies (i.e. embolization), as well as targeted and cytotoxic systemic treatments. A variety of systemic therapies have been developed for the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. These therapies include somatostatin analogs (octreotide or lanreotide), a select group of cytotoxic chemotherapy agents (alkylating, fluorouracil and platinum drugs), as well as targeted or biologic agents (everolimus and sunitinib). This chapter will review the available systemic therapy options for advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:26614372

  7. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases could be a risk factor for acute pancreatitis (AP), specifically hypertension and ischemic heart disease. Smoking is associated with AP (OR 2.34), with the association being less marked than with chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, smoking may worsen the prognosis of AP. The bedside index for severity in AP (BISAP) prognostic system has a similar ability to predict mortality to the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) index and is much simpler to calculate. Magnetic resonance imaging is a safe technique (it does not radiate the patient) and is useful in the diagnosis of complications, severity prediction and clinical decision making. Peripancreatic venous thrombosis is frequent in AP and is rarely associated with gastric variceal bleeding or mesenteric ischemia. The treatment of organized pancreatic necrosis by combined endoscopic and percutaneous drainage is safe and effective, avoiding the need for surgery. Aggressive fluid therapy does not seem to improve the outcome of patients with AP. The administration of early enteral nutrition in mild-moderate AP reduces abdominal pain and the risk of intolerance of oral refeeding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Recent advances in pancreatic cancer: biology, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Singh, Divya; Upadhyay, Ghanshyam; Srivastava, Rakesh K; Shankar, Sharmila

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in United States. Efforts have been made towards the development of the viable solution for its treatment with constrained accomplishment because of its complex biology. It is well established that pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs), albeit present in a little count, contribute incredibly to PC initiation, progression, and metastasis. Customary chemo and radiotherapeutic alternatives, however, expands general survival, the related side effects are the significant concern. Amid the most recent decade, our insight about molecular and cellular pathways involved in PC and role of CSCs in its progression has increased enormously. Presently the focus is to target CSCs. The herbal products have gained much consideration recently as they, usually, sensitize CSCs to chemotherapy and target molecular signaling involved in various tumors including PC. Some planned studies have indicated promising results proposing that examinations in this course have a lot to offer for the treatment of PC. Although preclinical studies uncovered the importance of herbal products in attenuating pancreatic carcinoma, limited studies have been conducted to evaluate their role in clinics. The present review provides a new insight to recent advances in pancreatic cancer biology, treatment and current status of herbal products in its anticipation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    The present article analyzes the main presentations on acute pancreatitis (AP) in Digestive Disease Week 2013. Perfusion computed tomography allows early diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin predicts the development of acute renal failure, severe AP and death. Factors associated with greater fluid sequestration in AP are alcoholic etiology, an elevated hematocrit, and the presence of criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome; fluid sequestration is associated with a worse outcome. True pseudocysts (fluid collections without necrosis for more than 4 weeks) are a highly infrequent complication in AP. Patients with necrotic collections have a poor prognosis, especially if associated with infection. A meta-analysis on fluid therapy suggests that early aggressive fluid administration is associated with higher mortality and more frequent respiratory complications. According to a meta-analysis, enteral nutrition initiated within 24 hours of admission improves the outcome of AP compared with later initiation of enteral nutrition. Pentoxifylline could be a promising alternative in AP; a double-blind randomized study showed that this drug reduced the length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, as well as the need for intensive care unit admission. The association of octreotide and celecoxib seems to reduce the frequency of organ damage compared with octreotide alone. Mild AP can be managed in the ambulatory setting through hospital-at-home units after a short, 24-hour admission.

  10. Non-focal enlargement in pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenberg, J.; Simeone, J.F.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Mueller, P.R.; van Sonnenberg, E.; Neff, C.C.

    1982-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma can appear radiographically as enlargement of the major part of the pancreas. In this series, part or all of three or more pancreatic segments (head, neck, body, and tail) were involved in 27% of patients with adenocarcinoma who had computed tomography. Differentiation from pure pancreatitis may require additional radiographic studies. The varied tissue composition of a pancreas enlarged by adenocarcinoma will often require biopsy of multiple sites for confirmation.

  11. Adjuvant treatment for pancreatic ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Macarulla, T; Fernández, T; Gallardo, M E; Hernando, O; López, A M; Hidalgo, M

    2017-06-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a tumor with a very poor prognosis. Most of the patients are diagnosed in advanced stages of the disease, and 5-year survival rates in these patients remains <10%. Surgery still remains the only radical treatment option, although only 15-20% of patients are candidates for surgical resection at the time of the diagnosis. Patients who undergo radical surgery still have a limited survival rate, being the average of 23 months. Three clinical trials have shown that adjuvant chemotherapy therapy after surgery may improve survival: CONKO-1, ESPAC-3, and ESPAC-4. Adjuvant therapy is recommended in patients with R0/R1, T1-4/N1-0 tumors and with ECOG 0-1. In patients with ECOG-2, the decision needs to be individualized. Treatment schemes that have demonstrated efficacy include gemcitabine alone, 5-fluorouracil, or the combination of gemcitabine and capecitabine for six months. Prior to adjuvant treatment, the following test are recommended: Complete blood tests, including CA19.9 biomarker; imaging studies to rule out early disease relapse (preferable thorax-abdomen-pelvic CT). Studies that have evaluated the efficacy of radiation therapy in the adjuvant setting have presented conflicting results. Its use should be considered in patients with R1 or R2 tumors or in those with lymph nodes involved.

  12. Renal adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and pancreatic islet cell carcinoma in a binturong (Arctictis binturong).

    PubMed

    Klaphake, Eric; Shoieb, Ahmed; Ramsay, Ed; Schumacher, Juergen; Craig, Linden

    2005-03-01

    A 19-yr-old binturong (Arctictis binturong) with acute upper respiratory disease was euthanized. Postmortem findings included hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreatic islet cell carcinoma, and renal adenocarcinoma with metastasis to the spleen, pleura, and pericardium. A link between primary hepatic and renal neoplasms has been noted in older humans.

  13. Ablation Strategies for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Linecker, Michael; Pfammatter, Thomas; Kambakamba, Patryk; DeOliveira, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of novel and somewhat effective chemotherapy against pancreas cancer, several groups developed a new interest on locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Unresectable tumors constitute up to 80% of pancreatic cancer (PC) at the time of diagnosis and are associated with a 5-year overall survival of less than 5%. To control those tumors locally, with perhaps improved patients survival, significant advances were made over the last 2 decades in the development of ablation methods including cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, high intensity focused ultrasound and irreversible electroporation (IRE). Many suggested a call for caution for possible severe or lethal complications in using such techniques on the pancreas. Most fears were on the heating or freezing of the pancreas, while non-thermal ablation (IRE) could offer safer approaches. The multimodal therapies along with high-resolution imaging guidance have created some enthusiasm toward ablation for LAPC. The impact of ablation techniques on primarily non-resectable PC remains, however, unclear.

  14. Pancreatic carcinoma masked as fever of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ning; Xing, Cheng; Chang, Xiaoyan; Dai, Menghua; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pancreatic carcinoma is a highly lethal malignancy. Common presenting features of pancreatic cancer include anorexia, asthenia, weight loss, pain, and obstructive jaundice. Nevertheless, fever as a symptom, or even primary manifestation of pancreatic cancer is rather rare. Methods: Here, we report a 63-year-old male patient presenting with daily fevers, night sweats, and fatigue of 2-month duration. Laboratory findings showed elevated white blood cell count (WBC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and serum C-reactive protein (CRP). A computed tomography scan demonstrated a tumor between the duodenum and pancreatic head. Chest radiograph was normal. Results: The patient underwent an uneventful tumor resection. Histological examination of a surgical specimen demonstrated an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma originated from pancreatic head. The tumor was compatible with TNM stage IIA (T3N0M0). Complete resolution of the fever was achieved on post-operative day 4 and no recurrence of the tumor or neoplastic fever happen during the 39-month follow-up. Conclusion: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma could manifest as neoplastic fever at the time of diagnosis. If the tumor is resectable, surgical resection is a safe and curative form of therapy not only for the fever but also for the original carcinoma. PMID:27583884

  15. Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Paraganglioma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  16. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ginesta, Mireia M.; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71–80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms. PMID:27602165

  17. Arterial complication of irreversible electroporation procedure for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Yahya; Tezcaner, Tugan; Aydın, Hüseyin Onur; Boyvat, Fatih; Moray, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a non-thermal ablation technique used especially in locally advanced pancreatic carcinomas that are considered surgically unresectable. We present the first case of acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion secondary to pancreatic IRE procedure that has not been reported before in the literature. A 66-year-old man underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. IRE procedure was applied to the patient during laparotomy under general anesthesia. After finishing the procedure, an acute intestinal ischemia was detected. A conventional vascular angiography was performed and a metallic stent was successfully placed to the SMA and blood flow was maintained. It is important to be careful in such cases of tumor involvement of SMA when evaluating for IRE procedure of pancreatic tumor. PMID:27795815

  18. Isolated pancreatic metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma after curative resection.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sang Myung; Park, Joong-Won; Han, Sung-Sik; Choi, Joon-Il; Lee, Woo Jin; Park, Sang Jae; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Chang-Min

    2010-04-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly malignant tumor and extrahepatic metastasis is not rare. The most common organ of HCC metastasis is lung, followed by bone and adrenal gland. To the best of our knowledge, isolated pancreatic metastasis of HCC that developed after curative resection has not been described previously. We report a case of solitary pancreatic metastasis of HCC, which was found 28 mo after left hemihepatectomy for HCC. The lesion was successfully resected with the pancreas, and no other metastatic lesions have been found in follow-up.

  19. Endosonography and cytology in diagnosing and staging pancreatic body and tail carcinoma: Preliminary results of endosonographic guided puncture

    SciTech Connect

    Tio, T.L.; Sie, L.H.; Tytgat, G.N.J. Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam )

    1993-01-01

    Endosonography was performed in diagnosing and staging pancreatic body and tail carcinoma in two patients. In the first case endoscopy, abdominal ultrasound, and computed tomography were nondiagnostic in diagnosing the origin of submucosal gastric abnormalities. Endosonography diagnosed a pancreatic tail carcinoma with submucosal gastric involvement, and this was confirmed by endosonographic-guided cytology. Fundus varices due to segmented splenic vein involvement were found. Surgery was not recommended due to the advanced disease. In the second case pancreatic body carcinoma was diagnosed by ERCP and computed tomography. Transcutaneous ultrasonographic-guided cytological puncture confirmed the diagnosis. Endosonography revealed additional information of segmental portal hypertension with fundic varices due to splenic vein involvement. Autopsy confirmed the endosonographic diagnosis. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Chromosome 7q allelic losses in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Achille, A; Biasi, M O; Zamboni, G; Bogina, G; Magalini, A R; Pederzoli, P; Perucho, M; Scarpa, A

    1996-08-15

    During our DNA fingerprinting studies of paired normal and pancreatic cancer tissues using arbitrarily primed PCR, we noticed a band showing an apparent homozygous deletion in a pancreatic cancer cell line and a decreased intensity in a number of primary cancers. That band was assigned to chromosome 7. Such information led us to analyze chromosome 7 loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in a panel of 12 cryostat-enriched primary pancreatic cancers and 2 pancreatic cancer cell lines, despite the reportedly low frequency of chromosome 7 LOH in xenograft-enriched pancreatic cancers. Seventeen PCR-amplified CA-microsatellite polymorphic sites were analyzed. One of the two cell lines and eight common-type cancers (including all five poorly differentiated and three of five moderately differentiated cancers) showed chromosome 7q LOH, whereas the two uncommon types of ductal cancer (one adenosquamous and one mucinous noncystic) scored negative. Our data suggest that chromosome 7q LOH is a frequent event (80%) in cryostat-enrichable common pancreatic ductal carcinomas, that is, those primarily of high cellularity. The chromosome 7q smallest common deleted region described by our cases was between 7q31.1 and 7q32.

  1. Pancreatic-type Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Stomach Included in Multiple Primary Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yonenaga, Yoshikuni; Kurosawa, Manabu; Mise, Masahiro; Yamagishi, Miki; Higashide, Shunichi

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic-type acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) in the stomach is extraordinarily rare. We pathologically examined two cases with multiple primary carcinomas, including gastric tumors. Gastric cancer specimens were examined by immunostaining and electron microscopy. Both cases had cancer cells with acinar patterns, resembling pancreatic ACC. The cancer cells in the first case were positive for exocrine markers, including chymotrypsin, lipase and alpha-1 antichymotrypsin (ACT), as well as neuroendocrine markers, including chromogranin A and synaptophysin. The cancer cells in the second case were positive for chymotrypsin and alpha-1 ACT, while being slightly positive for chromogranin A and synaptophysin. Ultrastructurally, cancer cells contained zymogen granules in both cases. The final diagnosis was pancreatic mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma and pure pancreatic ACC, respectively. We confirmed two cases with gastric pancreatic-type ACC included in multiple primary carcinomas. This type of double cancer has not been reported previously. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Pancreatic panniculitis as a paraneoplastic phenomenon of a pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Naeyaert, Charlotte; de Clerck, Frederik; De Wilde, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    We present the case of a 59-year-old patient admitted with extreme painful erythematous subcutaneous nodules of the lower extremities in association with arthritis and peripheral eosinophilia. Upon skin biopsy, the diagnosis of pancreatic panniculitis was made. On further investigation, an underlying acinar cell type pancreas carcinoma was revealed. This clinical case does illustrate how a seemingly innocuous skin condition may herald an underlying malignant disease. The presence of pancreatic panniculitis should trigger clinicians to undertake further thorough diagnostic investigation of the pancreas.

  3. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  4. [Surgical treatment and prognosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J W; Che, X; Lan, Z M; Chen, Y T; Huang, X H; Jiang, Q L; Wang, C F

    2016-12-23

    Objective: Pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (pNEC) is a highly malignant tumor.This study aimed to evaluate the role of surgery and the prognosis for patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (pNEC). Methods: We collected and reviewed all clinical data of patients who underwent radical surgery for pNEC from Jan 2000 through Jan 2016 in our hospital. Cox-regression analysis wasused to evaluate the factors potentially influencing survival. Results: Twenty patients including 11 males and 9 females (median age, 62.5 years) were included in this study. All patients underwent radical surgery and 17 cases received postoperative platinum-based chemotherapy.The median follow-up time was 41 months (range, 1 to 127 months). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates of the patients were 66.7%, 51.5% and 28.1%, with a median survival time of 75.3 months.The multivariate analysis indicated that tumor size and Ki-67 index were of prognostic significance. Conclusions: Pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas are rare but increasing in incidence. Patients with localized nonmetastatic primary tumors seem to benefit from surgery. Early diagnosis and multimodality therapy are key points of an improved survival.

  5. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists.

  6. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy treatment of pancreatic stones complicated with advanced stage autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Uehara, Takeshi; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2015-03-10

    Although most patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) respond favorably to prednisolone therapy, some individuals who later suffer from pancreatic calculi may require additional extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) treatment. This study compares the efficacy of ESWL for calculi in AIP with that in ordinary chronic pancreatitis (CP) and proposes a new treatment approach for pancreatic duct stones occurring in AIP. We examined the clinical records of 8 patients with chronic stage AIP and 92 patients with ordinary CP who received ESWL for pancreatic calculi. The AIP group was significantly older than the CP group (69.0 vs. 56.5 years, P = 0.018). With regard to the indications for ESWL, chronic pain was significantly less frequent in the chronic stage AIP group (0% vs. 45.7%, P = 0.001), whereas preservation of pancreatic function was significantly more frequent (75% vs. 19.6%, P = 0.001). Compared with the CP group, the AIP group tended to exhibit pancreatic duct stenosis proximal to pancreatic calculi and had a lower rate of complete extraction of stones from the main pancreatic duct. Histopathological analysis of a patient with chronic stage AIP revealed widely distributed nodular pancreatitis, which was characteristic of ordinary CP, along with isolated areas of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis. Different approaches are needed for the treatment of pancreatic calculi in chronic stage AIP and ordinary CP. Specifically, it appears that intensive ESWL therapy can be avoided or delayed in AIP if the patient displays: (1) advanced age, (2) little or no chronic pain or pancreatitis, and (3) pancreatic duct stenosis proximal to pancreatic stones. In such cases, the benefit of ESWL treatment may be outweighed by the risks involved in this procedure.

  7. Challenges of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Colagrande, Stefano; Inghilesi, Andrea L; Aburas, Sami; Taliani, Gian G; Nardi, Cosimo; Marra, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive malignancy, resulting as the third cause of death by cancer each year. The management of patients with HCC is complex, as both the tumour stage and any underlying liver disease must be considered conjointly. Although surveillance by imaging, clinical and biochemical parameters is routinely performed, a lot of patients suffering from cirrhosis have an advanced stage HCC at the first diagnosis. Advanced stage HCC includes heterogeneous groups of patients with different clinical condition and radiological features and sorafenib is the only approved treatment according to Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer. Since the introduction of sorafenib in clinical practice, several phase III clinical trials have failed to demonstrate any superiority over sorafenib in the frontline setting. Loco-regional therapies have also been tested as first line treatment, but their role in advanced HCC is still matter of debate. No single agent or combination therapies have been shown to impact outcomes after sorafenib failure. Therefore this review will focus on the range of experimental therapeutics for patients with advanced HCC and highlights the successes and failures of these treatments as well as areas for future development. Specifics such as dose limiting toxicity and safety profile in patients with liver dysfunction related to the underlying chronic liver disease should be considered when developing therapies in HCC. Finally, robust validated and reproducible surrogate end-points as well as predictive biomarkers should be defined in future randomized trials. PMID:27678348

  8. Irreversible electroporation of locally advanced pancreatic neck/body adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Irreversible electroporation (IRE) of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck has been used to palliate appropriate stage 3 pancreatic cancers without evidence of metastasis and who have undergone appropriate induction therapy. Currently there has not been a standardized reported technique for pancreatic mid-body tumors for patient selection and intra-operative technique. Patients Subjects are patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck who have undergone appropriate induction chemotherapy for a reasonable duration. Main outcome measures Technique of open IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck/body is described, with the emphasis on intra-operative ultrasound and intra-operative electroporation management. Results The technique of open IRE of the pancreatic neck/body with bracketing of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery with continuous intraoperative ultrasound imaging and consideration of intraoperative navigational system is described. Conclusions IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck is feasible for appropriate patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26029461

  9. Evaluating IPMN and pancreatic carcinoma utilizing quantitative histopathology.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Evan S; Zhang, Hao Helen; Hill, Kimberly A; Patel, Charmi; Kha, Stephanie T; Yozwiak, Michael L; Bartels, Hubert; Nafissi, Nellie N; Watkins, Joseph C; Alberts, David S; Krouse, Robert S

    2016-10-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) are pancreatic lesions with uncertain biologic behavior. This study sought objective, accurate prediction tools, through the use of quantitative histopathological signatures of nuclear images, for classifying lesions as chronic pancreatitis (CP), IPMN, or pancreatic carcinoma (PC). Forty-four pancreatic resection patients were retrospectively identified for this study (12 CP; 16 IPMN; 16 PC). Regularized multinomial regression quantitatively classified each specimen as CP, IPMN, or PC in an automated, blinded fashion. Classification certainty was determined by subtracting the smallest classification probability from the largest probability (of the three groups). The certainty function varied from 1.0 (perfectly classified) to 0.0 (random). From each lesion, 180 ± 22 nuclei were imaged. Overall classification accuracy was 89.6% with six unique nuclear features. No CP cases were misclassified, 1/16 IPMN cases were misclassified, and 4/16 PC cases were misclassified. Certainty function was 0.75 ± 0.16 for correctly classified lesions and 0.47 ± 0.10 for incorrectly classified lesions (P = 0.0005). Uncertainty was identified in four of the five misclassified lesions. Quantitative histopathology provides a robust, novel method to distinguish among CP, IPMN, and PC with a quantitative measure of uncertainty. This may be useful when there is uncertainty in diagnosis.

  10. CT and MR imaging patterns for pancreatic carcinoma invading the extrapancreatic neural plexus (Part II): Imaging of pancreatic carcinoma nerve invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hou-Dong; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Qiong-Hui; Xiao, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities which have the ability to detect, depict and stage the nerve invasion associated with pancreatic carcinoma. The aim of this article is to review the CT and MR patterns of pancreatic carcinoma invading the extrapancreatic neural plexus and thus provide useful information which could help the choice of treatment methods. Pancreatic carcinoma is a common malignant neoplasm with a high mortality rate. There are many factors influencing the prognosis and treatment options for those patients suffering from pancreatic carcinoma, such as lymphatic metastasis, adjacent organs or tissue invasion, etc. Among these factors, extrapancreatic neural plexus invasion is recognized as an important factor when considering the management of the patients. PMID:22328967

  11. Erlotinib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zong, Yuan; Xu, Gang-Zhu; Xing, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of erlotinib for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods: A systematic literature search was undertaken in June 2015. Phase II/III trials of erlotinib for the treatment of advanced HCC were included. A descriptive analysis was applied. The study was conducted in College of Medicine, Honghui Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, China, between June 2015 and January 2016. Results: Ten trials, comprising 9 phase II and one phase III trial, were included in the systematic review. The tumor response rate was 0% in 4 of the phase II trials, <10% in 3 of the phase II trials and the phase III trial, and >20% in 2 of the phase II trials. The disease control rate was 42.5-79.6% in most studies. Three studies reported a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 6.5-9.0 months, although PFS was <3.5 months in most studies. Most trials reported a median overall survival of 6.25-15.65 months. The most frequent grade 3/4 toxicities were fatigue (11.9%), diarrhea (10%), increased alanine and aspartate transaminases (7.3%), and rash/desquamation (6.9%). Conclusion: Erlotinib provides efficacious and well-tolerated treatment for advanced HCC. However, more detailed investigations of HCC pathogenesis and evaluation of sensitive patient subsets are needed to improve outcomes of patients with advanced HCC. Additional well-designed, randomized, controlled trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of erlotinib as monotherapy or combination with other drugs for advanced HCC. PMID:27761555

  12. Expression of claudin-5 in canine pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma - An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Jakab, Csaba; Rusvai, Miklós; Gálfi, Péter; Halász, Judit; Kulka, Janina

    2011-03-01

    Claudin-5 is an endothelium-specific tight junction protein. The aim of the present study was to detect the expression pattern of this molecule in intact pancreatic tissues and in well-differentiated and poorly differentiated pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas from dogs by the use of cross-reactive humanised anticlaudin-5 antibody. The necropsy samples taken from dogs included 10 nonneoplastic pancreatic tissues, 10 well-differentiated pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas, 10 poorly differentiated pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas, 5 intrahepatic metastases of well-differentiated and 5 intrahepatic metastases of poorly differentiated acinar cell carcinomas. A strong lateral membrane claudin-5 positivity was detected in exocrine cells in all intact pancreas samples. The endocrine cells of the islets of Langerhans and the epithelial cells of the ducts were negative for claudin-5. The endothelial cells of vessels and lymphatic channels in the stroma of the intact pancreas showed strong membrane positivity for this claudin. All well-differentiated exocrine pancreas carcinomas and all poorly-differentiated pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma samples showed a diffuse loss of claudin-5 expression. The claudin-5-positive peritumoural vessels and lymphatic channels facilitated the detection of vascular invasion of the claudin-5-negative cancer cells. In liver metastasis samples, the pancreatic carcinomas were negative for claudin-5. It seems that the loss of expression of claudin-5 may lead to carcinogenesis in canine exocrine pancreatic cells.

  13. [Efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for resectable pancreatic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Kawaguchi, Kei; Aoki, Takeshi; Kudo, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Shinichi; Fukase, Koji; Mizuma, Masamichi; Sakata, Naoaki; Otsutomo, Shigeru; Morikawa, Takanori; Hayashi, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Kei; Okada, Takaho; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Naitoh, Takeshi; Katayose, Yu; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki

    2013-11-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy is standard care for resectable pancreatic carcinoma. The maximum estimated 2-year survival rate associated with this strategy is nearly 50%. The use of neoadjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer remains controversial, and its efficacy has not been elucidated. To evaluate the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for planned pancreatic cancer resection, the oncological outcomes of neoadjuvant gemcitabine plus S-1 combination therapy( GS therapy) and a surgery-first approach were retrospectively compared. Patients with planned pancreatic cancer resection and without major artery abutments were enrolled in this study. There were 39 cases of neoadjuvant GS therapy (N group) and 93 cases of the surgery-first approach( S group). Survival and surrogate markers, including the R0 rate, the "true R0 rate"( R0 with tumor marker normalization after resection), and N0 rate, were compared. The groups did not differ significantly in terms of age, gender, or tumor location. The resection rates of the N and S groups were similar (92% and 86%, respectively). The median survival of the N group (39.4 months) was significantly longer than that of the S group (20.8 months) in intention-to-treat analysis (p=0.0009). The R0, true R0, and N0 rates of the N group (85%, 69%, and 44%, respectively) were higher than those of the S group( 72%, 48%, and 24%, respectively). In conclusion, this retrospective analysis showed that neoadjuvant GS therapy might be more effective than the standard surgery-first strategy in terms of oncological outcomes for resectable pancreatic cancer. A prospective randomized study, Prep-02/JSAP-05, which compares neoadjuvant therapy to the surgery-first approach, is ongoing (UMIN-No. 000009634).

  14. Treatment of pancreatic insufficiency using pancreatic extract in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: a pilot study (PICNIC).

    PubMed

    Zdenkowski, Nicholas; Radvan, George; Pugliese, Leanna; Charlton, Julie; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Fraser, Allison; Bonaventura, Antonino

    2017-06-01

    Survival with advanced pancreatic cancer is less than 12 months. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency may contribute to pancreatic cancer-related cachexia, via nutrient malabsorption. We aimed to determine the feasibility of prescribing pancreatic extract (Creon®) for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, without frank malabsorption, were randomised in this feasibility study to pancreatic extract 50,000 units with meals and 25,000 units with snacks, or placebo. Standardised dietary advice was given. Anti-cancer and supportive care treatments were permitted. Outcomes included weight, body mass index (BMI), quality of life (QLQC30, PAN26), survival and nutritional assessment (PG-SGA). Eighteen patients were randomised before study closure due to slow recruitment. Baseline characteristics were well matched. Weight loss prior to randomisation was numerically greater in the pancreatic extract group (mean 0.7 vs 2.2 kg). Weight loss was numerically greater in the placebo group, however not significantly. No differences in BMI or nutrition score were seen. Quality of life did not differ between study groups. Median overall survival was 17 (95% CI 8.1-48.7) weeks in the control group, and 67.6 (95% CI 14.1-98.4) weeks in the pancreatic extract group (p = 0.1063). Only 17% (18/106) of potentially eligible patients were recruited, related to patient/family reluctance, rapid clinical deterioration and patients already prescribed pancreatic extract. A moderate pill burden was noted. Despite intriguing survival results, this study was not sufficiently feasible to proceed to a fully powered comparative study. A multi-centre study would be required to exclude a significant difference in outcomes.

  15. Pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma with exocrine differentiation in a young cat.

    PubMed

    Michishita, Masaki; Takagi, Mariko; Kishimoto, Takuya E; Nakahira, Rei; Nogami, Takeshi; Yoshimura, Hisashi; Hatakeyama, Hitoshi; Azakami, Daigo; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Takahashi, Kimimasa

    2017-05-01

    A 35-mo-old spayed female mixed-breed cat with continuous vomiting, emaciation, and abdominal distention for 2 wk was presented to a private veterinary clinic for evaluation. At 71 d after the initial visit, the cat died with anemia, jaundice, and hypoalbuminemia, and was subjected to autopsy. Grossly, numerous firm masses, 0.5-2.5 cm diameter, were randomly located in the left lobe of the pancreas. Histologic examination revealed that the pancreatic mass consisted of 2 tumor cell types: mostly small round cells with a minority of epithelial cells. The small cells were arranged in nests of various sizes, which were separated by thin fibrous stroma, and had small, round, hyperchromatic nuclei, scant cytoplasm containing argyrophilic granules, and often formed rosettes. The epithelial cells formed luminal structures. Metastases were observed in the liver, greater omentum, and pancreatic, gastric, pulmonary, and mediastinal lymph nodes. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that the small cells were positive for vimentin, neuron-specific enolase, chromogranin A, cytokeratin (CK) AE1/AE3, and trypsin, whereas the epithelial cells were positive for AE1/AE3, trypsin, CK19, and nestin. Ultrastructurally, the small cells contained abundant electron-dense granules, ~200 nm diameter, whereas the epithelial cells had apical microvilli and numerous zymogen granules, ~300 nm diameter. These findings indicated that the tumor was a pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma with exocrine differentiation and systemic metastases.

  16. Basosquamous Carcinoma: Controversy, Advances, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Caroline Z; Rieger, Kerri E; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2017-01-01

    Basosquamous carcinoma is a rare cutaneous neoplasm that has caused considerable controversy as to its classification, pathogenesis, and management. To review and summarize current literature on the definition, pathogenesis, incidence, and management of basosquamous carcinoma. Through December 2015, an electronic search of the Pubmed database was performed using combinations of basosquamous carcinoma and metatypical basal cell carcinoma as search terms. A selection of 39 publications including case reports and series, retrospective studies, and systematic reviews of the literature were included. Descriptions of the definition of basosquamous carcinoma, clinical behavior, histopathological characteristics, current treatment therapies, and future advances are summarized. This systematic review provides a comprehensive overview of the current understanding of basosquamous carcinoma. Further study is required to elucidate the mechanisms driving the formation of this aggressive tumor.

  17. New advances in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Sonia; Herrera, Iván; Irurzun, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of deaths in cirrhotic patients and the third cause of cancer related deaths. Most HCC are associated with well known underlying risk factors, in fact, HCC arise in cirrhotic patients in up to 90% of cases, mainly due to chronic viral hepatitis and alcohol abuse. The worldwide prevention strategies are conducted to avoid the infection of new subjects and to minimize the risk of liver disease progression in infected patients. HCC is a condition which lends itself to surveillance as at-risk individuals can readily be identified. The American and European guidelines recommended implementation of surveillance programs with ultrasound every six months in patient at-risk for developing HCC. The diagnosis of HCC can be based on non-invasive criteria (only in cirrhotic patient) or pathology. Accurately staging patients is essential to oncology practice. The ideal tumour staging system in HCC needs to account for both tumour characteristics and liver function. Treatment allocation is based on several factors: Liver function, size and number of tumours, macrovascular invasion or extrahepatic spread. The recommendations in terms of selection for different treatment strategies must be based on evidence-based data. Resection, liver transplant and interventional radiology treatment are mainstays of HCC therapy and achieve the best outcomes in well-selected candidates. Chemoembolization is the most widely used treatment for unresectable HCC or progression after curative treatment. Finally, in patients with advanced HCC with preserved liver function, sorafenib is the only approved systemic drug that has demonstrated a survival benefit and is the standard of care in this group of patients. PMID:27028578

  18. Resection versus other treatments for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Kumar, Senthil; Davidson, Brian R; Fusai, Giuseppe

    2014-02-27

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer. Resection of the cancer is the only treatment with the potential to achieve long-term survival. However, a third of patients with pancreatic cancer have locally advanced cancer involving adjacent structures such as blood vessels which are not usually removed because of fear of increased complications after surgery. Such patients often receive palliative treatment. Resection of the pancreas along with the involved vessels is an alternative to palliative treatment for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. To compare the benefits and harms of surgical resection versus palliative treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 12), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and trial registers until February 2014. We included randomised controlled trials comparing pancreatic resection versus palliative treatments for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (irrespective of language or publication status). Two authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and independently extracted the data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and random-effects models using Review Manager (RevMan). We calculated the hazard ratio (HR), risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on an intention-to-treat analysis. We identified two trials comparing pancreatic resection versus other treatments for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Ninety eight patients were randomised to pancreatic resection (n = 47) or palliative treatment (n = 51) in the two trials included in this review. Both trials were at high risk of bias. Both trials included patients who had locally advanced pancreatic cancer which involved the serosa anteriorly or retroperitoneum posteriorly or involved the blood vessels. Such pancreatic cancers would be considered

  19. Metastatic pancreatic islet cell carcinoma to the orbit: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Amin M.; Teichmann, Klaus; Dabbagh, Najwa; Huaman, Antonio M.

    1998-03-01

    We report a rare case of pancreatic islet cell carcinoma metastatic to the orbit in a 29-year-old woman. The initial symptomatology, progression of the disease, and radiologic and histopathologic findings are presented and discussed.

  20. Advanced endoscopic ultrasound management techniques for preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hafiz Muhammad Sharjeel; Bharmal, Sheila; Duman, Deniz Guney; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Turner, Brian G

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions can be benign, premalignant or malignant. The recent increase in detection and tremendous clinical variability of pancreatic cysts has presented a significant therapeutic challenge to physicians. Mucinous cystic neoplasms are of particular interest given their known malignant potential. This review article provides a brief but comprehensive review of premalignant pancreatic cystic lesions with advanced endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) management approaches. A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Cochrane, OVID and EMBASE databases. Preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions include mucinous cystadenoma and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. The 2012 International Sendai Guidelines guide physicians in their management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Some of the advanced EUS management techniques include ethanol ablation, chemotherapeutic (paclitaxel) ablation, radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy. In future, EUS-guided injections of drug-eluting beads and neodymium:yttrium aluminum agent laser ablation is predicted to be an integral part of EUS-guided management techniques. In summary, International Sendai Consensus Guidelines should be used to make a decision regarding management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Advanced EUS techniques are proving extremely beneficial in management, especially in those patients who are at high surgical risk. PMID:27574295

  1. Resected pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma: clinicopathologic review and evaluation of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in 38 patients

    PubMed Central

    Voong, K. Ranh; Davison, Jon; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Uy, Manuel O.; Hsu, Charles C.; Winter, Jordan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Laheru, Daniel; Rudra, Sonali; Swartz, Michael J.; Nathan, Hari; Edil, Barish H.; Schulick, Richard; Cameron, John L.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma is a rare morphological variant of pancreatic adenocarcinoma with an especially poor prognosis. The purpose of this study is to identify clinicopathologic features associated with prognosis, assess whether the percentage of squamous differentiation in pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma is associated with an inferior prognosis, and examine the impact of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy on overall survival. Forty-five (1.2%) of 3651 patients who underwent pancreatic resection at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, between 1986 and 2007 were identified with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas with any squamous differentiation. All pathologic specimens were re-reviewed. Statistical analyses were performed on the 38 patients amenable to adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for whom clinical outcome data could be obtained. Median age was 68 years (61% male). Sixty-one percent underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Median tumor size was 5.0 cm. Seventy-six percent of carcinomas were node positive, 37% were margin-positive resections, and 68% had 30% or more squamous differentiation. Median overall survival of the pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma cohort was 10.9 months (range, 2.1-140.6 months; 95% confidence interval, 8.2-12.5 months). Adjuvant chemoradiation therapy was associated with superior overall survival in patients with pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma (P = .005). Adjuvant chemoradiation therapy was associated with improved survival in patients with tumors 3 cm or larger and vascular or perineural invasion (P = .02, .03, .02, respectively). The proportion of squamous differentiation was not associated with median overall survival (<30% versus ≥30%, P = .82). Survival after pancreatic resection of pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma is poor. Treatment with adjuvant chemoradiation therapy is associated with improved survival. The proportion of squamous differentiation in resected pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma specimens

  2. Characterization and utilization of a monoclonal antibody against pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtzman, S.H.; Sindelar, W.F.; Atcher, R.W.; Mitchell, J.B.; DeGraff, W.G.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody was produced against a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma line and was found to react with several different human carcinomas by immunoperoxidase staining of fixed tissues. The original cells used to generate the monoclonal antibody were treated with detergent to lyse the cell membrane. A membrane associated protein of molecular weight 35kD was isolated from this detergent lysed preparation and found to be recognized by the monoclonal antibody. The binding constant of the antigen antibody reaction on the cells is 5 x 10{sup {minus}5}. It was further determined that there are 700,000 binding sites per cell. Kinetics of the antigen-antibody reaction under several conditions were also explored.

  3. Therapy of human pancreatic carcinoma based on suppression of HMGA1 protein synthesis in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Trapasso, Francesco; Sarti, Manuela; Cesari, Rossano; Yendamuri, Sai; Dumon, Kristoffel R; Aqeilan, Rami I; Pentimalli, Francesca; Infante, Luisa; Alder, Hansjuerg; Abe, Nobutsugu; Watanabe, Takashi; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Croce, Carlo M; Fusco, Alfredo

    2004-09-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the most aggressive tumors, and, being refractory to conventional therapies, is an excellent target for new therapeutic approaches. Based on our previous finding of high HMGA1 expression in pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal pancreatic tissue, we evaluated whether suppression of HMGA1 protein expression could be a treatment option for patients affected by pancreatic cancer. Here we report that HMGA1 proteins are overexpressed in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, and their downregulation through an adenovirus carrying the HMGA1 gene in an antisense orientation (Ad Yas-GFP) results in the death of three human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines (PANC1, Hs766T and PSN1). Pretreatment of PANC1 and PSN1 cells with Ad Yas-GFP suppressed and reduced, respectively, their ability to form xenograft tumors in nude mice. To further verify the role of HMGA1 in pancreatic tumorigenesis, we used a HMGA1 antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN); its addition induced a decrease in HMGA1 protein levels and a significant reduction of the proliferation rate of PANC1-, Hs766T- and PSN1-treated cells. Therefore, suppression of HMGA1 protein synthesis by an HMGA1 antisense approach seems to be a feasible treatment strategy in pancreatic carcinomas.

  4. NCI-MATCH: Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-12

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Bladder Carcinoma; Breast Carcinoma; Cervical Carcinoma; Colon Carcinoma; Colorectal Carcinoma; Endometrial Carcinoma; Esophageal Carcinoma; Gastric Carcinoma; Glioma; Head and Neck Carcinoma; Kidney Carcinoma; Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoma; Lymphoma; Malignant Uterine Neoplasm; Melanoma; Ovarian Carcinoma; Pancreatic Carcinoma; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Prostate Carcinoma; Rectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma; Recurrent Glioma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Lymphoma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Refractory Lymphoma; Refractory Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Skin Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Uterine Corpus Cancer

  5. Nanovector-based therapies in advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chang-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Systemic therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer has been largely disappointing owing to the unfavorable pharmacokinetic profile and poor penetration of current chemotherapeutic agents ,as well as the fragile patient population with compromised tolerance to toxic chemotherapies. Nanovectors can provide passive drug delivery through abnormal tumor neo-vasculature microanatomy or active targeting via binding to receptors or macromolecules associated with the tumor. In such a manner, nanovector-based therapy may not only modulate the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic index of chemotherapeutic agents but also provide new treatment options in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. In this article, we present the rationale and currently available clinical results of nanovector-based therapies to highlight the potential use of this class of agent in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:22811849

  6. Systemic therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer: individualising cytotoxic therapy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Dearbhaile Catherine; Morris, Patrick Glyn

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive solid tumour associated with a high risk of local invasion and metastatic spread. In the absence of validated screening approaches, many patients present with advanced, incurable disease. Despite advances in treatment, the prognosis for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer remains poor. The benefits of surgical resection and radiation are unproven in this setting and, as patients generally present with distant metastases, systemic therapy forms the mainstay of treatment. The importance of selecting the optimal cytotoxic therapy remains to be critical to improving outcome and retaining quality of life. This review sets out to compare the current therapies available for advanced pancreatic cancer. This review examines the evolution of the systemic management of advanced pancreatic cancer, with a particular focus on the landmark Phase III trials identified from an extensive PubMed and Google scholar literature search. The article summarises the cytotoxic agents in use and the results of two decades of clinical trials to culminate in an almost doubling of survival in clinical trials. In the concluding expert opinion, the challenges interpreting and translating trial results into clinical practice are discussed, where patients are often older and of worse performance status. In the future, novel biomarkers might be used to tailor therapy.

  7. A primary pure pancreatic-type acinar cell carcinoma of the stomach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Kim, Chan Young; Hong, Seung-Mo; Jang, Kyu Yun

    2017-01-19

    Acinar cell carcinoma represents only 1-2% of exocrine pancreatic neoplasms. On exceptionally rare occasions, primary acinar cell carcinoma can occur in ectopic locations. Herein, we report a case of pure pancreatic-type acinar cell carcinoma arising in the stomach. A 54-year-old male presented with a gastric submucosal mass detected by endoscopic examination. Laparoscopic wedge resection was performed. Macroscopically, the 2.7 cm yellowish mass was located in the submucosa of the stomach. Microscopically, the tumor was well circumscribed and had a homogeneous acinar architecture. The tumor cells were small and had a minimal amount of cytoplasm. The nuclei of the tumor cells were round to oval with finely dispersed chromatin. The tumor cells were strongly positive for α1-antitrypsin, chymotrypsin, and α1-antichymotrypsin immunostaining, consistent with pancreatic exocrine differentiation. There was no clinical or radiologic evidence of primary pancreatic or head and neck tumors. After surgical resection of the tumor, there was no recurrence or metastasis during 33 months follow-up. In this report, we have presented a rare case of primary pure pancreatic-type acinar cell carcinoma arising in the stomach and suggest that it could be helpful if the pathologist were aware that pancreatic-type acinar cell carcinoma could arise in the stomach as a polypoid submucosal tumor in the routine diagnostic field of gastric endoscopy.

  8. Superficial necrolytic dermatitis in a dog with an insulin-producing pancreatic islet cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Isidoro-Ayza, M; Lloret, A; Bardagí, M; Ferrer, L; Martínez, J

    2014-07-01

    A 10-year-old dog presented with convulsive crisis and symmetrical hyperkeratotic cutaneous lesions affecting the abdomen, inguinal area, eyelids, muzzles, both pinnae, and all the paw pads. Hypoglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were the main biochemical findings. A mass 2 cm in diameter was detected within the left pancreatic lobe by ultrasonography. It was surgically removed and histologically and immunohistochemically diagnosed as an insulin-producing pancreatic islet cell carcinoma. The animal was eventually euthanized due to lack of clinical improvement. At necropsy, metastatic nodules were observed in the pancreatic lymph nodes and liver. Histopathological findings of cutaneous lesions were highly suggestive of superficial necrolytic dermatitis and were interpreted as a paraneoplastic syndrome derived from the islet cell carcinoma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of superficial necrolytic dermatitis associated with an insulin-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma in dogs.

  9. Guadecitabine and Durvalumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Liver, Pancreatic, Bile Duct, or Gallbladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-19

    Extrahepatic Bile Duct Adenocarcinoma, Biliary Type; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma, Biliary Type; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Gallbladder Cancer AJCC V7; Stage III Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage III Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma AJCC v7; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma AJCC v7; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma

  10. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  11. Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Martin; Wong, Adrian; Fuller, Clifton D.; Salter, Bill J.; Fuss, Cristina; Thomas, Charles R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To present the techniques and preliminary outcomes of ultrasound-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of 41 patients treated between November 2000 and March 2005 with IG-IMRT to mean total doses of 55 Gy (range, 45–64 Gy). We analyzed the clinical feasibility of IG-IMRT, dosimetric parameters, and outcomes, including acute gastrointestinal toxicity (RTOG grading). Survival was assessed for adenocarcinoma (n = 35) and other histologies. Results Mean daily image-guidance corrective shifts were 4.8 ± 4.3 mm, 7.5 ± 7.2 mm, and 4.6 ± 5.9 mm along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively (mean 3D correction vector, 11.7 ± 8.4 mm). Acute upper gastrointestinal toxicity was grade 0–1 in 22 patients (53.7%), grade 2 in 16 patients (39%), and grade 3 in 3 patients (7.3%). Lower gastrointestinal toxicity was grade 0–1 in 32 patients (78%), grade 2 in 7 patients (17.1%), and grade 4 in 2 patients (4.9%). Treatment was stopped early in 4 patients following administration of 30 to 54 Gy. Median survival for adenocarcinoma histology was 10.3 months (18.6 months in patients alive at analysis; n = 8) with actuarial 1- and 2-year survivals of 38% and 25%, respectively. Conclusion Daily image-guidance during delivery of IMRT for pancreatic carcinoma is clinically feasible. The data presented support the conclusion that safety margin reduction and moderate dose escalation afforded by implementation of these new radiotherapy technologies yields preliminary outcomes at least comparable with published survival data. PMID:19262697

  12. Intraoperative electron beam irradiation for patients with unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, W.U.; Wood, W.C.; Tepper, J.E.; Warshaw, A.L.; Orlow, E.L.; Kaufman, S.D.; Battit, G.E.; Nardi, G.L.

    1984-09-01

    Since 1978 we have used electron beam intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) to deliver higher radiation doses to pancreatic tumors than are possible with external beam techniques while minimizing the dose to the surrounding normal tissues. Twenty-nine patients with localized, unresectable, pancreatic carcinoma were treated by electron beam IORT in combination with conventional external radiation therapy (XRT). The primary tumor was located in the head of the pancreas in 20 patients, in the head and body in six patients, and in the body and tail in three. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given in 23 of the 29 patients. The last 13 patients have received misonidazole (3.5 mg/M2) just prior to IORT (20 Gy). At present 14 patients are alive and 11 are without evidence of disease from 3 to 41 months after IORT. The median survival is 16.5 months. Eight patients have failed locally in the IORT field and two others failed regionally. Twelve patients have developed distant metastases, including five who failed locally or regionally. We have seen no local recurrences in the 12 patients who have been treated with misonidazole and have completed IORT and XRT while 10 of 15 patients treated without misonidazole have recurred locally. Because of the shorter follow-up in the misonidazole group, this apparent improvement is not statistically significant. Fifteen patients (52%) have not had pain following treatment and 22 (76%) have had no upper gastrointestinal or biliary obstruction subsequent to their initial surgical bypasses and radiation treatments. Based on the good palliation generally obtained, the 16.5-month median survival, and the possible added benefit from misonidazole, we are encouraged to continue this approach.

  13. Advances in pancreatic cancer research: moving towards early detection.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang-Yi; Yuan, Yao-Zong

    2014-08-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal forms of cancer. Substantial progress has been made in the understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patient management have been significant. However, most patients (nearly 80%) who present with locally advanced or metastatic disease have an extremely poor prognosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localized to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Therefore, the early detection of pancreatic cancer may benefit patients with PDAC. However, its low rate of incidence and the limitations of current screening strategies make early detection difficult. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of PDAC suggest that it is possible to detect PDAC in early stages and even identify precursor lesions. The presence of new-onset diabetes mellitus in the early phase of pancreatic cancer may provide clues for its early diagnosis. Advances in the identification of novel circulating biomarkers including serological signatures, autoantibodies, epigenetic markers, circulating tumor cells and microRNAs suggest that they can be used as potential tools for the screening of precursors and early stage PDAC in the future. However, proper screening strategies based on effective screening methodologies need to be tested for clinical application.

  14. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A.; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A.

    2012-08-01

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  15. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  16. Grape-seed procyanidins inhibit the in vitro growth and invasion of pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yuan-Chiang; Huang, Chiu-Chen; Chen, Chin-Hui; Chiang, Hua-Che; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Chen, Yu-Jen; Liu, Chia-Ling; Chuang, Lu-Te; Liu, Ming; Hsu, Chih-Ping

    2012-04-01

    Grape-seed procyanidins (GSPs) can inhibit cell proliferation and invasiveness in various human cancers. However, the effect of GSP on pancreatic carcinoma cells has not been investigated. Pancreatic carcinoma cell lines MIA PaCa-2 and BxPC-3 treated with GSP were assessed for viability by trypan blue exclusion, for cell cycle distribution by flow cytometry, for increased apoptosis by annexin V labeling, for their adhesion and invasion potential by evaluating their ability to penetrate through a matrix gel-coated Boyden chamber, and for changes in the levels of proteins involved in cellular events by immunoblotting. Grape-seed procyanidin inhibited MIA PaCa-2 and BxPC-3 proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and induced G1-phase arrest of the cell cycle in BxPC-3 or mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in MIA PaCa-2. Grape-seed procyanidin also inhibited the adhesion and invasion potential of both cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, which are associated with the suppression of metalloproteases matrix metalloproteinase 9 or 2 (MMP-9 or -2) expression. Grape-seed procyanidin inhibited the proliferation of pancreatic carcinoma cells by cell cycle blockage or apoptotic induction. The invasiveness was also suppressed by GSP through down-regulation of MMP-2 or MMP-9 in pancreatic carcinoma cells. Grape-seed procyanidin is a potential chemotherapeutic or preventive agent for pancreatic carcinoma.

  17. Acute pancreatitis-onset carcinoma in situ of the pancreas with focal fat replacement diagnosed using serial pancreatic-juice aspiration cytologic examination (SPACE).

    PubMed

    Satoh, Tatsunori; Kikuyama, Masataka; Kawaguchi, Shinya; Kanemoto, Hideyuki; Muro, Hiroyuki; Hanada, Keiji

    2017-10-06

    A 59-year-old woman was admitted for acute pancreatitis. Abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a swollen pancreatic parenchyma with dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) of the pancreas tail, which was separated from the normal pancreas body side by a locally atrophic part of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed MPD stricture in the pancreas tail with dilatation of the upstream MPD. Endoscopic ultrasonography revealed that the MPD stricture of the pancreas tail was surrounded by a blurred and hypoechoic area. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed for serial pancreatic-juice aspiration cytologic examination (SPACE). The result indicated adenocarcinoma. Distal pancreatectomy was performed, and the histopathological examination showed high-grade PanIN (carcinoma in situ of the pancreatic duct) of the pancreas tail with atrophy and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma, and local fat replacement adjacent to the lesion. The final histopathological diagnosis was carcinoma in situ of the pancreatic duct of the pancreas tail. Acute pancreatitis and local fatty change of the pancreatic parenchyma with MPD stricture are important clinical manifestations of pancreatic carcinoma in situ (PCIS) and performing SPACE in cases of MPD stricture without a recognizable mass is preferable for a diagnosis of PCIS.

  18. Differential gene expression of the key signalling pathway in para-carcinoma, carcinoma and relapse human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zheng-Yan; Sun, Ran; Ma, Yu-Shui; Fu, Da; Lai, Xiao-Long; Li, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Xing-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Lv, Zhong-Wei; Cong, Xian-Ling; Li, Wen-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has a high rate of mortality and a poorly understood mechanism of progression. Investigation of the molecular mechanism of PC and exploration of the specific markers for early diagnosis and specific targets of therapy are key points to prevent and treat PC effectively and to improve their prognosis. In our study, expression profiles experiment of para-carcinoma, carcinoma and relapse human PC was performed using Agilent human whole genomic oligonucleotide microarrays with 45 000 probes. Differentially expressed genes related with PC were screened and analysed further by Gene Ontology term analysis and Kyoto encyclopaedia of genes and genomes pathway analysis. Our results showed that there were 3853 differentially expressed genes associated with pancreatic carcinogenesis and relapse. In addition, our study found that PC was related to the Jak-STAT signalling pathway, PPAR signalling pathway and Calcium signalling pathway, indicating their potential roles in pancreatic carcinogenesis and progress.

  19. Relative decreased splenic uptake of Tc-99m-sulfur colloid in patients with pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, J.L.; Burke, T.S.; Fratkin, M.J.; Sharpe, A.R. Jr.; Goodrich, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    Relative spleen/liver activity ratio was determined from posterior projection images using a photodensitometric method. Ratios from scans of 22 patients with proven pancreatic carcinoma (12 from rectilinear scans and 10 from scintillation camera images) were determined and compared to studies from patients documented as normal and to randomly selected liver/spleen imaging studies which had been previously interpreted as normal. The mean ratio from the pancreatic carcinoma group was significantly lower than the means of the respective normal groups (p(t) less than .0001 for rectilinear scans and p(t) less than .001 for scintigrams). There was no significant difference between the means of the proven normal and randomly selected normal groups or between the two pancreatic carcinoma groups. Splenic vascular alteration is discussed as a possible reason for decreased splenic distribution of Tc-99m-sulfur colloid in this patient group.

  20. [A Case of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma in the Fat Replacement of the Pancreatic Body and Tail].

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Tameyoshi; Hoshino, Hiromitsu; Yoshimura, Jumpei; Sasamatsu, Shingo; Hiraki, Yoko; Nishi, Hidemi; Shimizu, Katsushu; Kawada, Masahiro; Inoue, Toshiya; Kato, Fumitaka; Amano, Koji; Mikami, Jota; Yamamura, Jun; Makari, Yoichi; Nakata, Ken; Ikeda, Naoki; Kamigaki, Shunji; Tsujie, Masaki; Kimura, Yutaka; Nakata, Yasuki; Munakata, Satoru; Ohzato, Hiroki

    2015-11-01

    A 56 year-old woman with obesity (BMI3 2) and diabetes mellitus was diagnosed with right renal cell carcinoma. She underwent right nephrectomy 1 year ago. Seven months after surgery, CT revealed a rapidly growing mass near the spleen. The mass showed slight accumulation of FDG (SUVmax=2.4) on PET-CT. Since the lesion grew rapidly and was not enhanced in the early phase of enhanced CT, we diagnosed pancreatic cancer. Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. The final pathological diagnosis was invasive ductal carcinoma in the fat replacement of the pancreatic body and tail. Postoperatively, the patient had no complications such as pancreatic fistula or aggravation of glucose intolerance. She received postoperative chemotherapy with gemcitabine. Since she developed pulmonary artery thrombosis, postoperative chemotherapy was interrupted after 8 courses. Thirty-two months after the surgery, she was still living without any recurrence. Acinar cells were absent in the fat replacement of the pancreas, but the pancreatic duct cells were still present. There was carcinoma in situ in the main pancreatic duct surrounding chronic inflammation. Fat replacement itself could be potentially precursor of the pancreatic cancer.

  1. Oncocytic-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)-derived invasive oncocytic pancreatic carcinoma with brain metastasis - a case report.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Yu, Chi-Chang; Chen, Jim-Ray; Huang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Chen, Li-Wei; Chen, Hsien-Cin; Hsu, Jun-Te; Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Chen, Huang-Yang

    2012-07-09

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease without effective treatments at present. It ranks as s as 4th and 5th in cancer-related mortality in the western countries and worldwide. Locally advanced pancreatic duct carcinoma (PDAC) and metastatic PDAC, usually found the metastases over liver, peritoneum, or lung, have been shown to be with dismal prognosis. Brain metastasis is a rare entity and most cases reported before were found post-mortem. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas (IPMN) has been deemed as a precursor of PDAC with very slow progression rate. Here we reported a case diagnosed with IPMN-derived PDAC with brain metastasis. After surgeries for PDAC and brain metastasis, subsequent chemotherapy and radiotherapy were also given. One and half year after surgery, this patient is still living with good performance status, which may warrant individualization of therapeutic strategy for PDAC with only brain metastasis.

  2. Biological targeted therapies in patients with advanced enteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Nicola; Cinieri, Saverio; Lorizzo, Katia; Squadroni, Michela; Orlando, Laura; Spada, Francesca; Maiello, Evaristo; Bodei, Lisa; Paganelli, Giovanni; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; de Braud, Filippo

    2010-11-01

    Enteropancreatic (EP) neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) represent relatively rare and heterogeneous malignancies. They are the most common group among neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). In most cases they are advanced at diagnosis and slow-growing, therefore conditioning a better prognosis compared with non neuroendocrine carcinomas from the same sites. No standard medical therapy exists, except for somatostatin analogs in functioning tumors, and octreotide LAR in functioning or non functioning well differentiated NECs from small bowel. Several systemic therapeutic options exist, including chemotherapy, somatostatin analog, interferon, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), and molecular targeted drugs. Among them some therapies have specific biological tumor targets and can be defined as "biological targeted therapies". This review focuses on the status of EP NECs targeted therapies in the light of recent advances. Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are the first therapeutic target detected in EP NECs. Through them SS analogs and PRRT act, producing symptomatic, biochemical, and, to a lesser extent, antiproliferative effects. New SS analogs, covering a higher number of SSTR subtypes, were developed, including pasireotide (SOM230), which controls 25% of carcinoid syndromes resistant to full dose octreotide LAR. Chimeric analogs, which bind SSTR2/SSTR5 and dopamine-2 receptor subtype (D2), are in preclinical phase of development. Among the numerous molecular targeted agents investigated in NETs, mTOR inhibitors and VEGF/VEGFR/PDGFR inhibitors are in most advanced clinical phase of investigation. In particular, everolimus, sunitinib, and bevacizumab are all studied in phase III trials. Both everolimus and sunitinib produced significant survival benefit versus placebo in advanced progressing well-differentiated pancreatic NECs. Sunitinib data have been presented at the last ASCO in June 2010, and everolimus data will be presented at next ESMO in September 2010. Copyright

  3. Second-line chemotherapy in advanced pancreatic carcinoma: a multicenter survey of the Gruppo Oncologico Italia Meridionale on the activity and safety of the FOLFOX4 regimen in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gebbia, V; Maiello, E; Giuliani, F; Borsellino, N; Caruso, M; Di Maggio, G; Ferraù, F; Bordonaro, R; Verderame, F; Tralongo, P; Di Cristina, L; Agueli, R; Russo, P; Colucci, G

    2007-06-01

    In daily clinical practice second-line chemotherapy (SLCT) is frequently given to patients with advanced pancreatic cancer failing gemcitabine-based first-line chemotherapy without solid scientific support. A retrospective survey was carried out including 42 patients. Patients received standard FOLFOX4 regimen biweekly until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Six partial responses (14%) and 16 stabilizations (38%) were recorded for a tumor growth control rate of 57%. The median time to progression (TtP) was 4 months (range 1-7 months), and median overall survival (OS) was 6.7 months (range 2-9 months). A stabilization of performance status (PS) and a subjective improvement of cancer-related symptoms were recorded in 27 patients. Data presented in this paper support the use of FOLFOX4 regimen in the second-line treatment of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas patients. The use of SLCT, however, should be carefully proposed to patients with good PS or those who had a good response to first-line therapy.

  4. [Contribution of endoscopic ultrasound to the diagnosis of pancreatic metastases from renal carcinoma. Apropos of two cases].

    PubMed

    Repiso, Alejandro; Gómez-Rodríguez, Rafael; Aso, Sonsoles; Domper, Francisco; Buendía, Encarnación; González de Frutos, Concepción; Pérez-Grueso, María José; Rodríguez-Merlo, Rufo; Carrobles, José María

    2007-03-01

    Pancreatic metastases represent 2% of pancreatic tumors. The neoplasms most frequently metastasizing to the pancreas are breast, lung, melanoma and kidney tumors. We present the cases of two patients with pancreatic metastases from renal carcinoma diagnosed 4 and 8 years after the diagnosis and surgical treatment of the primary renal tumor. In both patients, endoscopic ultrasound was useful in the detection and characterization of these pancreatic lesions and allowed fine-needle aspiration for cytological study to be performed.

  5. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Advances in diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haoran; Song, Tianqiang

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the growing knowledge on biological behaviors of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), as well as continuous improvement in imaging techniques and experienced interpretation of imaging features of the nodules in cirrhotic liver, the detection and characterization of HCC has improved in the past decade. A number of practice guidelines for imaging diagnosis have been developed to reduce interpretation variability and standardize management of HCC, and they are constantly updated with advances in imaging techniques and evidence based data from clinical series. In this article, we strive to review the imaging techniques and the characteristic features of hepatocellular carcinoma associated with cirrhotic liver, with emphasis on the diagnostic value of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and utilization of hepatocyte-specific MRI contrast agents. We also briefly describe the concept of liver imaging reporting and data systems and discuss the consensus and controversy of major practice guidelines.

  6. Intrapancreatic distal common bile duct carcinoma: Analysis, staging considerations, and comparison with pancreatic ductal and ampullary adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Raul S; Bagci, Pelin; Basturk, Olca; Reid, Michelle D; Balci, Serdar; Knight, Jessica H; Kong, So Yeon; Memis, Bahar; Jang, Kee-Taek; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Tajiri, Takuma; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Kim, Grace E; Cheng, Jeanette D; Adsay, N Volkan

    2016-11-01

    Distal common bile duct carcinoma is a poorly characterized entity for reasons such as variable terminology and difficulty in determining site of origin of intrapancreatic lesions. We compared clinicopathologic features of pancreatobiliary-type adenocarcinomas within the pancreas, but arising from the distal common bile duct, with those of pancreatic and ampullary origin. Upon careful review of 1017 pancreatoduodenectomy specimens with primary adenocarcinoma, 52 (5%) qualified as intrapancreatic distal common bile duct carcinoma. Five associated with an intraductal papillary neoplasm were excluded; the remaining 47 were compared to 109 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and 133 ampullary carcinomas. Distal common bile duct carcinoma patients had a younger median age (58 years) than pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients (65 years) and ampullary carcinoma patients (68 years). Distal common bile duct carcinoma was intermediate between pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and ampullary carcinoma with regard to tumor size and rates of node metastases and margin positivity. Median survival was better than for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (P=0.0010) but worse than for ampullary carcinoma (P=0.0006). Distal common bile duct carcinoma often formed an even band around the common bile duct and commonly showed intraglandular neutrophil-rich debris and a small tubular pattern. Poor prognostic indicators included node metastasis (P=0.0010), lymphovascular invasion (P=0.0299), and margin positivity (P=0.0069). Categorizing the tumors based on size also had prognostic relevance (P=0.0096), unlike categorization based on anatomic structures invaded. Primary distal common bile duct carcinoma is seen in younger patients than pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma or ampullary carcinoma. Its prognosis is significantly better than pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and worse than ampullary carcinoma, at least partly because of differences in clinical presentation. Use of size-based criteria

  7. Definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yoo-Kang; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Myung-Ah; Chun, Hoo-Geun; Kim, Dong-Goo; You, Young Kyoung; Hong, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Survival outcome of locally advanced pancreatic cancer has been poor and little is known about prognostic factors of the disease, especially in locally advanced cases treated with concurrent chemoradiation. This study was to analyze overall survival and prognostic factors of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods Medical records of 34 patients diagnosed with unresectable pancreatic cancer and treated with definitive CCRT, from December 2003 to December 2012, were reviewed. Median prescribed radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 41.4 to 55.8 Gy), once daily, five times per week, 1.8 to 3 Gy per fraction. Results With a mean follow-up of 10 months (range, 0 to 49 months), median overall survival was 9 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 40% and 10%, respectively. Median and mean time to progression were 5 and 7 months, respectively. Prognostic parameters related to overall survival were post-CCRT CA19-9 (p = 0.02), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status (p < 0.01), and radiation dose (p = 0.04) according to univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, post-CCRT CA19-9 value below 180 U/mL and ECOG status 0 or 1 were statistically significant independent prognostic factors associated with improved overall survival (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). Conclusion Overall treatment results in locally advanced pancreatic cancer are relatively poor and few improvements have been accomplished in the past decades. Post-treatment CA19-9 below 180 U/mL and ECOG performance status 0 and 1 were significantly associated with an improved overall survival. PMID:25061572

  8. Advancement in treatment and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Conventional imaging modalities show limited accuracy for reliable assessment of the tumor. Recent researches suggest that molecular imaging techniques with tracers provide more biologically relevant information and are benefit for the diagnosis of the cancer. In addition, radiopharmaceuticals also play more important roles in treatment of the disease. This review summaries the advancement of the radiolabeled compounds in the theranostics of PC. PMID:26909131

  9. Management of advanced pancreatic cancer in daily clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Piacentini, Paolo; Bonetti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this outcome study was to evaluate the management of advanced pancreatic cancer in a real-world clinical practice; few such experiences have been reported in the literature. A retrospective analysis was performed of all consecutive patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma followed at our medical oncology unit between January 2003 and December 2013. We evaluated 78 patients, mostly with metastatic disease (64.1%). Median follow-up was 10.77 months, by which time 74 patients (94.9%) had died. Median overall survival was 8.29 months. Median age was 67 years. In univariate analysis, pain at onset (p = 0.020), ECOG performance status (p<0.001), stage (p = 0.047), first-line chemotherapy (p<0.001), second-line chemotherapy (p<0.001) and weight loss at diagnosis (p = 0.029) were factors that had an impact on overall survival. In multivariate analysis, the presence of pain at onset (p = 0.043), stage (p = 0.003) and second-line chemotherapy (p = 0.004) were confirmed as independent prognostic factors. Our data, derived from daily clinical practice, confirmed advanced pancreatic cancer as an aggressive malignant disease with a very short expected survival. Second-line treatment seems to provide an advantage in terms of overall survival in patients who showed a partial response as their best response to first-line treatment.

  10. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Sung Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Choi, Chul Won; Lee, Dong Han; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, YoungHan

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical application of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a focus on local efficacy and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with locally advanced and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer who had been treated between 2004 and 2006. Follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 41 months (median, 14.5 months). A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered in 20 fractions using a conventional three-field technique, and then a single fraction of 14, 15, 16, or 17 Gy SBRT was administered as a boost without a break. Twenty-one patients received chemotherapy. Overall and local progression-free survival were calculated and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: One-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rates were 60.0% and 70.2%, respectively. One patient (3%) developed Grade 4 toxicity. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a SBRT boost provides a safe means of increasing radiation dose. Based on the results of this study, we recommend that a well controlled Phase II study be conducted on locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  11. Gemcitabine alone or with cisplatin for the treatment of patients with locally advanced and/or metastatic pancreatic carcinoma: a prospective, randomized phase III study of the Gruppo Oncologia dell'Italia Meridionale.

    PubMed

    Colucci, Giuseppe; Giuliani, Francesco; Gebbia, Vittorio; Biglietto, Maria; Rabitti, Piergiorgio; Uomo, Generoso; Cigolari, Silvio; Testa, Antonio; Maiello, Evaristo; Lopez, Massimo

    2002-02-15

    A prospective, randomized Phase III trial was performed to determine whether, compared with gemcitabine (GEM) alone, the addition of cisplatin (CDDP) to GEM was able to improve the time to disease progression and the clinical benefit rate in patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The objective response rate, overall survival rate, and toxicity patterns of patients in the two treatment arms were evaluated as secondary end points. Patients with measurable, locally advanced and/or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were randomized to receive GEM (Arm A) or a combination of GEM and CDDP (Arm B). In Arm A, a dose of 1000 mg/m(2) GEM per week was administered for 7 consecutive weeks, and, after a 2-week rest, treatment was resumed on Days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle for 2 cycles. In Arm B, CDDP was given at a dose of 25 mg/m(2) per week 1 hour before GEM at the same dose that was used in Arm A. On Day 22, only GEM was administered. Patients were restaged after the first 7 weeks of therapy and then again after the other 2 cycles. A total of 107 patients entered the trial: Fifty-four patients were randomized to Arm A, and 53 patients were randomized to Arm B. The median time to disease progression was 8 weeks in Arm A and 20 weeks in Arm B; this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.048). In Arm A, one complete response and four partial responses were recorded on the basis of an intent-to-treat analysis, with an overall response rate of 9.2% (95% confidence interval [95%CI], 3-20%). In Arm B, there were no complete responses, whereas 14 partial responses were achieved, with an overall response rate of 26.4% (95%CI, 15-40%). This difference in the overall response rates was statistically significant (P = 0.02). The tumor growth control rate (i.e., total number of patients who achieved complete responses, partial responses, and stable disease) was 42.6% (95%CI, 29-57%) in Arm A and 56.6% (95%CI, 42-70%) in Arm B. A clinical benefit was observed in

  12. Imaging Characteristics and Prevalence of Pancreatic Carcinoma in Kosovo During 2011-2015 - Diagnostic Method as Choice.

    PubMed

    Dedushi, Kreshnike; Kabashi, Serbeze; Mucaj, Sefedin; Hasbahta, Gazmed; Ramadani, Naser; Hoxhaj, Astrit

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the 10(th)most common malignancy and the 4(th)largest cancer killer in adults. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the number of cases presented with pancreatic carcinoma during the years 2011-2015, our experience of the imaging characteristics of pancreatic carcinoma. We evaluated prevalence of the pancreatic cancers, distant metastases and other local infiltration signs among the total cases of the pancreatic cancers diagnosed in the University Clinical Center of Kosovo, with the aim to compare these research findings to similar studies made in the developed countries. This is a retrospective research study done during the period of 2011-2015. This retrospective research study includes 362 patients recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, examined in the period of 2011-2015 at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The imaging diagnostics are performed with MSCT Sensation 64 Siemens, MSCT Emotion 6 Siemens, and 1.5T MRI Symphony Siemens, biopsy guide with MSCT Sensation 64 Siemens in the Radiologic Clinic of UCCK; while the histopathology diagnostics has been performed in Clinic of Pathology at UCCK and prevalence is taken from the number of cases Reported at the Institute of Oncology Institute of Statistics and NIPH (National Institute of Public Health of Kosovo). Out of a total of the 362 patients diagnosed with pancreas cancer, results is female 39.5% (n=143) and male 61.5% (n=219), report M: F (1: 1.6), 286 cases resulted in head and neck 79 % (n=286), 76 cases resulted in body and tail cancers (21%), distant metastases in first imaging modality were found in(n=155) patients 43 %, local infiltration was found in patients: gastric infiltration 15 % (n=54), duodenal and papilla infiltration 26% (n=94), local infiltration spleen 16% (n=57), local infiltration mesentery 43 % (n= 155), dilated biliary tree 34 % (n=123), regional lymph node infiltration 83 % (n= 300). Out of a total of the 362 patients diagnosed with pancreas cancer

  13. Focal chronic pancreatitis mimicking pancreatic head carcinoma: are there suggestive features on ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Patlas, Michael; Deitel, Wayne; Taylor, Bryce; Gallinger, Steven; Wilson, Stephanie R

    2007-02-01

    Painless jaundice is one of the most common presentations of pancreatic head cancer. Chronic pancreatitis can also occasionally present with a mass or mass-like process in the pancreatic head, with the subsequent development of jaundice. In this retrospective review, we evaluate the clinical and imaging features of 22 patients presenting with painless jaundice, initially thought to have pancreatic head cancer and ultimately proven to have chronic focal pancreatitis, to determine whether there are any features on cross-sectional imaging to suggest the correct diagnosis. Patients (n = 22) were identified from the medical and imaging records of more than 400 patients with an original diagnosis of pancreatic cancer who were seen at our institution from 1995 to 2003. Of the patients, 17 were men and 5 were women (age range 25 to 82 years, mean age 54 years). Initial ultrasound showed a large, hypoechoic, well-defined mass in the pancreatic head, varying in size from 3 to 7.5 cm; 14 of 22 masses were > 5 cm in maximal diameter. Diagnosis of focal pancreatitis was proven by surgical pathology in 14 cases and suggested by percutaneous biopsy in 3 cases; for all patients, prolonged imaging follow-up (at least 1 year) showed no disease progression or evidence of malignancy. The mean follow-up in our study group was 31 months (range 12 to 72 months). Male sex, large size of the pancreatic head mass (mean diameter 5.5 cm), and lack of atrophy of the pancreatic body and tail were the only features associated with chronic inflammation rather than neoplasm as an explanation for a pancreatic head mass. Chronic pancreatitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of focal pancreatic masses, even in the absence of supporting clinical evidence.

  14. Neurogenin 3-directed cre deletion of Tsc1 gene causes pancreatic acinar carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Han, Lingling; Li, Yin; Zhao, Jing; He, Ping; Zhang, Weizhen

    2014-11-01

    The role of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancers remains largely unknown. The present study shows that neurogenin 3 directed Cre deletion of Tsc1 gene induces the development of pancreatic acinar carcinoma. By cross-breeding the Neurog3-cre mice with Tsc1 (loxp/loxp) mice, we generated the Neurog3-Tsc1-/- transgenic mice in which Tsc1 gene is deleted and mTOR signaling activated in the pancreatic progenitor cells. All Neurog3-Tsc1-/- mice developed notable adenocarcinoma-like lesions in pancreas starting from the age of 100 days old. The tumor lesions are composed of cells with morphological and molecular resemblance to acinar cells. Metastasis of neoplasm to liver and lung was detected in 5% of animals. Inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin significantly attenuated the growth of the neoplasm. Relapse of the neoplasm occurred within 14 days upon cessation of rapamycin treatment. Our studies indicate that activation of mTOR signaling in the pancreatic progenitor cells may trigger the development of acinar carcinoma. Thus, mTOR may serve as a potential target for treatment of pancreatic acinar carcinoma.

  15. Impact of Metformin on Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Survival: Too Little, Too Late?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Xiao; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Metformin offers no survival advantage in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. Despite promising experimental evidence suggesting an anti-tumor effect of metformin, its impact on the survival of advanced pancreatic cancer is likely very limited. Future studies may need to consider its role in early-stage pancreatic cancer. PMID:26637275

  16. Pancreatic carcinoma masked as fever of unknown origin: A case report and comprehensive review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ning; Xing, Cheng; Chang, Xiaoyan; Dai, Menghua; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a highly lethal malignancy. Common presenting features of pancreatic cancer include anorexia, asthenia, weight loss, pain, and obstructive jaundice. Nevertheless, fever as a symptom, or even primary manifestation of pancreatic cancer is rather rare. Here, we report a 63-year-old male patient presenting with daily fevers, night sweats, and fatigue of 2-month duration. Laboratory findings showed elevated white blood cell count (WBC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and serum C-reactive protein (CRP). A computed tomography scan demonstrated a tumor between the duodenum and pancreatic head. Chest radiograph was normal. The patient underwent an uneventful tumor resection. Histological examination of a surgical specimen demonstrated an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma originated from pancreatic head. The tumor was compatible with TNM stage IIA (T3N0M0). Complete resolution of the fever was achieved on post-operative day 4 and no recurrence of the tumor or neoplastic fever happen during the 39-month follow-up. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma could manifest as neoplastic fever at the time of diagnosis. If the tumor is resectable, surgical resection is a safe and curative form of therapy not only for the fever but also for the original carcinoma.

  17. Defect in assimilation following combined radiation and chemotherapy in patients with locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barkin, J.S.; Kalser, M.H.; Thomsen, S.; Redlhammer, D.

    1982-11-15

    The relative contributions of high-dose irradiation and/or chemotherapy to the nutritional problems of patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma were evaluated by study of pancreatic exocrine function and jejunal function and morphologic findings in ten patients before and after treatment. Nutrient assimilation studies included determination of serum carotene levels, D-xylose absorption and fat absorption. Crosby capsule biopsy specimen of jejunal mucosa were evaluated with light microscopy. Fat assimilation was the only parameter of nutritional function to significantly worsen after therapy. Low serum carotene levels present in the patients before therapy remained low but did not significantly change after treatment. D-xylose absorption and the morphologic structure of the jejunal mucosa were normal before and after treatment. These findings support the previous observations that the nutritional problems of the patient with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma are due to pancreatic insufficiency and that high dose irradiation and chemotherapy can exacerbate the pancreatic insufficiency but do not produce jejunal dysfunction. Therefore, it is suggested that pancreatic exocrine replacement therapy may improve the nutritional status of these patients.

  18. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered. PMID:25053938

  19. Fast neutron irradiation for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.P.; Schein, P.S.; MacDonald, J.S.; Woolley, P.V.; Ornitz, R.; Rogers, C.

    1981-11-01

    Nineteen patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer and one patient with islet cell cancer were treated with 1700-1500 neutron rad alone or in combination with 5-fluorouracil to exploit the theoretic advantages of higher linear energy of transfer, and lower oxygen enhancement ratio of neutrons. Only 5 of 14 (36%) obtained partial tumor regression. The median survival for all patients with pancreatic cancer was 6 months, which is less than that reported with 5-fluorouracil and conventional photon irradiation. Gastrointestinal toxicity was considerable; hemorhagic gastritis in five patients, colitis in two and esophagitis in one. One patient developed radiation myelitis. We therefore, caution any enthusiasm for this modality of therapy until clear evidence of a therapeutic advantage over photon therapy is demonstrated in controlled clinical trials.

  20. Frequency and spectrum of c-Ki-ras mutations in human sporadic colon carcinoma, carcinomas arising in ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Burmer, G.C.; Rabinovitch, P.S.; Loeb, L.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Sporadic colon carcinomas, carcinomas arising in chronic ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinomas have been analyzed for the presence of c-Ki-ras mutations by a combination of histological enrichment, cell sorting, polymerase chain reaction, and direct sequencing. Although 60% (37/61) of sporadic colon carcinomas contained mutations in codon 12, only 1 of 17 specimens of dysplasia or carcinoma from ulcerative colitis patients contained c-Ki-ras mutations, despite a high frequency of aneuploid tumors. In contrast, a higher percentage (16/20 = 80%) of pancreatic adenocarcinomas contained mutations in c-Ki-ras 2, despite a lower frequency of DNA aneuploidy in these neoplasms. Moreover, the spectrum of mutations differed between sporadic colon carcinoma, where the predominant mutation was a G to A transition, and pancreatic carcinomas, which predominantly contained G to C or T transversions. These results suggest that the etiology of ras mutations is different in these three human neoplasms.

  1. Perspectives of TGF-β inhibition in pancreatic and hepatocellular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï; de Mestier, Louis; Cros, Jérome; Faivre, Sandrine; Raymond, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are non-curable diseases with a particularly poor prognosis. Over the last decade, research has increasingly focused on the microenvironment surrounding cancer cells, and its role in tumour development and progression. PDAC and HCC differ markedly regarding their pathological features: PDAC are typically stromal-predominant, desmoplastic, poorly vascularized tumours, whereas HCC are cellular and highly vascularized. Despite these very different settings, PDAC and HCC share transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) as a common key-signalling mediator, involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, invasion, and stroma-tumour dialogue. Recently, novel drugs blocking the TGF-β pathway have entered clinical evaluation demonstrating activity in patients with advanced PDAC and HCC. TGF-β signalling is complex and mediates both pro- and anti-tumoural activities in cancer cells depending on their context, in space and time, and their microenvironment. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview of the role of the TGF-β pathway and its deregulation in PDAC and HCC development and progression at the cellular and microenvironment levels. We also summarize key preclinical and clinical data on the role of TGF-β as a target for therapeutic intervention in PDAC and HCC, and explore perspectives to optimize TGF-β inhibition therapy PMID:24393789

  2. Intra-pancreatic Distal Bile Duct Carcinoma is Morphologically, Genetically, and Clinically Distinct from Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Vikram; Konstantinidis, Ioannis T; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-Del; Hezel, Aram F; Haigis, Kevin M; Ting, David T; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Goyal, Lipika; Zhu, Andrew X; Warshaw, Andrew L; Lillemoe, Keith D; Ferrone, Cristina R

    2016-05-01

    Differentiating intra-pancreatic distal bile duct carcinoma invading the pancreas from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) surrounding the distal common bile duct (CBD) can be challenging. Our aim is to identify clinical, morphological, and genetic features characteristic of intra-pancreatic distal bile duct carcinoma. Clinicopathologic data of 550 patients undergoing a pancreaticoduodenectomy between September 1990 and May 2008 were reviewed. KRAS status was assessed with mass-spectrometric genotyping. Ninety-seven patients with intra-pancreatic adenocarcinomas surrounding the CBD were identified; slides were available for 80. Two relationships with the CBD were recognized as follows: type I (n = 42): cancer grew concentrically around the CBD and type II (n = 38): cancer grew asymmetrically around the CBD. Type I adenocarcinomas were associated with high-grade biliary dysplasia (45 vs. 13 %; p = 0.003); type II were associated with high-grade pancreatic intra-epithelial neoplasia (PanIN-2 or -3) (39 vs. 9 %; p = 0.003). Type I tumors had a better median survival (46 months) compared to type II (23 months) or other PDAC (20 months) (p < 0.001). Mutated KRAS was identified in 3/26 (11 %) type I and 20/21 (95 %) type II cancers (p < 0.001). There may be poorer survival in the presence of a KRAS mutation than wild-type KRAS (22.9 vs. 41.6 months; p = 0.3). Distal periductal adenocarcinomas fall into two distinct groups with biologic, morphologic and genetic differences. Those growing symmetrically around the CBD are more likely to be intra-pancreatic distal bile duct carcinomas and are associated with improved survival whereas cancers with asymmetric growth are more likely to have KRAS mutations and to be PDACs. These findings facilitate a more accurate histopathological diagnosis, which could improve patient selection for therapeutic trials.

  3. Advanced Basal Cell Carcinoma: Epidemiology and Therapeutic Innovations.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Shalini V; Chang, Anne Lynn S

    2014-01-01

    Advanced basal cell carcinomas are a subset of basal cell carcinomas that can be difficult to treat either due to their local invasiveness, proximity to vital structures, or metastasis. The incidence of all basal cell carcinoma is increasing in the United States, although it is not known whether advanced basal cell carcinomas (aBCCs) are also increasing. Recently, highly targeted therapy based on knowledge of the basal cell carcinoma pathogenesis has become available either commercially or through human clinical trials. These orally available drugs inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway, and lead to advanced basal cell carcinoma shrinkage that can enable preservation of adjacent vital organs. In this review, we outline the role of Hedgehog pathway inhibitors as well as other treatment modalities such as excision, radiotherapy and more traditional chemotherapy in treating advanced basal cell carcinomas. We also highlight current gaps in knowledge regarding the use and side effects of this targeted therapy.

  4. Carcinoma of the pancreatic head and periampullary region. Tumor staging with laparoscopy and laparoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed Central

    John, T G; Greig, J D; Carter, D C; Garden, O J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors performed a prospective evaluation of staging laparoscopy with laparoscopic ultrasonography in predicting surgical resectability in patients with carcinomas of the pancreatic head and periampullary region. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Pancreatic resection with curative intent is possible in a select minority of patients who have carcinomas of the pancreatic head and periampullary region. Patient selection is important to plan appropriate therapy and avoid unnecessary laparotomy in patients with unresectable disease. Laparoscopic ultrasonography is a novel technique that combines the proven benefits of staging laparoscopy with high resolution intraoperative ultrasound of the liver and pancreas, but which has yet to be evaluated critically in the staging of pancreatic malignancy. METHODS: A cohort of 40 consecutive patients referred to a tertiary referral center and with a diagnosis of potentially resectable pancreatic or periampullary cancer underwent staging laparoscopy with laparoscopic ultrasonography. The diagnostic accuracy of staging laparoscopy alone and in conjunction with laparoscopic ultrasonography was evaluated in predicting tumor resectability (absence of peritoneal or liver metastases; absence of malignant regional lymphadenopathy; tumor confined to pancreatic head or periampullary region). RESULTS: "Occult" metastatic lesions were demonstrated by staging laparoscopy in 14 patients (35%). Laparoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated factors confirming unresectable tumor in 23 patients (59%), provided staging information in addition to that of laparoscopy alone in 20 patients (53%), and changed the decision regarding tumor resectability in 10 patients (25%). Staging laparoscopy with laparoscopic ultrasonography was more specific and accurate in predicting tumor resectability than laparoscopy alone (88% and 89% versus 50% and 65%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Staging laparoscopy is indispensable in the detection of "occult" intra

  5. Clinical and Immune Effects of Lenalidomide in Combination with Gemcitabine in Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ullenhag, Gustav J.; Mozaffari, Fariba; Broberg, Mats; Mellstedt, Håkan; Liljefors, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess the immunomodulatory and clinical effects of lenalidomide with standard treatment of gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were treated in first line with lenalidomide orally for 21 days of a 28 days cycle and the standard regimen for gemcitabine. In Part I, which we previously have reported, the dose of lenalidomide was defined (n = 12). In Part II, every other consecutive patient was treated with either lenalidomide (Group A, n = 11) or gemcitabine (Group B, n = 10) during cycle 1. From cycle 2 on, all Part II patients received the combination. Results A significant decrease in the proliferative response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the frequency of DCs were noted in patients at baseline compared to healthy control donors while the frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, NK-cells and MDSCs were significantly higher in patients compared to controls. In Group A, a significant increase in the absolute numbers of activated (HLA-DR+) CD4 and CD8 T cells and CD8 effector memory T cells (p<0.01) was noted during treatment. A statistical increment in the absolute numbers of Tregs were seen after cycle 1 (p<0.05). The addition of gemcitabine, reduced most lymphocyte subsets (p<0.05). In Group B, the proportion of lymphocytes remained unchanged during the study period. There was no difference in overall survival, progression free survival and survival rate at one year comparing the two groups. Discussion Patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma had impaired immune functions. Lenalidomide augmented T cell reactivities, which were abrogated by gemcitabine. However, addition of lenalidomide to gemcitabine seemed to have no therapeutic impact compared to gemcitabine alone in this non-randomized study. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01547260 PMID:28099502

  6. [Concomitant gastric and pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma: case study].

    PubMed

    Portanova, Michel; Yabar, Alejandro; Lombardi, Emilio; Vargas, Fernando; Mena, Víctor; Carbajal, Ramiro; Palacios, Néstor; Orrego, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the case of a patient who underwent total gastrectomy, splenectomy and pancreatomy corporo-postero as a consequence of gastric and pancreatic metastasis from carcinoma to clear cells, five years after having undergone radical nephrectomy. Upper digestive bleeding was the first symptom, and pancreatic lesion was detected in previous CT scans. There are many documented cases of pancreatic metastasis, but only eight gastric metastasis in the last 15 years, although we did not find reports about surgical treatment for concomitant gastric and pancreatic injury. Surgical treatment which in some reports include highly complex surgeries such as gastrectomies with combined resections of invaded organs and pancreatoduodenectomy, are good options for select cases, because good survival rates have been reported.

  7. Prognostic parameters determining survival in pancreatic carcinoma and, in particular, after palliative treatment.

    PubMed

    Ridwelski, K; Meyer, F; Ebert, M; Malfertheiner, P; Lippert, H

    2001-01-01

    Prognosis and outcome of patients with pancreatic carcinoma is poor. The aim of the study was to investigate (1) which factors of medical history and clinical status as well as which laboratory parameters determine survival in pancreatic carcinoma and (2) whether specific data can be used as prognostic parameters or for early diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. In total, 287 patients with pancreatic carcinoma were enrolled in the study. In 193 subjects, only palliative treatment was possible. Survival was assessed using univariate survival probability curves by Kaplan-Meier. Comparison of patient groups with regard to survival was achieved using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was carried out using the Cox regression model. Overall, 22 factors, showing a significant impact on survival in pancreatic carcinoma were found, e.g., tumor-associated factors such as (1) tumor stage according to the UICC classification including TNM-based staging, grading, tumor site, and vascular infiltration; (2) preoperative habits and signs and symptoms (physical condition, pain, loss of appetite, ethanol consumption); (3) change of laboratory parameters (CA 19-9, bilirubin, prothrombin time, urea, C-reactive protein), and (4) type of intervention (surgical approach, R0/1/2 resection). Using multivariate analysis, seven factors (UICC tumor stage and site, surgical intervention including number of resected lymph nodes, chemotherapy, occurence of a carcinoma in relatives, preoperative physical condition, night sweat) were determined. In the 193 patients with palliative treatment, only ten factors (among them UICC tumor stage including the presence of metastases; data from the medical history such as physical condition, loss of appetite, and carcinoma in relatives, and laboratory parameters including prothrombin time, protein content, and aspartate aminotransferase levels) were found to be important. Chemotherapy had the strongest impact on survival which was confirmed by

  8. Antiangiogenic Therapies for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sampat, Keeran R.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a significant cause of death worldwide. HCC is a highly vascular tumor, and proangiogenic cytokines such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and fibroblast growth factor may play crucial roles in this disease. Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor that blocks VEGF and PDGF signaling, was the first systemic therapy to demonstrate improved survival in patients with advanced HCC. Several other drugs targeting VEGF are in development. Because of the anticipation of eventual resistance to anti-VEGF therapies, drugs that also target alternative proangiogenic pathways are being investigated. Recent clinical and preclinical data along with ongoing studies are reviewed. PMID:23576483

  9. Advanced treatment for basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Scott X; Whitson, Ramon J; Oro, Anthony E

    2014-07-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are very common epithelial cancers that depend on the Hedgehog pathway for tumor growth. Traditional therapies such as surgical excision are effective for most patients with sporadic BCC; however, better treatment options are needed for cosmetically sensitive or advanced and metastatic BCC. The first approved Hedgehog antagonist targeting the membrane receptor Smoothened, vismodegib, shows remarkable effectiveness on both syndromic and nonsyndromic BCCs. However, drug-resistant tumors frequently develop, illustrating the need for the development of next-generation Hedgehog antagonists targeting pathway components downstream from Smoothened. In this article, we will summarize available BCC treatment options and discuss the development of next-generation antagonists.

  10. Advanced Treatment for Basal Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Oro, Anthony E.

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are very common epithelial cancers that depend on the Hedgehog pathway for tumor growth. Traditional therapies such as surgical excision are effective for most patients with sporadic BCC; however, better treatment options are needed for cosmetically sensitive or advanced and metastatic BCC. The first approved Hedgehog antagonist targeting the membrane receptor Smoothened, vismodegib, shows remarkable effectiveness on both syndromic and nonsyndromic BCCs. However, drug-resistant tumors frequently develop, illustrating the need for the development of next-generation Hedgehog antagonists targeting pathway components downstream from Smoothened. In this article, we will summarize available BCC treatment options and discuss the development of next-generation antagonists. PMID:24985127

  11. Inhibition of growth of pancreatic carcinomas in animal models by analogs of hypothalamic hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Redding, T W; Schally, A V

    1984-01-01

    Using animal models of acinar and ductal pancreatic cancer, we investigated the effect of analogs of hypothalamic hormones on tumor growth. In Wistar/Lewis rats bearing the acinar pancreatic tumor DNCP-322, chronic administration of [L-5-Br-Trp8]somatostatin-14 significantly decreased tumor weights and volume. Somatostatin-28 and the cyclic hexapeptide analog of somatostatin cyclo(Pro-Phe-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Phe) failed to influence the growth of this tumor. The agonistic analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone [D-Trp6]LH-RH also significantly decreased tumor weight and volume in this model and reduced testosterone levels and the weights of the ventral prostate and tests. In Syrian hamsters bearing ductal type of pancreatic carcinoma, chronic administration of [L-5-Br-Trp8]somatostatin diminished tumor weights and volume. The percentage change in tumor volume was significantly decreased when compared to control animals. In one experiment, cyclic hexapeptide of somatostatin also inhibited growth of this tumor. [D-Trp6]LH-RH, given twice daily or injected in the form of microcapsules for constant controlled release, significantly decreased tumor weight and volume and suppressed serum testosterone levels. Hamsters castrated 4 days after transplantation of the pancreatic tumors showed a significant decrease in weight and volume of these tumors. This suggests that pancreatic cancers may, at least in part, be sex hormone sensitive. [D-Trp6]LH-RH may decrease the growth of pancreatic carcinomas by suppressing androgens. Somatostatin analogs reduce the growth of pancreatic ductal and acinar cancers, probably by inhibiting the release or stimulatory action of gastrointestinal hormones on tumor cells (or both). Inhibition of animal models of pancreatic tumors by chronic administration of somatostatin analogs and [D-Trp6]LH-RH suggests that these compounds should be considered for the development of a new hormonal therapy for cancer of the pancreas. PMID:6141560

  12. Is there a standard of care for the management of advanced pancreatic cancer?. Highlights from the Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. Orlando, FL, USA. January 25-27, 2008.

    PubMed

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2008-03-08

    Despite advances in our understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of pancreatic cancer, the outcome for this disease remains dismal. Gemcitabine, the standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer, offers modest improvement of tumor-related symptoms and marginal advantage of survival. Many chemotherapeutic and targeted agents have been pitted against or combined with gemcitabine in randomized phase III trials and no drug was shown to be superior to single-agent gemcitabine except two gemcitabine-containing combinations: capecitabine plus gemcitabine vs. gemcitabine and erlotinib. In this article, the author debates: "Is there a standard of care for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer?". In addition, he summarizes the key studies presented at the "Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium" held in Orlando, FL, USA on January 25-27, 2008. The studies discussed here include the following: i) a phase I study of a chemotherapy doublet gemcitabine plus capecitabine, combined with a biologic doublet (bevacizumab plus erlotinib) in patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (abstract #141); ii) a phase II study of gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib in locally advanced and metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (abstract #151); iii) final results of the multicenter phase II study on gemcitabine, capecitabine, and bevacizumab in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (abstract #198); iv) interim results from a phase II study of volociximab in combination with gemcitabine in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer (abstract #142); v) a pilot study of combination chemotherapy with S-1 and irinotecan for advanced pancreatic cancer (abstract #155); vi) a multicenter phase II study of gemcitabine and S-1 combination chemotherapy in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer (abstract #212); vii) a phase I/II study of PHY906 plus capecitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma (abstract #260); and viii) the final results of a phase II trial of

  13. Surgical management of hepato-pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chatzizacharias, Nikolaos A; Rosich-Medina, Anais; Dajani, Khaled; Harper, Simon; Huguet, Emmanuel; Liau, Siong S; Praseedom, Raaj K; Jah, Asif

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the outcomes of liver and pancreatic resections for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastatic disease. METHODS This is a retrospective, single centre review of liver and/or pancreatic resections for RCC metastases between January 2003 and December 2015. Descriptive statistical analysis and survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier estimation were performed. RESULTS Thirteen patients had 7 pancreatic and 7 liver resections, with median follow-up 33 mo (range: 3-98). Postoperative complications were recorded in 5 cases, with no postoperative mortality. Three patients after hepatic and 5 after pancreatic resection developed recurrent disease. Median overall survival was 94 mo (range: 23-94) after liver and 98 mo (range: 3-98) after pancreatic resection. Disease-free survival was 10 mo (range 3-55) after liver and 28 mo (range 3-53) after pancreatic resection. CONCLUSION Our study shows that despite the high incidence of recurrence, long term survival can be achieved with resection of hepatic and pancreatic RCC metastases in selected cases and should be considered as a management option in patients with oligometastatic disease. PMID:28255428

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with {>=}12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  15. [Successful endoscopic transpapillary pancreaticobiliary drainage for omental panniculitis by hepatocellular carcinoma complicated by biliary fistula and pancreatic fistula].

    PubMed

    Shindo, Yuji; Miyatani, Hiroyuki; Uehara, Takeshi; Ikeya, Takashi; Yamanaka, Kenichi; Ikeda, Masatoshi; Tokai, Kouichi; Ushimaru, Shinya; Matsumoto, Satohiro; Asano, Takeharu; Takamatsu, Toru; Fukunishi, Masanori; Iwaki, Takaaki; Sagihara, Yoshinori; Asabe, Shinichi; Yoshida, Yukio

    2012-07-01

    A 78-year-old man with hepatocellular carcinoma treated by chemoembolization and percutaneous ethanol injection was admitted to our hospital because of acute abdomen. The CT scan showed biliary fistula caused by hepatocellular carcinoma protruding from S3. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed disruption of an intrahepatic duct and the main pancreatic duct, and contrast agent leaked into the peritoneal cavity from each duct. Omental panniculitis with biliary fistula and pancreatic fistula was diagnosed. The symptoms improved by endoscopic nasobiliary drainage and endoscopic pancreatic stenting. On the 13th day after admission, we added endoscopic nasopancreatic drainage because his abdominal pain had been exacerbated by pancreatic juice leakage. Omental panniculitis by hepatocellular carcinoma complicated by biliary fistula and pancreatic fistula is extremely rare. Endoscopic transpapillary pancreaticobiliary drainage was effective for omental panniculitis in this case.

  16. An Open-Label Study of a Novel JAK-inhibitor, INCB047986, Given in Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Advanced Solid Tumors; Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Advanced Triple-Negative Breast Cancer; Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

  17. Efficacy of Contrast-enhanced Harmonic Endoscopic Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Uekitani, Toshiyuki; Kaino, Seiji; Harima, Hirofumi; Suenaga, Shigeyuki; Sen-yo, Manabu; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Distinguishing pancreatic ductal carcinoma (DC) from other pancreatic masses remains challenging. This study aims at evaluating the efficacy of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography (CEH-EUS) in the diagnosis of DC. Patients and Methods: Forty-nine patients with solid pancreatic mass lesions underwent CEH-EUS. EUS (B-mode) was used to evaluate the inner echoes, distributions, and borders of the masses. The vascular patterns of the masses were evaluated with CEH-EUS at 30–50 s (early phase) and 70–90 s (late phase) after the administration of Sonazoid®. Results: The final diagnoses included DCs (37), mass-forming pancreatitis (6), endocrine neoplasms (3), a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (1), a metastatic carcinoma (1), and an acinar cell carcinoma (1). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the diagnoses of DC in hypoechoic masses using EUS (B-mode) were 89.2%, 16.7%, and 71.4%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of DC in hypovascular masses using CEH-EUS were 73.0%, 91.7%, and 77.6% in the early phase and 83.8%, 91.7%, and 85.7% in the late phase, respectively. Conclusions: CEH-EUS for the diagnosis of DC is superior to EUS. CEH-EUS in the late phase was particularly efficacious in the diagnosis of DC. PMID:27184637

  18. Hematoporphyrin derivative uptake and photodynamic therapy in pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, T.; Chen, I.W.; Sperling, M.; Bell, R.H. Jr.; Brackett, K.; Joffe, S.N.

    1988-05-01

    Little information is currently available concerning the uptake of porphyrins by pancreatic tumors, or the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on pancreatic cancer. In Syrian golden hamsters (n = 33), the organ distribution of /sup 125/I-labeled dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE) was studied in a pancreatic cancer model. In the same animal model the effect of PDT was studied using a gold vapor laser for energy delivery 3 hr after the injection of DHE (n = 7). DHE was 2.4 times more concentrated in the pancreatic tumor than in the nontumorous pancreas at 3 hr. Simultaneously there was a considerable accumulation of DHE in the surrounding gastrointestinal tract, causing perforation of the duodenum and jejunum with resultant death in four (57%) animals after PDT. Photodynamic therapy caused extensive tumor necrosis without any obvious effect on the nontumor-bearing pancreas. Damage to the surrounding tissue in the hamster indicates that precautions should be taken if PDT is to be used clinically in pancreatic cancer. Intratumoral injection of DHE may give higher drug concentrations with greater specificity for tumor treatment.

  19. Combination chemotherapy for advanced bilharzial bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Khaled, H M; Gad el-Mawla, N; el-Said, A; Hamza, M R; Gaafar, R; el-Attar, I; Abu Rabia, A; Magrath, I

    1996-09-01

    Carcinoma of the bilharzial bladder, the most common cancer in Egyptian patients has been, until recently, largely treated by surgery. We have studied the activity of a series of single agents in phase II trials and identified a number of active agents. Here we report the results of a trial in which therapeutic combinations of the most active agents were administered in alternating cycles to patients who had never received chemotherapy. The study included 30 patients with histologically proven inoperable (20), recurrent (5, 2 of whom subsequently developed metastases), or metastatic disease (5). There were 27 males and 3 females, with a median age of 48.5 years (range 29-65 years). Fourteen patients had squamous cell carcinoma, 12 had transitional cell carcinoma, 2 had adenocarcinoma, and the remaining 2 had undifferentiated carcinoma. Chemotherapy consisted of epidoxorubicin (120 mg/sqm i.v. d1) and vincristine (1.4 mg/sqm i.v., days 1 and 8) alternating with etoposide (100 mg/sqm i.v. infusion over 1 hour, days 1 to 5) and ifosfamide (1800 mg/sqm i.v. infusion over 2 hours, days 1 to 5). Mesna was given as a uroprotector at 40% of the ifosfamide dose at 0, 4, and 8 hours after the ifosfamide infusion. Courses were repeated every 3-4 weeks. Among the 22 evaluable patients, 8 (36.5%) had a partial and one (4.5%), a complete response, giving a response rate of 46%. Three more patients had responses that were less than a partial remission, and 6 patients showed disease stabilisation on chemotherapy. Toxicities were tolerable and consisted mainly of myelosuppression. Results were further analysed in relation to pathologic subtype, disease status at the start of chemotherapy, and the delivered dose intensity. No relationship was found between any of these parameters and response to therapy. Advanced bilharzial bladder cancer is relatively sensitive to combination chemotherapy, but complete remission and prolonged survival is rare in this subgroup of patients with

  20. Complete pathological response following down-staging chemoradiation in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: Challenging the boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Khan, AZ; Pitsinis, V; Mudan, SS

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy, relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which usually presents late. Disease specific mortality approaches unity despite advances in adjuvant therapy. We present the first reported case of complete pathological response following neoadjuvant therapy in a locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:18081235

  1. A comparative proteomic study of plasma in feline pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify diagnostic biomarkers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Meachem, Melissa D.; Snead, Elisabeth R.; Kidney, Beverly A.; Jackson, Marion L.; Dickinson, Ryan; Larson, Victoria; Simko, Elemir

    2015-01-01

    While pancreatitis is now recognized as a common ailment in cats, the diagnosis remains challenging due to discordant results and suboptimal sensitivity of ultrasound and specific feline pancreatic lipase (Spec fPL) assay. Pancreatitis also shares similar clinical features with pancreatic carcinoma, a rare but aggressive disease with a grave prognosis. The objective of this pilot study was to compare the plasma proteomes of normal healthy cats (n = 6), cats with pancreatitis (n = 6), and cats with pancreatic carcinoma (n = 6) in order to identify potential new biomarkers of feline pancreatic disease. After plasma protein separation by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, protein spots were detected by Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 staining and identified by mass spectrometry. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), apolipoprotein-A1 (Apo-A1), and apolipoprotein-A1 precursor (Pre Apo-A1) appeared to be differentially expressed, which suggests the presence of a systemic acute-phase response and alteration of lipid metabolism in cats with pancreatic disease. Future studies involving greater case numbers are needed in order to assess the utility of these proteins as potential biomarkers. More sensitive proteomic techniques may also be helpful in detecting significant but low-abundance proteins. PMID:26130850

  2. Pancreatic ducts as an important route of tumor extension for acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ban, Daisuke; Shimada, Kazuaki; Sekine, Shigeki; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kanai, Yae; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi

    2010-07-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) of the pancreas is very rare, which usually grows expansively. Recently, a variant of ACC with predominant growth in the pancreatic ducts has been proposed, and is speculated to have potentially less aggressive behavior. The aim of this study was to investigate how the pancreatic duct system is related to the growth and extension of ACC. We reviewed the detailed gross and histologic features of 13 cases of ACC, of which 7 (54%) showed intraductal polypoid growth (IPG) of the tumor in the large pancreatic ducts with a mean IPG length of 24.8 mm. Tumors with IPG were found to spread characteristically along the pancreatic ducts as extending polypoid projections, filling the ducts and destroying the duct walls, although tumors did not tend to extend beyond the pancreatic parenchyma. Comparison of the clinicopathologic characteristics showed that ACC with IPG had less infiltrative features including lymphatic, venous, and neural invasion, formation of tumor thrombus in the portal vein, nodal metastasis, and invasion beyond the pancreas to the surrounding organs; death in only 1 case (14%) of ACC with IPG was the result of ACC itself. In contrast, ACC without IPG frequently showed more infiltrative growth, and was the cause of death in 50% of patients with this type of tumor. Intraductal dissemination of ACC in pancreatic ducts was proven in 1 case of ACC with IPG. These findings suggest that a significant proportion of ACC shows IPG, which is potentially linked to less aggressive clinicopathologic characteristics.

  3. [Application value of core needle biopsy technique in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Yingtai; Sun, Yuemin; Wang, Chengfeng

    2015-04-14

    To explore the application value of core needle biopsy technique in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients. During April 2007 to April 2014, retrospective analysis was conducted for 36 patients of locally advanced pancreatic cancer to summarize the clinical data of core needle biopsy technique. And the relevant data included clinical features, pathological findings and puncture-related complications. Regular postoperative follow-ups were conducted. All received pathological examination of core needle biopsy. And the pathological diagnoses were pancreatic cancer (n=29), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (n=2) and chronic pancreatitis (n=5). During the follow-ups, liver metastasis was pathologically confirmed postoperatively at Months 4 and 6 months among 5 chronic pancreatitis patients. The remainder was followed up for over 12 months. There was neither change in size nor metastasis. One case was diagnosed at Peking Union Hospital as autoimmune pancreatitis while another 2 cases had a clinical diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. The accuracy of core needle puncture was 94.4%. There were 2 cases of postoperative pancreatic fistula in class A. Bleeding complication was absent. The application of core needle biopsy technique is both safe and effective in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  4. Capecitabine and radiation therapy preceded and followed by combination chemotherapy in advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Bryan J.; McGinn, Cornelius J.; Chang, Alfred E.; Colletti, Lisa M.; Normolle, Daniel P.; Hejna, Gwen F. P.A.; Zalupski, Mark M. . E-mail: Zalupski@umich.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the tolerance and toxicity of radiation therapy (RT) and capecitabine in patients with advanced, unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. To control micrometastatic disease, combination chemotherapy (gemcitabine and cisplatin) before and after combined modality therapy (CMT) was planned. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer were eligible. Gemcitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2} and cisplatin 35 mg/m{sup 2} were administered on Days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle for two cycles. RT was then given to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions. Patients were treated with capecitabine 1330 mg/m{sup 2} daily during RT. After CMT, two additional cycles of gemcitabine and cisplatin completed the treatment. Results: Twenty-three patients were treated. Eighteen patients completed CMT. One patient was removed from study during CMT for toxicity issues. Treatment delays and dose reductions were common during the final two cycles of gemcitabine and cisplatin as a result of myelosuppression. Median survival was 10.1 months (95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.6, 13.7) for all 23 patients and 12.8 months (95% CI = 8.2, 18.9) for 18 patients without metastasis. Conclusion: Combined modality therapy with RT and capecitabine was well tolerated. Chemotherapy after CMT was difficult to complete owing to cumulative myelosuppression. Survival, response, and toxicity were comparable to infusional 5-fluorouracil and RT.

  5. Natural Products as Adjunctive Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer: Recent Trends and Advancements

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guogang; Zou, Gangyong; Yu, Haiqing

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a type of common malignant tumors with high occurrence in the world. Most patients presented in clinic had pancreatic cancer at advanced stages. Furthermore, chemotherapy or radiotherapy had very limited success in treating pancreatic cancer. Complementary and alternative medicines, such as natural products/herbal medicines, represent exciting adjunctive therapies. In this review, we summarize the recent advances of using natural products/herbal medicines, such as Chinese herbal medicine, in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic agents to treat pancreatic cancer in preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:28232946

  6. Postmortem examination of 22 pancreatic carcinoma patients treated with helium ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, K.H.; Castro, J.R.; Quivey, J.M.; Saunders, W.M.; Chen, G.T.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.; Tobias, C.A.; Walton, R.E.; Peters, T.C.

    1984-02-01

    Postmortem findings are available in this report in 22 patients with pancreatic carcinoma treated with helium ions at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; California. This represents the largest group evaluated histologically in the literature and is the first report evaluating effects of particle radiation in pancreatic tissue. Patient survival after therapy averaged 9 months. Most died of infection and/or pulmonary emboli. Local control was achieved in 27%. The pancreatic tumors had histologically more severe radiation changes than nontumor bearing pancreas. Irradiated bone marrow was severely hypocellular, and irradiated skin was atrophic. Five patients had radiation injury in the gastrointestinal tract. The spinal cord, liver, and kidneys showed no damage. This study demonstrates the safety of helium particle irradiation with present therapeutic planning. Injury to tumor was seen without excessive damage to adjacent tissues.

  7. Comparison of CT and angiography in assessing resectability of pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jafri, S.Z.H.; Aisen, A.M.; Glazer, G.M.; Weiss, C.A.

    1984-03-01

    A retrospective study of 27 patients with pancreatic carcinoma compared computed tomography (CT) and angiography in their ability to predict resectability of the neoplasm, using encasement of the splanchnic vessels as the criterion for nonresectability. Five patients had resectable tumor at surgery; the other 22 had unresectable disease. Tumor involvement of the splanchnic vessels was determined in 18 patients by CT examination and in 19 patients by angiography. Several other patients were found to have liver metastases, resulting in a radiologic diagnosis of nonresectability in 20 patients overall. All patients considered to have unresectable disease on the basis of either radiologic method proved to have unresectable tumor at surgery. CT is about as accurate as angiography in assessing resectability of pancreatic carcinoma.

  8. Incidence and pathology of pancreatic carcinoma among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.; Yamamoto, T.

    1986-09-01

    There is little evidence that pancreatic carcinoma is radiogenic in humans. To further investigate this possibility, all follow-up sources at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation were utilized to identify 378 incident cases of pancreatic cancer which occurred between October 1, 1950 and December 31, 1982 among 91,231 members of the cohort of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. An independent pathology review was conducted for all eligible cases, and pathology reports and slides were sought for those having a tissue diagnosis. The incidence of pancreatic carcinoma in this cohort was evaluated with respect to city, sex, age at exposure, time since exposure, radiation dose, and selected pathologic characteristics. Radiation dose effects, as well as spontaneous (background) incidence rates, were estimated using generalized Poisson regression models. Allowing for natural variations in background incidence, a significantly increased risk of pancreatic cancer was found to be associated with atomic bomb radiation exposure (relative risks = 1.3,95% confidence interval = 1.1-1.6). This relationship was much stronger in Nagasaki than Hiroshima, and among males than females. Age at exposure and time since exposure had little effect on radiation risk estimates. The interpretation of these findings in relation to their biologic plausibility is stressed, and the implications of using Radiation Effects Research Foundation incidence data in this regard are discussed.

  9. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  10. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Crane, Christopher H

    2016-08-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3-5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15-28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  11. Pain Analysis in Patients with Pancreatic Carcinoma: Irreversible Electroporation versus Cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiannan; Sheng, Shihou; Zhang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate and compare the postprocedure pain in patients with pancreatic carcinoma treated with irreversible electroporation (IRE) and cryoablation (CRYO). We compared 22 patients with 22 lesions in pancreas treated with IRE and 26 patients with 27 lesions treated with cryosurgery. All the patients in the two groups were under celiac plexus block (CPB) treatment to alleviate the postprocedure pain. A numerical rating scale (VAS) consisting of 11-point scales and the 24 h total hydromorphone use were recorded for the analysis of the pain level in the patients who underwent these two technologies separately. Other parameters, such as the complications and the ECOG performance status, were also noted. Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's exact test, the Chi-square test, and Student's t-test. All the pancreatic carcinoma patients in our study were reported to have postprocedure pain in the two groups. But there was no significant difference in the mean pain score (4.95 (IRE) versus 4.85 (CRYO); P = 0.52) and 24 h total hydromorphone use (3.89 mg (IRE) versus 3.97 mg (CRYO); P = 0.30). IRE is comparable to cryotherapy in the amount of pain that patients with pancreatic carcinoma experience. PMID:28074177

  12. Differentiation of pancreatic acinar carcinoma cells cultured on rat testicular seminiferous tubular basement membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.K.; Hansen, L.J.; Reddy, N.K.; Kanwar, Y.S.; Reddy, J.K.

    1984-11-01

    The use of rat testicular seminiferous tubular basement membrane (STBM) segments as a model substratum for the in vitro maintenance of tumor cells dissociated from a transplantable pancreatic acinar rat carcinoma is described. Ultrastructurally pure, hollow tubular segments of STBM were prepared by mechanical disaggregation, DNase digestion, and deoxycholate treatment. Dissociated pancreatic acinar carcinoma cells adhered readily to STBM segments within 1 to 6 hr, and these STBM-tumor cell aggregates were maintained for up to 7 days in serum-free chemically defined medium supplemented with hydrocortisone, insulin, vitamin C, and soybean trypsin inhibitor. The tumor cells formed acinar-like clusters and displayed intercellular junctions and polarization of secretory granules toward the center of these clusters. By 4 days, virtually all cells of this acinar carcinoma maintained on STBM in supplemented chemically defined medium contained numerous secretory granules. Cell replication, as determined by (/sup 3/H)thymidine autoradiography, ceased within 18 hr of attachment of neoplastic cells to STBM; however, all cells incorporated (/sup 3/H)leucine as evidenced by light and electron microscopic autoradiography. In addition, two-dimensional analysis and fluorography of newly synthesized secretory proteins discharged by these cells in response to carbamylcholine revealed the presence of Mr 24,000 protein and 19 other secretory proteins characteristic of this tumor. The culture system utilizing STBM and supplemented chemically defined medium should allow investigation of the effects of a variety of factors on morphogenesis, cytodifferentiation, and gene expression in pancreatic acinar tumors.

  13. [Combined radiochemotherapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Daniilidis, J; Constantinidis, J; Fountzilas, G

    2001-09-01

    Nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) is a tumor of epidermoid origin with an entirely different biological behavior than other carcinoma of the head and neck region. A retrospective analysis was performed in 93 cases with locally advanced NPC treated with induction chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy (RT; 79 patients) or concomitant RT and chemotherapy. Totally 66 patients (71%) achieved a complete response (CR), 68% of the patients treated with induction chemotherapy followed by RT, 86% with concomitant chemoradiotherapy. After a median follow-up of 5.5 years 28 out of these 66 relapsed, 25 of them locoregionally. Median time to progression was 22.5 months, median overall survival (OS) 45 months, 5-year actuarial survival was 41.5%. Age, T and N classification, histological type and type of chemotherapy were independent significant factors for OS. Combined chemotherapy and RT in patients with locally advanced NPC result in a high CR rate. The main problem remains the locoregional control. Randomized studies are needed in order to define the optimal use of chemotherapy in combination with RT.

  14. Characterization of 47D10, a glycoprotein associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.K.; Kato, K.P.; Murray, J.H.; Wolfe, H.; Rabin, H.; Carney, W.P.

    1986-03-05

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb), 47D10, was raised against a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549. 47D10 bound to lines derived from breast, colon, lung, and pancreatic tumors, but not to normal fibroblasts. Granulocytes also expressed 47D10 but red blood cells and lymphocytes were negative. Immunoperoxidase staining of paraffin-embedded tissues indicated that 47D10 was reactive with 36 out of 38 cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but not with chronic pancreatitis, regenerative pancreas or normal pancreas. The 47D10 antigen was a group of surface glycoproteins ranging from 63-97Kd (average Mr 85Kd). The antigen could be labeled by /sup 35/S-methionine, /sup 125/I, tritiated glucosamine, fucose, and mannose. Pulse-chase labeling showed that the 63-97Kd mature antigens were derived from precursors of 63Kd and 65Kd. The mature antigen was sensitive to endoglycosidase F (endo F) whereas the precursors were susceptible to both endoglycosidase H and endo F. Endo F digestion resulted in a polypeptide of 38Kd. Therefore, the 47D10 antigen is composed of at least 55% N-linked carbohydrates. The 47D10 MAb seems to be distinct from previously identified MAb against pancreatic tumors and may be useful in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma.

  15. Second primary pancreatic ductal carcinoma in the remnant pancreas after pancreatectomy for pancreatic ductal carcinoma: High cumulative incidence rates at 5 years after pancreatectomy.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Jun; Toyama, Hirochika; Matsumoto, Ippei; Asari, Sadaki; Goto, Tadahiro; Terai, Sachio; Nanno, Yoshihide; Yamashita, Azusa; Mizumoto, Takuya; Ueda, Yuki; Kido, Masahiro; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Fukumoto, Takumi; Ku, Yonson

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence rate and clinical features of second primary pancreatic ductal carcinoma (SPPDC) in the remnant pancreas after pancreatectomy for pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDC). Data of patients undergoing R0 resection for PDC at a single high-volume center were reviewed. SPPDC was defined as a tumor in the remnant pancreas after R0 resection for PDC, and SPPDC met at least one of the following conditions: 1) the time interval between initial pancreatectomy and development of a new tumor was 3 years or more; 2) the new tumor was not located in contact with the pancreatic stump. We investigated the clinical features and treatment outcomes of patients with SPPDC. This study included 130 patients who underwent surgical resection for PDC between 2005 and 2014. Six (4.6%) patients developed SPPDC. The cumulative 3- and 5-year incidence rates were 3.1% and 17.7%, respectively. Four patients underwent remnant pancreatectomy for SPPDC. They were diagnosed with the disease in stage IIA or higher and developed recurrence within 6 months after remnant pancreatectomy. One patient received carbon ion radiotherapy and survived 45 months. One patient refused treatment and died 19 months after the diagnosis of SPPDC. The incidence rate of SPPDC is not negligible, and the cumulative 5-year incidence rate of SPPDC is markedly high. Post-operative surveillance of the remnant pancreas is critical for the early detection of SPPDC, even in long-term survivors after PDC resection. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a review of current treatment strategies and developing therapies

    PubMed Central

    Teague, Andrea; Lim, Kian-Huat

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the deadliest solid malignancies. A large proportion of patients are diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of presentation and, unfortunately, this severely limits the number of patients who can undergo surgical resection, which offers the only chance for cure. Recent therapeutic advances for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have extended overall survival, but prognosis still remains grim. Given that traditional chemotherapy is ineffective in curing advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, current research is taking a multidirectional approach in the hopes of developing more effective treatments. This article reviews the major clinical trial data that is the basis for the current chemotherapy regimens used as first- and second-line treatments for advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We also review the current ongoing clinical trials, which include the use of agents targeting the oncogenic network signaling of K-Ras, agents targeting the extracellular matrix, and immune therapies. PMID:25755680

  17. Intravenous phentolamine infusion alleviates the pain of abdominal visceral cancer, including pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Masako; Yasukawa, Ken'ichi; Kamiizumi, You; Yokoyama, Ryouji

    2007-01-01

    This case report series describes eight patients (four patients with pancreatic carcinoma, one patient with hepatocellular carcinoma, one patient with gastric and rectal carcinoma, one with sigmoid colon cancer, and one with rectal cancer), whose abdominal cancer pain was treated with intravenous phentolamine infusion at 80 mg x day(-1) for 2 days. All but one of the patients had already been treated with opioids. All eight patients complained of severe abdominal pain; in five patients the pain radiated to the back, and there was associated anal pain in two patients. Analgesia was achieved in three patients; pain alleviation was obtained in four patients, but was not sustained in two of these four patients; and the treatment in one patient could not be judged for efficacy because epidural morphine was used together with the phentolamine. Adverse effects of phentolamine were tachycardia and/or hypotension.

  18. Quantification of pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor in colonic carcinoma and normal adjacent colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Bohe, H; Bohe, M; Jönsson, P; Lindström, C; Ohlsson, K

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To measure the content of immunoreactive human pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (irPSTI) in colonic carcinoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa. METHODS: From a stable hybridoma cell line producing monoclonal antibodies specific for human PSTI, a specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human PSTI was developed. In a precipitation assay system these antibodies bound human PSTI in a dose-dependent manner. The specimens were obtained from resectional surgery. RESULTS: The content of irPSTI was 19.9 micrograms/g protein (0.55 micrograms/g tissue wet weight) in colonic carcinoma. In adjacent normal colonic mucosa 43.6 micrograms/g protein (1.12 micrograms/g tissue wet weight) was shown. CONCLUSIONS: The enzymatic degradation of surrounding tissue necessary for tumour cell invasion could be facilitated by this relative deficit of the inhibitor in infiltrative carcinoma. PMID:1479031

  19. Zerumbone, a Southeast Asian Ginger Sesquiterpene, Induced Apoptosis of Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells through p53 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Songyan; Liu, Qiaojing; Liu, Yanju; Qiao, Hong; Liu, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is one common cancer with gradually increasing incidence during the past several decades. However, currently the candidate drugs to suppress pancreatic cancer remain lacking. This research was carried out to investigate if zerumbone, a natural cyclic sesquiterpene isolated from Zingiber zerumbet Smith, will produce the anticancer effects on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. The results showed that zerumbone concentration, and time, dependently produced inhibitory actions on cell viability of PANC-1 cells. In addition, Hoechst 33342, AO/EB, TUNEL staining, and caspase-3 activity assay further showed that zerumbone induced apoptosis of PANC-1 cells. The expression of p53 protein was markedly upregulated, and the p21 level was also obviously elevated in zerumbone-treated PANC-1 cells. Moreover, ROS production was increased by about 149% in PANC-1 cells treated by zerumbone 30 μM. Zerumbone also produced the same antitumor activity in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines SW1990 and AsPC-1. In summary, we found that zerumbone was able to induce apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, indicating to be a promising treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:22454691

  20. Advances in counselling and surveillance of patients at risk for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Randall E; Lerch, Markus M; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Neoptolemos, John P; Whitcomb, David C; Hruban, Ralph H; Brentnall, Teresa A; Lynch, Henry T; Canto, Marcia I

    2007-01-01

    Even with significant advances in imaging and our understanding of pancreatic cancer genetics, the survival rates for pancreatic cancer remain quite dismal. Although still at an early stage, there are efforts in place to develop surveillance and prevention strategies for people at high risk for pancreatic cancer. This comprehensive review article summarises the predispositions that put people at a high risk of developing pancreatic cancer and the current status in the counselling and surveillance of these people using not only available medical literature, but also incorporating international expert opinion. PMID:17872573

  1. Experimental virotherapy of chemoresistant pancreatic carcinoma using infectivity-enhanced fiber-mosaic oncolytic adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Curiel, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a significant clinical problem and novel therapeutic approaches are desperately needed. Recent advances in conditionally replicative adenovirus-based (CRAd) oncolytic virus design allow the application of CRAd vectors as a therapeutic strategy to efficiently target and eradicate chemoresistant pancreatic cancer cells thereby improving the efficacy of pancreatic cancer treatment. The goal of this study was to construct and validate the efficacy of an infectivity-enhanced, liver-untargeted, tumor-specific CRAd vector. A panel of CRAds has been derived which embody the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 promoter for conditional replication, two fiber complex mosaicism for targeting expansion, and hexon hypervariable region 7 (HVR7) modification for liver untargeting. We evaluated CRAds for cancer virotherapy using a human pancreatic tumor xenograft model. Employment of the fiber mosaic approach improved CRAd replication in pancreatic tumor xenografts. Substitution of the HVR7 of the Ad5 hexon for Ad serotype 3 hexon resulted in decreased liver tropism of systemically administrated CRAd. Obtained data demonstrated that employment of complex mosaicism increased efficacy of the combination of oncolytic virotherapy with chemotherapy in a human pancreatic tumor xenograft model. PMID:24903014

  2. MicroRNA-7 functions as a tumor-suppressor gene by regulating ILF2 in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yiliang; Shen, Wei; Min, Min; Liu, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Interleukin enhancer binding factor 2 (ILF2) has been found to be markedly upregulated in pancreatic carcinoma and is involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma. Thus, ILF2 may be a potential target for therapy. Yet, the regulatory mechanisms of ILF2 in pancreatic carcinoma remain largely elusive. In the present study, we demonstrated that ILF2 functioned as an oncogene and regulated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated genes in pancreatic carcinoma PANC-1 cells. MicroRNA-7 (miR-7) suppressed ILF2 mRNA expression and the protein level in PANC-1 cells. Contrary to ILF2, miRNA-7 functioned as a tumor-suppressor gene and negatively regulated EMT-associated genes in the PANC-1 cells. Curcumin, a polyphenol natural product isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa, has emerged as a promising anticancer therapeutic agent. We found that treatment with curcumin increased miR-7 expression and suppressed ILF2 protein in the PANC-1 cells. Thus, we identified ILF2 as a new downstream target gene of curcumin. The results revealed that ILF2 is regulated by miR-7 and suggest that downregulation of miR-7 may be an important factor for the ILF2 overexpression in pancreatic carcinoma.

  3. MicroRNA-7 functions as a tumor-suppressor gene by regulating ILF2 in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yiliang; Shen, Wei; Min, Min; Liu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin enhancer binding factor 2 (ILF2) has been found to be markedly upregulated in pancreatic carcinoma and is involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma. Thus, ILF2 may be a potential target for therapy. Yet, the regulatory mechanisms of ILF2 in pancreatic carcinoma remain largely elusive. In the present study, we demonstrated that ILF2 functioned as an oncogene and regulated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated genes in pancreatic carcinoma PANC-1 cells. MicroRNA-7 (miR-7) suppressed ILF2 mRNA expression and the protein level in PANC-1 cells. Contrary to ILF2, miRNA-7 functioned as a tumor-suppressor gene and negatively regulated EMT-associated genes in the PANC-1 cells. Curcumin, a polyphenol natural product isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa, has emerged as a promising anticancer therapeutic agent. We found that treatment with curcumin increased miR-7 expression and suppressed ILF2 protein in the PANC-1 cells. Thus, we identified ILF2 as a new downstream target gene of curcumin. The results revealed that ILF2 is regulated by miR-7 and suggest that downregulation of miR-7 may be an important factor for the ILF2 overexpression in pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:28259961

  4. Nab-paclitaxel as alternative treatment regimen in advanced cholangiocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Unseld, Matthias; Scheithauer, Werner; Weigl, Roman; Kornek, Gabriela; Stranzl, Nadja; Bianconi, Daniela; Brunauer, Georg; Steger, Guenther; Zielinski, Christoph C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced cholangiocellular carcinoma has a poor prognosis with limited therapeutic options. Nab-paclitaxel has recently been described to be beneficial in metastatic pancreatic cancer improving overall and progression free survival (PFS). The potential antitumor activity of nab-paclitaxel in cholangiocellular carcinoma is hitherto unknown. Methods We retrospectively analyzed an institutional cholangiocellular carcinoma registry to determine the potential biological activity of nab-paclitaxel in advanced intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma. Disease control rate (DCR), PFS and overall survival (OS) upon nab-paclitaxel based treatment, after failure of platinum-containing first-line combination chemotherapy, was assessed. Results Twelve patients were identified. Five of 12 patients (42%) received nab-paclitaxel as second line, and 7 patients (56%) as third-line treatment. The objective DCR with nab-paclitaxel was 83% (10/12 patients). One patient had a complete remission (CR), two patients had a partial remission (PR) and 7 patients had stable disease (SD). Disease was rated progressive in two patients. In all 12 patients receiving nab-paclitaxel the median time to progression was 6 months (range, 2.1–19.5 months). Median OS after initiation of nab-paclitaxel treatment was 9 months (2.1–28.4 months). The median time of survival after diagnosis of advanced disease was 21.5 months, whereby 3 patients were alive at the date of censoring (04/01/2015). Conclusions This is the first report suggesting substantial antitumor activity of nab-paclitaxel in advanced cholangiocellular carcinoma. In this small series, nab-paclitaxel based salvage chemotherapy appears to have a biological activity by controlling the disease and positively affecting survival. Randomized trials in this disease entity and subgroup of patients are urged. PMID:27563449

  5. Metastasized pancreatic carcinoma with neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX therapy and R0 resection

    PubMed Central

    Schneitler, Sophie; Kröpil, Patric; Riemer, Jasmin; Antoch, Gerald; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Häussinger, Dieter; Graf, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastasized carcinoma of the pancreas have a very poor prognosis, and long-term survival cannot be expected. This case report describes two patients with an initial diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic cancer, both with hepatic metastases and one with an additional peritoneal carcinomatosis. Initially, both patients were treated intravenously with the FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy regimen, consisting of 5-FU, folinic acid, irinotecan and oxaliplatin. Surprisingly, the FOLFIRINOX treatment resulted in complete resolution of the hepatic metastases in both patients, with no lesions detectable by computed tomography scan. Furthermore, treatment response included decreased diameter of the primary tumor in the tail of the pancreas and disappearance of the additional peritoneal carcinomatosis. Both patients were discussed by our multidisciplinary tumor board, which recommended surgical resections of the carcinoma. The R0 resection of the primary tumor was successful in both cases and, interestingly, the resected tissues showed no evidence of the hepatic metastases intraoperatively. In the first case, the patient received a postoperative 6-mo course of adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine. In the second case, the patient continued to receive the FOLFIRINOX regimen for an additional 6 mo postoperatively. At 12 mo after the operation, a nonresectable retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis was detected in the first patient, whereas the second patient remained in complete remission at the time of this report (5 mo after the adjuvant therapy was discontinued). This case report is the first of its kind to describe two cases of hepatic metastatic pancreatic carcinoma that were resectable following treatment with FOLFIRINOX. Further studies are required to examine the role of FOLFIRINOX as a neoadjuvant treatment option in subgroups of patients with initially metastasized pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:26034375

  6. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: clinical features, diagnosis and medical treatment: advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) comprise with gastrointestinal carcinoids, the main groups of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Although these two groups of GI-NETs share many features including histological aspects; over-/ectopic expression of somatostatin receptors; the ability to ectopically secrete hormones/peptides/amines which can result in distinct functional syndromes; similar approaches used for tumor localization and some aspects of treatment, it is now generally agreed they should be considered separate. They differ in their pathogenesis, hormonal syndromes produced, many aspects of biological behavior and most important, in their response to certain anti-tumor treatment (chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapies). In this chapter the clinical features of the different types of pNETs will be considered as well as aspects of their diagnosis and medical treatment of the hormone-excess state. Emphasis will be on controversial areas or recent advances. The other aspects of the management of these tumors (surgery, treatment of advanced disease, tumor localization) are not dealt with here, because they are covered in other chapters in this volume. PMID:23582916

  7. Challenges and advances in mouse modeling for human pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wanglong

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is critical for developed countries, where its rate of diagnosis has been increasing steadily annually. In the past decade, the advances of pancreatic cancer research have not contributed to the decline in mortality rates from pancreatic cancer—the overall 5-year survival rate remains about 5% low. This number only underscores an obvious urgency for us to better understand the biological features of pancreatic carcinogenesis, to develop early detection methods, and to improve novel therapeutic treatments. To achieve these goals, animal modeling that faithfully recapitulates the whole process of human pancreatic cancer is central to making the advancements. In this review, we summarize the currently available animal models for pancreatic cancer and the advances in pancreatic cancer animal modeling. We compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of three major categories of these models: (1) carcinogen-induced; (2) xenograft and allograft; and (3) genetically engineered mouse models. We focus more on the genetically engineered mouse models, a category which has been rapidly expanded recently for their capacities to mimic human pancreatic cancer and metastasis, and highlight the combinations of these models with various newly developed strategies and cell-lineage labeling systems. PMID:23114842

  8. Immune checkpoint and inflammation as therapeutic targets in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kimbara, Shiro; Kondo, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is one of the most deadly malignant neoplasms, and the efficacy of conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy is far from satisfactory. Recent research studies have revealed that immunosuppression and inflammation are associated with oncogenesis, as well as tumor development, invasion, and metastasis in PAC. Thus, immunosuppression-related signaling, especially that involving immune checkpoint and inflammation, has emerged as novel treatment targets for PAC. However, PAC is an immune-resistant tumor, and it is still unclear whether immune checkpoint or anti-inflammation therapies would be an ideal strategy. In this article, we will review immune checkpoint and inflammation as potential targets, as well as clinical trials and the prospects for immunotherapy in PAC. PMID:27672267

  9. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen Jiang; Gong, Jun; Xiang, Guang Ming; Mai, Gang; Liu, Xu Bao

    2011-05-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare type of disorder associated with pancreatic diseases. We describe here a case of 54-year-old man who was admitted to the Department of Dermatology with the diagnosis of erythema nodosum. The patient presented with a 9-month history of painful erythematous nodules on the extremities, joint pain and swelling, and weight loss. A highly elevated level of pancreatic lipase was found on the laboratory examinations. The biopsy specimens from the skin lesions showed subcutaneous fat necrosis. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a large mass with central necrosis in the body and tail of the pancreas. Distal pancreatectomy, splenectomy and partial transverse colectomy were successfully performed on day 17 of the hospitalization. The histopathologic findings supported the diagnosis of acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas (ACCP). Postoperatively, the level of serum lipase returned to normal, and the skin lesions and joint manifestations gradually regressed. However, the swelling did not significantly resolve in the left knee. In view of the non-specific clinical presentation of this disease, clinicians should be alert and have a high index of suspicion for pancreatic panniculitis.

  10. Iodine-125 implant and external beam irradiation in patients with localized pancreatic carcinoma. [Efficacy and complications

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, W.U.; Nardi, G.L.; Cohen, A.M.; Ling, C.C.

    1980-02-15

    Twelve patients with biopsy-proven clinically localized ductal pancreatic cancers (less than 7 cm in greatest diameter) judged unsuitable for resection were treated by bypass surgery, an Iodine-125 implant (20 to 39 mCi), and postoperative irradiation (4000 to 4500 rads). The potential problems of significant bleeding, pancreatic fistula, or pancreatitis were not experienced. A local recurrence developed in one patient and two recurred in regional lymph nodes. The projected median survival of the group is 11 months with four of the 12 patients still surviving. For purposes of comparison all patients with pancreatic ductal carcinoma treated by radical resection during a similar time were evaluated. All ten have died with a median survival of six months. Twelve of 22 (55%) of the combined implanted and resected groups have developed distant metastasis. Further pursuit of intraoperative techniques of irradiation in combination with adjuvant multidrug chemotherapy seems indicated in an attempt to prolong patient survival which is now limited by hematogenous metastases.

  11. Scintigraphic detection of gastric and pancreatic carcinomas with In-111 ZCE 025 monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Nabi, H.H.; Schwartz, A.N.; Wechter, D.G.; Higano, C.S.; Ortman-Nabi, J.A.; Unger, M.W. )

    1991-01-01

    We have evaluated the role of In-111 anti-CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) monoclonal antibody ZCE 025 in 8 patients. Three patients had a confirmed diagnosis of gastric carcinoma. Three had a confirmed diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. Two patients had elevated serum levels of CEA with no known primary. Each patient received 5.5 mCi In-111 ZCE 025 infused at doses of 10-80 mg. Planar and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging at 3 and 7 days after infusion detected 9 of 12 known tumor sites and all 5 of the previously identified sites of metastasis. In-111 ZCE 025 MoAb imaging also found 6 previously unsuspected tumor sites and changed the preoperative evaluation in 50% of the patients studied. It changed the clinical management in 2 patients and established the site of primary involvement in 2 others. There were no clinical or biochemical reactions. In-111 ZCE 025 monoclonal antibody scintigraphy is a useful adjunct in the evaluation of patients with either gastric or pancreatic carcinoma. It may have a beneficial impact on the surgical decision making in these patients.

  12. Modern management of locally advanced cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dueñas-Gonzalez, Alfonso; Cetina, Lucely; Mariscal, Ignacio; de la Garza, Jaime

    2003-10-01

    Radiation was until recently the key and only modality for the routine treatment of locally advanced cervical carcinoma. However after years of studying multi-modality treatments as an alternative to radiation alone in randomized phase III trials, the standard treatment has changed to chemo-radiation based on cisplatin. Three recent meta-analyses have confirmed that cisplatin-based chemo-radiation adds an absolute 12% benefit in five-year survival over radiation therapy alone. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiation has not been of proven benefit, but when neoadjuvant chemotherapy is followed by surgery, an absolute increase of 15% in five-year survival over radiation alone is seen. This benefit in survival is comparable to that obtained with the current chemo-radiation schedules based on cisplatin. Despite these encouraging results there remains room for improvement as the five-year survival of patients treated with chemo-radiation ranges from nearly 80% in bulky IB tumours to only 25% in stage IVA disease. Other therapeutic approaches need to be fully evaluated including the use of chemo-radiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy; the use of new drug combinations and the multi-modality combination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical surgery plus adjuvant chemo-radiation. Likewise, the addition of radiosensitizers to cisplatin, preoperative chemo-radiation and/or adjuvant chemotherapy may eventually improve the currents results of cisplatin-based chemo-radiation. Nevertheless, it is hard to foresee a dramatic increase in cure rate, even with the most optimal combination of cytotoxic drugs, surgery and radiation, and thus the testing of molecular targeted therapies against cervical cancer is a logical step to follow.

  13. A case report of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas with remarkable intraductal tumor growth into the main pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Mitsuyoshi; Makino, Isamu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Hayashi, Hironori; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2014-01-21

    We herein report a case of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas with remarkable intraductal tumor growth into the main pancreatic duct. A 76-year-old male was referred to our hospital for treatment of a pancreatic tumor. Preoperative examinations revealed a poorly defined tumor in the main pancreatic duct in the body of the pancreas, accompanied with severe dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, which was diagnosed as an intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm. We performed distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. The pathological examination revealed that the tumor consisted of a mixture of anaplastic carcinoma (giant cell type) and adenocarcinoma in the pancreas. There was a papillary projecting tumor composed of anaplastic carcinoma in the dilated main pancreatic duct. The patient is now receiving chemotherapy because liver metastasis was detected 12 mo after surgery. In this case, we could observe a remarkable intraductal tumor growth into the main pancreatic duct. We also discuss the pathogenesis and characteristics of this rare tumor with specific tumor growth.

  14. Definitive Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced Pulmonary Sarcomatoid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kazuya; Matsushita, Haruo; Kubozono, Masaki; Tanabe, Takaya; Ishikawa, Yojiro; Yamamoto, Takaya; Kozumi, Maiko; Takahashi, Noriyoshi; Katagiri, Yu; Tasaka, Shun; Fukui, Katsuya; Takeda, Ken; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Ichinose, Masakazu; Jingu, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare subtype of non-small cell lung cancer with a poor prognosis. We herein report on a case of pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma that was treated successfully by concurrent chemoradiotherapy. A 65-year-old man was diagnosed to have pulmonary pleomorphic carcinoma (clinical T4N2M0 stage IIIB). He received concurrent chemoradiotherapy (60 Gy of radiotherapy in 30 fractionations and two courses of chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel). After chemoradiotherapy, a significant reduction of the tumor size was observed. Two courses of adjuvant chemotherapy were performed. He is currently alive at 15 months after the first treatment without any recurrence or metastasis. PMID:27853077

  15. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, Yoshiaki; Makino, Naohiko; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

    2013-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs) among dendritic cells (DCs) fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines. Methods Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated. Results The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1) was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs. PMID:23378772

  16. Establishment of a carcinoembryonic antigen-producing cell line from human pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kaku, M; Nishiyama, T; Yagawa, K; Abe, M

    1980-10-01

    A human pancreatic carcinoma cell line of islet cell origin (QGP-1) has been established and maintained for over two years. The parent tumor and the cultured cell line produce carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and there is no evidence of hormone secretion from the tumor cells. The epithelioid cells, which had migrated from rounded, irregular cell aggregates, grow as a confluent monolayer with piling up of cells in some areas, and have a population doubling time of 3.5 days. The modal chromosome number was 50. Exponentially growing cultures produce 76.3 ng of CEA/10(6) cells after 7 days. CEA production was confirmed by immuno-peroxidase staining.

  17. Advances in the management of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Sonal A.

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common non-melanoma skin cancers worldwide. While most cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas are easily managed, there is a high-risk subset of tumors that can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Tumor characteristics as well as patient characteristics contribute to the classification of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas as low-risk vs. high-risk. Advances in the treatment of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas largely relate to the management of this high-risk subset. Surgical and non-surgical management options, including newer targeted molecular therapies, will be discussed here. Larger, multicenter studies are needed to determine the exact significance of individual risk factors with respect to aggressive clinical behavior and the risks of metastasis and death, as well as the role of surgical and adjuvant therapies in patients with high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:25165569

  18. Sudden disappearance of the blood flow in a case of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Hamada, Shin; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Kume, Kiyoshi; Hirota, Morihisa; Shima, Kentaro; Okada, Takaho; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2014-01-01

    A 55-year-old man was referred to our hospital for a further examination of a pancreatic cystic tumor with a solid component exhibiting vascularity. A few days later, the patient was admitted with a complaint of sudden severe epigastric pain. Enhanced CT showed the loss of vascularity in the tumor. In particular, contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) clearly demonstrated the disappearance of the blood flow, and a histological examination revealed acinar cell carcinoma with central necrosis. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature of acinar cell carcinoma associated with the sudden disappearance of vascularity. In this case, contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS was especially useful for assessing the degree of vascularity.

  19. Carcinoma of the anal canal: small steps in treatment advances.

    PubMed

    Eng, Cathy

    2011-09-01

    For locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal, efforts to discover effective treatments that would protect sphincter preservation led to the development of combined chemoradiotherapy, which, when administered appropriately, is curative. While the standard of combined modality chemoradiotherapy has minimally changed over the past 30 years, various chemotherapeutic and biologic agents, as well as novel methods for delivering radiation, have enhanced the treatment of anal carcinoma and are continuously being explored. This review examines the risk factors associated with anal carcinoma, and subsequently discusses the current standard of care from diagnosis through surveillance, paying attention to the pivotal trials that have shaped modern treatment paradigms.

  20. Altered coupling of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in pancreatic acinar carcinoma of rat

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, J.L.; Warren, J.R.

    1986-03-05

    The structure and function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in acinar carcinoma cells have been compared to mAChR in normal pancreatic acinar cells. Similar 80 kD proteins identified by SDS-PAGE of tumor and normal mAChR affinity-labeled with the muscarinic antagonist /sup 3/H-propylbenzilyl-choline mustards, and identical binding of the antagonist N-methylscopolamine to tumor and normal cells (K/sub D/approx.4x10/sup -10/ M), indicate conservation of mAChR proteins in carcinoma cells. Carcinoma mAChR display homogeneous binding of the agonists carbamylcholine (CCh), K/sub D/approx.3x10/sup -5/ M, and oxotremorine (Oxo), K/sub D/approx.x10/sup -6/ M, whereas normal cells display heterogeneous binding, with a minor component of high affinity interactions for CCh, K/sub D/approx.3x10/sup -6/ M, and Oxo, K/sub D/approx.2x/sup -17/ M, and a major component of low affinity interactions for CCh, K/sub D/approx.1x10/sup -4/ M, and Oxo, K/sub D/approx.2x10/sup -5/ M. Both carcinoma and normal cells exhibit concentration-dependent CCh-stimulated increase in cytosolic free Ca/sup 2 +/, as measured by intracellular Quin 2 fluorescence and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux. However, carcinoma cells demonstrate 50% maximal stimulation of intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ release at a CCh concentration (EC/sub 50/approx.6x10/sup -7/ M) one log below that observed for normal cells. The authors propose an altered coupling of mAChR to intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ homeostasis in carcinoma cells, which is manifest as a single activated receptor state for agonist binding, and increased sensitivity to muscarinic receptor stimulation of Ca/sup 2 +/ release.

  1. CA19-9: A promising tumor marker for pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Nakajima, K.; Hidaka, A.; Nakashima, T.; Ohta, H.; Torizuka, K.; Naito, A.; Suzuki, T.

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate CA19-9 as a tumor marker for pancreatic carcinoma (PC), serum levels of CA19-9 were compared with those of CEA and elastase-1 in 56 patients, consisted of 43 cases with histologically proven adenocarcinomas and 13 cases with chronic pancreatitis. Serum levels were determined by using RIA kit obtained from CIS, France (CA19-9 and CEA) and Abbot (elastase-1). CA19-9 gave the highest accuracy among tumor markers the authors have studied and serum levels were markedly elevated over 100U/ml in 30 (70%) cases with PC, whereas none in chronic pancreatitis. CA19-9 values were closely related to the tumor size and the presence or absence of metastsis on CT findings. Small tumors of less than 3cm in diameter, although the site of tumor was limited to the head of the pancreas, showed positive results in 2 out of 5 cases. Furthermore, CA19-9 was at a level of less than 22U/ml in 98 normal controls and was found to be elevated in only 4 (3%) out of 124 patients with benign diseases, including liver diseases, gastric ulcer, cholelithiasis, and so on. These results indicate that CA19-9 is much better in diagnosis and management of PC than is CEA.

  2. Targeted inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) enhances radiosensitivity in pancreatic carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhi-Jun; Gao, Jie; Kang, Hua-Feng; Ma, Yu-Guang; Ma, Xiao-Bin; Lu, Wang-Feng; Lin, Shuai; Ma, Hong-Bing; Wang, Xi-Jing; Wu, Wen-Ying

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that regulates protein translation, cell growth, and apoptosis. Rapamycin (RPM), a specific inhibitor of mTOR, exhibits potent and broad in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity against leukemia, breast cancer, and melanoma. Recent studies showing that RPM sensitizes cancers to chemotherapy and radiation therapy have attracted considerable attention. This study aimed to examine the radiosensitizing effect of RPM in vitro, as well as its mechanism of action. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and colony formation assay showed that 10 nmol/L to 15 nmol/L of RPM had a radiosensitizing effects on pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, a low dose of RPM induced autophagy and reduced the number of S-phase cells. When radiation treatment was combined with RPM, the PC-2 cell cycle arrested in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that the expression of DDB1, RAD51, and XRCC5 were downregulated, whereas the expression of PCNA and ABCC4 were upregulated in PC-2 cells. The results demonstrated that RPM effectively enhanced the radiosensitivity of pancreatic carcinoma cells. PMID:23662044

  3. Mithramycin-loaded mPEG-PLGA nanoparticles exert potent antitumor efficacy against pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu-Jie; Li, Liang; Liu, Xiu-Jun; Li, Yi; Zhao, Chun-Yan; Wang, Rui-Qi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that mithramycin A (MIT) is a promising candidate for the treatment of pancreatic carcinoma through inhibiting transcription factor Sp1. However, systemic toxicities may limit its clinical application. Here, we report a rationally designed formulation of MIT-loaded nanoparticles (MIT-NPs) with a small size and sustained release for improved passive targeting and enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Nearly spherical MIT-NPs with a mean particle size of 25.0±4.6 nm were prepared by encapsulating MIT into methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (mPEG-PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) with drug loading of 2.11%±0.51%. The in vitro release of the MIT-NPs lasted for >48 h with a sustained-release pattern. The cytotoxicity of MIT-NPs to human pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 and MIA Paca-2 cells was comparable to that of free MIT. Determined by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the NPs internalized into the cells quickly and efficiently, reaching the peak level at 1–2 h. In vivo fluorescence imaging showed that the prepared NPs were gradually accumulated in BxPC-3 and MIA Paca-2 xenografts and retained for 168 h. The fluorescence intensity in both BxPC-3 and MIA Paca-2 tumors was much stronger than that of various tested organs. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated with the poorly permeable BxPC-3 pancreatic carcinoma xenograft model. At a well-tolerated dose of 2 mg/kg, MIT-NPs suppressed BxPC-3 tumor growth by 96%. Compared at an equivalent dose, MIT-NPs exerted significantly higher therapeutic effect than free MIT (86% versus 51%, P<0.01). Moreover, the treatment of MIT and MIT-NPs reduced the expression level of oncogene c-Myc regulated by Sp1, and notably, both of them decreased the protein level of CD47. In summary, the novel formulation of MIT-NPs shows highly therapeutic efficacy against pancreatic carcinoma xenograft. In addition, MIT-NPs can downregulate CD47 expression, implying that it might play a positive role in

  4. Mithramycin-loaded mPEG-PLGA nanoparticles exert potent antitumor efficacy against pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu-Jie; Li, Liang; Liu, Xiu-Jun; Li, Yi; Zhao, Chun-Yan; Wang, Rui-Qi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that mithramycin A (MIT) is a promising candidate for the treatment of pancreatic carcinoma through inhibiting transcription factor Sp1. However, systemic toxicities may limit its clinical application. Here, we report a rationally designed formulation of MIT-loaded nanoparticles (MIT-NPs) with a small size and sustained release for improved passive targeting and enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Nearly spherical MIT-NPs with a mean particle size of 25.0±4.6 nm were prepared by encapsulating MIT into methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (mPEG-PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) with drug loading of 2.11%±0.51%. The in vitro release of the MIT-NPs lasted for >48 h with a sustained-release pattern. The cytotoxicity of MIT-NPs to human pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 and MIA Paca-2 cells was comparable to that of free MIT. Determined by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the NPs internalized into the cells quickly and efficiently, reaching the peak level at 1-2 h. In vivo fluorescence imaging showed that the prepared NPs were gradually accumulated in BxPC-3 and MIA Paca-2 xenografts and retained for 168 h. The fluorescence intensity in both BxPC-3 and MIA Paca-2 tumors was much stronger than that of various tested organs. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated with the poorly permeable BxPC-3 pancreatic carcinoma xenograft model. At a well-tolerated dose of 2 mg/kg, MIT-NPs suppressed BxPC-3 tumor growth by 96%. Compared at an equivalent dose, MIT-NPs exerted significantly higher therapeutic effect than free MIT (86% versus 51%, P<0.01). Moreover, the treatment of MIT and MIT-NPs reduced the expression level of oncogene c-Myc regulated by Sp1, and notably, both of them decreased the protein level of CD47. In summary, the novel formulation of MIT-NPs shows highly therapeutic efficacy against pancreatic carcinoma xenograft. In addition, MIT-NPs can downregulate CD47 expression, implying that it might play a positive role in

  5. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  6. Fat necrosis with features of erythema nodosum in a patient with metastatic pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Durden, F M; Variyam, E; Chren, M M

    1996-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the anterior surfaces of the legs. He had received oral antibiotics and supportive care for presumed cellulitis and thrombophlebitis, but had minimal improvement. Five months earlier, he had undergone pancreaticoduodenectomy for acinar pancreatic carcinoma; at that time, the serum level of amylase had been normal, but the level of lipase was elevated. The patient denied fever, rigors, arthritis/arthralgia, or pleuritic pain. His medications included aspirin, furosemide, ranitidine, and nortriptyline. He denied any allergies. Physical examination revealed numerous firm, tender, erythematous and violaceous, subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities, with marked bilateral pitting edema (Fig. 1). Skin biopsy of a representative lesion revealed septal panniculitis, consistent with erythema nodosum (Fig. 2). None of the characteristic changes of pancreatic fat necrosis was present. The patient was treated with aspirin, 650 mg orally, q 6 h, and indomethacin, 50 mg orally, q 12 h, but he continued to develop new nodules; prednisone, 60 mg orally was begun. Although he reported improvement in symptoms, the nodules failed to respond clinically and older nodules ulcerated along the medical aspect of the right leg (Fig. 3). The complete blood count was normal, except for hemoglobin, 10.9 mg per dL. Routine serum biochemical studies were also normal, except for albumin, 3.1 mg per dL, LDH, 312 U per L, and SGOT, 51 U per L. Serum amylase was 14 U per L (normal per 30 to 115 U per L) and serum lipase was 54,160 U per L (normal 0 to 200 U per L). Chest roentgenogram and tuberculin skin test were negative. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed extensive liver metastases. A second biopsy of the skin and subcutis of a necrotic nodule revealed lobular panniculitis with the characteristic picture seen in pancreatic fat necrosis (Fig. 4). The patient was presumed to have metastatic pancreatic carcinoma and pancreatic fat

  7. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  8. Thickening of the celiac axis and/or superior mesenteric artery: a sign of pancreatic carcinoma on computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Megibow, A.J.; Bosniak, M.A.; Ambos, M.A.; Beranbaum, E.R.

    1981-11-01

    Of 53 patients with carcinoma of the pancreas studied by computed tomography, 20 (37.7%) had apparent thickening of either the celiac axis or superior mesenteric artery. In 6 of them, the pancreatic mass was poorly defined. The frequency of this sign, correlation with angiographic findings, and pathogenesis are discussed.

  9. Advances in the pathology of penile carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Alcides; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2012-06-01

    The incidence of penile cancer varies from country to country, with the highest figures reported for countries in Africa, South America, and Asia and lowest in the United States and Europe. Causes of this variation are not clear, but they are thought to be related to human papillomavirus infection, smoking, lack of circumcision, chronic inflammation, and poor genital hygiene. Most penile tumors are squamous cell carcinomas, and a variegated spectrum of distinct morphologies is currently recognized. Each one of these subtypes has distinctive pathologic and clinical features. About half of penile carcinomas are usual squamous cell carcinomas, and the rest corresponds to verrucous, warty, basaloid, warty-basaloid, papillary, pseudohyperplastic, pseudoglandular, adenosquamous, sarcomatoid, and cuniculatum carcinomas. Previous studies have found a consistent association of tumor cell morphology and human papillomavirus presence in penile carcinomas. Those tumors composed of small- to intermediate-sized, basaloid ("blue") cells are often human papillomavirus positive, whereas human papillomavirus prevalence is lower in tumors showing large, keratinizing, maturing eosinophilic ("pink") cells. Human papillomavirus-related tumors affect younger patients, whereas human papillomavirus-unrelated tumors are seen in older patients with phimosis, lichen sclerosus, or squamous hyperplasia. This morphologic distinctiveness is also observed in penile intraepithelial neoplasia. The specific aim of this review is to provide a detailed discussion on the macroscopic and microscopic features of all major subtypes of penile cancer. We also discuss the role of pathologic features in the prognosis of penile cancer, the characteristics of penile precursor lesions, and the use of immunohistochemistry for the diagnosis of invasive and precursor lesions.

  10. Vismodegib induces significant clinical response in locally advanced trichoblastic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lepesant, P; Crinquette, M; Alkeraye, S; Mirabel, X; Dziwniel, V; Cribier, B; Mortier, L

    2015-10-01

    Patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma due to local extension or metastatic disease were previously at a therapeutic impasse. Targeted inhibition of the sonic hedgehog pathway by vismodegib represents a new therapeutic strategy. Adnexal carcinomas are rare malignant skin tumours derived from epithelial annexes. Conventional treatment of adnexal tumours is based on surgical excision. Although the radiosensitivity of adnexal carcinomas has not been established, radiotherapy could be offered alone or in combination in locally advanced or inoperable disease. Chemotherapy represents a therapeutic option in the treatment of metastatic adnexal tumours. Currently there is no effective treatment for these tumours when they become metastatic or unresectable, and treatment is palliative. Sunitinib represents a new therapeutic strategy, with efficiency described in the literature for a small number of patients. However, its efficacy is partial, and its tolerance is not always good. We report a patient with trichoblastic carcinoma, initially diagnosed as basal cell carcinoma, treated effectively with vismodegib. The remarkable response we have observed in this patient suggests an encouraging therapeutic role of vismodegib in trichoblastic carcinoma that should be evaluated in a carefully designed trial.

  11. Advances in the endoscopic management of pancreatic collections.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Clavijo, David; de la Higuera, Belen González; Vila, Juan J

    2015-04-16

    Treatment of pancreatic collections has experienced great progress in recent years with the emergence of alternative minimally invasive techniques comparing to the classic surgical treatment. Such techniques have been shown to improve outcomes of morbidity vs surgical treatment. The recent emergence of endoscopic drainage is noteworthy. The advent of endoscopic ultrasonography has been crucial for treatment of these specific lesions. They can be characterized, their relationships with neighboring structures can be evaluated and the drainage guided by this technique has been clearly improved compared with the conventional endoscopic drainage. Computed tomography is the technique of choice to characterize the recently published new classification of pancreatic collections. For this reason, the radiologist's role establishing and classifying in a rigorously manner the collections according to the new nomenclature is essential to making therapeutic decisions. Ideal scenario for comprehensive treatment of these collections would be those centers with endoscopic ultrasound and interventional radiology expertise together with hepatobiliopancreatic surgery. This review describes the different types of pancreatic collections: acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pancreatic pseudocysts, acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis; the indications and the contraindications for endoscopic drainage, the drainage technique and their outcomes. The integrated management of pancreatic collections according to their type and evolution time is discussed.

  12. Nursing Management of Advanced Merkel Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Pamela A; Freeman, Morganna L; Russell, Jeffery S

    2016-11-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and lethal skin cancer with few known treatment options. Management of this disease is challenging, and oncology nurses must understand the medical, physical, and psychosocial burden that MCC places on the patient and family caregivers. Patients must navigate a complex medical and insurance network that often fails to support patients with rare cancers. Nurses must advocate for these patients to ensure quality comprehensive cancer care.

  13. Fractionated Radioimmunotherapy With 90Y-Clivatuzumab Tetraxetan and Low-Dose Gemcitabine Is Active in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ocean, Allyson J.; Pennington, Kenneth L.; Guarino, Michael J.; Sheikh, Arif; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Serafini, Aldo N.; Lee, Daniel; Sung, Max W.; Gulec, Seza A.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Manzone, Timothy; Holt, Michael; O’Neil, Bert H.; Hall, Nathan; Montero, Alberto J.; Kauh, John; Gold, David V.; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A.; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND It has been demonstrated that the humanized clivatuzumab tetraxetan (hPAM4) antibody targets pancreatic ductal carcinoma selectively. After a trial of radioimmunotherapy that determined the maximum tolerated dose of single-dose yttrium-90-labeled hPAM4 (90Y-hPAM4) and produced objective responses in patients with advanced pancreatic ductal carcinoma, the authors studied fractionated radioimmunotherapy combined with low-dose gemcitabine in this disease. METHODS Thirty-eight previously untreated patients (33 patients with stage IV disease and 5 patients with stage III disease) received gemcitabine 200 mg/m2 weekly for 4 weeks with 90Y-hPAM4 given weekly in Weeks 2, 3, and 4 (cycle 1), and the same cycle was repeated in 13 patients (cycles 2–4). In the first part of the study, 19 patients received escalating weekly 90Y doses of 6.5 mCi/m2, 9.0 mCi/m2, 12.0 mCi/m2, and 15.0 mCi/m2. In the second portion, 19 additional patients received weekly doses of 9.0 mCi/m2 or 12.0 mCi/m2. RESULTS Grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia or neutropenia (according to version 3.0 of the National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) developed in 28 of 38 patients after cycle 1 and in all retreated patients; no grade >3 nonhematologic toxicities occurred. Fractionated dosing of cycle 1 allowed almost twice the radiation dose compared with single-dose radioimmunotherapy. The maximum tolerated dose of 90Y-hPAM4 was 12.0 mCi/m2 weekly for 3 weeks for cycle 1, with ≤9.0 mCi/m2 weekly for 3 weeks for subsequent cycles, and that dose will be used in future trials. Six patients (16%) had partial responses according to computed tomography-based Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, and 16 patients (42%) had stabilization as their best response (58% disease control). The median overall survival was 7.7 months for all 38 patients, including 11.8 months for those who received repeated cycles (46% [6 of 13 patients] ≥1 year), with improved efficacy at

  14. Molecular and immunochemical analyses of RB1 and cyclin D1 in human ductal pancreatic carcinomas and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Lang, D; Geradts, J; Obara, T; Klein-Szanto, A J; Lynch, H T; Ruggeri, B A

    1996-02-01

    Somatic mutations in the retinoblastoma-1 gene (RB1) and loss of RB1 protein function have been implicated in a number of human malignancies, but the role of RB1 gene and protein abnormalities in ductal pancreatic cancer (DPCA) is virtually unknown. We therefore analyzed expression of the RB1 protein immunohistochemically and/or by western blotting in a total of 54 sporadic and eight familial cases of archival and frozen DPCA and in 18 pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by using the antibodies RB-WL-1, 84-B3-1, and PMG3-245. Mutations in the RB1 promotor region and exons 13-21 of the RB1 gene were likewise examined by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analyses and DNA sequencing of genomic DNA from 30 microdissected primary pancreatic tumors and the pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Moreover, amplification and expression of a major regulatory component of RB1 function, cyclin D1, were assessed by southern and immunohistochemical analyses, respectively. The DPCAs were heterogeneous in both the intensity of RB1 nuclear staining and the percentage of immunoreactive cells. The tumors often had areas where RB1 staining was weak or absent adjacent to normal pancreatic tissue; however, only two of 32 archival cases and one of 30 frozen cases of DPCA completely lacked RB1 nuclear staining. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses of 18 pancreatic carcinoma cell lines demonstrated the absence of RB1 expression in only two cell lines, Capan-1 and QGP-1. Analyses of the RB1 gene and promotor region by SSCP and DNA sequencing largely confirmed the immunochemical findings. Three of 30 primary carcinomas had abnormalities revealed by SSCP analyses. In one case a single base-pair deletion was confirmed in exon 18 and resulted in premature termination and the absence of detectable RB1 protein. A second case had TAC-->TTC missense mutation in exon 13. The third primary carcinoma could not be reliably sequenced because it had a low percentage of epithelial cells. The

  15. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal is sometimes performed along with a sphincterotomy. Stent placement. Using the endoscope, the doctor places a ... a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  16. Massive hepatic necrosis with gastric, splenic, and pancreatic infarctions after ethanol ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Da Ines, David; Buc, Emmanuel; Petitcolin, Virginie; Flamein, Renaud; Lannareix, Valérie; Achim, Anca; Garcier, Jean-Marc

    2010-08-01

    Hepatic necrosis after ethanol ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), although rare, is well known and described, particularly in patients with chronic liver disease. The present report describes a rare case of massive hepatic necrosis with partial gastric, splenic, and pancreatic infarctions after local treatment of liver HCC with ethanol ablation and discusses the reasons for this complication. With the increasing use of percutaneous techniques to treat liver tumors, it is imperative for the interventional radiologist to be aware of the potential vascular complications of these techniques. An appreciation of vascular anatomy via multidetector computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography is important when planning image-guided interventions. Copyright (c) 2010 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recycling of epidermal growth factor in a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Korc, M.; Magun, B.E.

    1985-09-01

    PANC-1 human pancreatic carcinoma cells readily bound and internalized /sup 125/I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF). Bound /sup 125/I-labeled EGF was then partially processed to a number of high molecular weight acidic species. Percoll gradient centrifugation of cell homogenates indicated that the majority of /sup 125/I activity localized to several intracellular vesicular compartments. Both intact EGF and its processed species were subsequently released into the incubation medium. A major portion of the released radioactivity was capable of rebinding to the cell. Only a small amount of bound /sup 125/I-labeled EGF was degraded to low molecular weight products, and this degradation was completely blocked by methylamine. These findings suggest that in PANC-1 cells, bound EGF undergoes only limited processing. Both intact EGF and its major processed species bypass the cellular degradative pathways, are slowly released from the cell, and then rebind to the cell.

  18. Nitric oxide signaling pathway activation inhibits the immune escape of pancreatic carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LU, YEBIN; HU, JUANJUAN; SUN, WEIJIA; DUAN, XIAOHUI; CHEN, XIONG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the nitric oxide signaling pathway on immune escape; thus, a tumorigenesis model was established using nude mice. The mice were inoculated with pancreatic carcinoma cells and divided into two groups, a glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and a placebo group. When tumor volumes reached 150 mm3, the mice in the GTN group were treated with GTN transdermal patches (dose, 7.3 μg/h) while the mice in the placebo group were administered untreated patches. Following treatment, the tumor volume was recorded every 3–4 days and after 28 days, the tumors were analyzed. The results indicated that GTN treatment may reduce the levels of soluble major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related molecules, and natural killer group 2 member D, as well as inhibiting tumor growth. PMID:25364398

  19. High-dose lanreotide in the treatment of poorly differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Van Fraeyenhove, Frank; Meireson, Nathalie; Terriere, Luc; Willemsen, Paul; Kunnen, Jan; Mattelaer, Caroline; Van Acker, Frank; Schrijvers, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), including poorly differentiated carcinomas (NECs), are rarely encountered. The majority of these tumors do not secrete excess hormones, but functioning NETs produce large amounts of vasoactive peptides and may cause carcinoid syndrome. Synthetic somatostatin analogs (SSAs) have been widely used in NETs for control of hormonal syndromes. Here, we present a case of poorly differentiated, grade 3 pancreatic NEC associated with carcinoid syndrome, for which adequate symptom control was achieved for 2 years and 4 months using the long-acting SSA lanreotide Autogel(®). In February 2009, a 55-year-old woman presented with episodes of flushing, diarrhea and epigastric pain. Imaging techniques revealed the presence of a metabolically active mass expressing somatostatin receptors in the hilar area of the liver. Histopathological examination confirmed the malignant nature of the mass, which was identified as a poorly differentiated grade 3 pancreatic NEC (TNM staging: T4NxM0). Therapeutic options were limited for the patient because of the extent of the primary mass involving the celiac axis, severe gastrointestinal toxicity experienced as a side effect of chemotherapy with cisplatin-etoposide and, later in the course of the disease, extensive liver metastases and carcinoid heart syndrome. Along with a palliative debulking surgery and right portal vein embolization, biotherapy with a high dose of lanreotide Autogel (120 mg/14 days) contributed to alleviation of symptoms caused by hormone overproduction, even after the development of liver metastases. These results suggest that patients with poorly differentiated NECs who exhibit signs of carcinoid syndrome can benefit from treatment with somatostatin analogs.

  20. High-Dose Lanreotide in the Treatment of Poorly Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Van Fraeyenhove, Frank; Meireson, Nathalie; Terriere, Luc; Willemsen, Paul; Kunnen, Jan; Mattelaer, Caroline; Van Acker, Frank; Schrijvers, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), including poorly differentiated carcinomas (NECs), are rarely encountered. The majority of these tumors do not secrete excess hormones, but functioning NETs produce large amounts of vasoactive peptides and may cause carcinoid syndrome. Synthetic somatostatin analogs (SSAs) have been widely used in NETs for control of hormonal syndromes. Here, we present a case of poorly differentiated, grade 3 pancreatic NEC associated with carcinoid syndrome, for which adequate symptom control was achieved for 2 years and 4 months using the long-acting SSA lanreotide Autogel®. In February 2009, a 55-year-old woman presented with episodes of flushing, diarrhea and epigastric pain. Imaging techniques revealed the presence of a metabolically active mass expressing somatostatin receptors in the hilar area of the liver. Histopathological examination confirmed the malignant nature of the mass, which was identified as a poorly differentiated grade 3 pancreatic NEC (TNM staging: T4NxM0). Therapeutic options were limited for the patient because of the extent of the primary mass involving the celiac axis, severe gastrointestinal toxicity experienced as a side effect of chemotherapy with cisplatin-etoposide and, later in the course of the disease, extensive liver metastases and carcinoid heart syndrome. Along with a palliative debulking surgery and right portal vein embolization, biotherapy with a high dose of lanreotide Autogel (120 mg/14 days) contributed to alleviation of symptoms caused by hormone overproduction, even after the development of liver metastases. These results suggest that patients with poorly differentiated NECs who exhibit signs of carcinoid syndrome can benefit from treatment with somatostatin analogs. PMID:24707264

  1. Isoalantolactone Induces Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma PANC-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad; Ding, Chuan; Rasul, Azhar; Yi, Fei; Li, Ting; Gao, Hongwen; Gao, Rong; Zhong, Lili; Zhang, Kun; Fang, Xuedong; Ma, Tonghui

    2012-01-01

    Isoalantolactone, a sesquiterpene lactone compound possesses antifungal, antibacteria, antihelminthic and antiproliferative activities. In the present study, we found that isoalantolactone inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Further mechanistic studies revealed that induction of apoptosis is associated with increased generation of reactive oxygen species, cardiolipin oxidation, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c and cell cycle arrest at S phase. N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC), a specific ROS inhibitor restored cell viability and completely blocked isoalantolactone-mediated apoptosis in PANC-1 cells indicating that ROS are involved in isoalantolactone-mediated apoptosis. Western blot study showed that isoalantolactone increased the expression of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, Bax, and cleaved caspase-3 and decreased the expression of Bcl-2 in a dose-dependent manner. No change in expression of phosphorylated p38 MAPK and Bax was found when cells were treated with isoalantolactone in the presence of NAC, indicating that activation of these proteins is directly dependent on ROS generation. The present study provides evidence for the first time that isoalantolactone induces ROS-dependent apoptosis through intrinsic pathway. Furthermore, our in vivo toxicity study demonstrated that isoalantolactone did not induce any acute or chronic toxicity in liver and kidneys of CD1 mice at dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. Therefore, isoalantolactone may be a safe chemotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of human pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:22532787

  2. CMV chemotherapy for advanced transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, G. M.; Mead, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    Between May 1986 and September 1990 a total of 43 patients with metastatic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary tract have been treated at our institution with combination chemotherapy (CMV) consisting of cisplatin 100 mg m-2 i.v. day 2; methotrexate 30 mg m-2 i.v. days 1.8; and vinblastine 4 mg m-2 i.v. days 1.8. Chemotherapy was recycled on day 22 and continued for a maximum of six cycles in responding patients. Of 33 patients with measurable disease 8 (24%) achieved a complete remission (CR). The median survival for patients achieving a CR was 13 months (range 5-29+) whilst the median survival for all 43 patients was 7 months (range 1-29+). Only three patients are still alive--two are disease free. More effective and/or less toxic chemotherapy regimens are needed for the treatment of patients with metastatic TCC. PMID:1520591

  3. Systematic review of minimally invasive ablation treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Lucchina, Natalie; Petrillo, Mario; Floridi, Chiara; Piacentino, Filippo; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Fonio, Paolo; Fontana, Federico; Fugazzola, Carlo; Brunese, Luca; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2014-07-01

    Unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer with or without metastatic disease is associated with a very poor prognosis. Ablation techniques are based on direct application of chemical, thermal, or electrical energy to a tumor, which leads to cellular necrosis. Initial studies about ablation therapies of the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Modifications to the various applications, in particular combining the techniques with high-quality imaging and intra-operative approach has enabled real-time treatment monitoring and significant improvements in safety. Inoperable cases of pancreatic cancer have been treated by various ablation techniques in the last few years with promising results. The purpose of this review is to present the current status of local ablative therapies in the treatment of pancreatic advanced tumor.

  4. E2F-1 gene therapy induces apoptosis and increases chemosensitivity in human pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Mary Jane; Farmer, Michael R; Atienza, Cesar; Stilwell, Ariel; Dong, Yan Bin; Yang, Hai Liang; Wong, Sandra L; McMasters, Kelly M

    2002-01-01

    which was substantially increased by cotreatment with ROS or etoposide. E2F-1 overexpression initiates apoptosis and suppresses growth in pancreatic MIA PaCa-2 cells in vitro. E2F-1-mediated apoptosis was not associated with significant changes in the expression of Bcl-2 family member proteins in these pancreatic cancer cells. ROS and etoposide, when combined with E2F-1 overexpression, induce apoptosis in an additive manner. This chemogene combination may provide a potentially useful therapeutic strategy for advanced pancreatic cancer.

  5. Hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas with lymphoid stroma: first description of the clinical, morphological, immunohistochemical, and molecular characteristics of an unusual pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, Alessandro; Argenti, Francesca; Vinci, Alessio; La Rosa, Stefano; Viglio, Alessandra; Riboni, Roberta; Necchi, Vittorio; Pugliese, Luigi; Sessa, Fausto; Pietrabissa, Andrea; Paulli, Marco

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of tumour in the head of the pancreas observed in a 57-year-old man with a history of worsening jaundice and elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) serum level, who underwent Whipple pancreatoduodenectomy. Histologically, the tumour was predominantly composed of solid sheets of large eosinophilic cells with a prominent lymphoid infiltration without association neither with DNA microsatellite instability nor Epstein-Barr virus infection. The tumour was diffusely and strongly positive for hepatocyte paraffin-1 (Hep Par-1) and glypican-3 leading to the diagnosis of hepatoid carcinoma. Strong cytoplasmic staining for AFP was focally observed. Moreover, tumour cells showed countless cytoplasmic eosinophilic globules immunoreactive for the stress protein p62. A primary hepatocellular carcinoma of the liver was ruled out by careful clinical analysis. Hepatoid carcinoma is an extremely rare pancreatic neoplasm, and here, we describe the first case of such variant associated with lymphoid stroma. The characteristic histologic features and the immunophenotypic profile help in distinguishing this carcinoma from other pancreatic tumours, notably from medullary carcinoma.

  6. Radiation promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion of pancreatic cancer cell by activating carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Doudou; Qu, Chao; Ning, Zhouyu; Wang, Haiyong; Zang, Kun; Zhuang, Liping; Chen, Lianyu; Wang, Peng; Meng, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is of crucial importance affecting treatment and prognosis. High degree of carcinoma-associated fibroblast (CAF) infiltration occurs in pancreatic cancer, though its effect on radiotherapy remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that radiation enhanced the migration- and invasion-promoting capacity of CAFs both in vitro and in vivo in a lung metastasis model. Radiation exposure increased the expression of CXCL12 by CAFs. CAF-derived CXCL12 promoted tumor cell EMT and invasion directly, acting through CXCR4 on pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, we showed that CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling promoted pancreatic cancer cell EMT and invasion by activating the P38 pathway. Therefore, our study concluded that radiation promoted pancreatic cancer cell invasion and EMT by activating CAFs, while inhibiting the CXCL12/CXCR4 interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and CAFs could potentially attenuate tumor cell invasion induced by radiation, which provides an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic targets to improve the prognosis for human pancreatic cancer treated with radiation therapy. PMID:27822411

  7. Phase I trial of gefitinib with concurrent radiotherapy and fixed 2-h gemcitabine infusion, in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maurel, Joan . E-mail: jmaurel@clinic.ub.es; Martin-Richard, Marta; Conill, Carlos; Sanchez, Marcelo; Petriz, Lourdes; Gines, Angels; Miquel, Rosa; Gallego, Rosa; Cajal, Rosana; Ayuso, Carmen; Navarro, Salvador; Marmol, Maribel; Nadal, Cristina; Auge, Josep Maria; Gascon, Pere; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancers are resistant to radiotherapy (RT) and current chemotherapy agents. Epidermal growth factor receptor is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and in vitro studies have shown that epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors can overcome radio- and chemoresistance. The aim of the study was to determine whether the addition of gefitinib to RT and gemcitabine for patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC) was feasible and safe. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with pathologically proven LAPC, based on major vascular invasion based on helical computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasound, were entered into the study. The targeted irradiated volume included the tumor and 2-cm margin. Prophylactic irradiation of regional nodes was not allowed. Patients with >500 cm{sup 3} of planning tumor volume were excluded. An initial cohort of 6 patients was treated with RT (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) plus concomitant gefitinib (250 mg/day). Successive cohorts of patients received 100, 150, and 200 mg/m{sup 2}/day of gemcitabine in a 2-h infusion over Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 with gefitinib (250 mg/day) and RT. Gefitinib was continued after RT until progression. A pharmacodynamic study of angiogenic markers was also performed to evaluate a possible antiangiogenic effect. Results: There were no dose-limiting toxicities. Common toxicities were mild neutropenia, asthenia, diarrhea, cutaneous rash and nausea/vomiting. The median (95% confidence interval [CI]) progression-free survival was 3.7 (95% CI = 1.9-5.5) months, and the median overall survival was 7.5 (95% CI 5.2-9.9) months. No significant reduction of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-8 was observed after treatment. Conclusion: Our results support that the combination of gefitinib, RT, and gemcitabine has an acceptable toxicity but with modest activity in LAPC.

  8. Pancreatic carcinoma cells are susceptible to noninvasive radio frequency fields after treatment with targeted gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Evan S; Massey, Katheryn L; Zhu, Cihui; Curley, Steven A

    2010-08-01

    Gold and carbon nanoparticles absorb nonionizing radio frequency (RF) energy and release heat. Solid gold nanoparticles are delivered to cancer cells via conjugation with targeting antibodies. Here, 20-nm gold particles were conjugated to cetuximab, which is an epidermal growth factor receptor-1 (EGFR-1) antibody. A pancreatic carcinoma cell line that highly expresses EGFR-1, Panc-1, and Cama-1, which is a breast carcinoma cell line that minimally expresses EGFR-1, were treated with 100-nmol/L cetuximab-conjugated gold nanoparticles for 3 h (n = 4). Thirty-six hours later, the dishes were placed in an RF field with a generator power of 200 W for 5 min. After another 36 h, cell injury and death were evaluated with flow cytometry. The targeted cell line Panc-1 had a viability of 46% +/- 12%, whereas the Cama-1 cell had a viability of 92% +/- 2% after RF field exposure (P < .008). Transmission electron microscopy showed gold nanoparticle uptake in Panc-1 cells but negligible uptake by Cama-1 cells. Nontargeted cells do not internalize a sufficient amount of antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles to induce injury in a noninvasive RF field. This technique could be useful in cancer treatment if a cancer-specific antibody is used to localize gold nanoparticles to malignant cells. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of breast: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Miyai, Kosuke; Schwartz, Mary R; Divatia, Mukul K; Anton, Rose C; Park, Yong Wook; Ayala, Alberto G; Ro, Jae Y

    2014-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the breast is a rare special subtype of breast cancer characterized by the presence of a dual cell population of luminal and basaloid cells arranged in specific growth patterns. Most breast cancers with triple-negative, basal-like breast features (i.e., tumors that are devoid of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression, and express basal cell markers) are generally high-grade tumors with an aggressive clinical course. Conversely, while ACCs also display a triple-negative, basal-like phenotype, they are usually low-grade and exhibit an indolent clinical behavior. Many discoveries regarding the molecular and genetic features of the ACC, including a specific chromosomal translocation t(6;9) that results in a MYB-NFIB fusion gene, have been made in recent years. This comprehensive review provides our experience with the ACC of the breast, as well as an overview of clinical, histopathological, and molecular genetic features. PMID:25516849

  10. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  11. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonograpic studies on pancreatic carcinoma with special reference to staining and muscular arterial vessels.

    PubMed

    Suga, Hideya; Okabe, Yoshinobu; Tsuruta, Osamu; Naito, Yoshiki; Kinoshita, Hisafumi; Toyonaga, Atsushi; Ono, Naofumi; Oho, Kazuhiko; Kojiro, Masamichi; Sata, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Comparative study of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CE-US) and histopathology of surgically resected specimens in 13 patients with pancreatic carcinoma. A time intensity curve was used to determine the percentage brightness increase in cancerous and normal regions and the patients were divided into two groups, hyperperfusion, with a percentage brightness increase over 80% (n=6) and hypoperfusion, with an increase of less than 80% (n=7) on CE-US. The hyperperfusion group included well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma and acinar cell carcinoma, while all 7 patients in the hypoperfusion group had moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma. Immunological staining (α-SMA and anti-CD34) of the resected specimens showed significantly higher microartery count (MAC) in the hyperperfusion group (p<0.005) than in the hypoperfusion group or normal pancreas. In the normal pancreas, the mean vessel diameter was significantly higher (over 100 μm) than in the hyperperfusion group (30 μm; p<0.005). It was concluded that a muscular arterial vessel density of less than 30 μm is an important factor in determining staining degree and carcinoma progression by CE-US in pancreatic carcinoma.

  12. Impact of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Among Patients with Pancreatic Fistula After Gastrectomy for Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Takashi; Akiyama, Hirotoshi; Makino, Hirochika; Kimura, Jun; Takagawa, Ryo; Ono, Hidetaka A; Kunisaki, Chikara; Endo, Itaru

    2016-04-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) has been widely adopted for patients with advanced gastric cancer; however, the safety of gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy followed by NAC has not yet been evaluated. We retrospectively analyzed the influence of NAC on morbidity and mortality after gastrectomy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. A series of 364 patients with advanced gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy without pancreatectomy between January 2008 and December 2010 at eight hospitals registered to the Yokohama Clinical Oncology Group were studied retrospectively. There were 330 patients who underwent surgical treatment immediately after diagnosis (surgery alone group) and 34 patients (NAC group) who first received NAC and then underwent surgical resection. Although there were no significant differences in the morbidity rate between the two groups, postoperative pancreatic fistula was more often observed in NAC patients than in patients of the group treated with surgery alone [5 cases (14.7%) vs. 11 cases (3.3%); p=0.011]. In the univariate analysis, NAC (p=0.029), bursectomy (p<0.001) and operative bleeding (≥300 ml, p=0.002), were significantly correlated with postoperative pancreatic fistula, and NAC [odds ratio (OR)=4.901, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.455-16.67; p=0.010] and bursectomy (OR=11.2, 95% CI=3.460-37.04; p<0.001) were independent risk factors for postoperative pancreatic fistula by multivariate analysis. The incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula was 40.0% among patients who underwent gastrectomy with bursectomy followed by NAC. The incidence of pancreatic fistula in patients treated with NAC and bursectomy was significantly higher than that in other patients. Bursectomy may be discouraged for the prevention of pancreatic fistula from gastrectomy following NAC. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Functional imaging of interstitial brachytherapy in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts using spectral CT: how does iodine concentration correlate with standardized uptake value of 18FDG-PET-CT?

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shudong; Shi, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yerong; Huang, Wei; Song, Qi; Lin, Xiaozhu; Liu, Yu; Chen, Kemin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the correlation between iodine concentration (IC) for the quantitative analysis of spectral CT and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 18 fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography–CT (18FDG PET–CT) as an indicator of therapeutic response to interstitial brachytherapy in transplanted human pancreatic carcinomas in BALB/c-nu mice. Methods: Xenograft models were created by subcutaneous injection of SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell suspensions into immunodeficient BALB/c-nu mice. 30 mice bearing SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell xenografts were randomly separated into two groups: experimental (n = 15; 1.0 mCi) and control (n = 15, 0 mCi). After 2 weeks of treatment, spectral CT and 18FDG micro-PET–CT scan were performed. IC values and SUVmax in the lesions were measured. IC normalized to the muscle tissue is indicated as nIC. The relationships between the nIC and SUVmax of the transplantation tumours were analysed. Results: 2 weeks after treatment, the nIC in three-phase scans and SUVmax of the experimental group were significantly lower than those of the control group. The nIC values of the three-phase scans have certain positive correlation with the SUVmax values (r = 0.69, p < 0.05; r = 0.73 and p < 0.05; r = 0.80, p < 0.05 in the 10-, 25- and 60-s phase, respectively). Conclusion: Spectral CT could serve as a valuable imaging modality, as our results suggest that nIC correlates with SUVmax of 18FDG PET–CT for evaluating the therapeutic effect of 125I interstitial brachytherapy in a pancreatic carcinoma xenograft. Advances in knowledge: Spectral CT offers opportunities to assess the therapeutic response of pancreatic cancer. This study supports the conclusion that nIC values in spectral CT could also serve as a valuable functional imaging parameter for early monitoring and evaluation of the therapeutic response of 125I interstitial brachytherapy mouse models

  14. Radiation therapy combined with Adriamycin or 5-fluorouracil for the treatment of locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    One hundred fifty-seven patients with locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma were randomly allocated to therapy with radiation and 5-fluorouracil or radiation and Adriamycin (doxorubicin). A total of 138 of 143 analyzable patients have died, and no differences in the relative survival impact of the treatments have been observed. Toxicity on the Adriamycin arm was more substantial and primarily attributable to Adriamycin chemotherapy after the completion of radiotherapy.

  15. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27610018

  16. Single incision laparoscopic pancreas resection for pancreatic metastasis of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Barbaros, Umut; Sümer, Aziz; Demirel, Tugrul; Karakullukçu, Nazlı; Batman, Burçin; Içscan, Yalın; Sarıçam, Gülay; Serin, Kürçsat; Loh, Wei-Liang; Dinççağ, Ahmet; Mercan, Selçuk

    2010-01-01

    Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) offers excellent cosmetic results and may be associated with decreased postoperative pain, reduced need for analgesia, and thus accelerated recovery. Herein, we report the first transumbilical single incision laparoscopic pancreatectomy case in a patient who had renal cell cancer metastasis on her pancreatic corpus and tail. A 59-year-old female who had metastatic lesions on her pancreas underwent laparoscopic subtotal pancreatectomy through a 2-cm umbilical incision. Single incision pancreatectomy was performed with a special port (SILS port) and articulated equipment. The procedure lasted 330 minutes. Estimated blood loss was 100mL. No perioperative complications occurred. The patient was discharged on the seventh postoperative day with a low-volume (20mL/day) pancreatic fistula that ceased spontaneously. Pathology result of the specimen was renal cell cancer metastases. This is the first reported SILS pancreatectomy case, demonstrating that even advanced surgical procedures can be performed using the SILS technique in well-experienced centers. Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic pancreatectomy is feasible and can be performed safely in experienced centers. SILS may improve cosmetic results and allow accelerated recovery for patients even with malignancy requiring advanced laparoscopic interventions.

  17. Single Incision Laparoscopic Pancreas Resection for Pancreatic Metastasis of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sümer, Aziz; Demirel, Tugrul; Karakullukçu, Nazlι; Batman, Burçin; İçscan, Yalιn; Sarιçam, Gülay; Serin, Kürçsat; Loh, Wei-Liang; Dinççağ, Ahmet; Mercan, Selçuk

    2010-01-01

    Background: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) offers excellent cosmetic results and may be associated with decreased postoperative pain, reduced need for analgesia, and thus accelerated recovery. Herein, we report the first transumbilical single incision laparoscopic pancreatectomy case in a patient who had renal cell cancer metastasis on her pancreatic corpus and tail. Methods: A 59-year-old female who had metastatic lesions on her pancreas underwent laparoscopic subtotal pancreatectomy through a 2-cm umbilical incision. Results: Single incision pancreatectomy was performed with a special port (SILS port) and articulated equipment. The procedure lasted 330 minutes. Estimated blood loss was 100mL. No perioperative complications occurred. The patient was discharged on the seventh postoperative day with a low-volume (20mL/day) pancreatic fistula that ceased spontaneously. Pathology result of the specimen was renal cell cancer metastases. Conclusion: This is the first reported SILS pancreatectomy case, demonstrating that even advanced surgical procedures can be performed using the SILS technique in well-experienced centers. Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic pancreatectomy is feasible and can be performed safely in experienced centers. SILS may improve cosmetic results and allow accelerated recovery for patients even with malignancy requiring advanced laparoscopic interventions. PMID:21605524

  18. Efficacy of gemcitabine for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: comparison with 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tada, Minoru; Arizumi, Toshihiko; Arizumi, Masatoshi; Nakai, Yousuke; Sasaki, Takashi; Kogure, Hirofumi; Togawa, Osamu; Matsubara, Saburo; Tsujino, Takeshi; Hirano, Kenji; Sasahira, Naoki; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Kawabe, Takao; Omata, Masao

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of gemcitabine alone has not been established in comparison with conventional chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Of 180 consecutive patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer, 93 were locally advanced. Among these 93 patients, 45 were treated with gemcitabine, 18 with concurrent radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy, and 30 received best supportive care (BSC). In cases of metastatic disease, 42 were treated with gemcitabine and 32 received BSC. Overall survival and adverse events were analyzed retrospectively. Median survival time and 1-year survival rate were 11.6, 9.3, 6.7, 7.8 and 2.4 months and 47, 39, 27, 21 and 7% in the groups of gemcitabine, chemoradiotherapy, BSC of locally advanced cancer, and in those of gemcitabine, BSC of metastatic disease, respectively. Gemcitabine and chemoradiotherapy prolonged overall survival time compared with BSC (p = 0.0071). No significant difference in survival was observed between gemcitabine and chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cases. Adverse events >grade 3 were observed in 25 of 87 (29%) of gemcitabine-treated and in 3 of 18 (17%) of chemoradiotherapy-treated patients. Gemcitabine monotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer could be as effective as previous chemoradiotherapy. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. [Acute pancreatitis: recent advances in understanding its pathophysiology].

    PubMed

    Telek, G; Fehér, J; Jakab, F; Claude, R

    2000-02-06

    This article reviews the recent changes in the understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology emphasizing results deriving from the more detailed comprehension of the local and systemic aspects of the inflammatory process. The authors briefly discuss those theories that have been influencing the basic philosophies of treatment efforts. The role of premature digestive enzyme activation as the principal determinant of the pathoetiology and mortality of this disease has been questioned lately, and the inflammatory explosion has been placed into the center of attention. Simultaneously with the enzyme activation, the pancreatitogenic noxious event rapidly induces the formation of oxygen derived free radicals, activation of the transcription factor NF kappa-B, with consequent citokine production, cellular adhesion molecule upregulation and leukocyte hyperstimulation. Numerous other mediator cascades are activated in parallel, the uncontrolled surge of proinflammatory stimuli, and activity of the effector cells lead to multiple organ failure in severe cases. A genetically determined catastrophe management program is set forth in the acinar cell with pancreatitis associated protein expression and activation of the apoptosis machinery. Therapeutic approaches based on these recent findings are briefly touched upon.

  20. [Establishment of a three-dimensional pancreas model for simulating surgical resection of pancreatic tail carcinoma using virtual-reality technique].

    PubMed

    Fang, Chi-Hua; Liu, Yu-Bin; Tang, Yun-Qiang; Pan, Jia-Hui; Peng, Feng-Ping; Lu, Chao-Min; Bao, Su-Su

    2008-06-01

    To assess the feasibility of visual-reality technique for simulating surgical resection of pancreatic tail carcinoma using a 3-dimensional pancreas model reconstructed on the basis of the CT data. The original image data of 64-slice spiral CT was obtained from a patient with pancreatic tail carcinoma. Using adaptive region growing algorithm, the serial CT images were segmented and automatically extracted for 3-dimensional reconstruction of the pancreas and the anatomically related structures with a self-designed program. The model was then processed with Freeform Modeling System for image modification and smoothing. With the assistance of GHST SDK and PHANTOM software systems, preoperative simulation of surgical resection of the carcinoma was performed on the basis of the established pancreatic model. The reconstructed 3-dimensional pancreatic model with the related structures clearly visualized the 3-dimensional structures of the pancreas, the pancreatic tail compromised by the carcinoma, and the adjacent organs, displaying also the distribution, courses and the anatomical relations of the ductal systems including the main pancreatic duct, abdominal aorta, portal vein system, and the biliary tract. During simulated surgery for pancreatic tail carcinoma resection, the GHOST SDK system allowed effective application of the virtual surgical instruments, and the use of PHANTOM software produced a surgical experience with high resemblance of that from an actual operation. The serial CT data-based reconstruction of 3-dimensional pancreas model and simulated operation on this model using virtual-reality technique has great potentials for application in individualized surgical planning and surgical risk assessment in cases of pancreatic tail carcinoma, and also facilitates clinical training of the surgeons.

  1. Combination treatment including targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; Wang, Anqiang; Zhang, Haohai; Yang, Xiaobo; Wan, Xueshuai; Lu, Xin; Sang, Xinting; Zhao, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Management of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the most lethal cancers worldwide, has presented a therapeutic challenge over past decades. Most patients with advanced HCC and a low possibility of surgical resection have limited treatment options and no alternative but to accept local or palliative treatment. In the new era of cancer therapy, increasing numbers of molecular targeted agents (MTAs) have been applied in the treatment of advanced HCC. However, mono-targeted therapy has shown disappointing outcomes in disease control, primarily because of tumor heterogeneity and complex cell signal transduction. Because incapacitation of a single target is insufficient for cancer suppression, combination treatment for targeted therapy has been proposed and experimentally tested in several clinical trials. In this article, we review research studies aimed to enhance the efficacy of targeted therapy for HCC through combination strategies. Combination treatments involving targeted therapy for advanced HCC are compared and discussed. PMID:27626176

  2. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    DiMagno, Matthew J; DiMagno, Eugene P

    2012-09-01

    We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis reported in 2011. Smoking increases the risk of nongallstone acute pancreatitis and the progression of acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90 000 United States Pharmacopeia units of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared with endoscopic treatment in patients advanced chronic pancreatitis with a dilated main duct ± pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with chronic pancreatitis but approximately 30% of patients have significant side effects. Patients with nongallstone-related acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis of any cause should cease smoking. Results of this year's investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in chronic pancreatitis.

  3. Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas presenting as diffuse pancreatic enlargement: Two case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yaping; Hu, Guilan; Ma, Yanru; Guo, Ning; Li, Fang

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignant tumor of exocrine pancreas. It is typically a well-marginated large solid mass arising in a certain aspect of the pancreas. Diffuse involvement of ACC in the pancreas is very rare, and may simulate pancreatitis in radiological findings. We report 2 cases of ACC presenting as diffuse enlargement of the pancreas due to tumor involvement without formation of a distinct mass. The patients consisted of a 41-year-old man with weight loss and a 77-year-old man who was asymptomatic. Computed tomography (CT) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT showed diffuse enlargement of the pancreas forming a sausage-like shape with homogenously increased FDG activity. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of the pancreatic lesion was performed. Histopathology results from the pancreas confirmed the diagnosis of pancreatic ACC. Because diffuse enlargement of the pancreas is a common imaging feature of pancreatitis, recognition of this rare morphologic pattern of ACC is important for radiological diagnosis of this tumor.

  4. A spindle cell anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma with rhabdoid features following curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tomoyuki; Amano, Hironobu; Hanada, Keiji; Okazaki, Akihisa; Yonehara, Shuji; Kuranishi, Fumito; Nakahara, Masahiro; Kuroda, Yoshinori; Noriyuki, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (ANPC) accounts for ~5% of all pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases. Due to its rarity, its clinical features and surgical outcomes remain to be clearly understood. A 74-year-old woman was admitted to Onomichi General Hospital (Onomichi, Japan) in April 2015 without any significant past medical history. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a 9.5×8.0 cm tumor in the body and tail of the pancreas. The patient developed acute abdominal pain 3 weeks later and the CT revealed massive abdominal bleeding caused by tumor rupture. The tumor increased in size and reached 12.0×10.0 cm in maximal diameter. The tumor doubling time was estimated to be 13 days. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT confirmed the absence of distant metastasis since FDG accumulation was detected only in the tumor lesion. Emergency distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. Histologically, the tumor was classified as a spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features. The patient succumbed to mortality 8 months following the surgery while undergoing systemic adjuvant chemotherapy for multiple liver metastases. ANPC is difficult to detect in the early stages due to its progressive nature and atypical radiological findings. Long-term survival can be achieved only by curative resection; therefore, surgical resection must be performed whenever possible, even if the chance of long-term survival following surgery is considered dismal. As the present case suggested, spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features is highly aggressive and curative-intent resection must not be delayed. PMID:27446572

  5. Cyclical Combination Chemotherapy for Advanced Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Canellos, George P.; Devita, Vincent T.; Gold, G. Lennard; Chabner, Bruce A.; Schein, Philip S.; Young, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with advanced metastatic breast cancer were treated with the combination of methotrexate 60 mg/M2 and 5-fluorouracil 700 mg/M2 intravenously on the first and eighth days, and cyclophosphamide 100 mg/M2 and prednisone 40 mg/M2 by mouth daily for the first 14 days of a 28-day cycle. The patients had had no previous chemotherapy or extensive radiotherapy and all but two had not responded to hormonal therapy or endocrine ablation. The major metastatic lesions were: lung (12 patients), liver (four patients), bone (four patients), soft tissue (three patients), nodes (two patients). Seventeen of the 25 patients (68%) responded to treatment with seven complete remissions; these included patients suffering metastatic lesions in the lung, nodes, and soft tissue. The overall median duration of response was nine months (range 6-26 months). Toxicity was primarily haematological, but the group received an average of at least 75% of their calculated dose for each monthly cycle. Haematological toxicity was most pronounced in patients with liver dysfunction and bone marrow involvement. Out of eight nonresponders seven died, with a median survival of six months. Only six of 17 responders died, and the median survival in this group will exceed thirteen months. There was no correlation between the length of the metastasis-free interval after previous treatment and subsequent response to chemotherapy. PMID:4818162

  6. Pancreatic carcinomas deposit laminin-5, preferably adhere to laminin-5, and migrate on the newly deposited basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Tani, T.; Lumme, A.; Linnala, A.; Kivilaakso, E.; Kiviluoto, T.; Burgeson, R. E.; Kangas, L.; Leivo, I.; Virtanen, I.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the adhesion mechanism of pancreatic carcinoma using in vitro adhesion and migration assays of stable cell lines and tumors grown from these cell lines in nude mice. We also compared the results with the expression profiles of laminins and their receptors in pancreatic carcinomas to evaluate the relevance of these mechanisms in vivo. All of the cell lines preferably adhered to laminin-5, irrespective of their capability to synthesize laminin-5. Cell migration was studied in the presence of hepatocyte growth factor, as it increased the speed of migration manyfold. Herbimycin A treatment and antibodies against the beta 1 and alpha 3 integrin subunits and laminin alpha 3 chain almost entirely blocked cell migration of the BxPC-3 cell line, whereas migration was nearly unaffected by RGD peptide and only moderately inhibited by antibody against the alpha 6 integrin subunit. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of wounded BxPC-3 cells suggested a rapid endocytosis of alpha 3 integrin subunit in the cells at the margin of the wound and a rapid, polarized rearrangement of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin. Especially HGF-treated cultures showed a prominent cytoplasmic reaction for laminin-5 at the margin of the wound. Xenografted cells formed tumors that produced and deposited the same laminin chains as the in vitro cultures. Frozen sections of human pancreatic carcinomas showed reactivity for laminin chains suggestive for expression of laminin-1 and laminin-5. Both xenografted tumors and human pancreatic carcinomas also showed stromal reactivity for laminin-5. Electron microscopy of the human tumors suggested that this was due to an abundant reduplication the basement-membrane-like material around the nests of malignant cells. Our results suggest that pancreatic carcinomas synthesize and deposit laminin-5 in the basement membrane in an abnormal manner. Invading cells adhere to this newly produced basement membrane and migrate on it by using the alpha 3 beta 1

  7. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-10

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  8. SPARC gene variants predict clinical outcome in locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Arqueros, Cristina; Salazar, Juliana; Arranz, M J; Sebio, Ana; Mora, Josefina; Sullivan, Ivana; Tobeña, María; Martín-Richard, Marta; Barnadas, Agustí; Baiget, Montserrat; Páez, David

    2017-08-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a glycoprotein of the extracellular matrix whose expression can be altered in malignant pancreatic cells and in the adjacent stromal fibroblasts. We evaluated the possible role of SPARC gene variants as prognostic markers for locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer. We analyzed eight tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (TagSNPs) in the SPARC gene in 74 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated with chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy. TagSNPs were chosen using the HapMap genome browser and Haploview software 4.2 based on two predefined criteria: (1) coefficient cutoff of 0.80 and (2) minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 0.10. Univariate analyses revealed significant associations between four SNPs (rs17718347, rs2347128, rs3210714, and rs967527) and PFS. The rs3210714 genetic variant was also associated with OS. In the multivariate analyses, rs17718347 (HR 0.4; 95% CI 0.2-0.8; p = 0.013) and rs2347128 (HR 0.5; 95% CI 0.3-0.9; p = 0.049) remained statistically associated with PFS. In addition, patients harboring the T-A-G haplotype (rs17718347, rs1978707, rs2347128) had a better PFS (p = 0.002). Our findings suggest that SPARC polymorphisms may be useful in predicting outcome in patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer.

  9. Progress in systemic therapy of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin-Lei; Qin, Shu-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Primary liver cancer, mainly consisting of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is one of common malignancies worldwide, and prevalent among the Chinese population. A diagnosis of early stage HCC has proven to be very difficult because of its insidious feature in onset and development. At the time of diagnosis, most HCC cases are locally advanced and/or distant metastatic, which results in difficulty to be treated and poor prognosis. For advanced HCC, systemic therapy is frequently adopted as an important palliative method. In recent years, clinical studies and observations have often reported about systemic anti-cancer therapy of advanced HCC, including molecular target therapy, systemic chemotherapy and immunotherapy. In this article, we review these treatment modalities to provide a reference for clinicians. PMID:27547002

  10. Long-term outcomes and prognostic factors in 78 Japanese patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a single-center retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lingaku; Igarashi, Hisato; Fujimori, Nao; Hijioka, Masayuki; Kawabe, Ken; Oda, Yoshinao; Jensen, Robert T.; Ito, Tetsuhide

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite an increase in the number of Japanese patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, long-term outcomes and prognostic factors, especially for those with advanced disease, remain unclear. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 78 patients with unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms treated at our hospital from January 1987 to March 2015. Survival analyses were performed using Kaplan–Meier methods. Prognostic significance of several clinicopathological factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses using a Cox regression model. Results Median overall survivals of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (n = 64) and pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (n = 14) were 83.7 and 9.1 months, respectively (hazard ratio: 0.02, 95% confidence interval: 0.01–0.08, P < 0.001). Although no significant differences were observed using a Ki-67 cut-off value of 2% (hazard ratio: 0.46, 95% confidence interval: 0.16–1.13, P = 0.0989), a Ki-67 cut-off of 10% was a significant predictor in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (hazard ratio: 9.95, 95% confidence interval, 3.01–32.97, P < 0.001). Treatment after the advent of targeted therapy (hazard ratio: 0.07, 95% confidence interval: 0.03–0.19, P < 0.001) and the presence of bone metastases (hazard ratio: 4.38, 95% confidence interval: 1.42–11.29, P = 0.013) were significant prognostic factors in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor evaluated by univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis also revealed that a Ki-67 index ≥10% (hazard ratio: 38.8, 95% confidence interval: 8.42–226.62, P < 0.001), approval of targeted therapy (hazard ratio: 0.02, 95% confidence interval: 0.00–0.11, P < 0.001) and bone metastases (hazard ratio: 5.56, 95% confidence interval: 1.10–24.00, P = 0.039) were independent prognostic factors. Conclusions We elucidated the long-term outcomes and prognostic factors in Japanese patients with advanced pancreatic

  11. Secretion of neurotensin from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma cell line (QGP-1N).

    PubMed

    Tateishi, K; Funakoshi, A; Kitayama, N; Matsuoka, Y

    1993-12-10

    Effects of various secretagogues on secretion of neurotensin from a pancreatic islet cell carcinoma cell line (QGP-1N) were examined. Carbachol stimulated secretion of neurotensin concentration-dependently in the range of 10(-6) - 10(-4) M. The neurotensin secretion stimulated with 10(-5) M carbachol was completely inhibited by atropine at 10(-5) M. Phorbol ester and calcium ionophore (A23187) stimulated secretion of neurotensin. The removal of extracellular Ca2+ suppressed the secretion through the stimulation with 10(-5) M carbachol. Fluoride, an activator of guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein, stimulated secretion of neurotensin. Neurotensin released into culture medium through stimulation with carbachol coeluted with neurotensin 1-13 on a gel-chromatography. Our results suggest that secretion of neurotensin from QGP-1N cells is mainly regulated by acetylcholine through muscarinic receptors coupled to G protein and that an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and protein kinase C play an important role in stimulus-secretion coupling.

  12. Targeted Therapies Provide Treatment Options for Poorly Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gilabert, Marine; Rho, Young Soo; Kavan, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Poorly differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PD pNECs) is a rare disease that has a poor prognosis and is treated with systemic chemotherapy as the standard of care. We present 6 cases of chemo-naïve patients diagnosed with PD pNECs who refused systemic chemotherapy and received targeted therapies with sunitinib (37.5 mg/day, 5 patients) or the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus (10 mg/day, 1 patient) as the first-line treatment. We evaluated the drugs' toxicities and survival. The median age of the patients was 55 years (4 males, 2 females, functioning tumor in 1 of 6 patients). The median of the Ki67 index was 45% (range 20-80). Targeted therapies were combined with somatostatin analogues in 4 of 6 patients (30 mg Sandostatine LAR monthly). Toxicities (acute and late) were manageable and no toxicities necessitated cessation of treatment. All patients had progression-free survival during the 15-month treatment and an overall survival of more than 2 years after diagnosis. Even though this is a small cohort of selected patients, we conclude that sunitinib or everolimus are both feasible and safe and have encouraging results of efficacy as first-line therapies for PD pNEC.

  13. Overexpression and clinical significance of MYC-associated zinc finger protein in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaonian; Luo, Wei; Liang, Wenjin; Tang, Fen; Bei, Chunhua; Ren, Yuan; Qin, Linyuan; Tan, Chao; Zhang, Ying; Tan, Shengkui

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the expression and clinical significance of MYC-associated zinc finger protein (MAZ) in pancreatic carcinoma (PC), and the biological functions of MAZ in PC cells. MAZ expression was detected in 57 PC tissues and 41 paired adjacent nontumor tissues by immunohistochemistry. Compared to the expression in adjacent nontumor tissues, MAZ was significantly higher expressed in PC tissues (P<0.0001). In addition, MAZ expression had a significant correlation with certain clinical characteristics of PC patients, such as age, tumor diameter, tumor number, and the serum level of CA199 (P<0.05). The survival analysis showed that the survival time of PC patients with high expression of MAZ was significantly lower than patients with low expression of MAZ (P=0.0365). After MAZ was knocked down in PANC-1 cells by RNA interference, the cells’ ability to proliferate, invade, and migrate was decreased significantly (P<0.01). Moreover, MAZ expression was found to be associated with Ki-67, a cell proliferation marker, in PC tissues, further supporting the idea that MAZ promotes PC cell proliferation. Our study clarifies an oncogenic role of MAZ in pathogenesis of PC and provides MAZ as a biomarker in the treatment and prognosis of PC. PMID:28008270

  14. Identification and characterization of poorly differentiated invasive carcinomas in a mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Karen E; Quick, Marsha L; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Hanahan, Douglas; Joyce, Johanna A

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) are a relatively rare but clinically challenging tumor type. In particular, high grade, poorly-differentiated PanNETs have the worst patient prognosis, and the underlying mechanisms of disease are poorly understood. In this study we have identified and characterized a previously undescribed class of poorly differentiated PanNETs in the RIP1-Tag2 mouse model. We found that while the majority of tumors in the RIP1-Tag2 model are well-differentiated insulinomas, a subset of tumors had lost multiple markers of beta-cell differentiation and were highly invasive, leading us to term them poorly differentiated invasive carcinomas (PDICs). In addition, we found that these tumors exhibited a high mitotic index, resembling poorly differentiated (PD)-PanNETs in human patients. Interestingly, we identified expression of Id1, an inhibitor of DNA binding gene, and a regulator of differentiation, specifically in PDIC tumor cells by histological analysis. The identification of PDICs in this mouse model provides a unique opportunity to study the pathology and molecular characteristics of PD-PanNETs.

  15. Identification and Characterization of Poorly Differentiated Invasive Carcinomas in a Mouse Model of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Karen E.; Quick, Marsha L.; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Hanahan, Douglas; Joyce, Johanna A.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) are a relatively rare but clinically challenging tumor type. In particular, high grade, poorly-differentiated PanNETs have the worst patient prognosis, and the underlying mechanisms of disease are poorly understood. In this study we have identified and characterized a previously undescribed class of poorly differentiated PanNETs in the RIP1-Tag2 mouse model. We found that while the majority of tumors in the RIP1-Tag2 model are well-differentiated insulinomas, a subset of tumors had lost multiple markers of beta-cell differentiation and were highly invasive, leading us to term them poorly differentiated invasive carcinomas (PDICs). In addition, we found that these tumors exhibited a high mitotic index, resembling poorly differentiated (PD)-PanNETs in human patients. Interestingly, we identified expression of Id1, an inhibitor of DNA binding gene, and a regulator of differentiation, specifically in PDIC tumor cells by histological analysis. The identification of PDICs in this mouse model provides a unique opportunity to study the pathology and molecular characteristics of PD-PanNETs. PMID:23691228

  16. Bitter melon juice activates cellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase causing apoptotic death of human pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manjinder; Deep, Gagan; Jain, Anil K; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Chapla; Wempe, Michael F; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-07-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer is extremely poor, suggesting critical needs for additional drugs to improve disease outcome. In this study, we examined efficacy and associated mechanism of a novel agent bitter melon juice (BMJ) against pancreatic carcinoma cells both in culture and nude mice. BMJ anticancer efficacy was analyzed in human pancreatic carcinoma BxPC-3, MiaPaCa-2, AsPC-1 and Capan-2 cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, cell death enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and annexin/propidium iodide assays. BMJ effect on apoptosis regulators was assessed by immunoblotting. In vivo BMJ efficacy was evaluated against MiaPaCa-2 tumors in nude mice, and xenograft was analyzed for biomarkers by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results showed that BMJ (2-5% v/v) decreases cell viability in all four pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing strong apoptotic death. At molecular level, BMJ caused caspases activation, altered expression of Bcl-2 family members and cytochrome-c release into the cytosol. Additionally, BMJ decreased survivin and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein but increased p21, CHOP and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38) levels. Importantly, BMJ activated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a biomarker for cellular energy status, and an AMPK inhibitor (Compound C) reversed BMJ-induced caspase-3 activation suggesting activated AMPK involvement in BMJ-induced apoptosis. In vivo, oral administration of lyophilized BMJ (5mg in 100 µl water/day/mouse) for 6 weeks inhibited MiaPaCa-2 tumor xenograft growth by 60% (P < 0.01) without noticeable toxicity in nude mice. IHC analyses of MiaPaCa-2 xenografts showed that BMJ also inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and activates AMPK in vivo. Overall, BMJ exerts strong anticancer efficacy against human pancreatic carcinoma cells, both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting its clinical

  17. Combination therapy of gemcitabine or oral S-1 with the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Nagakawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Minako; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Kyo, Bunso; Suzuki, Satoru; Matsudo, Takaaki; Itoi, Takao; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Aoki, Tatsuya

    2012-04-01

    We previously reported that the administration of bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors inhibited angiogenesis in the host, resulting in tumor growth inhibition. In light of these results, we compared the effect of bevacizumab/gemcitabine/S-1 combination therapy vs. bevacizumab monotherapy. The QGP-1 pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma cell line and the BxPC-3 ductal cell carcinoma cell line were transplanted into the subcutaneous tissue of mice, and the mice were treated for 3 weeks with bevacizumab [50 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) twice weekly], gemcitabine (240 mg/kg i.p. once weekly) and S-1 (10 mg/kg orally five times weekly). The antitumor effect and side effects were evaluated by measuring the tumor volume and weight and by changes in body weight, respectively. The tumor volume became smaller (from the maximum volume) in the group treated with bevacizumab, gemcitabine and S-1 (BGS) and the group treated with bevacizumab and gemcitabine (BG). A significant difference was noted in the tumor weight between the BG group and the group treated with bevacizumab alone. A relatively significant decrease in the body weight was observed in the BGS and BG groups. We conclude that gemcitabine is appropriate as a drug used in combination with bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  18. Combination therapy of gemcitabine or oral S-1 with the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KASUYA, KAZUHIKO; NAGAKAWA, YUICHI; SUZUKI, MINAKO; SUZUKI, YOSHIAKI; KYO, BUNSO; SUZUKI, SATORU; MATSUDO, TAKAAKI; ITOI, TAKAO; TSUCHIDA, AKIHIKO; AOKI, TATSUYA

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that the administration of bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors inhibited angiogenesis in the host, resulting in tumor growth inhibition. In light of these results, we compared the effect of bevacizumab/gemcitabine/S-1 combination therapy vs. bevacizumab monotherapy. The QGP-1 pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma cell line and the BxPC-3 ductal cell carcinoma cell line were transplanted into the subcutaneous tissue of mice, and the mice were treated for 3 weeks with bevacizumab [50 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) twice weekly], gemcitabine (240 mg/kg i.p. once weekly) and S-1 (10 mg/kg orally five times weekly). The antitumor effect and side effects were evaluated by measuring the tumor volume and weight and by changes in body weight, respectively. The tumor volume became smaller (from the maximum volume) in the group treated with bevacizumab, gemcitabine and S-1 (BGS) and the group treated with bevacizumab and gemcitabine (BG). A significant difference was noted in the tumor weight between the BG group and the group treated with bevacizumab alone. A relatively significant decrease in the body weight was observed in the BGS and BG groups. We conclude that gemcitabine is appropriate as a drug used in combination with bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:22969935

  19. [Efficacy of whole body gamma-knife radiotherapy combined with thermochemotherapy on locally advanced pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Ping; Nie, Qing; Kang, Jing-Bo; Wang, Bin; Cai, Chang-Lan; Li, Jian-Guo; Qi, Wen-Jie

    2008-11-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are major therapies for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This study was to evaluate the efficacy of three-dimensional conformal gamma-knife radiotherapy combined with thermochemotherapy on locally advanced pancreatic cancer. From December 2001 to January 2006, 75 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer were divided into radiotherapy group (37 patients) and combination group (38 patients). All patients received gamma-knife radiotherapy using Stereotactic Radiotherapy Gamma Rays System, with iso-dose curves of 50%-60%, tumor encircling dose of 3.0-4.5 Gy per fraction, 8-11 fractions. The patients in combination group received simultaneous thermotherapy at 41.5-43.5 celsius (1 h/fraction, twice a week for 6 times), and chemotherapy with venous administration of tegafur (0.5-1.0 g) and calcium folinate (CF, 0.2 g) for 4-6 times, or venous administration of gemcitabine (0.6-1.0 g/m2) on Days 1 and 8 and cisplatin (DDP) (20-30 mg/m2) on Days 1-3, repeated every 28 days for 3-6 cycles. At 3 months after treatment, the total response (complete remission and partial remission) rate was 70.7% (53/75); the response rate was 73.7% in combination group and 67.5% in radiotherapy group. The 1-year survival rate was 48.3%, and the 2-year survival rate was 22.1%. The 1-and 2-year survival rates were 51.2% and 26.5% in combination group, and 45.2% and 17.6% in radiotherapy group. No serious complications, such as perforation, bleeding and high fever, were seen during treatment and follow-up. 3-D conformal gamma-knife radiotherapy combined with thermochemotherapy is well tolerated and is relatively effective for most patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  20. Perioperative high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Waniczek, Dariusz; Piecuch, Jerzy; Mikusek, Wojciech; Arendt, Jerzy; Białas, Brygida

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to present an original technique of catheter implantation for perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy in patients after palliative operations of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic tumors and to estimate the influence of perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy on pain relief in terminal pancreatic cancer patients. Material and methods Eight patients with pancreatic tumors located in the head of pancreas underwent palliative operations with the use of HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy. All patients qualified for surgery reported pain of high intensity and had received narcotic painkillers prior to operation. During the last phase of the surgery, the Nucletron® catheters were implanted in patients to prepare them for later perioperative brachytherapy. Since the 6th day after surgery HDR brachytherapy was performed. Before each brachytherapy fraction the location of implants were checked using fluoroscopy. A fractional dose was 5 Gy and a total dose was 20 Gy in the area of radiation. A comparative study of two groups of patients (with and without brachytherapy) with stage III pancreatic cancer according to the TNM scale was taken in consideration. Results and Conclusions The authors claim that the modification of catheter implantation using specially designed cannula, facilitates the process of inserting the catheter into the tumor, shortens the time needed for the procedure, and reduces the risk of complications. Mean survival time was 5.7 months. In the group of performed brachytherapy, the mean survival time was 6.7 months, while in the group of no brachytherapy performed – 4.4 months. In the group of brachytherapy, only one patient increased the dose of painkillers in the last month of his life. Remaining patients took constant doses of medicines. Perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy could be considered as a practical application of adjuvant therapy for pain relief in patients with an advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:27895674

  1. Perioperative high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Waniczek, Dariusz; Piecuch, Jerzy; Rudzki, Marek; Mikusek, Wojciech; Arendt, Jerzy; Białas, Brygida

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to present an original technique of catheter implantation for perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy in patients after palliative operations of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic tumors and to estimate the influence of perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy on pain relief in terminal pancreatic cancer patients. Eight patients with pancreatic tumors located in the head of pancreas underwent palliative operations with the use of HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy. All patients qualified for surgery reported pain of high intensity and had received narcotic painkillers prior to operation. During the last phase of the surgery, the Nucletron(®) catheters were implanted in patients to prepare them for later perioperative brachytherapy. Since the 6(th) day after surgery HDR brachytherapy was performed. Before each brachytherapy fraction the location of implants were checked using fluoroscopy. A fractional dose was 5 Gy and a total dose was 20 Gy in the area of radiation. A comparative study of two groups of patients (with and without brachytherapy) with stage III pancreatic cancer according to the TNM scale was taken in consideration. The authors claim that the modification of catheter implantation using specially designed cannula, facilitates the process of inserting the catheter into the tumor, shortens the time needed for the procedure, and reduces the risk of complications. Mean survival time was 5.7 months. In the group of performed brachytherapy, the mean survival time was 6.7 months, while in the group of no brachytherapy performed - 4.4 months. In the group of brachytherapy, only one patient increased the dose of painkillers in the last month of his life. Remaining patients took constant doses of medicines. Perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy could be considered as a practical application of adjuvant therapy for pain relief in patients with an advanced pancreatic cancer.

  2. Smad4 inhibits cell migration via suppression of JNK activity in human pancreatic carcinoma PANC-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XUEYING; CAO, JUNXIA; PEI, YUJUN; ZHANG, JIYAN; WANG, QINGYANG

    2016-01-01

    Smad4 is a common Smad and is a key downstream regulator of the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway, in which Smad4 often acts as a potent tumor suppressor and functions in a highly context-dependent manner, particularly in pancreatic cancer. However, little is known regarding whether Smad4 regulates other signaling pathways involved in pancreatic cancer. The present study demonstrated that Smad4 downregulates c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity using a Smad4 loss-of-function or gain-of-function analysis. Additionally, stable overexpression of Smad4 clearly affected the migration of human pancreatic epithelioid carcinoma PANC-1 cells, but did not affect cell growth. In addition, the present study revealed that upregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 is required for the reduction of JNK activity by Smad4, leading to a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor expression and inhibiting cell migration. Overall, the present findings indicate that Smad4 may suppress JNK activation and inhibit the tumor characteristics of pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:27123137

  3. Synergistic combination of valproic acid and oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV as a potential therapy against cervical and pancreatic carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Junwei; Bonifati, Serena; Hristov, Georgi; Marttila, Tiina; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Stanzel, Sven; Schnölzer, Martina; Mougin, Christiane; Aprahamian, Marc; Grekova, Svitlana P; Raykov, Zahari; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The rat parvovirus H-1PV has oncolytic and tumour-suppressive properties potentially exploitable in cancer therapy. This possibility is being explored and results are encouraging, but it is necessary to improve the oncotoxicity of the virus. Here we show that this can be achieved by co-treating cancer cells with H-1PV and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) such as valproic acid (VPA). We demonstrate that these agents act synergistically to kill a range of human cervical carcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. Strikingly, in rat and mouse xenograft models, H-1PV/VPA co-treatment strongly inhibits tumour growth promoting complete tumour remission in all co-treated animals. At the molecular level, we found acetylation of the parvovirus nonstructural protein NS1 at residues K85 and K257 to modulate NS1-mediated transcription and cytotoxicity, both of which are enhanced by VPA treatment. These results warrant clinical evaluation of H-1PV/VPA co-treatment against cervical and pancreatic ductal carcinomas.

  4. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Su Jin; Chang, Suhwan; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho; Chung, Young-Hwa; Park, Young Woo; Koh, Sang Seok

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31{sup +} vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models.

  5. Synergistic combination of valproic acid and oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV as a potential therapy against cervical and pancreatic carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junwei; Bonifati, Serena; Hristov, Georgi; Marttila, Tiina; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Stanzel, Sven; Schnölzer, Martina; Mougin, Christiane; Aprahamian, Marc; Grekova, Svitlana P; Raykov, Zahari; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The rat parvovirus H-1PV has oncolytic and tumour-suppressive properties potentially exploitable in cancer therapy. This possibility is being explored and results are encouraging, but it is necessary to improve the oncotoxicity of the virus. Here we show that this can be achieved by co-treating cancer cells with H-1PV and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) such as valproic acid (VPA). We demonstrate that these agents act synergistically to kill a range of human cervical carcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. Strikingly, in rat and mouse xenograft models, H-1PV/VPA co-treatment strongly inhibits tumour growth promoting complete tumour remission in all co-treated animals. At the molecular level, we found acetylation of the parvovirus nonstructural protein NS1 at residues K85 and K257 to modulate NS1-mediated transcription and cytotoxicity, both of which are enhanced by VPA treatment. These results warrant clinical evaluation of H-1PV/VPA co-treatment against cervical and pancreatic ductal carcinomas. PMID:24092664

  6. Anticancer effects of an oncolytic parvovirus combined with non-conventional therapeutics on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Raykov, Z; Georgieva, P B; Angelova, A; Galabov, A S; Rommelaere, J

    2009-01-01

    Standard therapies such as surgery and chemotherapy offer only minimal improvement in pancreatic cancer. However, the viruses killing cancer cells and substances like some antibiotics and phytoalexins with anticancer potential may represent a candidate non-conventional mean of cancer treatment in the future. In this study, the effect of infection with oncolytic H-1 parvovirus (H-1PV) combined with antibiotic norfloxacin (NFX) or phytoalexin resveratrol on the survival of cell lines Panc-1 and BxPC3 derived from human pancreatic carcinoma was tested. Whereas H-1PV with NFX exerted a synergistic effect, H-1PV with resveratrol resulted in an additive effect only. All the effects were partial, but they were more pronounced in Panc-1 compared to BxPC3 cells.

  7. Vismodegib: in locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2012-07-30

    Vismodegib is the first Hedgehog pathway inhibitor to be approved in the US, where it is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or with locally advanced BCC that has recurred following surgery or who are not candidates for surgery, and who are not candidates for radiation. Vismodegib selectively and potently inhibits the Hedgehog signalling pathway by binding to Smoothened, thereby inhibiting the activation of Hedgehog target genes. Oral vismodegib was effective in the treatment of patients with locally advanced (n = 63) or metastatic (n = 33) BCC, according to the results of an ongoing, noncomparative, multinational, pivotal, phase II trial (ERIVANCE BCC). In this trial (using a clinical cutoff date of 26 November 2010), the independent review facility overall response rate was 42.9% in patients with locally advanced BCC and 30.3% in patients with metastatic BCC. In both patients with locally advanced BCC and those with metastatic BCC, the median duration of response was 7.6 months and median progression-free survival was 9.5 months. Oral vismodegib had an acceptable tolerability profile in patients with advanced BCC.

  8. Liver abscess in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma after sorafenib treatment.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Kak; Jung, Young Kul; Yoon, Hyun Hwa; Kwon, Oh Sang; Kim, Yun Soo; Choi, Duck Joo; Kim, Ju Hyun

    2014-01-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a critical global health issue and the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The majority of patients who present HCC are already at an advanced stage and their tumors are unresectable. Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and was recently introduced as a therapy for advanced HCC. Furthermore, studies have shown that oral sorafenib has beneficial effects on survival. However, many patients experience diverse side effects, and some of these are severe. Liver abscess development has not been previously documented to be associated with sorafenib administration in HCC. Here, we report the case of a HCC patient that developed a liver abscess while being treated with sorafenib.

  9. Contemporary Management of Borderline Resectable and Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Andrew; Cardona, Kenneth; Alese, Olatunji B.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Kooby, David; Landry, Jerome; El-Rayes, Bassel F.

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas remains a highly lethal disease, with less than 5% survival at 5 years. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) and locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) account for approximately 30% of newly diagnosed cases of PC. The objective of BRPC therapy is to downstage the tumor to allow resection; the objective of LAPC therapy is to control disease and improve survival. There is no consensus on the definitions of BRPC and LAPC, which leads to major limitations in designing clinical trials and evaluating their results. A multimodality approach is always needed to ensure proper utilization and timing of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery in the management of this disease. Combination chemotherapy regimens (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, and gemcitabine [FOLFIRINOX] and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel) have improved overall survival in metastatic disease. The role of combination chemotherapy regimens in BRPC and LAPC is an area of active investigation. There is no consensus on the dose, modality, and role of radiation therapy in the treatment of BRPC and LAPC. This article reviews the literature and highlights the areas of controversy regarding management of BRPC and LAPC. Implications for Practice: Pancreatic cancer is one of the worst cancers with regard to survival, even at early stages of the disease. This review evaluates all the evidence for the stages in which the cancer is not primarily resectable with surgery, known as borderline resectable or locally advanced unresectable. Recently, advancements in radiation techniques and use of better combination chemotherapies have improved survival and tolerance. There is no consensus on description of stages or treatment sequences (chemotherapy, chemoradiation, radiation), nor on the best chemotherapy regimen. The evidence behind the treatment paradigm for these stages of pancreatic cancer is summarized. PMID:26834159

  10. Concurrent chemoradiation in locally advanced carcinoma cervix patients.

    PubMed

    Negi, R R; Gupta, Manish; Kumar, Muninder; Gupta, M K; Seam, R; Rastogi, Madhup

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of concurrent chemo radiation in locally advanced carcinoma cervix patients in our clinical setting. From Sept. 1st 2005 to Aug. 31st 2006, 102 patients of carcinoma cervix belonging to stage IIA to IV A were enrolled in the study. External beam radiation therapy was administered using Cobalt 60 teletherapy machine. Cisplatinum (40 mg/m 2) and 5 Fluorouracil (500 mg/m 2 ) continuous infusions with radiotherapy on D2-D5 in first and last 5 # of radiation therapy were administered. Response to treatment and toxicities were monitored and analyzed in 102 patients (50 study group and 52 control group). All 102 patients completed treatment. Out of 50 patients in the study group, 30, 10 and 4 patients had complete, partial and progressive disease, respectively. While out of 52 patients in the control group, 26 had complete and 12 showed partial response. No difference in overall renal, hematological and cutaneous toxicity was seen between two groups. This study did not show any benefit of concurrent chemo radiation as compared to radiotherapy alone in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. This could be due to more bulk of tumor stage per stage, poor nutritional status, less number of patients in both arms, not enough to pick up statistically significant small difference in outcome.

  11. Co-expression of CD133, CD44v6 and human tissue factor is associated with metastasis and poor prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Li, Zhonghu; Jiang, Peng; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Yujun; Jiang, Yan; He, Yu; Li, Xiaowu

    2014-08-01

    The metastasis-related molecules CD133, CD44v6 and human tissue factor (TF) have been shown to be associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. This study aimed to determine whether co-expression of these three molecules was associated with metastasis and overall prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma. We analyzed the expression profiles of these three molecules by immunohistochemistry and evaluated the relationship of their expression profiles with metastasis and prognosis in 109 pancreatic carcinomas. The results showed that the expression levels of CD133, CD44v6 and TF were increased in pancreatic carcinoma. Co-expression of CD133, CD44v6 and TF (tri-expression) was also detected in pancreatic carcinoma. Clinical analysis showed that individual expression of CD133, CD44v6 or TF was associated with vessel invasion, lymph node metastasis and liver metastasis, while tri-expression was associated with lymph node metastasis. Survival analysis showed that patients with co-expression of CD133 and TF or tri-expression had lower and the lowest overall survival rates, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that T-factor, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, and individual levels or tri-expression of CD133, CD44v6 and TF were survival risk factors. Multivariate analysis showed that tri-expression of CD133, CD44v6 and TF was an independent predictor of survival. These results suggest that overexpression of CD133, CD44v6 and TF is associated with pancreatic carcinoma metastasis. Tri-expression of these three molecules may be a useful predictor for pancreatic carcinoma prognosis.

  12. Insulin resistance is associated with the aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dugnani, Erica; Balzano, Gianpaolo; Pasquale, Valentina; Scavini, Marina; Aleotti, Francesca; Liberati, Daniela; Di Terlizzi, Gaetano; Gandolfi, Alessandra; Petrella, Giovanna; Reni, Michele; Doglioni, Claudio; Bosi, Emanuele; Falconi, Massimo; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2016-12-01

    To study whether insulin resistance accelerates the development and/or the progression of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we hypothesized that patients with insulin resistance, compared with those without insulin resistance, show: (1) a younger age and more advanced PDAC stage at diagnosis and (2) a shorter disease-free and overall survival after PDAC diagnosis. Prospective observational study of patients admitted to a referral center for pancreatic disease. Insulin resistance was defined as a HOMA-IR value greater than the 66th percentile value of the patients included in this study. Survival was estimated according to Kaplan-Meier and by Cox regression. Of 296 patients with PDAC, 99 (33 %) met criteria for being classified as insulin resistant at diagnosis. Median follow-up time after diagnosis was 5.27 ± 0.23 years. Patients with insulin resistance received a diagnosis of PDAC at a similar age compared to patients without insulin resistance (67.1 ± 9 vs. 66.8 ± 10 years, p = 0.68), but were more likely to have a cancer stage ≥3 (23.2 vs. 14.2 %, p = 0.053) and a residual disease after surgery (R1 56.4 vs. 38 %; p = 0.007). The median overall survival was 1.3 ± 0.14 and 1.79 ± 0.11 years for the patients with and without insulin resistance, respectively (p = 0.016). Results did not change when patients with diabetes at PDAC diagnosis were excluded from the analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that insulin resistance was independently associated with overall survival. Insulin resistance is associated with the aggressiveness of PDAC.

  13. Dendritic cell immunotherapy combined with gemcitabine chemotherapy enhances survival in a murine model of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ghansah, Tomar; Vohra, Nasreen; Kinney, Kathleen; Weber, Amy; Kodumudi, Krithika; Springett, Gregory; Sarnaik, Amod A; Pilon-Thomas, Shari

    2013-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an extremely aggressive malignancy with a dismal prognosis. Cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice have multiple immunoregulatory subsets including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) that may limit the effectiveness of anti-tumor immunotherapies for pancreatic cancer. It is possible that modulating these subsets will enhance anti-tumor immunity. The goal of this study was to explore depletion of immunoregulatory cells to enhance dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy in a murine model of pancreatic cancer. Flow cytometry results showed an increase in both Tregs and MDSC in untreated pancreatic cancer-bearing mice compared with control. Elimination of Tregs alone or in combination with DC-based vaccination had no effect on pancreatic tumor growth or survival. Gemcitabine (Gem) is a chemotherapeutic drug routinely used for the treatment for pancreatic cancer patients. Treatment with Gem led to a significant decrease in MDSC percentages in the spleens of tumor-bearing mice, but did not enhance overall survival. However, combination therapy with DC vaccination followed by Gem treatment led to a significant delay in tumor growth and improved survival in pancreatic cancer-bearing mice. Increased MDSC were measured in the peripheral blood of patients with pancreatic cancer. Treatment with Gem also led to a decrease of this population in pancreatic cancer patients, suggesting that combination therapy with DC-based cancer vaccination and Gem may lead to improved treatments for patients with pancreatic cancer.

  14. Research of Recognition Method of Discrete Wavelet Feature Extraction and PNN Classification of Rats FT-IR Pancreatic Cancer Data.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chayan; Cao, Wenqing; Cheng, Cungui

    2014-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats' normal and abnormal pancreatic tissues are determined directly by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectroscopy method. In order to diagnose earlier stage of SD rats pancreatic cancer rate with FT-IR, a novel method of extraction of FT-IR feature using discrete wavelet transformation (DWT) analysis and classification with the probability neural network (PNN) was developed. The differences between normal pancreatic and abnormal samples were identified by PNN based on the indices of 4 feature variants. When error goal was 0.01, the total correct rates of pancreatic early carcinoma and advanced carcinoma were 98% and 100%, respectively. It was practical to apply PNN on the basis of ATR-FT-IR to identify abnormal tissues. The research result shows the feasibility of establishing the models with FT-IR-DWT-PNN method to identify normal pancreatic tissues, early carcinoma tissues, and advanced carcinoma tissues.

  15. Research of Recognition Method of Discrete Wavelet Feature Extraction and PNN Classification of Rats FT-IR Pancreatic Cancer Data

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Chayan; Cao, Wenqing; Cheng, Cungui

    2014-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats' normal and abnormal pancreatic tissues are determined directly by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectroscopy method. In order to diagnose earlier stage of SD rats pancreatic cancer rate with FT-IR, a novel method of extraction of FT-IR feature using discrete wavelet transformation (DWT) analysis and classification with the probability neural network (PNN) was developed. The differences between normal pancreatic and abnormal samples were identified by PNN based on the indices of 4 feature variants. When error goal was 0.01, the total correct rates of pancreatic early carcinoma and advanced carcinoma were 98% and 100%, respectively. It was practical to apply PNN on the basis of ATR-FT-IR to identify abnormal tissues. The research result shows the feasibility of establishing the models with FT-IR-DWT-PNN method to identify normal pancreatic tissues, early carcinoma tissues, and advanced carcinoma tissues. PMID:25548717

  16. Targeting EGFR and sonic hedgehog pathways for locally advanced eyelid and periocular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Vivian T; Merritt, Helen; Esmaeli, Bita

    2014-01-01

    For patients with metastatic or locally advanced eyelid and periocular carcinoma not amenable to surgical excision, targeted therapies have shown efficacy with better tolerability compared to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Overexpression of epithelial growth factor receptor was found in squamous cell carcinomas. Vismodegib targets the mutation in the hedgehog pathway identified in basal cell carcinoma and basal cell nevus syndrome. Targeted therapies provide a novel and potentially effective treatment alternative for patients with eyelid carcinoma not amendable for surgery, including those with metastatic, locally advanced disease, advanced age, and significant comorbidities. High cost, need for long-term treatment, and toxicity are relative limitations. PMID:25232546

  17. [A Case of Unresectable Advanced Rectal Cancer with a Pancreatic Tumor That Was Successfully Treated with FOLFIRINOX].

    PubMed

    Yabe, Nobushige; Murai, Shinji; Ozawa, Hiroki; Yokose, Takahiro; Oto, Ippei; Yoshikawa, Takahisa; Kitasato, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Hirotomo; Kojima, Kenji; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-11-01

    A 72-year-old man was admitted to our hospital department in September 2014 because of a positive fecal occult blood test.Colonoscopy showed a type 2 tumor in half of the AV 15 cm rectosigmoid colon.Histology of the biopsy indicated a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and the RAS gene test found wild type.On CT examination, there were multiple liver lung metastases and a 30mm diameter tumor with pancreatic duct extension to the pancreatic body.A PET-CT examination had a high SUVmax at the same site.Because of the location of the tumor EUS-FNA was not used.However, the possibility of pancreatic body cancer could not be denied after the CT examination.Treatment by radical resection was impossible because of the spread of the cancer so we selected chemotherapy.Undeniable pancreatic metastasis of rectal cancer, pancreatic cancer was used as a prognostic factor as double cancer of rectal cancer and pancreatic cancer, from that UGT1A1 test side effects appearance was a low-risk decision, was selected FOLFIRINOX in the treatment regimen.After 25 cycles, the pancreatic body tumor and liver metastases and also the primary tumor were reduced, the multiple lung metastases disappeared, and disease control was good.Side effects were diarrhea on the day of administration of irinotecan, but this was controllable by administering oral loperamide when starting the infusion.Grade 3 or more peripheral neuropathy has not developed, and this regimen is continuing.Pancreatic cancer is a solid cancer with a poor prognosis; if you do not reach the tissue diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic cancer, was a case in which no choice but to select a regimen to carcinoma of the prognostic.

  18. Role of the WWOX gene, encompassing fragile region FRA16D, in suppression of pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shunji; Semba, Shuho; Maeda, Naoko; Aqeilan, Rami I; Huebner, Kay; Yokozaki, Hiroshi

    2008-07-01

    The WW-domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene spans the common chromosomal fragile site FRA16D (16q23.2) and is believed to be a tumor suppressor in various human malignancies. We have previously shown frequent down-modulation of Wwox expression in pancreatic carcinoma (PC); however, biological function of Wwox in pancreatic duct carcinogenesis remains unknown. In PANC-1 (Wwox-negative) PC-derived cells, restoration of recombinant WWOX gene expression with adenoviral gene delivery (Ad-WWOX) effectively increased the number of cells with subG(1) DNA contents in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manners: Ad-WWOX infection up-regulated caspase-3 activity and reduced procaspase-3 and procaspase-8 levels. We also confirmed that restoration of WWOX gene suppressed cell growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. In addition, transduction of wild-type WWOX-expressing vector inhibited PANC-1 colony formation; however, substitution of Y33 of Wwox with arginine did not lead to inhibition of colony formation, suggesting the biological significance of the WW1 domain of Wwox for its tumor-suppressing activity. In PC tissue samples, abundant cytoplasmic Wwox expression was detected in the normal pancreatic duct epithelium, whereas Wwox expression was frequently reduced not only in a large fraction of PC but also in precancerous lesions in accord with the pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) grade, which was closely correlated with patients' poorer outcome. Interestingly, the existence of Wwox expression was associated with elevated mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (Smad4) protein levels in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that down-modulation of Wwox expression is an early event and may be associated with the down-regulation of Smad4 protein levels during pancreatic duct carcinogenesis.

  19. Effects of integrin-targeted photodynamic therapy on pancreatic carcinoma cell.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Ni, Qian-Wen; Yang, Shan-Ying; Qu, Chun-Ying; Zhao, Peng-Cheng; Zhang, Jian-Cheng; Xu, Lei-Ming

    2013-10-21

    To investigate the effects of photodynamic therapy with quantum dots-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) probe as photosensitizer on the proliferation and apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells. Construction of quantum dots-RGD probe as photosensitizer for integrin-targeted photodynamic therapy was accomplished. After cells were treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT), the proliferation of SW1990 cells were measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Morphologic changes, cell cycle retardance and apoptosis were observed under fluoroscope and flow cytometry. The expression of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1), protein kinase B (Akt) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The amount of reactive oxygen species were also evaluated by fluorescence probe. The photodynamic therapy with quantum dots-RGD probe as photosensitizer significantly inhibited cell proliferation (P < 0.01). Apoptotic cells and morphologic changes could be found under optical microscope. The FCM revealed PDT group had more significant cell apoptosis rate compared to control cells (F = 130.617, P < 0.01) and cell cycle G0/G1 and S retardance (P < 0.05) compared to control cells. The expression of Mcl-1 and Akt mRNA were down-regulated, while expression of TRAIL mRNA was up-regulated after cells treated with PDT. PDT group had more significant number of cells producing reactive oxygen species compared to control cells (F = 3262.559, P < 0.01). The photodynamic therapy with quantum dots-RGD probe as photosensitizer significantly inhibits cell proliferation and increases apoptosis in SW1990 cells.

  20. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  1. Differentiation of pancreatic carcinoma and mass-forming focal pancreatitis: qualitative and quantitative assessment by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI combined with diffusion-weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Li; Liu, Huan-huan; Zhang, Cai-yuan; Li, Xiao-ming; Lu, Jian-ping; Wang, Deng-bin

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation between pancreatic carcinoma (PC) and mass-forming focal pancreatitis (FP) is invariably difficult. For the differential diagnosis, we qualitatively and quantitatively assessed the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in PC and FP in the present study. This study included 32 PC and 18 FP patients with histological confirmation who underwent DCE-MRI and DWI. The time-signal intensity curve (TIC) of PC and FP were classified into 5 types according to the time of reaching the peak, namely, type I, II, III, IV, and V, respectively, and two subtypes, namely, subtype-a (washout type) and subtype-b (plateau type) according to the part of the TIC profile after the peak. Moreover, the mean and relative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value between PC and FP on DWI were compared. The type V TIC was only recognized in PC group (P < 0.01). Type IV b were more frequently observed in PC (P = 0.036), while type- IIa (P < 0.01), type- Ia (P = 0.037) in FP. We also found a significant difference in the mean and relative ADC value between PC and FP. The combined image set of DCE-MRI and DWI yielded an excellent sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy (96.9%, 94.4%, and 96.0%). The TIC of DCE-MRI and ADC value of DWI for pancreatic mass were found to provide reliable information in differentiating PC from FP, and the combination of DCE-MRI and DWI can achieve a higher sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27661003

  2. A Multicenter Phase II Trial of S-1 With Concurrent Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Masafumi; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ito, Yoshinori; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagase, Michitaka; Yamao, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Furuse, Junji; Sato, Keiko; Sato, Tosiya; Okusaka, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. Results: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of {>=}100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

  3. [Conversion Surgery for Initially Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Following Gemcitabine plus Nab-Paclitaxel - A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Shuji; Nishiyama, Ryo; Kaneda, Takayoshi; Yokota, Mitsuo; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Tajima, Hiroshi; Kaizu, Takashi; Kumamoto, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Iwai, Tomohisa; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Erina; Hara, Atsuko; Ichinoe, Masaaki; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2017-02-01

    We report a case of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer successfully resected after gemcitabine(GEM)plus nab-paclitaxel(PTX)treatment. A 68-year-old man was referred to our institution with jaundice. We diagnosed pancreatic head cancer using computed tomography(CT)and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. We initially diagnosed it as locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer because of extensive invasion to the portal vein. GEM plus nab- PTX was administered to the patient as systemic chemotherapy. After 9 courses of chemotherapy, a CT scan revealed that the tumor had significantly reduced in size and range of portal vein invasion. Therefore, we performed pancreaticoduodenectomy with resection of the portal vein and achieved R0 resection. Currently, the patient is alive without recurrence. Therefore, conversion surgery after treatment with GEM plus nab-PTX chemotherapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer should be considered.

  4. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future.

  5. Advanced primary peritoneal carcinoma: clinicopathological and prognostic factor analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Xiao-ping; Cui, Heng; Shen, Dan-hua; Wei, Li-hui

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors favoring a positive prognosis for advanced primary peritoneal carcinoma (PPC). Methods: Twenty-four cases meeting the criteria for PPC were analyzed retrospectively for the clinicopathologic profiles. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expressions of p53, Top2α, Ki-67 and Her-2/neu. Then all these clinicopathological factors and molecular markers were correlated with the prognosis. Results: There were 15 cases of primary peritoneal serous papillary carcinoma (PPSPC), 6 cases of mixed epithelial carcinoma (MEC) and 3 cases of malignant mixed Mullerian tumor (MMMT). All patients underwent cytoreductive surgery with optimal debulking achieved in 3 cases. Among those receiving first-line chemotherapy, 13 patients received the TP regimen (paclitaxel-cisplatin or carboplatin) and 7 patients received the PAC regimen (cisplatin-doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide). The median overall survival of all patients was 42 months, while the breakdown for survival time for patients with PPSPC, MMT and MEC was 44, 13 and 19 months, respectively. The expressions of p53, Top2α and Ki-67 were all demonstrated in 11 cases respectively. None showed the expression of Her-2/neu. There were significant differences in the median survival between patients with PPSPC and those with MMMT (44 months vs 13 months, P<0.05), also between patients receiving TP combination and those receiving the PAC regimen (75 months vs 28 months, P<0.05). Another significant difference in the median progression-free survival (PFS) was identified between patients with positive p53 immunostaining and those with negative p53 immunostaining (15 months vs 47 months, P<0.05), whereas age, menopausal status, residual tumor size and the other molecular factors did not significantly impact survival. Conclusion: Patients with PPC should be treated with a comprehensive management plan including appropriate cytoreductive surgery and responsive chemotherapy. Overestimating an

  6. Interstitial iodine-125 implant in the management of unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, A.M.; Puthawala, A.A.; Neblett, D.L.

    1983-09-01

    Eighteen patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the head, body and tail of the pancreas were treated by a combination of biliary bypass, external and interstitial irradiation at Southern California Cancer Center of California Hospital Medical Center, Los Angeles, and Memorial Hospital Medical Center of Long Beach, Long Beach, CA, from July 31, 1975 to December 31, 1980. A dose of 3000 to 5000 rad was delivered to the pancreas and regional lymph nodes by external irradiation utilizing megavoltage units and 10,000 to 15,000 rad to the pancreas and metastatic lymph nodes by permanent Iodine-125 implants. In this group of 18 patients with unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas, excellent palliation of pain, jaundice and vomiting was achieved, with a median survival of 14 months.

  7. Transcatheter embolization of advanced renal cell carcinoma with radioactive seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, E.K.; deKernion, J.B.

    1981-11-01

    Advanced renal cell carcinoma was treated by transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds. There were 14 patients with nonresectable or metastatic disease (stage IV) and 8 with stage II tumors treated. In 8 patients the tumor was implanted with radon seeds, complemented by 2,500 rad of external beam therapy, and 10 were treated by embolization with 125iodine seeds. The total dose delivered ranged form 1,600 to 14,000 rad. Several patients also had intra-arterial chemotherapy. Survival was improved over previously reported studies: 13 of 22 (59 per cent) at risk for 2 years and 5 of 15 (33 per cent) for 5 years. Distant metastases did not resolve but significant local palliation was achieved. Tumor size decreased in all patients, 8 of whom subsequently underwent nephrectomy. Other local effects included pain control (10 per cent), weight gain (75 per cent) and control of hemorrhage (88 per cent). Toxicity was minimal and consisted of mild nausea or pain. This approach, using a low energy emitter, allows selective high dose radiation of the tumor, while sparing the adjacent normal tissues. In contrast to renal artery occlusion with inert embolic material, subsequent nephrectomy in patients with disseminated disease is not necessary. Transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds should be considered a reasonable palliative procedure in patients with nonresectable primary renal cell carcinoma.

  8. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC. PMID:26674766

  9. Current Management of Advanced Resectable Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ow, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The oral cavity is the most common site of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, a disease which results in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Though the primary modality of treatment for patients with oral cavity cancer remains surgical resection, many patients present with advanced disease and are thus treated using a multi-disciplinary approach. Patients with extracapsular spread of lymphatic metastasis and surgical margins that remain positive have been found to be at high risk for local-regional recurrence and death from disease, and are most often recommended to receive both post-operative radiation as well as systemic chemotherapy. The basis for this approach, as well as scientific developments that underly future trials of novels treatments for patients with high-risk oral cavity cancer are reviewed. PMID:21461056

  10. Advances in the management of basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Carucci, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC), a malignant neoplasm derived from non-keratinizing cells that originate in the basal layer of the epidermis, is the most common cancer in humans. Several factors such as anatomic location, histologic features, primary or recurrent tumors, and patient characteristics influence the choice of treatment modality for BCC. Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) facilitates optimal margin control and conservation of normal tissue for the management of BCC; however, other treatment modalities may also be implemented in the correct clinical scenario. Other treatment modalities that will be reviewed include simple excision, electrodesiccation and curettage, cryotherapy, topical immunotherapy and chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, and radiation therapy. In addition, targeted molecular therapeutic options for the treatment of advanced or metastatic BCC will be discussed in this informal review based on recent literature obtained by using PubMed with relevant search terms. PMID:26097726

  11. Lenvatinib: a potential breakthrough in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Oikonomopoulos, Georgios; Aravind, Preetha; Sarker, Debashis

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has reached a plateau after the approval of sorafenib in 2007. Several molecularly targeted therapies have failed to show significant improvement in survival outcomes compared with sorafenib, due to flaws in the design of clinical trials or failure to understand and correct for the competing co-morbidity of liver dysfunction. Lenvatinib is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent antiangiogenic effects, and has recently been approved for differentiated thyroid cancer. Lenvatinib has shown highly promising response data in Phase I/II clinical trials in HCC, although with some concerns regarding its toxicity profile. The pivotal Phase III REFLECT trial comparing lenvatinib to sorafenib has been completed, and the results of this trial will determine whether lenvatinib represents a breakthrough in the current crisis affecting HCC drug development.

  12. No Effect of Dietary Aspartame or Stevia on Pancreatic Acinar Carcinoma Development, Growth, or Induced Mortality in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, James; Lagou, Vasiliki; Dresselaers, Tom; van Dongen, Katinka A.; Himmelreich, Uwe; Liston, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has an extremely poor prognosis, largely due to a poor record for early detection. Known risk factors for pancreatic cancer include obesity, diet, and diabetes, implicating glucose consumption and regulation as a key player. The role of artificial sweeteners may therefore be pertinent to disease kinetics. The oncogenic impact of artificial sweeteners is a highly controversial area. Aspartame, one of the most studied food additives, is widely recognized as being generally safe, although there are still specific areas where research is incomplete due to study limitations. Stevia, by contrast, has been the subject of relatively few studies, and the potential health benefits are based on extrapolation rather than direct testing. Here, we used longitudinal tracking of pancreatic acinar carcinoma development, growth, and lethality in a sensitized mouse model. Despite exposure to aspartame and stevia from the in utero stage onward, we found no disease modification activity, in either direction. These results contribute to the data on aspartame and stevia safety, while also reducing confidence in several of the purported health benefits. PMID:28232906

  13. Clinicopathologic assessment of pancreatic ductal carcinoma located at the head of the pancreas, in relation to embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Yukiyasu; Fujii, Tsutomu; Kanzaki, Akiyuki; Yamada, Suguru; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Nomoto, Shuji; Takeda, Shin; Nakao, Akimasa

    2012-05-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy is performed for pancreatic head cancer that originated from the dorsal or ventral primordium. Although the extent of lymph node (LN) dissection is the same irrespective of the origin, the lymphatic continuities may differ between the 2 primordia. Between March 2003 and September 2010, 152 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer. One hundred six patients were assigned into 2 groups according to tumor location on preoperative computed tomography, and their clinical and pathological features were retrospectively analyzed in view of the embryonic development of the pancreas. Sixty of 106 patients were classified with tumors that were derived from the dorsal pancreas (D group) and 46 from the ventral pancreas (V group). The frequency of LN involvement around the middle colic artery (LN 15) in the D group was higher than in the V group (P = 0.008). The rate of additional resection of the pancreas tended to be higher in the D group (P = 0.067). The present study showed the detailed pattern of spread of pancreatic ductal carcinoma to the LNs and provided important information for determining the optimal surgical strategy.

  14. L-Carnitine-supplementation in advanced pancreatic cancer (CARPAN) - a randomized multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cachexia, a >10% loss of body-weight, is one factor determining the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer. Deficiency of L-Carnitine has been proposed to cause cancer cachexia. Findings We screened 152 and enrolled 72 patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer in a prospective, multi-centre, placebo-controlled, randomized and double-blinded trial to receive oral L-Carnitine (4 g) or placebo for 12 weeks. At entry patients reported a mean weight loss of 12 ± 2,5 (SEM) kg. During treatment body-mass-index increased by 3,4 ± 1,4% under L-Carnitine and decreased (−1,5 ± 1,4%) in controls (p < 0,05). Moreover, nutritional status (body cell mass, body fat) and quality-of-life parameters improved under L-Carnitine. There was a trend towards an increased overall survival in the L-Carnitine group (median 519 ± 50 d versus 399 ± 43 d, not significant) and towards a reduced hospital-stay (36 ± 4d versus 41 ± 9d,n.s.). Conclusion While these data are preliminary and need confirmation they indicate that patients with pancreatic cancer may have a clinically relevant benefit from the inexpensive and well tolerated oral supplementation of L-Carnitine. PMID:22824168

  15. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P.-I.; Chao, Yee; Li, C.-P.; Lee, R.-C.; Chi, K.-H.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m{sup 2}/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p < 0.001). The responders had a better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (86 {+-} 2 vs. 77 {+-} 2, p = 0.002) and had received a greater GEM dose intensity (347 {+-} 13 mg/m{sup 2}/wk vs. 296 {+-} 15 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP.

  16. Association between protein C levels and mortality in patients with advanced prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilts, I T; Hutten, B A; Meijers, J C M; Spek, C A; Büller, H R; Kamphuisen, P W

    2017-06-01

    Procoagulant factors promote cancer progression and metastasis. Protein C is involved in hemostasis, inflammation and signal transduction, and has a protective effect on the endothelial barrier. In mice, administration of activated protein C reduced experimental metastasis. We assessed the association between protein C and mortality in patients with three types of cancer. The study population consisted of patients with advanced prostate, non-small cell lung or pancreatic cancer, who participated in the INPACT trial (NCT00312013). The trial evaluated the addition of nadroparin to chemotherapy in patients with advanced malignancy. Patients were divided into tertiles based on protein C at baseline. The association between protein C levels and mortality was evaluated with Cox proportional hazard models. We analysed 477 patients (protein C tertiles: <97, 97-121 and ≥121%). Mean age was 65±9years; 390 (82%) were male; 191 patients (40%) had prostate cancer, 161 (34%) had lung cancer, and 125 (26%) pancreatic cancer. During a median follow-up of 10.4months, 291 patients (61%) died. Median protein C level was 107% (IQR 92-129). In the lowest tertile, 75 patients per 100 patient-years died, as compared to 60 and 54 in the middle and high tertile, respectively. Lower levels of protein C were associated with increased mortality (in tertiles: HR for trend 1.18, 95%CI 1.02-1.36, adjusted for age, sex and nadroparin use; as a continuous variable: HR 1.004, 95%CI 1.00-1.008, p=0.07). Protein C seems inversely associated with mortality in patients with advanced prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer. Further research should validate protein C as a biomarker for mortality, and explore the effects of protein C on progression of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thymostimulin in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Dollinger, Matthias M; Behrens, Christa M; Lesske, Joachim; Behl, Susanne; Behrmann, Curd; Fleig, Wolfgang E

    2008-01-01

    Background Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro. In a phase II trial, we investigated safety and efficacy including selection criteria for best response in advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods 44 patients (84 % male, median age 69 years) not suitable or refractory to conventional therapy received thymostimulin 75 mg subcutaneously five times per week for a median of 8.2 months until progression or complete response. 3/44 patients were secondarily accessible to local ablation or chemoembolisation. Primary endpoint was overall survival, secondary endpoint tumor response or progression-free survival. A multivariate Cox's regression model was used to identify variables affecting survival. Results Median survival was 11.5 months (95% CI 7.9–15.0) with a 1-, 2- and 3-year survival of 50%, 23% and 9%. In the univariate analysis, a low Child-Pugh-score (p = 0.01), a low score in the Okuda- and CLIP-classification (p < 0.001) or a low AFP-level (p < 0.001) were associated with better survival, but not therapy modalities other than thymostimulin (p = 0.1) or signs of an invasive HCC phenotype such as vascular invasion (p = 0.3) and metastases (p = 0.1). The only variables independently related to survival in the Cox's regression model were Okuda stage and presence of liver cirrhosis (p < 0.01) as well as response to thymostimulin (p < 0.05). Of 39/44 patients evaluable for response, two obtained complete responses (one after concomitant radiofrequency ablation), five partial responses (objective response 18%), twenty-four stable disease (tumor control rate 79%) and eight progressed. Median progression-free survival was 6.4 months (95% CI 0.8–12). Grade 1 local reactions following injection were the only side effects. Conclusion Outcome in our study rather depended on liver function and intrahepatic tumor growth (presence of liver cirrhosis and Okuda stage) in addition

  18. SBRT in unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer: preliminary results of a mono-institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To assess the efficacy and safety of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with either unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma or by locally recurrent disease after surgery. Methods Between January 2010 and October 2011, 30 patients with unresectable or recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma underwent exclusive SBRT. Twenty-one patients (70%) presented with unresectable locally advanced disease and 9 patients (30%) showed local recurrence after surgery. No patients had metastatic disease. Gemcitabine-based chemotherapy was administered to all patients before SBRT. Prescription dose was 45Gy in 6 daily fractions of 7.5Gy. SBRT was delivered using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) by RapidArc. Primary end-point of this study was freedom from local progression (FFLP), secondary end-points were overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS) and toxicity. Results Median Clinical Target Volume (CTV) was 25.6 cm3 (3.2-78.8 cm3) and median Planning Target Volume (PTV) was 70.9 cm3 (20.4- 205.2 cm3). The prescription dose was delivered in 25 patients (83%), in 5 patients (17%) it was reduced to 36Gy in 6 fractions not to exceed the dose constraints of organs at risk (OARs). Median follow-up was 11 months (2–28 months). FFLP was 91% at 6 months, 85% at median follow-up and 77% at 1 and 2 years. For the group with prescription dose of 45Gy, FFLP was 96% at 1 and 2 years. The median PFS was 8 months. The OS was 47% at 1 year and median OS was 11 months. At the end of the follow-up, 9 patients (32%) were alive and 4 (14%) were free from progression. No patients experienced G ≥ 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions Our preliminary results show that SBRT can obtain a satisfactory local control rate for unresectable locally advanced and recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This fractionation schedule is feasible, and no G ≥ 3 toxicity was observed. SBRT is an effective emerging technique in the multi

  19. SBRT in unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer: preliminary results of a mono-institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Angelo; Comito, Tiziana; Alongi, Filippo; Navarria, Pierina; Iftode, Cristina; Mancosu, Pietro; Reggiori, Giacomo; Clerici, Elena; Rimassa, Lorenza; Zerbi, Alessandro; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca; Tomatis, Stefano; Scorsetti, Marta

    2013-06-21

    To assess the efficacy and safety of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with either unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma or by locally recurrent disease after surgery. Between January 2010 and October 2011, 30 patients with unresectable or recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma underwent exclusive SBRT. Twenty-one patients (70%) presented with unresectable locally advanced disease and 9 patients (30%) showed local recurrence after surgery. No patients had metastatic disease. Gemcitabine-based chemotherapy was administered to all patients before SBRT. Prescription dose was 45Gy in 6 daily fractions of 7.5Gy. SBRT was delivered using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) by RapidArc. Primary end-point of this study was freedom from local progression (FFLP), secondary end-points were overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS) and toxicity. Median Clinical Target Volume (CTV) was 25.6 cm3 (3.2-78.8 cm3) and median Planning Target Volume (PTV) was 70.9 cm3 (20.4- 205.2 cm3). The prescription dose was delivered in 25 patients (83%), in 5 patients (17%) it was reduced to 36Gy in 6 fractions not to exceed the dose constraints of organs at risk (OARs). Median follow-up was 11 months (2-28 months). FFLP was 91% at 6 months, 85% at median follow-up and 77% at 1 and 2 years. For the group with prescription dose of 45Gy, FFLP was 96% at 1 and 2 years. The median PFS was 8 months. The OS was 47% at 1 year and median OS was 11 months. At the end of the follow-up, 9 patients (32%) were alive and 4 (14%) were free from progression. No patients experienced G ≥ 3 acute toxicity. Our preliminary results show that SBRT can obtain a satisfactory local control rate for unresectable locally advanced and recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This fractionation schedule is feasible, and no G ≥ 3 toxicity was observed. SBRT is an effective emerging technique in the multi-modality treatment of locally advanced pancreatic tumors.

  20. Radiofrequency ablation for unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fegrachi, Samira; Besselink, Marc G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Molenaar, Izaak Quintus

    2014-01-01

    Background: Median survival in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer lies in the range of 9–15 months. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) may prolong survival, but data on its safety and efficacy are scarce. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library with the syntax ‘(radiofrequency OR RFA) AND (pancreas OR pancreatic)’ for studies published until 1 January 2012. In addition, a search of the proceedings of conferences on pancreatic disease that took place during 2009–2011 was performed. Studies with fewer than five patients were excluded as they were considered to be case reports. The primary endpoint was survival. Secondary endpoints included morbidity and mortality. Results: Five studies involving a total of 158 patients with pancreatic cancer treated with RFA fulfilled the eligibility criteria. These studies reported median survival after RFA of 3–33 months, morbidity related to RFA of 4–37%, mortality of 0–19% and overall morbidity of 10–43%. Pooling of data was not appropriate as the study populations and reported outcomes were heterogeneous. Crucial safety aspects included ensuring a maximum RFA tip temperature of < 90 °C and ensuring minimum distances between the RFA probe and surrounding structures. Conclusions: Radiofrequency ablation seems to be feasible and safe when it is used with the correct temperature and at an appropriate distance from vital structures. It appears to have a positive impact on survival. Multicentre randomized trials are necessary to determine the true effect size of RFA and to minimize the impacts of selection and publication biases. PMID:23600801

  1. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody single therapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma exhibits a marked tumor growth-inhibitory effect.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Nagakawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Minako; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Ohta, Hiroshi; Itoi, Takao; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2011-11-01

    At present, no effective chemotherapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) exists. However, anti-angiogenic therapy is expected to be effective for PNEC, a hypervascular tumor. We treated PNEC and hypovascular pancreatic ductal cell carcinoma (DCC) cell lines with the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab, and compared the antitumor effect between the two different types of cell lines. The PNEC cell line QGP-1 and the DCC cell lines BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 were used. We evaluated the ability of the cell lines to proliferate and secrete VEGF in vitro, the antitumor effect of bevacizumab administration in vivo and the side effects of bevacizumab on the pancreas in a caerulein-induced pancreatitis model. Comparison of the QGP-1 and DCC cell lines showed that QGP-1 secreted a higher level of VEGF under a hypoxic environment than the DCC cell line, and bevacizumab exerted the most marked growth-inhibitory effect on QGP-1; the number of intratumoral blood vessels decreased and the percentage of proliferating cells was approximately the same. In the pancreatitis model, bevacizumab administration did not adversely affect the pancreatitis or the associated hypoxic environment. Bevacizumab does not affect the pancreas itself; therefore, its potent inhibitory effect on the growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors alone can be expected.

  2. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody single therapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma exhibits a marked tumor growth-inhibitory effect

    PubMed Central

    KASUYA, KAZUHIKO; NAGAKAWA, YUICHI; SUZUKI, MINAKO; TANAKA, HIROAKI; OHTA, HIROSHI; ITOI, TAKAO; TSUCHIDA, AKIHIKO

    2011-01-01

    At present, no effective chemotherapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) exists. However, anti-angiogenic therapy is expected to be effective for PNEC, a hypervascular tumor. We treated PNEC and hypovascular pancreatic ductal cell carcinoma (DCC) cell lines with the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab, and compared the antitumor effect between the two different types of cell lines. The PNEC cell line QGP-1 and the DCC cell lines BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 were used. We evaluated the ability of the cell lines to proliferate and secrete VEGF in vitro, the antitumor effect of bevacizumab administration in vivo and the side effects of bevacizumab on the pancreas in a caerulein-induced pancreatitis model. Comparison of the QGP-1 and DCC cell lines showed that QGP-1 secreted a higher level of VEGF under a hypoxic environment than the DCC cell line, and bevacizumab exerted the most marked growth-inhibitory effect on QGP-1; the number of intratumoral blood vessels decreased and the percentage of proliferating cells was approximately the same. In the pancreatitis model, bevacizumab administration did not adversely affect the pancreatitis or the associated hypoxic environment. Bevacizumab does not affect the pancreas itself; therefore, its potent inhibitory effect on the growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors alone can be expected. PMID:22977618

  3. Prognostic impact of normalization of serum tumor markers following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with borderline resectable pancreatic carcinoma with arterial contact.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshiaki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Sudo, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Yasushi; Kondo, Naru; Nakagawa, Naoya; Okada, Kenjiro; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro

    2017-04-01

    The survival benefit of neoadjuvant therapy for patients with borderline resectable pancreatic carcinoma has been reported recently. However, prognostic factors for this strategy have not been clearly elucidated. The aim of this study was to clarify prognostic factors for patients with borderline resectable pancreatic carcinoma who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Medical records of 66 patients with pancreatic carcinoma with arterial contact who intended to undergo tumor resection following neoadjuvant chemotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Prognostic factors were investigated by analyzing the clinicopathological factors with univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Gemcitabine plus S-1 was generally used as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The objective response rate was 24%, and normalization of serum tumor markers following neoadjuvant chemotherapy was achieved in 29 patients (44%). Of the 66 patients, 60 patients underwent tumor resection and the remaining six patients did not due to distant metastases following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For all 66 patients, overall 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 87.8, 54.5, and 20.5%, respectively (median survival time, 27.1 months) and multivariate analysis revealed that normalization of serum tumor markers was found to be an independent prognostic factor of better overall survival (P = 0.023). Moreover, for 60 patients who undergo tumor resection, normalization of serum tumor markers (P = 0.005) was independently associated with better overall survival by multivariate analysis. Patients with pancreatic carcinoma with arterial contact who undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy and experience normalization of serum tumor markers thereafter may be good candidates for tumor resection.

  4. Induction of Apoptosis in Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells and Therapy of Orthotopic Human Pancreatic Carcinoma in Nude Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Kenji; Kim, Sun-Jin; Thaker, Premal; Yazici, Sertac; Nam, Do-Hyun; He, Junqin; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Chiao, Paul J; Sclabas, Guido M; Abbruzzese, James L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Fidler, Isaiah J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Although gemcitabine has been accepted as the first-line chemotherapeutic reagent for advanced pancreatic cancer, improvement of response rate and survival is not sufficient and patients often develop resistance. We hypothesized that the inhibition of phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells, combined with gemcitabine, would overcome the resistance to gemcitabine in orthotopic pancreatic tumor animal model. L3.6pl, human pancreatic cancer cells growing in the pancreas, and tumor-associated endothelial cells in microorgan environment highly expressed phosphorylated EGFR, VEGFR, and Akt, which regulates antiapoptotic mechanism. Oral administration of AEE788 (dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor against EGFR and VEGFR) inhibited the phosphorylation of EGFR, VEGFR, and Akt on tumor-associated endothelial cells as well as tumor cells. Although intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of gemcitabine showed limited inhibitory effect on tumor growth, combination with AEE788 and gemcitabine produced nearly 95% inhibition of tumor growth in parallel with a high level of apoptosis on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells, and decreased microvascular density and proliferation rate. Collectively, these data indicate that dual inhibition of phosphorylation of EGFR and VEGFR, in combination with gemcitabine, produces apoptosis of tumor-associated endothelial cells and significantly suppresses human pancreatic cancer in nude mice. PMID:16026649

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Vismodegib in Advanced Basal-Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sekulic, Aleksandar; Migden, Michael R.; Oro, Anthony E.; Dirix, Luc; Lewis, Karl D.; Hainsworth, John D.; Solomon, James A.; Yoo, Simon; Arron, Sarah T.; Friedlander, Philip A.; Marmur, Ellen; Rudin, Charles M.; Chang, Anne Lynn S.; Low, Jennifer A.; Mackey, Howard M.; Yauch, Robert L.; Graham, Richard A.; Reddy, Josina C.; Hauschild, Axel

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Alterations in hedgehog signaling are implicated in the pathogenesis of basal-cell carcinoma. Although most basal-cell carcinomas are treated surgically, no effective therapy exists for locally advanced or metastatic basal-cell carcinoma. A phase 1 study of vismodegib (GDC-0449), a first-in-class, small-molecule inhibitor of the hedgehog pathway, showed a 58% response rate among patients with advanced basal-cell carcinoma. METHODS In this multicenter, international, two-cohort, nonrandomized study, we enrolled patients with metastatic basal-cell carcinoma and those with locally advanced basal-cell carcinoma who had inoperable disease or for whom surgery was inappropriate (because of multiple recurrences and a low likelihood of surgical cure, or substantial anticipated disfigurement). All patients received 150 mg of oral vismodegib daily. The primary end point was the independently assessed objective response rate; the primary hypotheses were that the response rate would be greater than 20% for patients with locally advanced basal-cell carcinoma and greater than 10% for those with metastatic basal-cell carcinoma. RESULTS In 33 patients with metastatic basal-cell carcinoma, the independently assessed response rate was 30% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16 to 48; P = 0.001). In 63 patients with locally advanced basal-cell carcinoma, the independently assessed response rate was 43% (95% CI, 31 to 56; P<0.001), with complete responses in 13 patients (21%). The median duration of response was 7.6 months in both cohorts. Adverse events occurring in more than 30% of patients were muscle spasms, alopecia, dysgeusia (taste disturbance), weight loss, and fatigue. Serious adverse events were reported in 25% of patients; seven deaths due to adverse events were noted. CONCLUSIONS Vismodegib is associated with tumor responses in patients with locally advanced or metastatic basal-cell carcinoma. (Funded by Genentech; Erivance BCC ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00833417

  6. Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy After Pancreatic Resection for Invasive Carcinoma Associated With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, Michael J.; Hsu, Charles C.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Winter, Jordan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Guler, Mehmet; Schulick, Richard D.; Cameron, John L.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are mucin-producing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. One-third are associated with invasive carcinoma. We examined the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for this cohort. Methods and Materials: Patients who had undergone pancreatic resection at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1999 and 2004 were reviewed. Of these patients, 83 with a resected pancreatic mass were found to have an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma, 70 of whom met inclusion criteria for the present analysis. Results: The median age at surgery was 68 years. The median tumor size was 3.3 cm, and invasive carcinoma was present at the margin in 16% of the patients. Of the 70 patients, 50% had metastases to the lymph nodes and 64% had Stage II disease. The median survival was 28.0 months, and 2- and 5-year survival rate was 57% and 45%, respectively. Of the 70 patients, 40 had undergone adjuvant CRT. Those receiving CRT were more likely to have lymph node metastases, perineural invasion, and Stage II-III disease. The 2-year survival rate after surgery with vs. without CRT was 55.8% vs. 59.3%, respectively (p = NS). Patients with lymph node metastases or positive surgical margins benefited significantly from CRT (p = .047 and p = .042, respectively). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant CRT was associated with improved survival, with a relative risk of 0.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.95; p = .044) after adjusting for major confounders. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT conferred a 57% decrease in the relative risk of mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with an associated invasive component after adjusting for major confounders. Patients with lymph node metastases or positive margins appeared to particularly benefit from CRT after definitive surgery.

  7. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarikova, Petra; Zavada, Filip; Salek, Cyril; Minarik, Marek

    2011-01-01

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, and Peutz–Jeghers and Lynch syndromes. Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:21734801

  8. Sunitinib re-challenge in advanced renal-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Porta, C; Paglino, C; Grünwald, V

    2014-09-09

    Despite offering significant clinical benefits in advanced renal-cell carcinoma (RCC), the effectiveness of targeted therapies eventually declines with the development of resistance. Defining optimal sequences of therapy is therefore the focus of much current research. There is also evidence that treatment 're-challenge' may be an effective strategy in some patients. We review evidence to evaluate whether sunitinib may have value as re-challenge therapy in patients who have progressed on prior targeted therapy with sunitinib and/or an alternative tyrosine kinase inhibitor or mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor. Re-challenge with sunitinib appears to be of clinical benefit, thus representing a feasible therapeutic option for patients with advanced RCC who are refractory to other treatments and are able to receive further therapy. These observations support hypotheses that resistance to targeted agents is transient and can be at least partially reversed by re-introduction of the same agent after a treatment break. Median progression-free survival durations appear to be shorter and response rates lower on re-challenge than following initial treatment, although a wider interval between treatments appears to increase response to sunitinib re-challenge.

  9. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Advances in diagnosis, management, and long term outcome.

    PubMed

    Bodzin, Adam S; Busuttil, Ronald W

    2015-05-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains a common and lethal malignancy worldwide and arises in the setting of a host of diseases. The incidence continues to increase despite multiple vaccines and therapies for viruses such as the hepatitis B and C viruses. In addition, due to the growing incidence of obesity in Western society, there is anticipation that there will be a growing population with HCC due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Due to the growing frequency of this disease, screening is recommended using ultrasound with further imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and multi-detector computed tomography used for further characterization of masses. Great advances have been made to help with the early diagnosis of small lesions leading to potential curative resection or transplantation. Resection and transplantation maybe used in a variety of patients that are carefully selected based on underlying liver disease. Using certain guidelines and clinical acumen patients may have good outcomes with either resection or transplantation however many patients are inoperable at time of presentation. Fortunately, the use of new locoregional therapies has made down staging patients a potential option making them potential surgical candidates. Despite a growing population with HCC, new advances in viral therapies, chemotherapeutics, and an expanding population of surgical and transplant candidates might all contribute to improved long-term survival of these patients.

  10. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Advances in diagnosis, management, and long term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bodzin, Adam S; Busuttil, Ronald W

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains a common and lethal malignancy worldwide and arises in the setting of a host of diseases. The incidence continues to increase despite multiple vaccines and therapies for viruses such as the hepatitis B and C viruses. In addition, due to the growing incidence of obesity in Western society, there is anticipation that there will be a growing population with HCC due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Due to the growing frequency of this disease, screening is recommended using ultrasound with further imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and multi-detector computed tomography used for further characterization of masses. Great advances have been made to help with the early diagnosis of small lesions leading to potential curative resection or transplantation. Resection and transplantation maybe used in a variety of patients that are carefully selected based on underlying liver disease. Using certain guidelines and clinical acumen patients may have good outcomes with either resection or transplantation however many patients are inoperable at time of presentation. Fortunately, the use of new locoregional therapies has made down staging patients a potential option making them potential surgical candidates. Despite a growing population with HCC, new advances in viral therapies, chemotherapeutics, and an expanding population of surgical and transplant candidates might all contribute to improved long-term survival of these patients. PMID:26019732

  11. Defining and recognising locally advanced basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Amici, Jean Michel; Battistella, Maxime; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Chatellier, Anne; Dalac-Ra, Sophie; Dreno, Brigitte; Falandry, Claire; Froget, Nicolas; Giacchero, Damien; Grob, Jean Jacques; Guerreschir, Pierre; Leccia, Marie-Thérèse; Malard, Olivier; Mortier, Laurent; Routier, Emilie; Stefan, Andreea; Stefan, Dinu; Stoebner, Pierre-Emmanuel; Basset-Seguin, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Rarely, basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) have the potential to become extensively invasive and destructive, a phenomenon that has led to the term "locally advanced BCC" (laBCC). We identified and described the diverse settings that could be considered "locally advanced". The panel of experts included oncodermatologists, dermatological and maxillofacial surgeons, pathologists, radiotherapists and geriatricians. During a 1-day workshop session, an interactive flow/sequence of questions and inputs was debated. Discussion of nine cases permitted us to approach consensus concerning what constitutes laBCC. The expert panel retained three major components for the complete assessment of laBCC cases: factors of complexity related to the tumour itself, factors related to the operability and the technical procedure, and factors related to the patient. Competing risks of death should be precisely identified. To ensure homogeneous multidisciplinary team (MDT) decisions in different clinical settings, the panel aimed to develop a practical tool based on the three components. The grid presented is not a definitive tool, but rather, it is a method for analysing the complexity of laBCC.

  12. Proteomic strategies in the search for novel pancreatic cancer biomarkers and drug targets: recent advances and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Orla; Henry, Michael; McVey, Gerard; Clynes, Martin; Moriarty, Michael; Meleady, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest cancers; despite a low incidence rate it is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Improvement of the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment remains the main focus of pancreatic cancer research. Rapid developments in proteomic technologies has improved our understanding of the pancreatic cancer proteome. Here, the authors summarise the recent proteomic strategies undertaken in the search for: novel biomarkers for early diagnosis, pancreatic cancer-specific proteins which may be used for novel targeted therapies and proteins which may be useful for monitoring disease progression post-therapy. Recent advances and findings discussed here provide great promise of having a significant clinical impact and improving the outcome of patients with this malignancy.

  13. Bioelectrical impedance phase angle as a prognostic indicator in advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Digant; Lis, Christopher G; Dahlk, Sadie L; Vashi, Pankaj G; Grutsch, James F; Lammersfeld, Carolyn A

    2004-12-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is an easy-to-use, non-invasive and reproducible technique to evaluate changes in body composition and nutritional status. Phase angle, determined by BIA, has been found to be a prognostic indicator in several chronic conditions, such as HIV, liver cirrhosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer, and in patients undergoing dialysis. The present study investigated the prognostic role of phase angle in advanced pancreatic cancer. We evaluated a case series of fifty-eight stage IV pancreatic cancer patients treated at Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center (Zion, IL, USA) between January 2000 and July 2003. BIA was conducted on all patients using a bioelectrical impedance analyser that operated at 50 kHz. The phase angle was calculated as capacitance (Xc)/resistance (R) and expressed in degrees. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival. Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to evaluate the prognostic effect of phase angle independent of other clinical and nutritional variables. The correlations between phase angle and traditional nutritional measures were evaluated using Pearson and Spearman coefficients. Patients with phase angle <5.0 degrees had a median survival time of 6.3 (95% CI 3.5, 9.2) months (n 29), while those with phase angle >5.0 degrees had a median survival time of 10.2 (95% CI 9.6, 10.8) months (n 29); this difference was statistically significant (P=0.02). The present study demonstrates that phase angle is a strong prognostic indicator in advanced pancreatic cancer. Similar studies in other cancer settings with larger sample sizes are needed to further validate the prognostic significance of the phase angle.

  14. Individual in-vitro sensitivities of human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moesta, K. T.; Dmytrijuk, Andrew; Schlag, Peter M.; Mang, Thomas S.

    1992-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative in the treatment of pancreatic cancer in man, due to the low sensitivity of the normal pancreas to PDT as shown in preclinical studies. Investigations on four human pancreatic cancer lines (MIA PaCa-2, PaCa 1, PaCa 3, and CAPAN 2) in vitro demonstrated a considerable variety in PDT-sensitivity proportional to the degree of differentiation, which was related to photosensitizer-uptake (PhotofrinTM). The well differentiated pancreatic tumor line Capan 2 showed a close relationship between high cell density and increased PDT-resistance. The Photofrin uptake of Capan 2 at high cell densities could be increased by short trypsinization prior to photosensitizer exposure. The data supports the hypothesis that a complex intercellular organization reduces the cell surface available for photosensitizer uptake and may cause the relative PDT resistance of normal pancreatic tissues and highly differentiated tumors.

  15. Treatment-related gastrointestinal toxicities and advanced colorectal or pancreatic cancer: A critical update.

    PubMed

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Rihawi, Karim; De Carlo, Elisa; Sonis, Stephen T

    2015-11-07

    Gastrointestinal toxicities (GIT), including oral mucositis, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea, are common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted agents in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Being often underreported, it is still difficult to precisely establish their burden in terms of both patient's quality of life and cancer care costs. Moreover, with the use of more intensive upfront combination regimens, the frequency of these toxicities is rapidly growing with a potential negative effect also on patient's outcome, as a result of dose reductions, delays or even discontinuation of active treatments. Thus, identifying patients at higher risk of developing GIT as well as an optimal management are paramount in order to improve patient's compliance and outcome. After the description of the main treatment-induced GIT, we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of these side effects and comment the scales commonly used to assess and grade them. We then provide a critical update on GIT incidence based on the results of key randomized trials conducted in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced pancreatic cancer.

  16. Transcatheter Arterial Infusion Therapy in the Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, Keiko; Nagata, Yasushi; Itoh, Tuyoshi; Okajima, Kaoru; Murata, Rumi; Takagi, Takehisa; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1999-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of transcatheter arterial infusion (TAI) therapy in 18 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: The drugs infused were epirubicin 60 mg, mitomycin C 20 mg, and 5-fluorouracil 500 mg. The efficacy of TAI was evaluated by a tumor marker (CA19-9), computed tomography (CT) findings, and postoperative histopathological specimens. Results: In 10 of 15 cases, the tumor marker level was decreased after TAI therapy. In 6 of 14 cases, CT showed a decrease in the tumor size, and in 1 case, the tumor disappeared completely. In 6 cases the tumor could be resected. Necrosis, fibrosis, and degeneration of cancer cells were seen in 3 of 4 cases for whom a histopathological evaluation was done. The median survival was 11 months. In 17 patients back pain was the chief complaint, and was reduced to a self-controlled level in 10 patients following TAI therapy. No major complications were encountered. Conclusion: TAI appears to be an effective palliative treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer.

  17. Treatment-related gastrointestinal toxicities and advanced colorectal or pancreatic cancer: A critical update

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Rihawi, Karim; De Carlo, Elisa; Sonis, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicities (GIT), including oral mucositis, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea, are common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted agents in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Being often underreported, it is still difficult to precisely establish their burden in terms of both patient’s quality of life and cancer care costs. Moreover, with the use of more intensive upfront combination regimens, the frequency of these toxicities is rapidly growing with a potential negative effect also on patient’s outcome, as a result of dose reductions, delays or even discontinuation of active treatments. Thus, identifying patients at higher risk of developing GIT as well as an optimal management are paramount in order to improve patient’s compliance and outcome. After the description of the main treatment-induced GIT, we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of these side effects and comment the scales commonly used to assess and grade them. We then provide a critical update on GIT incidence based on the results of key randomized trials conducted in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26557003

  18. Nuclear DNA content and p53 overexpression in stage I squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue compared with advanced tongue carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Högmo, A; Kuylenstierna, R; Lindholm, J; Nathansson, A; Auer, G; Munck-Wikland, E

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the predictive value of the nuclear DNA content (image cytometry) and p53 overexpression (immuno-histochemistry using antibody CM-1) in uniformly treated stage I carcinomas of the mobile tongue. Also, to compare stage I carcinomas with advanced tongue carcinomas (stages II-IV). METHODS: Archival formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tumour specimens from 54 patients with stage I squamous cell carcinoma and 37 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma were analysed. Mean follow up time of the stage I carcinomas was 71 months (median, 62.5; range, 6-175). RESULTS: Twenty three patients (stage I) had recurring disease: 10 had local recurrence (in the tongue) and 13 had regional recurrence (cervical metastases). Locally recurring stage I carcinomas had a more pronounced DNA deviation than the other stage I carcinomas and this degree of deviation was comparable with the DNA content of advanced carcinomas. Stage I carcinomas that developed regional recurrences overexpressed p53 more frequently. In Cox multivariate regression analysis of time to recurrence, DNA deviation was a significant parameter in tumours that recurred locally (p = 0.032). p53 overexpression was the only parameter close to significance for regional recurrence (p = 0.065). CONCLUSIONS: Nuclear DNA content and p53 immunostaining are of value for the prediction of recurrence of stage I squamous cell carcinomas of the mobile tongue. Stage I tongue carcinomas that are prone to local recurrence show the same DNA content as do advanced tongue carcinomas. PMID:10193521

  19. Surgical and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hackeng, Wenzel M; Hruban, Ralph H; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Brosens, Lodewijk A A

    2016-06-07

    Histologic characteristics have proven to be very useful for classifying different types of tumors of the pancreas. As a result, the major tumor types in the pancreas have long been classified based on their microscopic appearance. Recent advances in whole exome sequencing, gene expression profiling, and knowledge of tumorigenic pathways have deepened our understanding of the underlying biology of pancreatic neoplasia. These advances have not only confirmed the traditional histologic classification system, but also opened new doors to early diagnosis and targeted treatment. This review discusses the histopathology, genetic and epigenetic alterations and potential treatment targets of the five major malignant pancreatic tumors - pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm, acinar cell carcinoma and pancreatoblastoma.

  20. Estimating Optimal Dose of Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine for Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Mature Results of GEMRT-01 Phase I Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, Nicolas; Mornex, Francoise; Bossard, Nadine; Ychou, Marc; Chauffert, Bruno; Wautot, Virginie

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To accurately determine the maximal tolerated dose, feasibility, and antitumor activity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy including twice-weekly gemcitabine in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were included in this Phase I trial. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 50 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy with twice-weekly gemcitabine was administered during the 5 weeks of radiotherapy, from an initial dose of 30 mg/m{sup 2}. The gemcitabine doses were escalated in 10-mg/m{sup 2} increments in a three-plus-three design, until dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Results: A total of 35 patients were included in the trial. The feasibility of chemoradiotherapy was high, because all the patients received the planned total radiation dose, and 26 patients (74%) received {>=}70% of the planned chemotherapy dose. The mean total delivered dose of gemcitabine was 417 mg/m{sup 2} (i.e., 77% of the prescribed dose). The maximal tolerated dose of twice-weekly gemcitabine was 70 mg/m{sup 2}. Of the 35 patients, 13 had a partial response (37%) and 21 had stable disease (60%). Overall, the median survival and the 6-, 12-, and 18-month survival rates were 10.6 months and 82%, 31%, and 11%, respectively. Survival was significantly longer in patients with an initial performance status of 0 or 1 (p = .004). Conclusion: Our mature data have indicated that gemcitabine doses can be increased {<=}70 mg/m{sup 2}, when delivered twice-weekly with concurrent radiotherapy. This combination shows promises to achieve better recurrence-free and overall survival. These results will serve as a basis for further implementation of the multimodal treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  1. Enhanced cell killing in lewis lung carcinoma and a human pancreatic-carcinoma xenograft by the combination of cytotoxic drugs and misonidazole.

    PubMed

    Stephens, T C; Courtenay, V D; Mills, J; Peacock, J H; Rose, C M; Spooner, D

    1981-04-01

    The "chemosensitizing" properties of the radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO) were examined in 2 tumour systems, murine Lewis lung carcinoma and human pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografted into immune-suppressed mice, using a soft-agar colony assay to measure tumour-cell survival. In mice bearing Lewis lung tumour, the administration of MISO simultaneously with melphalan, cyclophosphamide. CCNU, FU or vincristine gave substantial enhancement of cytotoxicity (DEFs from 1.5 to 3.5). However, no enhancement was seen with bleomycin, VP 16-213 or cis-Pt. The same level of enhancement of cyclophosphamide effect (DEF = 2.0) was seen with both cell survival and growth delay end-points effect (DEF = 2.0) was seen with both cell survival and growth delay end-points of tumour response. Enhancement was also seen in the human tumour xenograft with melphalan, cyclophosphamide and MeCCNU, using a cell survival assay, but cis-Pt was again not enhanced.

  2. Docetaxel as neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Carlos T; Machiavelli, Mario R; Pérez, Juan E; Romero, Alberto O; Bologna, Fabrina; Vicente, Hernán; Lacava, Juan A; Ortiz, Eduardo H; Cubero, Alberto; Focaccia, Guillermo; Suttora, Guillermo; Scenna, Mirna; Boughen, José M; Leone, Bernardo A

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel as single-agent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locoregionally advanced cervical carcinoma. Between April 1998 and August 2000, 38 untreated patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IIB to IVA were entered onto this study. The median age was 44 years (range: 25-66 years). Stages: IIB 22 patients, IIIB 15 patients, and IVA 1 pt. Treatment consisted of docetaxel 100 mg/m2 IV infusion during 1 hour. Standard premedication with dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, and ranitidine was used. Cycles were repeated every 3 weeks for three courses, followed by radical surgery when it was judged appropriate, or definitive radiotherapy. Both staging and response assessment were performed by a multidisciplinary team. 106 cycles of therapy were administered; all patients were evaluable for TX, whereas 35 were evaluable for response (3 patients refused further treatment after the first cycle of therapy). Complete response (CR): 1 patient (3%); partial response: 11 patients (31%), for an overall objective response rate of 34% (95% CI: 15-53%); no change (NC): 16 patients (46%); and progressive disease: 7 patients (20%). Six patients (17%) underwent surgery and a pathologic CR was confirmed in 1 of them. The median time to treatment failure and the median survival have not been reached yet. The limiting toxicity was leukopenia in 25 patients (69%) (G1-G2: 14 patients, G3: 10 patients, and G4: 1 patient). Neutropenia: 28 patients (78%) (G1-G2: 10 patients, G3: 8 and G4: 10). Myalgias: 17 patients (47%) (G1-G2: 15 patients and G3: 2 patients). Emesis: 21 patients (55%) (G1-G2: 19 patients and G3: 2 patients). Alopecia G3: 13 patients (36%); rash cutaneous 26 patients (68%) (G1-G2: 22 patients and G3: 4 patients). There were no hypersensitivity reactions or fluid-retention syndrome. The received dose intensity was 91% of that projected. Docetaxel is an active drug against advanced

  3. Chemotherapy regimens for advanced pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advanced pancreatic cancer confers poor prognosis and treatment advancement has been slow. Recent randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have demonstrated survival benefits for combination therapy compared to gemcitabine alone. However, the comparative benefits and harms of available combination chemotherapy treatments are not clear. We therefore conducted a systematic review and Bayesian network meta-analysis to assess the comparative safety and efficacy of chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Registry of Clinical trials and abstracts from major scientific meetings were searched for RCTs published from 2002 to 2013. Key outcomes were overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), and safety including grade 3–4 febrile neutropenia, neutropenia, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue and sensory neuropathy. Bayesian network meta-analyses were conducted to calculate survival and safety outcomes using gemcitabine (GEM) as the reference comparator. Effect estimates and 95% credible intervals were calculated for each comparison. Mean ranks and the probability of being best were obtained for each treatment analyzed in the network meta-analysis. Results The search identified 23 studies involving 19 different treatment regimens and 9,989 patients. FOLFIRINOX, GEM/cisplatin/epirubicin/5FU (PEFG), GEM/NAB-paclitaxel (NAB-P), GEM/erlotinib+/-bevacizumab, GEM/capecitabine, and GEM/oxaliplatin were associated with statistically significant improvements in OS and PFS relative to gemcitabine alone and several other treatments. They were amongst the top ranked for survival outcomes amongst other treatments included. No significant differences were found for other combination chemotherapy treatments. Effect estimates from indirect comparisons matched closely to estimates derived from pairwise comparisons. Overall, combination therapies had greater risk for evaluated grade 3–4 toxicities over

  4. Lenvatinib in Advanced, Radioactive Iodine-Refractory, Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Kay T; Cohen, Ezra E W

    2015-12-15

    Management options are limited for patients with radioactive iodine refractory, locally advanced, or metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Prior to 2015, sorafenib, a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was the only approved treatment and was associated with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 11 months and overall response rate (ORR) of 12% in a phase III trial. Lenvatinib, a multikinase inhibitor with high potency against VEGFR and FGFR demonstrated encouraging results in phase II trials. Recently, the pivotal SELECT trial provided the basis for the FDA approval of lenvatinib as a second targeted therapy for these patients. Median PFS of 18.3 months in the lenvatinib group was significantly improved from 3.6 months in the placebo group, with an HR of 0.21 (95% confidence interval, 0.4-0.31; P < 0.0001). ORR was also significantly increased in the lenvatinib arm (64.7%) compared with placebo (1.5%). In this article, we will review the molecular mechanisms of lenvatinib, the data from preclinical studies to the recent phase III clinical trial, and the biomarkers being studied to further guide patient selection and predict treatment response.

  5. Partial Resection of the Pancreatic Head and Duodenum for Management of Carcinoma of the Ampulla of Vater: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Fang; Tang, Kun; Sun, Fu-Bo; Sui, Lu-Lu; Xu, Gang

    2016-03-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with spontaneous pain in the upper right quadrant of the abdominal region of one year's duration. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography revealed the presence of a tumour in the periampullary region, gallstones, cholecystitis, and biliary obstruction, as well as atrophy of the pancreas and dense adhesions involving the pancreas, portal vein, and superior mesenteric vein. Duodenoscopy revealed a papillary neoplasm, measuring 2.5×3 cm, in the descending duodenum. Pathological analysis of the duodenoscopic biopsy suggested carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. Partial resection of the pancreatic head and duodenum, together with lymph node dissection and digestive tract reconstruction, was performed. Postoperatively, the patient recovered well. CT at 14 months postoperatively showed no recurrence or metastasis. This surgical procedure avoids the potential risk of pancreaticoduodenectomy and retains the function of the pancreas as much as possible, while achieving radical tumour resection.

  6. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer.

  7. Interrogation of multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells: correlation of 99mTc-Sestamibi uptake with western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Harpstrite, Scott E; Gu, Hannah; Natarajan, Radhika; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-10-01

    Histopathological studies indicate that ∼63% of pancreatic tumors express multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and its polymorphic variants. However, Pgp expression detected at the mRNA or protein level does not always correlate with functional transport activity. Because Pgp transport activity is affected by specific mutations and the phosphorylation state of the protein, altered or less active forms of Pgp may also be detected by PCR or immunohistochemistry, which do not accurately reflect the status of tumor cell resistance. To interrogate the status of the functional expression of MDR1 Pgp in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, cellular transport studies using Tc-Sestamibi were performed and correlated with western blot analysis. Biochemical transport assays in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, human epidermal carcinoma drug-sensitive KB-3-1 cells, and human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells (negative controls), and human epidermal carcinoma drug-resistant KB-8-5 cells, human breast carcinoma stably transfected with Pgp MCF-7/MDR1Pgp cells, and liver carcinoma HepG2 cells (positive controls) were performed. Protein levels were determined using a monoclonal antibody C219. Tc-Sestamibi demonstrates accumulation in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Uptake profiles are not affected by treatment with LY335979, a Pgp inhibitor, and correlate with western blot analysis. These cellular transport studies indicate an absence of Pgp at a functional level in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Because major pancreatic tumors originate from the pancreatic duct and Tc-Sestamibi undergoes a dominant hepatobiliary mode of excretion, it would not be a sensitive probe for imaging pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Following interrogation of the functional status of Pgp in other pancreatic carcinoma cells, chemotherapeutic drugs that are also MDR1 substrates could offer alternative therapeutics for treating pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-producing pancreatic anaplastic carcinoma in ascitic fluid at initial diagnosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Nao; Naito, Yoshiki; Kawahara, Akihiko; Taira, Tomoki; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Yoshida, Tomoko; Abe, Hideyuki; Takase, Yorihiko; Fukumitsu, Chihiro; Murata, Kazuya; Ishida, Yusuke; Okabe, Yoshinobu; Kimura, Yoshizo; Tanigawa, Masahiko; Mihara, Yutaro; Nakayama, Masamichi; Yamaguchi, Rin; Akiba, Jun; Yano, Hirohisa

    2017-02-10

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-producing pancreatic tumors are extremely rare. These tumors have an aggressive clinical course and no established treatment. Here, we report an autopsy case of G-CSF-production in pancreatic anaplastic carcinoma (PAC). A 72-year-old woman presented with a large pancreatic head mass and multiple liver metastases. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis (leukocyte count 113.3 × 10(3) /µL) and high serum G-CSF levels (441 pg/mL; normal range: <39.0 pg/mL). The ascitic fluid was submitted to our pathology laboratory at initial diagnosis. Cytopathology showed that smears from the ascitic fluid were highly cellular and contained numerous malignant cells, mainly in loose groupings. Occasional pseudoglandular formations and giant cells were also present. The malignant cells were round, and no spindle-shaped cells were visible. The nuclei were round to ovoid with coarsely granular chromatin and large prominent nucleoli. Upon immunocytochemistry, tumor cells were positive for G-CSF and vimentin; there was no E-cadherin expression. Histopathological examination of the tumor showed a mixed composition of adenocarcinomatous and sarcomatous regions. Upon immunohistochemistry, both components were positive for G-CSF. Few CD34-positive myeloblasts were observed in the bone marrow. Thus, we diagnosed this as a case of G-CSF production in PAC with leukocytosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on G-CSF expression immunocytochemically confirmed in PAC. Diagn. Cytopathol. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Ellagic acid inhibits the proliferation of human pancreatic carcinoma PANC-1 cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Lu, Chenglin; Tang, Ribo; Pan, Yiming; Bao, Shanhua; Qiu, Yudong; Xie, Min

    2017-01-25

    Ellagic aicd (EA), a dietary polyphenolic compound found in plants and fruits, possesses various pharmacological activities. This study investigated the effect of EA on human pancreatic carcinoma PANC-1 cells both in vitro and in vivo; and defined the associated molecular mechanisms. In vitro, the cell growth and repairing ability were assessed by CCK-8 assay and wound healing assay. The cell migration and invasion activity was evaluated by Tanswell assay. In vivo, PANC-1 cell tumor-bearing mice were treated with different concentrations of EA. We found that EA significantly inhibited cell growth, cell repairing activity, and cell migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of PANC-1 xenografted mice with EA resulted in significant inhibition in tumor growth and prolong mice survival rate. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis showed that EA increased the percentage of cells in the G1 phase of cell cycle. Western blot analysis revealed that EA inhibited the expression of COX-2 and NF-κB. In addition, EA reversed epithelial to mesenchymal transition by up-regulating E-cadherin and down-regulating Vimentin. In summary, the present study demonstrated that EA inhibited cell growth, cell repairing activity, cell migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. EA also effectively inhibit human pancreatic cancer growth in mice. The anti-tumor effect of EA might be related to cell cycle arrest, down-regulating the expression of COX-2 and NF-κB, reversing epithelial to mesenchymal transition by up-regulating E-cadherin and down-regulating Vimentin. Our findings suggest that the use of EA would be beneficial for the management of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Needle tract implantation of hepatocellular carcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma after ultrasound-guided percutaneous puncture: clinical and pathologic characteristics and the treatment of needle tract implantation.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Chihiro; Furuse, Junji; Ishii, Hiroshi; Maru, Yasushi; Yoshino, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Taira; Konishi, Masaru; Nakagohri, Toshio; Inoue, Kazuto; Oda, Tatsuya

    2004-01-01

    Tumor implantation along the needle tract following percutaneous procedures under ultrasonographic guidance for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and pancreatic carcinoma (PC) has been well documented. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the procedure, the pathologic differentiation of the primary tumor, and the treatment after implantation. Between July 1992 and March 2000, HCC patients (n=372) who underwent biopsy, percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) therapy and percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy (PMCT) and PC (n=73) patients who underwent biopsy were retrospectively studied. Needle tract implantation was found in six of the HCC patients (1.6%) and one of the PC patients (1.4%). The interval to diagnosis ranged from 5 to 25 months (mean +/- SD 11.2 +/- 7.6 months) in the HCC patients. The needle tract implantation was evident for all procedure types in these patients (two after PEI alone, two after both biopsy and PEI, and one after PMCT) and for each degree of pathologic differentiation of the primary tumors (well differentiated in one, moderately differentiated in two, and poorly differentiated in one). Each implanted tumor was surgically resected, with no recurrence at the focal lesion. These results suggest that needle tract implantation develops regardless of the procedure or the pathologic differentiation of the primary tumor, and that surgical resection might be effective for controlling these implanted lesions.

  11. Immunoscintigraphy of human pancreatic carcinoma in nude mice with I-131-F(ab')/sub 2/-fragments of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Senekowitsch, R.; Maul, F.D.; Wenisch, H.J.C.; Kriegel, H.; Hor, G.

    1985-05-01

    In the present study radioiodinated F(ab')/sub 2/-fragments of CA19-9 and antibody that reacts specifically with human gastrointestinal cancer were examined for their ability to detect human pancreatic carcinoma hosted in nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice received 80..mu..Ci of I-131-F(ab')/sub 2/ with a specific activity of 1.8..mu..Ci/..mu..g. All mice were imaged after the injection and every 24hr up to 6 days. The retained radioactivity was also registered with a whole-body counter immediately after imaging. As a control F(ab's)/sub 2/ of a nonspecific antibody were administered in parallel to another group of animals bearing the same tumor. Three animals of each group were killed at 1,2,4 and 8 days for determination of the distribution of both labeled antibody-fragments. On scintigraphic images obtained with the CA19-9-F(ab')/sub 2/ the tumors could be visualized 24hr after injection, the best dilineation however was achieved 96hr p.i.. The biodistribution data exhibited a more rapid blood clearance for the specific fragments compared to that for the unspecific ones. Tumors showed an increase in uptake up to 48hr reaching 1.7% of the injected dose per gram, declining to values of 0.08%/g at day 6 p.i.. The highest tumor-to-blood ratios were found after 96h. They were 7 for the CA19-9-fragments compared to 1.5 for the unspecific fragments. The whole body counting revealed a more rapid excretion for the fragments of the specific monoclonal antibodies than for the unspecific ones. In summary the authors were able to show that CA19-9-F(ab')/sub 2/-fragments can be used for immunodetection of human pancreatic carcinoma hosted in nude mice.

  12. Inhibition of mutant KrasG12D-initiated murine pancreatic carcinoma growth by a dual c-Raf and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor t-CUPM.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie; Hwang, Sung Hee; Li, Haonan; Yang, Yihe; Yang, Jun; Wecksler, Aaron T; Liu, Jun-Yan; Hammock, Bruce D; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-02-28

    Mutant Kras and chronic pancreatitis are the most common pathological events involved in human pancreatic cancer. It has been demonstrated that c-Raf is responsible for transmitting signals from mutant Ras to its downstream signals including MEK-ERK and for initiating carcinogenesis. The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a pro-inflammatory enzyme, generally inactivates anti-inflammatory and anti-pain epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Herein, we have synthesized a novel compound of trans-4-{4-[3-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (t-CUPM) via modifying the central phenyl ring of sorafenib and confirmed its dual inhibition of sEH and c-Raf by recombinant kinase activity assay. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that oral dosing of t-CUPM resulted in higher blood levels than that of sorafenib throughout the complete time course (48 h). The effect of t-CUPM on the inhibition of mutant Kras(G12D)-initiated murine pancreatic cancer cell growth was determined using the mouse pancreatic carcinoma cell model obtained from LSL-Kras(G12D)/Pdx1-Cre mice and showed that t-CUPM significantly inhibited this murine pancreatic carcinoma cell growth both in vitro and in mice in vivo. Inhibition of mutant Kras-transmitted phosphorylations of cRAF/MEK/ERK was demonstrated in these pancreatic cancer cells using Western blot assay and immunohistochemical approach. Modulation of oxylipin profile, particularly increased EETs/DHET ratio by sEH inhibition, was observed in mice treated with t-CUPM. These results indicate that t-CUPM is a highly potential agent to treat pancreatic cancer via simultaneously targeting c-Raf and sEH.

  13. An epithelial cell adhesion molecule- and CD3-bispecific antibody plus activated T-cells can eradicate chemoresistant cancer stem-like pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Umebayashi, Masayo; Kiyota, Akifumi; Koya, Norihiro; Tanaka, Hiroto; Onishi, Hideya; Katano, Mitsuo; Morisaki, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    Cancer stem-like properties of various types of cancer, including pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive types, correlate with metastasis, invasion, and therapeutic resistance. More importantly, chemoresistance in cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) is a critical problem for eradication of pancreatic cancer. Several cell surface markers, such as CD44 and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), are molecular targets on CSLCs of pancreatic carcinoma. In this study, we investigated whether catumaxomab, a clinical-grade bi-specific antibody that binds to both EpCAM on tumor cells and CD3 on T-cells, combined with activated T-cells can eliminate chemoresistant pancreatic CSLCs in vitro. Firstly, we established a CSLC line (MU-PK1) from human pancreatic carcinoma cells derived from a patient with chemoresistant and disseminated pancreatic cancer. These CSLCs were almost completely resistant to gemcitabine-mediated cytotoxicity up to a concentration of 10 μg/ml. The cells expressed high levels of CSLC markers (CD44 and EpCAM) and had significantly higher capacities for sphere formation, invasion, and aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 expression, which are associated with cancer stemness properties. We found that pre-treatment with catumaxomab and subsequent addition of interleukin-2/OKT3 activated autologous T-cells eliminated CSLCs during a short incubation period. Moreover, when MU-PK1 cells were cultured under hypoxic conditions, the CSLCs became more aggressive. However, the combination of cytokine-activated killer T-cells with catumaxomab successfully lysed almost all these cells. In conclusion, catumaxomab combined with activated T-cells may be a potent therapeutic modality to eradicate chemoresistant pancreatic CSLCs.

  14. The prognostic influence of the proliferative discordance in metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma revealed by peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Montanier, Nathanaëlle; Joubert-Zakeyh, Juliette; Pétorin, Caroline; Montoriol, Pierre François; Maqdasy, Salwan; Kelly, Antony

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are rare slowly growing tumors with a high metastatic potential. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with radiolabeled analogues has been developed as a new tool for the management of metastatic well-differentiated (grade 1 and 2) neuroendocrine tumors expressing somatostatin receptor (SSTR2). Chemotherapy is the mainstay in the management of grade 3 (G3) unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (pNEC). To date, no study has evaluated the efficacy of PRRT in such tumors. Diagnoses and interventions: We describe a case of a progressive G3 pNEC with huge liver metastases successfully treated with PRRT (177Lu DOTATATE). Outcomes: Complete remission was obtained for 3 years. Indeed, the mitotic index was low (as G2 tumors) but with a very high Ki-67 index (45%–70%). Such discordance between the proliferative markers should consider the use of PRRT before chemotherapy in unresectable metastatic G3 tumors expressing SSTR2. Lessons: This case supports the hypotheses highlighting the heterogeneity of G3 pNEC. The latter should be subdivided into 2 distinct categories: proliferation-discordant (well differentiated) and concordant (poorly differentiated) NEC. PRRT could be suggested for the former group before the conventional chemotherapy. PMID:28178157

  15. Intraductal Tubulopapillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas Masquerading as Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: Review of the Literature with a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Savant, Deepika; Lee, Lili; Das, Kasturi

    2016-01-01

    Intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas (ITPN) is a rare tumor which was first described in 2009. We report a case with cytologic and histologic findings and discuss the pitfalls in diagnosing this entity on cytology. An 82-year-old female presented with a pancreatic body mass measuring 3.3 cm. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration showed cells in cohesive clusters with high-grade nuclear atypia. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed the neoplastic cells to be positive for CK19, CD56 and chromogranin (focal). Ki-67 was high at 50-60%, and chymotrypsin was negative. On the basis of this pattern of staining, the cytologic diagnosis rendered was 'favors high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma'. Distal pancreatic resection revealed a cystic 4-cm mass. Histologically, the tumor was seen arising from the duct with a solid growth pattern, tubule formation and papillary structures. IHC showed the tumor to be negative for chromogranin, synaptophysin, CD56, trypsin and chymotrypsin. The Ki-67 index was 70%. The final diagnosis was noninvasive ITPN. We review the literature and discuss the cytomorphologic features and IHC patterns characteristic of this new entity on cytology material in addition to the pitfalls of the cytologic diagnosis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. An Investigation Of Photodynamic Therapy In The Treatment Of Pancreatic Carcinoma: Dihematoporphyrin Ether Uptake And Photobleaching Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, Thomas S.; Wieman, Thomas J.

    1988-02-01

    Results of dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE) uptake and fluorescence kinetics show that the concentration in the pancreas is on the order of 40-60 μg DHE/g of tissue at an injected dose of 40 mg/kg. Previously concentrations on this order have only been found in organs of the reticuloendothelial system. Two intrapancreatic carcinoma models, one of acinar origin (rat) and one of ductal orgin (hamster), were studied. Both showed equal or higher concentrations of DHE as compared to normal pancreas when fluorescence measurements and chemical extraction procedures were performed. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment of the normal pancreas and pancreatic tumors yielded atypical results. When the normal pancreas with DHE present is exposed to 630 nm light from a dye laser (75 mW/cm2, 30 min), the normal photobleaching measurable by fluorescence decay does not occur. Yet, the pancreatic tumor responds with a relatively normal fluorescence decay pattern, with hemorrhaging and a resultant loss of measurable DHE concentration. These results represent the emergence of an entirely new modality, with substantial potential for the treatment of cancer of the pancreas.

  17. MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy increases the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer cell immunotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zibing; Liu, Yuqing; Zhang, Yong; Shang, Yiman; Gao, Quanli

    2016-01-26

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells is a promising cancer treatment, but its efficacy is restricted by various factors, including the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). In this study, we determine whether chemotherapeutic drugs that reduce MDSC levels enhance the efficacy of CIK cell therapy in the treatment of solid tumors. Fifty-three patients were included in this study; 17 were diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC), 10 with advanced pancreatic cancer (PC), and 26 with metastatic melanoma (MM). These patients were divided into two groups: CIK cell therapy alone and CIK cell therapy combined with chemotherapy. Combining CIK cell therapy and chemotherapy increased 1-year survival rates and median survival times in MRCC and PC patients, but not in MM patients. The disease control rate did not differ between treatment groups for MRCC or MM patients, but was higher in PC patients receiving combined treatment than CIK cell treatment alone. These data suggest that addition of MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy to CIK cell therapy improves survival in MRCC and PC patients.

  18. Metastatic pancreatic carcinoma masquerading as cystic lung disease: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Stern, Emily; Huseini, Taha; Kuok, YiJin; Lake, Fiona

    2017-09-01

    This 52-year-old male ex-smoker presented with a six-month history of progressive breathlessness and weight loss. He deteriorated acutely, and was admitted with severe type 1 respiratory failure. Apart from diffuse coarse crackles on chest auscultation, physical examination was unremarkable. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) showed diffuse cystic changes throughout the lungs. A diagnosis of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) was considered. Further workup identified a coincidental pancreatic lesion of uncertain significance, which remained indeterminate on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and on positron emission tomography (PET). Transbronchial biopsy revealed enteric differentiated adenocarcinoma exhibiting lepidic spread, and autopsy later confirmed primary pancreatic malignancy. This case demonstrates that metastatic pancreatic malignancy can present with severe respiratory failure and masquerade as cystic lung disease.

  19. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induction by alternol in pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cong, Pei-Fang; Qu, Ying-Chun; Chen, Jie-Peng; Duan, Li-Li; Lin, Cheng-Jiang; Zhu, Xiao-Lin; Li-Ling, Jesse; Zhang, Mei-Xia

    2015-04-21

    To investigate the effect of alternol on pancreatic cancer cells. Pancreatic cancer cells PANC-1 and BxPC3 were treated with various concentrations of alternol for 24, 48 and 72 h. Cell proliferation was measured by cell counting. Cell cycle distribution and mitochondrial membrane potential were determined by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was determined by a TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay and Hoechst staining. Expression of caspase 3, Bcl-2, p53 and p21 was measured by western blotting. Alternol showed dose- and time-dependent inhibition of the proliferation of PANC-1 and BxPC3 cells in vitro. Alternol induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at S phase and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Alternol activated caspase 3, upregulated p53 and p21 expression, and downregulated Bcl-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Our results suggested that alternol is a candidate for treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  20. CT Findings of Patients Treated with Irreversible Electroporation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinwande, Olaguoke; Ahmad, Shakeeb S.; Van Meter, Tracy; Schulz, Brittany; Martin, Robert C. G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), IRE has been shown to be safe for local disease control and palliation. As IRE continues to gain acceptance it is important to characterize the expected imaging findings. Materials and Methods. A review of our prospective soft tissue ablation registry from July 2010 to June 2013 was performed on patients who had undergone IRE for LAPC. Five masses treated with intraoperative IRE ablation for pancreatic tumors that underwent CT imaging before and after ablation were reviewed. Results and Discussion. Following IRE, the postablation bed is larger than the original ablated tumor. This ablation zone may get smaller in size (due to decreased edema and hyperemia) in the following months and more importantly remains stable provided there is no recurrence. In cases of recurrent disease there is increased size of the ablation bed, mass effect, and new or worsening vascular encasement or occlusion. Conclusion. CT imaging remains the best current imaging modality to assess post-IRE ablation changes. Serial imaging over at least 2–6 months must be employed to detect recurrence by comparing with prior studies in conjunction with clinical and serum studies. Larger imaging studies are underway to evaluate a more ideal imaging modality for this unique patient population. PMID:26649039

  1. Inhibition of renin–angiotensin system affects prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Y; Isayama, H; Ijichi, H; Sasaki, T; Sasahira, N; Hirano, K; Kogure, H; Kawakubo, K; Yagioka, H; Yashima, Y; Mizuno, S; Yamamoto, K; Arizumi, T; Togawa, O; Matsubara, S; Tsujino, T; Tateishi, K; Tada, M; Omata, M; Koike, K

    2010-01-01

    Background: The renin–angiotensin system (RAS) is thought to have a role in carcinogenesis, and RAS inhibition may prevent tumour growth. Methods: We retrospectively investigated the impact of angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II type-1 receptor blockers (ARBs) in 155 patients with pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine monotherapy. Patients were divided into three groups: the ACEI/ARB group (27 patients receiving an ACEI or ARB for hypertension (HT)), the non-ACEI/ARB with HT group (25 patients receiving antihypertensive drugs other than ACEIs or ARBs), and the non-HT group (103 patients receiving no antihypertensive drugs). Results: Patient characteristics were not different, except for age and HT medications. Progression-free survival (PFS) was 8.7 months in the ACEI/ARB group, 4.5 months in the non-ACEI/ARB with HT group, and 3.6 months in the non-HT group. Overall survival (OS) was 15.1 months in the ACEI/ARB group, 8.9 months in the non-ACEI/ARB with HT group, and 9.5 months in the non-HT group. The use of ACEIs/ARBs was a significant prognostic factor for both PFS (P=0.032) and OS (P=0.014) in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The ACEIs/ARBs in combination with gemcitabine might improve clinical outcomes in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Prospective trials are needed to test this hypothesis. PMID:20978506

  2. Photodynamic therapy of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (VERTPAC study): final clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, M. T.; Jermyn, M.; Gillams, A.; Mosse, S.; Kent, E.; Bown, S. G.; Hasan, T.; Pogue, B. W.; Pereira, S. P.

    2013-03-01

    We undertook a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) in 15 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Needle placement and laser delivery were technically successful in all patients. Thirteen patients were treated with a single laser fibre. Three treatments were carried out each at 5, 10 and 20 J/cm2; and 5 treatments (4 patients) at 40 J/cm2. A further 2 patients were treated with 2 or 3 laser fibres at 40 J/cm2. Tumour necrosis was measured on CT (computed tomography) by two radiologists 5 days after treatment. There was a clear dosedependent increase in necrosis with a median area of 20 x 16 mm (range 18 x 16 to 35 x 30 mm) at 40 J/cm2. In the 2 patients treated with multiple fibres, necrosis was 40 x 36 mm and 30 x 28 mm, respectively. There were no early complications in patients treated with a single fibre. Both patients treated with multiple fibres had evidence on CT of inflammatory change occurring anterior to the pancreas but without clinical deterioration. These results suggest that single fibre verteporfin PDT is safe in a clinical setting up to 40J/cm2 and produces a dose-dependent area of pancreatic necrosis.

  3. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wehler, Thomas C.; Graf, Claudine; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Brenner, Walburgis; Schadt, Jörg; Gockel, Ines; Berger, Martin R.; Thüroff, Joachim W.; Galle, Peter R.; Moehler, Markus; Schimanski, Carl C.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P = .039), tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005), and low hemoglobin (P = .039). In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma. PMID:19266088

  4. Survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after iodine125 seeds implantation brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Quanli; Deng, Muhong; Lv, Yao; Dai, Guanghai

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Brachytherapy with iodine125-labeled seeds (125I-seeds) implantation is increasingly being used to treat tumors because of its positional precision, minimal invasion, least damage to noncancerous tissue due to slow and continuous release of radioactivity and facilitation with modern medical imaging technologies. This study evaluates the survival and pain relief outcomes of the 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Methods: Literature search was carried out in multiple electronic databases (Google Scholar, Embase, Medline/PubMed, and Ovid SP) and studies reporting I125 seeds implantation brachytherapy in pancreatic cancer patients with unresectable tumor were selected by following predetermined eligibility criteria. Random effects meta-analysis was performed to achieve inverse variance weighted effect size of the overall survival rate after the intervention. Sensitivity and subgroups analyses were also carried out. Results: Twenty-three studies (824 patients’ data) were included in the meta-analysis. 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy alone was associated with 8.98 [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.94, 11.03] months (P < 0.00001) overall survival with 1-year survival of 25.7 ± 9.3% (mean ± standard deviation; SD) and 2-year survival was 17.9 ± 8.6% (mean ± SD). In stage IV pancreatic cancer patients, overall survival was 7.13 [95% CI: 4.75, 9.51] months (P < 0.00001). In patients treated with 125I-seeds implantation along with 1 or more therapies, overall survival was 11.75 [95% CI: 9.84, 13.65] months (P < 0.00001) with 1-year survival of 47.4 ± 22.75% (mean ± SD) and 2-year survival was 16.97 ± 3.1% (mean ± SD). 125I-seeds brachytherapy was associated with relief of pain in 79.7 ± 9.9% (mean ± SD) of the patients. Conclusions: Survival of pancreatic cancer patients after 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy is found to be 9 months

  5. Cyberknife treatment for advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hideo; Taniguch, Hiroyoshi; Nomura, Ryutaro; Sato, Kengo; Suzuki, Ichiro; Nakata, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of the Cyberknife treatment for patients with advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Patients with HCC with extrahepatic metastasis or vascular or bile duct invasion were enrolled between May 2011 and June 2015. The Cyberknife was used to treat each lesion. Treatment response scores were based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. The trends of tumor markers, including alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and proteins induced by vitamin K absence II (PIVKA II) were assessed. Prognostic factors for tumor response and tumor markers were evaluated with Fisher’s exact test and a logistic regression model. Survival was evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Sixty-five patients with 95 lesions were enrolled. Based on the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification, all patients were either in the advanced or terminal stage of the disease. The target lesions were as follows: 52 were bone metastasis; 9, lung metastasis; 7, brain metastasis; 9, portal vein invasion; 4, hepatic vein invasion; 4, bile duct invasion; and 10 other lesion types. The response rate and disease control rate were 34% and 53%, respectively. None of the clinical factors correlated significantly with tumor response. Fiducial marker implantation was associated with better control of both AFP (HR = 0.152; 95%CI: 0.026-0.887; P = 0.036) and PIVKA II (HR = 0.035; 95%CI: 0.003-0.342; P = 0.004). The median survival time was 9 mo (95%CI: 5-15 mo). Terminal stage disease (HR = 9.809; 95%CI: 2.589-37.17, P < 0.001) and an AFP of more than 400 ng/mL (HR = 2.548; 95%CI: 1.070-6.068, P = 0.035) were associated with worse survival. A radiation dose higher than 30 Gy (HR = 0.274; 95%CI: 0.093-0.7541, P = 0.012) was associated with better survival. In the 52 cases of bone metastasis, 36 patients (69%) achieved pain relief. One patient had cerebral

  6. Role of tumor endothelium in CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cell infiltration of human pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nummer, Daniel; Suri-Payer, Elisabeth; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus; Bonertz, Andreas; Galindo, Luis; Antolovich, Dalibor; Koch, Moritz; Büchler, Markus; Weitz, Jürgen; Schirrmacher, Volker; Beckhove, Philipp

    2007-08-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells have been detected in human carcinomas and may play a role in preventing the rejection of malignant cells. We quantified Treg cells and the expression of the addressins and the respective ligands that attract them in blood and in human pancreatic tumors and adjacent nonmalignant tissues from 47 patients. The capacity of Treg cells to adhere to and transmigrate through autologous endothelial cells was tested in vitro using spheroid adhesion assays and in vivo using a xenotransplant NOD/SCID model and in the presence and absence of antibodies to addressins. All statistical tests were two-sided. More Treg cells infiltrated pancreatic carcinomas than adjacent nonmalignant pancreatic tissues (120 cells per mm2 versus 80 cells per mm2, difference = 40 cells per mm2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 21.2 cells per mm2 to 52.1 cells per mm2; P<.001). In contrast to conventional CD4+ T cells, more blood-derived Treg cells adhered to (1.0% versus 5.2%, difference = 4.2%, 95% CI = 2.7% to 5.6%; P<.001) and transmigrated through (3332 cells versus 4976 cells, difference = 1644 cells, 95% CI = 708 cells to 2580 cells; P = .008) autologous tumor-derived endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo (458 cells versus 605 cells, difference = 147 cells, 95% CI = 50.8 to 237.2 cells; P = .04). Tumor-derived endothelial cells expressed higher levels of addressins--including mucosal adressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), CD62-E, and CD166--than endothelial cells from normal tissue. Experiments using antibodies to addressins showed that transmigration was mediated by interactions of addressins, including MAdCAM-1, VCAM-1, CD62-E, and CD166 with their respective ligands, beta7 integrin, CD62L, and CD166, which were expressed specifically on Treg cells. Tumor-induced expression of addressins on the surface of endothelial cells allows a selective transmigration of Treg cells from peripheral blood to tumor tissues.

  7. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Summary Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors including well differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and neuroendocrine carcinomas (pNECs). The incidence of pNENs has increased over the past few decades. Although, the understanding and interest for this tumor have also increased significantly, the debate about classification and diagnosis continues. Although the primary treatment for pNENs is surgical resection, there is still a lack of effective therapeutic options for patients with advanced unresectable pNENs. Although many therapeutic methods have proven effective, the choice of treatment and specific programs are still unclear. Our article presents an overview of pNENs, with a focus on their diagnostic work-up, clinical presentation and treatment options. PMID:28357177

  8. Advances in researches on the immune dysregulation and therapy of severe acute pancreatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-ping; Chen, Han-qing; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Jie

    2009-01-01

    During the development and progression of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), conspicuous immune dysregulation develops, which is mainly manifested as excessive immune response in the early stage and immunosuppression in the late stage. This process involves complex changes in a variety of immune molecules and cells, such as cytokines, complements, lymphocytes, and leukocytes. With the gradual deepening of studies on the development and progression of SAP, the role of immune dysregulation in the pathogenesis of SAP has attracted more and more attention. In this article, we review the advances in research on the immune dysregulation in SAP and the immunotherapy of this disease through exploring the formation of excessive immune response and immune suppression as well as their mutual transformation. PMID:19585666

  9. Prognostic factors and sites of metastasis in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Renata D’Alpino; Speers, Caroline; McGahan, Colleen E; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F; Kennecke, Hagen F

    2015-01-01

    Due to differences in natural history and therapy, clinical trials of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have recently been subdivided into unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and metastatic disease. We aimed to evaluate prognostic factors in LAPC patients who were treated with first-line chemotherapy and describe patterns of disease progression. Patients with LAPC who initiated first-line palliative chemotherapy, 2001–2011 at the BC Cancer Agency were included. A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify clinicopathologic variables, treatment, and subsequent sites of metastasis. Kaplan–Meier and Cox-regression survival analyses were performed. A total of 244 patients were included in this study. For the majority of patients (94.3%), first-line therapy was single-agent gemcitabine. About 144 (59%) patients developed distant metastatic disease and the most frequent metastatic sites included peritoneum/omentum (42.3%), liver (41%), lungs (13.9%), and distant lymph nodes (9%). Median overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort was 11.7 months (95% CI, 10.6–12.8). Development of distant metastases was associated with significantly inferior survival (HR 3.56, 95% CI 2.57–4.93), as was ECOG 2/3 versus 0/1 (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.28–2.23), CA 19.9 > 1000 versus ≤1000 (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.19–2.14) and female gender, (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.19–2.08). In this population-based study, 41% of LAPC patients treated with first-line chemotherapy died without evidence of distant metastases. Prognostic factors for LAPC were baseline performance status, elevated CA 19.9, gender, and development of distant metastasis. Results highlight the heterogeneity of LAPC and the importance of locoregional tumor control. PMID:25891650

  10. Prognostic factors and sites of metastasis in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino; Speers, Caroline; McGahan, Colleen E; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F; Kennecke, Hagen F

    2015-08-01

    Due to differences in natural history and therapy, clinical trials of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have recently been subdivided into unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and metastatic disease. We aimed to evaluate prognostic factors in LAPC patients who were treated with first-line chemotherapy and describe patterns of disease progression. Patients with LAPC who initiated first-line palliative chemotherapy, 2001-2011 at the BC Cancer Agency were included. A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify clinicopathologic variables, treatment, and subsequent sites of metastasis. Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression survival analyses were performed. A total of 244 patients were included in this study. For the majority of patients (94.3%), first-line therapy was single-agent gemcitabine. About 144 (59%) patients developed distant metastatic disease and the most frequent metastatic sites included peritoneum/omentum (42.3%), liver (41%), lungs (13.9%), and distant lymph nodes (9%). Median overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort was 11.7 months (95% CI, 10.6-12.8). Development of distant metastases was associated with significantly inferior survival (HR 3.56, 95% CI 2.57-4.93), as was ECOG 2/3 versus 0/1 (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.28-2.23), CA 19.9 > 1000 versus ≤ 1000 (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.19-2.14) and female gender, (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.19-2.08). In this population-based study, 41% of LAPC patients treated with first-line chemotherapy died without evidence of distant metastases. Prognostic factors for LAPC were baseline performance status, elevated CA 19.9, gender, and development of distant metastasis. Results highlight the heterogeneity of LAPC and the importance of locoregional tumor control.

  11. Phase II trial to evaluate gemcitabine and etoposide for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Marianne K; Webb, Craig P; Richardson, Patrick J; Luttenton, Charles R; Campbell, Alan D; Monroe, Thomas J; O'Rourke, Timothy J; Yost, Kathleen J; Szczepanek, Connie M; Bassett, Michelle R; Truszkowski, Kimberly J; Stein, Phyllis; Van Brocklin, Matthew W; Davis, Alan T; Bedolla, Gabriela; Vande Woude, George F; Koo, Han-Mo

    2010-08-01

    Prior studies suggest that tumor cell lines harboring RAS mutations display remarkable sensitivity to gemcitabine and etoposide. In a phase II clinical trial of patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, we evaluated the response rate to a combination of these drugs. Forty chemo-naïve patients with nonresectable and histologically confirmed pancreatic cancer were accrued. Patients received gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) (days 1 and 8) and etoposide 80 mg/m(2) (days 8, 9, and 10; 21-day cycle). The primary end point was radiological response rate. Secondary objectives were determination of overall survival, response duration (time to progression), quality of life, toxicity, and CA 19-9 biomarker response. In 35 evaluable patients, 10 exhibited a radiological partial response and 12 had stable disease in response to treatment. Twenty patients exhibited a >20% decrease in CA 19-9 biomarker levels. Median overall survival was 6.7 months for all patients (40) and 7.2 months for evaluable patients (35). Notably, four patients survived for longer than 1 year, with two patients surviving for more than 2 years. Median time to progression for evaluable patients was 3.1 months. The median overall survival for locally advanced patients was 8.8 months and 6.75 months for metastatic patients. One-year survival was 10% for all patients and 11.4% for evaluable patients. Quality of life improved in 12 patients and remained stable in 3 of the evaluable patients. The primary dose-limiting toxicities were hematologic toxicity and fatigue. These results show that the gemcitabine and etoposide combination is generally well-tolerated and exhibits a response rate similar to other published studies. (c) 2010 AACR.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of Gemcitabine Plus Modern Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Leung, Henry W C; Chan, Agnes L F; Muo, Chih-Hsin

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of gemcitabine plus modern radiotherapy versus gemcitabine alone in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer in Taiwan. A Markov decision-analytic model was performed to compare the cost-effectiveness of 3 treatment regimens; gemcitabine alone (gem-alone), gemcitabine plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (gem-IMRT), and gemcitabine plus stereotactic body radiotherapy (gem-SBRT). Patients transitioned between 5 health states: stable disease, local progression, distant metastasis, local and distant metastasis, and death. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for gem-IMRT and gem-SBRT compared with gem-alone were NT$27,120,168 and NT$2,145,683 per quality-adjusted life-year gained, respectively. A willingness to pay threshold of 3 times the per capita gross domestic product was adopted according to the definition of the World Health Organization. The Taiwan per capita gross domestic product in 2015 was NT$673,920 (US$22,464; 1 NT$ = US$0.03333 in Taiwan); thus, a threshold was considered as NT$2,021,760 (US$67,392). The Monte-Carlo simulation found that the probability of cost-effectiveness at a willingness to pay threshold of NT$2,021,760 per quality-adjusted life-year was 0% chance for gem-IMRT and 50% for gem-SBRT. This study indicated that gem-IMRT or gem-SBRT in locally advanced pancreatic cancer is not cost-effective at a willingness to pay as defined by World Health Organization guideline in Taiwan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Goodman, Karyn A.; Lee, Florence; Chang, Stephanie; Kuo, Timothy; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Greco, Ralph; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert C.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer achieves only modest local control. This prospective trial evaluated the efficacy of a single fraction of 25 Gy stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered between Cycle 1 and 2 of gemcitabine chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, pancreatic adenocarcinoma received gemcitabine with SBRT delivered 2 weeks after completion of the first cycle. Gemcitabine was resumed 2 weeks after SBRT and was continued until progression or dose-limiting toxicity. The gross tumor volume, with a 2-3-mm margin, was treated in a single 25-Gy fraction by Cyberknife. Patients were evaluated at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All 16 patients completed SBRT. A median of four cycles (range one to nine) of chemotherapy was delivered. Three patients (19%) developed local disease progression at 14, 16, and 21 months after SBRT. The median survival was 11.4 months, with 50% of patients alive at 1 year. Patients with normal carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9 levels either at diagnosis or after Cyberknife SBRT had longer survival (p <0.01). Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was mild, with 2 cases of Grade 2 (13%) and 1 of Grade 3 (6%) toxicity. Late gastrointestinal toxicity was more common, with five ulcers (Grade 2), one duodenal stenosis (Grade 3), and one duodenal perforation (Grade 4). A trend toward increased duodenal volumes radiated was observed in those experiencing late effects (p = 0.13). Conclusion: SBRT with gemcitabine resulted in comparable survival to conventional chemoradiotherapy and good local control. However, the rate of duodenal ulcer development was significant.

  14. Immunobiological effects of gemcitabine and capecitabine combination chemotherapy in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Gary; Greenhalf, William; Costello, Eithne; Shaw, Victoria; Cox, Trevor; Ghaneh, Paula; Palmer, Daniel H; Neoptolemos, John P

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preclinical studies suggest that chemotherapy may enhance the immune response against pancreatic cancer. Methods: The levels of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the associated inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) were assessed in 38 patients receiving gemcitabine and capecitabine combination chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer within the TeloVac trial. Apoptosis (M30) and total immune response (delayed-type hypersensitivity and/or T-cell response) were also assessed and levels of apoptosis induction correlated with immune response. The telomerase GV1001 vaccine was given either sequentially (n=18) or concomitantly (n=24) with the combination chemotherapy. Results: There were no differences between baseline and post-treatment levels of CRP (P=0.19), IL-6 (P=0.19) and GM-CSF (P=0.71). There was a positive correlation between post-chemotherapy CRP and IL-6 levels (r=0.45, P=0.005) and between CRP with carbohydrate antigen-19-9 (CA19-9) levels at baseline (r=0.45, P=0.015) and post treatment (r=0.40, P=0.015). The change in CRP and IL-6 levels was positively correlated (r=0.40, P=0.012). Hazard ratios (95% CI) for baseline CA19-9 (1.30 (1.07–1.59), P=0.009) and CRP (1.55 (1.00–2.39), P=0.049) levels were each independently predictive of survival. The M30 mean matched differences between pre- and post-chemotherapy showed evidence of apoptosis in both the sequential (P=0.058) and concurrent (P=0.0018) chemoimmunotherapy arms. Respectively, 5 of 10 and 9 of 20 patients had a positive immune response but there was no association with apoptosis. Conclusions: Combination gemcitabine and capecitabine chemotherapy did not affect circulating levels of GM-CSF, IL-6 and CRP. Chemotherapy-induced apoptosis was not associated with the immunogenicity induced by the GV1001 vaccine in advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26931369

  15. TP53 alterations in pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma: new insights into the molecular pathology of this rare cancer.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Stefano; Bernasconi, Barbara; Frattini, Milo; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Molinari, Francesca; Furlan, Daniela; Sahnane, Nora; Vanoli, Alessandro; Albarello, Luca; Zhang, Lizhi; Notohara, Kenji; Casnedi, Selenia; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Adsay, Volkan; Asioli, Sofia; Capella, Carlo; Sessa, Fausto

    2016-03-01

    The molecular alterations of pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) are poorly understood and have been reported as being different from those in ductal adenocarcinomas. Loss of TP53 gene function in the pathogenesis of ACCs is controversial since contradictory findings have been published. A comprehensive analysis of the different possible genetic and epigenetic mechanisms leading to TP53 alteration in ACC has never been reported and hence the role of TP53 in the pathogenesis and/or progression of ACC remains unclear. We investigated TP53 alterations in 54 tumor samples from 44 patients, including primary and metastatic ACC, using sequencing analysis, methylation-specific multiplex ligation probe amplification, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. TP53 mutations were found in 13 % of primary ACCs and in 31 % of metastases. Primary ACCs and metastases showed the same mutational profile, with the exception of one case, characterized by a wild-type sequence in the primary carcinoma and a mutation in the corresponding metastasis. FISH analysis revealed deletion of the TP53 region in 53 % of primary ACCs and in 50 % of metastases. Promoter hypermethylation was found in one case. The molecular alterations correlated well with the immunohistochemical findings. A statistically significant association was found between the combination of mutation of one allele and loss of the other allele of TP53 and worse survival.

  16. Effect of antidepressants on body weight, ethology and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin; Shang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yu-Yuan

    2008-07-21

    To investigate the effects of mirtazapine and fluoxetine, representatives of the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant respectively, on body weight, ingestive behavior, locomotor activity and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. A subcutaneous xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was established in nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into mirtazapine group (10 mg/kg per day), fluoxetine group (10 mg/kg per day) and control group (an equivalent normal saline solution) (7 mice in each group). Doses of all drugs were administered orally, once a day for 42 d. Tumor volume and body weight were measured biweekly. Food intake was recorded once a week. Locomotor activity was detected weekly using an open field test (OFT). Compared to the fluoxetine, mirtazapine significantly increased food intake from d 14 to 42 and attenuated the rate of weight loss from d 28 to 42 (t = 4.38, P < 0.05). Compared to the control group, food intake was significantly suppressed from d 21 to 42 and weight loss was promoted from d 35 to 42 in the fluoxetine group (t = 2.52, P < 0.05). There was a significant difference in body weight of the mice after removal of tumors among the three groups. The body weight of mice was the heaviest (13.66 +/- 1.55 g) in the mirtazapine group and the lightest (11.39 +/- 1.45 g) in the fluoxetine group (F( (2,12) ) = 11.43, P < 0.01). The behavioral test on d 7 showed that the horizontal and vertical activities were significantly increased in the mirtazapine group compared with the fluoxetine and control groups (F( (2,18) ) = 10.89, P < 0.01). These effects disappeared in the mirtazapine and fluoxetine groups during 2-6 wk. The grooming activity was higher in the mirtazapine group than in the fluoxetine group (10.1 +/- 2.1 vs 7.1 +/- 1.9 ) (t = 2.40, P < 0.05) in the second week. There was no

  17. Efficacy of nimotuzumab plus gemcitabine usage as first-line treatment in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Su, Dan; Jiao, Shun-Chang; Wang, Li-Jie; Shi, Wei-Wei; Long, Yan-Yan; Li, Juan; Bai, Li

    2014-03-01

    Advanced pancreatic cancer patients have poor prognosis and scarcely respond to conventional therapies. Clinical trials support the use of molecular-targeted therapy against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the contribution of a monoclonal antibody against EGFR, nimotuzumab, to standard gemcitabine therapy. Patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were assigned to receive gemcitabine plus nimotuzumab. The primary end point was overall survival, whereas the secondary end points included progression-free survival, objective response, and adverse side effects. A total of 18 eligible patients were accrued between December 2007 and July 2010. The disease control rate, calculated as the sum of complete response, partial response, and stable disease, was 55.6%. The median overall survival time was 9.29 months (95% CI, 5.499 to 13.072). The median progression-free survival was 3.71 months (95% CI, 2.526 to 4.902), and the 1-year survival rate was 38.9%. Of all the patients, 88.8% had at least one adverse side effect; however, no grade 4 adverse side effect was reported. Nimotuzumab as a high-purity humanized monoclonal antibody with favorable safety profile, its value in the treatment of pancreatic cancer along with gemcitabine, particularly in the comprehensive treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer, is appealing for further prospective randomized large-scale clinical trials.

  18. A matched-cohort analysis of 192 pancreatic anaplastic carcinomas and 960 pancreatic adenocarcinomas: A 13-year North American experience using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB).

    PubMed

    Paniccia, Alessandro; Hosokawa, Patrick W; Schulick, Richard D; Henderson, William; Kaplan, Jeffrey; Gajdos, Csaba

    2016-08-01

    Anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (APC) is a rare and poorly characterized disease. We sought to compare the clinical characteristics and outcomes of APC to pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The American National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected APC and PDAC using histologic and operative codes. APC cases were matched 1:5 with PDACs based on age, sex, pathologic tumor stage, operative margin status, lymph node positivity ratio, and use of adjuvant chemotherapy. After 1:5 matching, 192 APCs and 960 PDACs were analyzed. When comparing APC vs PDAC the median tumor size was 45 mm (interquartile range, 33-60) vs 30 mm (interquartile range, 23-40; P < .001), and metastatic nodal disease was present in 40.6% and 38.0% of the cases (P = .25), respectively. APC cases were distributed equally between the head and the body/tail region of the pancreas (50%), while PDAC cases were located mainly in the head of the pancreas (75%; P < .001). Although the resected APC group had a lesser survival during the first year after the diagnosis (51% vs 69%; P = .029), the overall survival was similar in the 2 groups, with 21.6% vs 17.4% alive at 5 years, respectively for APC and PDAC (P = .32). Subgroup analysis of patients with APC with (n = 18) versus those without (n = 80) osteoclastlike giant cells showed a greater 5-year survival (50% versus 15%, P < .001). Patients with resected APC tend to present with large tumors equally distributed between the head and body/tail of the pancreas. While APC is thought to have a more aggressive biology, our matched analysis showed similar overall survival compared with PDAC. The presence of osteoclastlike giant cells portends a significantly better prognosis compared with other histologic features of APCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Challenging Surgical Approach to Locally Advanced Primary Urethral Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Spilotros, Marco; Vavallo, Antonio; Palazzo, Silvano; Miacola, Carlos; Forte, Saverio; Matera, Matteo; Campagna, Marcello; Colamonico, Ottavio; Schiralli, Francesco; Sebastiani, Francesco; Di Cosmo, Federica; Bettocchi, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Buonerba, Carlo; Vincenti, Leonardo; Ludovico, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Battaglia, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary urethral carcinoma (PUC) is a rare and aggressive cancer, often underdetected and consequently unsatisfactorily treated. We report a case of advanced PUC, surgically treated with combined approaches. A 47-year-old man underwent transurethral resection of a urethral lesion with histological evidence of a poorly differentiated squamous cancer of the bulbomembranous urethra. Computed tomography (CT) and bone scans excluded metastatic spread of the disease but showed involvement of both corpora cavernosa (cT3N0M0). A radical surgical approach was advised, but the patient refused this and opted for chemotherapy. After 17 months the patient was referred to our department due to the evidence of a fistula in the scrotal area. CT scan showed bilateral metastatic disease in the inguinal, external iliac, and obturator lymph nodes as well as the involvement of both corpora cavernosa. Additionally, a fistula originating from the right corpus cavernosum extended to the scrotal skin. At this stage, the patient accepted the surgical treatment, consisting of different phases. Phase I: Radical extraperitoneal cystoprostatectomy with iliac-obturator lymph nodes dissection. Phase II: Creation of a urinary diversion through a Bricker ileal conduit. Phase III: Repositioning of the patient in lithotomic position for an overturned Y skin incision, total penectomy, fistula excision, and “en bloc” removal of surgical specimens including the bladder, through the perineal breach. Phase IV: Right inguinal lymphadenectomy. The procedure lasted 9-and-a-half hours, was complication-free, and intraoperative blood loss was 600 mL. The patient was discharged 8 days after surgery. Pathological examination documented a T4N2M0 tumor. The clinical situation was stable during the first 3 months postoperatively but then metastatic spread occurred, not responsive to adjuvant chemotherapy, which led to the patient's death 6 months after surgery. Patients with advanced stage tumors of

  20. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging.

  1. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Participants With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  2. Overexpression of homeobox B-13 correlates with angiogenesis, aberrant expression of EMT markers, aggressive characteristics and poor prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Lu-Lu; Wu, Yang; Cai, Chong-Yang; Tang, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the expression of homeobox B (Hoxb)-13 and analyze its relationship with tumor angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated markers (E-cadherin and vimentin), clinicopathologic data and prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry was applied to determine the level of Hoxb-13 expression in tumor tissues and surrounding non-tumor tissues from 85 subjects with pancreatic carcinoma. Besides, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD31, E-cadherin and vimentin were also detected in tumor tissues by immunostaining. We found that the level of Hoxb-13 expression was significantly higher in pancreatic carcinoma tissues than in paracarcinomatous tissues (P < 0.05). Hoxb-13 staining was positively correlated with VEGF (r = 0.429, P < 0.001) and microvessel density (MVD) (r = 0.454, P < 0.001). Likewise, Hoxb-13 staining was positively correlated with vimentin (r = 0.448, P < 0.001); while it was negatively correlated with E-cadherin (r = -0.405, P < 0.001). High Hoxb-13 expression was associated with aggressive clinicopathological characteristics, worse disease-free survival (DFS) (P < 0.001) and worse overall survival (OS) (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that Hoxb-13 was an independent predictor for poor DFS (P < 0.001) and OS (P = 0.002). In conclusion, our data show that overexpressed Hoxb-13 is correlated with tumor angiogenesis, aberrant expression of EMT-associated markers and aggressive clinicopathological characteristics, and serves as a promising marker for unfavourable prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma.

  3. Recent advances in the management of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Ana M.; Nanus, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have significantly improved over the past few years with the recent approval of two new agents resulting in prolonged progression-free and overall survival. PMID:27019698

  4. Prometheus' spirit: quality survival in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma after gemcitabine and cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Doval, D C; Pande, S B; Sharma, J B; Pavithran, K; Jena, A; Vaid, A K

    2008-10-01

    In advanced virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) associated with cirrhosis, the average survival is four months. We report a 56-year-old man with a large-volume advanced HCC, in whom gemcitabine and cisplatin-based chemotherapy resulted in near-complete regression, and quality survival of 24 months.

  5. Two different scenarios of squamous cell carcinoma within advanced Basal cell carcinomas: cases illustrating the importance of serial biopsy during vismodegib usage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gefei A; Sundram, Uma; Chang, Anne Lynn S

    2014-09-01

    Vismodegib is a Hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitor recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for advanced basal cell carcinoma. We present 2 cases of clinically significant squamous cell carcinoma within the tumor bed of locally advanced basal cell carcinoma found during vismodegib treatment. The first case is that of a patient with locally advanced basal cell carcinoma responsive to vismodegib but with an enlarging papule within the tumor bed. On biopsy, this papule was an invasive acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma. The second case is that of a patient with Gorlin syndrome with a locally advanced basal cell carcinoma that was stable while the patient was receiving therapy with vismodegib for 2.5 years but subsequently increased in size. Biopsy specimens from this tumor showed invasive squamous cell carcinoma, spindle cell subtype. In both cases, the squamous cell carcinomas were surgically resected. These cases highlight the importance of repeated biopsy in locally advanced basal cell carcinomas in 2 clinical situations: (1) when an area within the tumor responds differentially to vismodegib, and (2) when a tumor stops being suppressed by vismodegib. Timely diagnosis of non-basal cell histologic characteristics is critical to institution of effective therapy.

  6. Correlation between Ultrasound Reflection Intensity and Tumor Ablation Ratio of Late-Stage Pancreatic Carcinoma in HIFU Therapy: Dynamic Observation on Ultrasound Reflection Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Hui-Yu; Miao, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Rui; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Yan, Fang; Zheng, Cui-Shan; Jia, Jian-Wen; Cui, Li-Gang; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is thermal ablation treatment for late-stage pancreatic carcinoma with widely recognized safety and effectiveness, but there are currently no instant assessment methods for its ablation effect. It is vital to find a real-time high-sensitive assessment method. This research aims to dynamically observe the variation rules of ultrasound reflection intensity, analyze the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio, and find out the value of ultrasound reflection intensity in prognosis of HIFU ablation effect. HIFU intermittent therapies were retrospectively analyzed for 31 subjects with late-stage pancreatic carcinoma from March 2007 to December 2009 in the study. The variation rules of the ultrasound reflection intensity during HIFU therapy were summarized and the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio was analyzed based on the tumor ablation ratio indicated by CT scanning. The conclusion is that variation of ultrasound reflection intensity can be used for initial assessment of tumor ablation in HIFU therapy and early prognosis of overall HIFU ablation, providing important clinical basis for improving safety and effectiveness of HIFU therapy. Ultrasound can work as a real-time imaging instrument for observation of HIFU ablation effect in treating late-stage pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:24453916

  7. Effects of a non thermal plasma treatment alone or in combination with gemcitabine in a MIA PaCa2-luc orthotopic pancreatic carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Martel, Eric; Robert, Eric; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Trichet, Valérie; Richard, Serge; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel; Le Pape, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are the gastrointestinal cancer with the worst prognosis in humans and with a survival rate of 5% at 5 years. Nowadays, no chemotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in terms of survival for this cancer. Previous study focused on the development of a new therapy by non thermal plasma showed significant effects on tumor growth for colorectal carcinoma and glioblastoma. To allow targeted treatment, a fibered plasma (Plasma Gun) was developed and its evaluation was performed on an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma using a MIA PaCa2-luc bioluminescent cell line. The aim of this study was to characterize this pancreatic carcinoma model and to determine the effects of Plasma Gun alone or in combination with gemcitabine. During a 36 days period, quantitative BLI could be used to follow the tumor progression and we demonstrated that plasma gun induced an inhibition of MIA PaCa2-luc cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo and that this effect could be improved by association with gemcitabine possibly thanks to its radiosensitizing properties.

  8. Correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio of late-stage pancreatic carcinoma in HIFU therapy: dynamic observation on ultrasound reflection intensity.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui-Yu; Miao, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Rui; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Yan, Fang; Zheng, Cui-Shan; Jia, Jian-Wen; Cui, Li-Gang; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is thermal ablation treatment for late-stage pancreatic carcinoma with widely recognized safety and effectiveness, but there are currently no instant assessment methods for its ablation effect. It is vital to find a real-time high-sensitive assessment method. This research aims to dynamically observe the variation rules of ultrasound reflection intensity, analyze the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio, and find out the value of ultrasound reflection intensity in prognosis of HIFU ablation effect. HIFU intermittent therapies were retrospectively analyzed for 31 subjects with late-stage pancreatic carcinoma from March 2007 to December 2009 in the study. The variation rules of the ultrasound reflection intensity during HIFU therapy were summarized and the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio was analyzed based on the tumor ablation ratio indicated by CT scanning. The conclusion is that variation of ultrasound reflection intensity can be used for initial assessment of tumor ablation in HIFU therapy and early prognosis of overall HIFU ablation, providing important clinical basis for improving safety and effectiveness of HIFU therapy. Ultrasound can work as a real-time imaging instrument for observation of HIFU ablation effect in treating late-stage pancreatic carcinoma.

  9. Effects of a Non Thermal Plasma Treatment Alone or in Combination with Gemcitabine in a MIA PaCa2-luc Orthotopic Pancreatic Carcinoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Martel, Eric; Robert, Eric; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Trichet, Valérie; Richard, Serge; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel; Le Pape, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are the gastrointestinal cancer with the worst prognosis in humans and with a survival rate of 5% at 5 years. Nowadays, no chemotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in terms of survival for this cancer. Previous study focused on the development of a new therapy by non thermal plasma showed significant effects on tumor growth for colorectal carcinoma and glioblastoma. To allow targeted treatment, a fibered plasma (Plasma Gun) was developed and its evaluation was performed on an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma using a MIA PaCa2-luc bioluminescent cell line. The aim of this study was to characterize this pancreatic carcinoma model and to determine the effects of Plasma Gun alone or in combination with gemcitabine. During a 36 days period, quantitative BLI could be used to follow the tumor progression and we demonstrated that plasma gun induced an inhibition of MIA PaCa2-luc cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo and that this effect could be improved by association with gemcitabine possibly thanks to its radiosensitizing properties. PMID:23300736

  10. Metastatic pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma in a younger male with marked AFP production: A potential pitfall on fine needle aspiration biopsy.

    PubMed

    Valente, Kari; Yacoub, George; Cappellari, James O; Parks, Graham

    2017-02-01

    A 30-year-old male presented to his doctor with complaints of abdominal pain and was found to have retroperitoneal as well as multiple hepatic masses. A serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level was significantly elevated (17,373 ng mL(-1) ), raising suspicions for a metastatic germ cell tumor. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreatic lesion revealed atypical epithelioid cells with round nuclei, large prominent nucleoli, and granular cytoplasm. The morphologic differential diagnosis included pancreatic neoplasm, metastatic germ cell tumor, other metastatic carcinoma, and melanoma. An extensive panel of immunohistochemical stains confirmed the diagnosis of acinar cell carcinoma. The diagnosis of acinar cell carcinoma could be confounded by the markedly increased AFP level, particularly in the setting of a retroperitoneal mass in a younger male. The increased AFP level in the setting of an acinar cell tumor is a potential pitfall to correct diagnosis by cytology. As the treatment for these two entities differs considerably, acute awareness of the phenomenon is important. We present a case of pancreatic ACC with an increased AFP level diagnosed on a cytology specimen. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:133-136. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Tailored α-methylene-γ-butyrolactones and their effects on growth suppression in pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, P Veeraraghavan; Pratihar, Debarshi; Nair, Hari Narayanan G; Walters, Matthew; Smith, Sadie; Yip-Schneider, Michele T; Wu, Huangbing; Schmidt, C Max

    2010-11-15

    A selected series of racemic α-methylene-γ-butyrolactones (AMGBL) were synthesized via allylboration and screened against three human pancreatic cancer cell lines (Panc-1, MIA PaCa-2, and BxPC-3). This systematic study established a discernible relationship between the substitution pattern of AMGBL and their anti-proliferative activity. β,γ-diaryl-AMGBLs, particularly those with a trans-relationship exhibited higher potency than parthenolide and LC-1 against all three cell lines.

  12. In vivo induction of dendritic cell-mediated cytotoxicity against allogeneic pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Stift, Anton; Friedl, Josef; Dubsky, Peter; Bachleitner-Hofmann, Thomas; Benkoe, Thomas; Brostjan, Christine; Jakesz, Raimund; Gnant, Michael

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the toxicity and immunological response induced by autologous dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with allogeneic tumor lysate in a pancreatic cancer patient. The lack of available tumor peptides in pancreatic cancer strongly supports the idea to use allogeneic tumor cells as a source of antigens. The patient suffering from a stage IV pancreatic cancer received 1-2x10(7) autologous monocyte-derived DCs in three-week intervals injected into a groin lymph node. Monocytes from peripheral blood were isolated by magnetic bead selection. For the first ten vaccinations DCs were loaded with autologous tumor cell lysate obtained during surgical exploration. After consumption of the autologous lysate, equal numbers of DCs were pulsed with lysate of the tumor cell line AsPc-1 and BxPc-3 for a further five vaccinations. Peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNCs) were harvested after the seventh and compared with PMNCs obtained after the fourteenth vaccination for immunological response. Delayed type hypersensitivity reactivity to DCs pulsed with autologous and allogeneic tumor lysate was also assessed. The patient received a total of fifteen vaccinations. There was no toxicity or evidence of autoimmunity observed. Delayed type hypersensitivity was found to be positive for the autologous as well as the allogeneic tumor lysate pulsed DCs. in vitro cytotoxicity assays demonstrated a dramatic increase of the PMNC killing capacity against the pancreatic cancer cell lines AsPc-1 and BxPc-3 after the fourteenth compared to the seventh vaccination. CT scans revealed a stable disease for six months. The administration of autologous DCs pulsed with allogeneic tumor lysate is non-toxic and suitable for inducing an immunological anti-tumor response. Even though this study was confined to a single patient, the data might open a door for novel immunotherapeutical strategies.

  13. Multicenter retrospective analysis of systemic chemotherapy for advanced neuroendocrine carcinoma of the digestive system.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Machida, Nozomu; Morizane, Chigusa; Kasuga, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hideaki; Sudo, Kentaro; Nishina, Tomohiro; Tobimatsu, Kazutoshi; Ishido, Kenji; Furuse, Junji; Boku, Narikazu; Okusaka, Takuji

    2014-09-01

    This study analyzed outcomes of systemic chemotherapy for advanced neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) of the digestive system. Clinical data from 258 patients with unresectable or recurrent NEC of the gastrointestinal tract (GI) or hepato-biliary-pancreatic system (HBP), who received chemotherapy, were collected from 23 Japanese institutions and analyzed retrospectively. Patients had primary sites in the esophagus (n = 85), stomach (n = 70), small bowel (n = 6), colorectum (n = 31), hepato-biliary system (n = 31) and pancreas (n = 31). Median overall survival (OS) was 13.4 months the esophagus, 13.3 months for the stomach, 29.7 months for the small bowel, 7.6 months for the colorectum, 7.9 months for the hepato-biliary system and 8.5 months for the pancreas. Irinotecan plus cisplatin (IP) and etoposide plus cisplatin (EP) were most commonly selected for GI-NEC and HBP-NEC. For patients treated with IP/EP (n = 160/46), the response rate was 50/28% and median OS was 13.0/7.3 months. Multivariate analysis among patients treated with IP or EP showed that the primary site (GI vs HBP; hazard ratio [HR] 0.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.35-0.97) and baseline serum lactate dehydrogenase levels (not elevated vs elevated; HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.46-0.94) were independent prognostic factors for OS, while the efficacy of IP was slightly better than for EP (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.48-1.33; P = 0.389). IP and EP are the most common treatment regimens for NEC of the digestive system. HBP primary sites and elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels are unfavorable prognostic factors for survival. A randomized controlled trial is required to establish the appropriate chemotherapy regimen for advanced NEC of the digestive system. This study was registered at UMIN as trial number 000005176. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induction by alternol in pancreatic carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Pei-Fang; Qu, Ying-Chun; Chen, Jie-Peng; Duan, Li-Li; Lin, Cheng-Jiang; Zhu, Xiao-Lin; Li-Ling, Jesse; Zhang, Mei-Xia

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of alternol on pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS: Pancreatic cancer cells PANC-1 and BxPC3 were treated with various concentrations of alternol for 24, 48 and 72 h. Cell proliferation was measured by cell counting. Cell cycle distribution and mitochondrial membrane potential were determined by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was determined by a TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay and Hoechst staining. Expression of caspase 3, Bcl-2, p53 and p21 was measured by western blotting. RESULTS: Alternol showed dose- and time-dependent inhibition of the proliferation of PANC-1 and BxPC3 cells in vitro. Alternol induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at S phase and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Alternol activated caspase 3, upregulated p53 and p21 expression, and downregulated Bcl-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: Our results suggested that alternol is a candidate for treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25914461

  15. The Aurora-A-Twist1 axis promotes highly aggressive phenotypes in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Nikhil, Kumar; Viccaro, Keith; Chang, Lei; Jacobsen, Max; Sandusky, George; Shah, Kavita

    2017-03-15

    We uncovered a crucial role for the Aurora kinase A (AURKA)-Twist1 axis in promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. Twist1 is the first EMT-specific target of AURKA that was identified using an innovative screen. AURKA phosphorylates Twist1 at three sites, which results in its multifaceted regulation - AURKA inhibits its ubiquitylation, increases its transcriptional activity and favors its homodimerization. Twist1 reciprocates and prevents AURKA degradation, thereby triggering a feedback loop. Ablation of either AURKA or Twist1 completely inhibits EMT, highlighting both proteins as central players in EMT progression. Phosphorylation-dead Twist1 serves as a dominant-negative and fully reverses the EMT phenotype induced by Twist1, underscoring the crucial role of AURKA-mediated phosphorylation in mediating Twist1-induced malignancy. Likewise, Twist1-overexpressing BxPC3 cells formed large tumors in vivo, whereas expression of phosphorylation-dead Twist1 fully abrogated this effect. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic cancer specimens revealed a 3-fold higher level of Twist1 compared to that seen in healthy normal tissues. This is the first study that links Twist1 in a feedback loop with its activating kinase, which indicates that concurrent inhibition of AURKA and Twist1 will be synergistic in inhibiting pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis.

  16. Pembrolizumab Combined With Itacitinib (INCB039110) and/or Pembrolizumab Combined With INCB050465 in Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Advanced Solid Tumors; Endometrial Cancer; Melanoma; Microsatellite Unstable (MSI) Colorectal Cancer; MMR-deficient Tumors; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Genitourinary Tract; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Nutritional status of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Leah M; Bell, Diana; Thornton, Jennifer; Black, Glenda; McCorkle, Ruth; Heimburger, Douglas C; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2011-11-01

    Nutritional status may influence quality of life and prognosis among pancreatic cancer patients, yet few studies describe measures of nutritional status during treatment. We evaluated the nutritional status of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy who received baseline nutritional assessment and counseling. Fourteen newly diagnosed LAPC patients enrolled in phase I/II trials of capecitabine with concomitant radiotherapy were assessed for baseline clinical nutrition measures (body mass index, albumin, weight loss, total energy, and protein intake). Participants completed the Anorexia/Cachexia Subscale (A/CS) questionnaire at baseline and during the 6 weeks of treatment. We evaluated associations between baseline characteristics and subsequent A/CS scores with linear regression and changes in A/CS were assessed with the paired t test. We observed a statistically significant increase in mean A/CS between baseline [24.9, standard deviation (SD) = 9.7] and end of treatment (29.9, SD = 6.2). Controlling for baseline A/CS score, only weight loss greater than 5% of body weight over 1 month was associated with A/CS scores at 6 weeks (β = 10.558, standard error = 3.307, p value = 0.009) and mean A/CS scores during the last 3 weeks of treatment (β = 12.739, standard error = 2.251, p value = 0.001). After 6 weeks of chemoradiotherapy, LAPC patients reported a statistically significant improvement in appetite and weight concerns. Increases in AC/S scores were associated with higher baseline A/CS scores and weight loss of 5% or more during 1 month. Further research is needed to determine the impact of nutritional support during treatment, as improvements in this domain may impact LAPC patients' overall quality of life.

  18. Treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma: recent advances and current role of immunotherapy, surgery, and cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mennitto, Alessia; Verzoni, Elena; Calareso, Giuseppina; Spreafico, Carlo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2017-01-21

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the 10th most common cancer in Western countries. The prognosis of metastatic disease is unfavorable but may be different according to several risk factors, such as histology and clinical features (Karnofsky performance status, time from nephrectomy, hemoglobin level, neutrophils and thrombocytes count, lactate dehydrogenase and calcium serum value, sites and extension of the disease). In this review, we focused on some recent developments in the use of immunotherapy, surgery and cryotherapy in the treatment of advanced disease. While RCC is unresponsive to chemotherapy, recent advances have emerged with the development of targeted agents and innovative immunotherapy-based treatments. Surgical resection remains the standard of care for patients with small renal lesions but in patients with significant comorbidities ablative therapies such as cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation may lead to local cancer control and avoid surgical complications and morbidity. In the setting of metastatic RCC, radical nephrectomy, or cytoreductive nephrectomy, is considered a palliative surgery, usually part of a multimodality treatment approach that requires systemic treatments.

  19. A pilot clinical trial of the cholecystokinin receptor antagonist MK-329 in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzese, J L; Gholson, C F; Daugherty, K; Larson, E; DuBrow, R; Berlin, R; Levin, B

    1992-01-01

    MK-329 is a nonpeptidal, highly specific cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonist, with affinity for pancreatic and gallbladder CCK receptors similar to CCK itself. MK-329 and its progenitor, asperlicin, can inhibit the growth of CCK receptor-positive human pancreatic cancer in athymic mice. Based on these activities and the ability of MK-329 to transiently increase food intake and enhance morphine analgesia in murine models, we conducted an open trial of MK-329 in 18 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in whom the CCK receptor status of the tumors was unknown. Tumor response, pain control, and nutritional parameters (hunger rating, caloric intake, body weight, and anthropometrics) were serially assessed. The results of the study failed to demonstrate any impact of MK-329 on tumor progression, pain, or nutrition. Toxicity was mild and limited to nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps, with 17 of 18 patients able to tolerate treatment. While a role for MK-329 in the management of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer cannot be supported by the results of this trial, additional studies of this agent in patients with known CCK receptor-positive tumors, at escalated doses, and possibly in conjunction with other growth antagonists, appear warranted.

  20. Chemoradioimmunotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic and biliary tree adenocarcinoma: a multicenter phase II study.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Francesco; Sica, Gigliola; Candeloro, Giampiero; Bisegna, Roberta; Bratta, Massimo; Bonfili, Pierluigi; Necozione, Stefano; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Rea, Silvio

    2009-08-01

    The antitumor activity and toxicity of a multi-step treatment were evaluated in patients with locally advanced, inoperable, or incompletely resected pancreatic (Pa) and biliary tree (Bt) adenocarcinomas (ADKs). Fifty-four patients, 63% with Pa and 37% with Bt ADK, received 3 courses of cisplatin-gemcitabine induction chemotherapy. Progression-free (PF) patients were given consolidation radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine. PF patients had, as maintenance immunotherapy (MI), interleukin 2 (1.8x10 IU) and 13-cis-retinoic acid (0.5 mg/kg) [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED]. Thirty-eight patients, 27 with Pa and 11 with Bt ADKs, PF after cisplatin/gemcitabine, were treated with consolidation radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine. Fourteen PF patients, 7 with Pa and 7 with Bt ADK, received MI. Median PF and overall survivals (OS) for all 54 patients were 6.8 and 12.1 months, respectively. Patients treated with MI had a median PF survival of 16.2 months, whereas median OS had not been reached yet, after a median follow-up of 27.5 months. Grades 3 and 4 hematological and gastrointestinal in 30% and 37% of patients, respectively; grades 1 and 2 autoimmune reactions in 28% of patients. These results support the efficacy and safety of a multi-step sequential treatment in patients with locally advanced, inoperable or incompletely resected Pa and Bt ADKs.

  1. Dietary consumption of advanced glycation end products and pancreatic cancer in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Li; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Zimmerman, Thea Palmer; Duan, Zhigang; Chen, Liang; Kahle, Lisa; Risch, Adam; Subar, Amy F; Cross, Amanda J; Hollenbeck, Albert; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary; Sinha, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of compounds present in uncooked foods as well as in foods cooked at high temperatures. AGEs have been associated with insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation in patients with diabetes. Dietary AGEs are an important contributor to the AGE pool in the body. N(ϵ)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) AGE is one of the major biologically and chemically well-characterized AGE markers. The consumption of red meat, which is CML-AGE rich, has been positively associated with pancreatic cancer in men. With the use of a published food CML-AGE database, we estimated the consumption of CML AGE in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and evaluated the association between CML-AGE consumption and pancreatic cancer and the mediating effect of CML AGE on the association between red meat consumption and pancreatic cancer. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs for pancreatic cancer. During an average of 10.5 y of follow-up, we identified 2193 pancreatic cancer cases (1407 men and 786 women) from 528,251 subjects. With the comparison of subjects in the fifth and the first quintiles of CML-AGE consumption, we observed increased pancreatic cancer risk in men (HR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.93, P-trend = 0.003) but not women (HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.72, P-trend = 0.42). Men in the highest quintile of red meat consumption had higher risk of pancreatic cancer (HR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.70), which attenuated after adjustment for CML-AGE consumption (HR: 1.20; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.53). Dietary CML-AGE consumption was associated with modestly increased risk of pancreatic cancer in men and may partially explain the positive association between red meat and pancreatic cancer. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Differential ezrin and phosphorylated ezrin expression profiles between pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, and invasive ductal carcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yasunori; Aishima, Shinichi; Morimatsu, Katsuya; Hayashi, Akifumi; Shindo, Koji; Fujino, Minoru; Mizuuchi, Yusuke; Hattori, Masami; Tanaka, Masao; Oda, Yoshinao

    2013-08-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs) are important premalignant lesions of pancreatic cancer. Ezrin is a member of the ezrin, radixin, and moesin protein family and acts as a cross-linker between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton. We investigated the roles of ezrin during carcinogenesis in IPMN and invasive ductal carcinoma and examined whether ezrin was a prognostic factor. We examined ezrin and phosphorylated ezrin (p-ezrin) expression in 131 IPMNs, 47 PanINs, and 59 invasive ductal carcinomas by immunohistochemical staining. Ezrin and p-ezrin (tyr354) expressions were significantly higher in IPMN with an associated invasive carcinoma, compared with those in IPMN with high-grade dysplasia (P = .03 and P = .0007, respectively). In all grades of PanINs, ezrin and p-ezrin (tyr353) were highly expressed. In patients with invasive ductal carcinoma, the presence of PanIN-2 or PanIN-3 was significantly correlated with positive ezrin and p-ezrin (tyr353) expression of the invasive ductal carcinoma component (P = .01 and P = .0004). The negative p-ezrin (tyr353) expression group of invasive ductal carcinoma showed a significantly worse prognosis than did the positive p-ezrin (tyr353) expression group by survival analysis (P = .04) and was a statistically significant adverse prognostic factor by both univariate and multivariate analyses (P = .048 and P = .015). Ezrin phosphorylation sites differ between the developments of IPMN and PanIN. Although p-ezrin (tyr354) expression in IPMNs is associated with tumor invasion, p-ezrin (tyr353) expression in invasive ductal carcinoma plays an important role not in tumor invasion and metastasis but in the early development of PanINs.

  3. Retinoic acid receptor alpha mediates growth inhibition by retinoids in rat pancreatic carcinoma DSL-6A/C1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brembeck, F. H.; Kaiser, A.; Detjen, K.; Hotz, H.; Foitzik, T.; Buhr, H. J.; Riecken, E. O.; Rosewicz, S.

    1998-01-01

    During carcinogenesis, pancreatic acinar cells can dedifferentiate into ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. DSL-6A/C1 cells represent an in vitro model of this carcinogenic sequence. This study was designed to examine the effects of retinoids on cell growth in DSL-6A/C1 cells and to characterize further the molecular mechanisms underlying the antiproliferative actions of retinoids. Treatment of DSL-6A/C1 cells with retinoids results in a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth, paralleled by a retinoid-mediated transactivation of a pTK::betaRAREx2-luciferase reporter construct transiently transfected into DSL-6A/C1 cells. Retinoid receptor expression was evaluated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using subtype-specific primers and demonstrated expression of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR-alpha), RAR-beta and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR-alpha). Using a panel of receptor subtype-specific agonists, the RAR-alpha specific agonist Ro 40-6055 was the most potent retinoid in terms of growth inhibition. Furthermore, all-trans-retinoic acid-mediated growth inhibition and transactivation was completely blocked by the RAR-alpha-specific antagonist Ro 41-5253. In summary, the RAR-alpha subtype predominantly mediates the antiproliferative effects of retinoids in DSL-6A/C1 cells. Furthermore, this cell system provides a feasible tool to study the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth inhibitory effects of retinoids in ductal pancreatic carcinoma cells derived from a primary acinar cell phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:9823968

  4. Retinoic acid receptor alpha mediates growth inhibition by retinoids in rat pancreatic carcinoma DSL-6A/C1 cells.

    PubMed

    Brembeck, F H; Kaiser, A; Detjen, K; Hotz, H; Foitzik, T; Buhr, H J; Riecken, E O; Rosewicz, S

    1998-11-01

    During carcinogenesis, pancreatic acinar cells can dedifferentiate into ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. DSL-6A/C1 cells represent an in vitro model of this carcinogenic sequence. This study was designed to examine the effects of retinoids on cell growth in DSL-6A/C1 cells and to characterize further the molecular mechanisms underlying the antiproliferative actions of retinoids. Treatment of DSL-6A/C1 cells with retinoids results in a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth, paralleled by a retinoid-mediated transactivation of a pTK::betaRAREx2-luciferase reporter construct transiently transfected into DSL-6A/C1 cells. Retinoid receptor expression was evaluated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using subtype-specific primers and demonstrated expression of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR-alpha), RAR-beta and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR-alpha). Using a panel of receptor subtype-specific agonists, the RAR-alpha specific agonist Ro 40-6055 was the most potent retinoid in terms of growth inhibition. Furthermore, all-trans-retinoic acid-mediated growth inhibition and transactivation was completely blocked by the RAR-alpha-specific antagonist Ro 41-5253. In summary, the RAR-alpha subtype predominantly mediates the antiproliferative effects of retinoids in DSL-6A/C1 cells. Furthermore, this cell system provides a feasible tool to study the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth inhibitory effects of retinoids in ductal pancreatic carcinoma cells derived from a primary acinar cell phenotype.

  5. An Unusual Case of Locally Advanced Glycogen-Rich Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Beatriz; Berná-Serna, Juan D.; Sánchez-Henarejos, Pilar; López-Poveda, María J.; Berná-Mestre, Juan D.; Rodríguez-García, José R.

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen-rich clear cell (GRCC) is a rare subtype of breast carcinoma characterized by carcinoma cells containing an optically clear cytoplasm and intracytoplasmic glycogen. We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with a palpable mass in the right breast and clinical signs of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). The diagnosis of GRCC carcinoma was based on certain histopathological characteristics of the tumor and immunohistochemical analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first case of GRCC LABC with intratumoral calcifications. There is no evidence of recurrence or metastatic disease after 14 months’ follow-up. PMID:22087097

  6. Strategies for early detection of resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Okano, Keiichi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2014-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose at an early stage and generally has a poor prognosis. Surgical resection is the only potentially curative treatment for pancreatic carcinoma. To improve the prognosis of this disease, it is essential to detect tumors at early stages, when they are resectable. The optimal approach to screening for early pancreatic neoplasia has not been established. The International Cancer of the Pancreas Screening Consortium has recently finalized several recommendations regarding the management of patients who are at an increased risk of familial pancreatic cancer. In addition, there have been notable advances in research on serum markers, tissue markers, gene signatures, and genomic targets of pancreatic cancer. To date, however, no biomarkers have been established in the clinical setting. Advancements in imaging modalities touch all aspects of the clinical management of pancreatic diseases, including the early detection of pancreatic masses, their characterization, and evaluations of tumor resectability. This article reviews strategies for screening high-risk groups, biomarkers, and current advances in imaging modalities for the early detection of resectable pancreatic cancer.

  7. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  8. Optical diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma using advanced optical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-02-01

    Clinical imaging techniques for diagnosing breast cancer mainly include X-ray mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which have respective drawbacks. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a potentially attractive optical technique to bridge the current gap in clinical utility. In this paper, MPM was used to image normal and ductal cancerous breast tissues, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Our results showed that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of normal breast tissue, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) lesions at the molecular level comparable to histopathology. These findings indicate that, with integration of MPM into currently accepted clinical imaging system, it has the potential to make a real-time histological diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma in vivo.

  9. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy in Resected Pancreatic Carcinoma: Long-Term Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Morganti, Alessio G.; Macchia, Gabriella Mantini, Giovanna; Mattiucci, Gian C.; Brizi, M. Gabriella; Alfieri, Sergio; Bossola, Maurizio; Pacelli, Fabio; Sofo, Luigi; Doglietto, Giovanbattista; Cellini, Numa

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: The combination of external radiotherapy (RT) plus intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in patients with pancreatic cancer is still debated. This study presents long-term results (minimum follow-up, 102 months) for 26 patients undergoing integrated adjuvant RT (external RT + IORT). Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 1995, a total of 17 patients with pancreatic cancer underwent IORT (10 Gy) and postoperative external RT (50.4 Gy). Preoperative 'flash' RT was included for the last 9 patients. The liver and pancreatic head received 5 Gy (two 2.5-Gy fractions) the day before surgery. In the subsequent period (1996-1998), 9 patients underwent preoperative concomitant chemoradiation (39.6 Gy) with 5-fluorouracil, IORT (10 Gy), and adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Preoperative chemoradiation was completed in all patients, whereas postoperative therapy was completed in 13 of 17 patients. All 26 patients underwent pancreatectomy (25 R0 and one R1 resections). One patient died of postoperative complications (3.8%) not related to IORT. The 9 patients undergoing concomitant chemoradiation were candidates for adjuvant chemotherapy; however, only 4 of 9 underwent adjuvant chemotherapy. At last follow-up, 4 patients (15.4%) were alive and disease free. Disease recurrence was documented in 20 patients (76.9%). Sixteen patients (61.5%) showed distant metastasis, and 5 patients (19.2%) showed local recurrence. The incidence of local recurrence in R0 patients was 4 of 25 (16.0%). The overall 5-year survival rate was 15.4%. There was significant correlation with overall survival of tumor diameter (p = 0.019). Conclusions: The incidence of local recurrence in this long follow-up series (19.2%) was definitely less than that reported in other studies of adjuvant RT ({approx}50%), suggesting a positive impact on local control of integrated adjuvant RT (IORT + external RT)

  10. Gemcitabine as second-line chemotherapy after Folfirinox failure in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Viaud, Juliette; Brac, Clémence; Artru, Pascal; Le Pabic, Estelle; Leconte, Bérengère; Bodère, Anaïs; Pracht, Marc; Le Sourd, Samuel; Edeline, Julien; Lièvre, Astrid

    2017-06-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA) is diagnosed in most cases at an advanced stage requiring chemotherapy. Folfirinox is the standard first-line treatment. After Folfirinox failure, gemcitabine alone is routinely used as second-line therapy without data supporting this attitude. Determine the response rate and outcome of patients with advanced PA treated with gemcitabine after Folfirinox failure. We retrospectively analyzed all consecutive patients treated with gemcitabine after Folfirinox failure for a locally advanced or metastatic PA between 2009 and 2015. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Response rate, control rate and tolerability were assessed. 96 patients were included (male, 51%; median age, 62; performance status (PS) 0-1, 47%). Median duration on gemcitabine was 2.1 months. The overall disease control rate was 40%. Median OS was 3.7 months (95%CI: 2.5-5.2) and median PFS was 2.1 months (95%CI: 2.0-2.6). Reasons for treatment discontinuation were mostly progression (51%). Age at diagnosis and PS were independently associated with OS in multivariate analysis (HR of 1.86; p=0.0055 and 2.42; p<0.0001 respectively). 34 patients experienced a grade 3 adverse event. This study suggests that gemcitabine is not beneficial to all patients failing on Folfirinox first-line therapy and should be restricted to young patients with good PS. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pancreatic pseudocysts and aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2010-01-01

    A number of methods are available for the drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts, including percutaneous, endoscopic and open approaches. The author reviewed the most rently reports, and and summarized the latest advances in the pancreatic pseudocysts. PMID:22558566

  12. Hedgehog pathway inhibition in advanced basal cell carcinoma: latest evidence and clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Silapunt, Sirunya; Chen, Leon; Migden, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of locally advanced basal cell carcinomas (laBCCs) with large, aggressive, destructive, and disfiguring tumors, or metastatic disease is challenging. Dysregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified in the vast majority of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). There are two United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA)-approved Hh pathway inhibitors (HPIs) that exhibit antitumor activity in advanced BCC with an acceptable safety profile. Common adverse effects include muscle spasms, dysgeusia, alopecia, fatigue, nausea and weight loss. PMID:27583029

  13. Phase I study of oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo . E-mail: yama.take@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Shirai, Yoshihiko; Nakagawa, Akihiko; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 at escalating doses from 60 to 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Results: Sixteen patients were enrolled in this study. Three patients received S-1 at 60 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 3 at 70 mg/m{sup 2}/day, and 10 at 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Though 1 patient at the final dose level (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) experienced a dose limiting toxicity (biliary infection with Grade 3 neutropenia), the MTD was not reached in this study. The most common toxicities were anorexia and leukocytopenia, with Grade 3 toxicity occurring in 31% and 6.3% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy was determined to be 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Oral S-1 and radiotherapy is well tolerated and feasible and should be further investigated.

  14. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy in patients with borderline resectable and unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Michele; Ramella, Sara; Valeri, Sergio; Caputo, Damiano; Floreno, Barnaba; Trecca, Pasquale; Trodella, Luca Eolo; Trodella, Lucio; D’Angelillo, Rolando Maria; Coppola, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    There is not a clear consensus regarding the optimal treatment of locally advanced pancreatic disease. There is a potential role for neoadjuvant therapy to treat micrometastatic disease with chemotherapy, as well as for the treatment of local disease with radiotherapy. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of induction chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and gemcitabine followed by a high weekly dose of gemcitabine concurrent to radiation therapy in patients with borderline resectable and unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. In our study, 41 patients with pancreatic cancer were evaluated. In all cases an accurate pre-treatment staging was performed. Patients with evidence of metastatic disease were excluded, and thus a total of 34 patients were consequently enrolled. Of these, twenty-seven patients (80%) had locally advanced unresectable tumours, seven patients (20%) had borderline resectable disease. This protocol treatment represents a well-tolerated promising approach. Fifteen patients (55.5%) underwent surgical radical resection. With a median follow-up of 20 months, the median PFS and OS were 20 months and 19.2 months, respectively. The median OS for borderline resectable patients was 21.5 months compared with 14 months for unresectable patients (p = 0.3). Continued optimization in multimodality therapy and an accurate patient selection remain crucial points for the appropriate treatment of these patients. PMID:28378800

  15. Development of Aggressive Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas Depends on Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Secretion in Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Pickup, Michael W; Owens, Philip; Gorska, Agnieszka E; Chytil, Anna; Ye, Fei; Shi, Chanjuan; Weaver, Valerie M; Kalluri, Raghu; Moses, Harold L; Novitskiy, Sergey V

    2017-09-01

    The survival rate for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains low. More therapeutic options to treat this disease are needed, for the current standard of care is ineffective. Using an animal model of aggressive PDAC (Kras/p48(TGFβRIIKO)), we discovered an effect of TGFβ signaling in regulation of G-CSF secretion in pancreatic epithelium. Elevated concentrations of G-CSF in PDAC promoted differentiation of Ly6G(+) cells from progenitors, stimulated IL10 secretion from myeloid cells, and decreased T-cell proliferation via upregulation of Arg, iNOS, VEGF, IL6, and IL1b from CD11b(+) cells. Deletion of csf3 in PDAC cells or use of a G-CSF-blocking antibody decreased tumor growth. Anti-G-CSF treatment in combination with the DNA synthesis inhibitor gemcitabine reduced tumor size, increased the number of infiltrating T cells, and decreased the number of Ly6G(+) cells more effectively than gemcitabine alone. Human analysis of human datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas and tissue microarrays correlated with observations from our mouse model experiments, especially in patients with grade 1, stage II disease. We propose that in aggressive PDAC, elevated G-CSF contributes to tumor progression through promoting increases in infiltration of neutrophil-like cells with high immunosuppressive activity. Such a mechanism provides an avenue for a neoadjuvant therapeutic approach for this devastating disease. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(9); 718-29. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. KRAS mutant allele-specific imbalance is associated with worse prognosis in pancreatic cancer and progression to undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Moser, A James; Saka, Burcu; Adsay, N Volkan; Chiosea, Simion I

    2013-10-01

    KRAS codon 12 mutations are present in about 90% of ductal adenocarcinomas and in undifferentiated carcinomas of the pancreas. The role of KRAS copy number changes and resulting KRAS mutant allele-specific imbalance (MASI) in ductal adenocarcinoma (n=94), and its progression into undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas (n=25) was studied by direct sequencing and KRAS fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Semi-quantitative evaluation of sequencing electropherograms showed KRAS MASI (ie, mutant allele peak higher than or equal to the wild-type allele peak) in 22 (18.4%) cases. KRAS FISH (performed on 45 cases) revealed a trend for more frequent KRAS amplification among cases with KRAS MASI (7/20, 35% vs 3/25, 12%, P=0.08). KRAS amplification by FISH was seen only in undifferentiated carcinomas (10/24, 42% vs 0/21 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, 0%, P=0.0007). In 6 of 11 cases with both undifferentiated and well-differentiated components, transition to undifferentiated carcinoma was associated with an increase in KRAS copy number, due to amplification and/or chromosome 12 hyperploidy. Pancreatic carcinomas with KRAS MASI (compared to those without MASI) were predominantly undifferentiated (16/22, 73% vs 9/97, 9%, P<0.001), more likely to present at clinical stage IV (5/22, 23% vs 7/97, 7%, P=0.009), and were associated with shorter overall survival (9 months, 95% confidence interval, 5-13, vs 22 months, 95% confidence interval, 17-27; P=0.015) and shorter disease-free survival (5 months, 95% confidence interval, 2-8 vs 13 months, 95% confidence interval, 10-16; P=0.02). Our findings suggest that in a subset of ductal adenocarcinomas, KRAS MASI correlates with the progression to undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas.

  17. "Puestow modified procedure in the era of advanced endoscopic interventions for the management of chronic lithiasic pancreatitis. A two cases report".

    PubMed

    Fragulidis, Georgios P; Vezakis, Αntonios; Dellaportas, Dionissios; Sotirova, Ira; Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Kontis, Elliseos; Polydorou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic duct calculi in chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients are the main cause of intractable pain which is their main symptom. Decompression options of for the main pancreatic duct are both surgical and advanced endoscopic procedures. A 64-year-old male with known CP due to alcohol consumption and a 36-year-old female with known idiopathic CP and pancreatic duct calculi were managed recently in our hospital where endoscopic procedures were unsuccessful. A surgical therapy was considered and a longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (modified Puestow procedure) in both patients was performed with excellent results. Over the last 30 years, endoscopic procedures are developed to manage pancreatic duct strictures and calculi of the main pancreatic duct in CP patients. In both of our cases endoscopic therapy was first attempted but failed to extract the pancreatic duct stones, due to their size and speculations. Modified Puestow procedure was performed for both and it was successful for long term pain relief. Despite advancement in endoscopic interventions and less invasive therapies for the management of chronic lithiasic pancreatitis we consider that classic surgical management can be appropriate in certain cases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid induces both EGFR-dependent and EGFR-independent effects on DNA synthesis and migration in pancreatic and colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tveteraas, Ingun Heiene; Aasrum, Monica; Brusevold, Ingvild Johnsen; Ødegård, John; Christoffersen, Thoralf; Sandnes, Dagny

    2016-02-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a small glycerophospholipid ubiquitously present in tissues and plasma. It acts through receptors belonging to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, is involved in several biological processes, and is strongly implicated in different cancers. In this paper, we have investigated the effects of LPA on DNA synthesis and migration in a panel of pancreatic and colon cancer cells, with particular focus on the involvement of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) in LPA-induced signaling. LPA stimulated DNA synthesis and/or migration in all the cell lines included in this study. In five of the six cell lines, LPA induced phosphorylation of the EGFR, and the effects on EGFR and Akt, and in some of the cells also ERK, were sensitive to the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib, strongly suggesting LPA-induced EGFR transactivation in these cells. In contrast, in one of the pancreatic carcinoma cell lines (Panc-1), we found no evidence of transactivation of the EGFR. In the pancreatic carcinoma cell lines where transactivation took place (BxPC3, AsPC1, HPAFII), gefitinib reduced LPA-induced DNA synthesis and/or migration. However, we also found evidence of transactivation in the two colon carcinoma cell lines (HT29, HCT116) although gefitinib did not inhibit LPA-induced DNA synthesis or migration in these cells. Taken together, the data indicate that in many gastrointestinal carcinoma cells, LPA uses EGFR transactivation as a mechanism when exerting such effects as stimulation of cell proliferation and migration, but EGFR-independent pathways may be involved instead of, or in concerted action with, the EGFR transactivation.

  19. A somatostatin-secreting cell line established from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma (somatostatinoma): release experiment and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, H; Hayashi, I; Kono, A

    1990-06-15

    Production and secretion of somatostatin (SRIF) were studied using a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-producing cell line (QGP-1) established from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma. High concentrations of SRIF (274 +/- 51 ng/mg of protein, mean +/- SD, n = 5) and CEA (3083 +/- 347 ng/mg of protein, mean +/- SD, n = 5) were present in QGP-1 cells, and the basal secretion rates of SRIF and CEA by the cells (n = 5) were 46.4 +/- 4.8 and 1690 +/- 78 pg/10(5) cells/h, respectively. Immunohistochemical studies revealed the presence of SRIF in xenografts of QGP-1 cells and colocalization of SRIF and CEA. Secretion of SRIF by QGP-1 cells was stimulated in the presence of high K+ (50 mmol) and theophylline (10 mmol), but arginine (10 mmol) and glucose (300 mg/dl) had no effect on the SRIF secretion. The QGP-1 cell line may be useful for studying the regulation mechanism of SRIF secretion.

  20. Interleukin-33 acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine and modulates its receptor gene expression in highly metastatic human pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Annett; Multhoff, Gabriele; Radons, Jürgen

    2012-11-01

    Human pancreatic cancer is one of the most fatal of all solid tissue malignancies. Pancreatic inflammation plays a key role in the development of pancreatic malignancy mediated by pro-inflammatory signalling cascades. Despite advances in surgery and radiation oncology, no significant improvements in overall survival have yet been achieved. Recent investigations suggest a crucial role of interleukin-33 (IL-33), a novel IL-1 family cytokine, in the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis and possibly pancreatic cancer. However, the precise role of IL-33 in pancreatic carcinogenesis is poorly understood. As IL-33 mediates its effects via the heterodimeric ST2L/IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL-1RAcP) receptor complex, we investigated the influence of IL-33 alone, IL-33 combined with IL-1 and other inflammatory cytokines on IL-33 receptor/ligand mRNA expression and production of tumorigenic factors in the highly metastatic human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line Colo357. Our results demonstrated that IL-1 and IL-3 up-regulated IL-33 mRNA while IL-12 showed the opposite effect. We also detected a counter-regulatory effect of IL-33 and IL-1 on the mRNA expression of soluble IL-33 receptor ST2 and membrane-bound receptor ST2L. Furthermore, IL-33 and IL-1 acted synergistically in up-regulating secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6. IL-33 alone stimulated spontaneous release of pro-angiogenic IL-8, but it did not affect IL-1-induced IL-8 secretion. IL-33/IL-1 effects on cytokine production appear to be mediated via NF-κB activation. These data argue for the pro-inflammatory role of IL-33 in Colo357 cells implying that IL-33 might act as a crucial mediator in inflammation-associated pancreatic carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Superior therapeutic efficacy of nab-paclitaxel over cremophor-based paclitaxel in locally advanced and metastatic models of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Rajeshkumar, N V; Yabuuchi, Shinichi; Pai, Shweta G; Tong, Zeen; Hou, Shihe; Bateman, Scott; Pierce, Daniel W; Heise, Carla; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Maitra, Anirban; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2016-08-09

    Albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel, nab-PTX) plus gemcitabine (GEM) combination has demonstrated efficient antitumour activity and statistically significant overall survival of patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) compared with GEM monotherapy. This regimen is currently approved as a standard of care treatment option for patients with metastatic PDAC. It is unclear whether cremophor-based PTX combined with GEM provide a similar level of therapeutic efficacy in PDAC. We comprehensively explored the antitumour efficacy, effect on metastatic dissemination, tumour stroma and survival advantage following GEM, PTX and nab-PTX as monotherapy or in combination with GEM in a locally advanced, and a highly metastatic orthotopic model of human PDAC. Nab-PTX treatment resulted in significantly higher paclitaxel tumour plasma ratio (1.98-fold), robust stromal depletion, antitumour efficacy (3.79-fold) and survival benefit compared with PTX treatment. PTX plus GEM treatment showed no survival gain over GEM monotherapy. However, nab-PTX in combination with GEM decreased primary tumour burden, metastatic dissemination and significantly increased median survival of animals compared with either agents alone. These therapeutic effects were accompanied by depletion of dense fibrotic tumour stroma and decreased proliferation of carcinoma cells. Notably, nab-PTX monotherapy was equivalent to nab-PTX plus GEM in providing survival advantage to mice in a highly aggressive metastatic PDAC model, indicating that nab-PTX could potentially stop the progression of late-stage pancreatic cancer. Our data confirmed that therapeutic efficacy of PTX and nab-PTX vary widely, and the contention that these agents elicit similar antitumour response was not supported. The addition of PTX to GEM showed no survival advantage, concluding that a clinical combination of PTX and GEM may unlikely to provide significant survival advantage over GEM monotherapy and may not be a

  2. Superior therapeutic efficacy of nab-paclitaxel over cremophor-based paclitaxel in locally advanced and metastatic models of human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rajeshkumar, N V; Yabuuchi, Shinichi; Pai, Shweta G; Tong, Zeen; Hou, Shihe; Bateman, Scott; Pierce, Daniel W; Heise, Carla; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Maitra, Anirban; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel, nab-PTX) plus gemcitabine (GEM) combination has demonstrated efficient antitumour activity and statistically significant overall survival of patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) compared with GEM monotherapy. This regimen is currently approved as a standard of care treatment option for patients with metastatic PDAC. It is unclear whether cremophor-based PTX combined with GEM provide a similar level of therapeutic efficacy in PDAC. Methods: We comprehensively explored the antitumour efficacy, effect on metastatic dissemination, tumour stroma and survival advantage following GEM, PTX and nab-PTX as monotherapy or in combination with GEM in a locally advanced, and a highly metastatic orthotopic model of human PDAC. Results: Nab-PTX treatment resulted in significantly higher paclitaxel tumour plasma ratio (1.98-fold), robust stromal depletion, antitumour efficacy (3.79-fold) and survival benefit compared with PTX treatment. PTX plus GEM treatment showed no survival gain over GEM monotherapy. However, nab-PTX in combination with GEM decreased primary tumour burden, metastatic dissemination and significantly increased median survival of animals compared with either agents alone. These therapeutic effects were accompanied by depletion of dense fibrotic tumour stroma and decreased proliferation of carcinoma cells. Notably, nab-PTX monotherapy was equivalent to nab-PTX plus GEM in providing survival advantage to mice in a highly aggressive metastatic PDAC model, indicating that nab-PTX could potentially stop the progression of late-stage pancreatic cancer. Conclusions: Our data confirmed that therapeutic efficacy of PTX and nab-PTX vary widely, and the contention that these agents elicit similar antitumour response was not supported. The addition of PTX to GEM showed no survival advantage, concluding that a clinical combination of PTX and GEM may unlikely to provide significant survival

  3. Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: Flourishing Novel Approaches in the Era of Biological Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Joanne W.; Wong, Hilda; Leung, Roland; Pang, Roberta; Cheung, Tan-To; Fan, Sheung-Tat; Poon, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    The progress in the development of systemic treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) has been slow. The mainstream treatment remains using chemotherapy including gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, and nab-paclitaxel. Erlotinib is the only approved biological therapy with marginal benefit. Studies of agents targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and RAS signaling have not been satisfying, and the usefulness of targeted therapy in APC is uncertain. Understanding in molecular processes and tumor biology has opened the door for new treatment strategies such as targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, transforming growth factor β, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and Notch pathway. New directions also include the upcoming immunotherapy and many novel agents that act on the microenvironment. The practice of personalized medicine using predictive biomarkers and pharmacogenomics signatures may also enhance the effectiveness of existing treatment. Future treatment approaches may involve comprehensive genomic assessment of tumor and integrated combinations of multiple agents to overcome treatment resistance. PMID:25117068

  4. Inherited pancreatic endocrine tumor syndromes: advances in molecular pathogenesis, diagnosis, management and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Robert T.; Berna, Marc J.; Bingham, David B; Norton, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) can occur in as part of four inherited disorders including: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), neurofibromatosis 1(NF-1) [von Recklinghausen’s disease] and the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The relative frequency with which patients with these disorders develop PETs is MEN1>VHL>NF-1>TSC. Over the last few years there have been major advances in the understanding of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of these disorders as well in the localization, medical and surgical treatment of the PETs in these patients. The study of the PETs in these disorders has not only provided insights into the possible pathogenesis of sporadic PETs, but have also presented a number of unique management and treatment issues, some of which are applicable to patients with sporadic PETs. Therefore the study of PETs in these uncommon disorders has provided valuable insights that in many cases are applicable to the general group of patients with sporadic PETs. In this article these areas are briefly reviewed as well as the current state of knowledge of the PETs in these disorders and the controversies that exist in their management are briefly summarized and discussed. PMID:18798544

  5. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  6. Beyond first-line chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer: An expanding array of therapeutic options?

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Evan J; Ko, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    While an increasing number of therapeutic options are now available for the first-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, the optimal choice for treatment in the second-line setting and beyond is less well defined. A variety of cytotoxic agents, either alone or in combination, have been evaluated, although primarily in the context of small single-arm or retrospective studies. Most regimens have been associated with median progression-free survival rates in the range of 2-4 mo and overall survival rates between 4-8 mo, highlighting the very poor prognosis of patients who are candidates for such treatment. Targeted therapies studied in this chemotherapy-refractory setting, meanwhile, have produced even worse efficacy results. In the current article, we review the clinical evidence for treatment of refractory disease, primarily in patients who have progressed on front-line gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. In the process, we highlight the limitations of the available data to date as well as some of the challenges in designing appropriate clinical trials in this salvage setting, including how to select an appropriate control arm given the absence of a well-established reference standard, and the importance of incorporating predictive biomarkers and quality of life measures whenever possible into study design. PMID:24605022

  7. Sesamin Ameliorates Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang; Wang, Guo-Dong; Ma, Ming-Zhe; Deng, Ru-Yuan; Guo, Li-Qun; Zhang, Jun-Xiu; Yang, Jie-Ren; Su, Qing

    2015-06-09

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the direct modulators of β-cells, have been shown to cause insulin-producing β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis through increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Sesamin has been demonstrated to possess antioxidative activity. This study was designed to investigate whether sesamin protects against AGEs-evoked β-cell damage via its antioxidant property. The effects of sesamin were examined in C57BL/6J mice and MIN6 cell line. In in vivo studies, mice were intraperitoneally injected with AGEs (120 mg/kg) and orally treated with sesamin (160 mg/kg) for four weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin releasing tests were performed. Insulin content, ROS generation and β-cell apoptosis in pancreatic islets were also measured. In in vitro studies, MIN6 cells were pretreated with sesamin (50 or 100 μM) and then exposed to AGEs (200 mg/L) for 24 h. Insulin secretion, β-cell death, ROS production as well as expression and activity of NADPH oxidase were determined. Sesamin treatment obviously ameliorated AGE-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro. These effects were associated with decreased ROS production, down-regulated expression of p67(phox) and p22(phox), and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. These results suggest that sesamin protects β-cells from damage caused by AGEs through suppressing NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress.

  8. Prognostic Significance of a Minute Amount of Ascites During Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shinoto, Makoto; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Nishie, Akihiro; Asayama, Yoshiki; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Terashima, Kotaro; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical factors for predicting overall survival (OS) and the significance of a minute amount of ascites on computed tomography (CT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Between 2003 and 2011, 48 consecutive patients with LAPC were treated with CRT. Various clinical factors, including ascites, were evaluated for correlation with OS. A subset analysis of 16 patients with a minute amount of ascites was also performed. The median survival duration and the 1-year OS rates were 11.5 months and 50%, respectively. A minute amount of ascites on CT and elevated carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) level were significantly associated with poorer OS. In 16 patients with ascites, the amount of ascites increased in the course of the disease, and these were considered to be cancerous clinically, regardless of the amount. A minute amount of ascites and CA19-9 were important prognostic factors in CRT. Any amount of ascites was considered an early indicator of peritoneal carcinomatosis in LAPC. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. Sesamin Ameliorates Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang; Wang, Guo-Dong; Ma, Ming-Zhe; Deng, Ru-Yuan; Guo, Li-Qun; Zhang, Jun-Xiu; Yang, Jie-Ren; Su, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the direct modulators of β-cells, have been shown to cause insulin-producing β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis through increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Sesamin has been demonstrated to possess antioxidative activity. This study was designed to investigate whether sesamin protects against AGEs-evoked β-cell damage via its antioxidant property. The effects of sesamin were examined in C57BL/6J mice and MIN6 cell line. In in vivo studies, mice were intraperitoneally injected with AGEs (120 mg/kg) and orally treated with sesamin (160 mg/kg) for four weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin releasing tests were performed. Insulin content, ROS generation and β-cell apoptosis in pancreatic islets were also measured. In in vitro studies, MIN6 cells were pretreated with sesamin (50 or 100 μM) and then exposed to AGEs (200 mg/L) for 24 h. Insulin secretion, β-cell death, ROS production as well as expression and activity of NADPH oxidase were determined. Sesamin treatment obviously ameliorated AGE-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro. These effects were associated with decreased ROS production, down-regulated expression of p67phox and p22phox, and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. These results suggest that sesamin protects β-cells from damage caused by AGEs through suppressing NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:26066015

  10. High Volume Washing of the Abdomen in Increasing Survival After Surgery in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Ampulla of Vater Adenocarcinoma; Cholangiocarcinoma; Duodenal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm, Pancreatobiliary-Type; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma

  11. Phase II Study of Oral S-1 and Concurrent Radiotherapy in Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Hara, Taro; Denda, Tadamichi; Tawada, Katsunobu; Imagumbai, Toshiyuki; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro; Hatano, Kazuo; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative that has demonstrated favorable antitumor activity in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35. Two weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 was administered for 28 days every 6 weeks until progression. Results: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in this study. The most common Grade 3 toxicities during chemoradiotherapy were anorexia (24%) and nausea (12%). The overall response rate was 41% (95% confidence interval, 25%-58%) and overall disease control rate (partial response plus stable disease) was 97%. More than 50% decrease in serum CA 19-9 was seen in 27 of 29 evaluable patients (93%). The median progression-free survival was 8.7 months. The median overall survival and 1-year survival rate were 16.8 months and 70.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy exerted a promising antitumor activity with acceptable toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This combination therapy seems to be an attractive alternative to conventional chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil infusion.

  12. The miR-24-Bim pathway promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Likun; Li, Hongli; Deng, Ting; Qu, Yanjun; Duan, Jingjing; Bai, Ming; Ge, Shaohua; Ning, Tao; Zhang, Le

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are a group of small RNAs that have been reported to play a key role at each stage of tumorigenesis and are believed to have future practical value. We now demonstrate that Bim, which stimulates cell apoptosis, is obviously down-regulated in pancreatic cancer (PaC) tissues and cell lines. And Bim-related miR-24 is significantly up-regulated in PaC. The repressed expression of Bim is proved to be a result of miR-24, thus promoting cell growth of both cancer and vascular cells, and accelerating vascular ring formation. By using mouse tumor model, we clearly showed that miR-24 promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by suppressing Bim expression in vivo. Therefore, a new pathway comprising miR-24 and Bim can be used in the exploration of drug-target therapy of PaC. PMID:26517093

  13. The miR-24-Bim pathway promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Likun; Li, Hongli; Deng, Ting; Qu, Yanjun; Duan, Jingjing; Bai, Ming; Ge, Shaohua; Ning, Tao; Zhang, Le; Huang, Dingzhi; Ba, Yi

    2015-12-22

    miRNAs are a group of small RNAs that have been reported to play a key role at each stage of tumorigenesis and are believed to have future practical value. We now demonstrate that Bim, which stimulates cell apoptosis, is obviously down-regulated in pancreatic cancer (PaC) tissues and cell lines. And Bim-related miR-24 is significantly up-regulated in PaC. The repressed expression of Bim is proved to be a result of miR-24, thus promoting cell growth of both cancer and vascular cells, and accelerating vascular ring formation. By using mouse tumor model, we clearly showed that miR-24 promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by suppressing Bim expression in vivo. Therefore, a new pathway comprising miR-24 and Bim can be used in the exploration of drug-target therapy of PaC.

  14. Optical characterization of lesions and identification of surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma by using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing; Hong, Zhipeng; Chen, Hong; Chen, Youting; Xu, Yahao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Shi, Zheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy has become a powerful instrument for imaging unstained tissue samples in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TPEF imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) stain can be used to characterize lesions and identify surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The specimens of a pancreatic metastasis from RCC, as well as a primary RCC from a patient, were examined by TPEF microscopy and compared with their corresponding H-E stained histopathological results. The results showed that high-resolution TPEF imaging of unstained histological sections of pancreatic metastasis from RCC can reveal that the typical morphology of the tissue and cells in cancer tissues is different from the normal pancreas. It also clearly presented histopathological features of the collagenous capsule, which is an important boundary symbol to identify normal and cancerous tissue and to instruct surgical operation. It indicated the feasibility of using TPEF microscopy to make an optical diagnosis of lesions and identify the surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from RCC.

  15. Hints to the diagnosis of mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma on pancreatic fine-needle aspiration: avoiding a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Peggy S; Clebanoff, Jennifer L; Hirschowitz, Sharon L

    2013-01-01

    Mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma (MAEC) is a rare mixed tumor of the pancreas defined by both acinar and endocrine cell differentiation. We present 2 cases of MAEC initially diagnosed as pancreatic endocrine neoplasm on fine-needle aspiration. Both patients were male, aged 51 and 75 years, and presented with 16-mm and 6-mm pancreatic masses, respectively. Aspirates showed loose aggregates and dispersed single plasmacytoid cells with moderate nuclear size variation, slightly irregular nuclear contours, fine to coarsely granular chromatin, occasional prominent nucleoli, and scant to moderate finely granular cytoplasm. Rare mitotic figures and pyknotic forms were noted in one of the cases. Endocrine differentiation was confirmed by immunocytochemistry which led to an initial diagnosis of pancreatic endocrine neoplasm. Trypsin and lipase immunocytochemistry were later obtained, confirming a component of acinar cell differentiation. Findings were confirmed on surgical excision. Because of their potentially more aggressive clinical course and different therapeutic implications, MAECs are an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms. Certain cytomorphologic features and immunocytochemical markers of acinar cell differentiation may be helpful in raising the possibility of MAEC on cytology. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Conditional deletion of p53 and Rb in the renin-expressing compartment of the pancreas leads to a highly penetrant metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Glenn, S T; Jones, C A; Sexton, S; LeVea, C M; Caraker, S M; Hajduczok, G; Gross, K W

    2014-12-11

    Efforts to model human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) in animals have been moderately successful, with minimal evidence for glucagonomas or metastatic spread. The renin gene, although classically associated with expression in the kidney, is also expressed in many other extrarenal tissues including the pancreas. To induce tumorigenesis within rennin-specific tissues, floxed alleles of p53 and Rb were selectively abrogated using Cre-recombinase driven by the renin promoter. The primary neoplasm generated is a highly metastatic islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. Lineage tracing identifies descendants of renin-expressing cells as pancreatic alpha cells despite a lack of active renin expression in the mature pancreas. Both primary and metastatic tumors express high levels of glucagon; furthermore, an increased level of glucagon is found in the serum, identifying the pancreatic cancer as a functional glucagonoma. This new model is highly penetrant and exhibits robust frequency of metastases to the lymph nodes and the liver, mimicking human disease, and provides a useful platform for better understanding pancreatic endocrine differentiation and development, as well as islet cell carcinogenesis. The use of fluorescent reporters for lineage tracing of the cells contributing to disease initiation and progression provides an unique opportunity to dissect the timeline of disease, examining mechanisms of the metastatic process, as well as recovering primary and metastatic cells for identifying cooperating mutations that are necessary for progression of disease.

  17. Changing the course of pancreatic cancer--Focus on recent translational advances.

    PubMed

    Javle, Milind; Golan, Talia; Maitra, Anirban

    2016-03-01

    In the past decade, insightful preclinical research has led to important breakthroughs in our understanding of pancreatic cancer. Even though the vast majority of pancreatic cancers are KRAS mutated, not all pancreatic cancer tumors are "KRAS equal"; there seems to be varying dependencies on the KRAS pathway. While KRAS-targeting therapies have been disappointing in the clinic, 'synthetic lethal' approaches hold promise in this setting. The pancreatic cancer stromal microenvironment appears to have contradictory roles. While there is evidence to suggest that stromal barrier prevents drug delivery, in other circumstances, stroma can play a protective role and its disruption enhances tumor dissemination. Clinical trials aimed at manipulating the various stromal components are in progress. BRCA mutation-related pancreatic tumors illustrate a unique subtype with enhanced susceptibility to DNA damaging agents and PARP-inhibition. DNA repair defects in cancer extend beyond germ line BRCA mutation and may extend the indications for DNA repair-targeting agents. Immune strategies are an area of active investigation in pancreatic cancer. Although the initial trials of single-agent checkpoint inhibitors have been negative, combinational approaches using immune-modifying agents and vaccines appear promising and goal is to identify an 'immune-therapy responsive' profile in pancreatic cancer.

  18. Early tumor shrinkage as a predictor of favorable outcomes in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated with FOLFIRINOX

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Yutaro; Tagawa, Teppei; Yamamoto, Taikan; Ikusue, Toshikazu; Uto, Yu; Miyashita, Kouichirou; Toshima, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Kouji; Hisamatsu, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Wataru; Sekikawa, Takashi; Shimada, Ken; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2016-01-01

    There are several reports on the correlation between early tumor shrinkage (ETS) or depth of response (DpR) and survival in chemotherapies for colorectal cancer; however, few studies have investigated it in pancreatic cancer. We therefore investigated whether the ETS will predict outcomes in 59 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated with FOLFIRINOX therapy. The association of ETS with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was evaluated but also we addressed to the correlation between outcomes and DpR. ETS was defined as a reduction ≥ 20% of target lesions' diameters measured at 6 to 8 weeks from treatment start. DpR was percentage of maximal tumor shrinkage observed at the nadir diameter compared with baseline. Among 47 evaluable patients for the ETS, 12 (25.5%) patients experienced ETS. The ETS was significantly associated with better PFS (9.0 vs. 4.2 months) as well as OS (24.0 vs. 9.1 months); moreover, the association had a statistically significance for PFS but a strong trend for OS in multivariate analysis. The DpR was statistically significantly but weakly associated with OS. In conclusion, this is the first report that the early response to chemotherapy may predict favorable outcomes in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated with FOLFIRINOX therapy. PMID:27634903

  19. Vismodegib: a guide to its use in locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A; Keating, Gillian M

    2013-02-01

    Vismodegib is the first Hedgehog pathway inhibitor to be approved in the USA, where it is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or with locally advanced BCC that has recurred following surgery or who are not candidates for surgery, and who are not candidates for radiation. In an ongoing, noncomparative, phase II trial, oral vismodegib was effective in and had an acceptable tolerability profile in the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic BCC.

  20. Vaginal metastasis of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Benhayoune, Khadija; El Fatemi, Hinde; El Ghaouti, Meryem; Bannani, Abdelaziz; Melhouf, Abdelilah; Harmouch, Taoufik

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal metastasis from pancreatic cancer is an extreme case and often indicates a poor prognosis. We present a case of pancreatic carcinoma with metastasis to the vagina that was discovered by vaginal bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the third case in the world of a primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma discovered of symptoms from a vaginal metastasis.

  1. Sunitinib treatment for multifocal renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) in patient with Von Hippel-Lindau disease. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Babinska, Anna; Studniarek, Michał; Świątkowska-Stodulska, Renata; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) is an autosomal, dominant, hereditary disease occurring in approximately one in 36,000 births. VHL disease produces a variety of tumors and cysts in the central nervous system and visceral organs. Surgical management, when possible, improves prognosis and extends patient's life. When surgery is impossible, treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors demonstrates encouraging response rates. We present a 60-year old patient with coexistence of multifocal renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) in VHL disease, who received Sunitinib as the best option of treatment. Progression - free survival time is over 4 years. Regarding her acceptable tolerance for tyrosine kinase inhibitors, medical treatment is continued. RCC and pancreatic NET associated with VHL are responsive to Sunitinib for prolonged periods of time. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment for patients with multiple neoplasms associated with VHL disease may too be considered. Sunitinib showed acceptable toxicity.

  2. Preclinical evaluation of herpes simplex virus armed with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Yuan, Shou-Jun; Chen, Ying-Tai; Xie, Yi-Bin; Cui, Liang; Yang, Wei-Zhi; Yang, De-Xuan; Tian, Yan-Tao

    2013-08-21

    To investigate the therapeutic efficacy and mechanisms of action of oncolytic-herpes-simplex-virus encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (HSV(GM-CSF)) in pancreatic carcinoma. Tumor blocks were homogenized in a sterile grinder in saline. The homogenate was injected into the right armpit of each mouse. After vaccination, the mice were randomly assigned into four groups: a control group, a high dose HSV(GM-CSF) group [1 × 10⁷ plaque forming units (pfu)/tumor], a medium dose HSV(GM-CSF) group (5 × 10⁶ pfu/tumor) and a low dose HSV(GM-CSF) group (5 × 10⁵ pfu/tumor). After initiation of drug administration, body weights and tumor diameters were measured every 3 d. Fifteen days later, after decapitation of the animal by cervical dislocation, each tumor was isolated, weighed and stored in 10% formaldehyde solution. The drug effectiveness was evaluated according to the weight, volume and relative volume change of each tumor. Furthermore, GM-CSF protein levels in serum were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at 1, 2, 3 and 4 d after injection of HSV(GM-CSF). Injection of the recombinant mouse HSV encoding GM-CSF resulted in a significant reduction in tumor growth compared to the control group, and dose-dependent effects were observed: the relative tumor proliferation rates of the low dose, medium dose and high dose groups on 15 d after injection were 45.5%, 55.2% and 65.5%, respectively. The inhibition rates of the tumor weights of the low, middle, and high dose groups were 41.4%, 46.7% and 50.5%, respectively. Furthermore, the production of GM-CSF was significantly increased in the mice infected with HSV(GM-CSF). The increase in the GM-CSF level was more pronounced in the high dose group compared to the other two dose groups. Our study provides the first evidence that HSV(GM-CSF) could inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer. The enhanced GM-CSF expression might be responsible for the phenomenon.

  3. Vascular enhancement pattern of mass in computed tomography may predict chemo-responsiveness in advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin Il; Shin, Jun Young; Park, Jin-Seok; Jeong, Seok; Jeon, Yong Sun; Choi, Moon Han; Choi, Hyun Jong; Moon, Jong Ho; Hwang, Jae Chul; Yang, Min Jae; Yoo, Byoung Moo; Kim, Jin Hong; Lee, Hyun Woo; Kwon, Chang-Il; Lee, Don Haeng

    Chemo-responsiveness in pancreatic cancer is known to be dependent on fibrosis and vascularity. The purpose of this study was to assess vascular enhancement in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma with or without liver metastasis in computed tomography (CT) and to analyze the correlation between enhancement patterns and chemo-responsiveness. Patients were assigned to either a responder group (partial response or stable disease) or a non-responder group (progressive disease) according to chemo-responsiveness assessed by CT before and after gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. Hounsefield unit (HU) was measured in pancreatic mass and the largest metastatic liver mass using region of interest (ROI). HU differences (ΔHU) between arterial and pre-contrast phase were calculated. Of the 101 study subjects, 78(77.2%) were assigned to the pancreas responder group {mean ΔHU (±SD), 36.7(±21.6)} and 23(22.8%) to the pancreas non-responder group {mean ΔHU (±SD), 20.6(±9.9)} (p = 0.001 for ΔHUs). Of the 46 study subjects with liver metastasis, 25(54.3%) were assigned to the liver metastasis responder group {mean ΔHU (±SD), 36.9(±21.0} and 21(45.7%) to the liver metastasis non-responder group {mean ΔHU (±SD), 17.1 (±24.0)}, (p = 0.005 for ΔHUs). CT determined mass vascular enhancement patterns may predict chemoresponse in advanced pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical results with megestrol acetate in patients with advanced carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Ansfield, F J; Kallas, G J; Singson, J P

    1982-12-01

    Since it has been clearly established that multiple drug chemotherapy is more effective than the use of a single drug for advanced carcinoma of the breast, the latter is not commonly used today. However, upon failure of one of two combinations of drugs, if any of these drugs are then tried singly they are rarely useful, and valuable time is lost. It is at this point that megestrol acetate, a potent progestin, was found to be effective in 30 per cent of a series of 161 patients with advanced carcinoma of the breast. This drug was given orally, 40 milligrams, after each meal and at bedtime, without any toxicity or any undesirable reactions, except a weight gain--not fluid retention--in patients less than 55 years of age. The average duration of response was 8.1 months from onset of megestrol acetate therapy and for the group classified as unchanged, 5.2 months. This drug is at least as effective as any steroid or cytotoxic compound but has the advantage of not producing toxicity and, with the exception of weight gain in patients less than 55 years, no undesirable reactions of any kind, such as bone marrow depression, alopecia, nausea, vomiting or diarrhea. Hence, it can be properly administered by the patient's physician or surgeon. Since oncologists known that medroxyprogesterone therapy had not shown promising use for advanced carcinoma of the breast, it was assumed that megestrol acetate also had little activity, and hence, it was not used. However, those who did give it a trial found it a valuable compound in the management of advanced carcinoma of the breast, even after failure of all hormonal or cytotoxic combination trials. It proved to serve as an important addition to our armamentarium in the management of advanced carcinoma of the breast.

  5. Long-term results of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingtai; Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Huang, Huang; Zhao, Dongbing; Tian, Yantao; Li, Yexiong; Feng, Qinfu; Zhang, Zhihui; Jiang, Qinglong; Zhang, Shuisheng; Tang, Xiaolong; Huang, Xianghui; Chu, Yunmian; Zhang, Jianghu; Sun, Yuemin; Zhang, Yawei; Wang, Chengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To assess prognostic benefits of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment after IOERT. A retrospective cohort study using prospectively collected data was conducted at the Cancer Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China National Cancer Center. Two hundred forty-seven consecutive patients with nonmetastatic LAPC who underwent IOERT between January 2008 and May 2015 were identified and included in the study. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the day of IOERT. Prognostic factors were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year actuarial survival rates were 40%, 14%, and 7.2%, respectively, with a median OS of 9.0 months. On multivariate analysis, an IOERT applicator diameter < 6 cm (hazards ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47–0.97), no intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.32–0.66), and receipt of postoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy (HR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.04–0.25) were significantly associated with improved OS. Pain relief after IOERT was achieved in 111 of the 117 patients, with complete remission in 74 and partial remission in 37. Postoperative complications rate and mortality were 14.0% and 0.4%, respectively. Nonmetastatic LAPC patients with smaller size tumors could achieve positive long-term survival outcomes with a treatment strategy incorporating IOERT and postoperative adjuvant treatment. Chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy might be a recommended adjuvant treatment strategy for well-selected cases. Intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy should not be recommended for patients with nonmetastatic LAPC. PMID:27661028

  6. High-dose Helical Tomotherapy With Concurrent Full-dose Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jee Suk; Wang, Michael L.C.; Koom, Woong Sub; Yoon, Hong In; Chung, Yoonsun; Song, Si Young; Seong, Jinsil

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To improve poor therapeutic outcome of current practice of chemoradiotherapy (CRT), high-dose helical tomotherapy (HT) with concurrent full-dose chemotherapy has been performed on patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), and the results were analyzed. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients with LAPC treated with radiotherapy using HT (median, 58.4 Gy; range, 50.8-59.9 Gy) and concomitant chemotherapy between 2006 and 2009. Radiotherapy was directed to the primary tumor with a 0.5-cm margin without prophylactic nodal coverage. Twenty-nine patients (79%) received full-dose (1000 mg/m{sup 2}) gemcitabine-based chemotherapy during HT. After completion of CRT, maintenance chemotherapy was administered to 37 patients (95%). Results: The median follow-up was 15.5 months (range, 3.4-43.9) for the entire cohort, and 22.5 months (range, 12.0-43.9) for the surviving patients. The 1- and 2-year local progression-free survival rates were 82.1% and 77.3%, respectively. Eight patients (21%) were converted to resectable status, including 1 with a pathological complete response. The median overall survival and progression-free survival were 21.2 and 14.0 months, respectively. Acute toxicities were acceptable with no gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity higher than Grade 3. Severe late GI toxicity ({>=}Grade 3) occurred in 10 patients (26%); 1 treatment-related death from GI bleeding was observed. Conclusion: High-dose helical tomotherapy with concurrent full-dose chemotherapy resulted in improved local control and long-term survival in patients with LAPC. Future studies are needed to widen the therapeutic window by minimizing late GI toxicity.

  7. Current therapeutic strategies for advanced pancreatic cancer: A review for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Spadi, Rosella; Brusa, Federica; Ponzetti, Agostino; Chiappino, Isabella; Birocco, Nadia; Ciuffreda, Libero; Satolli, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) would become the second leading cause of cancer death in the near future, despite representing only 3% of new cancer diagnosis. Survival improvement will come from a better knowledge of risk factors, earlier diagnosis, better integration of locoregional and systemic therapies, as well as the development of more efficacious drugs rising from a deeper understanding of disease biology. For patients with unresectable, non-metastatic disease, combined strategies encompassing primary chemotherapy and radiation seems to be promising. In fit patients, new polychemotherapy regimens can lead to better outcomes in terms of slight but significant survival improvement associated with a positive impact on quality of life. The upfront use of these regimes can also increase the rate of radical resections in borderline resectable and locally advanced PC. Second line treatments showed to positively affect both overall survival and quality of life in fit patients affected by metastatic disease. At present, oxaliplatin-based regimens are the most extensively studied. Nonetheless, other promising drugs are currently under evaluation. Presently, in addition to surgery and conventional radiation therapy, new locoregional treatment techniques are emerging as alternative options in the multimodal approach to patients or diseases not suitable for radical surgery. As of today, in contrast with other types of cancer, targeted therapies failed to show relevant activity either alone or in combination with chemotherapy and, thus, current clinical practice does not include them. Up to now, despite the fact of extremely promising results in different tumors, also immunotherapy is not in the actual therapeutic armamentarium for PC. In the present paper, we provide a comprehensive review of the current state of the art of clinical practice and research in PC aiming to offer a guide for clinicians on the most relevant topics in the management of this disease. PMID:26862489

  8. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    SciTech Connect

    Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Kramer, Robin M.; Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve; Ulmert, David; Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L.; Russell, James

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of FOLFIRINOX in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer. A Single Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, G; Petranyi, A; Szűcs, A; Nehéz, L; Harsanyi, L; Hegyi, P; Bodoky, G

    2017-01-06

    The management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is a major challenge. Although new drugs are available for the treatment of metastatic disease, the optimal treatment of non-metastatic cases remains controversial. The role of neoadjuvant therapy is still a question of debate in this setting. The aim of the study was to prospectively collect and analyse data on efficacy and safety of a modified FOLFIRINOX regimen in LAPC patients treated in a single institution. Another major objective was to assess the capability of FOLFIRINOX to render primary non-resectable cancer to resectable. No bolus fluorouracil was given and a 20% dose reduction of oxaliplatin and irinotecan was applied. Primary G-CSF prophylaxis was applied to prevent febrile neutropenia. Thirty-two patients (mean age 60.2 years, range: 40-77 years) have been enrolled into the study. All patients had ECOG performance status of 0 or 1. Best response to therapy was stable disease (SD) or partial regression (PR) in 18 (56.2%) and 6 (18.8%) cases. Two patients (6.3%) underwent surgical resection (100% R0). The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse events were nausea (18.8%), fatigue (12.5%) and diarrhea (12.5%). The incidence of severe neutropenia was 28.1%, with only one documented case of febrile neutropenia. The probability of disease progression was 25% and 50% after 75 and 160 days with 88.4% of possibility of disease progression after 500 days. OS probability was 92.1, 71.5% and 49.5% at 180-, 365 and 540 days. Our data does not support the capability of FOLFIRINOX to render primary non-resectable cancer to resectable. However, due to the high disease control rate observed, FOLFRINOX might be recommended as first line option for the palliative treatment of LAPC. Despite reduced chemotherapy doses significant toxicity has been seen.

  10. Ultrasonically guided percutaneous implantation of iodine-125 seeds in pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, F.; Burcharth, F.; Holm, H.H.; Stroyer, I. )

    1990-10-01

    Cancer of the pancreas is most often not diagnosed before it has reached unresectable stages. The development of effective palliative treatment for these patients and for those with recurrence after resection is clearly needed. The present study reports the results of ultrasonically guided percutaneous implantation of {sup 125}I seeds in 19 patients with cancer of the pancreas. Twelve patients had further adjuvant external radiation. Despite satisfactory seed placement and delivery of the planned radiation dose in most cases, clinical improvement was lacking or only slight and short-lived. No difference in survival or palliation was observed between patients treated with seeds alone compared with patients treated with seeds and external radiation. Survival after seed implantation was short (median 140 days, range 7-401 days). Ultrasonically guided percutaneous implantation of {sup 125}I seeds cannot be recommended in the treatment of unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas.

  11. Remarkable response in 2 cases of Advanced Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma with liposomal doxorubicin plus cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiyan; Chen, Zhongjian; Wu, Meijuan; Lei, Tao; Yu, Haifeng; Ge, Minghua

    2016-06-02

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (PDTC), especially advanced PDTC, is an aggressive disease and displays a much poorer prognosis compared with well differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Surgery is the recommended treatment in the early stage of PDTC, however, no effective treatment modalities are currently available for advanced PDTCMethods: Two advanced PDTC patients with no radioiodine uptake adopted a cytotoxic chemotherapy with liposomal doxorubicin (35 mg/m(2), day 1) plus cisplatin (75 mg/m(2), day1-3) every 3 weeks. Computer tomography (CT) was performed after 6 cycles (case 1) or 5 cycles (case 2) of chemotherapy Our patients achieved remarkable response with one a Complete Remission (CR) and the other a very good Partial Remission (PR)Conclusion: Our findings indicate that liposomal doxorubicin-based chemotherapy regimens might produce response in PDTC patients, and improve their overall survival and quality of life. Hence we believe this result is very important for oncologists in treating PDTC.

  12. Managing patients receiving sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hull, Diana; Armstrong, Ceri

    2010-05-01

    Despite improvements in cytotoxic chemotherapy agents over the last 50 years, the outlook for patients with many of the most common solid tumours has remained poor. However, in recent years a number of targeted therapies have been licensed in the European Union for use in these cancer types. One such therapy, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (sorafenib) is now used to treat patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic renal cell carcinoma. This article will explore the role of the oncology nurse in managing patients receiving sorafenib for advanced HCC. A brief overview of sorafenib as a current treatment approved for advanced HCC in the palliative setting is presented. This is followed by a case study-based discussion with particular reference to some of the key care coordination challenges facing the oncology nurse. The management of treatment-related adverse events and the importance of using a multidisciplinary team approach is also reviewed.

  13. Immunohistochemical Markers Distinguishing Cholangiocellular Carcinoma (CCC) from Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) Discovered by Proteomic Analysis of Microdissected Cells.

    PubMed

    Padden, Juliet; Ahrens, Maike; Kälsch, Julia; Bertram, Stefanie; Megger, Dominik A; Bracht, Thilo; Eisenacher, Martin; Kocabayoglu, Peri; Meyer, Helmut E; Sipos, Bence; Baba, Hideo A; Sitek, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are two highly aggressive cancer types that arise from epithelial cells of the pancreatobiliary system. Owing to their histological and morphological similarity, differential diagnosis between CCC and metastasis of PDAC located in the liver frequently proves an unsolvable issue for pathologists. The detection of biomarkers with high specificity and sensitivity for the differentiation of these tumor types would therefore be a valuable tool. Here, we address this problem by comparing microdissected CCC and PDAC tumor cells from nine and eleven cancer patients, respectively, in a label-free proteomics approach. The novel biomarker candidates were subsequently verified by immunohistochemical staining of 73 CCC, 78 primary, and 18 metastatic PDAC tissue sections. In the proteome analysis, we found 180 proteins with a significantly differential expression between CCC and PDAC cells (p value < 0.05, absolute fold change > 2). Nine candidate proteins were chosen for an immunohistochemical verification out of which three showed very promising results. These were the annexins ANXA1, ANXA10, and ANXA13. For the correct classification of PDAC, ANXA1 showed a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 85% and ANXA10 a sensitivity of 90% at a specificity of 66%. ANXA13 was higher abundant in CCC. It presented a sensitivity of 84% at a specificity of 55%. In metastatic PDAC tissue ANXA1 and ANXA10 showed similar staining behavior as in the primary PDAC tumors (13/18 and 17/18 positive, respectively). ANXA13, however, presented positive staining in eight out of eighteen secondary PDAC tumors and was therefore not suitable for the differentiation of these from CCC. We conclude that ANXA1 and ANXA10 are promising biomarker candidates with high diagnostic values for the differential diagnosis of intrahepatic CCC and metastatic liver tumors deriving from PDAC. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry

  14. Immunohistochemical Markers Distinguishing Cholangiocellular Carcinoma (CCC) from Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) Discovered by Proteomic Analysis of Microdissected Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Padden, Juliet; Ahrens, Maike; Kälsch, Julia; Bertram, Stefanie; Megger, Dominik A.; Bracht, Thilo; Eisenacher, Martin; Kocabayoglu, Peri; Meyer, Helmut E.; Sipos, Bence; Baba, Hideo A.; Sitek, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are two highly aggressive cancer types that arise from epithelial cells of the pancreatobiliary system. Owing to their histological and morphological similarity, differential diagnosis between CCC and metastasis of PDAC located in the liver frequently proves an unsolvable issue for pathologists. The detection of biomarkers with high specificity and sensitivity for the differentiation of these tumor types would therefore be a valuable tool. Here, we address this problem by comparing microdissected CCC and PDAC tumor cells from nine and eleven cancer patients, respectively, in a label-free proteomics approach. The novel biomarker candidates were subsequently verified by immunohistochemical staining of 73 CCC, 78 primary, and 18 metastatic PDAC tissue sections. In the proteome analysis, we found 180 proteins with a significantly differential expression between CCC and PDAC cells (p value < 0.05, absolute fold change > 2). Nine candidate proteins were chosen for an immunohistochemical verification out of which three showed very promising results. These were the annexins ANXA1, ANXA10, and ANXA13. For the correct classification of PDAC, ANXA1 showed a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 85% and ANXA10 a sensitivity of 90% at a specificity of 66%. ANXA13 was higher abundant in CCC. It presented a sensitivity of 84% at a specificity of 55%. In metastatic PDAC tissue ANXA1 and ANXA10 showed similar staining behavior as in the primary PDAC tumors (13/18 and 17/18 positive, respectively). ANXA13, however, presented positive staining in eight out of eighteen secondary PDAC tumors and was therefore not suitable for the differentiation of these from CCC. We conclude that ANXA1 and ANXA10 are promising biomarker candidates with high diagnostic values for the differential diagnosis of intrahepatic CCC and metastatic liver tumors deriving from PDAC. PMID:26644413

  15. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  16. Virilizing Adrenocortical Carcinoma Advancing to Central Precocious Puberty after Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sun; Yang, Eu Jeen; Cho, Dong Hyu; Hwang, Pyung Han

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) in pediatric and adolescent patients is rare, and it is associated with various clinical symptoms. We introduce the case of an 8-year-old boy with ACC who presented with peripheral precocious puberty at his first visit. He displayed penis enlargement with pubic hair and facial acne. His serum adrenal androgen levels were elevated, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a right suprarenal mass. After complete surgical resection, the histological diagnosis was ACC. Two months after surgical removal of the mass, he subsequently developed central precocious puberty. He was treated with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist to delay further pubertal progression. In patients with functioning ACC and surgical removal, clinical follow-up and hormonal marker examination for the secondary effects of excessive hormone secretion may be a useful option at least every 2 or 3 months after surgery. PMID:26019766

  17. Virilizing adrenocortical carcinoma advancing to central precocious puberty after surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Sun; Yang, Eu Jeen; Cho, Dong Hyu; Hwang, Pyung Han; Lee, Dae-Yeol

    2015-05-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) in pediatric and adolescent patients is rare, and it is associated with various clinical symptoms. We introduce the case of an 8-year-old boy with ACC who presented with peripheral precocious puberty at his first visit. He displayed penis enlargement with pubic hair and facial acne. His serum adrenal androgen levels were elevated, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a right suprarenal mass. After complete surgical resection, the histological diagnosis was ACC. Two months after surgical removal of the mass, he subsequently developed central precocious puberty. He was treated with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist to delay further pubertal progression. In patients with functioning ACC and surgical removal, clinical follow-up and hormonal marker examination for the secondary effects of excessive hormone secretion may be a useful option at least every 2 or 3 months after surgery.

  18. Safety and feasibility of Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer: results of a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Paiella, Salvatore; Butturini, Giovanni; Frigerio, Isabella; Salvia, Roberto; Armatura, Giulia; Bacchion, Matilde; Fontana, Martina; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Martone, Enrico; Bassi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the safety of the NanoKnife Low Energy Direct Current (LEDC) System (Irreversible Electroporation, IRE) in order to treat patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Prospective, nonrandomized, single-center clinical evaluation of ten patients with a cytohystological diagnosis of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) that was no further responsive to standard treatments. The primary outcome was the rate of procedure-related abdominal complications. The secondary endpoints included the evaluation of the short-term efficacy of IRE through the evaluation of tumor reduction at imaging and biological tumor response as shown by CA 19-9, clinical assessments and patient quality of life. Ten patients (5 males, 5 females) were enrolled, with a median age of 66 and median tumor size of 30 mm. All patients were treated successfully with a median procedure time of 79.5 min. Two procedure-related complications were described in one patient (10%): a pancreatic abscess with a pancreoduodenal fistula. Three patients had early progression of disease: one patient developed pulmonary metastases 30 days post-IRE and two patients had liver metastases 60 days after the procedure. We registered an overall survival of 7.5 months (range: 2.9-15.9). IRE is a safe procedure in patients with LAPC and may represent a new technological option in the treatment and multimodality management of this disease. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Assessment of Nutritional Status, Digestion and Absorption, and Quality of Life in Patients with Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lochtenberg-Potjes, C. M.; Wierdsma, N. J.; Scheffer, H. J.; Kazemier, G.; Ottens-Oussoren, K.; Meijerink, M. R.; de van der Schueren, M. A. E.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim To provide a comprehensive quantitative assessment of nutritional status, digestion and absorption, and quality of life (QoL) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods Sixteen patients with LAPC were prospectively assessed for weight loss (WL), body mass index (BMI), fat-free mass index (FFMI), handgrip strength (HGS), dietary macronutrient intake, serum vitamin levels, resting and total energy expenditure (REE and TEE, indirect calorimetry), intestinal absorption capacity and fecal losses (bomb calorimetry), exocrine pancreatic function (fecal elastase-1 (FE1)), and gastrointestinal quality of life (GIQLI). Results Two patients had a low BMI, 10 patients had WL > 10%/6 months, 8 patients had a FFMI < P10, and 8 patients had a HGS < P10. Measured REE was 33% higher (P = 0.002) than predicted REE. TEE was significantly higher than daily energy intake (P = 0.047). Malabsorption (<85%) of energy, fat, protein, and carbohydrates was observed in, respectively, 9, 8, 12, and 10 patients. FE1 levels were low (<200 μg/g) in 13 patients. Total QoL scored 71% (ample satisfactory). Conclusion Patients with LAPC have a severely impaired nutritional status, most likely as a result of an increased REE and malabsorption due to exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. The trial is registered with PANFIRE clinicaltrials.gov NCT01939665. PMID:28912804

  20. Use of Respiratory-Correlated Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography to Determine Acceptable Treatment Margins for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Seth D.; Ford, Eric C.; Duhon, Mario; McNutt, Todd; Wong, John; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-induced excursions of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma could affect dose delivery. This study quantified tumor motion and evaluated standard treatment margins. Methods and Materials: Respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography images were obtained on 30 patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma; 15 of whom underwent repeat scanning before cone-down treatment. Treatment planning software was used to contour the gross tumor volume (GTV), bilateral kidneys, and biliary stent. Excursions were calculated according to the centroid of the contoured volumes. Results: The mean +- standard deviation GTV excursion in the superoinferior (SI) direction was 0.55 +- 0.23 cm; an expansion of 1.0 cm adequately accounted for the GTV motion in 97% of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. Motion GTVs were generated and resulted in a 25% average volume increase compared with the static GTV. Of the 30 patients, 17 had biliary stents. The mean SI stent excursion was 0.84 +- 0.32 cm, significantly greater than the GTV motion. The xiphoid process moved an average of 0.35 +- 0.12 cm, significantly less than the GTV. The mean SI motion of the left and right kidneys was 0.65 +- 0.27 cm and 0.77 +- 0.30 cm, respectively. At repeat scanning, no significant changes were seen in the mean GTV size (p = .8) or excursion (p = .3). Conclusion: These data suggest that an asymmetric expansion of 1.0, 0.7, and 0.6 cm along the respective SI, anteroposterior, and medial-lateral directions is recommended if a respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography scan is not available to evaluate the tumor motion during treatment planning. Surrogates of tumor motion, such as biliary stents or external markers, should be used with caution.

  1. American Gastroenterological Association guidelines are inaccurate in detecting pancreatic cysts with advanced neoplasia: a clinicopathologic study of 225 patients with supporting molecular data.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Aatur D; Zeh, Herbert J; Brand, Randall E; Nikiforova, Marina N; Chennat, Jennifer S; Fasanella, Kenneth E; Khalid, Asif; Papachristou, Georgios I; Slivka, Adam; Hogg, Melissa; Lee, Kenneth K; Tsung, Allan; Zureikat, Amer H; McGrath, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) recently reported evidence-based guidelines for the management of asymptomatic neoplastic pancreatic cysts. These guidelines advocate a higher threshold for surgical resection than prior guidelines and imaging surveillance for a considerable number of patients with pancreatic cysts. The aims of this study were to assess the accuracy of the AGA guidelines in detecting advanced neoplasia and present an alternative approach to pancreatic cysts. The study population consisted of 225 patients who underwent EUS-guided FNA for pancreatic cysts between January 2014 and May 2015. For each patient, clinical findings, EUS features, cytopathology results, carcinoembryonic antigen analysis, and molecular testing of pancreatic cyst fluid were reviewed. Molecular testing included the assessment of hotspot mutations and deletions for KRAS, GNAS, VHL, TP53, PIK3CA, and PTEN. Diagnostic pathology results were available for 41 patients (18%), with 13 (6%) harboring advanced neoplasia. Among these cases, the AGA guidelines identified advanced neoplasia with 62% sensitivity, 79% specificity, 57% positive predictive value, and 82% negative predictive value. Moreover, the AGA guidelines missed 45% of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with adenocarcinoma or high-grade dysplasia. For cases without confirmatory pathology, 27 of 184 patients (15%) with serous cystadenomas (SCAs) based on EUS findings and/or VHL alterations would continue magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) surveillance. In comparison, a novel algorithmic pathway using molecular testing of pancreatic cyst fluid detected advanced neoplasias with 100% sensitivity, 90% specificity, 79% positive predictive value, and 100% negative predictive value. The AGA guidelines were inaccurate in detecting pancreatic cysts with advanced neoplasia. Furthermore, because the AGA guidelines manage all neoplastic cysts similarly, patients with SCAs will continue to undergo unnecessary MRI

  2. Distal Pancreatectomy With En Bloc Celiac Axis Resection for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Haibing; Ma, Ruirui; Gong, Jian; Cai, Chengzong; Song, Zhenshun; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac resection (DP-CAR) is used to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the advantages and disadvantages of this surgical procedure remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its clinical safety and efficacy. Studies regarding DP-CAR were retrieved from the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Chinese electronic databases. Articles were selected according to predesigned inclusion criteria, and data were extracted according to predesigned sheets. Clinical, oncologic, and survival outcomes of DP-CAR were systematically reviewed by hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratio (OR) using fixed- or random-effects models. Eighteen studies were included. DP-CAR had a longer operating time and greater intraoperative blood loss compared to distal pancreatectomy (DP). A high incidence of vascular reconstruction occurred in DP-CAR: 11.53% (95%CI: 6.88–18.68%) for artery and 33.28% (95%CI: 20.45–49.19%) for vein. The pooled R0 resection rate of DP-CAR was 72.79% (95% CI, 46.19–89.29%). Higher mortality and morbidity rates were seen in DP-CAR, but no significant differences were detected compared to DP; the pooled OR was 1.798 for mortality (95% CI, 0.360–8.989) and 2.106 for morbidity (95% CI, 0.828–5.353). The pooled incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) was 31.31% (95%CI, 23.69–40.12%) in DP-CAR, similar to that of DP (OR = 1.07; 95%CI, 0.52–2.20). The pooled HR against DP-CAR was 5.67 (95%CI, 1.48–21.75) for delayed gastric emptying. The pooled rate of reoperation was 9.74% (95%CI, 4.56–19.59%) in DP-CAR. The combined 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates in DP-CAR were 65.22% (49.32–78.34%), 30.20% (21.50–40. 60%), and 18.70% (10.89–30.13%), respectively. The estimated means and medians for survival time in DP-CAR patients were 24.12 (95%CI, 18.26–29.98) months and 17.00 (95%CI, 13.52–20.48) months, respectively. There were no

  3. Translation of recent advances and discoveries in molecular biology and immunology in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Albo, Daniel; Farrow, Buckminster; Berger, David H

    2008-04-01

    Recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of cancer progression have allowed for targeted approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. New biologic markers are emerging that may improve the ability to detect these tumors earlier. Targeted biologic cancer therapies promise more effective and less toxic systemic treatment options. Although a clear "magic bullet" has yet to emerge, this type of targeted approach offers hope in the management of this dreadful disease. This article offers an update on these promising diagnostic and treatment modalities.

  4. Prospective small bowel mucosal assessment immediately after chemoradiotherapy of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer using capsule endoscopy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Yamashina, Takeshi; Takada, Ryoji; Uedo, Noriya; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ishihara, Ryu; Teshima, Teruki; Nishiyama, Kinji; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    In this case series, three consecutive patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (ULAPC) underwent capsule endoscopy (CE) before and after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) to evaluate duodenal and jejunal mucosa, and to examine the relationship between CE findings and dose distribution. CE after CRT showed duodenitis and proximal jejunitis in all three patients. The most inflamed region was the third part of the duodenum, and in dose distribution, this was the closest region to the center of irradiation. This case series shows that CE can safely diagnose acute duodenitis and proximal jejunitis caused by CRT for ULAPC, and that dose distribution is possible to predict the degree of duodenal and jejunal mucosal injuries.

  5. Phase 2 Multi-institutional Trial Evaluating Gemcitabine and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Joseph M; Chang, Daniel T; Goodman, Karyn A; Dholakia, Avani S; Raman, Siva P; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Griffith, Mary E; Pawlik, Timothy M; Pai, Jonathan S; O'Reilly, Eileen; Fisher, George A; Wild, Aaron T; Rosati, Lauren M; Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Laheru, Daniel A; Columbo, Laurie A; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Koong, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    Background This phase 2 multi-institutional study was designed to determine whether gemcitabine (GEM) with fractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) results in acceptable late grade 2 to 4 gastrointestinal toxicity when compared with a prior trial of GEM with single-fraction SBRT in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods A total of 49 patients with LAPC received up to 3 doses of GEM (1000 mg/m2) followed by a 1-week break and SBRT (33.0 gray [Gy] in 5 fractions). After SBRT, patients continued to receive GEM until disease progression or toxicity. Toxicity was assessed using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [version 4.0] and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and pancreatic cancer-specific QLQ-PAN26 module before SBRT and at 4 weeks and 4 months after SBRT. Results The median follow-up was 13.9 months (range, 3.9-45.2 months). The median age of the patients was 67 years and 84% had tumors of the pancreatic head. Rates of acute and late (primary endpoint) grade ≥2 gastritis, fistula, enteritis, or ulcer toxicities were 2% and 11%, respectively. QLQ-C30 global quality of life scores remained stable from baseline to after SBRT (67 at baseline, median change of 0 at both follow-ups; P>.05 for both). Patients reported a significant improvement in pancreatic pain (P = .001) 4 weeks after SBRT on the QLQ-PAN26 questionnaire. The median plasma carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) level was reduced after SBRT (median time after SBRT, 4.2 weeks; 220 U/mL vs 62 U/mL [P<.001]). The median overall survival was 13.9 months (95% confidence interval, 10.2 months-16.7 months). Freedom from local disease progression at 1 year was 78%. Four patients (8%) underwent margin-negative and lymph node-negative surgical resections. Conclusions

  6. Radiotherapy of unresectable pancreatic carcinoma: a six year experience with 104 patients. [/sup 125/I; Betatron

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, R.; Dobelbower, R.R.; Mohiuddin, M.; Rosato, F.E.; Weiss, S.M.

    1981-12-01

    From 1974 to 1980, 104 patients with unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas were seen in the Department of Radiation Therapy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Sixty-six patients were accepted for definitive therapy. Of these, 48 patients received precision high dose radiotherapy to a dose of 6800 rad on the 45 MeV Betatron, using either photons alone or mixed photon and high energy electron beams. Eighty-nine percent of the patients completed treatment as per the protocol. Relief of symptoms was obtained in 65% of patients. Median survival was 10 months. In spite of the high doses employed, 67% of the patients had evidence of recurrent tumor in the treatment volume at the time of death. In view of the high incidence of local failure with precision high dose therapy alone, a protocol using Iodine-125 implantation to supplement the external beam therapy was developed in 1978. Since then, 18 patients with disease confined to the region of the pancreas were treated with the combination of Iodine-125 implantation and precision high dose therapy. Eighty-five percent of the patients completed treatment. Follow-up ranges from eight to 22 months. None of the patients completing the treatment protocol have developed local recurrence of tumor. These results are presented together with details of the treatment technique, normal tissue reactions and implications for future approaches to the treatment of localized unresectable cancer of the pancreas.

  7. Radiotherapy of unresectable pancreatic carcinoma: a six year experience with 104 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, R.; Dobelbower, R.R.; Mohiuddin, M.; Rosato, F.E.; Weiss, S.M.

    1981-12-01

    From 1974 to 1980, 104 patients with unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas were seen in the Department of Radiation Therapy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Sixty-six patients were accepted for definitive therapy. Of these, 48 patients received precision high dose radiotherapy to a dose of 6800 rad on the 45 MeV Betatron, using either photons alone or mixed photon and high energy electron beams. Eighty-nine percent of the patients completed treatment as per the protocol. Relief of symptoms was obtained in 65% of patients. Median survival was 10 months. In spite of the high doses employed, 67% of the patients had evidence of recurrent tumor in the treatment volume at the time of death. In view of the high incidence of local failure with precision high dose therapy alone, a protocol using Iodine-125 implantation to supplement the external beam therapy was developed in 1978. Since then, 18 patients with disease confined to the region of the pancreas were treated with the combination of Iodine-125 implantation and precision high dose therapy. Eighty-five percent of the patients completed treatment. Follow-up ranges from eight to 22 months. None of the patients completing the treatment protocol have developed local recurrence of tumor. These results are presented together with details of the treatment technique, normal tissue reactions and implications for future approaches to the treatment of localized unresectable cancer of the pancreas.

  8. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma: recent advances in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tian Fei; Hua, Xiang Wei; Cui, Xiao Lan; Xia, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation is currently the best treatment option for selected patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). From 1980 to 2011, 8874 patients with HCC in China underwent liver transplantation. The organ donation classification criteria of China (China criteria), which are established by the Government of China, are divided into three parts: China criteria I, donation after brain death; China criteria II, donation after cardiac death and China criteria III, donation after dual brain-cardiac death. Data from the China Liver Transplant Registry(CLTR) System shows that patients within the Milan criteria have higher survival rates than those who are beyond these criteria. Based on CLTR data, altogether 416 patients received living-donor liver transplantation(LDLT) in China. Their 1-year and 3-year survival rates were significantly higher than those of the non-LDLT recipients. The most common early stage(<30 days after liver transplantation) complications include pleural effusion, diabetes, peritoneal effusion or abscess, postoperative infection, hypertension and intraperitoneal hemorrhage; while the most common late stage (≥ 30 days after liver transplantation) complications were diabetes, hypertension, biliary complications,postoperative infection, tacrolimus toxicity and chronic graft rejection. The incidence of vascular complication, which is the main reason for acute graft failure and re-transplantation, was 2.4%. Liver transplantation is an effective treatment for patients with HCC in China.

  9. Multimodality treatment of patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J.L.P.; Bross, D.S.; Hernandez, E.; Rosenshein, N.; Klein, J.L.; Ettinger, D.S.; Leichner, P.K.; Order, S.E.

    1982-10-01

    A multimodality treatment program has been applied to ovarian carcinoma at the Johns Hopkins Hospital since August 1975. Forty-nine patients were subdivided into 23 patients with maximally resected Stage III micrometastatic, and 26 patients with significant retained disease, 20 with Stage III macrometastatic and 6 with Stage IV. After initial pilot studies, those patients with minimally retained disease entered a randomized prospective study. Antiovarian antiserum was used in one arm of the study; in both study arms colloidal P-32, delayed split whole abdominal irradiation, and maintenance melphalan were used. For the 23 patients with micrometastatic disease the cumulative survival and survival without evidence of disease at four years is 78 and 34% respectively. Twenty-six patients with macrometastatic disease were treated with or without intraperitoneal antiserum and multiagent chemotherapy; their cumulative one year survival is 50%. The lack of significant toxicity of intraperitoneal antiovarian antiserum and the results of multimodality therapy indicate the feasibility of this therapeutic approach to further improve ovarian cancer therapy.

  10. Multimodality treatment of patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pino y Torres, J.L.; Bross, D.S.; Hernandez, E.; Rosenshein, N.; Klein, J.L.; Ettinger, D.S.; Leichner, P.K.; Order, S.E.

    1982-10-01

    A multimodality treatment program has been applied to ovarian carcinoma at the Johns Hopkins Hospital since August 1975. Forty-nine patients were subdivided into 23 patients with maximally respected Stage III micrometastatic, and 26 patients with significant retained disease, 20 with Stage III macrometastic and 6 with STage IV. After initial pilot studies, those patients with minimally retained disease entered a randomized prospective study. Antiovarian antiserum was used in one arm of the study; in both study arms colloidal P-32, delayed split whole abdominal irradiation, and maintenance melphalan were used. For the 23 patients with micrometastiatic disease the cumulative survival and survival without evidence of disease at four years is 78 and 34% respectively. Twenty-six patients with macrometastatic disease were treated with or witout intraperitoneal antiserum and multiagent chemotherapy; their cummulative one year survival is 50%. The lack of significant toxicity of intraperitoneal antiovarian antiserum and the results of multimodality therapy indicate the feasibility of this therapeutic approach to further improve ovarian cancer therapy.

  11. Advanced oxidation protein products and total antioxidant activity in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Avinash, S S; Anitha, M; Vinodchandran; Rao, Gayathri M; Sudha, K; Shetty, Beena V

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the levels of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and percent hemolysis (that indirectly indicates the degree of membrane damage secondary to lipid peroxidation) in colorectal carcinoma. Glutathione (GSH), total thiols and albumin were measured to determine the antioxidant status. Considering the dynamic interaction between various antioxidants in the body, we measured the total antioxidant activity (AOA). Globulin was measured to assess the inflammatory response secondary to oxidative stress. Investigations were conducted in 45 cases of recently diagnosed primary colorectal adenocarcinoma. As control, 45 age and sex matched healthy persons were chosen. GSH was estimated in whole blood, percent hemolysis in RBC suspension and other parameters in plasma. We observed a very high significant increase (P<0.001) in AOPP, percent hemolysis and a highly significant increase (P<0.01) in globulin in colorectal carcinoma. We observed a very high significant decrease (P<0.001) in whole blood GSH, total thiols, albumin, AOA and a significant decrease (P<0.05) in plasma GSH in colorectal carcinoma. A very high significant negative correlation between percent hemolysis and AOA and an apparent negative correlation between total thiols and AOPP was seen in colorectal carcinoma. This demonstrated oxidative stress, decreased antioxidant status and secondary inflammatory response in colorectal carcinoma.

  12. Angiogenesis-Related Gene Expression Profile with Independent Prognostic Value in Advanced Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Andrés; Mariño-Enríquez, Adrián; Madero, Rosario; Espinosa, Enrique; Vara, Juan Ángel Fresno; Sánchez-Navarro, Iker; Hernández-Cortes, Ginés; Zamora, Pilar; Pérez-Fernández, Elia; Miguel-Martín, María; Suárez, Asunción; Palacios, José; González-Barón, Manuel; Hardisson, David

    2008-01-01

    Background Ovarian carcinoma is the most important cause of gynecological cancer-related mortality in Western societies. Despite the improved median overall survival in patients receiving chemotherapy regimens such as paclitaxel and carboplatin combination, relapse still occurs in most advanced diseased patients. Increased angiogenesis is associated with rapid recurrence and decreased survival in ovarian cancer. This study was planned to identify an angiogenesis-related gene expression profile with prognostic value in advanced ovarian carcinoma patients. Methodology/Principal Findings RNAs were collected from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of 61 patients with III/IV FIGO stage ovarian cancer who underwent surgical cytoreduction and received a carboplatin plus paclitaxel regimen. Expression levels of 82 angiogenesis related genes were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction using TaqMan low-density arrays. A 34-gene-profile which was able to predict the overall survival of ovarian carcinoma patients was identified. After a leave-one-out cross validation, the profile distinguished two groups of patients with different outcomes. Median overall survival and progression-free survival for the high risk group was 28.3 and 15.0 months, respectively, and was not reached by patients in the low risk group at the end of follow-up. Moreover, the profile maintained an independent prognostic value in the multivariate analysis. The hazard ratio for death was 2.3 (95% CI, 1.5 to 3.2; p<0.001). Conclusions/Significance It is possible to generate a prognostic model for advanced ovarian carcinoma based on angiogenesis-related genes using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. The present results are consistent with the increasing weight of angiogenesis genes in the prognosis of ovarian carcinoma. PMID:19112514

  13. Oncogenic K-Ras signals through epidermal growth factor receptor and wild-type H-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cengel, Keith A; Voong, K Rahn; Chandrasekaran, Sanjay; Maggiorella, Laurence; Brunner, Thomas B; Stanbridge, Eric; Kao, Gary D; McKenna, W Gillies; Bernhard, Eric J

    2007-04-01

    Pancreatic and colorectal carcinomas frequently express oncogenic/mutant K-Ras that contributes to both tumorigenesis and clinically observed resistance to radiation treatment. We have previously shown that farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) radiosensitize many pancreatic and colorectal cancer cell lines that express oncogenic K-ras at doses that inhibit the prenylation and activation of H-Ras but not K-Ras. In the present study, we have examined the mechanism of FTI-mediated radiosensitization in cell lines that express oncogenic K-Ras and found that wild-type H-Ras is a contributor to radiation survival in tumor cells that express oncogenic K-Ras. In these experiments, inhibiting the expression of oncogenic K-Ras, wild-type H-Ras, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) led to similar levels of radiosensitization as treatment with the FTI tipifarnib. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib led to similar levels of radiosensitization, and the combinations of tipifarnib or gefitinib plus inhibition of K-Ras, H-Ras, or EGFR expression did not provide additional radiosensitization compared with tipifarnib or gefitinib alone. Finally, supplementing culture medium with the EGFR ligand transforming growth factor alpha was able to reverse the radiosensitizing effect of inhibiting K-ras expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFR-activated H-Ras signaling is initiated by oncogenic K-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal cancers.

  14. Oncogenic K-Ras Signals through Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Wild-Type H-Ras to Promote Radiation Survival in Pancreatic and Colorectal Carcinoma Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Cengel, Keith A.; Voong, K. Rahn; Chandrasekaran, Sanjay; Maggiorella, Laurence; Brunner, Thomas B.; Stanbridge, Eric; Kao, Gary D.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Bernhard, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic and colorectal carcinomas frequently express oncogenic/mutant K-Ras that contributes to both tumorigenesis and clinically observed resistance to radiation treatment. We have previously shown that farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) radiosensitize many pancreatic and colorectal cancer cell lines that express oncogenic K-ras at doses that inhibit the prenylation and activation of H-Ras but not K-Ras. In the present study, we have examined the mechanism of FTI-mediated radiosensitization in cell lines that express oncogenic K-Ras and found that wild-type H-Ras is a contributor to radiation survival in tumor cells that express oncogenic K-Ras. In these experiments, inhibiting the expression of oncogenic K-Ras, wild-type H-Ras, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) led to similar levels of radiosensitization as treatment with the FTI tipifarnib. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib led to similar levels of radiosensitization, and the combinations of tipifarnib or gefitinib plus inhibition of K-Ras, H-Ras, or EGFR expression did not provide additional radiosensitization compared with tipifarnib or gefitinib alone. Finally, supplementing culture medium with the EGFR ligand transforming growth factor α was able to reverse the radiosensitizing effect of inhibiting K-ras expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFR-activated H-Ras signaling is initiated by oncogenic K-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal cancers. PMID:17460778

  15. Caspase-3 activation downstream from reactive oxygen species in heat-induced apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells carrying a mutant p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, D; Sasaki, M; Watanabe, N

    2001-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the intracellular signaling pathway leading to p53-independent activation of caspase-3 during heat-induced apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells. Induction of mutant p53 protein, but not p21/WAF-1, was observed after heat treatment of both heat-resistant (PANC-1) and heat-sensitive (MIAPaCa-2) cells. A specific inhibitor of caspase-3 (Ac-DMQD-CHO) caused 84% and 92% inhibition of apoptosis in MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, respectively. Caspase-3 mRNA expression was increased in both cell lines after heat treatment. Further, heat-induced caspase-3 activity detected by fluorogenic assay in MIAPaCa-2 cells was almost completely inhibited by addition of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. In contrast, Ac-DMQD-CHO had no inhibitory effect on amounts of reactive oxygen species in heat-treated MIAPaCa-2 cells. These results suggest a possible pathway by which reactive oxygen species lead to caspase-3 activation to cause heat-induced death of pancreatic carcinoma cells carrying mutant p53.

  16. Knockdown or inhibition of aldo-keto reductase 1B10 inhibits pancreatic carcinoma growth via modulating Kras-E-cadherin pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanying; Li, Haonan; Yang, Yihe; Liao, Jie; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2014-12-28

    Aldo-keto reductase 1B10 (AKR1B10) has relatively specific lipid substrates including carbonyls, retinal and farnesal/geranylgeranial. Metabolizing these lipid substrates appears crucial to carcinogenesis, particularly for farnesal/geranylgeranial that involves protein prenylation. Mutant Kras is a most common active oncogene in pancreatic cancer, and its activation requires protein prenylation. To directly determine the role of AKR1B10 in pancreatic carcinogenesis, we knocked down AKR1B10 in CD18 human pancreatic carcinoma cells using shRNA approach. Silencing AKR1B10 resulted in a significant inhibition of anchor-dependent growth (knockdown cells vs. vector-control cells: 67 ± 9.5 colonies/HPF vs. 170 ± 3.7 colonies/HPF, p < 0.01), invasion index (0.27 vs. 1.00, p < 0.05), and cell migration (at 16 hours 9.2 ± 1.2% vs. 14.0 ± 1.8%, at 24 hours 21.0 ± 1.1% vs. 30.5 ± 3.5%, and at 48 hours 51.9 ± 5.7% vs. 88.9 ± 3.0%, p < 0.01). Inhibition of AKR1B10 by oleanolic acid (OA) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth with IC50 at 30 µM. Kras pull-down and Western blot analysis revealed a significant down-regulation of active form Kras and phosphorylated C-Raf, and Erk, as well as an up-regulation of E-cadherin. A significant reduction of in vivo tumor growth was observed in nude mice implanted with the CD18 pancreatic carcinoma cells with AKR1B10 knockdown (tumor weight: 0.25 ± 0.06 g vs. 0.52 ± 0.07 g, p = 0.01), and with OA treatment (tumor weight: 0.35 ± 0.05 g vs. 0.52 ± 0.07 g, p = 0.05). Our findings indicate AKR1B10 is a unique enzyme involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis via modulation of the Kras-E-cadherin pathway.

  17. Functional imaging of interstitial brachytherapy in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts using spectral CT: how does iodine concentration correlate with standardized uptake value of (18)FDG-PET-CT?

    PubMed

    Hu, Shudong; Shi, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yerong; Huang, Wei; Song, Qi; Lin, Xiaozhu; Liu, Yu; Chen, Kemin; Wang, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation between iodine concentration (IC) for the quantitative analysis of spectral CT and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 18 fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-CT ((18)FDG PET-CT) as an indicator of therapeutic response to interstitial brachytherapy in transplanted human pancreatic carcinomas in BALB/c-nu mice. Xenograft models were created by subcutaneous injection of SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell suspensions into immunodeficient BALB/c-nu mice. 30 mice bearing SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell xenografts were randomly separated into two groups: experimental (n = 15; 1.0 mCi) and control (n = 15, 0 mCi). After 2 weeks of treatment, spectral CT and (18)FDG micro-PET-CT scan were performed. IC values and SUVmax in the lesions were measured. IC normalized to the muscle tissue is indicated as nIC. The relationships between the nIC and SUVmax of the transplantation tumours were analysed. 2 weeks after treatment, the nIC in three-phase scans and SUVmax of the experimental group were significantly lower than those of the control group. The nIC values of the three-phase scans have certain positive correlation with the SUVmax values (r = 0.69, p < 0.05; r = 0.73 and p < 0.05; r = 0.80, p < 0.05 in the 10-, 25- and 60-s phase, respectively). Spectral CT could serve as a valuable imaging modality, as our results suggest that nIC correlates with SUVmax of (18)FDG PET-CT for evaluating the therapeutic effect of (125)I interstitial brachytherapy in a pancreatic carcinoma xenograft. Spectral CT offers opportunities to assess the therapeutic response of pancreatic cancer. This study supports the conclusion that nIC values in spectral CT could also serve as a valuable functional imaging parameter for early monitoring and evaluation of the therapeutic response of (125)I interstitial brachytherapy mouse models because the nIC correlates with the SUVmax of (18)FDG PET-CT.

  18. Superselective embolization as palliative treatment of recurrent hemorrhage in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Sittel, C; Gossmann, A; Jungehülsing, M; Zähringer, M

    2001-12-01

    We report a case of recurrent major hemorrhage in a patient with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Before and between the bleeding episodes, the functional level of the patient was remarkably high. Therefore, an attempt at bleeding control with superselective embolization with Ethibloc was made. Because of its specific characteristics, this substance is almost ideal for the purpose of palliative embolization. The material used and the technique of application are described in detail. After the procedure, no hemorrhage occurred for more than 4 months. We recommend superselective embolization, preferably with Ethibloc, for minimally invasive control of recurrent bleeding as palliative treatment in selected patients with advanced head and neck carcinoma, since significant benefit in terms of the quality of life may result.

  19. [Laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for advanced carcinoma associated with anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Takashi; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Sumi, Yasuo; Kanemitsu, Kiyonori; Yamamoto, Masashi; Kanaji, Shingo; Imanishi, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Tetsu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2014-11-01

    The patient was a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with anal fistula 50 years previously. He complained of mucous and bloody stools. He was diagnosed with a carcinoma associated with anal fistula after biopsy. Image examination showed that the tumor was filled with mucinous substances and that it had invaded the levator ani muscle, with left external iliac and left inguinal lymph node metastases. Therefore, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cancer was administered. After chemoradiotherapy, the tumor and metastatic lymph nodes reduced in size. We performed laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection. Histopathologically, the tumor was revealed as a mucinous adenocarcinoma, but no cancer cells were present on the surgical margin. This case suggested that preoperative chemoradiotherapy could be effective for locally advanced carcinoma associated with anal fistula.

  20. Effective multimodality treatment for advanced epidermoid carcinoma of the female genital tract

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, J.; Cortes, E.; Chen, S.; Krumholz, B.; Rovinsky, J.J.; Molho, L.; Seltzer, V.; Papantoniou, P.; Lee, J.Y.

    1985-07-01

    Fifteen patients with advanced or recurrent squamous-cell carcinoma of the cervix, vulva, vagina, and urethra were treated with simultaneous combination chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil infusion and mitomycin C) and radiotherapy (3,000 rad for a period of three weeks). Three to four weeks after completion of radiotherapy, 13 of 15 patients achieved partial or complete tumor shrinkage. Nine of 15 patients are alive, eight of whom (at a median follow-up time of 24 months) have no evidence of disease. The longest survival time was 45 + months. There was minimal toxicity associated with this therapy. The results of this pilot study suggest that the simultaneous administration of radiation and chemotherapy is an effective method of treatment of advanced female genital tract carcinoma.

  1. Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy for advanced carcinoma of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Lipsztein, R.; Kredentser, D.; Dottino, P.; Goodman, H.M.; Dalton, J.F.; Bloomer, W.D.; Cohen, C.

    1987-12-01

    Ten patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix received induction chemotherapy with cis-platinum, mitomycin-C, vincristine, and bleomycin (BOMP) over a 5 week period, followed by radiotherapy with concomitant weekly cisplatinum. Two patients were FIGO stage I-B barrel-shaped, five were stage II-B, and three were III-B. All patients responded to induction chemotherapy with five complete and five partial responses. At the completion of radiation therapy, nine patients had negative biopsies. One patient never reached a complete response and died of distant metastasis. Another underwent total exenteration for a central recurrence and was found to have microscopic paraaortic lymph node involvement. A third recurred in the parametrium. Two patients with barrel-shaped tumors underwent extrafascial hysterectomies; both had negative specimens and tolerated surgery well. Although follow-up is short, this new approach for advanced carcinoma of the cervix yielded excellent results and was well tolerated.

  2. Interaction of gonadal status with systemic inflammation and opioid use in determining nutritional status and prognosis in advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Skipworth, Richard J E; Moses, Alastair G W; Sangster, Kathryn; Sturgeon, Catharine M; Voss, Anne C; Fallon, Marie T; Anderson, Richard A; Ross, James A; Fearon, Kenneth C H

    2011-03-01

    Hypogonadism has been linked with systemic inflammation and opioid use in males with advanced cancer. We aimed to investigate the interaction of gonadal status with systemic inflammation and opioids in determining nutritional status and prognosis in advanced pancreatic cancer. One hundred and seventy-five patients (92 males, 83 postmenopausal females) with unresectable pancreatic cancer were studied. Serum sex steroids (total testosterone [TT], calculated free testosterone [cFT], oestradiol, sex hormone binding globulin), gonadotropins (follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone) and pro-inflammatory mediators (C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin-6 [IL-6], soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor 75 [sTNFR75]) were measured, and nutritional assessment and opioid use recorded. Seventy-three percent of males were hypogonadal (by cFT definition). cFT correlated positively with BMI (r (2) =0.349; p< 0.001) and grip strength (r (2) = 0.229; p = 0.034) and inversely with weight loss (r (2) = -0.287; p = 0.007), CRP (r (2) = -0.426; p < 0.001) and IL-6 (r (2) = -0.303; p = 0.004). CRP (p= 0.007), opioid dosage (p = 0.009) and BMI (p = 0.005) were independent determinants of cFT on ANOVA. Hypogonadal males demonstrated worsened survival compared with eugonadal patients (TT: OR of death = 2.87; p < 0.001; cFT: OR = 2.26; p = 0.011). Furthermore, male opioid use was associated with decreased TT (p < 0.001) and cFT (p < 0.001) and worsened survival (OR = 1.96; p = 0.012). In contrast, 18% of postmenopausal females exhibited premenopausal ("hyperoestrogenic") oestradiol levels. Oestradiol correlated positively with sTNFR75 (r (2) = 0.299; p = 0.008). CRP (p < 0.001) was an independent determinant of oestradiol. Hyperoestrogenic females demonstrated worsened survival compared with eugonadal patients (OR = 2.43; p = 0.013). In males with pancreatic cancer, systemic

  3. Adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced upper tract urothelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Chiu, Kuo-Hsiung; Shindel, Alan W.; Lai, Chia-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    There is relatively little literature on adjuvant radiotherapy after radical nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff excision (RNU) for patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). This study was designed to determine the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with pT3N0M0 UTUC. We retrospectively reviewed 198 patients treated with RNU between December 2001 and January 2015. Postoperative radiotherapy was administered in 40 (20.2%) of patients. Patients who received radiotherapy were younger than those that did not (65.2 vs. 70.5 years, p = 0.023). With median follow up of 29.1 months, Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test demonstrated no significant differences between those omitting vs receiving adjuvant radiotherapy in regards to 2-year rates of overall survival (72.0% vs. 73.4%, p = 0.979), cancer-specific survival (73.2% vs. 75.3%, p = 0.844), and recurrence-free survival (61.2% vs. 66.3%, p = 0.742). However, in multivariable analysis with Cox regression, young age, absence of chronic kidney disease, negative lymphovascular invasion, negative surgical margin, and adjuvant chemotherapy were also associated with better cancer-specific survival. In conclusion, adjuvant radiotherapy did not offer any significant benefit in terms of overall, cancer-specific, and recurrence-free survivals in patients with pT3N0M0 UTUC after RNU. More effective systemic adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary to improve the outcome of these patients. PMID:27910890

  4. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma-Performance, Technical Advances, and Future Concepts.

    PubMed

    Molvar, Christopher; Lewandowski, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a lethal tumor, claiming over half a million lives per year. Treatment of HCC is commonly performed without curative intent, and palliative options dominate, including catheter-based therapies, namely, transarterial chemoembolization and yttrium-90 ((90)Y) radioembolization. This review will showcase the performance of (90)Y radioembolization for the treatment of HCC, focusing on recent seminal data and technical advances. In particular, novel radioembolization treatment concepts are discussed and compared with conventional HCC therapy.

  5. Pilot study with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin for advanced or unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmidinger, M; Wenzel, C; Locker, G J; Muehlbacher, F; Steininger, R; Gnant, M; Crevenna, R; Budinsky, A C

    2001-01-01

    We performed a pilot-study on pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Seventeen patients received 40 mg/m2 PLD intravenously every 4 weeks. A clinical benefit response was achieved in 50% (complete remission 7%, minor remission 7%, stable disease 36%). Toxicities were moderate. In view of these encouraging findings, further studies appear warranted. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747325

  6. Cost-effectiveness of sorafenib versus SBRT for unresectable advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Leung, Henry W C; Liu, Chung-Feng; Chan, Agnes L F

    2016-05-18

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been shown to improve overall survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. This study aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of SBRT compared to sorafenib which is the only drug for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. A Markov decision-analytic model was performed to compare the cost-effectiveness of SBRT and sorafenib for unresectable advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients transitioned between three health states: stable disease, progression disease and death. We calculated the data on cost from the perspective of our National Health Insurance Bureau. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to determine the impact of several variables. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) for sorafenib compared to SBRT was NT$3,788,238 per quality-adjusted life year gained (cost/QALY), which was higher than the willingness to pay threshold of Taiwan according to WHO's guideline. One-way sensitivity analysis revealed that the utility of progression disease for the sorafenib treatment, utility of progression free survival for SBRT, utility of progression free survival for sorafenib, utility of PFS to progression disease for SBRT and transition probability of progression disease to dead for SBRT were the most sensitive parameters in all cost scenarios. The Monte-Carlo simulation demonstrated that the probability of cost-effectiveness at a willingness to pay threshold of NT$ 2,213,145 per QALY was 100 % and 0 % chance for SBRT and sorafenib. This study indicated that SBRT for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma is cost-effective at a willingness to pay threshold as defined by WHO guideline in Taiwan.

  7. Targeted therapy in advanced gastric carcinoma: the future is beginning.

    PubMed

    Schinzari, G; Cassano, A; Orlandi, A; Basso, M; Barone, C

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer represents one of the most common cancer worldwide. Unfortunately, the majority of patients present in advanced stage and outcome still remains poor with high mortality rate despite decreasing incidence and new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Although utility of classical chemotherapy agents has been widely explored, advances have been slow and the efficacy of these agents has reached a plateau of median overall survival not higher than 12 months. Therefore, researchers focused their attention on better understanding molecular biology of carcinogenesis and deeper knowledge of the cancer cell phenotype, as well on development of rationally designed drugs that would target specific molecular aberrancies in signal transduction pathways. These targets include cell surface receptors, circulating growth and angiogenic factors and other molecules involved in downstream intracellular signaling pathways, including receptor tyrosine kinases. However, therapeutic advances in gastric cancer are not so encouraging when compared to other solid organ malignancies such as breast and colorectal cancer. This article reviews the role of targeted agents in gastric cancer as single-agent therapy or in combination regimens, including their rational and emerging mechanism of action, current and emerging data. We focused our attention mainly on published phase III studies, therefore cornerstone clinical trials with trastuzumab and bevacizumab have been largely discussed. Phase III studies presented in important international meetings are also reviewed as well phase II published studies and promising new therapies investigated in preclinical or phase I studies. Today, in first-line treatment only trastuzumab has shown significantly increased survival in combination with chemotherapy, whereas ramucirumab as single agent resulted effective in progressing patients, but - despite several disappointing results - these are the proof of principle that targeting the proper

  8. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) in advanced inoperable bronchial carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghissi, Keyvan; Dixon, Kate; Stringer, Mark R.; Brown, Stanley B.

    1996-12-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of PDT to: Palliate symptoms, control disease and extend survival in patients with advanced inoperable cancer. Subject and Method: 55 Males and 23 females aged between 45-81 years (mean 66 years) with inoperable and advanced lung cancer with > 5O. obstructive lesions of the main, lobar or segmental bronchi. Patients had pre-treatment routine clinical radiological, functional and endoscopic assessment with proven histological diagnosis. Protocol of PDT was; Intravenous injection of 2 mg/Kg bodyweight Polyhaematoporphyrin (equivalent to Photofrin) or Photofrin followed 24-72 hours later by illumination of tumour using 630 nm light (Oxford Laser) delivered via an optical fibre with end diffuser. Treatments were carried out under general anaesthesia as a day case procedure. Patients were rebronchoscoped for debridement/retreatment 4-7 days later. Results: There was no treatment related mortality. Two patients developed mild photosensitivity reaction. All patients showed symptomatic improvement with good initial functional and radiological amelioration. Every patient responded to treatment. Seven patients had complete response and negative histology for 3-12 months. After the first treatment average Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1) improvement was 0.5 litres and 0.4 litres respectively. Twenty five percent of patients (nr 19) survived more than 2 years, 10'. (nr=8) between 1-2 years and the remaining 51 patients less than a year. Conclusion: PDT should be considered as a therapeutic modality for all stages of lung cancer and is an excellent treatment modality for palliation in advanced bronchial malignancies.

  9. Bilateral Blindness Following Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, K. Liang; Kuruvilla, Sara; Sanatani, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a life-threatening neurologic complication of thiamine deficiency. Though the presentation of symptoms can vary widely, the classical triad is founded on ophthalmoplegia, alteration of mental status, and gait disturbance. We describe a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in an oncology patient shortly after concurrent 5-fluorouracil, carboplatin, and radiotherapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer, presenting as complete bilateral blindness, ataxia, nystagmus, and confusion. Thiamine was given based on clinical suspicion and rapid improvement of clinical findings occurred. An MRI performed later supported the diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy. A multifactorial etiology of thiamine deficiency from nutritional deficits and neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy are hypothesized. PMID:26623207

  10. A phase I pilot trial of MUC1-peptide-pulsed dendritic cells in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yefei; Qin, Xia; Jin, Dayong; Lou, Wenhui; Wu, Lili; Wang, Dansong; Wu, Wenchuan; Ni, Xiaolin; Mao, Zhengfa; Kuang, Tiantao; Zang, Ying Qin; Qin, Xinyu

    2012-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the toxicity and immunological response induced by the intra-dermal (i.d.) administration of MUC1-peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Patients with recurrent lesions or metastasis after surgery, and immunohistochemistry positive for MUC1 were treated in cohorts that received 3-6 × 10(6) DCs i.d. for three or four vaccines. Each vaccine was composed of autologus DCs pulsed with MUC1-peptide. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that harvested 2 weeks after the second immunization were compared with PBMCs obtained before treatment for immunological response. Serial ELISPOT assays of PBMCs for antitumor reactivity were performed. Three patients received all four vaccines, and four patients received three vaccines. These patients were evaluable for toxicity and immunological monitoring. There were no grade 3 or 4 toxicities associated with the vaccines or major evidence of autoimmunity. Interferon-γ and granzyme B ELISPOT assay reactivity increased significantly in 2 of 7 patients (P < 0.05). The administration of MUC1-peptide-pulsed DCs is non-toxic and capable of inducing immunological response to tumor antigen MUC1 in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Additional studies are necessary to improve tumor rejection responses.

  11. Phase 1 study of erlotinib plus radiation therapy in patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Heath, C Hope; Deep, Nicholas L; Nabell, Lisle; Carroll, William R; Desmond, Renee; Clemons, Lisa; Spencer, Sharon; Magnuson, J Scott; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2013-04-01

    To assess the toxicity profile of erlotinib therapy combined with postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy in patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. This was a single-arm, prospective, phase 1 open-label study of erlotinib with radiation therapy to treat 15 patients with advanced cutaneous head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Toxicity data were summarized, and survival was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. The majority of patients were male (87%) and presented with T4 disease (93%). The most common toxicity attributed to erlotinib was a grade 2-3 dermatologic reaction occurring in 100% of the patients, followed by mucositis (87%). Diarrhea occurred in 20% of the patients. The 2-year recurrence rate was 26.7%, and mean time to cancer recurrence was 10.5 months. Two-year overall survival was 65%, and disease-free survival was 60%. Erlotinib and radiation therapy had an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. The disease-free survival in this cohort was comparable to that in historical controls. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy of nimotuzumab combined with docetaxel-cisplatin-fluorouracil regimen in treatment of advanced oral carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jian; Gu, Qian-ping; Meng, Qing-fei; Zhang, Jie; Li, Zhi-ping; Si, Ya-meng; Guo, Wei; Zhuang, Qian-wei

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate efficacy and adverse effects of Nimotuzumab combined with docetaxel-cisplatin-fluorouracil regimen in the treatment of advanced oral carcinoma. Nine patients with advanced oral carcinoma were treated with Nimotuzumab combined with docetaxel-cisplatin-fluorouracil regimen (test group). The treatment was given as follows: Nimotuzumab 200 mg, given as intravenous infusion once a week for 6 weeks; docetaxel and cisplatin, 75 mg/m(2) each, on day 1 only; 5-fluorouracil, 750 mg/m(2) infused continually for 8 h, used from day 1 to 5; the total cycle was for 21 days. Another eight patients comprised control group (docetaxel-cisplatin-fluorouracil regimen alone). Study patients from both groups were evaluated for objective response. The response rate was significantly (p = 0.044) higher in test group (88.9 vs. 37.5 % in control group). The disease control rate also tended to be higher in test group (100 vs. 62.5 % in control group; p = 0.083). The major adverse effects were bone marrow suppression, nausea, vomiting, and alopecia. The incidence of adverse effects was similar between both study groups. In conclusion, Nimotuzumab combined with docetaxel-cisplatin-fluorouracil regimen is effective and safe in the treatment of advanced oral carcinoma.

  13. Phase II Study of Concurrent Chemoradiation in Combination With Erlotinib for Locally Advanced Esophageal Carcinoma