Science.gov

Sample records for advanced pancreatic carcinoma

  1. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma Using the Dorsal Approach: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffer, Hester J. Melenhorst, Marleen C. A. M.; Vogel, Jantien A.; Tilborg, Aukje A. J. M. van; Nielsen, Karin Kazemier, Geert; Meijerink, Martijn R.

    2015-06-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively.

  2. Current management of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Lillemoe, K D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The author seeks to provide an update on the current management of pancreatic carcinoma, including diagnosis and staging, surgical resection and adjuvant therapy for curative intent, and palliation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: During the 1960s and 1970s, the operative mortality and long-term survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma was so poor that some authors advocated abandoning the procedure. Several recent series have reported a marked improvement in perioperative results with 5-year survival in excess of 20%. Significant advances also have been made in areas of preoperative evaluation and palliation for advanced disease. CONCLUSION: Although carcinoma of the pancreas remains a disease with a poor prognosis, advances in the last decade have led to improvements in the overall management of this disease. Resection for curative intent currently should be accomplished with minimal perioperative mortality. Surgical palliation also may provide the optimal management of selected patients. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 7. PMID:7531966

  3. Pancreatic carcinoma: results with fast neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, R.; Cohen, L.; Hendrickson, F.; Awschalom, M.; Hrejsa, A.F.; Rosenberg, I.

    1981-02-01

    Results of therapy in 31 of 50 patients who were treated for advanced pancreatic carcinoma at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are presented here. To date, six patients are alive and four are free of disease. Since the main reason for failure was lack of control of primary tumor, the tumor dose has been increased by 15%. Based on our results, a nationwide study has been launched to assess the effectiveness of neutrons vs photons in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  4. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guannan; Cao, Zhe; Yang, Gang; Wu, Wenming; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication of pancreatic cancer, most often accompanying rare acinar cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with pancreatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Patient information: A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital for weight loss. A physical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on his lower extremities. The blood test showed abnormal increases in amylase, lipase, and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 levels. A computed tomography scan detected a hypodense 2 × 1.5 cm solid mass with an unclear margin in the head of the pancreas. The biopsy of subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities was conducted and revealed lobular panniculitis. Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic panniculitis were strongly suspected. After the administration of octreotide acetate and the Whipple procedure, the serous amylase and lipase levels returned to normal, and the pancreatic panniculitis had almost resolved by 4 weeks later. Conclusion: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare complication of pancreatic cancer. However, in the presence of a pancreatic mass, as in this case, clinicians should be aware that panniculitis may be the sentinel of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27495045

  5. Immunotherapy of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Märten, Angela

    2008-05-01

    Patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas have especially poor prognosis with a five-year survival rate of <1% and a median survival of 4-6 months. Pancreatic carcinoma is a systemic disease, insensitive to radiotherapy and mostly to chemotherapy. Accordingly, new treatment modalities are worth being investigated. One of the promising approaches is immunotherapy. Several phase I/II trials that have been published show interesting results, whereupon antibody-based strategies seem to fail and unspecific stimulation or vaccination with peptides look encouraging. Furthermore, phase II trials dealing with combination therapies are highly promising. One of them, a combination of chemoradiotherapy plus interferon-alpha is currently tested in a randomized phase III trial. As most of the trials had enrolled only limited numbers of patients and most of the trials were not conducted and/or reported according to the new standards it is difficult to draw final conclusions from the discussed trials. Immuno-monitoring was performed only in 40% of the discussed publications. In all cases immune responses were observed and correlation with the clinical outcome is discussed. Immunotherapy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and especially combination therapies including immunotherapy is an up-and-coming approach and needs to be investigated in well conducted phase III randomized controlled trials accompanied by appropriate immuno-monitoring.

  6. Advances in diagnosis, treatment and palliation of pancreatic carcinoma: 1990-2010

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chakshu; Eltawil, Karim M; Renfrew, Paul D; Walsh, Mark J; Molinari, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Several advances in genetics, diagnosis and palliation of pancreatic cancer (PC) have occurred in the last decades. A multidisciplinary approach to this disease is therefore recommended. PC is relatively common as it is the fourth leading cause of cancer related mortality. Most patients present with obstructive jaundice, epigastric or back pain, weight loss and anorexia. Despite improvements in diagnostic modalities, the majority of cases are still detected in advanced stages. The only curative treatment for PC remains surgical resection. No more than 20% of patients are candidates for surgery at the time of diagnosis and survival remains quite poor as adjuvant therapies are not very effective. A small percentage of patients with borderline non-resectable PC might benefit from neo-adjuvant chemoradiation therapy enabling them to undergo resection; however, randomized controlled studies are needed to prove the benefits of this strategy. Patients with unresectable PC benefit from palliative interventions such as biliary decompression and celiac plexus block. Further clinical trials to evaluate new chemo and radiation protocols as well as identification of genetic markers for PC are needed to improve the overall survival of patients affected by PC, as the current overall 5-year survival rate of patients affected by PC is still less than 5%. The aim of this article is to review the most recent high quality literature on this topic. PMID:21412497

  7. Erlotinib-associated interstitial lung disease in advanced pancreatic carcinoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Macerelli, Marianna; Mazzer, Micol; Foltran, Luisa; Cardellino, Giovanni Gerardo; Aprile, Giuseppe

    2015-07-24

    The combination of erlotinib and gemcitabine is a recognized option for patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer whose common adverse events such as skin rash, diarrhea, or fatigue are usually easily manageable. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a life-threatening toxicity reported in patients with non-small-cell lung cancers treated with epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors or gemcitabine. This side effect is extremely rare in patients with pancreatic cancer. We report fatal treatment-related ILD that occurred in a 67-year-old patient with metastatic pancreatic cancer. Risk factors and pathophysiology of ILD need further investigation but caution is highly recommended for patients with an underlying pulmonary disease when using erlotinib in monotherapy or combination therapy.

  8. Comparison of CT and PET-CT based planning of radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Topkan, Erkan; Yavuz, Ali A; Aydin, Mehmet; Onal, Cem; Yapar, Fuat; Yavuz, Melek N

    2008-01-01

    Background To compare computed tomography (CT) with co-registered positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) as the basis for delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) in unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). Methods Fourteen patients with unresectable LAPC had both CT and PET images acquired. For each patient, two three-dimensional conformal plans were made using the CT and PET-CT fusion data sets. We analyzed differences in treatment plans and doses of radiation to primary tumors and critical organs. Results Changes in GTV delineation were necessary in 5 patients based on PET-CT information. In these patients, the average increase in GTV was 29.7%, due to the incorporation of additional lymph node metastases and extension of the primary tumor beyond that defined by CT. For all patients, the GTVCT versus GTVPET-CT was 92.5 ± 32.3 cm3 versus 104.5 ± 32.6 cm3 (p = 0.009). Toxicity analysis revealed no clinically significant differences between two plans with regard to doses to critical organs. Conclusion Co-registration of PET and CT information in unresectable LAPC may improve the delineation of GTV and theoretically reduce the likelihood of geographic misses. PMID:18808725

  9. Comparison of Intrahepatic and Pancreatic Perfusion on Fusion Images Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Assessment of Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osama Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro; Baba, Hideo

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images using a combined single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT system and to evaluate the efficacy of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Materials and Methods. CTAI was performed in 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; age range, 35-77 years; mean age, 60 years) with stage IV pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. In all patients we obtained fusion images using a combined SPECT/CT system. Pancreatic perfusion on fusion images was classified as perfusion presence or as perfusion absent in the pancreatic cancer. Using WHO criteria we recorded the tumor response after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the pancreatic cancer, liver metastasis, and factors such as intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images. For statistical analysis we used the chi-square test; survival was evaluated by the Kaplan Meier method (log-rank test). Results. On fusion images, pancreatic and intrahepatic perfusion was recorded as hot spot and as homogeneous distribution, respectively, in 18 patients (55%) and as cold spot and heterogeneous distribution, respectively, in 15 (45%). Patients with hot spot in the pancreatic tumor and homogeneous distribution in the liver manifested better treatment results (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Patients with hot spot both in the pancreatic cancer and in the liver survived longer than those with cold spot in the pancreatic cancer and heterogeneous distribution in the liver (median {+-} SD, 16.0 {+-} 3.7 vs. 8.0 {+-} 1.4 months; p < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that in patients with advanced

  10. Advances in cryoablation for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Mei; Niu, Li-Zhi; Chen, Ji-Bing; Xu, Ke-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a common cancer of the digestive system with a poor prognosis. It is characterized by insidious onset, rapid progression, a high degree of malignancy and early metastasis. At present, radical surgery is considered the only curative option for treatment, however, the majority of patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed too late to undergo surgery. The sensitivity of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy or radiotherapy is also poor. As a result, there is no standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Cryoablation is generally considered to be an effective palliative treatment for pancreatic cancer. It has the advantages of minimal invasion and improved targeting, and is potentially safe with less pain to the patients. It is especially suitable in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. However, our initial findings suggest that cryotherapy combined with 125-iodine seed implantation, immunotherapy or various other treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer can improve survival in patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Although these findings require further in-depth study, the initial results are encouraging. This paper reviews the safety and efficacy of cryoablation, including combined approaches, in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26811625

  11. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  12. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis.

  13. Inflammatory pancreatic masses: problems in differentiating focal pancreatitis from carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, C.C.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.; Mueller, P.R.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The authors studied 19 patients with focal inflammatory masses of the pancreas over an 18-month period. In 13 cases, transhepatic cholangiography and/or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were unsuccessful in differentiating pancreatitis from carcinoma. Eighteen patients had a history of alcohol abuse, and 12 had had pancreatitis previously. Pre-existing glandular injury appears to be a prerequisite to formation of focal inflammatory pancreatic masses.

  14. Surgical palliation of advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bahra, M; Jacob, D

    2008-01-01

    in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma cannot be recommended at this time.

  15. Familial pancreatic carcinoma in Jews.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Henry T; Deters, Carolyn A; Lynch, Jane F; Brand, Randall E

    2004-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most fatal of all gastrointestinal cancers, wherein its mortality compares strikingly with its incidence. Unfortunately, 80-90% of PCs are diagnosed in the nonresectable stage. While the lifetime risk of PC in developed countries is approximately 1-3%, it is the fifth most common cause of cancer deaths among both males and females in Western countries. It occurs in excess in Jews. Approximately 5-10% of PC shows familial clustering. Examination of such familial clusters must take into consideration cancers of diverse anatomic sites, such as malignant melanoma in the familial atypical multiple melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome due to the CDKN2A (p16) germline mutation, and combinations of colorectal and endometrial carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, and several other cancers in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), which are due to mismatch repair germline mutations, the most common of which are MSH2 and MLH1 . Other hereditary disorders predisposing to PC include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, due to the STK11 mutation, familial pancreatitis due to the cationic trypsinogen gene, site-specific familial pancreatic cancer which may be due to the 4q32-34 mutation, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome that is due to BRCA2 and possibly some families with HBOC that is due to BRCA1 , familial adenomatous polyposis due to the ATP gene, and ataxia telangiectasia due to the ATM germline mutation. This extant heterogeneity mandates that the physician be knowledgeable about these PC-prone syndromes which play such an important role when considering the differential diagnosis of hereditary PC. Unfortunately, there are no PC screening programs with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. However, the gold standard for screening at this time is endoscopic ultrasound. Clearly, there is a great need for the development of novel screening approaches with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. Further research is needed to elucidate those etiologic

  16. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up.

  17. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of the disease, the pharmacological treatment of pain, and knowledge of the natural history of autoimmune pancreatitis. New evidence supports the relatively low prevalence of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, and the role of tobacco in triggering the etiopathogenic mechanisms of chronic pancreatitis is better understood. Some studies have identified certain factors that are associated with having a positive genetic test in adults with chronic idiopathic pancreatitis, which should help to select those patients who should undergo genetic studies. Antioxidant therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Finally, the development of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency is a very common finding during the long-term follow-up of patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. Smoking also seems to play a role in this type of pancreatitis.

  18. Computed tomographic appearance of resectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Araki, T.; Tasaka, A.; Maruyama, M.

    1982-06-01

    Thirteen patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma were examined by computed tomography (CT). Nine had a mass, 2 had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, 1 appeared to have ductal dilatation, and 1 had no sign of abnormality. Resectable carcinoma was diagnosed retrospectively in 8 cases, based on the following criteria: a mass with a distinct contour, frequently containing a tiny or irregular low-density area and accompanied by dilatation of the caudal portion of the main pancreatic duct without involvement of the large vessels, liver, or lymph nodes. Including unresectable cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and obstructive jaundice from causes other than cancer, the false-positive rate was less than 6%. However, a small cancer without change in pancreatic contour is difficult to detect with CT.

  19. Etiology and oncogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dobrila-Dintinjana, Renata; Vanis, Nenad; Dintinjana, Marijan; Radić, Mladen

    2012-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death overall. The factors that favor the development of pancreatic cancer can be divided into hereditary and acquired. Cancerogenesis is best explained by a "multi-hit" hypothesis, charcterized with the developmental sequence of cellular mutatitions, forcing mutant cell to inappropriate proliferation and preventing its repair and programmed cell death (apoptosis). The most common mutations involve K-ras gene, epidermal growth factor (EGF-R) and HER2 gene. Continuous stimulation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) enhances the permeability of blood vessels provides nutrient supply to tumor site through newly formed vascular channels. This phenomena is known as vasculogenic mimicry. Loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes has been documented in pancreatic cancer, especially in CDKN2a, p53, DPC4 and BRCA2 genes. SDKN2A gene inactivation occurs in 95% of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. As regards acquired factors, smoking is only confirmed risk factor that increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes, alcohol consumption, central obesity in men, infection with Helicobacter pylori and chronic pancreatitis are suspected, but not proven risk factors. Consumption of fruits and vegetables does not protect, while the consumption of meat processed at high temperatures increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. According to some studies, lykopene and folate levels are reduced in pancreatic carcinoma patients, reduced folate intake increases the risk of pancreatic carcinoma (48%), and this risk can be diminished by introducing folate-rich foods to diet, not by using pharmaceutical products. Occupational exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons, vinyl chloride, nickel, chromium, insecticides and acrylic amide minimally increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Exposure to cadmium (metal industry) associated with smoking result in the accumulation of cadmium in pancreatic tissue and the possible impact

  20. Etiology and oncogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dobrila-Dintinjana, Renata; Vanis, Nenad; Dintinjana, Marijan; Radić, Mladen

    2012-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death overall. The factors that favor the development of pancreatic cancer can be divided into hereditary and acquired. Cancerogenesis is best explained by a "multi-hit" hypothesis, charcterized with the developmental sequence of cellular mutatitions, forcing mutant cell to inappropriate proliferation and preventing its repair and programmed cell death (apoptosis). The most common mutations involve K-ras gene, epidermal growth factor (EGF-R) and HER2 gene. Continuous stimulation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) enhances the permeability of blood vessels provides nutrient supply to tumor site through newly formed vascular channels. This phenomena is known as vasculogenic mimicry. Loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes has been documented in pancreatic cancer, especially in CDKN2a, p53, DPC4 and BRCA2 genes. SDKN2A gene inactivation occurs in 95% of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. As regards acquired factors, smoking is only confirmed risk factor that increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes, alcohol consumption, central obesity in men, infection with Helicobacter pylori and chronic pancreatitis are suspected, but not proven risk factors. Consumption of fruits and vegetables does not protect, while the consumption of meat processed at high temperatures increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. According to some studies, lykopene and folate levels are reduced in pancreatic carcinoma patients, reduced folate intake increases the risk of pancreatic carcinoma (48%), and this risk can be diminished by introducing folate-rich foods to diet, not by using pharmaceutical products. Occupational exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons, vinyl chloride, nickel, chromium, insecticides and acrylic amide minimally increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Exposure to cadmium (metal industry) associated with smoking result in the accumulation of cadmium in pancreatic tissue and the possible impact

  1. Lymphatic drainage and CTV in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morganti, Alessio G; Cellini, Numa; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Macchia, Gabriella; Smaniotto, Daniela; Luzi, Stefano; Balducci, Mario; Deodato, Francesco; Valentini, Vincenzo; Trodella, Lucio

    2003-01-01

    CTV definition in exclusive or adjuvant radiation therapy of pancreatic carcinoma is essentially based on the opinion of "expert" authors and on the knowledge of lymphatic pathways. The subject has been widely debated. Radiotherapy treatments of the entire upper abdomen (liver and pancreatic region), pancreas and lymph node stations, to volumes focused on macroscopic tumor only, have been proposed. Carcinoma of exocrine pancreas is characterized by the frequent, early appearance of metastasis via the lymphatic route. Most commonly involved lymph node stations include those of the celiac trunk, superior mesenteric, peripancreatic, lumboaortic lymph nodes, those of the hepatic portal (the latter in particular for pancreatic head tumors) and of the hilum of spleen (the latter in particular for pancreatic tail tumors). The possible multicentricity of pancreatic carcinoma, most likely due to intraductal spread, should lead to the inclusion in the CTV of the entire pancreatic parenchyma. This should be considered also for the frequent perineural intra- or extrapancreatic spread of pancreatic carcinoma present also in small tumors (T1). In extrapancreatic spread the retropancreatic adipose tissue should be included in the CTV at least at the GTV level. At the present state of knowledge, in the absence of pattern of failure analysis and of comparison of different treatment approaches, in terms of the definition of volumes of interest, CTV definitions which include lymphatic drainage stations, most part of pancreatic parenchyma and retropancreatic adipose tissue seem justified especially in treatments for cure. In palliation, the CTV may be limited to the GTV and the adipose tissue behind it. PMID:15018319

  2. A dosimetric analysis of dose escalation using two intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques in locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael W.; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara; Albert, Paul S.; Poggi, Matthew; Camphausen, Kevin; Citrin, Deborah . E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To perform an analysis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), sequential boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRTs), and integrated boost IMRT (IMRTi) for dose escalation in unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography images from 15 patients were used. Treatment plans were generated using 3D-CRT, IMRTs, and IMRTi for dose levels of 54, 59.4, and 64.8 Gy. Plans were analyzed for target coverage, doses to liver, kidneys, small bowel, and spinal cord. Results: Three-dimensional-CRT exceeded tolerance to small bowel in 1 of 15 (6.67%) patients at 54 Gy, and 4 of 15 (26.7%) patients at 59.4 and 64.8 Gy. 3D-CRT exceeded spinal cord tolerance in 1 of 15 patients (6.67%) at 59.4 Gy and liver constraints in 1 of 15 patients (6.67%) at 64.8 Gy; no IMRT plans exceeded tissue tolerance. Both IMRT techniques reduced the percentage of total kidney volume receiving 20 Gy (V20), the percentage of small bowel receiving 45 Gy (V45), and the percentage of liver receiving 35 Gy (V35). IMRTi appeared superior to IMRTs in reducing the total kidney V20 (p < 0.0001), right kidney V20 (p < 0.0001), and small bowel V45 (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Sequential boost IMRT and IMRTi improved the ability to achieve normal tissue dose goals compared with 3D-CRT. IMRTi allowed dose escalation to 64.8 Gy with acceptable normal tissue doses and superior dosimetry compared with 3D-CRT and IMRTs.

  3. A hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreatic head.

    PubMed

    Stamatova, D; Theilmann, L; Spiegelberg, C

    2016-12-01

    Hepatoid carcinoma (HC) is an extremely rare form of neoplasm. Its cellular structure resembles that of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To date, only 26 cases of hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas have been reported in the literature. We report the diagnosis of a hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreatic head in a 78-year-old male patient. The tumor was detected incidentally during routine abdominal ultrasound scanning. Laboratory tests did not show any abnormalities except for a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. After CT, MRI, and laparoscopic biopsy that failed to obtain the diagnosis, the patient underwent a Whipple procedure. The final pathology report described a hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreatic head (pathological T3, N0 (0/10), L0, V0, R0, M0). After the patient recovered, no further therapy was recommended by the tumor board and he was discharged. Regular follow-up was suggested; however, the patient suddenly died of acute coronary artery disease 2 months after surgery. PMID:27488314

  4. [The historical development of resection surgery in pancreatic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, U; Meyer, J; Reers, B; Pinger, P; Waldner, M

    1991-01-01

    Based on the pitfalls of the past the development of pancreatic resection therapy is outlined, starting with the first distal pancreatic resection in 1882 performed by Trendelenburg. Giving details of operations from the first decades of this century the Whipple operation is described as the early cornerstone in the history of radical therapy of pancreatic cancer. Summarizing the disappointments of the seventies gives the clue to the present situation with a modified Whipple operation as the standard curative approach to pancreatic carcinoma today. Additionally, various aspects of palliative therapy for pancreatic carcinoma are discussed.

  5. Pancreatic endocrine tumors: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Jensen, R T

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET's) can be divided on a clinical and pathologic basis into ten classes [insulinomas, gastrinomas (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome), VIPomas (Verner-Morrison syndrome, WDHA, pancreatic cholera), glucagonomas, somatostatinomas, ACTH-releasing tumors (ACTHomas), growth hormone-releasing factor secreting tumors (GRFomas), nonfunctioning or pancreatic polypeptide secreting tumors (non-functioning PET), PET's causing carcinoid syndrome and PET's causing hypercalcemia)]. Recent reports suggest calcitonin-secreting PET's also rarely occur but whether they cause a distinct clinical syndrome is unclear. PET's resemble carcinoid tumors histologically; in their ability to synthesize and frequently secrete multiple peptides such as neuroendocrine cell markers (chromogranins); their biologic behavior and their tumor growth patterns. Both groups of tumors are highly vascular, have high densities of somatostatin receptors and similar tumor localization studies including somatostatin receptor scintigraphy are used for both. PET's, similar to carcinoids causing the carcinoid syndrome, require two separate treatment options be considered: treatment directed against the hormone-excess state and treatment directed against the tumor per se because of their malignant nature. In the last few years there have been advances in tumor diagnosis, localization methods, treatment approaches particularly related to the use of synthetic somatostatin analogues, and the definition of the role of surgical procedures in these diseases. Important other advances include insights into the long-term natural history of PET's particularly from studies of gastrinomas, which allow prognostic factors to be identified and the timing of treatment options to better planned, as well as insights into the molecular basis of these disorders. The latter includes both a description of the molecular basis of the genetic inherited syndromes associated with PET's or carcinoid tumors, as well as

  6. CT pancreatogram in carcinoma of the pancreas and chronic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Karasawa, E.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Federle, M.P.; London, S.S.

    1983-08-01

    CT has made it possible to determine the contour of the pancreatic duct, to measure its caliber, and to detect dilatation of the duct. CT scans of 75 patients with pancreatic carcinoma and of 45 patients with chronic pancreatitis were obtained. Dilatation of the pancreatic duct was seen in 56% of patients with carcinoma, and in 70% of those with tumors confined to the pancreatic head and body. Smooth dilatation (43%) or beaded dilatation (40%) were most commonly associated with carcinoma. Ductal dilatation was present in 58% of the patients with chronic pancreatitis, and irregular dilatation was seen in 73% of the patients in this group. About half of the patients who had irregular dilatation had calculi within the ducts. Eight cases of dilatation of the duct with no detectible pancreatic mass were seen in a subgroup of 13 patients who had small carcinomas of the pancreas (tumor size of 3 cm or less). Our findings indicate that a dilated pancreatic duct with a smooth contour and a ratio of duct to total gland width of 0.50 or greater suggests carcinoma as the underlying pathology.

  7. KRAS Mutations in Canine and Feline Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Crozier, C; Wood, G A; Foster, R A; Stasi, S; Liu, J H W; Bartlett, J M S; Coomber, B L; Sabine, V S

    2016-07-01

    Companion animals may serve as valuable models for studying human cancers. Although KRAS is the most commonly mutated gene in human ductal pancreatic cancers (57%), with mutations frequently occurring at codons 12, 13 and 61, human pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) lack activating KRAS mutations. In the present study, 32 pancreatic ACC samples obtained from 14 dogs and 18 cats, including seven metastases, were analyzed for six common activating KRAS mutations located in codons 12 (n = 5) and 13 (n = 1) using Sequenom MassARRAY. No KRAS mutations were found, suggesting that, similar to human pancreatic ACC, KRAS mutations do not play a critical role in feline or canine pancreatic ACC. Due to the similarity of the clinical disease in dogs and cats to that of man, this study confirms that companion animals offer potential as a suitable model for investigating this rare subtype of pancreatic carcinoma.

  8. Epidermal growth factor and its receptors in human pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.F.; Pan, G.Z.; Hou, X.; Liu, T.H.; Chen, J.; Yanaihara, C.; Yanaihara, N. )

    1990-05-01

    The role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in oncogenesis and progression of malignant tumors is a subject of vast interest. In this study, radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay of EGF were established. EGF contents in malignant and benign pancreatic tumors, in normal pancreas tissue, and in culture media of a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line were determined. EGF receptor binding studies were performed. It was shown that EGF contents in pancreatic carcinomas were significantly higher than those in normal pancreas or benign pancreatic tumors. EGF was also detected in the culture medium of a pancreatic carcinoma cell line. The binding of 125I-EGF to the pancreatic carcinoma cells was time and temperature dependent, reversible, competitive, and specific. Scatchard analysis showed that the dissociation constant of EGF receptor was 2.1 X 10(-9) M, number of binding sites was 1.3 X 10(5) cell. These results indicate that there is an over-expression of EGF/EGF receptors in pancreatic carcinomas, and that an autocrine regulatory mechanism may exist in the growth-promoting effect of EGF on tumor cells.

  9. Novel agents for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinleye, Akintunde; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Furqan, Muhammad; Cang, Shundong; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is relatively insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, novel agents targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, EGFR, TGF-β, HEDGEHOG, NOTCH, IGF, PARP, PI3K/AKT, RAS, and Src) are being explored in clinical trials as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. This review summarizes the most recent advances with the targeted therapies in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26369833

  10. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition.

  11. Gemcitabine alone versus combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin for the treatment of patients with locally advanced and/or metastatic pancreatic carcinoma: a retrospective analysis of multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Inal, A; Kos, F T; Algin, E; Yildiz, R; Dikiltas, M; Unek, I T; Colak, D; Elkiran, E T; Helvaci, K; Geredeli, C; Dane, F; Balakan, O; Kaplan, M A; Durnali, A G; Harputoglu, H; Goksel, G; Ozdemir, N; Buyukberber, S; Gumus, M; Kucukoner, M; Ozkan, M; Uncu, D; Benekli, M; Isikdogan, A

    2012-01-01

    The majority of patients with pancreatic cancer is of advanced disease. Several randomized Phase II and III trials suggest that the combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin (GemCis) response rates were higher than Gemcitabine (Gem) alone, however the trials were not enough powered to indicate a statistically significant prolongation of survival in patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study is to evaluated the efficiency of Gem alone versus GemCis in patients with locally advanced and/or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma .A total of 406 patients, from fourteen centers were evaluated retrospectively. All patients received Gem or GemCis as first-line treatment between September 2005 to March 2011. Primary end of this study were to evaluate the toxicity, clinical response rate, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) between the arms. There were 156 patients (M: 98, F: 58) in Gem arm and 250 patients (M: 175, F: 75) in the combination arm. Gemcitabin arm patients older than the combination arm ( median 63 vs 57.5, p=0.001). In patients with the combination arm had a higher dose reduction (25.2% vs 11.3%, p=0.001) and dose delay (34% vs 16.8%, p=0.001). Among patients with the combination and Gemcitabin arm gender, diabetes mellitus, performance status, cholestasis, grade, stage did not have a statistically difference (p>0.05). Clinical response rate to the combination arm was higher than the Gem arm (69.0% vs 49.7%, p=0.001). PFS was more favorable in the GemCis arm than Gem alone, but the difference did not attain statistical significance (8.9 vs 6.0, p=0.08). OS was not significantly superior in the GemCis arm (12.0 vs 10.2, p>0.05). Grade III-IV hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity were higher in the combination arm. PFS was more favorable in the GemCis arm than Gem alone, but the difference did not attain statistical significance. OS was not significantly superior in the GemCis arm.

  12. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; PALB2 Gene Mutation; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  13. Advances in Management of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Janisch, Nigeen H; Gardner, Timothy B

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews advances in the management of acute pancreatitis. Medical treatment has been primarily supportive for this diagnosis, and despite extensive research efforts, there are no pharmacologic therapies that improve prognosis. The current mainstay of management, notwithstanding the ongoing debate regarding the volume, fluid type, and rate of administration, is aggressive intravenous fluid resuscitation. Although antibiotics were used consistently for prophylaxis in severe acute pancreatitis to prevent infection, they are no longer used unless infection is documented. Enteral nutrition, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis, is considered a cornerstone in management of this disease.

  14. miR-215 overexpression distinguishes ampullary carcinomas from pancreatic carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong Ho; Park, Sang Jae; Kim, Hark Kyun

    2015-06-01

    Distinguishing ampullary carcinoma from pancreatic carcinoma is important because of their different prognoses. microRNAs are differentially expressed according to the tissue of origin. However, there is rare research on the differential diagnosis between the two types of cancers by microRNA in periampullary cancers. The present study was undertaken to compare microRNA profiles between ampullary and pancreatic carcinomas using microarrays. miR-215 was most significantly overexpressed in ampullary carcinomas; whereas the expressions of miR-134 and miR-214 were significantly lower in ampullary carcinomas than in pancreatic carcinomas. When these discriminatory microRNAs were applied to liver metastases, they were correctly predicted for the tissue of origin. Although this study is limited by small sample size, striking difference in microRNA expression and concordant expression of discriminating microRNAs in primary tumors and metastases suggest that these novel discriminatory microRNAs warrant future validation.

  15. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Phil A; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a form of chronic pancreatitis that is characterized clinically by frequent presentation with obstructive jaundice, histologically by a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with fibrosis, and therapeutically by a dramatic response to corticosteroid therapy. Two distinct diseases, type 1 and type 2 AIP, share these features. However, these 2 diseases have unique pancreatic histopathologic patterns and differ significantly in their demographic profiles, clinical presentation, and natural history. Recognizing the popular and long-standing association of the term "AIP" with what is now called "type 1 AIP," we suggest using "AIP" solely for type 1 AIP and to acknowledge its own distinct disease status by using "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis" (IDCP) for type 2 AIP. AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The etiopathogenesis of AIP and IgG4-RD is largely unknown. However, the remarkable effectiveness of B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab in patients with AIP and IgG4-RD highlights the crucial role of B cells in its pathogenesis. IDCP is less commonly recognized, and little is known about its pathogenesis. IDCP has no biomarker but is associated with inflammatory bowel disease in ~25% of patients. Recently, the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP identified combinations of features that are diagnostic of both diseases. Both AIP and IDCP are corticosteroid responsive; however, relapses are common in AIP and rare in IDCP. Therefore, maintenance therapy with either an immunomodulator (eg, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or mycophenolate mofetil) or rituximab is often necessary for patients with AIP. Long-term survival is excellent for both patients with AIP and patients with IDCP. PMID:25770706

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis--recent advances.

    PubMed

    Novotný, I; Díte, P; Lata, J; Nechutová, H; Kianicka, B

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is recognized as a distinct clinical entity, identified as a chronic inflammatory process of the pancreas in which the autoimmune mechanism is involved. Clinically and histologically, AIP has two subsets: type 1--lymphoplasmatic sclerosing pancreatitis with abundant infiltration of the pancreas and other affected organs with immunoglobulin G4-positive plasma cells, and type 2--duct centric fibrosis, characterized by granulocyte epithelial lesions in the pancreas without systemic involvement. In the diagnosis of AIP, two diagnostic criterions are used--the HISORt criteria and Asian Diagnostic Criteria. In the differential diagnosis, the pancreatic cancer must be excluded by endosonographically guided pancreatic biopsy. Typical signs of AIP are concomitant disorders in other organs (kidney, liver, biliary tract, salivary glands, colon, retroperitoneum, prostate). Novel clinicopathological entity was proposed as an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' (IgG4-RSC). Extensive IgG4-positive plasma cells and T lymphocyte infiltration is a common characteristics of this disease. Recently, IgG4-RSC syndrome was extended to a new entity, characterized by IgG4 hypergammaglobulinemia and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration, this being considered an expression of a lymphoproliferative disease, 'IgG4-positive multiorgan lymphoproliferative syndrome'. This syndrome includes Mikulicz's disease, mediastinal fibrosis, autoimmune hypophysitis, and inflammatory pseudotumor--lung, liver, breast. In the therapy of AIP, steroids constitute first-choice treatment. High response to the corticosteroid therapy is an important diagnostic criterion. In the literature, there are no case-control studies that determine if AIP predisposes to pancreatic cancer. Undoubtedly, AIP is currently a hot topic in pancreatology.

  17. Non-focal enlargement in pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenberg, J.; Simeone, J.F.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Mueller, P.R.; van Sonnenberg, E.; Neff, C.C.

    1982-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma can appear radiographically as enlargement of the major part of the pancreas. In this series, part or all of three or more pancreatic segments (head, neck, body, and tail) were involved in 27% of patients with adenocarcinoma who had computed tomography. Differentiation from pure pancreatitis may require additional radiographic studies. The varied tissue composition of a pancreas enlarged by adenocarcinoma will often require biopsy of multiple sites for confirmation.

  18. Recent advances in autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Tabata, Taku; Hara, Seiichi; Kuruma, Sawako; Chiba, Kazuro; Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-01-01

    It is now clear that are two histological types (Type-1 and Type-2) of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The histological pattern of Type-1 AIP, or traditional AIP, is called lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The histological pattern of Type-2 AIP is characterized by neutrophilic infiltration in the epithelium of the pancreatic duct. In general, Type-2 AIP patients are younger, may not have a male preponderance, and rarely show elevation of serum IgG4 compared with Type-1 AIP patients. Unlike Type-1 AIP patients, Type-2 AIP patients rarely have associated sclerosing diseases, but they are more likely to have acute pancreatitis and ulcerative colitis. Although Type-2 AIP is sometimes observed in the USA and Europe, most AIP cases in Japan and Korea are Type-1. The international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP comprise 5 cardinal features, and combinations of one or more of these features provide the basis for diagnoses of both Type-1 and Type-2 AIP. Due to the fact that steroid therapy is clinically, morphologically, and serologically effective in AIP patients, it is the standard therapy for AIP. The indications for steroid therapy in AIP include symptoms such as obstructive jaundice and the presence of symptomatic extrapancreatic lesions. Oral prednisolone (0.6 mg/kg/day) is administered for 2–4 weeks and gradually tapered to a maintenance dose of 2.5–5 mg/day over a period of 2–3 months. Maintenance therapy by low-dose prednisolone is usually performed for 1–3 years to prevent relapse of AIP. PMID:23060806

  19. Pancreatic carcinoma masked as fever of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ning; Xing, Cheng; Chang, Xiaoyan; Dai, Menghua; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pancreatic carcinoma is a highly lethal malignancy. Common presenting features of pancreatic cancer include anorexia, asthenia, weight loss, pain, and obstructive jaundice. Nevertheless, fever as a symptom, or even primary manifestation of pancreatic cancer is rather rare. Methods: Here, we report a 63-year-old male patient presenting with daily fevers, night sweats, and fatigue of 2-month duration. Laboratory findings showed elevated white blood cell count (WBC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and serum C-reactive protein (CRP). A computed tomography scan demonstrated a tumor between the duodenum and pancreatic head. Chest radiograph was normal. Results: The patient underwent an uneventful tumor resection. Histological examination of a surgical specimen demonstrated an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma originated from pancreatic head. The tumor was compatible with TNM stage IIA (T3N0M0). Complete resolution of the fever was achieved on post-operative day 4 and no recurrence of the tumor or neoplastic fever happen during the 39-month follow-up. Conclusion: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma could manifest as neoplastic fever at the time of diagnosis. If the tumor is resectable, surgical resection is a safe and curative form of therapy not only for the fever but also for the original carcinoma. PMID:27583884

  20. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    The present article analyzes the main presentations on acute pancreatitis (AP) in Digestive Disease Week 2013. Perfusion computed tomography allows early diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin predicts the development of acute renal failure, severe AP and death. Factors associated with greater fluid sequestration in AP are alcoholic etiology, an elevated hematocrit, and the presence of criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome; fluid sequestration is associated with a worse outcome. True pseudocysts (fluid collections without necrosis for more than 4 weeks) are a highly infrequent complication in AP. Patients with necrotic collections have a poor prognosis, especially if associated with infection. A meta-analysis on fluid therapy suggests that early aggressive fluid administration is associated with higher mortality and more frequent respiratory complications. According to a meta-analysis, enteral nutrition initiated within 24 hours of admission improves the outcome of AP compared with later initiation of enteral nutrition. Pentoxifylline could be a promising alternative in AP; a double-blind randomized study showed that this drug reduced the length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, as well as the need for intensive care unit admission. The association of octreotide and celecoxib seems to reduce the frequency of organ damage compared with octreotide alone. Mild AP can be managed in the ambulatory setting through hospital-at-home units after a short, 24-hour admission.

  1. Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Paraganglioma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  2. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ginesta, Mireia M.; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71–80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms.

  3. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ginesta, Mireia M.; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71–80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms. PMID:27602165

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sikka, Amrita; Adam, Sharon Z; Wood, Cecil; Hoff, Frederick; Harmath, Carla B; Miller, Frank H

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases are rare but are thought to be most commonly from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). These metastases can present many years after the initial tumor is resected, and accordingly, these patients require prolonged imaging follow-up. Although the computed tomographic findings of these metastases have been extensively reviewed in the literature, little has been written about the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of these metastases. Pancreatic metastases from RCC are typically T1 hypointense and T2 hyperintense. After intravenous administration of gadolinium, they are typically hypervascular and less commonly hypovascular. Chemical shift and diffusion-weighted imaging can aid in the diagnosis of these metastases.

  5. Arterial complication of irreversible electroporation procedure for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Yahya; Tezcaner, Tugan; Aydın, Hüseyin Onur; Boyvat, Fatih; Moray, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a non-thermal ablation technique used especially in locally advanced pancreatic carcinomas that are considered surgically unresectable. We present the first case of acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion secondary to pancreatic IRE procedure that has not been reported before in the literature. A 66-year-old man underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. IRE procedure was applied to the patient during laparotomy under general anesthesia. After finishing the procedure, an acute intestinal ischemia was detected. A conventional vascular angiography was performed and a metallic stent was successfully placed to the SMA and blood flow was maintained. It is important to be careful in such cases of tumor involvement of SMA when evaluating for IRE procedure of pancreatic tumor. PMID:27795815

  6. Advances in biomarker research for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Kruttika; Wang, Fengfei; Ma, Qingyong; Li, Qinyu; Mallik, Sanku; Hsieh, Tze-Chen; Wu, Erxi

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a leading cause of cancer related deaths in United States. The lack of early symptoms results in latestage detection and a high mortality rate. Currently, the only potentially curative approach for PC is surgical resection, which is often unsuccessful because the invasive and metastatic nature of the tumor masses makes their complete removal difficult. Consequently, patients suffer relapses from remaining cancer stem cells or drug resistance that eventually lead to death. To improve the survival rate, the early detection of PC is critical. Current biomarker research in PC indicates that a serum carbohydrate antigen, CA 19-9, is the only available biomarker with approximately 90% specificity to PC. However, the efficacy of CA 19-9 for assessing prognosis and monitoring patients with PC remains contentious. Thus, advances in technology and the detection of new biomarkers with high specificity to PC are needed to reduce the mortality rate of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  8. Pancreatic mucinous noncystic (colloid) carcinomas and intraductal papillary mucinous carcinomas are usually microsatellite stable.

    PubMed

    Lüttges, Jutta; Beyser, Kurt; Pust, Susanne; Paulus, Anja; Rüschoff, Josef; Klöppel, Günter

    2003-06-01

    Pancreatic mucinous noncystic (colloid) carcinomas (MNCC) differ from the usual ductal adenocarcinomas in their mucin expression profile and share with many extrapancreatic mucinous carcinomas the expression of MUC2. Because mucinous carcinomas are frequently associated with mutations of the DNA mismatch repair genes, causing them to exhibit the so-called mutator phenotype, we decided to investigate whether MNCCs of the pancreas are characterized by microsatellite instability (MSI). Twelve carcinomas with a mucinous phenotype (8 mucinous noncystic carcinomas, 3 intraductal papillary-mucinous carcinomas with an invasive muconodular component, and 1 ductal adenocarcinoma with an extensive mucinous noncystic component) and 11 ductal adenocarcinomas were immunostained with monoclonal antibodies to the mismatch repair gene products hMLH1, hMSH2, and hMSH6. For MSI analysis, DNA was isolated from microdissected tissue, and five primary microsatellites (BAT 25, BAT 26, D5S346, D17S250, and D2S123) were analyzed. MSI was diagnosed in case a novel allele was found, compared with the normal tissue. The criterion for LOH was a 75% signal reduction. All carcinomas tested exhibited nuclear expression of mismatch repair gene products, except for one MNCC that also showed MSI at the molecular level. The data suggest that pancreatic carcinomas with a mucinous phenotype (MUC2+/MUC1-) do not appear to normally exhibit mutations in the mismatch repair genes and therefore differ in their carcinogenesis from those in other organs.

  9. Lesser sac endoscopy and laparoscopy in pancreatic carcinoma definitive diagnosis, staging and palliation.

    PubMed

    Charukhchyan, S A; Lucas, G W

    1998-09-01

    Laparoscopy with lesser sac endoscopy (LSE) were used in combination from 1987 to 1992 in 103 patients for differentiation between pancreatic carcinoma and other peripancreatic pathology, staging, and palliation. LSE identified pancreatic carcinoma in 38 patients; pancreatic cystadenocarcinoma in 2 patients; pancreatic cystadenoma in 3 patients; pancreatic adenoma in 1 patient; pancreatic metastases from liver in 2 patients; and pancreatic cysts in 5 patients. False negative diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma occurred in two cases. Nontumor pancreatic pathology was revealed in 10 patients. Specifically, acute pancreatitis was found in four patients, and chronic pancreatitis was found in six patients. Extrapancreatic cancers were identified in 15 patients: retroperitoneal extraorgan tumors were found in 2 patients; extrahepatic biliary tract cancer in 6 patients; gallbladder cancer in 1 patient; liver cancer in 3 patients; and stomach cancer in 1 patient. In five cases no pathology was found. Overall correct definitive diagnosis was established in 101 patients. Sensitivity of laparoscopy with LSE for pancreatic carcinoma diagnosis proved to be 95 per cent (38 of 40 patients), for pancreatic tumors diagnosis 96.22 per cent (51 of 53 patients); specificity of the method 100 per cent; and accuracy of diagnosis 98 per cent (101 of 103 patients). Thus, the accuracy of the method was as high as the accuracy of combination of all known modalities. Criteria of unresectability were revealed with the combination of LSE and laparoscopy in 75 per cent (30 of 40 cases) of pancreatic carcinoma. Moreover, laparoscopy allowed palliation of pancreatic carcinoma. Laparoscopic cholecystostomy was performed in 10 patients, and laparoscopic cholecystojejunostomy with enteroenterostomy was performed in 6 patients.

  10. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists.

  11. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists. PMID:27376795

  12. Lymphocytic mural folliculitis and pancreatic carcinoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Lobetti, Remo

    2015-06-01

    A 9-year-old castrated domestic shorthair cat was presented with a 6 week history of progressive non-pruritic alopecia, polyphagia and weight loss. A diagnosis of lymphocytic mural folliculitis was made and the cat was treated with a combination of prednisolone and ciclosporin; this produced an improvement in the alopecia but no resolution. Sixteen months after the initial assessment and diagnosis, the cat was re-evaluated for intermittent vomiting and weight loss with normal appetite. On examination the dermatopathy was still evident and a mass involving the duodenum and pancreas was present, which was diagnosed as a pancreatic carcinoma. From this case it would appear that lymphocytic mural folliculitis might be an early dermatological manifestation of pancreatic neoplasia.

  13. Challenges of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Colagrande, Stefano; Inghilesi, Andrea L; Aburas, Sami; Taliani, Gian G; Nardi, Cosimo; Marra, Fabio

    2016-09-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive malignancy, resulting as the third cause of death by cancer each year. The management of patients with HCC is complex, as both the tumour stage and any underlying liver disease must be considered conjointly. Although surveillance by imaging, clinical and biochemical parameters is routinely performed, a lot of patients suffering from cirrhosis have an advanced stage HCC at the first diagnosis. Advanced stage HCC includes heterogeneous groups of patients with different clinical condition and radiological features and sorafenib is the only approved treatment according to Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer. Since the introduction of sorafenib in clinical practice, several phase III clinical trials have failed to demonstrate any superiority over sorafenib in the frontline setting. Loco-regional therapies have also been tested as first line treatment, but their role in advanced HCC is still matter of debate. No single agent or combination therapies have been shown to impact outcomes after sorafenib failure. Therefore this review will focus on the range of experimental therapeutics for patients with advanced HCC and highlights the successes and failures of these treatments as well as areas for future development. Specifics such as dose limiting toxicity and safety profile in patients with liver dysfunction related to the underlying chronic liver disease should be considered when developing therapies in HCC. Finally, robust validated and reproducible surrogate end-points as well as predictive biomarkers should be defined in future randomized trials. PMID:27678348

  14. Challenges of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Colagrande, Stefano; Inghilesi, Andrea L; Aburas, Sami; Taliani, Gian G; Nardi, Cosimo; Marra, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive malignancy, resulting as the third cause of death by cancer each year. The management of patients with HCC is complex, as both the tumour stage and any underlying liver disease must be considered conjointly. Although surveillance by imaging, clinical and biochemical parameters is routinely performed, a lot of patients suffering from cirrhosis have an advanced stage HCC at the first diagnosis. Advanced stage HCC includes heterogeneous groups of patients with different clinical condition and radiological features and sorafenib is the only approved treatment according to Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer. Since the introduction of sorafenib in clinical practice, several phase III clinical trials have failed to demonstrate any superiority over sorafenib in the frontline setting. Loco-regional therapies have also been tested as first line treatment, but their role in advanced HCC is still matter of debate. No single agent or combination therapies have been shown to impact outcomes after sorafenib failure. Therefore this review will focus on the range of experimental therapeutics for patients with advanced HCC and highlights the successes and failures of these treatments as well as areas for future development. Specifics such as dose limiting toxicity and safety profile in patients with liver dysfunction related to the underlying chronic liver disease should be considered when developing therapies in HCC. Finally, robust validated and reproducible surrogate end-points as well as predictive biomarkers should be defined in future randomized trials.

  15. Challenges of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Colagrande, Stefano; Inghilesi, Andrea L; Aburas, Sami; Taliani, Gian G; Nardi, Cosimo; Marra, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive malignancy, resulting as the third cause of death by cancer each year. The management of patients with HCC is complex, as both the tumour stage and any underlying liver disease must be considered conjointly. Although surveillance by imaging, clinical and biochemical parameters is routinely performed, a lot of patients suffering from cirrhosis have an advanced stage HCC at the first diagnosis. Advanced stage HCC includes heterogeneous groups of patients with different clinical condition and radiological features and sorafenib is the only approved treatment according to Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer. Since the introduction of sorafenib in clinical practice, several phase III clinical trials have failed to demonstrate any superiority over sorafenib in the frontline setting. Loco-regional therapies have also been tested as first line treatment, but their role in advanced HCC is still matter of debate. No single agent or combination therapies have been shown to impact outcomes after sorafenib failure. Therefore this review will focus on the range of experimental therapeutics for patients with advanced HCC and highlights the successes and failures of these treatments as well as areas for future development. Specifics such as dose limiting toxicity and safety profile in patients with liver dysfunction related to the underlying chronic liver disease should be considered when developing therapies in HCC. Finally, robust validated and reproducible surrogate end-points as well as predictive biomarkers should be defined in future randomized trials. PMID:27678348

  16. Direct therapeutic intervention for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Kazuki; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-12-10

    Currently, chemotherapy is an accredited, standard treatment for unresectable, advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). However, it has been still showed treatment-resistance and followed dismal prognosis in many cases. Therefore, some sort of new, additional treatments are needed for the better therapeutic results for advanced PC. According to the previous reports, it is obvious that interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a well-established, helpful and low-risky procedure in general. As the additional treatments of the conventional therapy for advanced PC, many therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapies, molecular biological therapies, physiochemical therapies, radioactive therapies, using siRNA, using autophagy have been developing in recent years. Moreover, the efficacy of the other potential therapeutic targets for PC using EUS-fine needle injection, for example, intra-tumoral chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, irinotecan), several ablative energies (radiofrequency ablation and cryothermal treatment, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound), etc., has already been showed in animal models. Delivering these promising treatments reliably inside tumor, interventional EUS may probably be indispensable existence for the treatment of locally advanced PC in near future. PMID:26677434

  17. Direct therapeutic intervention for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takakura, Kazuki; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Currently, chemotherapy is an accredited, standard treatment for unresectable, advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). However, it has been still showed treatment-resistance and followed dismal prognosis in many cases. Therefore, some sort of new, additional treatments are needed for the better therapeutic results for advanced PC. According to the previous reports, it is obvious that interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a well-established, helpful and low-risky procedure in general. As the additional treatments of the conventional therapy for advanced PC, many therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapies, molecular biological therapies, physiochemical therapies, radioactive therapies, using siRNA, using autophagy have been developing in recent years. Moreover, the efficacy of the other potential therapeutic targets for PC using EUS-fine needle injection, for example, intra-tumoral chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, irinotecan), several ablative energies (radiofrequency ablation and cryothermal treatment, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound), etc., has already been showed in animal models. Delivering these promising treatments reliably inside tumor, interventional EUS may probably be indispensable existence for the treatment of locally advanced PC in near future. PMID:26677434

  18. Irreversible electroporation of locally advanced pancreatic neck/body adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Irreversible electroporation (IRE) of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck has been used to palliate appropriate stage 3 pancreatic cancers without evidence of metastasis and who have undergone appropriate induction therapy. Currently there has not been a standardized reported technique for pancreatic mid-body tumors for patient selection and intra-operative technique. Patients Subjects are patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck who have undergone appropriate induction chemotherapy for a reasonable duration. Main outcome measures Technique of open IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck/body is described, with the emphasis on intra-operative ultrasound and intra-operative electroporation management. Results The technique of open IRE of the pancreatic neck/body with bracketing of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery with continuous intraoperative ultrasound imaging and consideration of intraoperative navigational system is described. Conclusions IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck is feasible for appropriate patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26029461

  19. Pancreatic carcinoma, pancreatitis, and healthy controls: metabolite models in a three-class diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Leichtle, Alexander Benedikt; Ceglarek, Uta; Weinert, Peter; Nakas, Christos T; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Kase, Julia; Conrad, Tim; Witzigmann, Helmut; Thiery, Joachim; Fiedler, Georg Martin

    2013-06-01

    Metabolomics as one of the most rapidly growing technologies in the "-omics" field denotes the comprehensive analysis of low molecular-weight compounds and their pathways. Cancer-specific alterations of the metabolome can be detected by high-throughput mass-spectrometric metabolite profiling and serve as a considerable source of new markers for the early differentiation of malignant diseases as well as their distinction from benign states. However, a comprehensive framework for the statistical evaluation of marker panels in a multi-class setting has not yet been established. We collected serum samples of 40 pancreatic carcinoma patients, 40 controls, and 23 pancreatitis patients according to standard protocols and generated amino acid profiles by routine mass-spectrometry. In an intrinsic three-class bioinformatic approach we compared these profiles, evaluated their selectivity and computed multi-marker panels combined with the conventional tumor marker CA 19-9. Additionally, we tested for non-inferiority and superiority to determine the diagnostic surplus value of our multi-metabolite marker panels. Compared to CA 19-9 alone, the combined amino acid-based metabolite panel had a superior selectivity for the discrimination of healthy controls, pancreatitis, and pancreatic carcinoma patients [Formula: see text] We combined highly standardized samples, a three-class study design, a high-throughput mass-spectrometric technique, and a comprehensive bioinformatic framework to identify metabolite panels selective for all three groups in a single approach. Our results suggest that metabolomic profiling necessitates appropriate evaluation strategies and-despite all its current limitations-can deliver marker panels with high selectivity even in multi-class settings. PMID:23678345

  20. Proteomic analysis of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and pancreatic carcinoma in rat models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Hai-Lin; Li, Ya; Yuan, Ping

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To detect the proteomic variabilities of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and pancreatic carcinoma (PC) induced by 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) in rat models and to identify potential biomarkers. METHODS: Sixty adult male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into three groups. The rats had DMBA implanted into their pancreas for one (n = 20) or two months (n = 20) or assigned to the normal group (n = 20). The rats were killed after one or two months, and were evaluated histopathologically. Three tissue samples from each group of rats with either normal pancreas, PanIN (PanIN-2) or PC were examined by 2D-DIGE. The different expression spot features were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight/time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) tandem mass spectrometry. The expression of enolase 1, a differentially expressed protein, was identified by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: There was significant difference in the proportions of neoplastic changes between the 1- and 2-mogroups (P = 0.0488). There was an increase in the frequency of adenocarcinomas in the 2-mo group compared with the 1-mo group (P = 0.0309). No neoplastic changes were observed in any of the animals in the normal group. Enolase 1, pancreatic ELA3B, necdin, Hbp23, CHD3, hnRNP A2/B1, Rap80, and Gnb2l1 were up-regulated in the PanIN and PC tissues, and CEL, TPT1, NME2, PCK2, an unnamed protein product, and glycine C-acetyltransferase were down-regulated in the PanIN and PC tissues. The immunohistochemical results showed that enolase 1 expression was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer tissues of rats and humans. CONCLUSION: The pancreatic protein expression changes induced by DMBA suggest potential molecular targets for the early diagnosis and treatment of PC. PMID:21472101

  1. Biologic therapies for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Aiwu Ruth; Lindenberg, Andreas Peter; Marshall, John Lindsay

    2008-08-01

    Patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer have poor prognosis and short survival due to lack of effective therapy and aggressiveness of the disease. Pancreatic cancer has widespread chromosomal instability, including a high rate of translocations and deletions. Upregulated EGF signaling and mutation of K-RAS are found in most pancreatic cancers. Therefore, inhibitors that target EGF receptor, K-RAS, RAF, MEK, mTOR, VEGF and PDGF, for example, have been evaluated in patients with pancreatic cancer. Although significant activities of these inhibitors have not been observed in the majority of pancreatic cancer patients, an enormous amount of experience and knowledge has been obtained from recent clinical trials. With a better inhibitor or combination of inhibitors, and improvement in the selection of patients for available inhibitors, better therapy for pancreatic cancer is on the horizon.

  2. Characterization and utilization of a monoclonal antibody against pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtzman, S.H.; Sindelar, W.F.; Atcher, R.W.; Mitchell, J.B.; DeGraff, W.G.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody was produced against a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma line and was found to react with several different human carcinomas by immunoperoxidase staining of fixed tissues. The original cells used to generate the monoclonal antibody were treated with detergent to lyse the cell membrane. A membrane associated protein of molecular weight 35kD was isolated from this detergent lysed preparation and found to be recognized by the monoclonal antibody. The binding constant of the antigen antibody reaction on the cells is 5 x 10{sup {minus}5}. It was further determined that there are 700,000 binding sites per cell. Kinetics of the antigen-antibody reaction under several conditions were also explored.

  3. [Morphologic, morphometric and immunohistochemical studies on pancreatic intraductal hyperplasia and infiltrating carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, R

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer belongs to the neoplasms which are characterised by increasing morbidity and mortality. Five-year survival rates of about 0.4% are the norm, and little has changed in the last 70 years. Important etiological factors are age, sex, diet, tobacco smoking, alcohol abuse, occupation and chemical exposure, hereditary chronic pancreatitis, and previous surgery (cholecystectomy and gastrectomy). The majority of exocrine tumours of the pancreas are malignant and 80-90% of them comprise ductal adenocarcinomas. The development and growth of pancreatic carcinoma appears to be caused by a progressive accumulation of multiple genetic abnormalities. This includes oncogene (K-ras) activation, loss of tumour-suppressor p53 gene function and overexpression of growth factors and their ligands. The morphological background for the development of pancreatic carcinoma is ductal epithelial hyperplasia. Current molecular studies have resulted in the identification of cell clones exhibiting the same genetic alterations (K-ras and p53 mutations) as in infiltrating pancreatic carcinoma. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia is only partially defined. The purpose of our study was to evaluate Ki-67 proliferative index and HER-2/neu gene expression in pancreatic intraepithelial proliferative lesions as a sign of increasing epithelial proliferation and dysplasia. Additionally we made an attempt to apply morphometry in demarcating between intraepithelial proliferations of "reactive" type and proliferations with tendency towards progression to cancer. Another aim of the study was to evaluate the expression of bcl-2 and p53 genes in various types of pancreatic intraepithelial proliferations and in pancreatic cancer and to answer the question whether they interact in the process of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. We have also undertaken investigations aiming at determination of the CD44s gene and its v6 isoform expression in intraductal and invasive pancreatic carcinoma

  4. New advances in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Sonia; Herrera, Iván; Irurzun, Javier

    2016-03-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of deaths in cirrhotic patients and the third cause of cancer related deaths. Most HCC are associated with well known underlying risk factors, in fact, HCC arise in cirrhotic patients in up to 90% of cases, mainly due to chronic viral hepatitis and alcohol abuse. The worldwide prevention strategies are conducted to avoid the infection of new subjects and to minimize the risk of liver disease progression in infected patients. HCC is a condition which lends itself to surveillance as at-risk individuals can readily be identified. The American and European guidelines recommended implementation of surveillance programs with ultrasound every six months in patient at-risk for developing HCC. The diagnosis of HCC can be based on non-invasive criteria (only in cirrhotic patient) or pathology. Accurately staging patients is essential to oncology practice. The ideal tumour staging system in HCC needs to account for both tumour characteristics and liver function. Treatment allocation is based on several factors: Liver function, size and number of tumours, macrovascular invasion or extrahepatic spread. The recommendations in terms of selection for different treatment strategies must be based on evidence-based data. Resection, liver transplant and interventional radiology treatment are mainstays of HCC therapy and achieve the best outcomes in well-selected candidates. Chemoembolization is the most widely used treatment for unresectable HCC or progression after curative treatment. Finally, in patients with advanced HCC with preserved liver function, sorafenib is the only approved systemic drug that has demonstrated a survival benefit and is the standard of care in this group of patients. PMID:27028578

  5. New advances in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Sonia; Herrera, Iván; Irurzun, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of deaths in cirrhotic patients and the third cause of cancer related deaths. Most HCC are associated with well known underlying risk factors, in fact, HCC arise in cirrhotic patients in up to 90% of cases, mainly due to chronic viral hepatitis and alcohol abuse. The worldwide prevention strategies are conducted to avoid the infection of new subjects and to minimize the risk of liver disease progression in infected patients. HCC is a condition which lends itself to surveillance as at-risk individuals can readily be identified. The American and European guidelines recommended implementation of surveillance programs with ultrasound every six months in patient at-risk for developing HCC. The diagnosis of HCC can be based on non-invasive criteria (only in cirrhotic patient) or pathology. Accurately staging patients is essential to oncology practice. The ideal tumour staging system in HCC needs to account for both tumour characteristics and liver function. Treatment allocation is based on several factors: Liver function, size and number of tumours, macrovascular invasion or extrahepatic spread. The recommendations in terms of selection for different treatment strategies must be based on evidence-based data. Resection, liver transplant and interventional radiology treatment are mainstays of HCC therapy and achieve the best outcomes in well-selected candidates. Chemoembolization is the most widely used treatment for unresectable HCC or progression after curative treatment. Finally, in patients with advanced HCC with preserved liver function, sorafenib is the only approved systemic drug that has demonstrated a survival benefit and is the standard of care in this group of patients. PMID:27028578

  6. Superficial necrolytic dermatitis in a dog with an insulin-producing pancreatic islet cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Isidoro-Ayza, M; Lloret, A; Bardagí, M; Ferrer, L; Martínez, J

    2014-07-01

    A 10-year-old dog presented with convulsive crisis and symmetrical hyperkeratotic cutaneous lesions affecting the abdomen, inguinal area, eyelids, muzzles, both pinnae, and all the paw pads. Hypoglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were the main biochemical findings. A mass 2 cm in diameter was detected within the left pancreatic lobe by ultrasonography. It was surgically removed and histologically and immunohistochemically diagnosed as an insulin-producing pancreatic islet cell carcinoma. The animal was eventually euthanized due to lack of clinical improvement. At necropsy, metastatic nodules were observed in the pancreatic lymph nodes and liver. Histopathological findings of cutaneous lesions were highly suggestive of superficial necrolytic dermatitis and were interpreted as a paraneoplastic syndrome derived from the islet cell carcinoma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of superficial necrolytic dermatitis associated with an insulin-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma in dogs.

  7. Role of heparanase in radiation-enhanced invasiveness of pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Meirovitz, Amichay; Hermano, Esther; Lerner, Immanuel; Zcharia, Eyal; Pisano, Claudio; Peretz, Tamar; Elkin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by very low survival rates because of high intrinsic resistance to conventional therapies. Ionizing radiation (IR)-enhanced tumor invasiveness is emerging as one mechanism responsible for the limited benefit of radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we establish the role of heparanase - the only known mammalian endoglycosidase that cleaves heparan sulfate - in modulating the response of pancreatic cancer to radiotherapy. We found that clinically relevant doses of IR augment the invasive capability of pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo by upregulating heparanase. Changes in the levels of the transcription factor Egr-1 occurred in pancreatic cancer cells following radiation, underlying the stimulatory effect of IR on heparanase expression. Importantly, the specific heparanase inhibitor SST0001 abolished IR-enhanced invasiveness of pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro, while combined treatment with SST0001 and IR, but not IR alone, attenuated the spread of orthotopic pancreatic tumors in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that combining radiotherapy with heparanase inhibition is an effective strategy to prevent tumor resistance and dissemination, observed in many IR-treated pancreatic cancer patients. Further, the molecular mechanism underlying heparanase upregulation in pancreatic cancer that we identified in response to IR may help identify patients in which radiotherapeutic intervention may confer increased risk of metastatic spread, where anti-heparanase therapy may be particularly beneficial. PMID:21447736

  8. Advances in the etiology of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Aghdassi, Ali A; Budde, Christoph; Nitsche, Claudia; Sauter, Gabriele; Persike, Maria; Günther, Annett; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    In the past, chronic pancreatitis has been regarded as a fairly uniform and largely untreatable disorder that most commonly affects patients who both lack gainful employment or adequate insurance coverage and have a tendency to smoke and drink. Large clinical trials suggest that this perception is not only misguided and discriminatory but also not based on facts. We forgot that the perception of chronic liver disease was similar before World War II, and just like liver cirrhosis the fibrosis and cirrhosis of the pancreas--i.e. chronic pancreatitis--is the end result of a range of environmental, inflammatory, infectious and genetic disorders. A growing number of these have only recently been recognized as a distinct entity and several of which are becoming truly treatable. A large proportion of the risk for developing pancreatitis is conveyed by genetic risk factors, and we estimate that less than half of those have been identified so far. The same holds true for protective factors that can prevent pancreatitis, even in the face of excessive alcohol abuse. Various gene mutations and polymorphisms appear to determine an individual's susceptibility for developing pancreatic disease, for the severity of the disease, and for the disease progression. The spectrum of genotype/phenotype associations ranges from straightforward autosomal dominant traits with near-complete penetrance, as for the most common mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1), to moderate risks factors without mendelian inheritance patterns, as for SPINK1 and CFTR mutations, to very subtle risk associations and disease modifiers that can only be identified in large cohort studies, as for the chymotrypsin C, calcium-sensing receptor and the anionic trypsin (PRSS2) mutations. Only a better understanding of the disease mechanisms that underlie these changes will make an individualized therapy of pancreatic disorders a realistic option.

  9. DPC4 Gene Status of the Primary Carcinoma Correlates With Patterns of Failure in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Fu, Baojin; Yachida, Shinichi; Luo, Mingde; Abe, Hisashi; Henderson, Clark M.; Vilardell, Felip; Wang, Zheng; Keller, Jesse W.; Banerjee, Priya; Herman, Joseph M.; Cameron, John L.; Yeo, Charles J.; Halushka, Marc K.; Eshleman, James R.; Raben, Marian; Klein, Alison P.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Hidalgo, Manuel; Laheru, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Contrary to the extensive data accumulated regarding pancreatic carcinogenesis, the clinical and molecular features characteristic of advanced stage (stage III and IV) disease are unknown. A comprehensive study of pancreatic cancers from patients who have succumbed to their disease has the potential to greatly expand our understanding of the most lethal stage of this disease and identify novel areas for intervention. Materials and Methods Rapid autopsies were performed on 76 patients with documented pancreatic cancer. The histologic features of end stage disease were determined and correlated to the stage at initial diagnosis, patterns of failure (locally destructive v metastatic disease) and the status of the KRAS2, TP53, and DPC4 genes. Results At autopsy, 30% of patients died with locally destructive pancreatic cancer, and 70% died with widespread metastatic disease. These divergent patterns of failure found at autopsy (locally destructive v metastatic) were unrelated to clinical stage at initial presentation, treatment history, or histopathologic features. However, Dpc4 immunolabeling status of carcinoma tissues harvested at autopsy, a sensitive marker of DPC4 genetic status, was highly correlated with the presence of widespread metastasis but not with locally destructive tumors (P = .007). Conclusion Pancreatic cancers are represented by distinct genetic subtypes with significantly different patterns of failure. Determinations of DPC4 status at initial diagnosis may be of value in stratifying patients into treatment regimens related to local control versus systemic therapy. PMID:19273710

  10. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  11. Recent Advances and Prospects for Multimodality Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Awalpreet S; Khoo, Allison; Aliru, Maureen L; Arora, Harpreet K; Gunther, Jillian R; Krishnan, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    The outcomes for treatment of pancreatic cancer have not improved dramatically in many decades. However, the recent promising results with combination chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease increase optimism for future treatments. With greater control of overt or occult metastatic disease, there will likely be an expanding role for local treatment modalities, especially given that nearly a third of pancreatic cancer patients have locally destructive disease without distant metastatic disease at the time of death. Technical advances have allowed for the safe delivery of dose-escalated radiation therapy, which can then be combined with chemotherapy, targeted agents, immunotherapy, and nanoparticulate drug delivery techniques to produce novel and improved synergistic effects. Here we discuss recent advances and future directions for multimodality therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27619253

  12. Recent Advances and Prospects for Multimodality Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Awalpreet S; Khoo, Allison; Aliru, Maureen L; Arora, Harpreet K; Gunther, Jillian R; Krishnan, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    The outcomes for treatment of pancreatic cancer have not improved dramatically in many decades. However, the recent promising results with combination chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease increase optimism for future treatments. With greater control of overt or occult metastatic disease, there will likely be an expanding role for local treatment modalities, especially given that nearly a third of pancreatic cancer patients have locally destructive disease without distant metastatic disease at the time of death. Technical advances have allowed for the safe delivery of dose-escalated radiation therapy, which can then be combined with chemotherapy, targeted agents, immunotherapy, and nanoparticulate drug delivery techniques to produce novel and improved synergistic effects. Here we discuss recent advances and future directions for multimodality therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  13. Palliative laparoscopic hepatico- and gastrojejunostomy for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gentileschi, Paolo; Kini, Subhash; Gagner, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Only 10% to 20% of pancreatic tumors are resectable at the time of diagnosis. Patients with advanced disease have a median survival of 4.9 months. Palliation is often required for biliary or duodenal obstruction, or both, and for pain. Optimal palliation should guarantee the shortest possible hospital stay and as long a survival as possible with a good quality of life. In recent years, treatment options for palliation of biliary and duodenal obstruction due to pancreatic cancer have broadened. Endoscopic and percutaneous biliary stenting have been shown to be successful tools for safe palliation of high-risk patients. Nevertheless, fit patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer benefit from surgery, which allows long-lasting biliary and gastric drainage. While laparoscopic cholecystojejunostomy and gastroenterostomy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have been widely reported, laparoscopic hepatico-jejunostomy has been rarely described. In this article, we describe our technique of laparoscopic hepatico-jejunostomy and gastrojejunostomy. We also discuss current evidence on the indications for these procedures in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

  14. Does contrast-enhanced ultrasound reveal tumor angiogenesis in pancreatic ductal carcinoma? A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Mutsumi; Koito, Kazumitsu; Hirokawa, Naoki; Hori, Masakazu; Satoh, Taishi; Hareyama, Masato

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate tumor vascularity of pancreatic carcinoma noninvasively by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) and clarify the diagnostic value of tumor vascularity in subjects with nonresectable advanced pancreatic carcinoma. The study was approved by our institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. Twenty-seven subjects with advanced pancreatic ductal carcinoma were treated by chemoradiotherapy. Contrast-enhanced US, US guided biopsies and dynamic computed tomography (CT) were performed before and after the therapy. We assigned the intratumoral enhancement pattern of US as an enhanced ultrasound (EU) score, from 1 to 4, according to the degree of enhancement area. Intratumoral microvessel density (IMD) and average vessel diameter (AVD) were calculated by means of CD 34 immunostaining. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) staining was graded on a scale of 1 to 3. EU scores before chemoradiotherapy were compared with IMD, AVD, VEGF, histological grading and hepatic metastasis. After the therapy, local treatment response was evaluated by dynamic CT calculating the maximum area of the tumor, by comparing it with its size in pre- therapy. Subjects who had at least a 50% or more decrease of tumor size lasting more than 4 wk were estimated as partial response (PR), more than a 50% of increase progressive disease (PD) and if neither PR nor PD criteria were met, they were classified as stabled disease (SD). Next, EU scores were compared with IMD, AVD, VEGF and treatment response. Statistically significant differences were evaluated by Pearson's correlation, post-hoc, Spearman's rank correlation, Wilcoxon rank sum and Student's t-test. A p < 0.05 was defined as being statistically significant. Before the therapy, the EU score and IMD were significantly correlated (r = 0.50, p < 0.02), as was VEGF (r = 0.45, p < 0.05). The EU score and AVD were negatively correlated (r = - 0.56, p < 0.02). Significant

  15. Relative decreased splenic uptake of Tc-99m-sulfur colloid in patients with pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, J.L.; Burke, T.S.; Fratkin, M.J.; Sharpe, A.R. Jr.; Goodrich, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    Relative spleen/liver activity ratio was determined from posterior projection images using a photodensitometric method. Ratios from scans of 22 patients with proven pancreatic carcinoma (12 from rectilinear scans and 10 from scintillation camera images) were determined and compared to studies from patients documented as normal and to randomly selected liver/spleen imaging studies which had been previously interpreted as normal. The mean ratio from the pancreatic carcinoma group was significantly lower than the means of the respective normal groups (p(t) less than .0001 for rectilinear scans and p(t) less than .001 for scintigrams). There was no significant difference between the means of the proven normal and randomly selected normal groups or between the two pancreatic carcinoma groups. Splenic vascular alteration is discussed as a possible reason for decreased splenic distribution of Tc-99m-sulfur colloid in this patient group.

  16. Radiotherapy technical considerations in the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer: American-French consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose intensity

  17. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A.; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A.

    2012-08-01

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  18. Massive renal urothelial carcinoma with renal vein tumor thrombus, pancreatic infiltration and adrenal metastasis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Gao, Liang; Wu, Weilu; Chen, Peng; Bu, Siyuan; Wei, Qiang; Yang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old female patient presented with a massive left renal tumor, recurrent left flank pain and gross hematuria. The tumor was accompanied by a renal vein tumor thrombus, pancreatic infiltration and a solitary adrenal metastasis. Radical nephrectomy, distal pancreatectomy, ipsilateral adrenalectomy and splenectomy were performed. Histopathological examination suggested high-grade urothelial carcinoma (UC); however, tumor recurrence and multiple metastases were detected only 3 months after the surgery, and the patient succumbed during follow-up 1 month later. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of renal UC of such advanced stage with renal vein tumor thrombus, pancreatic infiltration and a solitary adrenal metastasis. PMID:27446406

  19. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  20. Isolation and immunohistochemical characterization of a pancreatic carcinoma-associated monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Halwani, F; Cheung, M; Jothy, S

    1990-10-01

    The aim of this study was to define a cellular antigen associated with human pancreatic ductal carcinoma, and to study its distribution in a large panel of malignant, benign, and normal tissues. For this purpose, monoclonal antibodies were generated against a postmicrosomal fraction of fresh human pancreatic cancer. One such antibody, LD-B1, reacted strongly with 95% of cases of primary and metastatic pancreatic ductal carcinomas. It also immunostained gallbladder carcinomas and cholangiocarcinomas. By contrast, it exhibited focal or weak reactivity to 10% of other types of common malignant tumors. On normal pancreas, staining was observed in ductal and centriacinar cells, but not in acinar or endocrine cells. In chronic pancreatitis, ductal staining intensity increased proportionally with the degree of cellular atypia. The antigen was also detected in gallbladder epithelium, bile ducts, ductal epithelium of sweat glands and salivary glands, and focally in a few other normal nonpancreatic tissues. These results suggest that LD-B1 MoAb can be used in immunohistochemical studies as a marker of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  1. Distinctive heavy metal composition of pancreatic juice in patients with pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carrigan, Patricia E; Hentz, Joseph G; Gordon, Gwyneth; Morgan, Jennifer L; Raimondo, Massimo; Anbar, Ariel D; Miller, Laurence J

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown the health risks of exposure to cigarette smoke and air pollution, with heavy metal composition implicated as contributing to both. Environmental exposure to cigarette smoke has been epidemiologically associated with pancreatic cancer, but the pathophysiologic basis for this is not yet clear. In the current work, we have used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to quantify the metal composition of pancreatic juice collected in response to secretin stimulation in successive patients evaluated for abdominal pain (35 with pancreatic cancer, 30 with chronic pancreatitis, and 35 with normal pancreas). Indeed, metal composition of pancreatic juice was distinctive in patients with pancreatic cancer relative to those without such a cancer. The metal concentrations that were found to have the strongest association with pancreatic cancer were chromium, selenium, and molybdenum, with 1 SD increases in the concentrations of each associated with substantial increases in the odds of having pancreatic cancer relative to those in patients with normal pancreas (210%, 160%, and 76%, respectively). Of note, elevations in concentrations of chromium and selenium did not correlate in individuals, whereas those having a 1 SD increase in the sum of the concentrations of these two metals in their pancreatic juice had a 480% increase in the odds of having pancreatic cancer. Elevations of nickel and zinc correlated with elevated chromium in individuals, with each of these metals known to be present in cigarette smoke, whereas other recognized metal components of cigarette smoke were not elevated. An understanding of why these metals are elevated in pancreatic juice and what effects they might have on pancreatic cells may have important implications for the diagnosis, treatment, and even prevention of pancreatic cancer.

  2. Frequency and spectrum of c-Ki-ras mutations in human sporadic colon carcinoma, carcinomas arising in ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Burmer, G.C.; Rabinovitch, P.S.; Loeb, L.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Sporadic colon carcinomas, carcinomas arising in chronic ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinomas have been analyzed for the presence of c-Ki-ras mutations by a combination of histological enrichment, cell sorting, polymerase chain reaction, and direct sequencing. Although 60% (37/61) of sporadic colon carcinomas contained mutations in codon 12, only 1 of 17 specimens of dysplasia or carcinoma from ulcerative colitis patients contained c-Ki-ras mutations, despite a high frequency of aneuploid tumors. In contrast, a higher percentage (16/20 = 80%) of pancreatic adenocarcinomas contained mutations in c-Ki-ras 2, despite a lower frequency of DNA aneuploidy in these neoplasms. Moreover, the spectrum of mutations differed between sporadic colon carcinoma, where the predominant mutation was a G to A transition, and pancreatic carcinomas, which predominantly contained G to C or T transversions. These results suggest that the etiology of ras mutations is different in these three human neoplasms.

  3. Pancreatic carcinoma presenting as bleeding from segmental gastric varices: pitfalls in diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mullan, F. J.; McKelvey, S. T.

    1990-01-01

    Splenic vein occlusion leading to gastric variceal haemorrhage should be considered in cases of obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We report an unusual case in which the underlying pathology was a resectable carcinoma of the pancreatic tail. Images Figure 1 PMID:2371194

  4. Advancement in treatment and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Conventional imaging modalities show limited accuracy for reliable assessment of the tumor. Recent researches suggest that molecular imaging techniques with tracers provide more biologically relevant information and are benefit for the diagnosis of the cancer. In addition, radiopharmaceuticals also play more important roles in treatment of the disease. This review summaries the advancement of the radiolabeled compounds in the theranostics of PC. PMID:26909131

  5. Carcinoma of the pancreatic head and periampullary region. Tumor staging with laparoscopy and laparoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed Central

    John, T G; Greig, J D; Carter, D C; Garden, O J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors performed a prospective evaluation of staging laparoscopy with laparoscopic ultrasonography in predicting surgical resectability in patients with carcinomas of the pancreatic head and periampullary region. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Pancreatic resection with curative intent is possible in a select minority of patients who have carcinomas of the pancreatic head and periampullary region. Patient selection is important to plan appropriate therapy and avoid unnecessary laparotomy in patients with unresectable disease. Laparoscopic ultrasonography is a novel technique that combines the proven benefits of staging laparoscopy with high resolution intraoperative ultrasound of the liver and pancreas, but which has yet to be evaluated critically in the staging of pancreatic malignancy. METHODS: A cohort of 40 consecutive patients referred to a tertiary referral center and with a diagnosis of potentially resectable pancreatic or periampullary cancer underwent staging laparoscopy with laparoscopic ultrasonography. The diagnostic accuracy of staging laparoscopy alone and in conjunction with laparoscopic ultrasonography was evaluated in predicting tumor resectability (absence of peritoneal or liver metastases; absence of malignant regional lymphadenopathy; tumor confined to pancreatic head or periampullary region). RESULTS: "Occult" metastatic lesions were demonstrated by staging laparoscopy in 14 patients (35%). Laparoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated factors confirming unresectable tumor in 23 patients (59%), provided staging information in addition to that of laparoscopy alone in 20 patients (53%), and changed the decision regarding tumor resectability in 10 patients (25%). Staging laparoscopy with laparoscopic ultrasonography was more specific and accurate in predicting tumor resectability than laparoscopy alone (88% and 89% versus 50% and 65%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Staging laparoscopy is indispensable in the detection of "occult" intra

  6. Bacterial Quorum Sensing Molecule N-3-Oxo-Dodecanoyl-L-Homoserine Lactone Causes Direct Cytotoxicity and Reduced Cell Motility in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashwath S.; Bryan, Jeffrey N.; Kumar, Senthil R.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of chemotherapeutic and surgical advances, pancreatic cancer continues to have a dismal prognosis. Metastasis due to tumor cell migration remains the most critical challenge in treating pancreatic cancer, and conventional chemotherapy is rarely curative. In the quest for more novel molecules to fight this disease, we tested the hypothesis that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecule N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (O-DDHSL) would be cytotoxic to and reduce mobility of pancreatic carcinoma cells (Panc-1 and Aspc-1). Results showed a decrease in cell viability from apoptosis, diminished colony formation, and inhibition of migration of the evaluated pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Also, cell viability decreased in the presence of O-DDHSL when cells were grown in matrigel basement membrane matrix. While messenger RNA for IQGAP-1 decreased in Panc-1 and HPDE cells upon exposure to O-DDHSL, no change was observed in Aspc-1 cells. Cofilin mRNA expression was found to be increased in both HPDE and Panc-1 cells with marginal decrease in Aspc-1 cells. RhoC, a Rho-family GTPase involved in cell motility, increased in the presence of O-DDHSL, suggesting a possible compensatory response to alteration in other migration associated genes. Our results indicate that O-DDHSL could be an effective biomolecule in eukaryotic systems with multimodal function for essential molecular targeting in pancreatic cancer. PMID:25188245

  7. Preoperative Folfirinox for Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma - A Phase II Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Poorly Differentiated Malignant Neoplasm; Resectable Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Undifferentiated Pancreatic Carcinoma

  8. Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review of the clinical and radiological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yoshinori; Shinozaki, Hiroharu; Kimura, Yuki; Masugi, Yohei; Ito, Homare; Terauchi, Toshiaki; Kimata, Masaru; Furukawa, Junji; Kobayashi, Kenji; Ogata, Yoshiro

    2013-11-09

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer is rare, accounting for approximately 2% of all pancreatic malignancies, and most cases arise from renal cell carcinoma. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman, who presented with a pancreatic tumor detected during her annual health examination. She had undergone left nephrectomy 13 years previously for renal cell carcinoma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed two tumors in the head and body of the pancreas, a hypervascular tumor and a hypovascular tumor with an enhanced rim, respectively. She underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, and metastatic pancreatic tumors arising from the kidney with clustered clear cell carcinoma immunohistochemically positive for CD10 were diagnosed. This report presents the different enhancement features of different lesions on CT scans. Because the enhancement features of lesions have been reported to vary according to the size of the metastatic tumor, a knowledge of the history of renal cell carcinoma is crucial for diagnosis.

  9. Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review of the clinical and radiological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yoshinori; Shinozaki, Hiroharu; Kimura, Yuki; Masugi, Yohei; Ito, Homare; Terauchi, Toshiaki; Kimata, Masaru; Furukawa, Junji; Kobayashi, Kenji; Ogata, Yoshiro

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer is rare, accounting for approximately 2% of all pancreatic malignancies, and most cases arise from renal cell carcinoma. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman, who presented with a pancreatic tumor detected during her annual health examination. She had undergone left nephrectomy 13 years previously for renal cell carcinoma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed two tumors in the head and body of the pancreas, a hypervascular tumor and a hypovascular tumor with an enhanced rim, respectively. She underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, and metastatic pancreatic tumors arising from the kidney with clustered clear cell carcinoma immunohistochemically positive for CD10 were diagnosed. This report presents the different enhancement features of different lesions on CT scans. Because the enhancement features of lesions have been reported to vary according to the size of the metastatic tumor, a knowledge of the history of renal cell carcinoma is crucial for diagnosis. PMID:24209713

  10. Efficacy of Contrast-enhanced Harmonic Endoscopic Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Uekitani, Toshiyuki; Kaino, Seiji; Harima, Hirofumi; Suenaga, Shigeyuki; Sen-yo, Manabu; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Distinguishing pancreatic ductal carcinoma (DC) from other pancreatic masses remains challenging. This study aims at evaluating the efficacy of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography (CEH-EUS) in the diagnosis of DC. Patients and Methods: Forty-nine patients with solid pancreatic mass lesions underwent CEH-EUS. EUS (B-mode) was used to evaluate the inner echoes, distributions, and borders of the masses. The vascular patterns of the masses were evaluated with CEH-EUS at 30–50 s (early phase) and 70–90 s (late phase) after the administration of Sonazoid®. Results: The final diagnoses included DCs (37), mass-forming pancreatitis (6), endocrine neoplasms (3), a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (1), a metastatic carcinoma (1), and an acinar cell carcinoma (1). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the diagnoses of DC in hypoechoic masses using EUS (B-mode) were 89.2%, 16.7%, and 71.4%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of DC in hypovascular masses using CEH-EUS were 73.0%, 91.7%, and 77.6% in the early phase and 83.8%, 91.7%, and 85.7% in the late phase, respectively. Conclusions: CEH-EUS for the diagnosis of DC is superior to EUS. CEH-EUS in the late phase was particularly efficacious in the diagnosis of DC. PMID:27184637

  11. Advanced Treatment for Basal Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Oro, Anthony E.

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are very common epithelial cancers that depend on the Hedgehog pathway for tumor growth. Traditional therapies such as surgical excision are effective for most patients with sporadic BCC; however, better treatment options are needed for cosmetically sensitive or advanced and metastatic BCC. The first approved Hedgehog antagonist targeting the membrane receptor Smoothened, vismodegib, shows remarkable effectiveness on both syndromic and nonsyndromic BCCs. However, drug-resistant tumors frequently develop, illustrating the need for the development of next-generation Hedgehog antagonists targeting pathway components downstream from Smoothened. In this article, we will summarize available BCC treatment options and discuss the development of next-generation antagonists. PMID:24985127

  12. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered. PMID:25053938

  13. Hematoporphyrin derivative uptake and photodynamic therapy in pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, T.; Chen, I.W.; Sperling, M.; Bell, R.H. Jr.; Brackett, K.; Joffe, S.N.

    1988-05-01

    Little information is currently available concerning the uptake of porphyrins by pancreatic tumors, or the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on pancreatic cancer. In Syrian golden hamsters (n = 33), the organ distribution of /sup 125/I-labeled dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE) was studied in a pancreatic cancer model. In the same animal model the effect of PDT was studied using a gold vapor laser for energy delivery 3 hr after the injection of DHE (n = 7). DHE was 2.4 times more concentrated in the pancreatic tumor than in the nontumorous pancreas at 3 hr. Simultaneously there was a considerable accumulation of DHE in the surrounding gastrointestinal tract, causing perforation of the duodenum and jejunum with resultant death in four (57%) animals after PDT. Photodynamic therapy caused extensive tumor necrosis without any obvious effect on the nontumor-bearing pancreas. Damage to the surrounding tissue in the hamster indicates that precautions should be taken if PDT is to be used clinically in pancreatic cancer. Intratumoral injection of DHE may give higher drug concentrations with greater specificity for tumor treatment.

  14. A comparative proteomic study of plasma in feline pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify diagnostic biomarkers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Meachem, Melissa D.; Snead, Elisabeth R.; Kidney, Beverly A.; Jackson, Marion L.; Dickinson, Ryan; Larson, Victoria; Simko, Elemir

    2015-01-01

    While pancreatitis is now recognized as a common ailment in cats, the diagnosis remains challenging due to discordant results and suboptimal sensitivity of ultrasound and specific feline pancreatic lipase (Spec fPL) assay. Pancreatitis also shares similar clinical features with pancreatic carcinoma, a rare but aggressive disease with a grave prognosis. The objective of this pilot study was to compare the plasma proteomes of normal healthy cats (n = 6), cats with pancreatitis (n = 6), and cats with pancreatic carcinoma (n = 6) in order to identify potential new biomarkers of feline pancreatic disease. After plasma protein separation by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, protein spots were detected by Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 staining and identified by mass spectrometry. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), apolipoprotein-A1 (Apo-A1), and apolipoprotein-A1 precursor (Pre Apo-A1) appeared to be differentially expressed, which suggests the presence of a systemic acute-phase response and alteration of lipid metabolism in cats with pancreatic disease. Future studies involving greater case numbers are needed in order to assess the utility of these proteins as potential biomarkers. More sensitive proteomic techniques may also be helpful in detecting significant but low-abundance proteins. PMID:26130850

  15. An Open-Label Study of a Novel JAK-inhibitor, INCB047986, Given in Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Advanced Solid Tumors; Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Advanced Triple-Negative Breast Cancer; Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with {>=}12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  17. Postmortem examination of 22 pancreatic carcinoma patients treated with helium ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, K.H.; Castro, J.R.; Quivey, J.M.; Saunders, W.M.; Chen, G.T.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.; Tobias, C.A.; Walton, R.E.; Peters, T.C.

    1984-02-01

    Postmortem findings are available in this report in 22 patients with pancreatic carcinoma treated with helium ions at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; California. This represents the largest group evaluated histologically in the literature and is the first report evaluating effects of particle radiation in pancreatic tissue. Patient survival after therapy averaged 9 months. Most died of infection and/or pulmonary emboli. Local control was achieved in 27%. The pancreatic tumors had histologically more severe radiation changes than nontumor bearing pancreas. Irradiated bone marrow was severely hypocellular, and irradiated skin was atrophic. Five patients had radiation injury in the gastrointestinal tract. The spinal cord, liver, and kidneys showed no damage. This study demonstrates the safety of helium particle irradiation with present therapeutic planning. Injury to tumor was seen without excessive damage to adjacent tissues.

  18. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in pancreatic acinar carcinoma of rat.

    PubMed

    Taton, G; Delhaye, M; Swillens, S; Morisset, J; Larose, L; Longnecker, D S; Poirier, G G

    1985-04-15

    The active enantiomer of tritiated quinuclidinyl benzilate (3H(-)QNB) was used as a ligand to evaluate the muscarinic receptors. The 3H(-)QNB binding characteristics of muscarinic cholinergic receptors obtained from normal and neoplastic tissues were studied to determine changes in receptor properties during neoplastic transformation. Saturable and stereospecific binding sites for 3H(-)QNB are present in homogenates of rat pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The proportions of high- and low-affinity agonist binding sites are similar for neoplastic and normal tissues. The density of muscarinic receptors is higher in neoplastic (200 femtomoles/mg protein) than in normal pancreatic homogenates (80 femtomoles/mg protein). The muscarinic binding sites of the neoplastic and fetal pancreas show similar KD values which are higher than those observed for normal pancreas. PMID:2580801

  19. Characterization of 47D10, a glycoprotein associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.K.; Kato, K.P.; Murray, J.H.; Wolfe, H.; Rabin, H.; Carney, W.P.

    1986-03-05

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb), 47D10, was raised against a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549. 47D10 bound to lines derived from breast, colon, lung, and pancreatic tumors, but not to normal fibroblasts. Granulocytes also expressed 47D10 but red blood cells and lymphocytes were negative. Immunoperoxidase staining of paraffin-embedded tissues indicated that 47D10 was reactive with 36 out of 38 cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but not with chronic pancreatitis, regenerative pancreas or normal pancreas. The 47D10 antigen was a group of surface glycoproteins ranging from 63-97Kd (average Mr 85Kd). The antigen could be labeled by /sup 35/S-methionine, /sup 125/I, tritiated glucosamine, fucose, and mannose. Pulse-chase labeling showed that the 63-97Kd mature antigens were derived from precursors of 63Kd and 65Kd. The mature antigen was sensitive to endoglycosidase F (endo F) whereas the precursors were susceptible to both endoglycosidase H and endo F. Endo F digestion resulted in a polypeptide of 38Kd. Therefore, the 47D10 antigen is composed of at least 55% N-linked carbohydrates. The 47D10 MAb seems to be distinct from previously identified MAb against pancreatic tumors and may be useful in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma.

  20. Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Veitch, David; Tsai, Ted; Joshua, Fredrick

    2013-06-01

    Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic condition that may portend a diagnosis of malignancy. We describe the case of a 73-year-old man who presented with progressive palmar swelling, erythema, pain, and contractures of both hands, This presentation and associated weight loss eventually led to the diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This case highlights the often delayed, but important diagnosis of this unusual paraneoplastic phenomenon which can mimic arthropathy, Dupuytren contracture, and scleroderma. Our case is also the first documentation of the extensive inflammatory magnetic resonance imaging changes in palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome, which affects all tissue planes including the synovium and explains its confusing clinical manifestations.

  1. Predictive markers in advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, M Dror; Stadler, Walter M

    2013-08-01

    Predictive markers of response to therapy are increasingly important in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) due to the proliferation of treatment options in recent years. Different types of potential predictive markers may include clinical, toxicity-based, serum, tissue, and radiologic biomarkers. Clinical factors are commonly used in overall prognostic models of RCC but have limited utility in predicting response to therapy. Correlation between development of particular toxicities and response to therapy has been noted, such as the correlation between hypertension and response to angiogenesis-targeted therapy. Serum and tissue biomarkers will be covered in detail elsewhere, but factors such as serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and circulating cytokines show promise in this regard. Finally, baseline or early treatment radiology studies may have predictive ability for longer term efficacy, with most studies to date focusing on functional imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and DCE ultrasound (US). The ultimate goal of developing predictive biomarkers is to enable rational and personalized treatment strategies for patients with advanced RCC. PMID:23972709

  2. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Crane, Christopher H

    2016-08-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3-5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15-28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection.

  3. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  4. Imaging Characteristics and Prevalence of Pancreatic Carcinoma in Kosovo During 2011-2015 - Diagnostic Method as Choice

    PubMed Central

    Dedushi, Kreshnike; Kabashi, Serbeze; Mucaj, Sefedin; Hasbahta, Gazmed; Ramadani, Naser; Hoxhaj, Astrit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pancreatic cancer is the 10thmost common malignancy and the 4thlargest cancer killer in adults. Aim: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the number of cases presented with pancreatic carcinoma during the years 2011-2015, our experience of the imaging characteristics of pancreatic carcinoma. We evaluated prevalence of the pancreatic cancers, distant metastases and other local infiltration signs among the total cases of the pancreatic cancers diagnosed in the University Clinical Center of Kosovo, with the aim to compare these research findings to similar studies made in the developed countries. This is a retrospective research study done during the period of 2011-2015. Materials and Methodology: This retrospective research study includes 362 patients recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, examined in the period of 2011-2015 at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The imaging diagnostics are performed with MSCT Sensation 64 Siemens, MSCT Emotion 6 Siemens, and 1.5T MRI Symphony Siemens, biopsy guide with MSCT Sensation 64 Siemens in the Radiologic Clinic of UCCK; while the histopathology diagnostics has been performed in Clinic of Pathology at UCCK and prevalence is taken from the number of cases Reported at the Institute of Oncology Institute of Statistics and NIPH (National Institute of Public Health of Kosovo). Results: Out of a total of the 362 patients diagnosed with pancreas cancer, results is female 39.5% (n=143) and male 61.5% (n=219), report M: F (1: 1.6), 286 cases resulted in head and neck 79 % (n=286), 76 cases resulted in body and tail cancers (21%), distant metastases in first imaging modality were found in(n=155) patients 43 %, local infiltration was found in patients: gastric infiltration 15 % (n=54), duodenal and papilla infiltration 26% (n=94), local infiltration spleen 16% (n=57), local infiltration mesentery 43 % (n= 155), dilated biliary tree 34 % (n=123), regional lymph node infiltration 83 % (n= 300). Out of a total

  5. Clinical Impact of Pancreatic Metastases from Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Paolo; Doucet, Ludovic; Giglione, Palma; Grünwald, Viktor; Melichar, Bohuslav; Galli, Luca; De Giorgi, Ugo; Sabbatini, Roberto; Ortega, Cinzia; Santoni, Matteo; Bamias, Aristotelis; Verzoni, Elena; Derosa, Lisa; Studentova, Hana; Pacifici, Monica; Coppa, Jorgelina; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; de Braud, Filippo; Porta, Camillo; Escudier, Bernard; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma are uncommon and their prognostic significance is not well defined. In this analysis we evaluated the outcome of patients with pancreatic metastases treated with either targeted therapies or local treatment to the pancreas. Patients with pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma treated between 1993 and 2014 were identified from 11 European centers. Clinical records were retrospectively reviewed. Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to evaluate progression-free survival and overall survival. Cox’s proportional hazard models were used for survival analysis. In total, 276 PM patients were evaluated, including 77 (28%) patients treated by either surgery or radiotherapy to the pancreas, and 256 (93%) who received systemic therapy. Median time from nephrectomy to diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 91 months (IQR 54–142). Disease control rate after first-line TTs was 84%, with a median progression-free survival of 12 months (95% CI 10–14). Median overall survival was 73 months (95% CI 61–86) with a 5-year OS of 58%. Median OS of patients treated with local treatment was 106 months (95% CI 78–204) with a 5-year overall survival of 75%. On multivariable analysis, nephrectomy (HR 5.31; 95%CI 2.36–11.92; p<0.0001), Memorial Sloan Kettering/International Metastatic RCC Database Consortium prognostic score (HR 1.45, 95% CI 0.94–2.23 for intermediate vs good vs risk; HR 2.76 95%, CI 1.43–5.35 for poor vs good risk p = 0.0099) and pancreatic local treatment (HR 0.48; 95%CI 0.30–0.78 p = 0.0029) were associated with overall survival. Difference in median OS between patients with PM and that reported in a matched-control group of mRCC patients with extrapancreatic metastases was statistically significant (p < .0001). Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma usually occur years after nephrectomy, are associated with an indolent behavior and a prolonged survival. Targeted therapies and

  6. Immune checkpoint and inflammation as therapeutic targets in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kimbara, Shiro; Kondo, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is one of the most deadly malignant neoplasms, and the efficacy of conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy is far from satisfactory. Recent research studies have revealed that immunosuppression and inflammation are associated with oncogenesis, as well as tumor development, invasion, and metastasis in PAC. Thus, immunosuppression-related signaling, especially that involving immune checkpoint and inflammation, has emerged as novel treatment targets for PAC. However, PAC is an immune-resistant tumor, and it is still unclear whether immune checkpoint or anti-inflammation therapies would be an ideal strategy. In this article, we will review immune checkpoint and inflammation as potential targets, as well as clinical trials and the prospects for immunotherapy in PAC.

  7. Immune checkpoint and inflammation as therapeutic targets in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kimbara, Shiro; Kondo, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is one of the most deadly malignant neoplasms, and the efficacy of conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy is far from satisfactory. Recent research studies have revealed that immunosuppression and inflammation are associated with oncogenesis, as well as tumor development, invasion, and metastasis in PAC. Thus, immunosuppression-related signaling, especially that involving immune checkpoint and inflammation, has emerged as novel treatment targets for PAC. However, PAC is an immune-resistant tumor, and it is still unclear whether immune checkpoint or anti-inflammation therapies would be an ideal strategy. In this article, we will review immune checkpoint and inflammation as potential targets, as well as clinical trials and the prospects for immunotherapy in PAC. PMID:27672267

  8. Immune checkpoint and inflammation as therapeutic targets in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kimbara, Shiro; Kondo, Shunsuke

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is one of the most deadly malignant neoplasms, and the efficacy of conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy is far from satisfactory. Recent research studies have revealed that immunosuppression and inflammation are associated with oncogenesis, as well as tumor development, invasion, and metastasis in PAC. Thus, immunosuppression-related signaling, especially that involving immune checkpoint and inflammation, has emerged as novel treatment targets for PAC. However, PAC is an immune-resistant tumor, and it is still unclear whether immune checkpoint or anti-inflammation therapies would be an ideal strategy. In this article, we will review immune checkpoint and inflammation as potential targets, as well as clinical trials and the prospects for immunotherapy in PAC. PMID:27672267

  9. Nab-paclitaxel as alternative treatment regimen in advanced cholangiocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Unseld, Matthias; Scheithauer, Werner; Weigl, Roman; Kornek, Gabriela; Stranzl, Nadja; Bianconi, Daniela; Brunauer, Georg; Steger, Guenther; Zielinski, Christoph C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced cholangiocellular carcinoma has a poor prognosis with limited therapeutic options. Nab-paclitaxel has recently been described to be beneficial in metastatic pancreatic cancer improving overall and progression free survival (PFS). The potential antitumor activity of nab-paclitaxel in cholangiocellular carcinoma is hitherto unknown. Methods We retrospectively analyzed an institutional cholangiocellular carcinoma registry to determine the potential biological activity of nab-paclitaxel in advanced intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma. Disease control rate (DCR), PFS and overall survival (OS) upon nab-paclitaxel based treatment, after failure of platinum-containing first-line combination chemotherapy, was assessed. Results Twelve patients were identified. Five of 12 patients (42%) received nab-paclitaxel as second line, and 7 patients (56%) as third-line treatment. The objective DCR with nab-paclitaxel was 83% (10/12 patients). One patient had a complete remission (CR), two patients had a partial remission (PR) and 7 patients had stable disease (SD). Disease was rated progressive in two patients. In all 12 patients receiving nab-paclitaxel the median time to progression was 6 months (range, 2.1–19.5 months). Median OS after initiation of nab-paclitaxel treatment was 9 months (2.1–28.4 months). The median time of survival after diagnosis of advanced disease was 21.5 months, whereby 3 patients were alive at the date of censoring (04/01/2015). Conclusions This is the first report suggesting substantial antitumor activity of nab-paclitaxel in advanced cholangiocellular carcinoma. In this small series, nab-paclitaxel based salvage chemotherapy appears to have a biological activity by controlling the disease and positively affecting survival. Randomized trials in this disease entity and subgroup of patients are urged. PMID:27563449

  10. Iodine-125 implant and external beam irradiation in patients with localized pancreatic carcinoma. [Efficacy and complications

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, W.U.; Nardi, G.L.; Cohen, A.M.; Ling, C.C.

    1980-02-15

    Twelve patients with biopsy-proven clinically localized ductal pancreatic cancers (less than 7 cm in greatest diameter) judged unsuitable for resection were treated by bypass surgery, an Iodine-125 implant (20 to 39 mCi), and postoperative irradiation (4000 to 4500 rads). The potential problems of significant bleeding, pancreatic fistula, or pancreatitis were not experienced. A local recurrence developed in one patient and two recurred in regional lymph nodes. The projected median survival of the group is 11 months with four of the 12 patients still surviving. For purposes of comparison all patients with pancreatic ductal carcinoma treated by radical resection during a similar time were evaluated. All ten have died with a median survival of six months. Twelve of 22 (55%) of the combined implanted and resected groups have developed distant metastasis. Further pursuit of intraoperative techniques of irradiation in combination with adjuvant multidrug chemotherapy seems indicated in an attempt to prolong patient survival which is now limited by hematogenous metastases.

  11. Advances in systemic treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wan-Ling; Tan, Eng-Huat; Lim, Darren Wan-Teck; Ng, Quan-Sing; Tan, Daniel Shao-Weng; Jain, Amit; Ang, Mei-Kim

    2016-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a unique disease endemic in Asia. It is etiologically linked to the Epstein-Barr virus and is both radio- and chemo-sensitive. While radiotherapy (RT) remains the primary treatment modality with high cure rates for early stage disease, systemic treatment forms an important integral component in the treatment of NPC, both in the non-metastatic as well as palliative setting. Presently, standard therapy in locally advanced NPC comprises conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy administered concurrently during RT. The role of induction chemotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy remain to be well-defined. Further research strategies in non-metastatic disease will require better identification of patients with high risk disease, and determining the optimal sequence and combination of chemotherapeutic regimens. In metastatic disease, whilst chemotherapy remains the mainstay of care, resistance inevitably develops. Development of molecularly targeted therapies has not yielded much success to date, and further research has been focused on development of EBV-targeted strategies such as vaccination or administration of cytotoxic T-cells directed towards EBV, as well as evaluation of immune checkpoint inhibition approaches. PMID:27121881

  12. Advances in Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Intaraprasong, Pongphob; Siramolpiwat, Sith; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most frequent type of malignant liver tumor and a high impact health problem worldwide. The prevalence of HCC is particularly high in many Asian and African countries. Some HCC patients have no symptoms prior to diagnosis and many of them therefore present at late stage and have a grave prognosis. The well-established causes of HCC are chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) or chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection or alcoholic cirrhosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) Staging System remains the most widely used for HCC management guidelines. To date, the treatments for HCC are still very challenging for physicians due to limited resources in many parts of the world, but many options of management have been proposed, including hepatic resection, liver transplantation, ablative therapy, chemoembolization, sora nib and best supportive care. This review article describes the current evidence-based management of HCC with focus on early to advance stages that impact on patient overall survival. PMID:27644603

  13. Resolution of paraneoplastic alopecia following surgical removal of a pancreatic carcinoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Tasker, S; Griffon, D J; Nuttall, T J; Hill, P B

    1999-01-01

    A 13-year-old female neutered domestic longhaired cat was presented with a five-month history of progressive weight loss and bilaterally symmetrical alopecia of the ventrum, limbs and perineum. The alopecic skin had a shiny appearance and hair in the non-alopecic areas was easily epilated. Fine needle aspirate cytology of a palpable cranial abdominal mass revealed it to be of epithelial or glandular origin. A pancreatic mass was excised by left pancreatectomy during exploratory laparotomy, and histopathology and skin biopsies confirmed a diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma with concurrent paraneoplastic alopecia. No evidence of metastases was found on liver and lymph node biopsies. At re-examination 10 weeks after surgery, the hair had fully regrown. Skin signs recurred after 18 weeks and metastatic spread of the tumour was confirmed on postmortem examination. This case confirms that paraneoplastic alopecia associated with internal malignancies is a potentially reversible process if the internal neoplasm is excised.

  14. Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R M S; Byrne, M F; Baillie, J

    2003-04-26

    In the past decade, our understanding of the genetic basis, pathogenesis, and natural history of pancreatitis has grown strikingly. In severe acute pancreatitis, intensive medical support and non-surgical intervention for complications keeps patients alive; surgical drainage (necrosectomy) is reserved for patients with infected necrosis for whom supportive measures have failed. Enteral feeding has largely replaced the parenteral route; controversy remains with respect to use of prophylactic antibiotics. Although gene therapy for chronic pancreatitis is years away, our understanding of the roles of gene mutations in hereditary and sporadic pancreatitis offers tantalising clues about the disorder's pathogenesis. The division between acute and chronic pancreatitis has always been blurred: now, genetics of the disorder suggest a continuous range of disease rather than two separate entities. With recognition of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, we see that chronic pancreatitis is a premalignant disorder in some patients. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound are destined to replace endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for many diagnostic indications in pancreatic disease.

  15. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  16. Partial pancreatic head resection for intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma originating in a branch of the duct of santorini.

    PubMed

    Nakagohri, T; Konishi, M; Inoue, K; Izuishi, K; Kinoshita, T

    2002-01-01

    We report partial pancreatic head resection of intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma originating in a branch of the duct of Santorini. The tumor was located in the ventral part of pancreatic head at a distance from the Wirsung duct. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography accurately showed the communication between the duct of Santorini and the cystic tumor, and was useful for determining the part of the pancreas to be resected. Both the duct of Wirsung and the duct of Santorini were preserved. Partial pancreatic head resection would play an important role in surgical management of low-grade malignant neoplasm.

  17. Challenges and advances in mouse modeling for human pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wanglong

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is critical for developed countries, where its rate of diagnosis has been increasing steadily annually. In the past decade, the advances of pancreatic cancer research have not contributed to the decline in mortality rates from pancreatic cancer—the overall 5-year survival rate remains about 5% low. This number only underscores an obvious urgency for us to better understand the biological features of pancreatic carcinogenesis, to develop early detection methods, and to improve novel therapeutic treatments. To achieve these goals, animal modeling that faithfully recapitulates the whole process of human pancreatic cancer is central to making the advancements. In this review, we summarize the currently available animal models for pancreatic cancer and the advances in pancreatic cancer animal modeling. We compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of three major categories of these models: (1) carcinogen-induced; (2) xenograft and allograft; and (3) genetically engineered mouse models. We focus more on the genetically engineered mouse models, a category which has been rapidly expanded recently for their capacities to mimic human pancreatic cancer and metastasis, and highlight the combinations of these models with various newly developed strategies and cell-lineage labeling systems. PMID:23114842

  18. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: clinical features, diagnosis and medical treatment: advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) comprise with gastrointestinal carcinoids, the main groups of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Although these two groups of GI-NETs share many features including histological aspects; over-/ectopic expression of somatostatin receptors; the ability to ectopically secrete hormones/peptides/amines which can result in distinct functional syndromes; similar approaches used for tumor localization and some aspects of treatment, it is now generally agreed they should be considered separate. They differ in their pathogenesis, hormonal syndromes produced, many aspects of biological behavior and most important, in their response to certain anti-tumor treatment (chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapies). In this chapter the clinical features of the different types of pNETs will be considered as well as aspects of their diagnosis and medical treatment of the hormone-excess state. Emphasis will be on controversial areas or recent advances. The other aspects of the management of these tumors (surgery, treatment of advanced disease, tumor localization) are not dealt with here, because they are covered in other chapters in this volume. PMID:23582916

  19. Metronomic temozolomide as second line treatment for metastatic poorly differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    De Divitiis, C; von Arx, C; Grimaldi, A M; Cicala, D; Tatangelo, F; Arcella, A; Romano, G M; Simeone, E; Iaffaioli, R V; Ascierto, P A; Tafuto, S

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine Neoplasms (NEN) are a group of heterogeneous malignancies derived from neuroendocrine cell compartment, with different roles in both endocrine and nervous system. Most NETs have gastroentero-pancreatic (GEP) origin, arising in the foregut, midgut, or hindgut. The 2010 WHO classification divides GEP-NETs into two main subgroups, neuroendocrine tumors (NET) and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC), according with Ki-67 levels. NET are tumors with low (<20 %) Ki-67 value, and NECs, including small cell lung carcinomas and Merkel Cell carcinomas, are all NETs with high Ki-67 levels (>20 %-G3). Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC) are usually treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens. Here we present a case of a patient with pancreatic NEC progressing after cisplatin and etoposide, treated with temozolomide as palliative, second line treatment. According with the poor Performance Status (PS = 2) and to reduce the toxicity of the treatment was chosen an intermittent dosing regimen of metronomic temozolomide (75 mg/m(2)/day-one-week-on/on-week-off). MGMT resulted methylated. On July 2014 the patient started the treatment. On August 2014 the patient obtained a significant clinical benefit (PS = 0) and the total body CT scan performed on October 2014 showed a RECIST partial response on all the sites of disease. No drug-related side effects were reported by the patient. After 18 months of therapy the treatment continues without significant toxicity, and with further remission of the metastases. Treatment with metronomic "one-week-on/on-week-off" Temozolomide can be considered a good treatment option in patients with poor performance status, affected by pNEC with MGMT methylation. PMID:27142424

  20. CA19-9: A promising tumor marker for pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Nakajima, K.; Hidaka, A.; Nakashima, T.; Ohta, H.; Torizuka, K.; Naito, A.; Suzuki, T.

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate CA19-9 as a tumor marker for pancreatic carcinoma (PC), serum levels of CA19-9 were compared with those of CEA and elastase-1 in 56 patients, consisted of 43 cases with histologically proven adenocarcinomas and 13 cases with chronic pancreatitis. Serum levels were determined by using RIA kit obtained from CIS, France (CA19-9 and CEA) and Abbot (elastase-1). CA19-9 gave the highest accuracy among tumor markers the authors have studied and serum levels were markedly elevated over 100U/ml in 30 (70%) cases with PC, whereas none in chronic pancreatitis. CA19-9 values were closely related to the tumor size and the presence or absence of metastsis on CT findings. Small tumors of less than 3cm in diameter, although the site of tumor was limited to the head of the pancreas, showed positive results in 2 out of 5 cases. Furthermore, CA19-9 was at a level of less than 22U/ml in 98 normal controls and was found to be elevated in only 4 (3%) out of 124 patients with benign diseases, including liver diseases, gastric ulcer, cholelithiasis, and so on. These results indicate that CA19-9 is much better in diagnosis and management of PC than is CEA.

  1. Spiclomazine Induces Apoptosis Associated with the Suppression of Cell Viability, Migration and Invasion in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuojia; Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2013-01-01

    The effective treatment for pancreatic carcinoma remains critically needed. Herein, this current study showed that spiclomazine treatment caused a reduction in viability in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines CFPAC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 in vitro. It was notable in this regard that, compared with pancreatic carcinoma cells, normal human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and liver (HL-7702) cells were more resistant to the antigrowth effect of spiclomazine. Biochemically, spiclomazine treatment regulated the expression of protein levels in the apoptosis related pathways. Consistent with this effect, spiclomazine reduced the mitochondria membrane potential, elevated reactive oxygen species, and activated caspase-3/9. In addition, a key finding from this study was that spiclomazine suppressed migration and invasion of cancer cells through down-regulation of MMP-2/9. Collectively, the proposed studies did shed light on the antiproliferation effect of spiclomazine on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, and further clarified the mechanisms that spiclomazine induced apoptosis associated with the suppression of migration and invasion. PMID:23840452

  2. Baiting for Cancer: Using the Zebrafish as a Model in Liver and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Katie L; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Liver and pancreatic cancers are amongst the leading causes of cancer death. In recent years, genetic and chemical approaches in zebrafish have elucidated cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver and pancreatic cancer formation and progression. In this chapter, we review the recent approaches and advances in the field to study both hepatocellular carcinomas and pancreatic cancer. PMID:27165363

  3. Successful palliative approach with high-intensity focused ultrasound in a patient with metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ungaro, Antonio; Orsi, Franco; Casadio, Chiara; Galdy, Salvatore; Spada, Francesca; Cella, Chiara Alessandra; Tonno, Clementina Di; Bonomo, Guido; Vigna, Paolo Della; Murgioni, Sabina; Frezza, Anna Maria; Fazio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man with a metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (APC). After an early tumour progression on first-line chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine, even though it was badly tolerated, he was treated with a combination of systemic modified FOLFIRI and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on the pancreatic mass. A tumour showing partial response with a clinical benefit was obtained. HIFU was preferred to radiotherapy because of its shorter course and minimal side effects, in order to improve the patient’s clinical conditions. The patient is currently on chemotherapy, asymptomatic with a good performance status. In referral centres, with specific expertise, HIFU could be safely and successfully combined with systemic chemotherapy for treatment of metastatic pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27170835

  4. Cutaneous pancreatic metastasis: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hafez, H Z Abdel

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most dangerous human cancers and will continue to be a major unsolved health problem as we enter the 21(st) century. This is the case despite advances in imaging technology and surgical management. Indeed, 80% to 90% of pancreatic cancers are diagnosed either at the locally advanced or metastatic stage. Cutaneous metastases originating from pancreatic cancer are relatively rare. The most common site of cutaneous metastasis is the umbilicus, and this is known as the Sister Joseph's nodule. Very few patients have been reported with cutaneous lesions disclosing a pancreatic carcinoma at sites other than the umbilical area. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no previous reports on cutaneous pancreatic metastasis in Egypt. This is a report on a patient with cutaneous pancreatic metastases at the neck and review of reported non-umbilical cutaneous metastases from pancreatic carcinoma in the literatures.

  5. Cutaneous pancreatic metastasis: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Hza

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers and continues to be a major unsolved health problem as we enter the 21st century. This is the case despite advances in imaging technology and surgical management. Indeed, 80-90% of pancreatic cancers are diagnosed either at the locally advanced stage or metastatic stage. Cutaneous metastases originating from pancreatic cancer are relatively rare. The most common site of cutaneous metastasis is the umbilicus, and it is known as the Sister Joseph's nodule. Very few patients have been reported with cutaneous lesions disclosing pancreatic carcinoma at sites other than the umbilical area. To our knowledge, there were no previous reports on cutaneous pancreatic metastasis in Egypt. This is a report of a patient with cutaneous pancreatic metastases at the neck, followed by a review of reported non-umbilical cutaneous metastases from pancreatic carcinoma in the literature.

  6. Advances and challenges in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Abdelalim, Essam M; Emara, Mohamed M

    2015-01-26

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are able to differentiate into several cell types, including pancreatic β cells. Differentiation of pancreatic β cells depends on certain transcription factors, which function in a coordinated way during pancreas development. The existing protocols for in vitro differentiation produce pancreatic β cells, which are not highly responsive to glucose stimulation except after their transplantation into immune-compromised mice and allowing several weeks for further differentiation to ensure the maturation of these cells in vivo. Thus, although the substantial improvement that has been made for the differentiation of induced PSCs and embryonic stem cells toward pancreatic β cells, several challenges still hindering their full generation. Here, we summarize recent advances in the differentiation of PSCs into pancreatic β cells and discuss the challenges facing their differentiation as well as the different applications of these potential PSC-derived β cells.

  7. Repeated Pancreatectomy for Metachronous Duodenal and Pancreatic Metastases of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Tatsuo; Sakata, Naoaki; Aoki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kanno, Atsushi; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Unno, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman had undergone left nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma 13 years previously. Ten years later, a solitary metastatic tumor had been detected in the pancreatic tail and she had undergone subsequent resection of the pancreatic tail and spleen. Three years after surgery, she was admitted to our hospital for severe anemia resulting from gastrointestinal tract bleeding. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a 3-cm solid tumor at the oral side of the papilla of Vater. Histology of the bioptic duodenal tissue revealed inflammatory granulation without malignancy. Computed tomography showed a well-contrasted hypervascular tumor in the descending portion of the duodenum. We diagnosed the patient with metachronous duodenal metastasis of renal cell carcinoma and performed a pancreaticoduodenectomy. An ulcerated polypoid mass was detected at the oral side of the papilla of Vater. Histology revealed clear cell carcinoma coated by granulation tissue across the surface of the tumor. Immunohistology demonstrated that the cells were positive for vimentin, CD10 and epithelial membrane antigen and negative for CK7. After a repeated pancreatectomy, the patient had no symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding and maintained good glucose tolerance without insulin therapy because the remnant pancreas functioned well. In conclusion, for the diagnosis of patients who have previously undergone nephrectomy and present with gastrointestinal bleeding, the possibility of metastasis to the gastrointestinal tract, including the duodenum, should be considered. With respect to surgical treatment, the pancreas should be minimally resected to maintain a free surgical margin during the first surgery taking into account further metachronous metastasis to the duodenum and pancreas. PMID:24403883

  8. Repeated pancreatectomy for metachronous duodenal and pancreatic metastases of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hata, Tatsuo; Sakata, Naoaki; Aoki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kanno, Atsushi; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Unno, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman had undergone left nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma 13 years previously. Ten years later, a solitary metastatic tumor had been detected in the pancreatic tail and she had undergone subsequent resection of the pancreatic tail and spleen. Three years after surgery, she was admitted to our hospital for severe anemia resulting from gastrointestinal tract bleeding. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a 3-cm solid tumor at the oral side of the papilla of Vater. Histology of the bioptic duodenal tissue revealed inflammatory granulation without malignancy. Computed tomography showed a well-contrasted hypervascular tumor in the descending portion of the duodenum. We diagnosed the patient with metachronous duodenal metastasis of renal cell carcinoma and performed a pancreaticoduodenectomy. An ulcerated polypoid mass was detected at the oral side of the papilla of Vater. Histology revealed clear cell carcinoma coated by granulation tissue across the surface of the tumor. Immunohistology demonstrated that the cells were positive for vimentin, CD10 and epithelial membrane antigen and negative for CK7. After a repeated pancreatectomy, the patient had no symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding and maintained good glucose tolerance without insulin therapy because the remnant pancreas functioned well. In conclusion, for the diagnosis of patients who have previously undergone nephrectomy and present with gastrointestinal bleeding, the possibility of metastasis to the gastrointestinal tract, including the duodenum, should be considered. With respect to surgical treatment, the pancreas should be minimally resected to maintain a free surgical margin during the first surgery taking into account further metachronous metastasis to the duodenum and pancreas. PMID:24403883

  9. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  10. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  11. Recycling of epidermal growth factor in a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Korc, M.; Magun, B.E.

    1985-09-01

    PANC-1 human pancreatic carcinoma cells readily bound and internalized /sup 125/I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF). Bound /sup 125/I-labeled EGF was then partially processed to a number of high molecular weight acidic species. Percoll gradient centrifugation of cell homogenates indicated that the majority of /sup 125/I activity localized to several intracellular vesicular compartments. Both intact EGF and its processed species were subsequently released into the incubation medium. A major portion of the released radioactivity was capable of rebinding to the cell. Only a small amount of bound /sup 125/I-labeled EGF was degraded to low molecular weight products, and this degradation was completely blocked by methylamine. These findings suggest that in PANC-1 cells, bound EGF undergoes only limited processing. Both intact EGF and its major processed species bypass the cellular degradative pathways, are slowly released from the cell, and then rebind to the cell.

  12. Acute pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice as initial complaints of hepatocellular carcinoma: case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with cirrhosis-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) rarely present with acute pancreatitis (AP) and obstructive jaundice as the main clinical features. AP with obstructive jaundice caused by common bile duct embolism (CBDE) is very rare. Case presentation A 54-year-old man with CBDE was misdiagnosed with common bile duct stones three times over a 7-month period. Investigations during this time did not identify CBDE. Surgical exploration was performed because of AP, obstructive jaundice, and a tumor in the left lobe of the liver. CBDE from the hepatic tumor was diagnosed by intraoperative biopsy and frozen section examination. The patient underwent left hemihepatectomy, cholecystectomy, and bile duct exploration. Conclusion Preoperative diagnosis of CBDE is difficult because of the rarity of the condition, lack of physician awareness, and easy misdiagnosis on imaging examinations. Early and accurate diagnosis of this condition is important. PMID:24422982

  13. Racial differences in pancreatic cancer: comparison of survival and histologic types of pancreatic carcinoma in Asians, blacks, and whites in the United States.

    PubMed

    Longnecker, D S; Karagas, M R; Tosteson, T D; Mott, L A

    2000-11-01

    SEER data for histologically confirmed carcinomas of the pancreas for 1973-1995 from Hawaii, San Francisco, and Seattle (n = 10,621) were analyzed to compare the survival and types of carcinomas in various racial groups. These geographic sites were selected because each included a sizable number of Asian patients. The median survival after diagnosis in unadjusted data was longer in Asian patients than in whites. After adjustment for age at diagnosis and year of diagnosis, only the survival advantage of Asian women over whites and blacks persisted as a statistically significant difference. Racial differences were no longer statistically significant when further adjustments were made for stage, grade, and morphology. The proportion of papillary carcinomas or mucinous cystadenocarcinomas was higher in Asians than in whites and blacks (p = 0.02), and patients with these neoplasms had a longer median survival than did patients with ductal adenocarcinoma (12 vs. 3.3 months). The fraction of Asian patients with lower stages and grades of carcinomas also was higher than among white and black patients. Longer survival of Asian compared with white and black patients with pancreatic carcinoma is at least partly explained by their higher proportion of less aggressive carcinomas at the time of diagnosis.

  14. Isoalantolactone Induces Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma PANC-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad; Ding, Chuan; Rasul, Azhar; Yi, Fei; Li, Ting; Gao, Hongwen; Gao, Rong; Zhong, Lili; Zhang, Kun; Fang, Xuedong; Ma, Tonghui

    2012-01-01

    Isoalantolactone, a sesquiterpene lactone compound possesses antifungal, antibacteria, antihelminthic and antiproliferative activities. In the present study, we found that isoalantolactone inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Further mechanistic studies revealed that induction of apoptosis is associated with increased generation of reactive oxygen species, cardiolipin oxidation, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c and cell cycle arrest at S phase. N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC), a specific ROS inhibitor restored cell viability and completely blocked isoalantolactone-mediated apoptosis in PANC-1 cells indicating that ROS are involved in isoalantolactone-mediated apoptosis. Western blot study showed that isoalantolactone increased the expression of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, Bax, and cleaved caspase-3 and decreased the expression of Bcl-2 in a dose-dependent manner. No change in expression of phosphorylated p38 MAPK and Bax was found when cells were treated with isoalantolactone in the presence of NAC, indicating that activation of these proteins is directly dependent on ROS generation. The present study provides evidence for the first time that isoalantolactone induces ROS-dependent apoptosis through intrinsic pathway. Furthermore, our in vivo toxicity study demonstrated that isoalantolactone did not induce any acute or chronic toxicity in liver and kidneys of CD1 mice at dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. Therefore, isoalantolactone may be a safe chemotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of human pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:22532787

  15. Advances in the endoscopic management of pancreatic collections

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Clavijo, David; de la Higuera, Belen González; Vila, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of pancreatic collections has experienced great progress in recent years with the emergence of alternative minimally invasive techniques comparing to the classic surgical treatment. Such techniques have been shown to improve outcomes of morbidity vs surgical treatment. The recent emergence of endoscopic drainage is noteworthy. The advent of endoscopic ultrasonography has been crucial for treatment of these specific lesions. They can be characterized, their relationships with neighboring structures can be evaluated and the drainage guided by this technique has been clearly improved compared with the conventional endoscopic drainage. Computed tomography is the technique of choice to characterize the recently published new classification of pancreatic collections. For this reason, the radiologist’s role establishing and classifying in a rigorously manner the collections according to the new nomenclature is essential to making therapeutic decisions. Ideal scenario for comprehensive treatment of these collections would be those centers with endoscopic ultrasound and interventional radiology expertise together with hepatobiliopancreatic surgery. This review describes the different types of pancreatic collections: acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pancreatic pseudocysts, acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis; the indications and the contraindications for endoscopic drainage, the drainage technique and their outcomes. The integrated management of pancreatic collections according to their type and evolution time is discussed. PMID:25901217

  16. Molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma and impact of therapeutic advances

    PubMed Central

    Dhanasekaran, Renumathy; Bandoh, Salome; Roberts, Lewis R.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality and has an increasing incidence worldwide. HCC can be induced by multiple etiologies, is influenced by many risk factors, and has a complex pathogenesis. Furthermore, HCCs exhibit substantial heterogeneity, which compounds the difficulties in developing effective therapies against this highly lethal cancer. With advances in cancer biology and molecular and genetic profiling, a number of different mechanisms involved in the development and progression of HCC have been identified. Despite the advances in this area, the molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma is still not completely understood. This review aims to elaborate our current understanding of the most relevant genetic alterations and molecular pathways involved in the development and progression of HCC, and anticipate the potential impact of future advances on therapeutic drug development. PMID:27239288

  17. How Grim is Pancreatic Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Weledji, Elroy Patrick; Enoworock, George; Mokake, Martin; Sinju, Motaze

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma continues to be the most lethal malignancy with rising incidence. It is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the western world due to its low treatment success rate. In addition, because of its rapid growth and silent course, diagnosis is often only established in the advanced stages. As one of the most aggressive malignancies, the treatment of this disease is a great challenge to clinicians. This paper reviewed the natural history of pancreatic cancer, the current clinical practice and the future in pancreatic cancer management. PMID:27471581

  18. How Grim is Pancreatic Cancer?

    PubMed

    Weledji, Elroy Patrick; Enoworock, George; Mokake, Martin; Sinju, Motaze

    2016-04-15

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma continues to be the most lethal malignancy with rising incidence. It is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the western world due to its low treatment success rate. In addition, because of its rapid growth and silent course, diagnosis is often only established in the advanced stages. As one of the most aggressive malignancies, the treatment of this disease is a great challenge to clinicians. This paper reviewed the natural history of pancreatic cancer, the current clinical practice and the future in pancreatic cancer management. PMID:27471581

  19. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  20. Utility of ovarian biopsy in pancreatic metastasis of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, KOHEI; NAKAYAMA, KENTARO; ISHIKAWA, MASAKO; ISHIKAWA, NORIYOSHI; NAGASE, MAMIKO; KATAGIRI, HIROSHI; ISHIBASHI, TOMOKA; SATO, EMI; IIDA, KOHJI; SULTANA, RAZIA; KYO, SATORU

    2016-01-01

    It is very rare that ovarian carcinoma metastasizes to the pancreas, and pathological diagnosis is required to confirm the primary site. The present study reported a 73-year-old woman with serous carcinoma of the ovary that metastasized to the tail of the pancreas. Metastasis was confirmed by pathological and immunohistochemical examination of a biopsy of the ovarian tumor, an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreatic tumor and computerized tomography-guided paraaortic lymph node biopsy. A biopsy of the ovarian tumor is useful to make a precise diagnosis and to determine proper treatment when ovarian and pancreatic tumors are identified at the same time and the primary neoplasm is uncertain. PMID:27330762

  1. Bioengineered Human Arginase I with Enhanced Activity and Stability Controls Hepatocellular and Pancreatic Carcinoma Xenografts1

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Evan S; Stone, Everett M; Zhu, Cihui; Massey, Katherine L; Hamir, Amir N; Curley, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and pancreatic carcinoma (PC) cells often have inherent urea cycle defects rendering them auxotrophic for the amino acid l-arginine (l-arg). Most HCC and PC require extracellular sources of l-arg and undergo cell cycle arrest and apoptosis when l-arg is restricted. Systemic, enzyme-mediated depletion of l-arg has been investigated in mouse models and human trials. Non-human enzymes elicit neutralizing antibodies, whereas human arginases display poor pharmacological properties in serum. Co2+ substitution of the Mn2+ metal cofactor in human arginase I (Co-hArgI) was shown to confer more than 10-fold higher catalytic activity (kcat/Km) and 5-fold greater stability. We hypothesized that the Co-hArgI enzyme would decrease tumor burden by systemic elimination of l-arg in a murine model. Co-hArgI was conjugated to 5-kDa PEG (Co-hArgI-PEG) to enhance circulation persistence. It was used as monotherapy for HCC and PC in vitro and in vivo murine xenografts. The mechanism of cell death was also investigated. Weekly treatment of 8 mg/kg Co-hArgI-PEG effectively controlled human HepG2 (HCC) and Panc-1 (PC) tumor xenografts (P = .001 and P = .03, respectively). Both cell lines underwent apoptosis in vitro with significant increased expression of activated caspase-3 (P < .001). Furthermore, there was evidence of autophagy in vitro and in vivo. We have demonstrated that Co-hArgI-PEG is effective at controlling two types of l-arg-dependent carcinomas. Being a nonessential amino acid, arginine deprivation therapy through Co-hArgI-PEG holds promise as a new therapy in the treatment of HCC and PC. PMID:21633669

  2. Combined treatment of L1CAM antibodies and cytostatic drugs improve the therapeutic response of pancreatic and ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Heiner; Dieckmann, Chantal; Korniienko, Olena; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Kiefel, Helena; Salnikov, Alexey; Krüger, Achim; Altevogt, Peter; Sebens, Susanne

    2012-06-01

    The adhesion molecule L1CAM (CD171) accounts for enhanced motility, invasiveness and chemoresistance of tumor cells and represents a novel marker for various tumor entities including pancreatic and ovarian carcinoma. Recently, we showed that L1CAM inhibition increases the apoptotic response of tumor cells towards cytostatic drugs pointing to the potential of L1CAM to serve as a chemosensitizer in anti-cancer therapy. Thus, the present study evaluated the therapeutic potential of combined treatment with L1CAM antibodies and chemotherapeutic drugs in pancreatic and ovarian carcinoma model systems in vivo. Two L1CAM-specific antibodies (L1-14.10 and L1-9.3/2a) exhibiting high binding affinity to the L1CAM expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line Colo357 and the ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3ip were used for treatment. The combined therapy of SCID mice with either L1CAM antibody and gemcitabine and paclitaxel, respectively, reduced the growth of subcutaneously grown Colo357 or SKOV3ip tumors more efficiently than treatment with the cytostatic drug alone or in combination with control IgG. This was accompanied by an increased number of apoptotic tumor cells along with an elevated procaspase-8 expression. Furthermore, a lowered activation of NF-κB along with a reduced expression of VEGF and a diminished number of CD31-positive blood vessels were observed in tumors after combined therapy compared to control treatments, while the infiltration of F4/80-positive macrophages increased. Overall, these data provide new insights into the mechanism of the anti-cancer activity of L1CAM-blocking antibodies in vivo and support the suitability of L1CAM as a target for chemosensitization and of L1CAM-interfering antibodies as an appropriate tool to increase the therapeutic response of pancreatic and ovarian carcinoma.

  3. Update on phase I studies in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Hunting in darkness?

    PubMed

    Strimpakos, Alexios S; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-07-10

    Over the last twenty years, there is a limited number of effective cytotoxic or biological agents that managed to get approval in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Despite numerous trials, investments in translational research and generally in health care, the survival of pancreatic cancer patients has improved by a few only months. This disappointing reality necessitates a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease and the identification of targetable alterations which might lead to development of more effective drugs or better combinations. At the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, few novel agents and new therapeutic concepts, tested in phase I studies in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, were presented. The first notable phase I study referred to the combination of chemotherapy with local delivery of silencing RNA against the K-ras mutation G12D, in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which was well tolerated and promising (Abstract #4037). The second one referred to a combination of gemcitabine with pegylated recombinant human hyaluronidase (PEGPH20), an inhibitor of hyaluronan which as a matrix glycosaminoglycan is believed to play role in the reduced drug delivery to cancer (Abstract #4010). The other notable abstract was related to an early phase study which tested the safety and toxicity of arctigenin, a traditional herbal agent found in Arctium lappa Linné, administered as an oral formulation (GMS-01) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patient resistant to standard chemotherapy (Abstract #2559). The aforementioned early phase studies open new therapeutic approaches which deserve further testing in advanced pancreatic cancer.

  4. Update on phase I studies in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Hunting in darkness?

    PubMed

    Strimpakos, Alexios S; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-07-01

    Over the last twenty years, there is a limited number of effective cytotoxic or biological agents that managed to get approval in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Despite numerous trials, investments in translational research and generally in health care, the survival of pancreatic cancer patients has improved by a few only months. This disappointing reality necessitates a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease and the identification of targetable alterations which might lead to development of more effective drugs or better combinations. At the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, few novel agents and new therapeutic concepts, tested in phase I studies in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, were presented. The first notable phase I study referred to the combination of chemotherapy with local delivery of silencing RNA against the K-ras mutation G12D, in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which was well tolerated and promising (Abstract #4037). The second one referred to a combination of gemcitabine with pegylated recombinant human hyaluronidase (PEGPH20), an inhibitor of hyaluronan which as a matrix glycosaminoglycan is believed to play role in the reduced drug delivery to cancer (Abstract #4010). The other notable abstract was related to an early phase study which tested the safety and toxicity of arctigenin, a traditional herbal agent found in Arctium lappa Linné, administered as an oral formulation (GMS-01) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patient resistant to standard chemotherapy (Abstract #2559). The aforementioned early phase studies open new therapeutic approaches which deserve further testing in advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:23846926

  5. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  6. Chronic inflammation and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    McKay, Colin J; Glen, Paul; McMillan, Donald C

    2008-01-01

    There is a proven association between carcinoma of the pancreas and both the sporadic and hereditary forms of chronic pancreatitis. In chronic pancreatitis the standardised incidence ratio for development of pancreatic cancer is 14-18 and is further increased by cigarette smoking. Underlying mechanisms are unclear but current theories point to the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations as a consequence of repeated DNA damage and cell regeneration in an environment favouring proliferation and neovascularisation. In patients who develop pancreatic cancer, there is interest in the role of the inflammatory response in the development of cancer cachexia and in determining prognosis. Furthermore, markers of a systemic inflammatory response have prognostic significance in both advanced, inoperable pancreatic cancer and in patients undergoing resection. Further understanding of the details of the relationship between inflammation, carcinogenesis and cancer prognosis may lead to new therapeutic possibilities as part of multi-modality management of this difficult disease.

  7. Advanced pancreatic cancer - how to choose an adequate treatment option

    PubMed Central

    Korkeila, Eija A

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is poor, making it one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. The 5-year overall survival rate remains below 5% and little progress is made during the past decade. Only about 10%-20% of patients are eligible for curative-intent surgery and the majority end up having recurring disease even after radical surgery and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Chemotherapy in metastatic disease is palliative at best, aiming at disease and symptom control and prolongation of life. Treatment always causes side effects, the degree of which varies from patient to patient, depending on the patient’s general condition, concomitant morbidities as well as on the chosen treatment modality. Why is pancreatic cancer so resistant to treatment? How to best help the patient to reach the set treatment goals? PMID:26478662

  8. Pancreatic carcinomas deposit laminin-5, preferably adhere to laminin-5, and migrate on the newly deposited basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Tani, T.; Lumme, A.; Linnala, A.; Kivilaakso, E.; Kiviluoto, T.; Burgeson, R. E.; Kangas, L.; Leivo, I.; Virtanen, I.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the adhesion mechanism of pancreatic carcinoma using in vitro adhesion and migration assays of stable cell lines and tumors grown from these cell lines in nude mice. We also compared the results with the expression profiles of laminins and their receptors in pancreatic carcinomas to evaluate the relevance of these mechanisms in vivo. All of the cell lines preferably adhered to laminin-5, irrespective of their capability to synthesize laminin-5. Cell migration was studied in the presence of hepatocyte growth factor, as it increased the speed of migration manyfold. Herbimycin A treatment and antibodies against the beta 1 and alpha 3 integrin subunits and laminin alpha 3 chain almost entirely blocked cell migration of the BxPC-3 cell line, whereas migration was nearly unaffected by RGD peptide and only moderately inhibited by antibody against the alpha 6 integrin subunit. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of wounded BxPC-3 cells suggested a rapid endocytosis of alpha 3 integrin subunit in the cells at the margin of the wound and a rapid, polarized rearrangement of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin. Especially HGF-treated cultures showed a prominent cytoplasmic reaction for laminin-5 at the margin of the wound. Xenografted cells formed tumors that produced and deposited the same laminin chains as the in vitro cultures. Frozen sections of human pancreatic carcinomas showed reactivity for laminin chains suggestive for expression of laminin-1 and laminin-5. Both xenografted tumors and human pancreatic carcinomas also showed stromal reactivity for laminin-5. Electron microscopy of the human tumors suggested that this was due to an abundant reduplication the basement-membrane-like material around the nests of malignant cells. Our results suggest that pancreatic carcinomas synthesize and deposit laminin-5 in the basement membrane in an abnormal manner. Invading cells adhere to this newly produced basement membrane and migrate on it by using the alpha 3 beta 1

  9. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-08-21

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27610018

  10. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27610018

  11. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  12. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  13. Liver transplantation for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae Won; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2016-01-01

    There has been ongoing debate that the Milan criteria may be too strict that a significant number of patients who could benefit from liver transplantation (LT) might have been excluded. Based on this idea, various studies have been conducted to further expand the Milan criteria and give more HCC patients a chance of cure. In deceased donor LT (DDLT) setting, expansion of the criteria is relatively tempered because the results of LT for HCC should be comparable to those of patients with non-malignant indications. On the other hand, in living donor LT (LDLT) situation, liver grafts are not public resources. The acceptable target outcomes for LDLT might be much lower than those for DDLT. Patients with biologically favorable tumors might have excellent survivals after LT despite morphological advanced HCCs. Therefore, the significance and utility of biological tumor parameters for selecting suitable LT candidates have been increased to predict HCC recurrence after LT. Although there is no consensus regarding the use of prognostic biomarkers in LT selection criteria for HCC, the combination of conventional morphological parameters and new promising biomarkers could help us refine and expand the LT criteria for HCC in the near future. PMID:27729631

  14. High intensity focused ultrasound: A noninvasive therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The noninvasive ablation of pancreatic cancer with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) energy is received increasingly widespread interest. With rapidly temperature rise to cytotoxic levels within the focal volume of ultrasound beams, HIFU can selectively ablate a targeted lesion of the pancreas without any damage to surrounding or overlying tissues. Preliminary studies suggest that this approach is technical safe and feasible, and can be used alone or in combination with systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. It can effectively alleviate cancer-related abdominal pain, and may confer an additional survival benefit with few significant complications. This review provides a brief overview of HIFU, describes current clinical applications, summarizes characteristics of continuous and pulsed HIFU, and discusses future applications and challenges in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25469016

  15. Apoptosis of human pancreatic carcinoma cell-1 cells induced by Yin Chen Hao Decoction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai-Bo; Chen, Jing-Ming; Shao, Li-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (PANC-1) cells apoptosis and Bcl-2 and Bax expression induced by Yin Chen Hao Decoction (YCHD). METHODS: The cell growth inhibitory rate was determined by MTT assay. Apoptosis of PANC-1 cells before and after treatment with YCHD was determined by TUNEL staining. Expression of the apoptosis-associated genes, Bcl-2 and Bax, was detected by immunohistochemical staining and reverse transcription -PCR. RESULTS: YCHD inhibited the growth of PANC-1 cells. Following treatment with YCHD for 24-96 h, the apoptotic rate of PANC-1 cells increased with time. In addition, the positive rate of Bcl-2 protein expression decreased in a time-dependent manner, whereas the positive rate of Bax protein expression increased in a time-dependent manner. Following treatment of with YCHD for 24-96h, expression of BAX mRNA increased gradually and BCL-2 mRNA reduced gradually with time. CONCLUSION: YCHD induces apoptosis of PANC-1 cells mediated in part via up-regulation of BAX and down-regulation of BCL-2. PMID:26217086

  16. Treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer with opioid growth factor: phase I.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jill P; Conter, Robert L; Bingaman, Sandra I; Harvey, Harold A; Mauger, David T; Ahmad, Mejdi; Demers, Lawrence M; Stanley, Wayne B; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2004-03-01

    Opioid growth factor (OGF) is an endogenous pentapeptide that inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in culture, as well as xenografts in nude mice. To establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and determine safety and toxicity of OGF, a phase I trial was performed in patients with advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with escalating doses of OGF for 30 min i.v. to determine the MTD. The s.c. route of administration also was evaluated. Once the MTD was established, a group of patients was treated chronically, and monitored for safety and toxicity. Hypotension was the dose-limiting toxicity, resulting in a MTD of 250 microg/kg i.v. Due to limited solubility of OGF in small volumes, a maximum dose of 50 microg/kg twice daily was determined by the s.c. route of administration. No adverse events were reported for oxygen saturation, cardiac rhythm, laboratory values or neurological status in either the acute or chronic parts of the study with the i.v. or s.c. routes. During the chronic i.v. phase, two subjects had resolution of liver metastases and one showed regression of the pancreatic tumor. Mean survival from the time of diagnosis was 8.7 months (range 2-23 months) in the i.v. group and 9.5 months (range 1-18 months) in the s.c. group. We conclude that OGF can be safely administered to patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Further studies are needed to determine the efficacy of OGF alone or in combination with present modes of therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Review of experimental animal models of biliary acute pancreatitis and recent advances in basic research.

    PubMed

    Wan, Mei H; Huang, Wei; Latawiec, Diane; Jiang, Kun; Booth, David M; Elliott, Victoria; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Xia, Qing

    2012-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a formidable disease, which, in severe forms, causes significant mortality. Biliary AP, or gallstone obstruction-associated AP, accounts for 30-50% of all clinical cases of AP. In biliary AP, pancreatic acinar cell (PAC) death (the initiating event in the disease) is believed to occur as acinar cells make contact with bile salts when bile refluxes into the pancreatic duct. Recent advances have unveiled an important receptor responsible for the major function of bile acids on acinar cells, namely, the cell surface G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 (Gpbar1), located in the apical pole of the PAC. High concentrations of bile acids induce cytosolic Ca(2+) overload and inhibit mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, resulting in cell injury to both PACs and pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Various bile salts are employed to induce experimental AP, most commonly sodium taurocholate. Recent characterization of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulphate on PACs has led researchers to focus on this bile salt because of its potency in causing acinar cell injury at relatively low, sub-detergent concentrations, which strongly implicates action via the receptor Gpbar1. Improved surgical techniques have enabled the infusion of bile salts into the pancreatic duct to induce experimental biliary AP in mice, which allows the use of these transgenic animals as powerful tools. This review summarizes recent findings using transgenic mice in experimental biliary AP. PMID:22221567

  18. A comparison study of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with ductal adenocarcinoma using computed tomography in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingbing; Wang, Xiaolin; Guo, Rongfang; Li, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the computed tomography (CT) features of ACC and compare the results with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DAC) for improving preoperative diagnosis. The control group consisted of 34 patients with DAC collected from the pathology electronic database. The CT imaging from nine patients with pathologically confirmed ACC was retrospectively reviewed. Two radiologists independently assessed the tumor location, size, texture, and enhancement patterns. We found that 64.3% (9/14) of ACC tumors were homogeneous and 35.7% (5/14) had necrosis. The percentage of common bile duct and pancreatic ductal dilation was 14.3% (2/14) and 7.1% (1/14), respectively. The mean size of ACC was 50.1±24.2 mm. The mean attenuation of ACC was 35.4±3.9 Hounsfield unit (HU) before enhancement, 73.1±42.9 HU in arterial phase, and 71.8±15.6 HU in port venous phase. It is difficult to distinguish ACC from DAC preoperatively only based on CT findings. However, compared with DAC, we found that ACC tumors are likely to be larger and contain more heterogeneous intratumoral necrotic hypovascular regions, and less pancreatic ductal and common biliary dilation. PMID:27660464

  19. A comparison study of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with ductal adenocarcinoma using computed tomography in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingbing; Wang, Xiaolin; Guo, Rongfang; Li, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the computed tomography (CT) features of ACC and compare the results with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DAC) for improving preoperative diagnosis. The control group consisted of 34 patients with DAC collected from the pathology electronic database. The CT imaging from nine patients with pathologically confirmed ACC was retrospectively reviewed. Two radiologists independently assessed the tumor location, size, texture, and enhancement patterns. We found that 64.3% (9/14) of ACC tumors were homogeneous and 35.7% (5/14) had necrosis. The percentage of common bile duct and pancreatic ductal dilation was 14.3% (2/14) and 7.1% (1/14), respectively. The mean size of ACC was 50.1±24.2 mm. The mean attenuation of ACC was 35.4±3.9 Hounsfield unit (HU) before enhancement, 73.1±42.9 HU in arterial phase, and 71.8±15.6 HU in port venous phase. It is difficult to distinguish ACC from DAC preoperatively only based on CT findings. However, compared with DAC, we found that ACC tumors are likely to be larger and contain more heterogeneous intratumoral necrotic hypovascular regions, and less pancreatic ductal and common biliary dilation.

  20. A comparison study of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with ductal adenocarcinoma using computed tomography in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingbing; Wang, Xiaolin; Guo, Rongfang; Li, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the computed tomography (CT) features of ACC and compare the results with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DAC) for improving preoperative diagnosis. The control group consisted of 34 patients with DAC collected from the pathology electronic database. The CT imaging from nine patients with pathologically confirmed ACC was retrospectively reviewed. Two radiologists independently assessed the tumor location, size, texture, and enhancement patterns. We found that 64.3% (9/14) of ACC tumors were homogeneous and 35.7% (5/14) had necrosis. The percentage of common bile duct and pancreatic ductal dilation was 14.3% (2/14) and 7.1% (1/14), respectively. The mean size of ACC was 50.1±24.2 mm. The mean attenuation of ACC was 35.4±3.9 Hounsfield unit (HU) before enhancement, 73.1±42.9 HU in arterial phase, and 71.8±15.6 HU in port venous phase. It is difficult to distinguish ACC from DAC preoperatively only based on CT findings. However, compared with DAC, we found that ACC tumors are likely to be larger and contain more heterogeneous intratumoral necrotic hypovascular regions, and less pancreatic ductal and common biliary dilation. PMID:27660464

  1. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A/B (MICA/B) in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dambrauskas, Zilvinas; Svensson, Helena; Joshi, Meghnad; Hyltander, Anders; Naredi, Peter; Iresjö, Britt-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) are two stress-inducible ligands that bind to the immunoreceptor NKG2D and play an important role in mediating cytotoxicity of NK and T cells. Release of MIC molecules from the cell surface is thought to constitute an immune escape mechanism of tumor cells and thus could be associated with more aggressive course of tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the expression of MICA/B in ductal pancreatic carcinoma and serum in relation to tumor stage, differentiation and survival. MICA/B expression in tumor tissues and sera from patients with pancreatic cancer were analyzed by immunohistochemical staining (IHC), western blotting and ELISA, respectively. MICA/B expression was present in 17 of 22 (77%) of the tumors but not in normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Poorly differentiated tumors showed more pronounced MICA/B expression compared to differentiated tumors, but did not correlate significantly to other tumor characteristics. MICA/B-negative tumors displayed significantly lower incidence of lymph node metastases (p<0.01), and less mortality within 3 years following resection (p<0.02). In conclusion, tissue levels of MICA/B expression were elevated in pancreatic cancer cells without elevated levels in serum, despite well-recognized acute phase reactants in serum. Poorly differentiated tumors showed high MICA/B expression, which was related to extended tumor lymph node metastases and less frequent long-term survival.

  2. Progress in systemic therapy of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin-Lei; Qin, Shu-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Primary liver cancer, mainly consisting of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is one of common malignancies worldwide, and prevalent among the Chinese population. A diagnosis of early stage HCC has proven to be very difficult because of its insidious feature in onset and development. At the time of diagnosis, most HCC cases are locally advanced and/or distant metastatic, which results in difficulty to be treated and poor prognosis. For advanced HCC, systemic therapy is frequently adopted as an important palliative method. In recent years, clinical studies and observations have often reported about systemic anti-cancer therapy of advanced HCC, including molecular target therapy, systemic chemotherapy and immunotherapy. In this article, we review these treatment modalities to provide a reference for clinicians. PMID:27547002

  3. Synergistic combination of valproic acid and oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV as a potential therapy against cervical and pancreatic carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Junwei; Bonifati, Serena; Hristov, Georgi; Marttila, Tiina; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Stanzel, Sven; Schnölzer, Martina; Mougin, Christiane; Aprahamian, Marc; Grekova, Svitlana P; Raykov, Zahari; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The rat parvovirus H-1PV has oncolytic and tumour-suppressive properties potentially exploitable in cancer therapy. This possibility is being explored and results are encouraging, but it is necessary to improve the oncotoxicity of the virus. Here we show that this can be achieved by co-treating cancer cells with H-1PV and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) such as valproic acid (VPA). We demonstrate that these agents act synergistically to kill a range of human cervical carcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. Strikingly, in rat and mouse xenograft models, H-1PV/VPA co-treatment strongly inhibits tumour growth promoting complete tumour remission in all co-treated animals. At the molecular level, we found acetylation of the parvovirus nonstructural protein NS1 at residues K85 and K257 to modulate NS1-mediated transcription and cytotoxicity, both of which are enhanced by VPA treatment. These results warrant clinical evaluation of H-1PV/VPA co-treatment against cervical and pancreatic ductal carcinomas.

  4. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Su Jin; Chang, Suhwan; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho; Chung, Young-Hwa; Park, Young Woo; Koh, Sang Seok

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31{sup +} vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models.

  5. Pancreatic Hepatoid Carcinoma Mimicking a Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm: A Challenging Case on Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Fine-needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yutaka; Kato, Hironari; Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Harada, Ryo; Oda, Shinsuke; Fushimi, Soichiro; Mizukawa, Shou; Yabe, Shuntaro; Uchida, Daisuke; Seki, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Yagi, Takahito; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of a 45 mm pancreatic mass found during a medical examination. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology showed polygonal cells with pseudopapillary structures. The tumor cells were positive for nuclear/cytoplasmic β-catenin and CD10, and negative for chromogranin A. After a tentative diagnosis of a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm, middle pancreatectomy was performed. Histologically, polygonal cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm formed in the trabeculae and were immunohistochemically positive for HepPar1 and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II. The tumor was finally diagnosed to be pancreatic hepatoid carcinoma. No recurrence occurred for 12 months, even without adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27580541

  6. Dynamic telecytopathology of on site rapid cytology diagnoses for pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Burton; Chhieng, David C; Crowe, David R; Jhala, Darshana; Jhala, Nirag; Winokur, Thomas; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A; Eltoum, Isam E

    2006-01-01

    difference in agreement between onsite and telecytopathology diagnoses. Kappa values for telecytopathology were less than onsite evaluation when compared to the final diagnosis; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion This retrospective study demonstrates the potential use of telecytopathology as a valid substitute for onsite evaluation of pancreatic carcinoma by EUS-FNA. PMID:17156485

  7. Conventional chemotherapy and emerging targeted therapy for advanced adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yun-Ze; Zhu, Yu

    2013-02-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare but typically aggressive malignancy. Radical surgery remains the potentially curative option. However, about one third of patients initially present with distant metastases. Regarding to chemotherapy, mitotane alone or in combination with cytotoxic drugs should be the first selection. Meanwhile, a phase lll clinical trial of etoposide, doxorubicin, cisplatin plus mitotane or streptozotocin plus mitotane is currently undergoing worldwide. The study on molecular pathogenesis of ACC is progressing. A lot of targeted therapies are also enrolled in preclinical investigations and clinical trials, including small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, antiangiogenic compounds. This article introduced the conventional chemotherapy, newly developed targeted therapy for advanced ACC.

  8. Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Treatment of Malignant Biliary Strictures due to Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samie, Ahmed Abdel; Stumpf, Michael; Theilmann, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    Background Transpapillary stents are used to treat malignant biliary strictures. However, there are different stent types and data are controversial in respect to success and complications. Recently, completely covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMS) have become available. The aim of this study is to present a consecutive series of CSEMS placed to decompress the bile duct in malignant stenosis due to pancreatic carcinoma and to evaluate the effectiveness, complication rate and extractability of these devices. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the courses of 27 consecutive patients who received CSEMS due to malignant biliary strictures because of pancreatic carcinoma regardless of presumed resectability between January 2010 and May 2012 in our endoscopic unit. Results A total of 27 patients (12 male and 15 female) were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 75 years. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) and stent placement were successful at first attempt in all cases. The mean length of the stenosis was 20 mm. In 24 patients (89%) a stent length of 4 cm was sufficient to bridge the stenosis. In three cases a stent length of 6 cm was necessary. Drainage was achieved as monitored by a significant decrease or normalization of bilirubin in all cases (mean bilirubin 8.5 mg/dL and 1.5 mg/dL before and after stent placement respectively), 15 patients underwent surgery with pylorus preserving duodenopancreatectomy. In all patients who underwent surgery stents could be removed during the operation without difficulties. Leakage of the biliodigestive anastomosis occurred in one patient (6.6%). Four (15%) of the 27 patients developed complications related to the endoscopic procedure and/or stent placement respectively (cholecystitis in two patients, stent occlusion in one patient, and post-sphincterotomy bleeding in one patient). Conclusion The prolonged patency, extractability, and low complication rate

  9. Prolonged clinical benefit of everolimus therapy in the management of high-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Paula J; Uriol, Esther; Galván, José A; Alvarez, Carlos; Pérez, Quionia; Villanueva, Noemi; Berros, José P; Izquierdo, Marta; Viéitez, José M

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with high-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are limited, especially for those with progressive disease and for those who experience treatment failure. Everolimus, an oral inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), has been approved for the treatment of patients with low- or intermediate-grade advanced pNET. In the randomized phase III RADIANT-3 study in patients with low- or intermediate-grade advanced pNET, everolimus significantly increased progression-free survival (PFS) and decreased the relative risk for disease progression by 65% over placebo. This case report describes a heavily pretreated patient with high-grade pNET and liver and peritoneal metastases who achieved prolonged PFS, clinically relevant partial radiologic tumor response, and resolution of constitutional symptoms with improvement in Karnofsky performance status while receiving a combination of everolimus and octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR). Radiologic and clinical responses were maintained for 19 months, with minimal toxicity over the course of treatment. This case supports the findings that the combination of everolimus plus octreotide LAR may be considered for use in patients with high-grade pNET and progressive disease. Although behavior and aggressiveness are different between low- or intermediate-grade and high-grade pNET, some high-grade pNET may express mTOR; hence, everolimus should be considered in a clinical trial.

  10. Prolonged Clinical Benefit of Everolimus Therapy in the Management of High-Grade Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paula J.; Uriol, Esther; Galván, José A.; Álvarez, Carlos; Pérez, Quionia; Villanueva, Noemi; Berros, José P.; Izquierdo, Marta; Viéitez, José M.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with high-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are limited, especially for those with progressive disease and for those who experience treatment failure. Everolimus, an oral inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), has been approved for the treatment of patients with low- or intermediate-grade advanced pNET. In the randomized phase III RADIANT-3 study in patients with low- or intermediate-grade advanced pNET, everolimus significantly increased progression-free survival (PFS) and decreased the relative risk for disease progression by 65% over placebo. This case report describes a heavily pretreated patient with high-grade pNET and liver and peritoneal metastases who achieved prolonged PFS, clinically relevant partial radiologic tumor response, and resolution of constitutional symptoms with improvement in Karnofsky performance status while receiving a combination of everolimus and octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR). Radiologic and clinical responses were maintained for 19 months, with minimal toxicity over the course of treatment. This case supports the findings that the combination of everolimus plus octreotide LAR may be considered for use in patients with high-grade pNET and progressive disease. Although behavior and aggressiveness are different between low- or intermediate-grade and high-grade pNET, some high-grade pNET may express mTOR; hence, everolimus should be considered in a clinical trial. PMID:24019785

  11. FDG-PET in diagnosis, staging and prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Chen, Jun-Qiang; Liu, Jin-Lu; Qin, Xin-Gan; Huang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential role of positron emission tomography (PET) in the diagnosis, staging and prognosis predicting of pancreatic carcinoma (PC). METHODS: A systematic review of relevant literatures in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library was performed. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic and staging studies, and HRs for prognosis predicting studies were pooled. The bivariate model was used for diagnostic studies and the random-effect model for prognostic studies. Heterogeneity between included studies was tested using χ2 test, and subgroup analysis was performed to explain the heterogeneities. All of the calculations were performed using Stata version 11.0. RESULTS: A total of 39 studies were included. The pooled sensitivity of PET in diagnosing PC (30 studies, 1582 patients), evaluating N stating (4 studies, 101 patients) and liver metastasis (7 studies, 316 patients) were 0.91 (95%CI: 0.88-0.93), 0.64 (95%CI: 0.50-0.76), and 0.67 (95%CI: 0.52-0.79), respectively; and the corresponding specificity was 0.81 (95%CI: 0.75-0.85), 0.81 (95%CI: 0.25-0.85), and 0.96 (95%CI: 0.89-0.98), respectively. In prognosis analysis (6 studies, 198 patients), significant difference of overall survival was observed between high and low standardized uptake value groups (HR = 2.39, 95%CI: 1.57-3.63). Subgroup analysis showed that PET/CT was more sensitive than PET alone in evaluating liver metastasis of PC, 0.82 (95%CI: 0.48-0.98) and 0.67 (95%CI: 0.52-0.79), respectively. CONCLUSION: PET can be used as a valuable diagnostic and predictive tool for PC, but its effect in the staging of PC remains indeterminate. PMID:23922481

  12. Everolimus in advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: the clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Yao, James C; Phan, Alexandria T; Jehl, Valentine; Shah, Gaurav; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2013-03-01

    The incidence of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) has increased dramatically in the past 30 years. This information has revitalized basic and clinical research into the molecular biology of NET and has resulted in the recent approval of new therapies for pancreatic NET (pNET), including the oral inhibitor of the mTOR everolimus. Everolimus significantly improved progression-free survival among patients with pNET in the phase III RADIANT-3 study. Here, we review the clinical studies showing the efficacy of everolimus in pNET and summarize the translational science from these studies. To understand the mechanisms of resistance and cause of treatment failure, we compared the type of progression events observed in the everolimus and placebo arms of the RADIANT-3 study. Comparison of the everolimus arm to the placebo arm indicated the fractions of progression events due to new metastasis only (21% vs. 22%), growth of preexisting lesions only (54% vs. 49%), and new metastasis along with growth of preexisting lesions (24% vs. 27%) were similar. These results suggest that although everolimus delays disease progression in patients with pNET, patients who experience disease progression while on everolimus do not appear to have a more aggressive metastatic phenotype than those whose disease progresses while on placebo.

  13. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-09-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC.

  14. The effects of curcumin (diferuloylmethane) on body composition of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Henrique A.; Baracos, Vickie E.; Hong, David S.; Abbruzzese, James; Bruera, Eduardo; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Curcumin is a natural product that is often explored by patients with cancer. Weight loss due to fat and muscle depletion is a hallmark of pancreatic cancer and is associated with worse outcomes. Studies of curcumin's effects on muscularity show conflicting results in animal models. Methods and results Retrospective matched 1:2 case-control study to evaluate the effects of curcumin on body composition (determined by computerized tomography) of 66 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (22 treated,44 controls). Average age (SEM) was 63(1.8) years, 30/66(45%) women, median number of prior therapies was 2, median (IQR) time from advanced pancreatic cancer diagnosis to baseline image was 7(2-13.5) months (p>0.2, all variables). All patients lost weight (3.3% and 1.3%, treated vs. control, p=0.13). Treated patients lost more muscle (median [IQR] percent change −4.8[−9.1,-0.1] vs. −0.05%[−4.2, 2.6] in controls,p<0.001) and fat (median [IQR] percent change −6.8%[−15,-0.6] vs. −4.0%[−7.6, 1.3] in controls,p=0.04). Subcutaneous fat was more affected in the treated patients. Sarcopenic patients treated with curcumin(n=15) had survival of 169(115-223) days vs. 299(229-369) sarcopenic controls(p=0.024). No survival difference was found amongst non-sarcopenic patients. Conclusions Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated with curcumin showed significantly greater loss of subcutaneous fat and muscle than matched untreated controls. PMID:26934122

  15. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

  16. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  17. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy.

  18. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-08-28

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  19. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without Erlotinib Hydrochloride Followed By the Same Chemotherapy Regimen With or Without Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine or Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Has Been Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-04

    Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary-Mucinous Neoplasm; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer

  20. Reactivity of monoclonal anti-human pancreatic carcinoma antibodies AR2-20 and AR1-28 with tumors of nonpancreatic origin.

    PubMed Central

    Chin, J.; Zuna, R.; Miller, F.

    1987-01-01

    The reactivity of two IgG1 murine monoclonal antibodies, AR2-20 and AR1-28 directed against the RWP-1 and RWP-2 human pancreatic cell lines was evaluated with paraffin sections of nonpancreatic human carcinomas. These monoclonal antibodies, which are directed against a 200-kd glycoprotein, and which did not stain normal tissues, were both reactive with 6 of 116 neoplasms (6 of 103 carcinomas) by indirect immunofluorescent histochemistry. This contrasts with the positive incidence of staining obtained with 29 of 34 human pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The two antibodies have specificities different from those previously described that reacted with pancreatic neoplasms. The significance of these findings is discussed with respect to the use of these antibodies in a diagnostic panel. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 2 Figure 6 PMID:2433945

  1. A Multicenter Phase II Trial of S-1 With Concurrent Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Masafumi; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ito, Yoshinori; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagase, Michitaka; Yamao, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Furuse, Junji; Sato, Keiko; Sato, Tosiya; Okusaka, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. Results: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of {>=}100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

  2. Transcatheter embolization of advanced renal cell carcinoma with radioactive seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, E.K.; deKernion, J.B.

    1981-11-01

    Advanced renal cell carcinoma was treated by transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds. There were 14 patients with nonresectable or metastatic disease (stage IV) and 8 with stage II tumors treated. In 8 patients the tumor was implanted with radon seeds, complemented by 2,500 rad of external beam therapy, and 10 were treated by embolization with 125iodine seeds. The total dose delivered ranged form 1,600 to 14,000 rad. Several patients also had intra-arterial chemotherapy. Survival was improved over previously reported studies: 13 of 22 (59 per cent) at risk for 2 years and 5 of 15 (33 per cent) for 5 years. Distant metastases did not resolve but significant local palliation was achieved. Tumor size decreased in all patients, 8 of whom subsequently underwent nephrectomy. Other local effects included pain control (10 per cent), weight gain (75 per cent) and control of hemorrhage (88 per cent). Toxicity was minimal and consisted of mild nausea or pain. This approach, using a low energy emitter, allows selective high dose radiation of the tumor, while sparing the adjacent normal tissues. In contrast to renal artery occlusion with inert embolic material, subsequent nephrectomy in patients with disseminated disease is not necessary. Transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds should be considered a reasonable palliative procedure in patients with nonresectable primary renal cell carcinoma.

  3. Gross Hematuria and Bladder Tumor in a Patient with Advanced Thyroid Papillary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yuki; Ikeoka, Toshiyuki; Oba, Kojiro; Miyata, Yasuyoshi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Kuniko; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    We present a 73-year-old female with advanced thyroid papillary carcinoma who complained of gross hematuria. We found a bladder tumor and considered it the cause of her symptom. Cystoscopic findings of the tumor were unusual, with peri-tumor vessel formation. Pathological examination of the bladder tumor was consistent with metastasis of thyroid papillary carcinoma. Therefore, we identified thyroid carcinoma metastasis to the urinary bladder as the cause of hematuria in our patient. Thyroid carcinoma metastasis to the bladder is extremely rare, but it should be included among differential diagnoses for gross hematuria in patients with a clinical history of thyroid carcinoma. PMID:23762664

  4. Advances in the management of basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Carucci, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC), a malignant neoplasm derived from non-keratinizing cells that originate in the basal layer of the epidermis, is the most common cancer in humans. Several factors such as anatomic location, histologic features, primary or recurrent tumors, and patient characteristics influence the choice of treatment modality for BCC. Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) facilitates optimal margin control and conservation of normal tissue for the management of BCC; however, other treatment modalities may also be implemented in the correct clinical scenario. Other treatment modalities that will be reviewed include simple excision, electrodesiccation and curettage, cryotherapy, topical immunotherapy and chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, and radiation therapy. In addition, targeted molecular therapeutic options for the treatment of advanced or metastatic BCC will be discussed in this informal review based on recent literature obtained by using PubMed with relevant search terms. PMID:26097726

  5. Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy After Pancreatic Resection for Invasive Carcinoma Associated With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, Michael J.; Hsu, Charles C.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Winter, Jordan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Guler, Mehmet; Schulick, Richard D.; Cameron, John L.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are mucin-producing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. One-third are associated with invasive carcinoma. We examined the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for this cohort. Methods and Materials: Patients who had undergone pancreatic resection at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1999 and 2004 were reviewed. Of these patients, 83 with a resected pancreatic mass were found to have an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma, 70 of whom met inclusion criteria for the present analysis. Results: The median age at surgery was 68 years. The median tumor size was 3.3 cm, and invasive carcinoma was present at the margin in 16% of the patients. Of the 70 patients, 50% had metastases to the lymph nodes and 64% had Stage II disease. The median survival was 28.0 months, and 2- and 5-year survival rate was 57% and 45%, respectively. Of the 70 patients, 40 had undergone adjuvant CRT. Those receiving CRT were more likely to have lymph node metastases, perineural invasion, and Stage II-III disease. The 2-year survival rate after surgery with vs. without CRT was 55.8% vs. 59.3%, respectively (p = NS). Patients with lymph node metastases or positive surgical margins benefited significantly from CRT (p = .047 and p = .042, respectively). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant CRT was associated with improved survival, with a relative risk of 0.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.95; p = .044) after adjusting for major confounders. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT conferred a 57% decrease in the relative risk of mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with an associated invasive component after adjusting for major confounders. Patients with lymph node metastases or positive margins appeared to particularly benefit from CRT after definitive surgery.

  6. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-09-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC. PMID:26674766

  7. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarikova, Petra; Zavada, Filip; Salek, Cyril; Minarik, Marek

    2011-06-28

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, and Peutz-Jeghers and Lynch syndromes. Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  8. Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, pancreatic nesidioblastosis and microadenosis, and pancreatic polypeptide hypersecretion: a new association and clinical and hormonal responses to long-acting somatostatin analog SMS 201-995.

    PubMed

    Jerkins, T W; Sacks, H S; O'Dorisio, T M; Tuttle, S; Solomon, S S

    1987-06-01

    We describe a 63-yr-old man with disseminated medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and pancreatic nesidioblastosis and microadenosis with pancreatic polypeptide (PP) hypersecretion. His major symptoms were watery diarrhea, flushing, and abdominal bloating; these and the elevated plasma PP levels did not change after resection of the distal two thirds of the pancreas, which contained a 2-cm mass of nesidioblastotic tissue. Postoperatively, a long-acting somatostatin analog, SMS 201-995 (100 micrograms/day), normalized PP secretion acutely and chronically (7 months) and ameliorated his symptoms. The analog had no side-effects and did not alter glucose tolerance, calcitonin hypersecretion, or growth of the medullary carcinoma, but it did inhibit GH secretion. After withdrawal from therapy for 1 month, PP hypersecretion and all symptoms except diarrhea recurred. The coexistence of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and PP cell nesidioblastosis represents a new variant of the overlap syndromes between multiple endocrine neoplasia types I and II. Patients with medullary carcinoma and unexplained watery diarrhea should have fasting gastroenteropancreatic hormone assays done to screen for a potential gastrointestinal or pancreatic origin for the diarrhea. PMID:2883196

  9. Individual in-vitro sensitivities of human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moesta, K. T.; Dmytrijuk, Andrew; Schlag, Peter M.; Mang, Thomas S.

    1992-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative in the treatment of pancreatic cancer in man, due to the low sensitivity of the normal pancreas to PDT as shown in preclinical studies. Investigations on four human pancreatic cancer lines (MIA PaCa-2, PaCa 1, PaCa 3, and CAPAN 2) in vitro demonstrated a considerable variety in PDT-sensitivity proportional to the degree of differentiation, which was related to photosensitizer-uptake (PhotofrinTM). The well differentiated pancreatic tumor line Capan 2 showed a close relationship between high cell density and increased PDT-resistance. The Photofrin uptake of Capan 2 at high cell densities could be increased by short trypsinization prior to photosensitizer exposure. The data supports the hypothesis that a complex intercellular organization reduces the cell surface available for photosensitizer uptake and may cause the relative PDT resistance of normal pancreatic tissues and highly differentiated tumors.

  10. L-Carnitine-supplementation in advanced pancreatic cancer (CARPAN) - a randomized multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cachexia, a >10% loss of body-weight, is one factor determining the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer. Deficiency of L-Carnitine has been proposed to cause cancer cachexia. Findings We screened 152 and enrolled 72 patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer in a prospective, multi-centre, placebo-controlled, randomized and double-blinded trial to receive oral L-Carnitine (4 g) or placebo for 12 weeks. At entry patients reported a mean weight loss of 12 ± 2,5 (SEM) kg. During treatment body-mass-index increased by 3,4 ± 1,4% under L-Carnitine and decreased (−1,5 ± 1,4%) in controls (p < 0,05). Moreover, nutritional status (body cell mass, body fat) and quality-of-life parameters improved under L-Carnitine. There was a trend towards an increased overall survival in the L-Carnitine group (median 519 ± 50 d versus 399 ± 43 d, not significant) and towards a reduced hospital-stay (36 ± 4d versus 41 ± 9d,n.s.). Conclusion While these data are preliminary and need confirmation they indicate that patients with pancreatic cancer may have a clinically relevant benefit from the inexpensive and well tolerated oral supplementation of L-Carnitine. PMID:22824168

  11. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P.-I.; Chao, Yee; Li, C.-P.; Lee, R.-C.; Chi, K.-H.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m{sup 2}/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p < 0.001). The responders had a better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (86 {+-} 2 vs. 77 {+-} 2, p = 0.002) and had received a greater GEM dose intensity (347 {+-} 13 mg/m{sup 2}/wk vs. 296 {+-} 15 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP.

  12. Estimating Optimal Dose of Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine for Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Mature Results of GEMRT-01 Phase I Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, Nicolas; Mornex, Francoise; Bossard, Nadine; Ychou, Marc; Chauffert, Bruno; Wautot, Virginie

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To accurately determine the maximal tolerated dose, feasibility, and antitumor activity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy including twice-weekly gemcitabine in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were included in this Phase I trial. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 50 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy with twice-weekly gemcitabine was administered during the 5 weeks of radiotherapy, from an initial dose of 30 mg/m{sup 2}. The gemcitabine doses were escalated in 10-mg/m{sup 2} increments in a three-plus-three design, until dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Results: A total of 35 patients were included in the trial. The feasibility of chemoradiotherapy was high, because all the patients received the planned total radiation dose, and 26 patients (74%) received {>=}70% of the planned chemotherapy dose. The mean total delivered dose of gemcitabine was 417 mg/m{sup 2} (i.e., 77% of the prescribed dose). The maximal tolerated dose of twice-weekly gemcitabine was 70 mg/m{sup 2}. Of the 35 patients, 13 had a partial response (37%) and 21 had stable disease (60%). Overall, the median survival and the 6-, 12-, and 18-month survival rates were 10.6 months and 82%, 31%, and 11%, respectively. Survival was significantly longer in patients with an initial performance status of 0 or 1 (p = .004). Conclusion: Our mature data have indicated that gemcitabine doses can be increased {<=}70 mg/m{sup 2}, when delivered twice-weekly with concurrent radiotherapy. This combination shows promises to achieve better recurrence-free and overall survival. These results will serve as a basis for further implementation of the multimodal treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  13. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Advances in diagnosis, management, and long term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bodzin, Adam S; Busuttil, Ronald W

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains a common and lethal malignancy worldwide and arises in the setting of a host of diseases. The incidence continues to increase despite multiple vaccines and therapies for viruses such as the hepatitis B and C viruses. In addition, due to the growing incidence of obesity in Western society, there is anticipation that there will be a growing population with HCC due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Due to the growing frequency of this disease, screening is recommended using ultrasound with further imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and multi-detector computed tomography used for further characterization of masses. Great advances have been made to help with the early diagnosis of small lesions leading to potential curative resection or transplantation. Resection and transplantation maybe used in a variety of patients that are carefully selected based on underlying liver disease. Using certain guidelines and clinical acumen patients may have good outcomes with either resection or transplantation however many patients are inoperable at time of presentation. Fortunately, the use of new locoregional therapies has made down staging patients a potential option making them potential surgical candidates. Despite a growing population with HCC, new advances in viral therapies, chemotherapeutics, and an expanding population of surgical and transplant candidates might all contribute to improved long-term survival of these patients. PMID:26019732

  14. BRAF Mutation Is Rare in Advanced-Stage Low-Grade Ovarian Serous Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Tsang, Yvonne T.M.; Deavers, Michael T.; Mok, Samuel C.; Zu, Zhifei; Sun, Charlotte; Malpica, Anais; Wolf, Judith K.; Lu, Karen H.; Gershenson, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Low-grade ovarian serous carcinomas are believed to arise via an adenoma-serous borderline tumor-serous carcinoma sequence. In this study, we found that advanced-stage, low-grade ovarian serous carcinomas both with and without adjacent serous borderline tumor shared similar regions of loss of heterozygosity. We then analyzed 91 ovarian tumor samples for mutations in TP53, BRAF, and KRAS. TP53 mutations were not detected in any serous borderline tumors (n = 30) or low-grade serous carcinomas (n = 43) but were found in 73% of high-grade serous carcinomas (n = 18). BRAF (n = 9) or KRAS (n = 5) mutation was detected in 47% of serous borderline tumors, but among the low-grade serous carcinomas (39 stage III, 2 stage II, and 2 stage I), only one (2%) had a BRAF mutation and eight (19%) had a KRAS mutation. The low frequency of BRAF mutations in advanced-stage, low-grade serous carcinomas, which contrasts with previous findings, suggests that aggressive, low-grade serous carcinomas are more likely derived from serous borderline tumors without BRAF mutation. In addition, advanced-stage, low-grade carcinoma patients with BRAF or KRAS mutation have a better apparent clinical outcome. However, further investigation is needed. PMID:20802181

  15. Proteomic strategies in the search for novel pancreatic cancer biomarkers and drug targets: recent advances and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Orla; Henry, Michael; McVey, Gerard; Clynes, Martin; Moriarty, Michael; Meleady, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest cancers; despite a low incidence rate it is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Improvement of the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment remains the main focus of pancreatic cancer research. Rapid developments in proteomic technologies has improved our understanding of the pancreatic cancer proteome. Here, the authors summarise the recent proteomic strategies undertaken in the search for: novel biomarkers for early diagnosis, pancreatic cancer-specific proteins which may be used for novel targeted therapies and proteins which may be useful for monitoring disease progression post-therapy. Recent advances and findings discussed here provide great promise of having a significant clinical impact and improving the outcome of patients with this malignancy. PMID:26985644

  16. Interrogation of multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells: correlation of 99mTc-Sestamibi uptake with western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Harpstrite, Scott E; Gu, Hannah; Natarajan, Radhika; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-10-01

    Histopathological studies indicate that ∼63% of pancreatic tumors express multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and its polymorphic variants. However, Pgp expression detected at the mRNA or protein level does not always correlate with functional transport activity. Because Pgp transport activity is affected by specific mutations and the phosphorylation state of the protein, altered or less active forms of Pgp may also be detected by PCR or immunohistochemistry, which do not accurately reflect the status of tumor cell resistance. To interrogate the status of the functional expression of MDR1 Pgp in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, cellular transport studies using Tc-Sestamibi were performed and correlated with western blot analysis. Biochemical transport assays in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, human epidermal carcinoma drug-sensitive KB-3-1 cells, and human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells (negative controls), and human epidermal carcinoma drug-resistant KB-8-5 cells, human breast carcinoma stably transfected with Pgp MCF-7/MDR1Pgp cells, and liver carcinoma HepG2 cells (positive controls) were performed. Protein levels were determined using a monoclonal antibody C219. Tc-Sestamibi demonstrates accumulation in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Uptake profiles are not affected by treatment with LY335979, a Pgp inhibitor, and correlate with western blot analysis. These cellular transport studies indicate an absence of Pgp at a functional level in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Because major pancreatic tumors originate from the pancreatic duct and Tc-Sestamibi undergoes a dominant hepatobiliary mode of excretion, it would not be a sensitive probe for imaging pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Following interrogation of the functional status of Pgp in other pancreatic carcinoma cells, chemotherapeutic drugs that are also MDR1 substrates could offer alternative therapeutics for treating pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  17. [Incretin-based antidiabetic treatment and diseases of the pancreas (pancreatitis, pancreas carcinoma)].

    PubMed

    Jermendy, György

    2016-04-01

    In the last couple of years incretin-based antidiabetic drugs became increasingly popular and widely used for treating patients with type 2 diabetes. Immediately after launching, case reports and small case series were published on the potential side effects of the new drugs, with special attention to pancreatic disorders such as acute pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer. As clinical observations accumulated, these side-effects were noted with nearly all drugs of this class. Although these side-effects proved to be rare, an intensive debate evolved in the literature. Opinion of diabetes specialists and representatives of pharmaceutical industry as well as position statements of different international scientific boards and health authorities were published. In addition, results of randomized clinical trials with incretin-based therapy and meta-analyses became available. Importantly, in everyday clinical practice, the label of the given drug should be followed. With regards to incretins, physicians should be cautious if pancreatitis in the patients' past medical history is documented. Early differential diagnosis of any abdominal pain during treatment of incretin-based therapy should be made and the drug should be discontinued if pancreatitis is verified. Continuous post-marketing surveillance and side-effect analysis are still justified with incretin-based antidiabetic treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  18. Inhibition of mutant KrasG12D-initiated murine pancreatic carcinoma growth by a dual c-Raf and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor t-CUPM.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie; Hwang, Sung Hee; Li, Haonan; Yang, Yihe; Yang, Jun; Wecksler, Aaron T; Liu, Jun-Yan; Hammock, Bruce D; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-02-28

    Mutant Kras and chronic pancreatitis are the most common pathological events involved in human pancreatic cancer. It has been demonstrated that c-Raf is responsible for transmitting signals from mutant Ras to its downstream signals including MEK-ERK and for initiating carcinogenesis. The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a pro-inflammatory enzyme, generally inactivates anti-inflammatory and anti-pain epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Herein, we have synthesized a novel compound of trans-4-{4-[3-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (t-CUPM) via modifying the central phenyl ring of sorafenib and confirmed its dual inhibition of sEH and c-Raf by recombinant kinase activity assay. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that oral dosing of t-CUPM resulted in higher blood levels than that of sorafenib throughout the complete time course (48 h). The effect of t-CUPM on the inhibition of mutant Kras(G12D)-initiated murine pancreatic cancer cell growth was determined using the mouse pancreatic carcinoma cell model obtained from LSL-Kras(G12D)/Pdx1-Cre mice and showed that t-CUPM significantly inhibited this murine pancreatic carcinoma cell growth both in vitro and in mice in vivo. Inhibition of mutant Kras-transmitted phosphorylations of cRAF/MEK/ERK was demonstrated in these pancreatic cancer cells using Western blot assay and immunohistochemical approach. Modulation of oxylipin profile, particularly increased EETs/DHET ratio by sEH inhibition, was observed in mice treated with t-CUPM. These results indicate that t-CUPM is a highly potential agent to treat pancreatic cancer via simultaneously targeting c-Raf and sEH.

  19. Inhibition of mutant KrasG12D-initiated murine pancreatic carcinoma growth by a dual c-Raf and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor t-CUPM.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie; Hwang, Sung Hee; Li, Haonan; Yang, Yihe; Yang, Jun; Wecksler, Aaron T; Liu, Jun-Yan; Hammock, Bruce D; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-02-28

    Mutant Kras and chronic pancreatitis are the most common pathological events involved in human pancreatic cancer. It has been demonstrated that c-Raf is responsible for transmitting signals from mutant Ras to its downstream signals including MEK-ERK and for initiating carcinogenesis. The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a pro-inflammatory enzyme, generally inactivates anti-inflammatory and anti-pain epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Herein, we have synthesized a novel compound of trans-4-{4-[3-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (t-CUPM) via modifying the central phenyl ring of sorafenib and confirmed its dual inhibition of sEH and c-Raf by recombinant kinase activity assay. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that oral dosing of t-CUPM resulted in higher blood levels than that of sorafenib throughout the complete time course (48 h). The effect of t-CUPM on the inhibition of mutant Kras(G12D)-initiated murine pancreatic cancer cell growth was determined using the mouse pancreatic carcinoma cell model obtained from LSL-Kras(G12D)/Pdx1-Cre mice and showed that t-CUPM significantly inhibited this murine pancreatic carcinoma cell growth both in vitro and in mice in vivo. Inhibition of mutant Kras-transmitted phosphorylations of cRAF/MEK/ERK was demonstrated in these pancreatic cancer cells using Western blot assay and immunohistochemical approach. Modulation of oxylipin profile, particularly increased EETs/DHET ratio by sEH inhibition, was observed in mice treated with t-CUPM. These results indicate that t-CUPM is a highly potential agent to treat pancreatic cancer via simultaneously targeting c-Raf and sEH. PMID:26683769

  20. An Investigation Of Photodynamic Therapy In The Treatment Of Pancreatic Carcinoma: Dihematoporphyrin Ether Uptake And Photobleaching Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, Thomas S.; Wieman, Thomas J.

    1988-02-01

    Results of dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE) uptake and fluorescence kinetics show that the concentration in the pancreas is on the order of 40-60 μg DHE/g of tissue at an injected dose of 40 mg/kg. Previously concentrations on this order have only been found in organs of the reticuloendothelial system. Two intrapancreatic carcinoma models, one of acinar origin (rat) and one of ductal orgin (hamster), were studied. Both showed equal or higher concentrations of DHE as compared to normal pancreas when fluorescence measurements and chemical extraction procedures were performed. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment of the normal pancreas and pancreatic tumors yielded atypical results. When the normal pancreas with DHE present is exposed to 630 nm light from a dye laser (75 mW/cm2, 30 min), the normal photobleaching measurable by fluorescence decay does not occur. Yet, the pancreatic tumor responds with a relatively normal fluorescence decay pattern, with hemorrhaging and a resultant loss of measurable DHE concentration. These results represent the emergence of an entirely new modality, with substantial potential for the treatment of cancer of the pancreas.

  1. MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy increases the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer cell immunotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Shang, Yiman; Gao, Quanli

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells is a promising cancer treatment, but its efficacy is restricted by various factors, including the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). In this study, we determine whether chemotherapeutic drugs that reduce MDSC levels enhance the efficacy of CIK cell therapy in the treatment of solid tumors. Fifty-three patients were included in this study; 17 were diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC), 10 with advanced pancreatic cancer (PC), and 26 with metastatic melanoma (MM). These patients were divided into two groups: CIK cell therapy alone and CIK cell therapy combined with chemotherapy. Combining CIK cell therapy and chemotherapy increased 1-year survival rates and median survival times in MRCC and PC patients, but not in MM patients. The disease control rate did not differ between treatment groups for MRCC or MM patients, but was higher in PC patients receiving combined treatment than CIK cell treatment alone. These data suggest that addition of MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy to CIK cell therapy improves survival in MRCC and PC patients. PMID:26716894

  2. Treatment-related gastrointestinal toxicities and advanced colorectal or pancreatic cancer: A critical update

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Rihawi, Karim; De Carlo, Elisa; Sonis, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicities (GIT), including oral mucositis, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea, are common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted agents in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Being often underreported, it is still difficult to precisely establish their burden in terms of both patient’s quality of life and cancer care costs. Moreover, with the use of more intensive upfront combination regimens, the frequency of these toxicities is rapidly growing with a potential negative effect also on patient’s outcome, as a result of dose reductions, delays or even discontinuation of active treatments. Thus, identifying patients at higher risk of developing GIT as well as an optimal management are paramount in order to improve patient’s compliance and outcome. After the description of the main treatment-induced GIT, we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of these side effects and comment the scales commonly used to assess and grade them. We then provide a critical update on GIT incidence based on the results of key randomized trials conducted in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26557003

  3. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer.

  4. TLN-4601 suppresses growth and induces apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells through inhibition of Ras-ERK MAPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background TLN-4601 is a structurally novel farnesylated dibenzodiazepinone discovered using Thallion's proprietary DECIPHER® technology, a genomics and bioinformatics platform that predicts the chemical structures of secondary metabolites based on gene sequences obtained by scanning bacterial genomes. Our recent studies suggest that TLN-4601 inhibits the Ras-ERK MAPK pathway post Ras prenylation and prior to MEK activation. The Ras-ERK MAPK signaling pathway is a well-validated oncogenic cascade based on its central role in regulating the growth and survival of cells from a broad spectrum of human tumors. Furthermore, RAS isoforms are the most frequently mutated oncogenes, occurring in approximately 30% of all human cancers, and KRAS is the most commonly mutated RAS gene, with a greater than 90% incidence of mutation in pancreatic cancer. Results To evaluate whether TLN-4601 interferes with K-Ras signaling, we utilized human pancreatic epithelial cells and demonstrate that TLN-4601 treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of Ras-ERK MAPK signaling. The compound also reduced Ras-GTP levels and induced apoptosis. Finally, treatment of MIA PaCa-2 tumor-bearing mice with TLN-4601 resulted in antitumor activity and decreased tumor Raf-1 protein levels. Conclusion These data, together with phase I/II clinical data showing tolerability of TLN-4601, support conducting a clinical trial in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:21044336

  5. Pancreatic carcinoma cells are susceptible to non-invasive radiofrequency fields after treatment with targeted gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, E. S.; Massey, K. L.; Zhu, C.; Curley, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gold and carbon nanoparticles absorb non-ionizing radiofrequency (RF) energy and release heat. Solid gold nanoparticles are delivered to cancer cells via conjugation with targeting antibodies. Here, 20 nm gold particles were conjugated to cetuximab, an epidermal growth factor recpetor-1 (EGFR-1) antibody. Methods A pancreatic carcinoma cell line that highly expresses EGFR-1, Panc-1, and a breast carcinoma cell line that minimally expresses EGFR-1, Cama-1, were treated with 100 nM cetuximab-conjugated gold nanoparticles for 3 hours (n = 4). Thirty-six hours later, the dishes were placed in an RF field with a generator power of 200 W for 5 minutes. After another 36 hours, cell injury and death were evaluated with flow cytometry. Results The targeted cell line, Panc-1, had a viability of 45.5% ± 11.7% while Cama-1 cell had a viability of 91.7% ± 1.6% after RF field exposure (p < 0.008). Transmission electron microscopy showed gold nanoparticle uptake in Panc-1 cells, but negligible uptake by Cama-1 cells. Non-targeted cells do not internalize a sufficient amount of antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles to induce injury in a noninvasive RF field. Conclusion This technique could be useful in cancer treatment provided a cancer-specific antibody is utilized to localize gold nanoparticles to malignant cells. PMID:20541785

  6. Therapy of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs): recent insights and advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) [carcinoids, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs)] are becoming an increasing clinical problem because not only are they increasing in frequency, but they can frequently present with advanced disease that requires diagnostic and treatment approaches different from those used in the neoplasms that most physicians are used to seeing and treating. In the past few years there have been numerous advances in all aspects of NETs including: an understanding of their unique pathogenesis; specific classification systems developed which have prognostic value; novel methods of tumor localization developed; and novel treatment approaches described. In patients with advanced metastatic disease these include the use of newer chemotherapeutic approaches, an increased understanding of the role of surgery and cytoreductive methods, the development of methods for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents, and the development of targeted medical therapies (everolimus, sunitinib) based on an increased understanding of the disease biology. Although pNETs and gastrointestinal NETs share many features, recent studies show they differ in pathogenesis and in many aspects of diagnosis and treatment, including their responsiveness to different therapies. Because of limited space, this review will be limited to the advances made in the management and treatment of patients with advanced metastatic pNETs over the past 5 years. PMID:22886480

  7. FOLFIRINOX in Locally Advanced and Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: A Single Centre Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, SJ; Mungroop, TH; Heilmann, MN; van Laarhoven, HW; Busch, OR; Molenaar, IQ; Besselink, MG; Wilmink, JW

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: FOLFIRINOX is emerging as new standard of care for fit patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC). However, some of the physicians are reluctant to use FOLFIRINOX due to high toxicity rates reported in earlier studies. We reviewed our experience with FOLFIRINOX in LAPC and MPC, focussing on dose adjustments, toxicity and efficacy. Methods: We reviewed all patients with LAPC or MPC treated with FOLFIRINOX in our institution between April 2011 and December 2015. Unresectability (stage III and IV) was determined by the institution's multidisciplinary team for pancreatic cancer. Results: Fifty patients (18 LAPC and 32 MPC) were enrolled, with a median age of 55 years (IQR 49-66) and WHO performance status of 0/1. FOLFIRINOX was given as first-line treatment in 82% of patients. Dose modifications were applied in 90% of patients. The median number of completed cycles was 8 (IQR 5-9). Grade 3-4 toxicity occurred in 52% and grade 5 toxicity in 2%. The response rate was 25% (12% in LAPC, 32% in MPC). Median overall survival and progression-free survival were 14.8 and 10.3 months in LAPC, and 9.0 and 5.9 months in MPC, respectively. Overall 1- and 2-year survival was 65% and 10% in LAPC and 40% and 5% in MPC. Within the LAPC group, 6 patients (33%) underwent local ablative therapy and 1 patient (6%) a resection, leading to a median survival of 21.8 months. Conclusion: FOLFIRINOX treatment with nearly routine dose modification was associated with acceptable toxicity rates, relatively high response rates and an encouraging overall survival.

  8. Novel germline p16(INK4) allele (Asp145Cys) in a family with multiple pancreatic carcinomas. Mutations in brief no. 148. Online.

    PubMed

    Moskaluk, C A; Hruban, H; Lietman, A; Smyrk, T; Fusaro, L; Fusaro, R; Lynch, J; Yeo, C J; Jackson, C E; Lynch, H T; Kern, S E

    1998-01-01

    As part of a search for causative genes of familial pancreatic carcinoma, the p16 genes were sequenced in members of 21 families with a phenotype of familial pancreatic carcinoma (2 or more first degree relatives affected). One family was found in which members carried a novel p16 allele with a G to T transversion at position 451, creating a missense amino acid change at codon 145 (Asp to Cys) and possibly disrupting the donor splice site of the exon 2/3 boundary. This coding change is not a known polymorphism, and occurs at a codon position in which another missese/splicing change has been shown to be linked to familial melanoma/pancreas cancer.

  9. Cyberknife treatment for advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hideo; Taniguch, Hiroyoshi; Nomura, Ryutaro; Sato, Kengo; Suzuki, Ichiro; Nakata, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of the Cyberknife treatment for patients with advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Patients with HCC with extrahepatic metastasis or vascular or bile duct invasion were enrolled between May 2011 and June 2015. The Cyberknife was used to treat each lesion. Treatment response scores were based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. The trends of tumor markers, including alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and proteins induced by vitamin K absence II (PIVKA II) were assessed. Prognostic factors for tumor response and tumor markers were evaluated with Fisher’s exact test and a logistic regression model. Survival was evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Sixty-five patients with 95 lesions were enrolled. Based on the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification, all patients were either in the advanced or terminal stage of the disease. The target lesions were as follows: 52 were bone metastasis; 9, lung metastasis; 7, brain metastasis; 9, portal vein invasion; 4, hepatic vein invasion; 4, bile duct invasion; and 10 other lesion types. The response rate and disease control rate were 34% and 53%, respectively. None of the clinical factors correlated significantly with tumor response. Fiducial marker implantation was associated with better control of both AFP (HR = 0.152; 95%CI: 0.026-0.887; P = 0.036) and PIVKA II (HR = 0.035; 95%CI: 0.003-0.342; P = 0.004). The median survival time was 9 mo (95%CI: 5-15 mo). Terminal stage disease (HR = 9.809; 95%CI: 2.589-37.17, P < 0.001) and an AFP of more than 400 ng/mL (HR = 2.548; 95%CI: 1.070-6.068, P = 0.035) were associated with worse survival. A radiation dose higher than 30 Gy (HR = 0.274; 95%CI: 0.093-0.7541, P = 0.012) was associated with better survival. In the 52 cases of bone metastasis, 36 patients (69%) achieved pain relief. One patient had cerebral

  10. Photodynamic therapy of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (VERTPAC study): final clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, M. T.; Jermyn, M.; Gillams, A.; Mosse, S.; Kent, E.; Bown, S. G.; Hasan, T.; Pogue, B. W.; Pereira, S. P.

    2013-03-01

    We undertook a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) in 15 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Needle placement and laser delivery were technically successful in all patients. Thirteen patients were treated with a single laser fibre. Three treatments were carried out each at 5, 10 and 20 J/cm2; and 5 treatments (4 patients) at 40 J/cm2. A further 2 patients were treated with 2 or 3 laser fibres at 40 J/cm2. Tumour necrosis was measured on CT (computed tomography) by two radiologists 5 days after treatment. There was a clear dosedependent increase in necrosis with a median area of 20 x 16 mm (range 18 x 16 to 35 x 30 mm) at 40 J/cm2. In the 2 patients treated with multiple fibres, necrosis was 40 x 36 mm and 30 x 28 mm, respectively. There were no early complications in patients treated with a single fibre. Both patients treated with multiple fibres had evidence on CT of inflammatory change occurring anterior to the pancreas but without clinical deterioration. These results suggest that single fibre verteporfin PDT is safe in a clinical setting up to 40J/cm2 and produces a dose-dependent area of pancreatic necrosis.

  11. CT Findings of Patients Treated with Irreversible Electroporation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinwande, Olaguoke; Ahmad, Shakeeb S.; Van Meter, Tracy; Schulz, Brittany; Martin, Robert C. G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), IRE has been shown to be safe for local disease control and palliation. As IRE continues to gain acceptance it is important to characterize the expected imaging findings. Materials and Methods. A review of our prospective soft tissue ablation registry from July 2010 to June 2013 was performed on patients who had undergone IRE for LAPC. Five masses treated with intraoperative IRE ablation for pancreatic tumors that underwent CT imaging before and after ablation were reviewed. Results and Discussion. Following IRE, the postablation bed is larger than the original ablated tumor. This ablation zone may get smaller in size (due to decreased edema and hyperemia) in the following months and more importantly remains stable provided there is no recurrence. In cases of recurrent disease there is increased size of the ablation bed, mass effect, and new or worsening vascular encasement or occlusion. Conclusion. CT imaging remains the best current imaging modality to assess post-IRE ablation changes. Serial imaging over at least 2–6 months must be employed to detect recurrence by comparing with prior studies in conjunction with clinical and serum studies. Larger imaging studies are underway to evaluate a more ideal imaging modality for this unique patient population. PMID:26649039

  12. Predictors for resectability and survival in locally advanced pancreatic cancer after gemcitabine-based neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the predictors for resectability and survival of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based neoadjuvant therapy (GBNAT). Methods Between May 2003 and Dec 2009, 41 tissue-proved LAPC were treated with GBNAT. The location of pancreatic cancer in the head, body and tail was 17, 18 and 6 patients respectively. The treatment response was evaluated by RECIST criteria. Surgical exploration was based on the response and the clear plan between tumor and celiac artery/superior mesentery artery. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox Model were used to calculate the resectability and survival rates. Results Finally, 25 patients received chemotherapy (CT) and 16 patients received concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). The response rate was 51% (21 patients), 2 CR (1 in CT and 1 in CRT) and 19 PR (10 in CT and 9 in CRT). 20 patients (48.8%) were assessed as surgically resectable, in which 17 (41.5%) underwent successful resection with a 17.6% positive-margin rate and 3 failed explorations were pancreatic head cancer for dense adhesion. Two pancreatic neck cancer turned fibrosis only. Patients with surgical intervention had significant actuarial overall survival. Tumor location and post-GBNAT CA199 < 152 were predictors for resectability. Post-GBNAT CA-199 < 152 and post-GBNAT CA-125 < 32.8 were predictors for longer disease progression-free survival. Pre-GBNAT CA-199 < 294, post-GBNAT CA-125 < 32.8, and post-op CEA < 6 were predictors for longer overall survival. Conclusion Tumor location and post-GBNAT CA199 < 152 are predictors for resectability while pre-GBNAT CA-199 < 294, post-GBNAT CA-125 < 32.8, post-GBNAT CA-199 < 152 and post-op CEA < 6 are survival predictors in LAPC patients with GBNAT. PMID:25258022

  13. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-03

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  14. Effects of a non thermal plasma treatment alone or in combination with gemcitabine in a MIA PaCa2-luc orthotopic pancreatic carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Martel, Eric; Robert, Eric; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Trichet, Valérie; Richard, Serge; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel; Le Pape, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are the gastrointestinal cancer with the worst prognosis in humans and with a survival rate of 5% at 5 years. Nowadays, no chemotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in terms of survival for this cancer. Previous study focused on the development of a new therapy by non thermal plasma showed significant effects on tumor growth for colorectal carcinoma and glioblastoma. To allow targeted treatment, a fibered plasma (Plasma Gun) was developed and its evaluation was performed on an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma using a MIA PaCa2-luc bioluminescent cell line. The aim of this study was to characterize this pancreatic carcinoma model and to determine the effects of Plasma Gun alone or in combination with gemcitabine. During a 36 days period, quantitative BLI could be used to follow the tumor progression and we demonstrated that plasma gun induced an inhibition of MIA PaCa2-luc cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo and that this effect could be improved by association with gemcitabine possibly thanks to its radiosensitizing properties.

  15. Correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio of late-stage pancreatic carcinoma in HIFU therapy: dynamic observation on ultrasound reflection intensity.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui-Yu; Miao, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Rui; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Yan, Fang; Zheng, Cui-Shan; Jia, Jian-Wen; Cui, Li-Gang; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is thermal ablation treatment for late-stage pancreatic carcinoma with widely recognized safety and effectiveness, but there are currently no instant assessment methods for its ablation effect. It is vital to find a real-time high-sensitive assessment method. This research aims to dynamically observe the variation rules of ultrasound reflection intensity, analyze the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio, and find out the value of ultrasound reflection intensity in prognosis of HIFU ablation effect. HIFU intermittent therapies were retrospectively analyzed for 31 subjects with late-stage pancreatic carcinoma from March 2007 to December 2009 in the study. The variation rules of the ultrasound reflection intensity during HIFU therapy were summarized and the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio was analyzed based on the tumor ablation ratio indicated by CT scanning. The conclusion is that variation of ultrasound reflection intensity can be used for initial assessment of tumor ablation in HIFU therapy and early prognosis of overall HIFU ablation, providing important clinical basis for improving safety and effectiveness of HIFU therapy. Ultrasound can work as a real-time imaging instrument for observation of HIFU ablation effect in treating late-stage pancreatic carcinoma.

  16. Recent advances in the surgical treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morise, Zenichi; Kawabe, Norihiko; Tomishige, Hirokazu; Nagata, Hidetoshi; Kawase, Jin; Arakawa, Satoshi; Yoshida, Rie; Isetani, Masashi

    2014-10-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver malignancy. The treatment of HCC is complex and complicated by the severity of associated chronic liver disease, the stage of HCC, and the clinical condition of the patient. Liver resection (LR) is one of the most efficient treatments for patients with HCC, with an expected 5-year survival of 38%-61% depending on the stage of the disease. Improved liver function assessment, increased understanding of segmental liver anatomy from advanced imaging studies, and surgical technical progress are important factors that have led to reduced mortality in patients with HCC. The indication for LR may be expanded due to emerging evidences from laparoscopic hepatectomies and combined treatments with newly developed chemotherapies. Liver transplantation (LT) is considered as an ideal treatment for removal of existing tumors and the injured/preneoplastic underlying liver tissue with impaired liver function and the risk of multicentric carcinogenesis that results from chronically injured liver. However, LT is restricted to patients with minimal risk of tumor recurrence under immunosuppression. The expansion of criteria for LT in HCC patients is still under trial and discussion. Limited availability of grafts, as well as the risk and the cost of transplantation have led to considerable interest in expansion of the donor pool, living donor-related transplantation, and combined treatment involving LR and LT. This highlight presents evidence concerning recent studies evaluating LR and LT in HCC patients. In addition, alternative therapies for the treatment of early stage tumors and the management of patients on transplant waiting lists are discussed. PMID:25339825

  17. Organ preservation in locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Smaniotto, D; Andrulli, A D; Tortoreto, F; Niespolo, R M; Valentini, V

    1997-01-01

    In the treatment of locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix the multimodal therapeutic approach is useful to improve overall survival and disease-free survival. Two studies of concomitant radiochemotherapy were conducted. In the first, recurrences of gynecologic tumors were treated, in the second primary tumors of the uterine cervix. In the first study 29 patients, of whom 15 with endometrial cancer recurrence, 10 with cervical cancer recurrence and 4 with vulvar cancer recurrence were treated with FUMIR schedule (5-FU and mitomycin C plus concomitant radiotherapy to the pelvis in two cycles of 23.4 Gy) and subsequent brachytherapy boost. In the second study 17 patients, of whom 14 evaluable, were treated with external beam radiotherapy (ERT 40 Gy) and concomitant chemotherapy (5-FU and CDDP). Before and after treatment the patients were examined with MRI. After radiochemotherapy radical hysterectomy and histology of surgical specimen was performed. Results of first study were as follows: acute G1-G2 (RTOG) hematologic toxicity 56%, G3 4%; G1-G2 gastrointestinal 54%, G1-G2 skin 29%; G1-G2 rectum 24%; G1-G2 bladder 25%; G1-G2 vagina 30%. Local control, overall survival and disease-free survival at 24 months were 45%, 76% and 67%, respectively. Results of the second study showed 9/14 patients with complete response and 4/4 patients with partial response (93%), no change in 1, with 100% MRI accuracy as compared to histology. Based on these results a phase III clinical trial was planned in primary cancer of the uterine cervix using concomitant radiochemotherapy (CDDP + 5-FU) plus intracavitary brachytherapy for organ preservation.

  18. A Challenging Surgical Approach to Locally Advanced Primary Urethral Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Spilotros, Marco; Vavallo, Antonio; Palazzo, Silvano; Miacola, Carlos; Forte, Saverio; Matera, Matteo; Campagna, Marcello; Colamonico, Ottavio; Schiralli, Francesco; Sebastiani, Francesco; Di Cosmo, Federica; Bettocchi, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Buonerba, Carlo; Vincenti, Leonardo; Ludovico, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Battaglia, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary urethral carcinoma (PUC) is a rare and aggressive cancer, often underdetected and consequently unsatisfactorily treated. We report a case of advanced PUC, surgically treated with combined approaches. A 47-year-old man underwent transurethral resection of a urethral lesion with histological evidence of a poorly differentiated squamous cancer of the bulbomembranous urethra. Computed tomography (CT) and bone scans excluded metastatic spread of the disease but showed involvement of both corpora cavernosa (cT3N0M0). A radical surgical approach was advised, but the patient refused this and opted for chemotherapy. After 17 months the patient was referred to our department due to the evidence of a fistula in the scrotal area. CT scan showed bilateral metastatic disease in the inguinal, external iliac, and obturator lymph nodes as well as the involvement of both corpora cavernosa. Additionally, a fistula originating from the right corpus cavernosum extended to the scrotal skin. At this stage, the patient accepted the surgical treatment, consisting of different phases. Phase I: Radical extraperitoneal cystoprostatectomy with iliac-obturator lymph nodes dissection. Phase II: Creation of a urinary diversion through a Bricker ileal conduit. Phase III: Repositioning of the patient in lithotomic position for an overturned Y skin incision, total penectomy, fistula excision, and “en bloc” removal of surgical specimens including the bladder, through the perineal breach. Phase IV: Right inguinal lymphadenectomy. The procedure lasted 9-and-a-half hours, was complication-free, and intraoperative blood loss was 600 mL. The patient was discharged 8 days after surgery. Pathological examination documented a T4N2M0 tumor. The clinical situation was stable during the first 3 months postoperatively but then metastatic spread occurred, not responsive to adjuvant chemotherapy, which led to the patient's death 6 months after surgery. Patients with advanced stage tumors of

  19. Retinoic acid receptor alpha mediates growth inhibition by retinoids in rat pancreatic carcinoma DSL-6A/C1 cells.

    PubMed

    Brembeck, F H; Kaiser, A; Detjen, K; Hotz, H; Foitzik, T; Buhr, H J; Riecken, E O; Rosewicz, S

    1998-11-01

    During carcinogenesis, pancreatic acinar cells can dedifferentiate into ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. DSL-6A/C1 cells represent an in vitro model of this carcinogenic sequence. This study was designed to examine the effects of retinoids on cell growth in DSL-6A/C1 cells and to characterize further the molecular mechanisms underlying the antiproliferative actions of retinoids. Treatment of DSL-6A/C1 cells with retinoids results in a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth, paralleled by a retinoid-mediated transactivation of a pTK::betaRAREx2-luciferase reporter construct transiently transfected into DSL-6A/C1 cells. Retinoid receptor expression was evaluated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using subtype-specific primers and demonstrated expression of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR-alpha), RAR-beta and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR-alpha). Using a panel of receptor subtype-specific agonists, the RAR-alpha specific agonist Ro 40-6055 was the most potent retinoid in terms of growth inhibition. Furthermore, all-trans-retinoic acid-mediated growth inhibition and transactivation was completely blocked by the RAR-alpha-specific antagonist Ro 41-5253. In summary, the RAR-alpha subtype predominantly mediates the antiproliferative effects of retinoids in DSL-6A/C1 cells. Furthermore, this cell system provides a feasible tool to study the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth inhibitory effects of retinoids in ductal pancreatic carcinoma cells derived from a primary acinar cell phenotype.

  20. Recent advances in the management of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Ana M.; Nanus, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have significantly improved over the past few years with the recent approval of two new agents resulting in prolonged progression-free and overall survival. PMID:27019698

  1. Pembrolizumab Combined With INCB039110 and/or Pembrolizumab Combined With INCB050465 in Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Advanced Solid Tumors; Endometrial Cancer; Melanoma; Microsatellite Unstable (MSI) Colorectal Cancer; MMR-deficient Tumors; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Genitourinary Tract; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

  2. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging.

  3. ADH-1, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic or Biliary Tract Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Gallbladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer

  4. Palliative treatment in "peri"-pancreatic carcinoma: stenting or surgical therapy?

    PubMed

    van Heek, N T; van Geenen, R C I; Busch, O R C; Gouma, D J

    2002-01-01

    Mostly, patients with peri-pancreatic cancer (including pancreatic, ampullary and distal bile duct tumors) are diagnosed in a stage in which curative resection is not possible. The median survival rate of patients with non resectable peri-pancreatic cancer varies between 6 and 12 months. During this period palliative treatment is necessary, which should focus on major symptoms as obstructive jaundice, duodenal obstruction and pain. Controversy exists about how to provide optimal palliative treatment. Both surgical and non surgical palliative procedures relief obstructive jaundice. From early retrospective and prospective randomized studies it is known that in the early phase after treatment, more complications are found after surgical palliation, whereas in the late phase more complications are seen after endoscopic palliation. Because more recent studies clearly showed improved results after surgical palliation, current recommendations probably should be that patients with a suspected poor short-term survival (< 6 months) should be offered non surgical palliative therapy and those with a longer life expectancy may best be treated with bypass surgery. Unfortunately, valid criteria for estimating the remaining survival time are not available, except for the presence of metastases. The use of a prognostic score chart might assist in estimating the prognosis. Literature does not give sufficient information to make a well deliberated (evidence based) selection between the different types of surgical bypasses, but a choledochojejunostomy is generally preferred. After stenting, a correlation is found between survival and the development of duodenal obstruction, and between 9% and 21% of the patients who underwent a surgical biliary bypass without a prophylactic gastric bypass, will develop gastric outlet obstruction. Therefore, in patients with a relatively good prognosis it is recommended to perform routinely a double--biliary and gastric--bypass. Pain is a frequent

  5. Hedgehog- and mTOR-targeted therapies for advanced basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Paquet, Philippe; Herfs, Michael; Delvenne, Philippe; Piérard, Gérald E

    2015-11-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are the most frequent human cancer. Over 90% of all BCCs have a mutation in PTCH1 or smoothened, two conducting proteins of the Hedgehog pathway. They rarely progress deeply and metastasize; however, if they do, these advanced basal cell carcinoma become amenable to treatment by inhibiting the Hedgehog and the P13K-mTOR pathways. Such innovative drugs include vismodegib, cyclopamine, itraconazole, everolimus and a few other agents that are in early clinical development. PMID:26437034

  6. ACVR1B (ALK4, activin receptor type 1B) gene mutations in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Su, Gloria H.; Bansal, Ravi; Murphy, Kathleen M.; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Yeo, Charles J.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kern, Scott E.

    2001-01-01

    DPC4 is known to mediate signals initiated by type β transforming growth factor (TGFβ) as well as by other TGFβ superfamily ligands such as activin and BMP (bone morphogenic proteins), but mutational surveys of such non-TGFβ receptors have been negative to date. Here we describe the gene structure and novel somatic mutations of the activin type I receptor, ACVR1B, in pancreatic cancer. ACVR1B has not been described previously as a mutated tumor-suppressor gene. PMID:11248065

  7. Venous thromboembolism and pancreatic cancer: incidence, pathogenesis and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Mario; Moro, Cecilia; Labianca, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is still a major clinical challenge. Recent efforts to improve survival in locally advanced and metastatic disease have focused on combining cytotoxic drugs with targeted therapies. One of the major complications of pancreatic cancer is venous thromboembolism (VTE). Despite the general perception that patients with mucinous carcinoma of the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract present a high incidence of thromboembolic complications, there is little data regarding the incidence and pathogenesis of VTE in pancreatic cancer patients. Clinical data suggest that, among patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, the occurrence of VTE may be associated with reduced overall survival. Furthermore emerging clinical data strongly suggest that anticoagulant treatments may improve cancer patient survival by decreasing thromboembolic complications as well as by anticancer effects. Given the lack of extensive data and the clinical relevance of this topic for both physicians and basic research scientists, this overview focuses attention on the incidence, pathogenesis and clinical implications of VTE in pancreatic cancer patients.

  8. Optical diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma using advanced optical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-02-01

    Clinical imaging techniques for diagnosing breast cancer mainly include X-ray mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which have respective drawbacks. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a potentially attractive optical technique to bridge the current gap in clinical utility. In this paper, MPM was used to image normal and ductal cancerous breast tissues, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Our results showed that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of normal breast tissue, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) lesions at the molecular level comparable to histopathology. These findings indicate that, with integration of MPM into currently accepted clinical imaging system, it has the potential to make a real-time histological diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma in vivo.

  9. First-line erlotinib and fixed dose-rate gemcitabine for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vaccaro, Vanja; Bria, Emilio; Sperduti, Isabella; Gelibter, Alain; Moscetti, Luca; Mansueto, Giovanni; Ruggeri, Enzo Maria; Gamucci, Teresa; Cognetti, Francesco; Milella, Michele

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate activity, toxicity, and prognostic factors for survival of erlotinib and fixed dose-rate gemcitabine (FDR-Gem) in advanced pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We designed a single-arm prospective, multicentre, open-label phase II study to evaluate the combination of erlotinib (100 mg/d, orally) and weekly FDR-Gem (1000 mg/m2, infused at 10 mg/m2 per minute) in a population of previously untreated patients with locally advanced, inoperable, or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Primary endpoint was the rate of progression-free survival at 6 mo (PFS-6); secondary endpoints were overall response rate (ORR), response duration, tolerability, overall survival (OS), and clinical benefit. Treatment was not considered to be of further interest if the PFS-6 was < 20% (p0 = 20%), while a PFS-6 > 40% would be of considerable interest (p1 = 40%); with a 5% rejection error (α = 5%) and a power of 80%, 35 fully evaluable patients with metastatic disease were required to be enrolled in order to complete the study. Analysis of prognostic factors for survival was also carried out. RESULTS: From May 2007 to September 2009, 46 patients were enrolled (male/female: 25/21; median age: 64 years; median baseline carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9): 897 U/mL; locally advanced/metastatic disease: 5/41). PFS-6 and median PFS were 30.4% and 14 wk (95%CI: 10-19), respectively; 1-year and median OS were 20.2% and 26 wk (95%CI: 8-43). Five patients achieved an objective response (ORR: 10.9%, 95%CI: 1.9-19.9); disease control rate was 56.5% (95%CI: 42.2-70.8); clinical benefit rate was 43.5% (95%CI: 29.1-57.8). CA 19-9 serum levels were decreased by > 25% as compared to baseline in 14/23 evaluable patients (63.6%). Treatment was well-tolerated, with skin rash being the most powerful predictor of both longer PFS (P < 0.0001) and OS (P = 0.01) at multivariate analysis (median OS for patients with or without rash: 42 wk vs 15 wk, respectively, Log-rank P = 0.03). Additional predictors of

  10. The pancreatic beta cell as a paradigm for advances in inositide research.

    PubMed

    Barker, Christopher J; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2012-09-01

    In a previous review for Advances in Enzyme Research (Berggren and Barker, 2008) we outlined the history of our involvement in discovering important roles for inositides in the insulin secreting pancreatic beta cell. In this current appraisal we bring the work up to date and project how we believe this field will continue to develop in the future. Recently, we have seen an important synergism between the growth in our understanding of inositide function and our knowledge of beta cell stimulus-secretion coupling in both physiological and pathophysiological contexts. Important advances have been made in three areas. 1. The classic regulation of cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)](i) by Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P(3)) and its receptor, 2. A novel role of the inositol pyrophosphates, especially 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (5-PP-InsP(5)), in exocytosis, and 3. The unique signaling roles of PI3K pathways instituted by the engagement of the insulin receptor in an autocrine, positive feed-back loop. We examine each of these in turn and close with an assessment of the likely future directions the research will take.

  11. High Volume Washing of the Abdomen in Increasing Survival After Surgery in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Ampulla of Vater Adenocarcinoma; Cholangiocarcinoma; Duodenal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm, Pancreatobiliary-Type; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma

  12. Hedgehog pathway inhibition in advanced basal cell carcinoma: latest evidence and clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Silapunt, Sirunya; Chen, Leon; Migden, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of locally advanced basal cell carcinomas (laBCCs) with large, aggressive, destructive, and disfiguring tumors, or metastatic disease is challenging. Dysregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified in the vast majority of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). There are two United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA)-approved Hh pathway inhibitors (HPIs) that exhibit antitumor activity in advanced BCC with an acceptable safety profile. Common adverse effects include muscle spasms, dysgeusia, alopecia, fatigue, nausea and weight loss. PMID:27583029

  13. Hedgehog pathway inhibition in advanced basal cell carcinoma: latest evidence and clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Silapunt, Sirunya; Chen, Leon; Migden, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of locally advanced basal cell carcinomas (laBCCs) with large, aggressive, destructive, and disfiguring tumors, or metastatic disease is challenging. Dysregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified in the vast majority of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). There are two United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA)-approved Hh pathway inhibitors (HPIs) that exhibit antitumor activity in advanced BCC with an acceptable safety profile. Common adverse effects include muscle spasms, dysgeusia, alopecia, fatigue, nausea and weight loss. PMID:27583029

  14. The miR-24-Bim pathway promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Likun; Li, Hongli; Deng, Ting; Qu, Yanjun; Duan, Jingjing; Bai, Ming; Ge, Shaohua; Ning, Tao; Zhang, Le; Huang, Dingzhi; Ba, Yi

    2015-12-22

    miRNAs are a group of small RNAs that have been reported to play a key role at each stage of tumorigenesis and are believed to have future practical value. We now demonstrate that Bim, which stimulates cell apoptosis, is obviously down-regulated in pancreatic cancer (PaC) tissues and cell lines. And Bim-related miR-24 is significantly up-regulated in PaC. The repressed expression of Bim is proved to be a result of miR-24, thus promoting cell growth of both cancer and vascular cells, and accelerating vascular ring formation. By using mouse tumor model, we clearly showed that miR-24 promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by suppressing Bim expression in vivo. Therefore, a new pathway comprising miR-24 and Bim can be used in the exploration of drug-target therapy of PaC.

  15. Conditional deletion of p53 and Rb in the renin-expressing compartment of the pancreas leads to a highly penetrant metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Glenn, S T; Jones, C A; Sexton, S; LeVea, C M; Caraker, S M; Hajduczok, G; Gross, K W

    2014-12-11

    Efforts to model human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) in animals have been moderately successful, with minimal evidence for glucagonomas or metastatic spread. The renin gene, although classically associated with expression in the kidney, is also expressed in many other extrarenal tissues including the pancreas. To induce tumorigenesis within rennin-specific tissues, floxed alleles of p53 and Rb were selectively abrogated using Cre-recombinase driven by the renin promoter. The primary neoplasm generated is a highly metastatic islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. Lineage tracing identifies descendants of renin-expressing cells as pancreatic alpha cells despite a lack of active renin expression in the mature pancreas. Both primary and metastatic tumors express high levels of glucagon; furthermore, an increased level of glucagon is found in the serum, identifying the pancreatic cancer as a functional glucagonoma. This new model is highly penetrant and exhibits robust frequency of metastases to the lymph nodes and the liver, mimicking human disease, and provides a useful platform for better understanding pancreatic endocrine differentiation and development, as well as islet cell carcinogenesis. The use of fluorescent reporters for lineage tracing of the cells contributing to disease initiation and progression provides an unique opportunity to dissect the timeline of disease, examining mechanisms of the metastatic process, as well as recovering primary and metastatic cells for identifying cooperating mutations that are necessary for progression of disease.

  16. Optical characterization of lesions and identification of surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma by using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing; Hong, Zhipeng; Chen, Hong; Chen, Youting; Xu, Yahao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Shi, Zheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy has become a powerful instrument for imaging unstained tissue samples in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TPEF imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) stain can be used to characterize lesions and identify surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The specimens of a pancreatic metastasis from RCC, as well as a primary RCC from a patient, were examined by TPEF microscopy and compared with their corresponding H-E stained histopathological results. The results showed that high-resolution TPEF imaging of unstained histological sections of pancreatic metastasis from RCC can reveal that the typical morphology of the tissue and cells in cancer tissues is different from the normal pancreas. It also clearly presented histopathological features of the collagenous capsule, which is an important boundary symbol to identify normal and cancerous tissue and to instruct surgical operation. It indicated the feasibility of using TPEF microscopy to make an optical diagnosis of lesions and identify the surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from RCC.

  17. Conditional deletion of p53 and Rb in the renin-expressing compartment of the pancreas leads to a highly penetrant metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Sexton, Sandra; LeVea, Charles M.; Caraker, Susan M.; Hajduczok, George; Gross, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to model human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) in animals have been moderately successful, with minimal evidence for glucagonomas or metastatic spread. The renin gene while classically associated with expression in the kidney is also expressed in many other extra-renal tissues including the pancreas. To induce tumorigenesis within renin specific tissues, floxed alleles of p53 and Rb were selectively abrogated using Cre-recombinase driven by the renin promoter. The primary neoplasm generated is a highly metastatic islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. Lineage tracing identifies descendants of renin-expressing cells as pancreatic alpha cells despite a lack of active renin expression in the mature pancreas. Both primary and metastatic tumors express high levels of glucagon, furthermore an increased level of glucagon is found in the serum identifying the pancreatic cancer as a functional glucagonoma. This new model is highly penetrant and exhibits robust frequency of metastases to lymph nodes and liver, mimicking human disease and provides a useful platform for better understanding pancreatic endocrine differentiation and development, as well as islet cell carcinogenesis. The use of fluorescent reporters for lineage tracing of the cells contributing to disease initiation and progression provides a unique opportunity to dissect the timeline of disease, examining mechanisms of the metastatic process, as well as recovering primary and metastatic cells for identifying co-operating mutations that are necessary for progression of disease. PMID:24292676

  18. Phase I study of oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo . E-mail: yama.take@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Shirai, Yoshihiko; Nakagawa, Akihiko; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 at escalating doses from 60 to 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Results: Sixteen patients were enrolled in this study. Three patients received S-1 at 60 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 3 at 70 mg/m{sup 2}/day, and 10 at 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Though 1 patient at the final dose level (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) experienced a dose limiting toxicity (biliary infection with Grade 3 neutropenia), the MTD was not reached in this study. The most common toxicities were anorexia and leukocytopenia, with Grade 3 toxicity occurring in 31% and 6.3% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy was determined to be 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Oral S-1 and radiotherapy is well tolerated and feasible and should be further investigated.

  19. Intraductal Carcinoma of the Prostate Gland: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Divatia, Mukul K.

    2016-01-01

    Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate (IDC-P) is characterized by prostatic carcinoma involving ducts and/or acini. The presence of IDC-P is usually associated with a high-grade Gleason score, large tumor volume, and adverse prognostic parameters, including extraprostatic extension and seminal vesicle invasion. When present, IDC-P is associated with worse outcomes, regardless of treatment status. IDC-P is included in a broader diagnostic category of atypical cribriform lesions of the prostate gland. This category of lesions also includes high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), urothelial carcinoma involving prostatic ducts or acini, and prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma, amongst other intraductal proliferations. Differentiating between these entities is important as they have differing therapeutic and prognostic implications for patients, although differential diagnosis thereof is not always straightforward. The present review discusses IDC-P in regards to its morphological characteristics, molecular features, and clinical outcomes. Given the current state of knowledge, the presence of IDC-P should be evaluated and documented correctly in both radical prostatectomy and needle biopsy specimens, and the clinical implications thereof should be taken into consideration during treatment and follow up. PMID:27401634

  20. Partial atrial resection in advanced lung carcinoma with and without cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed Central

    Shirakusa, T; Kimura, M

    1991-01-01

    Combined pneumonectomy and partial resection of the left atrium was performed in 12 patients with advanced lung carcinoma (T3 and T4 in the new UICC classification). In the eight patients with a T3 lung carcinoma intrapericardial atrial resection with vascular clamping was carried out; four of the patients died within a year. The remaining four patients had a T4 tumour and underwent removal of the right lung and part of the left atrium under total cardiopulmonary bypass. One patient died shortly after the operation from cerebral and cerebellar infarction, and one died 11 months later from brain metastases. Two are alive and well. Complete resection appears to offer a chance for longer survival in patients with advanced lung carcinoma that extends directly into the intrapericardial pulmonary vessels or atrium. Images PMID:1652165

  1. Trimodality Therapy for an Advanced Thymic Carcinoma With Both Aorta and Vena Cava Invasion.

    PubMed

    Momozane, Tohru; Inoue, Masayoshi; Shintani, Yasushi; Funaki, Soichiro; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Minami, Masato; Shirakawa, Yukitoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Okumura, Meinoshin

    2016-08-01

    A case of locally advanced thymic carcinoma that was successfully resected with the great vessels after chemoradiation therapy is reported. A 57-year-old man with Masaoka stage III thymic carcinoma received two cycles of cisplatin/docetaxel and 60 Gy irradiation. The response was stable disease with 19% size reduction, and a radical resection with the ascending aorta and superior vena cava with the patient under circulatory arrest with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient has been free of disease for 28 months. Trimodality therapy with use of a cardiovascular surgical procedure might be a valuable option in locally advanced thymic carcinoma. PMID:27449450

  2. Inaugural Meeting of North American Pancreatic Cancer Organizations: Advancing Collaboration and Communication.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Barbara J; Fleshman, Julie M; Goldberg, Ann E; Rothschild, Laura J

    2015-11-01

    A meeting of North American Pancreatic Cancer Organizations planned by Kenner Family Research Fund and Pancreatic Cancer Action Network was held on July 15-16, 2015, in New York City. The meeting was attended by 32 individuals from 20 nonprofit groups from the United States and Canada. The objectives of this inaugural convening were to share mission goals and initiatives, engage as leaders, cultivate potential partnerships, and increase participation in World Pancreatic Cancer Day. The program was designed to provide opportunities for informal conversations, as well as facilitated discussions to meet the stated objectives. At the conclusion of the meeting, the group agreed that enhancing collaboration and communication will result in a more unified approach within the field and will benefit individuals diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. As a first step, the group will actively collaborate to participate in World Pancreatic Cancer Day, which is planned for November 13, 2015, and seeks to raise the level of visibility about the disease globally.

  3. Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: Flourishing Novel Approaches in the Era of Biological Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Joanne W.; Wong, Hilda; Leung, Roland; Pang, Roberta; Cheung, Tan-To; Fan, Sheung-Tat; Poon, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    The progress in the development of systemic treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) has been slow. The mainstream treatment remains using chemotherapy including gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, and nab-paclitaxel. Erlotinib is the only approved biological therapy with marginal benefit. Studies of agents targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and RAS signaling have not been satisfying, and the usefulness of targeted therapy in APC is uncertain. Understanding in molecular processes and tumor biology has opened the door for new treatment strategies such as targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, transforming growth factor β, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and Notch pathway. New directions also include the upcoming immunotherapy and many novel agents that act on the microenvironment. The practice of personalized medicine using predictive biomarkers and pharmacogenomics signatures may also enhance the effectiveness of existing treatment. Future treatment approaches may involve comprehensive genomic assessment of tumor and integrated combinations of multiple agents to overcome treatment resistance. PMID:25117068

  4. Advanced pancreatic cancer: flourishing novel approaches in the era of biological therapy.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Joanne W; Wong, Hilda; Leung, Roland; Pang, Roberta; Cheung, Tan-To; Fan, Sheung-Tat; Poon, Ronnie; Yau, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The progress in the development of systemic treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) has been slow. The mainstream treatment remains using chemotherapy including gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, and nab-paclitaxel. Erlotinib is the only approved biological therapy with marginal benefit. Studies of agents targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and RAS signaling have not been satisfying, and the usefulness of targeted therapy in APC is uncertain. Understanding in molecular processes and tumor biology has opened the door for new treatment strategies such as targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, transforming growth factor β, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and Notch pathway. New directions also include the upcoming immunotherapy and many novel agents that act on the microenvironment. The practice of personalized medicine using predictive biomarkers and pharmacogenomics signatures may also enhance the effectiveness of existing treatment. Future treatment approaches may involve comprehensive genomic assessment of tumor and integrated combinations of multiple agents to overcome treatment resistance. PMID:25117068

  5. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-14

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  6. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  7. Inherited pancreatic endocrine tumor syndromes: advances in molecular pathogenesis, diagnosis, management and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Robert T.; Berna, Marc J.; Bingham, David B; Norton, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) can occur in as part of four inherited disorders including: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), neurofibromatosis 1(NF-1) [von Recklinghausen’s disease] and the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The relative frequency with which patients with these disorders develop PETs is MEN1>VHL>NF-1>TSC. Over the last few years there have been major advances in the understanding of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of these disorders as well in the localization, medical and surgical treatment of the PETs in these patients. The study of the PETs in these disorders has not only provided insights into the possible pathogenesis of sporadic PETs, but have also presented a number of unique management and treatment issues, some of which are applicable to patients with sporadic PETs. Therefore the study of PETs in these uncommon disorders has provided valuable insights that in many cases are applicable to the general group of patients with sporadic PETs. In this article these areas are briefly reviewed as well as the current state of knowledge of the PETs in these disorders and the controversies that exist in their management are briefly summarized and discussed. PMID:18798544

  8. Successful resection of pancreatic carcinoma recurrence in the remnant pancreas after a pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Yamade, Naohisa; Nakai, Hiroaki; Sasaya, Takahiro; Matsumura, Shuichi; Kimura, Arishige; Shima, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    We present a rare case in which a pancreatectomy was performed for a recurrent tumor in the remnant pancreas after a pancreaticoduodenectomy, and we review the associated literature. A 67-year old man underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer on April 9, 2003. The tumor was composed of well differentiated adenocarcinoma and diagnosed as R0, pT2, pN1, pM0, pStage III according to UICC TNM classification. Five years and eight months later, his serum level of carcinoembryonic antigen was found to be elevated, and a computed tomography showed a low-density mass near the site of the pancreaticojejunostomy and dilatation of the jejunal stump. We conducted a total resection of the remnant pancreas including pancreaticojejunostomy, splenectomy and peripancreatic lymph node dissection without any residual macroscopic tumor. Histologically, it was diagnosed as a well differentiated adenocarcinoma, similar to the initial tumor. It is difficult to assess whether this tumor developing in the remnant pancreas was a local recurrence or a second primary cancer. However, we believe this tumor was a second primary tumor because of the long interval period and the absence of a neoplastic invasion in the resection margins of the initial specimens. PMID:21937417

  9. ERCC1 expression affects outcome in metastatic pancreatic carcinoma treated with FOLFIRINOX: A single institution analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strippoli, Antonia; Rossi, Sabrina; Martini, Maurizio; Basso, Michele; D'Argento, Ettore; Schinzari, Giovanni; Barile, Rosalba; Cassano, Alessandra; Barone, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction No clinically useful predictive factor has been yet identified for treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer (mPC). It is noteworthy that FOLFIRINOX, despite its high toxicity, is effective only in some patients. We retrospectively analyzed expression of excision repair cross-complementing group-1 (ERCC1) - involved in the repair of platinum induced damage - in patients affected by mPC treated with FOLFIRINOX in order to evaluate its predictive role. Results FOLFIRINOX resulted more effective in patients with normal ERCC1 levels than in those with ERCC1 hyper-expression. Median progression free survival (PFS) was 11 vs. 4 months (HR 0.26; 95% CI 0.14-0.50; p<.0001), median overall survival (OS) 16 vs. 8 months (HR 0.23; 95% CI 0.12-0.46; p<.0001) and disease control rate (DCR) 93% vs. 50% (p=0.00006). The advantage was confirmed at univariate and multivariate analysis. Patients and Methods 71 patients with histologically proven mPC and treated with FOLFIRINOX as first-line therapy were considered eligible. mRNA ERCC1 expression was determined using RT-PCR analysis. Discussion ERCC1 might be an effective predictor of response to FOLFIRINOX in mPC. Patients overexpressing ERCC1 should be excluded by this often toxic therapy and referred to an alternative treatment. PMID:27147577

  10. Phase II Study of Oral S-1 and Concurrent Radiotherapy in Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Hara, Taro; Denda, Tadamichi; Tawada, Katsunobu; Imagumbai, Toshiyuki; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro; Hatano, Kazuo; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative that has demonstrated favorable antitumor activity in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35. Two weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 was administered for 28 days every 6 weeks until progression. Results: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in this study. The most common Grade 3 toxicities during chemoradiotherapy were anorexia (24%) and nausea (12%). The overall response rate was 41% (95% confidence interval, 25%-58%) and overall disease control rate (partial response plus stable disease) was 97%. More than 50% decrease in serum CA 19-9 was seen in 27 of 29 evaluable patients (93%). The median progression-free survival was 8.7 months. The median overall survival and 1-year survival rate were 16.8 months and 70.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy exerted a promising antitumor activity with acceptable toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This combination therapy seems to be an attractive alternative to conventional chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil infusion.

  11. Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (pp Whipple) versus pancreaticoduodenectomy (classic Whipple) for surgical treatment of periampullary and pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Markus K; Fitzmaurice, Christina; Schwarzer, Guido; Seiler, Christoph M; Hüttner, Felix J; Antes, Gerd; Knaebel, Hanns-Peter; Büchler, Markus W

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death for men and the fifth for women. The standard treatment for resectable tumours consists of a classic Whipple (CW) operation or a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPW). It is unclear which of these procedures is more favourable in terms of survival, mortality, complications and quality of life. Objectives The objective of this systematic review is to compare the effectiveness of CW and PPW techniques for surgical treatment of cancer of the pancreatic head and the periampullary region. Search methods We conducted searches on 28 March 2006, 11 January 2011 and 9 January 2014 to identify all randomised controlled trials (RCTs), while applying no language restrictions. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) from The Cochrane Library (2013, Issue 4); MEDLINE (1946 to January 2014); and EMBASE (1980 to January 2014). We also searched abstracts from Digestive Disease Week and United European Gastroenterology Week (1995 to 2010). We identified no additional studies upon updating the systematic review in 2014. Selection criteria We considered RCTs comparing CW versus PPW to be eligible if they included study participants with periampullary or pancreatic carcinoma. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data from the included studies. We used a random-effects model for pooling data. We compared binary outcomes using odds ratios (ORs), pooled continuous outcomes using mean differences (MDs) and used hazard ratios (HRs) for meta-analysis of survival. Two review authors independently evaluated the methodological quality and risk of bias of included studies according to the standards of The Cochrane Collaboration. Main results We included six RCTs with a total of 465 participants. Our

  12. Salvage chemoradiotherapy after primary chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a single-institution retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on the indication for salvage chemoradiotherapy (CRT) after failure of primary chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Here we report on the retrospective analysis of patients who received salvage CRT after primary chemotherapy for LAPC. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of salvage CRT after primary chemotherapy for LAPC. Methods Thirty patients who underwent salvage CRT, after the failure of primary chemotherapy for LAPC, were retrospectively enrolled from 2004 to 2011 at the authors’ institution. All the patients had histologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Results Primary chemotherapy was continued until progression or emergence of unacceptable toxicity. Eventually, 26 patients (87%) discontinued primary chemotherapy because of local tumor progression, whereas four patients (13%) discontinued chemotherapy because of interstitial pneumonitis caused by gemcitabine. After a median period of 7.9 months from starting chemotherapy, 30 patients underwent salvage CRT combined with either S-1 or 5-FU. Toxicities were generally mild and self-limiting. Median survival time (MST) from the start of salvage CRT was 8.8 months. The 6 month, 1-year and 2-year survival rates from the start of CRT were 77%, 33% and 26%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that a lower pre-CRT serum CA 19–9 level (≤ 1000 U/ml; p = 0.009) and a single regimen of primary chemotherapy (p = 0.004) were independent prognostic factors for survival after salvage CRT. The MST for the entire patient population from the start of primary chemotherapy was 17.8 months, with 2- and 3-year overall survival rates of 39% and 22%, respectively. Conclusions CRT had moderate anti-tumor activity and an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with LAPC, even after failure of gemcitabine-based primary chemotherapy. If there are any signs of failure of primary chemotherapy without distant metastasis

  13. [Platin-containing cytostatic combinations in the therapy of advanced gynecologic carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Schulz, B O; Hof, K; Friedrich, H J; Weppelmann, B; Krebs, D

    1984-01-01

    95 patients with advanced and recurred gynecological carcinomas (57 ovarian carcinoma, 22 cervical carcinoma) were treated by a platinum (CDDP) based polychemotherapy platinum, adriamycine, cyclophosphamide (PAC); platinum, adriamycine, bleomycine (PAB), 22 out of 48 patients with low differentiated epithelial carcinoma of the ovary stage III and IV achieved a remission (13 CR; 9 PR). Today 6 of the CR-patients survive 23 months without recurrence; 7 had a medium survival of 17 months. Medium survival of PR-patients was 15 months. 6 NED-patients survive 22 months without recurrence and 2 NED-patients died after 19,5 months. The overall response rate (CR, PR, NED) was 63%. A retrospective comparison with 78 patients (low differentiated ovarian carcinoma stage III and IV) treated by a cyclophosphamide monotherapy shows an elevated 2-year survival rate of the PAC treated patients. The other patients suffered from carcinoma of the mamma, the tubes, the corpus uteri, the vagina, and the vulva. The therapeutic effect of CDDP based polychemotherapy cannot be judged because of the small number of cases; but the side effects at these patients were registered thoroughly. Side effects of totally 514 therapeutic cycles (460 mg CDDP per patient, 78 mg CDDP per cycle) are presented.

  14. The value of lactate dehydrogenase serum levels as a prognostic and predictive factor for advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Sobrero, Alberto; Labianca, Roberto; Ferrari, Daris; Barni, Sandro; Aitini, Enrico; Zaniboni, Alberto; Boni, Corrado; Caprioni, Francesco; Mosconi, Stefania; Fanello, Silvia; Berardi, Rossana; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Cinquini, Michela; Torri, Valter; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Although lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) serum levels, indirect markers of angiogenesis, are associated with a worse outcome in several tumours, their prognostic value is not defined in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, high levels are associated even with a lack of efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, contributing to explain negative results in clinical trials. We assessed the role of LDH in advanced pancreatic cancer receiving sorafenib. Seventy-one of 114 patients included in the randomised phase II trial MAPS (chemotherapy plus or not sorafenib) and with available serum LDH levels, were included in this analysis. Patients were categorized according to serum LDH levels (LDH ≤vs.> upper normal rate). A significant difference was found in progression free survival (PFS) and in overall survival (OS) between patients with LDH values under or above the cut-off (PFS: 5.2 vs. 2.7 months, p = 0.0287; OS: 10.7 vs. 5.9 months, p = 0.0021). After stratification according to LDH serum levels and sorafenib treatment, patients with low LDH serum levels treated with sorafenib showed an advantage in PFS (p = 0.05) and OS (p = 0.0012). LDH appears to be a reliable parameter to assess the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer patients, and it may be a predictive parameter to select patients candidate to receive sorafenib. PMID:26397228

  15. The value of lactate dehydrogenase serum levels as a prognostic and predictive factor for advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Sobrero, Alberto; Labianca, Roberto; Ferrari, Daris; Barni, Sandro; Aitini, Enrico; Zaniboni, Alberto; Boni, Corrado; Caprioni, Francesco; Mosconi, Stefania; Fanello, Silvia; Berardi, Rossana; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Cinquini, Michela; Torri, Valter; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-10-27

    Although lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) serum levels, indirect markers of angiogenesis, are associated with a worse outcome in several tumours, their prognostic value is not defined in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, high levels are associated even with a lack of efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, contributing to explain negative results in clinical trials. We assessed the role of LDH in advanced pancreatic cancer receiving sorafenib. Seventy-one of 114 patients included in the randomised phase II trial MAPS (chemotherapy plus or not sorafenib) and with available serum LDH levels, were included in this analysis. Patients were categorized according to serum LDH levels (LDH ≤ vs.> upper normal rate). A significant difference was found in progression free survival (PFS) and in overall survival (OS) between patients with LDH values under or above the cut-off (PFS: 5.2 vs. 2.7 months, p = 0.0287; OS: 10.7 vs. 5.9 months, p = 0.0021). After stratification according to LDH serum levels and sorafenib treatment, patients with low LDH serum levels treated with sorafenib showed an advantage in PFS (p = 0.05) and OS (p = 0.0012). LDH appears to be a reliable parameter to assess the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer patients, and it may be a predictive parameter to select patients candidate to receive sorafenib. PMID:26397228

  16. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  17. Targeted treatments in advanced renal cell carcinoma: focus on axitinib

    PubMed Central

    Verzoni, Elena; Grassi, Paolo; Testa, Isabella; Iacovelli, Roberto; Biondani, Pamela; Garanzini, Enrico; De Braud, Filippo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Antiangiogenesis options have evolved rapidly in the last few years, with an increasing number of agents currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency. Angiogenesis inhibitors have been shown to be very effective for the treatment of metastatic renal cancer cell. Axitinib is a third-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and is currently being developed for the treatment of various malignancies. The pharmacokinetic properties of axitinib may have a selective therapeutic effect, with minimal adverse reactions and enhanced safety. In a large Phase III study of previously treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, axitinib achieved a longer progression-free survival than sorafenib with an acceptable safety profile and good quality of life. This review focuses on the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and clinical activity of axitinib in the current treatment of renal cell carcinoma. The role of axitinib in the adjuvant and/or neoadjuvant setting needs to be evaluated in further clinical trials. PMID:24715765

  18. Persistent Uroplakin Expression in Advanced Urothelial Carcinomas: Implications in Urothelial Tumor Progression and Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Ying; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Sun, Tung-Tien; Lepor, Herbert; Shapiro, Ellen; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Ashfaq, Raheela; Lotan, Yair; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2007-01-01

    As the terminal differentiation products of human urothelium, uroplakins (UPs) would be expected to diminish during urothelial tumorigenesis. Surprisingly, recent studies found UPs to be retained even by well-advanced urothelial carcinomas, suggesting that the loss of UPs does not strictly parallel urothelial transformation. Little is known, however, about whether the status of UPs is associated with a particular pathological parameter, tumor’s biological behavior or patient outcome. Here we assessed UP expression by immunohistochemistry on tissue arrays from 285 patients with bladder urothelial carcinomas or non-tumor conditions. UPs were expressed in all 9 normal urothelial specimens, 63/74 (85%) patients with non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinomas on transurethral resection, 104/202 (51.5%) patients who underwent radical cystectomy for advanced urothelial carcinomas, and 33/50 (66%) lymph node metastases. Normally associated with urothelial apical surface, UPs were localized aberrantly in tumors, including micro-luminal, basal-laminal, cytoplasmic or uniform patterns. In non-muscle-invasive diseases, there was no association between UP expression and disease recurrence, progression or mortality. In contrast, in invasive diseases, absent UP expression was significantly associated with advanced pathologic stage, lymph node metastases, disease recurrence and bladder cancer-specific mortality (p=0.042, p=0.035, p=0.023 and p=0.022, respectively) in univariate analyses. Furthermore, UP status was independent of key cell-cycle regulators, including p53, pRb, p27 and cyclin D1, thus excluding a functional link between these two groups of proteins. Our data demonstrate for the first time that persistent UP expression is associated with a favorable clinical outcome and that UPs may be used as adjunct markers for predicting the prognoses of patients with invasive and metastatic bladder carcinomas. Our results also suggest that UP-positive and –negative carcinomas

  19. Chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients: is it still an open question?

    PubMed Central

    Sawicka, Emilia; Mirończuk, Anna; Wojtukiewicz, Marek Z.

    2016-01-01

    Operable pancreatic cancer is characterized by a high risk of recurrence. Efforts are made to incorporate new therapies. Throughout the world there is a lack of uniform recommendations concerning the adjuvant treatment of pancreatic cancer patients, due to confusing evidence-based data. The patients recruited to clinical trials differ from the population of patients treated in everyday practice. These differences have an influence on tolerance of treatment, toxicity and results of therapy. The decision on administration of adjuvant treatment is made individually and differs from center to center. A review of the literature concerning both results and tolerance of postoperative chemoradiotherapy of pancreatic cancer patients is presented. PMID:27358587

  20. PIM kinases: an overview in tumors and recent advances in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianwei; Zhang, Taiping; Wang, Tianxiao; You, Lei; Zhao, Yupei

    2014-04-01

    The PIM kinases represent a family of serine/threonine kinases, which is composed of three different members (PIM1, PIM2 and PIM3). Aberrant expression of PIM kinases is observed in variety of tumors, including pancreatic cancer. The PIM kinases play pivotal roles in the regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, properties of stem cells, metabolism, autophagy, drug resistance and targeted therapy. The roles of PIM kinases in pancreatic cancer include the regulation of proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, formation, angiogenesis and prediction prognosis. Blocking the activities of PIM kinases could prevent pancreatic cancer development. PIM kinases may be a novel target for cancer therapy. PMID:24799066

  1. [Two-year survivor in response to gemcitabine-based chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer with multiple lung metastases].

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Osamu; Usui, Yuji

    2005-02-01

    A 65-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for appetite loss and jaundice. Abdominal CT scan and ultrasonography both revealed a tumor in the head of the pancreas. Chest CT scan showed multiple nodules in both lungs. The patient was diagnosed as having advanced pancreatic cancer with multiple lung metastases. The primary tumor showed a partial response to the administration of gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 on days 1, 8 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Concurrent treatment with 5-fluorouracil (200 mg/day) was efficacious against the lung metastases. One year later the pancreatic and lung tumors had enlarged, and cisplatin (20 mg/body) was added to the protocol. For 20 months the patient was treated as an outpatient, maintaining good quality of life. The patient died of progressive disease 25 months after her first hospital admission.

  2. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  3. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist.

    PubMed

    Patel, Milan R; Eppolito, Amanda L; Willingham, Field F

    2013-03-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68-81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for

  4. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    SciTech Connect

    Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Kramer, Robin M.; Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve; Ulmert, David; Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L.; Russell, James

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response.

  5. Role of methylphenidate in the treatment of fatigue in advanced pancreatic cancer population

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhenyang; Butler-Bowen, Harriet; Rodriguez, Teresa; Garcon, Marie C.; Smith, Melissa Hennessey; Relias, Valerie; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a common but devastating symptom for advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) patients. To date, no proven treatment exists. Methylphenidate (MPH) showed inconsistent results in treating other cancer related fatigue. We performed a retrospective study to assess MPH in ameliorating fatigue in APC patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed our clinic APC patients’ records who visited from 06/2011 - 11/2014. Fatigue was assessed by Visual Analog Fatigue Scale (VAFS) and classified as grade 1 (VAFS 1-3), grade 2 (VAFS 4-6) and grade 3 (VAFS 7-10) to correspond with CTCAE V4.0. MPH was dosed at 5 mg daily in the morning and was escalated to 10 mg after 2 weeks if needed. The primary endpoint was to assess the change of fatigue grade after 4 weeks of MPH. Secondary outcomes included MPH’s effect on depression, anorexia, maintenance chemotherapy intensity and adverse effects. Results A total of 71 APC patients on concomitant chemotherapy were included, of whom 67% received doublet, 13% triplet, and 20% single-agent chemotherapy. Mean baseline VAFS was 7, which dropped to 4 after 4 weeks of MPH, 55% patients’ fatigue score improved by 1 grade, 8% by 2 grades, 23% had fatigue resolved, 14% without benefit. 72% patients maintained chemotherapy intensity, 39% felt less depression and 52% had improved appetite. 13% stopped MPH due to side effects. Rare Grade 3 or 4 adverse events included insomnia, restlessness, palpitations and anorexia. Conclusions Our findings support low-dose MPH benefits APC patients with improved fatigue, depression and anorexia. A large randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm its usage and safety.

  6. Current therapeutic strategies for advanced pancreatic cancer: A review for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Spadi, Rosella; Brusa, Federica; Ponzetti, Agostino; Chiappino, Isabella; Birocco, Nadia; Ciuffreda, Libero; Satolli, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) would become the second leading cause of cancer death in the near future, despite representing only 3% of new cancer diagnosis. Survival improvement will come from a better knowledge of risk factors, earlier diagnosis, better integration of locoregional and systemic therapies, as well as the development of more efficacious drugs rising from a deeper understanding of disease biology. For patients with unresectable, non-metastatic disease, combined strategies encompassing primary chemotherapy and radiation seems to be promising. In fit patients, new polychemotherapy regimens can lead to better outcomes in terms of slight but significant survival improvement associated with a positive impact on quality of life. The upfront use of these regimes can also increase the rate of radical resections in borderline resectable and locally advanced PC. Second line treatments showed to positively affect both overall survival and quality of life in fit patients affected by metastatic disease. At present, oxaliplatin-based regimens are the most extensively studied. Nonetheless, other promising drugs are currently under evaluation. Presently, in addition to surgery and conventional radiation therapy, new locoregional treatment techniques are emerging as alternative options in the multimodal approach to patients or diseases not suitable for radical surgery. As of today, in contrast with other types of cancer, targeted therapies failed to show relevant activity either alone or in combination with chemotherapy and, thus, current clinical practice does not include them. Up to now, despite the fact of extremely promising results in different tumors, also immunotherapy is not in the actual therapeutic armamentarium for PC. In the present paper, we provide a comprehensive review of the current state of the art of clinical practice and research in PC aiming to offer a guide for clinicians on the most relevant topics in the management of this disease. PMID:26862489

  7. Long-term results of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingtai; Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Huang, Huang; Zhao, Dongbing; Tian, Yantao; Li, Yexiong; Feng, Qinfu; Zhang, Zhihui; Jiang, Qinglong; Zhang, Shuisheng; Tang, Xiaolong; Huang, Xianghui; Chu, Yunmian; Zhang, Jianghu; Sun, Yuemin; Zhang, Yawei; Wang, Chengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To assess prognostic benefits of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment after IOERT. A retrospective cohort study using prospectively collected data was conducted at the Cancer Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China National Cancer Center. Two hundred forty-seven consecutive patients with nonmetastatic LAPC who underwent IOERT between January 2008 and May 2015 were identified and included in the study. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the day of IOERT. Prognostic factors were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year actuarial survival rates were 40%, 14%, and 7.2%, respectively, with a median OS of 9.0 months. On multivariate analysis, an IOERT applicator diameter < 6 cm (hazards ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47–0.97), no intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.32–0.66), and receipt of postoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy (HR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.04–0.25) were significantly associated with improved OS. Pain relief after IOERT was achieved in 111 of the 117 patients, with complete remission in 74 and partial remission in 37. Postoperative complications rate and mortality were 14.0% and 0.4%, respectively. Nonmetastatic LAPC patients with smaller size tumors could achieve positive long-term survival outcomes with a treatment strategy incorporating IOERT and postoperative adjuvant treatment. Chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy might be a recommended adjuvant treatment strategy for well-selected cases. Intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy should not be recommended for patients with nonmetastatic LAPC. PMID:27661028

  8. Reverse-contrast imaging and targeted radiation therapy of advanced pancreatic cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Kramer, Robin M.; Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve; Ulmert, H. David; Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L.; Russell, James

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiotherapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by X-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas, and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. CT imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1 cm diameter field. Selective X-ray radiation therapy (XRT) of the non-invasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360-degree arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic XRT to orthotopic tumors. Results Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times post-treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate non-invasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in pre-clinical models is now possible, and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response. PMID:26238952

  9. Locally advanced adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous carcinomas of the cervix compared to squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix in Gynecologic Oncology Group trials of cisplatin-based chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Peter G; Java, James J; Whitney, Charles W.; Stehman, Frederick B; Lanciano, Rachelle; Thomas, Gillian M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conflicting results have been reported for adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas of the cervix with respect to their response to therapy and prognosis. The current study sought to evaluate impact of adeno- and adenosquamous histology in the randomized trials of primary cisplatin-based chemoradiation for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods Patients with adeno- and adenosquamous cervical carcinomas were retrospectively studied and compared to squamous cell carcinomas in GOG trials of chemoradiation. Results Among 1671 enrolled in clinical trials of chemoradiation, 182 adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas were identified (10.9%). A higher percentage of adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas were stage IB2 (27.5% versus 20.0%) and fewer had stage IIIB (21.4% versus 28.6%). The mean tumor size was larger for squamous than adeno- and adenosquamous. Adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas were more often poorly differentiated (46.2% versus 26.8%). When treated with radiation therapy alone, the 70 patients with adeno- and adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix showed a statistically poorer overall survival (p=0.0499) compared to the 647 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. However, when treated with radiation therapy with concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy, the 112 patients with adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas had a similar overall survival (p=0.459) compared the 842 patients with squamous cell carcinoma. Adverse effects to treatment were similar across histologies. Conclusion Adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas of the cervix are associated with worse overall survival when treated with radiation alone but with similar progression-free and overall survival compared to squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix when treated with cisplatin based chemoradiation. PMID:25152438

  10. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  11. Fatal Pancreatic Panniculitis Associated with Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Sun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Woo; Paik, Chang Nyol; Kim, Hyung Ok

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thick shadowy wall. We herein report a case of fatal pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with acute pancreatitis in a 50-yr-old man. He presented with a 3-week history of multiple tender skin nodules, abdominal pain and distension. Laboratory and radiologic findings revealed acute pancreatitis, and skin biopsy showed pancreatic panniculitis. Despite intensive medical care, he died of multi-organ failure 3 weeks after presentation. PMID:17982246

  12. DNT cell inhibits the growth of pancreatic carcinoma via abnormal expressions of NKG2D and MICA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Zhu, Xing-Xing; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the effects of natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) and its ligands major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related molecules A(MICA) in DNT cell killing pancreatic carcinoma. Antibodies adsorption was used to separate DNT cell from human peripheral blood. Human pancreatic tumor models were established via implanting BXPC-3 cells into nude mice. Then randomly divided mice into blank group, gemcitabine group and DNT group. Mice weights and mice tumor volumes were measured every 5 days. 50 days later mice were euthanized at cervical dislocation method. Tumor weights were measured. Relative tumor volume and tumor inhibition rate were calculated. Western blot and qPCR were used to detect the expressions of NKG2D and MICA in the transplanted tumors of the three groups. DNT cell significantly increased over time. The blank group tumor volume and weight were significantly larger than the other groups (p < 0.001, p < 0.001), but there were no significantly difference between DNT group and gemcitabine group (p > 0.05). Gemcitabine and DNT cell tumor inhibition rate were 40.4% and 35.5%. Western blot and qPCR showed that MICA mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly higher than DNT group (p = 0.001, p = 0.003). NKG2D mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly lower than DNT cells group (p < 0.001, p = 0.001). In conclusion DNT cell can significantly inhibit the growth of pancreatic carcinoma in vivo, and the mechanism may be involved in abnormal expressions of MICA and NKG2D. PMID:26616050

  13. DNT cell inhibits the growth of pancreatic carcinoma via abnormal expressions of NKG2D and MICA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Zhu, Xing-Xing; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the effects of natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) and its ligands major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related molecules A(MICA) in DNT cell killing pancreatic carcinoma. Antibodies adsorption was used to separate DNT cell from human peripheral blood. Human pancreatic tumor models were established via implanting BXPC-3 cells into nude mice. Then randomly divided mice into blank group, gemcitabine group and DNT group. Mice weights and mice tumor volumes were measured every 5 days. 50 days later mice were euthanized at cervical dislocation method. Tumor weights were measured. Relative tumor volume and tumor inhibition rate were calculated. Western blot and qPCR were used to detect the expressions of NKG2D and MICA in the transplanted tumors of the three groups. DNT cell significantly increased over time. The blank group tumor volume and weight were significantly larger than the other groups (p < 0.001, p < 0.001), but there were no significantly difference between DNT group and gemcitabine group (p > 0.05). Gemcitabine and DNT cell tumor inhibition rate were 40.4% and 35.5%. Western blot and qPCR showed that MICA mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly higher than DNT group (p = 0.001, p = 0.003). NKG2D mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly lower than DNT cells group (p < 0.001, p = 0.001). In conclusion DNT cell can significantly inhibit the growth of pancreatic carcinoma in vivo, and the mechanism may be involved in abnormal expressions of MICA and NKG2D.

  14. Phase II Study of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Advanced Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lemma, Girum L.; Lee, Ju-Whei; Aisner, Seena C.; Langer, Corey J.; Tester, William J.; Johnson, David H.; Loehrer, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with advanced previously untreated thymoma and thymic carcinoma. Patients and Methods We conducted a prospective multicenter study in patients with unresectable thymoma (n = 21) or thymic carcinoma (n = 23). Patients were treated with carboplatin (area under the curve, 6) plus paclitaxel (225 mg/m2) every 3 weeks for a maximum of six cycles. The primary end point of this trial was to evaluate the objective response rate. Results From February 2001 through January 2008, 46 patients were enrolled. Thirteen patients had grade 4 or greater toxicity, mostly neutropenia. Using RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) 1.0 criteria, three complete responses (CRs) and six partial responses (PRs; objective response rate [ORR], 42.9%; 90% CI, 24.5% to 62.8%) were observed in the thymoma cohort; 10 patients had stable disease. For patients with thymic carcinoma, no CRs and five PRs (ORR, 21.7%; 90% CI, 9.0% to 40.4%) were observed; 12 patients had stable disease. Progression-free survival (PFS) was 16.7 (95% CI, 7.2 to 19.8) and 5.0 (95% CI, 3.0 to 8.3) months for thymoma and thymic carcinoma cohorts, respectively. To date, only seven patients (33.3%) with thymoma have died, compared with 16 patients (69.6%) with thymic carcinoma. Median survival time was 20.0 months (95% CI, 5.0 to 43.6 months) for patients with thymic carcinoma, but it has not been reached for patients with thymoma. Conclusion Carboplatin plus paclitaxel has moderate clinical activity for patients with thymic malignancies, but this seems less than expected with anthracycline-based therapy. Patients with thymic carcinoma have poorer PFS and overall survival than patients with thymoma. PMID:21502559

  15. Sorafenib-induced Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Chou, Jen-Wei; Cheng, Ken-Sheng; Huang, Chih-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib has been approved to increase the survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Acute pancreatitis is an uncommon complication of sorafenib treatment. Only a few cases of sorafenib-induced acute pancreatitis have been reported in the English literature. We herein present the case of a 56-year-old man with hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib at 200 mg once daily. After six days of treatment, he suffered epigastric pain. Laboratory tests showed markedly elevated serum amylase and lipase levels. Imaging studies demonstrated negative findings. Sorafenib-induced acute pancreatitis was diagnosed after reviewing his history. The sorafenib treatment was discontinued, and his symptoms were resolved seven days later. To date, this case had the shortest duration and the lowest dosage of sorafenib to have induced acute pancreatitis.

  16. Advanced oxidation protein products and total antioxidant activity in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Avinash, S S; Anitha, M; Vinodchandran; Rao, Gayathri M; Sudha, K; Shetty, Beena V

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the levels of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and percent hemolysis (that indirectly indicates the degree of membrane damage secondary to lipid peroxidation) in colorectal carcinoma. Glutathione (GSH), total thiols and albumin were measured to determine the antioxidant status. Considering the dynamic interaction between various antioxidants in the body, we measured the total antioxidant activity (AOA). Globulin was measured to assess the inflammatory response secondary to oxidative stress. Investigations were conducted in 45 cases of recently diagnosed primary colorectal adenocarcinoma. As control, 45 age and sex matched healthy persons were chosen. GSH was estimated in whole blood, percent hemolysis in RBC suspension and other parameters in plasma. We observed a very high significant increase (P<0.001) in AOPP, percent hemolysis and a highly significant increase (P<0.01) in globulin in colorectal carcinoma. We observed a very high significant decrease (P<0.001) in whole blood GSH, total thiols, albumin, AOA and a significant decrease (P<0.05) in plasma GSH in colorectal carcinoma. A very high significant negative correlation between percent hemolysis and AOA and an apparent negative correlation between total thiols and AOPP was seen in colorectal carcinoma. This demonstrated oxidative stress, decreased antioxidant status and secondary inflammatory response in colorectal carcinoma.

  17. Oncolytic Adenoviral Mutants with E1B19K Gene Deletions Enhance Gemcitabine-induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells and Anti-Tumor Efficacy In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Stephan; Sweeney, Katrina; Öberg, Daniel; Davies, Derek; Miranda, Enrique; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a rapidly progressive malignancy that is highly resistant to current chemotherapeutic modalities and almost uniformly fatal.We show that a novel targeting strategy combining oncolytic adenoviral mutants with the standard cytotoxic treatment, gemcitabine, can markedly improve the anticancer potency. Experimental Design Adenoviral mutants with the E1B19K gene deleted with and without E3B gene expression (AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, respectively) were assessed for synergistic interactions in combination with gemcitabine. Cell viability, mechanism of cell death, and antitumor efficacy in vivo were determined in the pancreatic carcinoma cells PT45 and Suit2, normal human bronchial epithelial cells, and in PT45 xenografts. Results The ΔE1B19K-deleted mutants synergized with gemcitabine to selectively kill cultured pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts in vivo with no effect in normal cells. The corresponding wild-type virus (Ad5) stimulated drug-induced cell killing to a lesser degree. Gemcitabine blocked replication of all viruses despite the enhanced cell killing activity due to gemcitabine-induced delay in G1/S-cell cycle progression, with repression of cyclin E and cdc25A, which was not abrogated by viral E1A-expression. Synergistic cell death occurred through enhancement of gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in the presence of both AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, shown by increased cell membrane fragmentation, caspase-3 activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions Our data suggest that oncolytic mutants lacking the antiapoptotic E1B19K gene can improve efficacy of DNA-damaging drugs such as gemcitabine through convergence on cellular apoptosis pathways.These findings imply that less toxic doses than currently practicedin the clinic could efficiently target pancreatic adenocarcinomas when combined with adenoviral mutants. PMID:19223497

  18. Primary Pancreatic Head Tuberculosis: Great Masquerader of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dhaval; Patel, Jatin; Rathi, Chetan; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is considered an extremely rare condition, even in the developing countries. Most reported cases of pancreatic TB are diagnosed after exploratory laparotomy or autopsy. Pancreatic TB is a potential mimic of invasive pancreatic malignancy and the presence of vascular invasion does not distinguish one condition from the other. Every effort should be made for the earliest diagnosis of this condition as TB is a treatable condition and it avoids unnecessary management of pancreatic carcinoma. Here we report a rare case of primary pancreatic head TB in a 58-year-old male who presented with hypodense lesion in head of pancreas with double duct sign and portal vein invasion mimicking non-resectable pancreatic carcinoma.

  19. Wilms Tumor Gene (WT1) Peptide–based Cancer Vaccine Combined With Gemcitabine for Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Sumiyuki; Koido, Shigeo; Takeda, Yutaka; Homma, Sadamu; Komita, Hideo; Takahara, Akitaka; Morita, Satoshi; Ito, Toshinori; Morimoto, Soyoko; Hara, Kazuma; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Yanagisawa, Satoru; Toyama, Yoichi; Ikegami, Masahiro; Kitagawa, Toru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Wada, Hiroshi; Nagano, Hiroaki; Nakata, Jun; Nakae, Yoshiki; Hosen, Naoki; Oji, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshio; Kawase, Ichiro; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Junichi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Tajiri, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    Wilms tumor gene (WT1) protein is an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. We aimed to investigate the feasibility of a combination therapy consisting of gemcitabine and WT1 peptide–based vaccine for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and to make initial assessments of its clinical efficacy and immunologic response. Thirty-two HLA-A*24:02+ patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Patients received HLA-A*24:02-restricted, modified 9-mer WT1 peptide (3 mg/body) emulsified with Montanide ISA51 adjuvant (WT1 vaccine) intradermally biweekly and gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. This combination therapy was well tolerated. The frequencies of grade 3–4 adverse events for this combination therapy were similar to those for gemcitabine alone. Objective response rate was 20.0% (6/30 evaluable patients). Median survival time and 1-year survival rate were 8.1 months and 29%, respectively. The association between longer survival and positive delayed-type hypersensitivity to WT1 peptide was statistically significant, and longer survivors featured a higher frequency of memory-phenotype WT1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes both before and after treatment. WT1 vaccine in combination with gemcitabine was well tolerated for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Delayed-type hypersensitivity-positivity to WT1 peptide and a higher frequency of memory-phenotype WT1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes could be useful prognostic markers for survival in the combination therapy with gemcitabine and WT1 vaccine. Further clinical investigation is warranted to determine the effectiveness of this combination therapy. PMID:24509173

  20. Use of Respiratory-Correlated Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography to Determine Acceptable Treatment Margins for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Seth D.; Ford, Eric C.; Duhon, Mario; McNutt, Todd; Wong, John; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-induced excursions of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma could affect dose delivery. This study quantified tumor motion and evaluated standard treatment margins. Methods and Materials: Respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography images were obtained on 30 patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma; 15 of whom underwent repeat scanning before cone-down treatment. Treatment planning software was used to contour the gross tumor volume (GTV), bilateral kidneys, and biliary stent. Excursions were calculated according to the centroid of the contoured volumes. Results: The mean +- standard deviation GTV excursion in the superoinferior (SI) direction was 0.55 +- 0.23 cm; an expansion of 1.0 cm adequately accounted for the GTV motion in 97% of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. Motion GTVs were generated and resulted in a 25% average volume increase compared with the static GTV. Of the 30 patients, 17 had biliary stents. The mean SI stent excursion was 0.84 +- 0.32 cm, significantly greater than the GTV motion. The xiphoid process moved an average of 0.35 +- 0.12 cm, significantly less than the GTV. The mean SI motion of the left and right kidneys was 0.65 +- 0.27 cm and 0.77 +- 0.30 cm, respectively. At repeat scanning, no significant changes were seen in the mean GTV size (p = .8) or excursion (p = .3). Conclusion: These data suggest that an asymmetric expansion of 1.0, 0.7, and 0.6 cm along the respective SI, anteroposterior, and medial-lateral directions is recommended if a respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography scan is not available to evaluate the tumor motion during treatment planning. Surrogates of tumor motion, such as biliary stents or external markers, should be used with caution.

  1. Pathologic response with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy for borderline resectable and locally-advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has potential applicability in the management of borderline resectable and locally-advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In this series, we report the pathologic outcomes in the subset of patients who underwent surgery after neoadjuvant SBRT. Methods Patients with borderline resectable or locally-advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma who were treated with SBRT followed by resection were included. Chemotherapy was to the discretion of the medical oncologist and preceded SBRT for most patients. Results Twelve patients met inclusion criteria. Most (92%) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and gemcitabine/capecitabine was most frequently utilized (n = 7). Most were treated with fractionated SBRT to 36 Gy/3 fractions (n = 7) and the remainder with single fraction to 24 Gy (n = 5). No grade 3+ acute toxicities attributable to SBRT were found. Two patients developed post-surgical vascular complications and one died secondary to this. The mean time to surgery after SBRT was 3.3 months. An R0 resection was performed in 92% of patients (n = 11/12). In 25% (n = 3/12) of patients, a complete pathologic response was achieved, and an additional 16.7% (n = 2/12) demonstrated <10% viable tumor cells. Kaplan-Meier estimated median progression free survival is 27.4 months. Overall survival is 92%, 64% and 51% at 1-, 2-, and 3-years. Conclusions This study reports the pathologic response in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and SBRT for borderline resectable and locally-advanced pancreatic cancer. In our experience, 92% achieved an R0 resection and 41.7% of patients demonstrated either complete or extensive pathologic response to treatment. The results of a phase II study of this novel approach will be forthcoming. PMID:24175982

  2. Chronic Pancreatitis and Neoplasia: Correlation or Coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Bean, A. G.; Bowles, M.; Williamson, R. C. N.

    1997-01-01

    Any link between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could reflect the malignant potential of a chronic inflammatory process. Four patients with ductal adenocarcinomas had a long history of pancreatic pain (median duration 5 years) and showed clearcut evidence of chronic pancreatitis “downstream” of the tumour. Four were alcoholics and two heavy smokers. These four cases arose within a surgical series of approximately 250 patients with chronic pancreatitis, giving an incidence of 1.6 per cent. The incidence and anatomical distribution of carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could possibly be consistent with a casual relationship. PMID:9184877

  3. Epithelial plasticity in urothelial carcinoma: Current advancements and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Minal

    2016-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is characterized by high recurrence rate where a subset of these cells undergoes transition to deadly muscle invasive disease and later metastasizes. Urothelial cancer stem cells (UroCSCs), a tumor subpopulation derived from transformation of urothelial stem cells, are responsible for heterogeneous tumor formation and resistance to systemic treatment in UC of the bladder. Although the precise reason for pathophysiologic spread of tumor is not clear, transcriptome analysis of microdissected cancer cells expressing multiple progenitor/stem cell markers validates the upregulation of genes that derive epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Experimental studies on human bladder cancer xenografts describe the mechanistic functions and regulation of epithelial plasticity for its cancer-restraining effects. It has been further examined to be associated with the recruitment of a pool of UroCSCs into cell division in response to damages induced by adjuvant therapies. This paper also discusses the various probable therapeutic approaches to attenuate the progressive manifestation of chemoresistance by co-administration of inhibitors of epithelial plasticity and chemotherapeutic drugs by abrogating the early tumor repopulation as well as killing differentiated cancer cells. PMID:27621760

  4. Epithelial plasticity in urothelial carcinoma: Current advancements and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Minal

    2016-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is characterized by high recurrence rate where a subset of these cells undergoes transition to deadly muscle invasive disease and later metastasizes. Urothelial cancer stem cells (UroCSCs), a tumor subpopulation derived from transformation of urothelial stem cells, are responsible for heterogeneous tumor formation and resistance to systemic treatment in UC of the bladder. Although the precise reason for pathophysiologic spread of tumor is not clear, transcriptome analysis of microdissected cancer cells expressing multiple progenitor/stem cell markers validates the upregulation of genes that derive epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Experimental studies on human bladder cancer xenografts describe the mechanistic functions and regulation of epithelial plasticity for its cancer-restraining effects. It has been further examined to be associated with the recruitment of a pool of UroCSCs into cell division in response to damages induced by adjuvant therapies. This paper also discusses the various probable therapeutic approaches to attenuate the progressive manifestation of chemoresistance by co-administration of inhibitors of epithelial plasticity and chemotherapeutic drugs by abrogating the early tumor repopulation as well as killing differentiated cancer cells.

  5. Epithelial plasticity in urothelial carcinoma: Current advancements and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Garg, Minal

    2016-08-26

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is characterized by high recurrence rate where a subset of these cells undergoes transition to deadly muscle invasive disease and later metastasizes. Urothelial cancer stem cells (UroCSCs), a tumor subpopulation derived from transformation of urothelial stem cells, are responsible for heterogeneous tumor formation and resistance to systemic treatment in UC of the bladder. Although the precise reason for pathophysiologic spread of tumor is not clear, transcriptome analysis of microdissected cancer cells expressing multiple progenitor/stem cell markers validates the upregulation of genes that derive epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Experimental studies on human bladder cancer xenografts describe the mechanistic functions and regulation of epithelial plasticity for its cancer-restraining effects. It has been further examined to be associated with the recruitment of a pool of UroCSCs into cell division in response to damages induced by adjuvant therapies. This paper also discusses the various probable therapeutic approaches to attenuate the progressive manifestation of chemoresistance by co-administration of inhibitors of epithelial plasticity and chemotherapeutic drugs by abrogating the early tumor repopulation as well as killing differentiated cancer cells. PMID:27621760

  6. LTP-1, a novel antimitotic agent and Stat3 inhibitor, inhibits human pancreatic carcinomas in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han-Li; Chao, Min-Wu; Chen, Chung-Chun; Cheng, Chun-Chun; Chen, Mei-Chuan; Lin, Chao-Feng; Liou, Jing-Ping; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide with a poor survival rate. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism of action of a novel antimitotic and Stat3 inhibitor, LTP-1, on human pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. We found that LTP-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth and viability with significant G2/M arrest and disruption of microtubule dynamics. LTP-1 also caused G2/M arrest-independent Stat3 dephosphorylation along with ERK activation, which indicated the possible dual function of LTP-1. Long-term treatment of LTP-1 also induced polyploidy, activated caspases, induced subG1 cell population, and therefore, triggered pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis. Finally, we used an in vivo xenograft model to demonstrate that LTP-1 suppressed the growth of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In summary, our data suggest that LTP-1 may alter microtubule dynamics, which ultimately causes polyploidy and apoptosis, thereby inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. This study provides evidence that LTP-1 could be a potential therapeutic agent for further development of pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:27278358

  7. Distal Pancreatectomy With En Bloc Celiac Axis Resection for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Haibing; Ma, Ruirui; Gong, Jian; Cai, Chengzong; Song, Zhenshun; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac resection (DP-CAR) is used to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the advantages and disadvantages of this surgical procedure remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its clinical safety and efficacy. Studies regarding DP-CAR were retrieved from the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Chinese electronic databases. Articles were selected according to predesigned inclusion criteria, and data were extracted according to predesigned sheets. Clinical, oncologic, and survival outcomes of DP-CAR were systematically reviewed by hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratio (OR) using fixed- or random-effects models. Eighteen studies were included. DP-CAR had a longer operating time and greater intraoperative blood loss compared to distal pancreatectomy (DP). A high incidence of vascular reconstruction occurred in DP-CAR: 11.53% (95%CI: 6.88–18.68%) for artery and 33.28% (95%CI: 20.45–49.19%) for vein. The pooled R0 resection rate of DP-CAR was 72.79% (95% CI, 46.19–89.29%). Higher mortality and morbidity rates were seen in DP-CAR, but no significant differences were detected compared to DP; the pooled OR was 1.798 for mortality (95% CI, 0.360–8.989) and 2.106 for morbidity (95% CI, 0.828–5.353). The pooled incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) was 31.31% (95%CI, 23.69–40.12%) in DP-CAR, similar to that of DP (OR = 1.07; 95%CI, 0.52–2.20). The pooled HR against DP-CAR was 5.67 (95%CI, 1.48–21.75) for delayed gastric emptying. The pooled rate of reoperation was 9.74% (95%CI, 4.56–19.59%) in DP-CAR. The combined 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates in DP-CAR were 65.22% (49.32–78.34%), 30.20% (21.50–40. 60%), and 18.70% (10.89–30.13%), respectively. The estimated means and medians for survival time in DP-CAR patients were 24.12 (95%CI, 18.26–29.98) months and 17.00 (95%CI, 13.52–20.48) months, respectively. There were no

  8. Phase 2 Multi-institutional Trial Evaluating Gemcitabine and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Joseph M; Chang, Daniel T; Goodman, Karyn A; Dholakia, Avani S; Raman, Siva P; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Griffith, Mary E; Pawlik, Timothy M; Pai, Jonathan S; O'Reilly, Eileen; Fisher, George A; Wild, Aaron T; Rosati, Lauren M; Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Laheru, Daniel A; Columbo, Laurie A; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Koong, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    Background This phase 2 multi-institutional study was designed to determine whether gemcitabine (GEM) with fractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) results in acceptable late grade 2 to 4 gastrointestinal toxicity when compared with a prior trial of GEM with single-fraction SBRT in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods A total of 49 patients with LAPC received up to 3 doses of GEM (1000 mg/m2) followed by a 1-week break and SBRT (33.0 gray [Gy] in 5 fractions). After SBRT, patients continued to receive GEM until disease progression or toxicity. Toxicity was assessed using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [version 4.0] and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and pancreatic cancer-specific QLQ-PAN26 module before SBRT and at 4 weeks and 4 months after SBRT. Results The median follow-up was 13.9 months (range, 3.9-45.2 months). The median age of the patients was 67 years and 84% had tumors of the pancreatic head. Rates of acute and late (primary endpoint) grade ≥2 gastritis, fistula, enteritis, or ulcer toxicities were 2% and 11%, respectively. QLQ-C30 global quality of life scores remained stable from baseline to after SBRT (67 at baseline, median change of 0 at both follow-ups; P>.05 for both). Patients reported a significant improvement in pancreatic pain (P = .001) 4 weeks after SBRT on the QLQ-PAN26 questionnaire. The median plasma carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) level was reduced after SBRT (median time after SBRT, 4.2 weeks; 220 U/mL vs 62 U/mL [P<.001]). The median overall survival was 13.9 months (95% confidence interval, 10.2 months-16.7 months). Freedom from local disease progression at 1 year was 78%. Four patients (8%) underwent margin-negative and lymph node-negative surgical resections. Conclusions

  9. Translation of recent advances and discoveries in molecular biology and immunology in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Albo, Daniel; Farrow, Buckminster; Berger, David H

    2008-04-01

    Recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of cancer progression have allowed for targeted approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. New biologic markers are emerging that may improve the ability to detect these tumors earlier. Targeted biologic cancer therapies promise more effective and less toxic systemic treatment options. Although a clear "magic bullet" has yet to emerge, this type of targeted approach offers hope in the management of this dreadful disease. This article offers an update on these promising diagnostic and treatment modalities.

  10. Cabozantinib versus everolimus in advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choueiri, Toni K.; Escudier, Bernard; Powles, Thomas; Mainwaring, Paul; Rini, Brian I.; Donskov, Frede; Hammers, Hans; Hutson, Thomas E.; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Peltola, Katriina; Roth, Bruce J.; Bjarnason, Georg A.; Géczi, Lajos; Keam, Bhumsuk; Moroto, Pablo; Heng, Daniel Y. C.; Schmidinger, Manuela; Kantoff, Philip W.; Borgman, Anne; Hessel, Colin; Scheffold, Christian; Schwab, Gisela M.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Motzer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cabozantinib is an oral small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) as well as MET and AXL; each has been implicated in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathobiology or development of resistance to antiangiogenic drugs. This randomized open-label phase 3 trial evaluated the efficacy of cabozantinib compared to everolimus in RCC patients who progressed after VEGFR-targeted therapy. Methods The trial randomized 658 patients to receive cabozantinib at a dose of 60 mg daily, or everolimus at a dose of 10 mg daily. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Secondary efficacy endpoints were overall survival and objective response rate. Results Median progression-free survival was 7.4 months with cabozantinib and 3.8 months with everolimus. The risk of progression or death was 42% lower with cabozantinib compared to everolimus (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45 to 0.75; P < 0.001). Objective response rates were 21% with cabozantinib and 5% with everolimus (P < 0.001). A planned interim analysis showed that overall survival was improved with cabozantinib (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.89; P = 0.005) but did not cross the significance boundary. Adverse events (grade 3 or 4, regardless of causality) were reported in 74% of cabozantinib patients and 65% of everolimus patients. Discontinuation of study treatment for adverse events occurred in 9.1% of cabozantinib patients and 10% of everolimus patients. Conclusions Cabozantinib improved progression-free survival compared to everolimus in RCC patients who progressed after VEGFR-targeted therapy. PMID:26406150

  11. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma-Performance, Technical Advances, and Future Concepts.

    PubMed

    Molvar, Christopher; Lewandowski, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a lethal tumor, claiming over half a million lives per year. Treatment of HCC is commonly performed without curative intent, and palliative options dominate, including catheter-based therapies, namely, transarterial chemoembolization and yttrium-90 ((90)Y) radioembolization. This review will showcase the performance of (90)Y radioembolization for the treatment of HCC, focusing on recent seminal data and technical advances. In particular, novel radioembolization treatment concepts are discussed and compared with conventional HCC therapy.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Cetuximab for Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Marco J.; Polinder, Suzanne; Lorenzen, Sylvie; Lordick, Florian; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spaander, Manon C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Costly biologicals in palliative oncology are emerging at a rapid pace. For example, in patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma addition of cetuximab to a palliative chemotherapy regimen appears to improve survival. However, it simultaneously results in higher costs. We aimed to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of adding cetuximab to first-line chemotherapeutic treatment of patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, based on data from a randomized controlled phase II trial. Methods A cost effectiveness analysis model was applied based on individual patient data. It included only direct medical costs from the health-care perspective. Quality-adjusted life-years and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated. Sensitivity analysis was performed by a Monte Carlo analysis. Results Adding cetuximab to a cisplatin-5-fluorouracil first-line regimen for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma resulted in an the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €252,203 per quality-adjusted life-year. Sensitivity analysis shows that there is a chance of less than 0.001 that the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio will be less than a maximum willingness to pay threshold of €40,000 per quality-adjusted life-year, which is representative for the threshold used in The Netherlands and other developed countries. Conclusions Addition of cetuximab to a cisplatin-5-fluorouracil first-line regimen for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is not cost-effective when appraised according to currently accepted criteria. Cost-effectiveness analyses using outcome data from early clinical trials (i.c. a phase II trial) enable pharmaceutical companies and policy makers to gain early insight into whether a new drug meets the current eligibility standards for reimbursement and thereby potential admittance for use in regular clinical practice. PMID:27100871

  13. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) in advanced inoperable bronchial carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghissi, Keyvan; Dixon, Kate; Stringer, Mark R.; Brown, Stanley B.

    1996-12-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of PDT to: Palliate symptoms, control disease and extend survival in patients with advanced inoperable cancer. Subject and Method: 55 Males and 23 females aged between 45-81 years (mean 66 years) with inoperable and advanced lung cancer with > 5O. obstructive lesions of the main, lobar or segmental bronchi. Patients had pre-treatment routine clinical radiological, functional and endoscopic assessment with proven histological diagnosis. Protocol of PDT was; Intravenous injection of 2 mg/Kg bodyweight Polyhaematoporphyrin (equivalent to Photofrin) or Photofrin followed 24-72 hours later by illumination of tumour using 630 nm light (Oxford Laser) delivered via an optical fibre with end diffuser. Treatments were carried out under general anaesthesia as a day case procedure. Patients were rebronchoscoped for debridement/retreatment 4-7 days later. Results: There was no treatment related mortality. Two patients developed mild photosensitivity reaction. All patients showed symptomatic improvement with good initial functional and radiological amelioration. Every patient responded to treatment. Seven patients had complete response and negative histology for 3-12 months. After the first treatment average Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1) improvement was 0.5 litres and 0.4 litres respectively. Twenty five percent of patients (nr 19) survived more than 2 years, 10'. (nr=8) between 1-2 years and the remaining 51 patients less than a year. Conclusion: PDT should be considered as a therapeutic modality for all stages of lung cancer and is an excellent treatment modality for palliation in advanced bronchial malignancies.

  14. Sonidegib, a novel smoothened inhibitor for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Hung Q; Silapunt, Sirunya; Migden, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common nonmelanoma skin cancer. If left untreated, BCCs can become locally aggressive or even metastasize. Currently available treatments include local destruction, surgery, and radiation. Systemic options for advanced disease are limited. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is aberrantly activated in a majority of BCCs and in other cancers. Hh pathway inhibitors are targeted agents that inhibit the aberrant activation of the Hh pathway, with smoothened being a targeted component. Sonidegib is a novel smoothened inhibitor that was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. This review focuses on BCC pathogenesis and the clinical efficacy of sonidegib for the treatment of advanced BCC. PMID:27695345

  15. Sonidegib, a novel smoothened inhibitor for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Hung Q; Silapunt, Sirunya; Migden, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common nonmelanoma skin cancer. If left untreated, BCCs can become locally aggressive or even metastasize. Currently available treatments include local destruction, surgery, and radiation. Systemic options for advanced disease are limited. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is aberrantly activated in a majority of BCCs and in other cancers. Hh pathway inhibitors are targeted agents that inhibit the aberrant activation of the Hh pathway, with smoothened being a targeted component. Sonidegib is a novel smoothened inhibitor that was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. This review focuses on BCC pathogenesis and the clinical efficacy of sonidegib for the treatment of advanced BCC.

  16. Advanced carcinoma of the stomach treated with definitive proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, S.; Kawanishi, N.; Fukutomi, H.; Osuga, T.; Iijima, T.; Tsujii, H.; Kitagawa, T. )

    1990-04-01

    We report the case of a 72-yr-old man who suffered from severe chronic emphysema with poor pulmonary function, and who had advanced cancer of the stomach. Proton beam radiotherapy was applied to the lesion, since surgery was contraindicated. The total dose to the stomach lesion was 61 Gy in 7 wk. The tumor on the stomach regressed, with flattening of the round wall of the lesion. The reactive changes of the proton beam radiotherapy, based on the histopathological examination, revealed extensive tumor necrosis and sparing of vital architecture of normal tissue around the irradiated tumor tissue. Only small clusters of vital or devitalized tumor cells with less than approximately 5% of the whole tumor tissue remained after treatment. We suggest that a high dose of radiation delivered by well-defined proton field could result in an improved therapeutic outcome without undue risk of injury to normal tissue.

  17. Factors related to advanced stage oral squamous cell carcinoma in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kerdpon, D; Sriplung, H

    2001-04-01

    A critical factor that indicates a poor prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is advanced stage disease. This study, therefore, aimed to identify the factors related to advanced stage (TNM staging III, IV) OSCC in Thailand. There were 161 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and lip (ICD-9 140, 141, 143-5), included in the study. Sixty-two per cent of the patients presented with advanced stage disease. Information on demographic characteristics, risk habits, health-seeking behaviour prior to health care professional (HCP) consultation, tumour characteristics and patient and professional delay was obtained by questionnaire-based interview of the patients. These variables were included as initial variables in a logistic regression to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of advanced versus early stage OSCC. Having traditional herbal medication before HCP consultation significantly increased the risk of advanced stage OSCC (OR 5.77; 95% C.I. 1.25-26.62). Floor of mouth location of tumour was associated with a lower risk of advanced stage disease (OR 0.27; 95% C.I. 0.09-0.82) as was having an ulcer (OR 0.43, 95% C.I. 0.02-0.89). The findings indicate that having traditional herbal medication before HCP consultation increased the risk of advanced stage disease. The lower risk of advanced stage OSCC associated with ulcerative tumours and those on the floor of the mouth may be due to their being more readily detected by the patients. PMID:11287274

  18. High dose intensity combination chemotherapy for advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetenham, J. W.; McKendrick, J. J.; Jones, D. H.; Whitehouse, J. M.; Williams, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Retrospective studies have recently demonstrated a significant correlation between dose intensity of chemotherapy and response rates and survival in various diseases including epithelial ovarian carcinoma. As part of a proposed randomised trial to assess the effect of dose intensity on outcome in ovarian carcinoma, a pilot study has been undertaken to determine the toxicity and efficacy of the high intensity therapy. Nineteen patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma received initial treatment with cisplatin 120 mg m-2 i.v. day 1, and cyclophosphamide 1,000 mg-2 i.v. day 1, given at 21-day intervals for six cycles. The average relative dose intensity of this therapy is 1.14 when compared with the CHAP regimen. Severe toxicity was experienced by most patients. The median received average relative dose intensity was 0.90, with only one patient receiving treatment to the proposed intensity. Randomised studies of the effect of dose intensity in ovarian carcinoma are essential, but an initial step must be to assess whether the proposed high dose treatment can be delivered. PMID:2155645

  19. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  20. Efficacy and Tolerability of ABT-869 Versus Sorafenib in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-09-07

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma Non-resectable; Hepatocellular Carcinoma Recurrent; Carcinoma, Hepatocellular; Liver Diseases; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Digestive System Neoplasms; Carcinoma; Liver Neoplasms; Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Adenocarcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial

  1. Third generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors and their development in advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis in general and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling axis in particular is a validated target in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Clear-cell carcinoma of the kidney is now recognized as a malignancy that is sensitive to inhibitors of the VEGF pathway. Treatment options for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have evolved in dramatic fashion over the past 6 years, and a new paradigm has developed. The cytokines interferon-α and interleukin-2 were previously utilized for therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the United States for the treatment of advanced RCC. Two are tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI's) including sunitinib and recently pazopanib, and the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib. The current review examines the evolving data with the next generation of TKI's, axitinib and tivozanib being developed for the treatment of advanced RCC. These agents were synthesized to provide increased target specificity and enhanced target inhibition. The preclinical and clinical data are examined, an overview of the development of these TKI's is provided, and discussion plus speculation concerning their potential roles as RCC therapy is provided.

  2. A Phase II Trial of Cetuximab, Gemcitabine, 5-Fluorouracil, and Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Nonmetastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Piperdi, Bilal; Bathini, Venu; Walsh, William V.; Yunus, Shakeeb; Tseng, Jennifer F.; Whalen, Giles F.; Wassef, Wahid Y.; Kadish, Sidney P.; FitzGerald, Thomas J.; Mikule, Christine; Wang, Yuxia; Grossman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. A minority of patients present with localized disease and surgical resection still offers patients the only hope for long-term survival. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer is defined as surgically unresectable, but has no evidence of distant metastases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cetuximab in combination with gemcitabine and 5-FU along with radiation therapy in locally advanced non-resectable, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, using progression free survival as the primary end point. METHODS: This was a prospective, single arm, open label pilot phase II study to evaluate the anti-tumor activity of gemcitabine (200 mg/m2 per week) and cetuximab (250 mg/m2 per week after an initial 400 mg/m2 loading dose) with continuous infusion 5-FU (800 mg/m2 over 96 hours) and daily concurrent external beam radiation therapy (50.4 Gy total dose) for six weeks (cycle 1) in patients with non-metastatic, locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Following neoadjuvant treatment, subjects were re-evaluated for response and surgical candidacy with restaging scans. After resection, or also if not resected; subjects received further therapy with four 28-day cycles (cycles 2-5) of weekly gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) and cetuximab (250 mg/m2) on days 1, 8, and 15. RESULTS: Between 2006 and 2011, twenty-six patients were screened and eleven of them were enrolled in the study. Most common reasons for screen failures were having resectable disease, metastatic disease or co-morbidity. Ten patients were able to tolerate and complete cycle 1 of chemoradiotherapy. One patient stopped the study prematurely due to grade III diarrhea. All except this one patient received planned radiation therapy. The response evaluation after cycle 1 showed one Partial Response, eight Stable Disease and two Progressive Disease. Four patients subsequently underwent surgical

  3. Exome sequencing identifies early gastric carcinoma as an early stage of advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guhyun; Hwang, Woo Cheol; Do, In-Gu; Wang, Kai; Kang, So Young; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Kang, Won Ki; Jang, Jiryeon; Choi, Min-Gew; Lee, Jun Ho; Sohn, Tae Sung; Bae, Jae Moon; Kim, Sung; Kim, Min Ji; Kim, Seonwoo; Park, Cheol Keun; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2013-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is one of the major causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Early detection and treatment leads to an excellent prognosis in patients with early gastric cancer (EGC), whereas the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC) remains poor. It is unclear whether EGCs and AGCs are distinct entities or whether EGCs are the beginning stages of AGCs. We performed whole exome sequencing of four samples from patients with EGC and compared the results with those from AGCs. In both EGCs and AGCs, a total of 268 genes were commonly mutated and independent mutations were additionally found in EGCs (516 genes) and AGCs (3104 genes). A higher frequency of C>G transitions was observed in intestinal-type compared to diffuse-type carcinomas (P = 0.010). The DYRK3, GPR116, MCM10, PCDH17, PCDHB1, RDH5 and UNC5C genes are recurrently mutated in EGCs and may be involved in early carcinogenesis.

  4. From Uniplex to Multiplex Molecular Profiling in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ileana, Ecaterina E; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Izzo, Julie G

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Understanding the molecular biology of survival and proliferation of cancer cells led to a new molecular classification of lung cancer and the development of targeted therapies with promising results. With the advances of image-guided biopsy techniques, tumor samples are becoming smaller, and the molecular testing techniques have to overcome the challenge of integrating the characterization of a panel of abnormalities including gene mutations, copy-number changes, and fusions in a reduced number of assays using only a small amount of genetic material. This article reviews the current knowledge about the most frequent actionable molecular abnormalities in non-small cell lung carcinoma, the new approaches of molecular analysis, and the implications of these findings in the context of clinical practice.

  5. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%.

  6. Concomitant Statin Use Has a Favorable Effect on Gemcitabine-Erlotinib Combination Chemotherapy for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Do Chang; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Yong Il; Chung, Moon Jae; Park, Jeong Youp; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Chung, Jae Bock

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Erlotinib-gemcitabine combined chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to determine the clinical factors associated with response to this treatment. Materials and Methods This retrospective study included 180 patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer who received ≥2 cycles of gemcitabine-erlotinib combination therapy as first-line palliative chemotherapy between 2006 and 2014. "Long-term response" was defined as tumor stabilization after >6 chemotherapy cycles. Results The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 3.9 and 8.1 months, respectively. On univariate analysis, liver metastasis (p=0.023) was negatively correlated with long-term response. Locally advanced stage (p=0.017), a history of statin treatment (p=0.01), and carcinoembryonic antigen levels <4.5 (p=0.029) had a favorable effect on long-term response. On multivariate analysis, a history of statin treatment was the only independent favorable factor for long-term response (p=0.017). Prognostic factors for OS and PFS were significantly correlated with liver metastasis (p=0.031 and 0.013, respectively). A history of statin treatment was also significantly associated with OS after adjusting for all potential confounders (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.26–0.92; p=0.026). Conclusion These results suggest that statins have a favorable effect on "long-term response" to gemcitabine-erlotinib chemotherapy in unresectable pancreatic cancer patients. Statins may have a chemoadjuvant role in stabilizing long-term tumor growth. PMID:27401642

  7. Cisplatin and Etoposide or Temozolomide and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Gastrointestinal Tract or Pancreas That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-05

    Colorectal Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Esophageal Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gallbladder Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gastric Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Pancreatic Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Small Intestinal Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

  8. Ablation of the locally advanced pancreatic cancer: An introduction and brief summary of techniques.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Athanasios; Moris, Demetrios; Paul Tabet, Patrick; David Wensley Richards, Brian; Kourounis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal and late presenting malignancy with dismal survival rates. An estimated total of 330,000 people died from this malignancy in 2012. Although there have been improvements in diagnostic and treatment methods, the survival of late stage pancreatic cancer has not shown significant improvement in the past 4 decades. Multiple treatment approaches are available including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy, but to this day surgical resection remains the only curative treatment option. Ablative techniques use various forms of energy to cause local tissue destruction through necrosis or apoptosis. They are relevant in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as they are a treatment option in non-resectable tumors where their use ranges from symptom control to reducing tumor size for resection. In this narrative review we have grouped and outlined the various ablative methods, classifying them into thermal (Radiofrequency ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, Cryoablation), and non-thermal ablative methods (Irreversible Electroporation (NanoKnife®), Photodynamic Therapy). This is followed by a description and review of the available evidence on survival and complications for each of these ablative methods. According to the literature, thermal ablative methods appear to be more accessible but are implicated with more complications than non thermal ablative methods which show the most promise. PMID:27569086

  9. Motility Related Actinin Alpha-4 Is Associated with Advanced and Metastatic Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barbolina, Maria V.; Adley, Brian P.; Kelly, David L.; Fought, Angela J.; Scholtens, Denise; Shea, Lonnie D.; Sharon Stack, M.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced and metastatic ovarian cancer is a leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies. A more detailed understanding of the factors controlling invasion and metastasis may lead to novel anti-metastatic therapies. To model cellular interactions that occur during intraperitoneal metastasis, comparative cDNA microarray analysis and confirmatory real time RT-PCR were employed to uncover changes in gene expression that may occur in late stage ovarian cancer in response to microenvironmental cues, particularly native three-dimensional collagen I. Gene expression in human ovarian carcinoma tissues was evaluated on the RNA and protein level using real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Cell invasion and migration were evaluated in a collagen invasion assay and a scratch wound assay. Three-dimensional collagen I culture led to differential expression of several genes. The role of actinin alpha-4 (ACTN4), a cytosketeton-associated protein implicated in regulation of cell motility, was examined in detail. ACTN4 RNA and protein expression were associated with advanced and metastatic human ovarian carcinoma. This report demonstrates that a cytoskeletal-associated protein ACTN4 is upregulated by three-dimensional collagen culture conditions, leading to increased invasion and motility of ovarian cancer cells. Expression of ACTN4 in human ovarian tumors was found to be associated with advanced stage disease and peritoneal metastases. PMID:18362906

  10. Sneddon-Wilkinson disease induced by sorafenib in a patient with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Kazuto; Nakajima, Takahiko; Kawai, Kengo; Minemura, Masami; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib is the standard treatment for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), although it is known to cause a variety of dermatologic adverse events. Subcorneal pustular dermatosis (SCPD), also known as Sneddon-Wilkinson disease, is a rare skin eruption that accompanies various systemic disorders and may become chronically progressive. We herein describe the case of a patient who developed SCPD after sorafenib administration. The dermatologic reaction was improved by the cessation of sorafenib and worsened by its readministration. Clinicians treating HCC patients with sorafenib should be aware of the possibility of SCPD. PMID:25786448

  11. Evaluation of antiangiogenic efficacy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: Biomarkers and functional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bouattour, Mohamed; Payancé, Audrey; Wassermann, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Many years after therapeutic wilderness, sorafenib finally showed a clinical benefit in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. After the primary general enthusiasm worldwide, some disappointments emerged particularly since no new treatment could exceed or at least match sorafenib in this setting. Without these new drugs, research focused on optimizing care of patients treated with sorafenib. One challenging research approach deals with identifying prognostic and predictive biomarkers of sorafenib in this population. The task still seems difficult; however appropriate investigations could resolve this dilemma, as observed for some malignancies where other drugs were used. PMID:26380650

  12. Immunological Treatment Options for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirandola, Leonardo; Bernardini, Giovanni; Cunha, Nicholas D’; Tijani, Lukman; Nguyen, Diane; Cordero, Joehassin; Jenkins, Marjorie R.; Cobos, Everardo; Kast, W. Martin; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) are usually treated by a multimodal approach with surgery and/or radiochemotherapy as the mainstay of local–regional treatment in cases with advanced disease. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy have the disadvantage of causing severe side effects, while the clinical outcome of patients diagnosed with HNSCC has remained essentially unchanged over the last decade. The potential of immunotherapy is still largely unexplored. Here the authors review the current status of the art and discuss the future challenges in HNSCC treatment and prevention. PMID:22251006

  13. Sneddon-Wilkinson disease induced by sorafenib in a patient with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Kazuto; Nakajima, Takahiko; Kawai, Kengo; Minemura, Masami; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib is the standard treatment for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), although it is known to cause a variety of dermatologic adverse events. Subcorneal pustular dermatosis (SCPD), also known as Sneddon-Wilkinson disease, is a rare skin eruption that accompanies various systemic disorders and may become chronically progressive. We herein describe the case of a patient who developed SCPD after sorafenib administration. The dermatologic reaction was improved by the cessation of sorafenib and worsened by its readministration. Clinicians treating HCC patients with sorafenib should be aware of the possibility of SCPD.

  14. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas. PMID:26839647

  16. [A Case of Radical Resection for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer with Positive Peritoneal Cytology Treated with Chemoradiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Sato, Ryohei; Takizawa, Kazuyasu; Yuza, Kizuki; Soma, Daiki; Hirose, Yuki; Morimoto, Yuta; Miura, Kohei; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Takano, Kabuto; Sakata, Jun; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Minagawa, Masahiro; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2015-11-01

    A 54-year-old female patient was admitted with obstructive jaundice. The patient was diagnosed with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer of the head with invasion to the super mesenteric artery and the third portion of the duodenum. A biliary- and gastric-enteric bypass surgery was performed, and peritoneal lavage cytology was positive during surgery. After 6 courses of gemcitabine and S-1 combination chemotherapy, the CA19-9 level was normalized and the primary tumor shrank to 79% of its original size. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed that distant metastasis was not detected and the peritoneal lavage cytology was negative. After additional chemoradiation therapy, a pancreaticoduodenectomy was perfomed. Microscopic investigation revealed that about 60% of the cancer tissue had been replaced by fibrosis and no cancer cells were found at the surgical margin. The patient was alive with no evidence of recurrence 17 months after radical surgery. PMID:26805372

  17. Prospective small bowel mucosal assessment immediately after chemoradiotherapy of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer using capsule endoscopy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Yamashina, Takeshi; Takada, Ryoji; Uedo, Noriya; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ishihara, Ryu; Teshima, Teruki; Nishiyama, Kinji; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    In this case series, three consecutive patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (ULAPC) underwent capsule endoscopy (CE) before and after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) to evaluate duodenal and jejunal mucosa, and to examine the relationship between CE findings and dose distribution. CE after CRT showed duodenitis and proximal jejunitis in all three patients. The most inflamed region was the third part of the duodenum, and in dose distribution, this was the closest region to the center of irradiation. This case series shows that CE can safely diagnose acute duodenitis and proximal jejunitis caused by CRT for ULAPC, and that dose distribution is possible to predict the degree of duodenal and jejunal mucosal injuries. PMID:27366048

  18. Application of 18F-FDG PET/CT combined with carbohydrate antigen 19-9 for differentiating pancreatic carcinoma from chronic mass-forming pancreatitis in Chinese elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinjin; Liu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The current study was designed to analyze the value of 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) combined with carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in differentiating pancreatic carcinoma (PC) from chronic mass-forming pancreatitis (CMFP) in Chinese elderly. Methods As it is impossible to differentially diagnose PC from CMFP, 60 participants older than 65 years with focal pancreatic lesions were scanned by 18F-FDG PET/CT and their CA19-9 levels were tested. Diagnoses of all participants were confirmed by comprehensive methods including aspiration biopsy, surgical pathology, and clinical follow-up of 12 months. Twenty participants with CMFP were included in CMFP group and 40 participants with PC in PC group. Results In CMFP and PC groups, 46 participants showed increased 18F-FDG uptake, 43 had elevated CA19-9 levels, and 38 participants had both increased 18F-FDG uptake and elevated CA19-9 levels. Standardized uptake value maximum of PC group (5.98±2.27) was significantly different from CMFP group (2.58±1.81, P<0.05). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT in differentiating PC from CMFP were 95%, 60%, and 83.3%, respectively. CA19-9 levels of PC group (917.44±1,088.24) were significantly different from CMFP group (19.09±19.54, P<0.05). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CA19-9 levels in differentiating PC from CMFP were 87.5%, 60%, and 78.3%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT combined with CA19-9 levels in differentiating PC from CMFP were 90%, 90%, and 90%, respectively. Conclusion 18F-FDG PET/CT had reliable sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in differentiating PC from CMFP, and CA19-9 levels could be helpful in 18F-FDG PET/CT for differentiating PC from CMFP in Chinese elderly. Moreover, 18F-FDG PET/CT combined with CA19-9 levels was found to be an effective method to differentially diagnose PC from CMFP and has paved the way for the timely and safe treatment of

  19. Weekly paclitaxel, gemcitabine, and external irradiation followed by randomized farnesyl transferase inhibitor R115777 for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Tyvin A; Winter, Kathryn; Safran, Howard; Hoffman, John P; Erickson, Beth; Anne, Pramila R; Myerson, Robert J; Cline-Burkhardt, Vivian JM; Perez, Kimberly; Willett, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) multi-institutional Phase II study 98-12, evaluating paclitaxel and concurrent radiation (RT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer, demonstrated a median survival of 11.3 months and a 1-year survival of 43%. The purpose of the randomized Phase II study by RTOG 0020 was to evaluate the addition of weekly low- dose gemcitabine with concurrent paclitaxel/RT and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the farnesyl transferase inhibitor R115777 following chemoradiation. Patients and methods Patients with unresectable, nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were eligible. Patients in Arm 1 received gemcitabine, 75 mg/m2/week, and paclitaxel, 40 mg/m2/week, for 6 weeks, with 50.4 Gy radiation (CXRT). Patients in Arm 2 received an identical chemoradiation regimen but then received maintenance R115777, 300 mg twice a day for 21 days every 28 days (CXRT+R115777), until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results One hundred ninety-five patients were entered into this study, and 184 were analyzable. Grade 4 nonhematologic toxicities occurred in less than 5% of CXRT patients. The most common grade 3/4 toxicity from R115777 was myelosuppression; however, grade 3/4 hepatic, metabolic, musculoskeletal, and neurologic toxicities were also reported. The median survival time was 11.5 months and 8.9 months for the CXRT and CXRT+R115777 arms, respectively. Conclusions The CXRT arm achieved a median survival of almost 1-year, supporting chemoradiation as an important therapeutic modality for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Maintenance R115777 is not effective and is associated with a broad range of toxicities. These findings provide clinical evidence that inhibition of farnesylation affects many metabolic pathways, underscoring the challenge of developing an effective K-ras inhibitor. PMID:22977306

  20. Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Sequential Gemcitabine for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Kim, Jeff; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Chun, Carlene L.; Columbo, Laurie Ann; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Kunz, Pamela L.; Van Dam, Jacques; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Hsu, Annie; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Goodman, Karyn A.; Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: This Phase II trial evaluated the toxicity, local control, and overall survival in patients treated with sequential gemcitabine and linear accelerator-based single-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled on this prospective single-institution, institutional review board-approved study. Gemcitabine was administered on Days 1, 8, and 15, and SBRT on Day 29. Gemcitabine was restarted on Day 43 and continued for 3-5 cycles. SBRT of 25 Gy in a single fraction was delivered to the internal target volume with a 2- 3-mm margin using a nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique. Respiratory gating was used to account for breathing motion. Follow-up evaluations occurred at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All patients completed SBRT and a median of five cycles of chemotherapy. Follow-up for the 2 remaining alive patients was 25.1 and 36.4 months. No acute Grade 3 or greater nonhematologic toxicity was observed. Late Grade 3 or greater toxicities occurred in 1 patient (5%) and consisted of a duodenal perforation (G4). Three patients (15%) developed ulcers (G2) that were medically managed. Overall, median survival was 11.8 months, with 1-year survival of 50% and 2-year survival of 20%. Using serial computed tomography, the freedom from local progression was 94% at 1 year. Conclusion: Linear accelerator-delivered SBRT with sequential gemcitabine resulted in excellent local control of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Future studies will address strategies for reducing long-term duodenal toxicity associated with SBRT.

  1. Using economic analysis to evaluate the potential of multimodality therapy for elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krzyzanowska, Monika K. . E-mail: monika.krzyzanowska@uhn.on.ca; Earle, Craig C.; Kuntz, Karen M.; Weeks, Jane C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Development of new and expensive drugs with activity against pancreatic cancer has made economic considerations more relevant to treatment decision-making for advanced disease. Economic modeling can be used to explore the potential of such novel therapies and to inform clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of radiation plus fluorouracil (RT-FU) relative to no treatment in elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and to determine the economic potential of radiation plus gemcitabine (RT-GEM), a novel regimen for this disease. We used the SEER-Medicare database to estimate effectiveness and costs supplemented by data from the literature where necessary. Results: Relative to no treatment, RT-FU was associated with a cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $68,724/QALY in the base case analysis. Compared with RT-FU, the ICER for RT-GEM was below $100,000/QALY when the risk of dying with the new regimen was <85% than with the standard regimen. However, >1,000 subjects would be necessary to demonstrate this level of efficacy in a randomized trial. The ICER of RT-GEM was most sensitive to utility values, and, at lower efficacy levels, to costs of gemcitabine and treatment-related toxicity. Conclusions: In elderly patients with LAPC, RT-FU is a cost-effective alternative to no treatment. The novel regimen of RT-GEM is likely to be cost-effective at any clinically meaningful benefit, but quality-of-life issues, drug acquisition, and toxicity-related costs may be relevant, especially at lower efficacy levels.

  2. Intensity-Modulated and Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Patients with Locally Advanced Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer after Preradiation Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, M.; Ganeshan, R.; Graf, R.; Pelzer, U.; Stieler, J. M.; Striefler, J. K.; Bahra, M.; Wust, P.; Riess, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) in patients with pancreatic cancer is still a controversial subject and its benefit in inoperable stages of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), even after induction chemotherapy, remains unclear. Modern radiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may improve effectiveness and reduce radiotherapy-related toxicities. Methods. Patients with LAPC who underwent radiotherapy after chemotherapy between 09/2004 and 05/2013 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to preradiation chemotherapy (PRCT), modalities of radiotherapy, and toxicities. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves. Results. 15 (68%) women and 7 men (median age 64 years; range 40–77) were identified. Median duration of PRCT was 11.1 months (range 4.3–33.0). Six patients (27%) underwent conventional RT and 16 patients (73%) advanced IMRT and IGRT; median dosage was 50.4 (range 9–54) Gray. No grade III or IV toxicities occurred. Median PFS (estimated from the beginning of RT) was 5.8 months, 2.6 months in the conventional RT group (conv-RT), and 7.1 months in the IMRT/IGRT group (P = 0.029); median OS was 11.0 months, 4.2 months (conv-RT), and 14.0 months (IMRT/IGRT); P = 0.141. Median RT-specific PFS for patients with prolonged PRCT > 9 months was 8.5 months compared to 5.6 months for PRCT < 9 months (P = 0.293). This effect was translated into a significantly better median RT-specific overall survival of patients in the PRCT > 9 months group, with 19.0 months compared to 8.5 months in the PRCT  <  9 months group (P = 0.049). Conclusions. IGRT and IMRT after PRCT are feasible and effective options for patients with LAPC after prolonged preradiation chemotherapy. PMID:25401140

  3. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  4. PD-1 Blockade with Pembrolizumab in Advanced Merkel-Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nghiem, Paul T.; Bhatia, Shailender; Lipson, Evan J.; Kudchadkar, Ragini R.; Miller, Natalie J.; Annamalai, Lakshmanan; Berry, Sneha; Chartash, Elliot K.; Daud, Adil; Fling, Steven P.; Friedlander, Philip A.; Kluger, Harriet M.; Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Lundgren, Lisa; Margolin, Kim; Mitchell, Alan; Olencki, Thomas; Pardoll, Drew M.; Reddy, Sunil A.; Shantha, Erica M.; Sharfman, William H.; Sharon, Elad; Shemanski, Lynn R.; Shinohara, Michi M.; Sunshine, Joel C.; Taube, Janis M.; Thompson, John A.; Townson, Steven M.; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Cheever, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Merkel-cell carcinoma is an aggressive skin cancer that is linked to exposure to ultraviolet light and the Merkel-cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). Advanced Merkel-cell carcinoma often responds to chemotherapy, but responses are transient. Blocking the programmed death 1 (PD-1) immune inhibitory pathway is of interest, because these tumors often express PD-L1, and MCPyV-specific T cells express PD-1. METHODS In this multicenter, phase 2, noncontrolled study, we assigned adults with advanced Merkel-cell carcinoma who had received no previous systemic therapy to receive pembrolizumab (anti–PD-1) at a dose of 2 mg per kilogram of body weight every 3 weeks. The primary end point was the objective response rate according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.1. Efficacy was correlated with tumor viral status, as assessed by serologic and immunohistochemical testing. RESULTS A total of 26 patients received at least one dose of pembrolizumab. The objective response rate among the 25 patients with at least one evaluation during treatment was 56% (95% confidence interval [CI], 35 to 76); 4 patients had a complete response, and 10 had a partial response. With a median follow-up of 33 weeks (range, 7 to 53), relapses occurred in 2 of the 14 patients who had had a response (14%). The response duration ranged from at least 2.2 months to at least 9.7 months. The rate of progression-free survival at 6 months was 67% (95% CI, 49 to 86). A total of 17 of the 26 patients (65%) had virus-positive tumors. The response rate was 62% among patients with MCPyV-positive tumors (10 of 16 patients) and 44% among those with virus-negative tumors (4 of 9 patients). Drug-related grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred in 15% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS In this study, first-line therapy with pembrolizumab in patients with advanced Merkel-cell carcinoma was associated with an objective response rate of 56%. Responses were observed in patients with virus-positive tumors

  5. Salivary biomarkers for detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma – current state and recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Yakob, Maha; Fuentes, Laurel; Wang, Marilene B.; Abemayor, Elliot; Wong, David T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignant neoplasm of the oral cavity. Detection of OSCC is currently based on thorough clinical oral examination combined with biopsy for histological analysis. Most cases of OSCC are not detected until the cancer has developed into advanced stages; thus, a reliable early stage diagnostic marker is needed. This literature review presents an overview of the status of current advances in salivary diagnostics for OSCC. Though many protein and mRNA salivary biomarkers have been identified that can detect OSCC with high sensitivity and specificity, the most discernable findings occur with the use of multiple markers. Studies that incorporate proteomic, transcriptomic, and potentially additional “omics”, including methylomics, need to be initiated to bring technology to clinical applications and allow the best use of saliva in diagnosing OSCC. PMID:24883261

  6. Sorafenib for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with extrahepatic metastasis: a prospective multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahito; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Kuromatsu, Ryoko; Nagamatsu, Hiroaki; Tajiri, Nobuyoshi; Satani, Manabu; Niizeki, Takashi; Aino, Hajime; Okamura, Shusuke; Iwamoto, Hideki; Shimose, Shigeo; Shirono, Tomotake; Koga, Hironori; Torimura, Takuji

    2015-12-01

    Sorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, is approved for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. However, its therapeutic effect in advanced HCC patients with extrahepatic metastasis remains uncertain. This study aimed to prospectively assess the efficacy, safety, and survival risk factors and evaluate the prognostic impact of sorafenib treatment in advanced HCC patients with or without extrahepatic metastasis. Between May 2009 and March 2014, 312 consecutive advanced HCC patients who received sorafenib were enrolled in this study. We evaluated their characteristics and compared the clinical outcomes of those with and without extrahepatic metastasis. Of the enrolled patients, 245 (81%) received sorafenib treatment for more than 1 month, with a median duration of 3.6 months. Eighteen patients demonstrated partial response to sorafenib therapy, 127 had stable disease, and 134 had progressive disease at the first radiologic assessment. The median survival time (MST) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 10.3 and 3.6 months, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified gender, Child-Pugh class, baseline serum des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin level, and treatment duration as independent risk factors for survival. Extrahepatic metastasis was detected in 178 patients. However, the MST, PFS, and therapeutic effect were comparable between patients with and without extrahepatic metastasis. The independent risk factors for decreased overall survival in patients with extrahepatic metastasis were similar to those affecting all patients. Our results indicated that sorafenib could be administered for hepatic reserve and as long-term treatment for advanced HCC patients regardless of their extrahepatic metastasis status.

  7. The effect of locoregional therapies in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Sarpel, Umut; Spivack, John H.; Berger, Yaniv; Heskel, Marina; Aycart, Samantha N.; Sweeney, Robert; Edwards, Martin P.; Labow, Daniel M.; Kim, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background & aims It is unknown whether the addition of locoregional therapies (LRTx) to sorafenib improves prognosis over sorafenib alone in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LRTx in this population. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of patients with advanced HCC as defined by extrahepatic metastasis, lymphadenopathy >2 cm, or gross vascular invasion. Sorafenib therapy was required for inclusion. Survival of patients who received LRTx after progression to advanced stage was compared to those who did not receive LRTx. Results Using an intention to treat analysis of 312 eligible patients, a propensity weighted proportional hazards model demonstrated LRTx as a predictor of survival (HR = 0.505, 95% CI: 0.407–0.628; P < 0.001). The greatest benefit was seen in patients with the largest tumor burden (HR = 0.305, 95% CI: 0.236–0.393; P < 0.01). Median survival in the sorafenib arm was 143 days (95% CI: 118–161) vs. 247 days (95% CI: 220–289) in the sorafenib plus LRTx arm (P < 0.001). Conclusions These results demonstrate a survival benefit with the addition of LRTx to sorafenib for patients with advanced HCC. These findings should prompt a prospective clinical trial to further assess the role of LRTx in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:27154804

  8. Planned preoperative radiation therapy for advanced laryngeal carcinoma. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Kazem, I.; van den Broek, P.; Huygen, P.L.M.

    1982-09-01

    One hundred ten patients with predominantly advanced laryngeal carcinoma were treated in the period 1969-1978 with planned preoperative radiation therapy followed by surgery. Site distribution was: 63 supraglottic, 26 glottic, 15 transglottic and 6 subglottic. There were 4 Stage II patients, 66 Stage III and 40 Stage IV. Preoperative radiation therapy consisted of Telecobalt irradiation to a total dose of 25 Gy given to a target volume encompassing the larynx and regional neck nodes, given in 5 equal daily fractions of 5 Gy in 5 consecutive days. Surgery was performed 2 days later. Total laryngectomy was performed on 48 patients, total laryngectomy with neck dissection on 55 patients, supraglottic laryngectomy on 5 and supraglottic laryngectomy with neck dissection on 2 patients. Crude actuarial 5 and 10 year survival probability for the whole group is 71 and 61%, respectively. The corrected 5 and 10 year survival is 75%. For patients with T/sub 3/-T/sub 4/-N/sub 0/ tumors 5 and 10 year survival probability is: crude 65 and 58%, and corrected 70% respectively. For T/sub 3/-T/sub 4/-N/sub +/ crude: 75 and 60% and corrected: 78%. Of 110 patients, one died postoperative, three died of intercurrent disease, five died as a result of second malignancy, and 23 died of their larynx carcinoma: 12/23 because of locoregional failure, and 11/23 because of distant metastasis. We concluded that short intensive preoperative radiation therapy and surgery offer a high cure rate in the treatment of advanced resectable laryngeal carcinoma. The merits of this technique are outlined in the text.

  9. Anorexia-cachexia syndrome in pancreatic cancer: recent advances and new pharmacological approach.

    PubMed

    Ronga, Ilaria; Gallucci, Fernando; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Uomo, Generoso

    2014-03-01

    About 80% of all pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients suffer from a wasting syndrome referred to as the "cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome" (CACS) characterized by abnormally low weight, weakness and loss of skeletal muscle mass with or without loss of body fat, which directly impacts overall survival, quality of life, and physical activity. The aim of this review was to examine recent findings about CACS' pathophysiology and to describe the current pharmacological approaches. In recent years many efforts were made to improve our knowledge of CACS; currently we know that cachexia arises from a complex and multifactorial interaction between various mechanisms including inflammation, anorexia/malnutrition, alterations of protein and lipid metabolism; consequently its management requires multidisciplinary and multipharmacological approach that should address the different causes underlying this clinical event. On these premises, several drugs have been proposed starting from the first pharmacological treatment based on progestational agents or corticosteroids; most of them are in the preclinical phase, but some have already reached the clinical experimentation stage. In conclusion, to date, there is no standard effective treatment and further studies are needed to unravel the basic mechanisms underlying CACS and to develop newer therapeutic strategies with the hope to improve the quality of life of pancreatic cancer patients.

  10. Inhibition of pancreatic tumoral cells by snake venom disintegrins

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Sara; Castro, Roberto; Lundin, Courtney; Hofstetter, Amanda; Alaniz, Amber; Suntravat, Montamas; Sánchez, Elda Eliza

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer often has a poor prognosis, even when diagnosed early. Pancreatic cancer typically spreads rapidly and is rarely detected in its early stages, which is a major reason it is a leading cause of cancer death. Signs and symptoms may not appear until pancreatic cancer is quite advanced, and complete surgical removal is not possible. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. The importance of integrins in several cell types that affect tumor progression has made them an appealing target for cancer therapy. Some of the proteins found in the snake venom present a great potential as anti-tumor agents. In this study, we summarize the activity of two integrins antagonist, recombinant disintegrins mojastin 1 and viridistatin 2, on human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BXPC-3). Both recombinant disintegrins inhibited some essential aspects of the metastasis process such as proliferation, adhesion, migration, and survival through apoptosis, making these proteins prominent candidates for the development of drugs for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25450798

  11. A Phase 2 Study of Cediranib in Combination With Olaparib in Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-30

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  12. Modeling Combined Chemotherapy and Particle Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Marco; Tommasino, Francesco; Yamada, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the only cancer for which deaths are predicted to increase in 2014 and beyond. Combined radiochemotherapy protocols using gemcitabine and hypofractionated X-rays are ongoing in several clinical trials. Recent results indicate that charged particle therapy substantially increases local control of resectable and unresectable pancreas cancer, as predicted from previous radiobiology studies considering the high tumor hypoxia. Combination with chemotherapy improves the overall survival (OS). We compared published data on X-ray and charged particle clinical results with or without adjuvant chemotherapy calculating the biological effective dose. We show that chemoradiotherapy with protons or carbon ions results in 1 year OS significantly higher than those obtained with other treatment schedules. Further hypofractionation using charged particles may result in improved local control and survival. A comparative clinical trial using the standard X-ray scheme vs. the best current standard with carbon ions is crucial and may open new opportunities for this deadly disease. PMID:26217585

  13. Using 18F Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG PET) to Monitor Clinical Outcomes in Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemo-Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Minsig; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Venkatramanamoorthy, Raghu; Lawhorn-Crews, Jawana M.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Shields, Anthony F.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pancreatic cancer ranks as the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with five year survival ranging from 1-5%. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a metabolic imaging system that is widely used for the initial staging of cancer and detecting residual disease after treatment. There are limited data, however, on the use of this molecular imaging technique to assess early tumor response after treatment in pancreatic cancer. METHODS The objective of the study was to explore the relationship of early treatment response using the 18 F- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET with surgical outcome and overall survival in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. FDG-PET measurements of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) and kinetic parameters were compared to the clinical outcome. RESULTS Twenty patients were enrolled in the study evaluating neoadjuvant induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (chemo-RT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. All twenty patients had pre-study PET scans and a total of fifty PET scans were performed. Among patients who were PET responders (≥50% decrease in SUV after cycle 1), 100% (2/2) had complete surgical resection. Only 6% (1/16) had surgical resection in the PET non-responders (<50% decrease). Two patients did not have the second PET scan due to clinical progression or treatment toxicity. Mean survival was 23.2 months for PET responders and 11.3 months for non-responders (p=0.234). Similar differences in survival were also noted when response was measured using Patlak analysis. CONCLUSION FDG-PET can aid in monitoring the clinical outcome of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemo-RT. FDG-PET may be used to aid patients who could have complete surgical resection as well as prognosticate patients’ survival. PMID:19806035

  14. Advanced basal cell carcinoma, the hedgehog pathway, and treatment options – role of smoothened inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fecher, Leslie A; Sharfman, William H

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer and its incidence is rising worldwide. Ultraviolet radiation exposure, including tanning bed use, as well as host factors play a role in its development. The majority of cases are treated and cured with local therapies including surgery. Yet, the health care costs of diagnosis and treatment of BCCs in the US is substantial. In the United States, the cost of nonmelanoma skin cancer care in the Medicare population is estimated to be US$426 million per year. While rare, locally advanced BCCs that can no longer be controlled with surgery and/or radiation, and metastatic BCCs do occur and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Vismodegib (GDC-0449), a smoothened inhibitor targeted at the hedgehog pathway, is the first US Food and Drug Association (FDA)-approved agent in the treatment of locally advanced, unresectable, and metastatic BCCs. This class of agents appears to be changing the survival rates in advanced BCC patients, but appropriate patient selection and monitoring are important. Multidisciplinary assessments are essential for the optimal care and management of these patients. For some patients with locally advanced BCC, treatment with a hedgehog inhibitor may eliminate the need for an excessively disfiguring or morbid surgery. PMID:26604681

  15. [Transarterial infusion chemotherapy using fine-powder cisplatin in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Takeshi; Kakizaki, Satoru; Ueno, Takashi; Takeuchi, Suguru; Takizawa, Daichi; Katakai, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the therapeutic effects and safety of fine powder cisplatin for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma( HCC). From January 2006 to March 2012, 123 patients with advanced HCC were treated by transarterial infusion chemotherapy(TAI)with fine-powder cisplatin(IA-call®, Nippon Kayaku Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). The drug was infused into the liver through the feeding artery at a dose of 65 mg/m2. The treatment was repeated every 4 to 8 weeks until evidence of either tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity appeared. Treatment responses were classified as complete response(CR), partial response(PR), stable disease(SD), and progressive disease(PD)in 3.2%, 12.0%, 32.2%, and 52.4% of patients, respectively. The median survival durations were as follows: overall, 12.2 months; CR/PR patients, 23.8 months; and SD/PD patients, 10.6 months. The cumulative survival rates of CR/PR patients were significantly higher than those of SD/PD patients (p<0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that treatment response, etiology, Child-Pugh grading, and level of protein induced by the vitamin K antagonist- II (PIVKA- II )were predictive factors of survival duration. Problematic adverse events were not observed in any of the patients. Our results suggest that TAI using fine-powder cisplatin can be safely administered for advanced HCC and can improve the prognosis of patients with advanced disease. PMID:24743198

  16. Phase 1 Pharmacogenetic and Pharmacodynamic Study of Sorafenib With Concurrent Radiation Therapy and Gemcitabine in Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chiorean, E. Gabriela; Schneider, Bryan P.; Akisik, Fatih M.; Perkins, Susan M.; Anderson, Stephen; Johnson, Cynthia S.; DeWitt, John; Helft, Paul; Clark, Romnee; Johnston, Erica L.; Spittler, A. John; Deluca, Jill; Bu, Guixue; Shahda, Safi; Loehrer, Patrick J.; Sandrasegaran, Kumar; Cardenes, Higinia R.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To define the safety, efficacy, and pharmacogenetic and pharmacodynamic effects of sorafenib with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously weekly × 3 every 4 weeks per cycle for 1 cycle before CRT and continued for up to 4 cycles after CRT. Weekly gemcitabine 600 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously was given during concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy of 50 Gy to gross tumor volume in 25 fractions. Sorafenib was dosed orally 400 mg twice daily until progression, except during CRT when it was escalated from 200 mg to 400 mg daily, and 400 mg twice daily. The maximum tolerated dose cohort was expanded to 15 patients. Correlative studies included dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and angiogenesis genes polymorphisms (VEGF-A and VEGF-R2 single nucleotide polymorphisms). Results: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred during induction gemcitabine/sorafenib followed by concurrent CRT. The most common grade 3/4 toxicities were fatigue, hematologic, and gastrointestinal. The maximum tolerated dose was sorafenib 400 mg twice daily. The median progression-free survival and overall survival for 25 evaluable patients were 10.6 and 12.6 months, respectively. The median overall survival for patients with VEGF-A -2578 AA, -1498 CC, and -1154 AA versus alternate genotypes was 21.6 versus 14.7 months. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI demonstrated higher baseline K{sup trans} in responding patients. Conclusions: Concurrent sorafenib with CRT had modest clinical activity with increased gastrointestinal toxicity in localized unresectable pancreatic cancer. Select VEGF-A/VEGF-R2 genotypes were associated with favorable survival.

  17. Dietary consumption of advanced glycation end products and pancreatic cancer in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study12345

    PubMed Central

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Zimmerman, Thea Palmer; Duan, Zhigang; Chen, Liang; Kahle, Lisa; Risch, Adam; Subar, Amy F; Cross, Amanda J; Hollenbeck, Albert; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary; Sinha, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of compounds present in uncooked foods as well as in foods cooked at high temperatures. AGEs have been associated with insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation in patients with diabetes. Dietary AGEs are an important contributor to the AGE pool in the body. Nϵ-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) AGE is one of the major biologically and chemically well-characterized AGE markers. The consumption of red meat, which is CML-AGE rich, has been positively associated with pancreatic cancer in men. Objectives: With the use of a published food CML-AGE database, we estimated the consumption of CML AGE in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and evaluated the association between CML-AGE consumption and pancreatic cancer and the mediating effect of CML AGE on the association between red meat consumption and pancreatic cancer. Design: Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs for pancreatic cancer. Results: During an average of 10.5 y of follow-up, we identified 2193 pancreatic cancer cases (1407 men and 786 women) from 528,251 subjects. With the comparison of subjects in the fifth and the first quintiles of CML-AGE consumption, we observed increased pancreatic cancer risk in men (HR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.93, P-trend = 0.003) but not women (HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.72, P-trend = 0.42). Men in the highest quintile of red meat consumption had higher risk of pancreatic cancer (HR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.70), which attenuated after adjustment for CML-AGE consumption (HR: 1.20; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.53). Conclusion: Dietary CML-AGE consumption was associated with modestly increased risk of pancreatic cancer in men and may partially explain the positive association between red meat and pancreatic cancer. The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00340015. PMID:25527756

  18. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva

    PubMed Central

    GAUDINEAU, A.; WEITBRUCH, D.; QUETIN, P.; HEYMANN, S.; PETIT, T.; VOLKMAR, P.; BODIN, F.; VELTEN, M.; RODIER, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative therapies have been sought to alleviate mutilation and morbidity associated with surgery for vulvar neoplasms. Our prime objective was to assess tumor absence in pathological vulvar and nodal specimens following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced vulvar neoplasms. Data were retrospectively collected from January 2001 to May 2009 from 22 patients treated with neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of inguino-pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy) in association with chemotherapy when possible. Surgery occurred at intervals of between 5 to 8 weeks. The median age of patients at diagnosis was 74.1 years. All patients were primarily treated with radiotherapy and 15 received a concomitant chemotherapy. Additionally, all patients underwent radical vulvectomy and bilateral inguino-femoral lymphadenectomy. Tumor absence in the vulvar and nodal pathological specimens was achieved for 6 (27%) patients, while absence in the vulvar pathological specimens was only achieved for 10 (45.4%) patients. Postoperative follow-up revealed breakdown of groin wounds, vulvar wounds and chronic lymphedema in 3 (14.3%), 7 (31.8%) and 14 cases (63.6%), respectively. Within a median follow-up time of 2.3 years [interquartile range (IQR), 0.6–4.6], 12 (54.6%) patients experienced complete remission and 6 cases succumbed to metastatic evolution within a median of 2.2 years (IQR, 0.6–4.6), with 1 case also experiencing perineal recurrence. Median survival time, estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, was 5.1 years (IQR, 1.0–6.8). We suggest that neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy may represent a reliable and promising strategy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva. PMID:23205089

  19. Adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced squamous carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Pradier, Olivier . E-mail: opradier@gwdg.de; Christiansen, Hans; Schmidberger, Heinz; Martin, Alexios; Jaeckel, Martin C.; Steiner, Wolfgang; Ambrosch, Petra; Kahler, Elke; Hess, Clemens F.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of an adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and to show that a less invasive surgery with organ preservation in combination with radiotherapy is an alternative to a radical treatment. Patients and Methods: Between 1987 and 2000, 208 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with postoperative radiotherapy after surgical CO{sub 2} laser resection. Primary sites included oral cavity, 38; oropharynx, 88; larynx, 36; hypopharynx, 46. Disease stages were as follows: Stage III, 40 patients; Stage IV, 168 patients. Before 1994, the treatment consisted of a split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum (Treatment A). After 1994, the patients received a conventional radiotherapy (Treatment B). Results: Patients had 5-year locoregional control and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates of 68% and 48%, respectively. The 5-year DSS was 70% and 44% for Stages III and IV, respectively (p = 0.00127). Patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater or equal to 13.5 g/dL before radiotherapy had a 5-year DSS of 55% as compared with 39% for patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater than 13.5 g/dL (p = 0.0054). Conclusion: In this series of patients with advanced head-and-neck tumors, transoral laser surgery in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy resulted in locoregional control and DSS rates similar to those reported for radical surgery followed by radiotherapy. Treatment B has clearly been superior to Treatment A. A further improvement of our treatment regimen might be expected by the combination of adjuvant radiotherapy with concomitant platinum-based chemotherapy.

  20. A miRNA Signature of Chemoresistant Mesenchymal Phenotype Identifies Novel Molecular Targets Associated with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Alakesh; VenkataSubbaRao, Kolaparthi; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Hill, Ping; Freeman, James W.

    2014-01-01

    In this study a microRNA (miRNA) signature was identified in a gemcitabine resistant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell line model (BxPC3-GZR) and this signature was further examined in advanced PDAC tumor specimens from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. BxPC3-GZR showed a mesenchymal phenotype, expressed high levels of CD44 and showed a highly significant deregulation of 17 miRNAs. Based on relevance to cancer, a seven-miRNA signature (miR-100, miR-125b, miR-155, miR-21, miR-205, miR-27b and miR-455-3p) was selected for further studies. A strong correlation was observed for six of the seven miRNAs in 43 advanced tumor specimens compared to normal pancreas tissue. To assess the functional relevance we initially focused on miRNA-125b, which is over-expressed in both the BxPC3-GZR model and advanced PDAC tumor specimens. Knockdown of miRNA-125b in BxPC3-GZR and Panc-1 cells caused a partial reversal of the mesenchymal phenotype and enhanced response to gemcitabine. Moreover, RNA-seq data from each of 40 advanced PDAC tumor specimens from the TCGA data base indicate a negative correlation between expression of miRNA-125b and five of six potential target genes (BAP1, BBC3, NEU1, BCL2, STARD13). Thus far, two of these target genes, BBC3 and NEU1, that are tumor suppressor genes but not yet studied in PDAC, appear to be functional targets of miR-125b since knockdown of miR125b caused their up regulation. These miRNAs and their molecular targets may serve as targets to enhance sensitivity to chemotherapy and reduce metastatic spread. PMID:25184537

  1. Tolerance and efficacy of palliative radiotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer: A retrospective analysis of single-institutional experiences

    PubMed Central

    WOLNY-ROKICKA, EDYTA; SUTKOWSKI, KRZYSZTOF; GRZĄDZIEL, ALEKSANDRA; DORSZ, ŻANETA; TUKIENDORF, ANDRZEJ; LIPIŃSKI, JAKUB; WYDMAŃSKI, JERZY

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) in patients with locally advanced or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. A total of 31 patients were enrolled in this study, 26 of whom had locally advanced (M0) pancreatic cancer and 5 had metastatic (M1) disease. The patients were treated with palliative RT (6–30 Gy in 1–10 fractions over a period of 1 day-2 weeks). Treatment-related toxicity was classified according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Early mild toxicity was observed. A total of 17 patients (55%) achieved good pain control without pharmacological therapy, and 12 patients (39%) reduced their use of analgesics; in the remaining 2 patients (6%), there was no change in analgesic use. Late high-grade (>3) toxicity was not observed. The average survival time for the 31 patients was 9 months. The 1-year overall survival rate was 16%. Palliative RT was well-tolerated and was able to prolong the survival time. The majority of the patients achieved better pain control with palliative RT. PMID:27284450

  2. Precursor Lesions for Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer: PanIN, IPMN, and MCN

    PubMed Central

    Distler, M.; Aust, D.; Weitz, J.; Pilarsky, C.; Grützmann, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is still a dismal disease. The high mortality rate is mainly caused by the lack of highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tools, and most of the patients are diagnosed in an advanced and incurable stage. Knowledge about precursor lesions for pancreatic cancer has grown significantly over the last decade, and nowadays we know that mainly three lesions (PanIN, and IPMN, MCN) are responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer. The early detection of these lesions is still challenging but provides the chance to cure patients before they might get an invasive pancreatic carcinoma. This paper focuses on PanIN, IPMN, and MCN lesions and reviews the current level of knowledge and clinical measures. PMID:24783207

  3. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas in a Patient with Germline BRCA2 Mutation-Response to Neoadjuvant Radiochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schultheis, Anne M.; Nguyen, Gia Phuong; Ortmann, Monika; Kruis, Wolfgang; Büttner, Reinhard; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Markiefka, Birgid

    2014-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignant neoplasia, accounting for approximately 0.5–2% of all malignant pancreatic tumors. These lesions are characterized by poor prognosis. Here we report on a case of a 57-year-old female patient with known BRCA2 germline mutation presenting with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas as the only malignancy. The tumor was locally advanced at the first presentation but responded almost completely to neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy. Our case highlights the facts (i) that pancreatic carcinomas belong to the tumor spectrum of patients with the BRCA2-associated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and (ii) that tumors of the pancreas can represent the first or even the only manifestation of HBOC. Furthermore, this case of a nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma indicates that HBOC-associated carcinomas of the pancreas might be characterized by a broader morphological spectrum than was previously thought. Since BRCA mutations cause deficiency of DNA double-strand breakage repair in tumors, neoadjuvant treatment regimens might become a reasonable option in HBOC-associated pancreatic carcinomas. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a primary pancreatic squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with this particular genetic background of BRCA2-associated HBOC. PMID:24959366

  4. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas in a Patient with Germline BRCA2 Mutation-Response to Neoadjuvant Radiochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Anne M; Nguyen, Gia Phuong; Ortmann, Monika; Kruis, Wolfgang; Büttner, Reinhard; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Markiefka, Birgid

    2014-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignant neoplasia, accounting for approximately 0.5-2% of all malignant pancreatic tumors. These lesions are characterized by poor prognosis. Here we report on a case of a 57-year-old female patient with known BRCA2 germline mutation presenting with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas as the only malignancy. The tumor was locally advanced at the first presentation but responded almost completely to neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy. Our case highlights the facts (i) that pancreatic carcinomas belong to the tumor spectrum of patients with the BRCA2-associated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and (ii) that tumors of the pancreas can represent the first or even the only manifestation of HBOC. Furthermore, this case of a nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma indicates that HBOC-associated carcinomas of the pancreas might be characterized by a broader morphological spectrum than was previously thought. Since BRCA mutations cause deficiency of DNA double-strand breakage repair in tumors, neoadjuvant treatment regimens might become a reasonable option in HBOC-associated pancreatic carcinomas. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a primary pancreatic squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with this particular genetic background of BRCA2-associated HBOC.

  5. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason Kihyuk; Enns, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins, autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted. PMID:18081217

  6. Ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma inhibit growth of pancreatic cancers both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Itami, A; Watanabe, G; Shimada, Y; Hashimoto, Y; Kawamura, J; Kato, M; Hosotani, R; Imamura, M

    2001-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is expressed largely in adipose tissues and plays an important role in adipocyte differentiation. Several studies have recently shown that ligands of PPARgamma could lead to growth inhibition in some malignancies. In our study, we focused on pancreatic cancers, because the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer has not significantly improved due to its resistance to various chemotherapeutic regimens, so that a novel strategy should be required. We show here that PPARgamma is expressed in 5 pancreatic cancer cell lines detected in both mRNA and protein level as well as in human primary and metastatic pancreatic carcinomas examined by immunohistochemical studies. A specific ligand of PPARgamma, troglitazone, led to G1 accumulation with the increase in p27(Kip1), but not p21(Waf1/Cip1) and inhibited cellular proliferation in a pancreatic cancer cell line, Panc-1. The overexpression of PPARgamma in a pancreatic cancer cell line, KMP-3, caused lipid accumulation, which suggested cell growth in some cancers might be inhibited, at least in part, through terminal differentiation in the adipogenic lineage. In addition, implanted Panc-1 tumors in nude mice showed significant inhibition of tumor growth, when treated with pioglitazone, another specific ligand of PPARgamma. Our results suggest that ligands of PPARgamma may be a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of pancreatic carcinomas.

  7. Management of inferior vena cava tumor thrombus in locally advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Psutka, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma is accompanied by intravascular tumor thrombus in up to 10% of cases, of which nearly one-third of patients also have concurrent metastatic disease. Surgical resection in the form of radical nephrectomy and caval thrombectomy represents the only option to obtain local control of the disease and is associated with durable oncologic control in approximately half of these patients. The objective of this clinical review is to outline the preoperative evaluation for, and operative management of patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma with venous tumor thrombi involving the inferior vena cava. Cornerstones of the management of these complex patients include obtaining high-quality imaging to characterize the renal mass and tumor thrombus preoperatively, with further intraoperative real-time evaluation using transesophageal echocardiography, careful surgical planning, and a multidisciplinary approach. Operative management of patients with high-level caval thrombi should be undertaken in high-volume centers by surgical teams with capacity for bypass and invasive intraoperative monitoring. In patients with metastatic disease at presentation, cytoreductive nephrectomy and tumor thrombectomy may be safely performed with simultaneous metastasectomy if possible. In the absence of level one evidence, neoadjuvant targeted therapy should continue to be viewed as experimental and should be employed under the auspices of a clinical trial. However, in patients with significant risk factors for postoperative complications and mortality, and especially in those with metastatic disease, consultation with medical oncology and frontline targeted therapy may be considered. PMID:26445601

  8. Calcitriol enhances gemcitabine antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo by promoting apoptosis in a human pancreatic carcinoma model system

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei-Dong; Ma, Yingyu; Flynn, Geraldine; Muindi, Josephia R; Kong, Rui-Xian; Trump, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    Gemcitabine is the standard care chemotherapeutic agent to treat pancreatic cancer. Previously we demonstrated that calcitriol (1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol) has significant anti-proliferative effects in vitro and in vivo in multiple tumor models and enhances the activity of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. We therefore investigated whether calcitriol could potentiate the cytotoxic activity of gemcitabine in the human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 model system. Isobologram analysis revealed that calcitriol and gemcitabine had synergistic antiproliferative effect over a wide range of drug concentrations. Calcitriol did not reduce the cytidine deaminase activity in Capan-1 tumors nor in the livers of Capan-1 tumor bearing mice. Calcitriol and gemcitabine combination promoted apoptosis in Capan-1 cells compared with either agent alone. The combination treatment also increased the activation of caspases-8, -9, -6 and -3 in Capan-1 cells. This result was confirmed by substrate-based caspase activity assay. Akt phosphorylation was reduced by calcitriol and gemcitabine combination treatment compared to single agent treatment. However, ERK1/2 phosphorylation was not modulated by either agent alone or by the combination. Tumor regrowth delay studies showed that calcitriol in combination with gemcitabine resulted in a significant reduction of Capan-1 tumor volume compared to single agent treatment. Our study suggests that calcitriol and gemcitabine in combination promotes caspase-dependent apoptosis, which may contribute to increased anti-tumor activity compared to either agent alone. PMID:20699664

  9. Atypical culture-negative skull base osteomyelitis masquerading as advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    See, Anna; Tan, Tiong Yong; Gan, Eng Cern

    2016-01-01

    Skull base osteomyelitis typically arises as a complication of otogenic or sinonasal infections in immunocompromised patients. A much rarer entity, atypical skull base osteomyelitis is not associated with an obvious infective source. Atypical and culture-negative skull base osteomyelitis is even rarer and hampers diagnosis, as its clinical presentation is remarkably similar to skull base neoplasms. We report a case of extensive skull base osteomyelitis with orbital apex syndrome and multiple lower cranial nerve palsies which initially masqueraded as possible advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Extensive investigations and consult with an infectious diseases specialist aided in elucidation of the correct diagnosis. Through this article, we emphasize that skull base osteomyelitis must be considered in the setting of headache, cranial neuropathies, elevated inflammatory markers and abnormal imaging findings. Early tissue sampling for histology, stainings and cultures and prompt appropriate treatment may prevent or arrest further complications. PMID:27178515

  10. Rapid sequence treatment of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Moloy, P.J.; Moran, E.M.; Azawi, S. )

    1991-01-01

    A review of the literature suggested that prolonged treatment time may lessen the probability of cure for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. To shorten treatment time, rapid sequence treatment (RST) was devised in which chemotherapy, surgery, and irradation were administered in a total treatment time of 8 weeks. Twelve patients were treated and followed 3 years or longer. Medical complications were minor. Osteonecrosis occurred in each of the first five patients and was the only major complication of the protocol. Surgical techniques were modified, and no additional patient developed osteonecrosis. No patient developed local or regional recurrence. Two patients developed distant metastases and three other patients developed second primaries. Absolute survival was 50%. Rapid sequence treatment is an aggressive and potentially hazardous protocol that yielded encouraging results in this pilot study.

  11. Acute chylous peritonitis mimicking ovarian torsion in a patient with advanced gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Moo; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Bub Woo; Kim, Kyung Sik; Choi, Jin Sub; Lee, Woo Jung; Kim, Byong Ro

    2007-09-01

    The extravasation of chyle into the peritoneal space usually does not accompany an abrupt onset of abdominal pain with symptoms and signs of peritonitis. The rarity of this condition fails to reach preoperative diagnosis prior to laparotomy. Here, we introduce a case of chylous ascites that presented with acute abdominal pain mimicking peritonitis caused by ovarian torsion in a 41-yr-old female patient with advanced gastric carcinoma. An emergency exploratory laparotomy was performed but revealed no evidence of ovarian torsion. Only chylous ascites was discovered in the operative field. She underwent a complete abdominal hysterectomy and salphingo-oophorectomy. Only saline irrigation and suction-up were performed for the chylous ascites. The postoperative course was uneventful. Her bowel movement was restored within 1 week. She was allowed only a fat-free diet, and no evidence of re-occurrence of ascites was noted on clinical observation. She now remains under consideration for additional chemotherapy.

  12. Vismodegib: A smoothened inhibitor for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aditya, Suruchi; Rattan, Aditya

    2013-10-01

    Incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common skin cancer in humans, is rising. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment but there is no standard of care for locally advanced or metastatic disease. Hedgehog signaling proteins are critical for cell growth and differentiation during embryogenesis; Hh pathway is silenced in adults. Dysregulated or aberrant Hh signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of BCC. This hyperactive pathway can be inhibited by use of smoothened inhibitors such as vismodegib. Food and drug administration approved this oral, once-daily medication in 2012 to treat adults with metastatic BCC or locally advanced, recurrent BCC after surgery and also for patients with locally advanced BCC who are not candidates for surgery or radiation treatment. Clinical studies have shown it to be highly efficacious and the most common adverse effects include, muscle spasms, alopecia and dysgeusia. Use of targeted biologic modifiers, exemplified by Hh directed therapeutics offer a new hope to patients with high-surgical morbidity or inoperable tumors.

  13. Sorafenib-induced acute interstitial pneumonia in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Haruhiko; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Iguchi, Eriko; Matsuda, Fumihiro; Kita, Ryuichi; Kimura, Toru; Osaki, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) induced by sorafenib therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we present three patients with advanced HCC who developed AIP during sorafenib therapy, with fatal complications in two cases. Case 1 was a 76-year-old man who developed dyspnea. Chest CT showed interstitial pneumonia. Sorafenib was discontinued immediately, and prednisolone was started. His pneumonia resolved. A drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test for sorafenib was positive. Case 2 was a 75-year-old man and case 3 was a 77-year-old man, both of whom developed high-grade fever and hypoxemia during sorafenib therapy, and were diagnosed with AIP. In spite of high-dose steroid therapy, their respiratory failure worsened and both patients died. In all three cases, serum KL-6 or surfactant protein D concentrations were elevated, and blood and sputum cultures did not grow pathogens. All three patients were smokers with restrictive lung disease on preoperative respiratory function testing, but did not have respiratory symptoms before sorafenib therapy. The clinical features of these three cases suggest that male gender, older age, smoking history, and lung disease are associated with acute sorafenib-induced AIP in patients with advanced HCC.

  14. Chemotherapy and target therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: New advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gan-Lu; Zeng, Shan; Shen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Primary liver cancer is one of the commonest causes of death. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for 90% of primary liver cancers. For patients with unresectable or metastatic HCC, conventional chemotherapy is of limited or no benefit. Sorafenib is the only systemic treatment to demonstrate a statistically significant but modest overall survival benefit, leading to an era of targeted agents. Many clinical trials of targeted drugs have been carried out with many more in progress. Some drugs like PTK787 showed potential benefits in the treatment of HCC. Despite these promising breakthroughs, patients with HCC still have a dismal prognosis. Recently, both a phase III trial of everolimus and a phase II clinical trial of trebananib failed to demonstrate effective antitumor activity in advanced HCC. Sorafenib still plays a pivotal role in advanced HCC, leading to further explorations to exert its maximum efficacy. Combinations targeted with chemotherapy or transarterial chemoembolization is now being tested and might bring about advances. New targeted agents such as mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors are under investigation, as well as further exploration of the mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:25914779

  15. Patterns of treatment and costs of intermediate and advanced hepatocellular carcinoma management in four Italian centers

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Giorgio Lorenzo; Cammà, Calogero; Attili, Adolfo Francesco; Ganga, Roberto; Gaeta, Giovanni Battista; Brancaccio, Giuseppina; Franzini, Jean Marie; Volpe, Marco; Turchetti, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a severe health condition associated with high hospitalizations and mortality rates, which also imposes a relevant economic burden. Purpose The aim of the present survey is to investigate treatment strategies and related costs for HCC in the intermediate and advanced stages of the disease. Patients and methods The survey was conducted in four Italian centers through structured interviews with physicians. Information regarding the stage of disease, treatments performed, and related health care resource consumption was included in the questionnaire. Direct health care cost per patient associated with the most relevant treatments such as sorafenib, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and transarterial radioembolization (TARE) was evaluated. Results Between 2013 and 2014, 285 patients with HCC were treated in the four participating centers; of these, 80 were in intermediate stage HCC (Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Classification [BCLC] B), and 57 were in the advanced stage of the disease (BCLC C). In intermediate stage HCC, the most frequent first-line treatment was TACE (63%) followed by sorafenib (15%), radiofrequency ablation (14%), and TARE (1.3%). In the advanced stage of HCC, the most frequently used first-line therapy was sorafenib (56%), followed by best supportive care (21%), TACE (18%), and TARE (3.5%). The total costs of treatment per patient amounted to €12,214.54 with sorafenib, €13,418.49 with TACE, and €26,106.08 with TARE. Both in the intermediate and in the advanced stage of the disease, variability in treatment patterns among centers was observed. Conclusion The present analysis raises for the first time the awareness of the overall costs incurred by the Italian National Healthcare System for different treatments used in intermediate and advanced HCC. Further investigations would be important to better understand the effective health care resource usage. PMID:26527877

  16. LYMPHOPENIA AS A PROGNOSTIC FACTOR FOR OVERALL SURVIVAL IN ADVANCED CARCINOMAS, SARCOMAS AND LYMPHOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Cropet, Claire; Van Glabbeke, Martine; Sebban, Catherine; Le Cesne, Axel; Judson, Ian; Tredan, Olivier; Verweij, Jaap; Biron, Pierre; Labidi, Inthidar; Guastalla, Jean-Paul; Bachelot, Thomas; Perol, David; Chabaud, Sylvie; Hogendoorn, Pancras C.W.; Cassier, Philippe; Dufresne, Armelle; Blay, Jean-Yves

    2009-01-01

    Lymphopenia is frequent in advanced cancers and predicts the toxicity of chemotherapy. Its impact on relapse and survival is uncertain. Its prognostic value for survival was analyzed in 3 databases of previously reported prospective multicenter studies: 1) FEC chemotherapy in metastatic breast carcinoma; 2) CYVADIC in advanced soft-tissue sarcoma (EORTC-STBSG 62791); 3) prospective, consecutive phase III studies of aggressive diffuse large-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas conducted at Bérard center between 1987 and 1993. Univariate and multivariate analyses of prognostic factors for survival were performed. The incidence of lymphopenia <1000/μL before treatment was constant among series: 25%, 24%, 27% respectively. Lymphopenia was significantly more frequent (p<0.05) in metastatic breast cancer patients with performance status (PS)>1, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients with international prognostic index (IPI)>0, and advanced soft-tissue sarcoma and metastatic breast cancer patients with bone metastases. In univariate analysis, lymphopenia <1000/μL significantly correlated to overall survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer (median 10 vs. 14 months, p <0.0001), advanced soft-tissue sarcoma (median 5 vs. 10 months, p <0.01), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (median 11 vs. 94 months, p <0.0001). In multivariate analysis (Cox model), lymphopenia was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in metastatic breast cancer (RR: 1.8; 95%CI 1.3–2.4) along with liver metastases and PS; in advanced soft-tissue sarcoma (RR: 1.46; 95%CI 1.0–2.1) along with liver metastases, lung metastases and PS; and in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (RR: 1.48; 95%CI 1.03–2.1) along with IPI. Our findings demonstrate that lymphopenia is an independent prognostic factor for overall and progression-free survival in several cancers. PMID:19549917

  17. Neuroendocrine pancreatic carcinoma after initial diagnosis of acute postpartal coeliac disease in a 37-year old woman - fatal coincidence or result of a neglected disease?

    PubMed

    Gundling, Felix; Nerlich, Andreas; Heitland, Wolf; Schepp, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    An acute presentation after pregnancy of coeliac disease (CD) in the puerperium is a rare condition which has been described mostly in primigravidae in patients highly suspicious of latent CD. We report the case of a 37-year-old woman who was referred to our Hospital because of refractory watery diarrhea and malnutrition syndrome. Endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract revealed the classic visual features of CD and in addition, some duodenal ulcers negative for Helicobacter pylori, which seems to be another clinical feature in patients with CD. The diagnosis of acute onset of fulminant postpartal CD (Marsh score stage 3c) was confirmed histologically. Remarkably, simultaneous well-differentiated neuroendocrine non-functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNET) was diagnosed on radiological abdominal imaging which was performed since serum gastrin was remarkably high, treated by distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. This report is, to our knowledge, the first description of the two entities, CD and PNET occurring together. Since results of antral histological studies showed diffuse hyperplasia of G-cells, probably in response to hypergastrinaemia, enterochromaffin cell carcinogenesis might have served as a possible link between both diseases.

  18. Minireview on laparoscopic hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan-Tam, Clara; Chung, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    The first laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed in the mid-1980s. Since then, laparoscopic surgery has continued to gain prominence in numerous fields, and has, in some fields, replaced open surgery as the preferred operative technique. The role of laparoscopy in staging cancer is controversial, with regards to gallbladder carcinoma, pancreatic carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastasis from colorectal carcinoma, laparoscopy in conjunction with intraoperative ultrasound has prevented nontherapeutic operations, and facilitated therapeutic operations. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the preferred option in the management of gallbladder disease. Meta-analyses comparing laparoscopic to open distal pancreatectomy show that laparoscopic pancreatectomy is safe and efficacious in the management of benign and malignant disease, and have better patient outcomes. A pancreaticoduodenectomy is a more complex operation and the laparoscopic technique is not feasible for this operation at this time. Robotic assisted pancreaticoduodenectomy has been tried with limited success at this time, but with continuing advancement in this field, this operation would eventually be feasible. Liver resection remains to be the best management for hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and colorectal liver metastases. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have shown that laparoscopic liver resections result in patients with equal or less blood loss and shorter hospital stays, as compared to open surgery. With improving equipment and technique, and the incorporation of robotic surgery, minimally invasive liver resection operative times will improve and be more efficacious. With the incorporation of robotic surgery into hepatobiliary surgery, donor hepatectomies have also been completed with success. The management of benign and malignant disease with minimally invasive hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery is safe and efficacious. PMID:24634709

  19. KiSS-1-mediated suppression of the invasive ability of human pancreatic carcinoma cells is not dependent on the level of KiSS-1 receptor GPR54

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHUN-HUI; QIAO, CHONG; WANG, RUO-CHEN; ZHOU, WEN-PING

    2016-01-01

    The onset of local invasion and lymphatic metastasis in pancreatic cancer limits survival following surgical intervention and additional therapies. Reduced expression of KiSS-1 in pancreatic cancer is associated with cancer metastasis. Previous studies have indicated that kisspeptin, the KiSS-1 peptide, is able to bind to its receptor-GPR54 (hOT7T175) and suppress the migration of PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells. Whether the metastatic suppression of KiSS-1 is dependent on the levels of GPR54 in pancreatic cancer cell lines remains unclear. Human BxPC-3 pancreatic carcinoma cells are highly differentiated without exhibiting metastasis, however PANC-1 pancreatic carcinoma cells are poorly differentiated and exhibit local and lymph node metastasis. Compared with primary cultured trophoblasts, BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cells were observed to express low levels of KiSS-1 mRNA and protein, measured using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. However, greater mRNA and protein expression levels of GPR54 were observed in PANC-1 cells compared with BxPc-3 cells. An MTT assay was used to investigate the effect of KiSS-1 on BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cell proliferation. There were no significant differences in proliferation following transfection with KiSS-1 in BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cells compared with the controls (P>0.05). A Transwell assay with chambers coated with Matrigel was used to evaluate the in vitro invasive ability of BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cells, with the invasion index of BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cells significantly reduced following 48 h of KiSS-1 overexpression (P<0.05). The mRNA and protein expression levels of KiSS-1 were significantly increased in BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cells 48 h subsequent to transfection with KiSS-1 (P<0.05), while GPR54 expression was not altered (P>0.05). KiSS-1 is a metastasis suppressor gene of pancreatic cancer, and this suppression is not dependent on the expression levels of GPR54. Therefore, KiSS-1 is

  20. ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN Report on the Assessment of Exocrine Pancreatic Function and Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher J; Chen, Kathy; Horvath, Karoly; Hughes, David; Lowe, Mark E; Mehta, Devendra; Orabi, Abrahim I; Screws, Jeremy; Thomson, Mike; Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Verkade, Henkjan J; Husain, Sohail Z; Wilschanski, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this clinical report is to discuss several recent advances in assessing exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) and pancreatitis in children, to review the array of pancreatic function tests, to provide an update on the inherited causes of EPI, with special emphasis on newly available genetic testing, and to review newer methods for evaluating pancreatitis.

  1. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  2. Having Your Cake and Eating It Too: Combining SBRT and Multi-agent Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Amar; Lee, Percy

    2016-01-01

    We read with great interest the results of the LAP07 study comparing capecitabine-based chemoradiation with gemcitabine-based therapy for non-progressive locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), following four months of gemcitabine-based therapy. The results, consistent with previous data, showed that standard chemoradiation improves local control (LC) but not overall survival. In this brief editorial, we emphasize that LC may still be very important in LAPC, as up to 30% of patients with LAPC may die from locally progressive disease. This is particularly likely to be true as systemic therapies continue to improve in efficacy. We very briefly review the data in support of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for LAPC, which has been shown to offer excellent LC with minimal late grade ≥ 2 toxicity rate in a recent multi-institutional phase II study. We underscore that  a short course of SBRT offers an expeditious alternative to a long course of chemoradiation, allowing the use of fully-intensive systemic therapy. PMID:27555984

  3. Having Your Cake and Eating It Too: Combining SBRT and Multi-agent Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Amar; Lee, Percy

    2016-01-01

    We read with great interest the results of the LAP07 study comparing capecitabine-based chemoradiation with gemcitabine-based therapy for non-progressive locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), following four months of gemcitabine-based therapy. The results, consistent with previous data, showed that standard chemoradiation improves local control (LC) but not overall survival. In this brief editorial, we emphasize that LC may still be very important in LAPC, as up to 30% of patients with LAPC may die from locally progressive disease. This is particularly likely to be true as systemic therapies continue to improve in efficacy. We very briefly review the data in support of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for LAPC, which has been shown to offer excellent LC with minimal late grade ≥ 2 toxicity rate in a recent multi-institutional phase II study. We underscore that  a short course of SBRT offers an expeditious alternative to a long course of chemoradiation, allowing the use of fully-intensive systemic therapy.

  4. Having Your Cake and Eating It Too: Combining SBRT and Multi-agent Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Percy

    2016-01-01

    We read with great interest the results of the LAP07 study comparing capecitabine-based chemoradiation with gemcitabine-based therapy for non-progressive locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), following four months of gemcitabine-based therapy. The results, consistent with previous data, showed that standard chemoradiation improves local control (LC) but not overall survival. In this brief editorial, we emphasize that LC may still be very important in LAPC, as up to 30% of patients with LAPC may die from locally progressive disease. This is particularly likely to be true as systemic therapies continue to improve in efficacy. We very briefly review the data in support of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for LAPC, which has been shown to offer excellent LC with minimal late grade ≥ 2 toxicity rate in a recent multi-institutional phase II study. We underscore that  a short course of SBRT offers an expeditious alternative to a long course of chemoradiation, allowing the use of fully-intensive systemic therapy.  PMID:27555984

  5. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  6. Pancreatic cancer: chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer in many cases appears in a non-curatively resectable stage when the diagnosis is made. Palliative treatment become an option in the patients with advanced stage. The present article reviewed chemotherapy and radiotherapy in various advanced stage of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22540056

  7. Identifying the optimal criteria of radiotherapeutic parameters for patients with unresectable locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Son, Seok Hyun; Jang, Hong Seok; Sung, Soo Yoon; Kang, Hye Jin; Lee, Sojung; Kay, Chul Seung

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the optimal criteria of the radiotherapeutic parameters in patients with unresectable locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). 103 patients were enrolled in this study. All patients received RT delivered using the TomoTherapy Hi-Art system between March 2006 and February 2012. We evaluated the planning target volume (PTV), total dose (Gy10), and NTNL-V(BED20) (non-target normal liver volume receiving more than a biologically effective dose of 20 Gy8) as significant radiotherapeutic parameters associated with hepatic function deterioration and local progression-free survival (PFS). A PTV of 279 cm3 or 304 cm3, a total dose of 60 Gy10, and a NTNL-V(BED20) of 40.8% were identified as the optimal cut-off values of radiotherapeutic parameters to prevent hepatic function deterioration and prolong local PFS. Based on these findings, patients were divided in a favorable and an unfavorable prognosis group. The differences in median local PFS, overall survival, and incidence of deteriorated hepatic function between the two groups were 11.2 months, 11.1 months, and 71.7%, respectively (p < 0.001 in each case). In conclusion, we suggest that the optimal criteria of the radiotherapeutic parameters for patients with unresectable locally advanced HCC are: PTV ≤ 279 cm3, total dose > 60 Gy10, and NTNL-V(BED20) ≤ 40.8%. PMID:26510905

  8. Nimotuzumab combined with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu-juan; Yang, Wen-juan; Qiu, Yan-fang; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Nimotuzumab is a blocking monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, little is known about the safety and preliminary efficacy of nimotuzumab combined with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced NPC patients. A total of 42 patients diagnosed between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Our results demonstrated 38 patients had a complete response (90.5%), 4 patients had a partial response (9.5%). And no patients had progressive disease at early treatment response evaluation, giving an ORR of 100%. The 2-year local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were 96.4%, 93.1% and 96.6% respectively. The most common adverse events were mucositis (19 patients), hematology toxicity (14 patients) with 6 and 3 cases of grade 3/4 toxicity respectively. Skin rash was not developed in our 43 patients. Thus, nimotuzumab combined with concurrent chemoradiotherapy showed encouraging outcomes in the treatment of locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma, without accumulation of toxicity and well-tolerated. PMID:27016412

  9. Predictive biomarkers of sorafenib efficacy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: Are we getting there?

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yu-Yun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Cheng, Ann-Lii

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib is the current standard treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but its efficacy is modest with low response rates and short response duration. Predictive biomarkers for sorafenib efficacy are necessary. However, efforts to determine biomarkers for sorafenib have led only to potential candidates rather than clinically useful predictors. Studies based on patient cohorts identified the potential of blood levels of angiopoietin-2, hepatocyte growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, and transforming growth factor-β1 for predicting sorafenib efficacy. Alpha-fetoprotein response, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and treatment-related side effects may serve as early surrogate markers. Novel approaches based on super-responders or experimental mouse models may provide new directions in biomarker research. These studies identified tumor amplification of FGF3/FGF4 or VEGFA and tumor expression of phospho-Mapk14 and phospho-Atf2 as possible predictive markers that await validation. A group effort that considers various prognostic factors and proper collection of tumor tissues before treatment is imperative for the success of future biomarker research in advanced HCC. PMID:26420960

  10. Safety and efficacy of sorafenib in patients with Child-Pugh B advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    DA FONSECA, LEONARDO GOMES; BARROSO-SOUSA, ROMUALDO; BENTO, AFONSO DA SILVA ALVES; BLANCO, BRUNA PACCOLA; VALENTE, GABRIEL LUIS; PFIFFER, TULIO EDUARDO FLESCH; HOFF, PAULO MARCELO; SABBAGA, JORGE

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib demonstrated a survival benefit in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in phase III trials. However, almost all the patients included in those trials exhibited well-preserved liver function (Child-Pugh A). The aim of this study was to describe our experience with sorafenib in Child-Pugh B HCC patients. A database of patients with advanced HCC treated with sorafenib was retrospectively evaluated. The median overall survival of Child-Pugh B patients (n=20) was 2.53 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.33–5.92 months] and of Child-Pugh A patients (n=100) 9.71 months (95% CI: 6.22–13.04). Child-Pugh B patients had a significantly poorer survival compared to Child-Pugh A patients (P=0.002). The toxicities were similar between the two groups. Metastasis, vascular invasion and α-fetoprotein level >1,030 ng/ml were not associated with survival among Child-Pugh B patients (P=0.281, 0.189 and 0.996, respectively). Although the survival outcomes were worse in Child-Pugh B patients treated with sorafenib, the toxicity profile was manageable. Therefore, there remains the question of whether to treat this subgroup of patients and more data are required to define the role of sorafenib in the context of liver dysfunction. PMID:26171182

  11. Predictive biomarkers of sorafenib efficacy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: Are we getting there?

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu-Yun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Cheng, Ann-Lii

    2015-09-28

    Sorafenib is the current standard treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but its efficacy is modest with low response rates and short response duration. Predictive biomarkers for sorafenib efficacy are necessary. However, efforts to determine biomarkers for sorafenib have led only to potential candidates rather than clinically useful predictors. Studies based on patient cohorts identified the potential of blood levels of angiopoietin-2, hepatocyte growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, and transforming growth factor-β1 for predicting sorafenib efficacy. Alpha-fetoprotein response, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and treatment-related side effects may serve as early surrogate markers. Novel approaches based on super-responders or experimental mouse models may provide new directions in biomarker research. These studies identified tumor amplification of FGF3/FGF4 or VEGFA and tumor expression of phospho-Mapk14 and phospho-Atf2 as possible predictive markers that await validation. A group effort that considers various prognostic factors and proper collection of tumor tissues before treatment is imperative for the success of future biomarker research in advanced HCC.

  12. Recent Advances in CT and MR Imaging for Evaluation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Min; Yoon, Jeong-Hee; Joo, Ijin; Woo, Hyun Sik

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Accurate diagnosis and assessment of disease extent are crucial for proper management of patients with HCC. Imaging plays a crucial role in early detection, accurate staging, and the planning of management strategies. A variety of imaging modalities are currently used in evaluating patients with suspected HCC; these include ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine, and angiography. Among these modalities, dynamic MRI and CT are regarded as the best imaging techniques available for the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC. Recent improvements in CT and MRI technology have made noninvasive and reliable diagnostic assessment of hepatocellular nodules possible in the cirrhotic liver, and biopsy is frequently not required prior to treatment. Until now, the major challenge for radiologists in imaging cirrhosis has been the characterization of small cirrhotic nodules smaller than 2 cm in diameter. Further technological advancement will undoubtedly have a major impact on liver tumor imaging. The increased speed of data acquisition in CT and MRI has allowed improvements in both spatial and temporal resolution, which have made possible a more precise evaluation of the hemodynamics of liver nodules. Furthermore, the development of new, tissue-specific contrast agents such as gadoxetic acid has improved HCC detection on MRI. In this review, we discuss the role of CT and MRI in the diagnosis and staging of HCC, recent technological advances, and the strengths and limitations of these imaging modalities. PMID:24159569

  13. Recent advances in renal cell carcinoma from a pathological point of view.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Shuji; Oya, Mototsugu; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Kosaka, Takeo; Ishida, Masaru; Kuroda, Naoto; Nagashima, Yoji; Katsube, Ken-Ichi; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the recent advances in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) from a pathological point of view. Because the genetic features and morphological characteristics have become major criteria for the classification of RCC, special techniques, such as immunohistochemistry, are essential to the differential diagnosis of renal tumors. Metastasis is frequently observed among the RCC patients with curative nephrectomy, and extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and heparanase, play a key role in invasion and metastasis of RCC. Snail and Slug, transcription factors of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), accelerate cancer cell invasion through downregulation of E-cadherin and up-regulation of MMP. Therapies targeted at the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway have become the standard treatment of metastatic RCC. Although they lead to tumor shrinkage mainly by inhibiting angiogenesis, they have typically been associated with drug resistance. The mechanism of the resistance remains largely unknown, but complex events including re-activation of angiogenesis, EMT and cancer stem cells, and immune escape are implicated in the refractory response to the therapy. Recent advances of the research on RCC have caused the changes of classification and therapy, and pathologists should take overall view of these as integrated pathology.

  14. Reconstruction With Modified Face Lift and Orbicularis Oculi V-Y Advancement Flap for Sebaceous Carcinoma on Temple Area.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeong Ho; Kim, Joo Hyun; Park, Seong Hoon; Ahn, Duk Kyun; Suh, In Suck; Jeong, Hii Sun

    2015-09-01

    Extraocular sebaceous carcinoma that occurs on sebaceous gland is a rare malignant cancer with unknown causes and nonspecific clinical characters, but with distinct pathology and immunohistochemical finding. In Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, there was a case that the result of preoperative punch biopsy was squamous cell carcinoma and malignant proliferating trichilemmal tumor, but that of postoperative permanent biopsy was sebaceous carcinoma. The type of tumor, differentiation, location, and aesthetic results are considered to get both recurrence-safe and aesthetically pleasing result. Various flaps were considered, and modified face-lift flap, forehead rotation flap, orbicularis oculi V-Y advancement flap were planned. There were no sign of recurrence of cancer or functional and aesthetical deformities 6 months after the surgery. PMID:26267581

  15. Rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Clinical results in 178 advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.D.; Demange, L.; Froissart, D.; Panis, X.; Loirette, M.

    1985-07-01

    The authors present a series of 178 patients with Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated by rapid irradiation using multiple and small fractions per day. An initial group of 91 patients (G1) received a total dose of 72 Gy in 80 sessions and 10 days, according to the following split course schedule: J1 to J5, 36 Gy in 40 sessions, eight daily fractions of .9 Gy separated by 2 hours; J6 to J20, rest period; J21 to J25, same as in J1 except that the spinal cord was shielded. This protocol was altered for the following 87 patients (G2) by lessening the total dose to 60 to 66 Gy and the number of fractions to 60. The rest period was lengthened to 4 weeks. All patients but five completed the whole program and the minimal follow-up period was 24 months. At the end of irradiation, 121 patients achieved a total remission, but local recurrences occurred in 56%. Moreover, acute intolerance was considered as severe in 34% of G1 patients, and included extensive mucosal necrosis and bleeding. Although this rate was significantly reduced in G2 patients, late complications were observed in 20 of the 25 survivors, and included trismus, cervical sclerosis, and recurrent laryngeal edema. The crude survival rate is 13% at 2 years. Although this study was not randomized, this particular type of accelerated and hyperfractionated combination of irradiation did not really improve the clinical results in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck. Other schedules and probably other tumors, less extended, should be tested.

  16. Hereditary pancreatitis and secondary screening for early pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Vitone, L J; Greenhalf, W; Howes, N R; Neoptolemos, J P

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance (80%), accounting for approximately 1% of all cases of pancreatitis. It is characterized by the onset of recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis in childhood and frequent progression to chronic pancreatitis. Whitcomb et al. identified the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1) on chromosome 7q35 as the site of the mutation that causes hereditary pancreatitis. The European registry of hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer (EUROPAC) aims to identify and make provisions for those affected by hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer. The most common mutations in hereditary pancreatitis are R122H, N29I and A16V but many families have been described with clinically defined hereditary pancreatitis where there is no PRSS1 mutation. It is known that the cumulative lifetime risk (to age 70 years) of pancreatic cancer is 40% in individuals with hereditary pancreatitis. This subset of individuals form an ideal group for the development of a screening programme aimed at detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage in an attempt to improve the presently poor long-term survival. Current screening strategies involve multimodality imaging (computed tomography, endoluminal ultrasound) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for pancreatic juice collection followed by molecular analysis of the DNA extracted from the juice. The potential benefit of screening (curative resection) must be balanced against the associated morbidity and mortality of surgery. Philosophically, the individual's best interest must be sought in light of the latest advances in medicine and science following discussions with a multidisciplinary team in specialist pancreatic centres.

  17. Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Inferior Vena Cava and Right Atrial Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, M. C. Chuang, V. P. Cheng, T. Lin, Z. H. Lin, Y. M.

    2008-07-15

    Advanced hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) with invasion of venous systems usually indicates not only a poor prognosis but also a contraindication for transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). This study evaluated the feasibility of TACE for advanced HCC with inferior vena cava (IVC) and right atrium (RA) tumors and, also, to search for the ideal embolization particle size. Twenty-six patients who had HCC invasion into the IVC included five patients with coexistent RA tumors that were treated with TACE. The chemoembolization method was cisplatin, doxorubicin, and mitomycin C mixed with Lipiodol and Ivalon. The selection of Ivalon particles was divided into two groups based on their size: (A) >180 {mu}m, N = 9; and (B) 47-180 {mu}m, N = 17. The overall response rate was 53.8% (14/26). Based on the response to TACE, the median survival period of the entire group was 4.2 months (range, 1.5 to 76.7 months). The median survival period of the 14 responders was 13.5 months (1.5-76.7 months), and that of the 12 nonresponders, 3.3 months (2.1 to 24.3 months) (p < 0.002). Comparing the two Ivalon particle sizes, the response rate was 12.5% (1/9 patients) for group A and 76.5% for group B (13/17 patients) (p < 0.02). No serious complication was observed post-chemoembolization. In conclusion, TACE is a safe and effective treatment for advanced HCC with IVC and RA tumors, and small Ivalon particles (47-180 {mu}m) are superior to large ones (>180 {mu}m).

  18. A double-blind placebo-controlled, randomised study comparing gemcitabine and marimastat with gemcitabine and placebo as first line therapy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bramhall, S R; Schulz, J; Nemunaitis, J; Brown, P D; Baillet, M; Buckels, J A C

    2002-07-15

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in the western world and the prognosis for unresectable disease remains poor. Recent advances in conventional chemotherapy and the development of novel 'molecular' treatment strategies with different toxicity profiles warrant investigation as combination treatment strategies. This randomised study in pancreatic cancer compares marimastat (orally administered matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor) in combination with gemcitabine to gemcitabine alone. Two hundred and thirty-nine patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer were randomised to receive gemcitabine (1000 mg m(-2)) in combination with either marimastat or placebo. The primary end-point was survival. Objective tumour response and duration of response, time to treatment failure and disease progression, quality of life and safety were also assessed. There was no significant difference in survival between gemcitabine and marimastat and gemcitabine and placebo (P=0.95 log-rank test). Median survival times were 165.5 and 164 days and 1-year survival was 18% and 17% respectively. There were no significant differences in overall response rates (11 and 16% respectively), progression-free survival (P=0.68 log-rank test) or time to treatment failure (P=0.70 log-rank test) between the treatment arms. The gemcitabine and marimastat combination was well tolerated with only 2.5% of patients withdrawn due to presumed marimastat toxicity. Grade 3 or 4 musculoskeletal toxicities were reported in only 4% of the marimastat treated patients, although 59% of marimastat treated patients reported some musculoskeletal events. The results of this study provide no evidence to support a combination of marimastat with gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The combination of marimastat with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Further studies of marimastat as a maintenance treatment following a response or stable disease on gemcitabine may be justified. PMID

  19. Targeting CXCL12 from FAP-expressing carcinoma-associated fibroblasts synergizes with anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Feig, Christine; Jones, James O; Kraman, Matthew; Wells, Richard J B; Deonarine, Andrew; Chan, Derek S; Connell, Claire M; Roberts, Edward W; Zhao, Qi; Caballero, Otavia L; Teichmann, Sarah A; Janowitz, Tobias; Jodrell, Duncan I; Tuveson, David A; Fearon, Douglas T

    2013-12-10

    An autochthonous model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) permitted the analysis of why immunotherapy is ineffective in this human disease. Despite finding that PDA-bearing mice had cancer cell-specific CD8(+) T cells, the mice, like human patients with PDA, did not respond to two immunological checkpoint antagonists that promote the function of T cells: anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (α-CTLA-4) and α-programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (α-PD-L1). Immune control of PDA growth was achieved, however, by depleting carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) that express fibroblast activation protein (FAP). The depletion of the FAP(+) stromal cell also uncovered the antitumor effects of α-CTLA-4 and α-PD-L1, indicating that its immune suppressive activity accounts for the failure of these T-cell checkpoint antagonists. Three findings suggested that chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12) explained the overriding immunosuppression by the FAP(+) cell: T cells were absent from regions of the tumor containing cancer cells, cancer cells were coated with the chemokine, CXCL12, and the FAP(+) CAF was the principal source of CXCL12 in the tumor. Administering AMD3100, a CXCL12 receptor chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 inhibitor, induced rapid T-cell accumulation among cancer cells and acted synergistically with α-PD-L1 to greatly diminish cancer cells, which were identified by their loss of heterozygosity of Trp53 gene. The residual tumor was composed only of premalignant epithelial cells and inflammatory cells. Thus, a single protein, CXCL12, from a single stromal cell type, the FAP(+) CAF, may direct tumor immune evasion in a model of human PDA.

  20. Feasibility of Electromagnetic Transponder Use to Monitor Inter- and Intrafractional Motion in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Kassaee, Alireza; Mitra, Nandita; Vapiwala, Neha; Plastaras, John P.; Drebin, Jeff; Wan, Fei; Metz, James M.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of electromagnetic transponder implantation in patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Secondarily, the use of transponders to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, and the efficacy of breath holding for limiting target motion, were examined. Methods and Materials: During routine screening laparoscopy, 5 patients without metastatic disease were implanted with transponders peri-tumorally. The Calypso System's localization and tracking modes were used to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, respectively. Intrafractional motion, with and without breath holding, was also examined using Calypso tracking mode. Results: Transponder implantation was well tolerated in all patients, with minimal migration, aside from 1 patient who expulsed a single transponder. Interfractional motion based on mean shifts from setup using tattoos/orthogonal imaging to transponder based localization from 164 treatments was significant in all dimensions. Mean shift (in millimeters), followed by the standard deviation and p value, were as follows: X-axis: 4.5 mm (1.0, p = 0.01); Y axis: 6.4 mm (1.9, p = 0.03); and Z-axis 3.9 mm (0.6, p = 0.002). Mean intrafractional motion was also found to be significant in all directions: superior, 7.2 mm (0.9, p = 0.01); inferior, 11.9 mm (0.9, p < 0.01); anterior: 4.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.01); posterior, 2.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.02); left, 2.2 mm (0.4, p = 0.02); and right, 3.1 mm (0.6, p = 0.04). Breath holding during treatment significantly decreased tumor motion in all directions. Conclusions: Electromagnetic transponder implantation appears to be safe and effective for monitoring inter- and intrafractional motion. Based on these results a larger clinical trial is underway.

  1. The Association Between Chemoradiation-related Lymphopenia and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Aaron T.; Ye, Xiaobu; Ellsworth, Susannah G.; Smith, Jessica A.; Narang, Amol K.; Garg, Tanu; Campian, Jian; Laheru, Daniel A.; Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Grossman, Stuart A.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Lymphopenia is a common consequence of chemoradiation therapy yet is seldom addressed clinically. This study was conducted to determine if patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with definitive chemoradiation develop significant lymphopenia and if this affects clinical outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis of patients with LAPC treated with chemoradiation at a single institution from 1997 to 2011 was performed. Total lymphocyte counts (TLCs) were recorded at baseline and then monthly during and after chemoradiation. The correlation between treatment-induced lymphopenia, established prognostic factors, and overall survival was analyzed using univariate Cox regression analysis. Important factors identified by univariate analysis were selected as covariates to construct a multivariate proportional hazards model for survival. Results A total of 101 patients met eligibility criteria. TLCs were normal in 86% before chemoradiation. The mean reduction in TLC per patient was 50.6% (SD, 40.6%) 2 months after starting chemoradiation (P< 0.00001), and 46% had TLC< 500 cells/mm3. Patients with TLC < 500 cells/mm3 2 months after starting chemoradiation had inferior median survival (8.7 vs. 13.3mo, P= 0.03) and PFS (4.9 vs. 9.0mo, P = 0.15). Multivariate analysis revealed TLC< 500 cells/mm3 to be an independent predictor of inferior survival (HR= 2.879, P= 0.001) along with baseline serum albumin (HR= 3.584, P = 0.0002), BUN (HR = 1.060, P= 0.02), platelet count (HR= 1.004, P = 0.005), and radiation planning target volume (HR= 1.003, P= 0.0006). Conclusions Severe treatment-related lymphopenia occurs frequently after chemoradiation for LAPC and is an independent predictor of inferior survival. PMID:23648440

  2. Multicriteria Optimization in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Locally Advanced Cancer of the Pancreatic Head

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S. Craft, David L.; Carlsson, Fredrik; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) affords the potential to decrease radiation therapy-associated toxicity by creating highly conformal dose distributions. However, the inverse planning process can create a suboptimal plan despite meeting all constraints. Multicriteria optimization (MCO) may reduce the time-consuming iteration loop necessary to develop a satisfactory plan while providing information regarding trade-offs between different treatment planning goals. In this exploratory study, we examine the feasibility and utility of MCO in physician plan selection in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods and Materials: The first 10 consecutive patients with LAPC treated with IMRT were evaluated. A database of plans (Pareto surface) was created that met the inverse planning goals. The physician then navigated to an 'optimal' plan from the point on the Pareto surface at which kidney dose was minimized. Results: Pareto surfaces were created for all 10 patients. A physician was able to select a plan from the Pareto surface within 10 minutes for all cases. Compared with the original (treated) IMRT plans, the plan selected from the Pareto surface had a lower stomach mean dose in 9 of 10 patients, although often at the expense of higher kidney dose than with the treated plan. Conclusion: The MCO is feasible in patients with LAPC and allows the physician to choose a satisfactory plan quickly. Generally, when given the opportunity, the physician will choose a plan with a lower stomach dose. The MCO enables a physician to provide greater active clinical input into the IMRT planning process.

  3. Randomised, open-label, phase II study of gemcitabine with and without IMM-101 for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalgleish, Angus G; Stebbing, Justin; Adamson, Douglas JA; Arif, Seema Safia; Bidoli, Paolo; Chang, David; Cheeseman, Sue; Diaz-Beveridge, Robert; Fernandez-Martos, Carlos; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Granetto, Cristina; Massuti, Bartomeu; McAdam, Karen; McDermott, Raymond; Martín, Andrés J Muñoz; Papamichael, Demetris; Pazo-Cid, Roberto; Vieitez, Jose M; Zaniboni, Alberto; Carroll, Kevin J; Wagle, Shama; Gaya, Andrew; Mudan, Satvinder S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Immune Modulation and Gemcitabine Evaluation-1, a randomised, open-label, phase II, first-line, proof of concept study (NCT01303172), explored safety and tolerability of IMM-101 (heat-killed Mycobacterium obuense; NCTC 13365) with gemcitabine (GEM) in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Methods: Patients were randomised (2 : 1) to IMM-101 (10 mg ml−l intradermally)+GEM (1000 mg m−2 intravenously; n=75), or GEM alone (n=35). Safety was assessed on frequency and incidence of adverse events (AEs). Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall response rate (ORR) were collected. Results: IMM-101 was well tolerated with a similar rate of AE and serious adverse event reporting in both groups after allowance for exposure. Median OS in the intent-to-treat population was 6.7 months for IMM-101+GEM v 5.6 months for GEM; while not significant, the hazard ratio (HR) numerically favoured IMM-101+GEM (HR, 0.68 (95% CI, 0.44–1.04, P=0.074). In a pre-defined metastatic subgroup (84%), OS was significantly improved from 4.4 to 7.0 months in favour of IMM-101+GEM (HR, 0.54, 95% CI 0.33–0.87, P=0.01). Conclusions: IMM-101 with GEM was as safe and well tolerated as GEM alone, and there was a suggestion of a beneficial effect on survival in patients with metastatic disease. This warrants further evaluation in an adequately powered confirmatory study. PMID:27599039

  4. Prognostic Factors for Survival and Resection in Patients With Initial Nonresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerregaard, Jon K.; Mortensen, Michael B.; Jensen, Helle A.; Nielsen, Morten; Pfeiffer, Per

    2012-07-01

    Background and Purpose: Controversies regarding the optimal therapy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) exist. Although the prognosis as a whole remains dismal, subgroups are known to benefit from intensive therapy, including chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We describe the results in 178 patients treated from 2001 to 2010 and have developed a prognostic model for both survival and the possibility of a subsequent resection in these patients. Methods and Materials: From 2001 until 2010, 178 consecutive patients with LAPC were treated and included in the present study, with CRT consisting of 50 Gy in 27 fractions combined with tegafur-uracil(UFT)/folinic acid(FA). Results: The median survival from diagnosis was 11.5 months. Adverse events of Grade 3 or above were seen in 36% of the patients. Ninety-three percent of the patients completed all fractions. A Cox regression model for survival demonstrated resection (hazard ratio [HR] 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1-0.3) and pre-CRT gemcitabine-based therapy (HR 0.57; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) as being associated with a favorable outcome, increasing gross tumor volume (HR 1.14; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3) was associated with shorter survival. A logistic regression model showed Stage III disease (odds ratio [OR] 0.16; 95% CI, 0.0-1.1) and abnormal hemoglobin (OR 0.26; 95% CI, 0.0-1.2) as being associated with lower odds of resection. Conclusion: This study confirms the favorable prognosis for patients receiving gemcitabine therapy before CRT and the poor prognosis associated with increasing tumor volume. In addition, CRT in patients with abnormal hemoglobin and Stage III disease rarely induced tumor shrinkage allowing subsequent resection.

  5. Long-Term Results of Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced N2-3 Stage Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Chen, Meng; Wu, Jing; Xu, Jian-Hua; Qian, Pu-Dong; Guo, Wen-Jie; Jiang, Xue-Song; Zhu, Huan-Feng; Gu, Jia-Jia; Wu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Ye-wei; He, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Background N-stage is related to distant metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of different nedaplatin-based chemotherapy regimens in advanced N2-3 stage NPC patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patients and Methods Between April 2005 and December 2009, a total of 128 patients with N2-3 advanced NPC were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were treated with IMRT concurrent with 2 cycles of chemotherapy consisting of either nedaplatin plus paclitaxel (NP group, n = 67) or nedaplatin plus fluorouracil and paclitaxel (NFP group, n = 61). Two to four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy were then administered every 21 days following concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Results With a median follow-up of 60 months, the 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local-regional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) for all patients were 81.4%, 71.5%, 87.8% and 82.0%, respectively. No significant difference in PFS (66.6% vs. 76.7%, P = 0.212) and LRRFS rates (89.0% vs. 86.3%, P = 0.664) was observed between the NP and NFP groups. The 5-year OS (75.4% vs. 88.5%, P = 0.046) and DMFS (75.1% vs. 89.0%, P = 0.042) rate were superior in the NFP group compared with the NP group. The NFP group had a higher incidence of grade 3–4 acute toxicities including bone marrow suppression (leukopenia: χ2 = 3.935, P = 0.047; anemia: χ2 = 9.760, P = 0.002; thrombocytopenia: χ2 = 8.821, P = 0.003), and both liver and renal dysfunction (χ2 = 5.206, P = 0.023) compared with the NP group. Late toxicities were moderate and no difference was observed between the two groups. Conclusion IMRT concurrent with nedaplatin-based chemotherapy is an advocated regimen for patients with advanced N2-3 stage NPC. Patients with advanced N2-3 stage may be better candidates for the NFP regimen although this regimen was associated with a high acute

  6. Recent Advances in the Imaging Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Value of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DPTA), or gadoxetic acid for short, is a hepatocyte-specific contrast agent which is now increasingly used for the detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions, particularly in patients at high-risk of developing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In fact, several recent guidelines now recognize gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI (Gd-EOB-MRI) as the primary diagnostic imaging modality for the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, although it must be noted that several major guidelines still include only extracellular contrast media-enhanced computed tomography and MRI. The primary merits of Gd-EOB-MRI lie in the fact that it can provide not only dynamic imaging, but also hepatobiliary phase (HBP) imaging which can lead to high lesion-to-liver contrast and give additional information regarding hepatocyte uptake via organic anion transporting polypeptides. This, in turn, allows higher sensitivity in detecting small HCCs and helps provide additional information regarding the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis. Indeed, many recent studies have investigated the diagnostic value of Gd-EOB-MRI for early HCCs as well as its role as a potential imaging biomarker in predicting outcome. We herein review the recent advances in the imaging diagnosis of HCCs focusing on the applications of Gd-EOB-MRI and the challenging issues that remain. PMID:26989660

  7. Neurological Adverse Effects in Patients of Advanced Colorectal Carcinoma Treated with Different Schedules of FOLFOX

    PubMed Central

    Najam, Rahila; Mateen, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The study is designed to assess the frequency and severity of few dose limiting neurological adverse effects of four different schedules of FOLFOX. Patients with histologically confirmed advanced colorectal carcinoma (CRC) were included in the study. Toxicity was graded according to CTC v 2.0. The frequency of grade 3 and 4 adverse effects was comparatively assessed in each treatment arm. The difference in the pattern of toxicity between the treatment schedule was evaluated. The most frequent adverse symptom of neurological adverse effect was grade 1 paresthesia in the patients treated with FOLFOX4 schedule. Grade 4 peripheral neuropathy was reported in few patients of FOLFOX7 treatment arm. Frequency and onset of neurological adverse effects like paresthesia, dizziness, and hypoesthesia were significantly different (P < 0.05), whereas frequency and onset of peripheral neuropathy were highly significant (P < 0.01) in each treatment arm of FOLFOX. Peripheral neuropathy was associated with electrolyte imbalance and diabetes in few patients. Frequency of symptoms, for example, paresthesia, is associated with increased number of recurrent exposure to oxaliplatin (increased number of cycles) even at low doses (85 mg/m2), whereas severity of symptoms, for example, peripheral neuropathy, is associated with higher dose (130 mg/m2) after few treatment cycles. PMID:24187619

  8. Neurological Adverse Effects in Patients of Advanced Colorectal Carcinoma Treated with Different Schedules of FOLFOX.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Mateen, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The study is designed to assess the frequency and severity of few dose limiting neurological adverse effects of four different schedules of FOLFOX. Patients with histologically confirmed advanced colorectal carcinoma (CRC) were included in the study. Toxicity was graded according to CTC v 2.0. The frequency of grade 3 and 4 adverse effects was comparatively assessed in each treatment arm. The difference in the pattern of toxicity between the treatment schedule was evaluated. The most frequent adverse symptom of neurological adverse effect was grade 1 paresthesia in the patients treated with FOLFOX4 schedule. Grade 4 peripheral neuropathy was reported in few patients of FOLFOX7 treatment arm. Frequency and onset of neurological adverse effects like paresthesia, dizziness, and hypoesthesia were significantly different (P < 0.05), whereas frequency and onset of peripheral neuropathy were highly significant (P < 0.01) in each treatment arm of FOLFOX. Peripheral neuropathy was associated with electrolyte imbalance and diabetes in few patients. Frequency of symptoms, for example, paresthesia, is associated with increased number of recurrent exposure to oxaliplatin (increased number of cycles) even at low doses (85 mg/m(2)), whereas severity of symptoms, for example, peripheral neuropathy, is associated with higher dose (130 mg/m(2)) after few treatment cycles.

  9. [Plasma Biomarkers as Predictive Factors for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Sorafenib].

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Kazue; Watanabe, Manabu; Ikehara, Takashi; Matsukiyo, Yasushi; Kogame, Michio; Shinohara, Mie; Kikuchi, Yoshinori; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Sumino, Yasukiyo

    2016-07-01

    We examined plasma biomarkers as predictive factors for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma(ad-HCC)patients treated with sorafenib. We analyzed a-fetoprotein(AFP), AFP-L3, des-g-carboxy prothrombin(DCP), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio(NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio(PLR), and vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF)before sorafenib therapy, and changes in AFP-L3, NLR, PLR, and VEGF 1 month after sorafenib therapy in 16 patients. High AFP-L3(hazard ratio: 1.058, 95%CI: 1.019-1.098, p=0.003)and high NLR(hazard ratio: 1.475, 95%CI: 1.045-2.082, p=0.027)were significantly associated with poor prognosis in ad-HCC patients treated with sorafenib. There were no significant differences in changes in AFP-L3, NLR, PLR, and VEGF 1 month after sorafenib therapy. We suggest that AFP-L3 and NLR levels before sorafenib therapy in patients with ad-HCC are an important predictive factor for the therapeutic effect of sorafenib and patient survival. PMID:27431630

  10. Non-coding RNAs deregulation in oral squamous cell carcinoma: advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Yu, T; Li, C; Wang, Z; Liu, K; Xu, C; Yang, Q; Tang, Y; Wu, Y

    2016-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a common cause of cancer death. Despite decades of improvements in exploring new treatments and considerable advance in multimodality treatment, satisfactory curative rates have not yet been reached. The difficulty of early diagnosis and the high prevalence of metastasis associated with OSCC contribute to its dismal prognosis. In the last few decades the emerging data from both tumor biology and clinical trials led to growing interest in the research for predictive biomarkers. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are promising biomarkers. Among numerous kinds of ncRNAs, short ncRNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), have been extensively investigated with regard to their biogenesis, function, and importance in carcinogenesis. In contrast to miRNAs, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are much less known concerning their functions in human cancers especially in OSCC. The present review highlighted the roles of miRNAs and newly discovered lncRNAs in oral tumorigenesis, metastasis, and their clinical implication.

  11. Pazopanib: a multikinase inhibitor with activity in advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2010-05-01

    Treatment options for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have changed dramatically, and a new paradigm has evolved. IFN-alpha and IL-2 were previously mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the USA for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three of these new agents are multitargeted kinase inhibitors, including sunitinib, sorafenib, and recently pazopanib, two target the mTOR (temsirolimus and everolimus), and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with IFN-alpha) that targets VEGF. Sunitinib has emerged as the standard of care for treatment-naive RCC patients, with the recently approved bevacizumab and IFN-alpha combination providing an additional option for this population. The recent approval of pazopanib, based on the results from sequential Phase II and III clinical trials demonstrating improved overall response rates and progression-free survival, provides yet another option for front-line therapy. The current article examines the pazopanib preclinical and clinical data, provides an overview of the development of this tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and provides some speculation concerning its role in RCC therapy.

  12. Advanced imaging techniques in the therapeutic response of transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ke; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Lin; Xu, Hao; Peng, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic liver disease. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) can significantly improve the survival rate of patients with HCC and is the first treatment choice for patients who are not suitable for surgical resections. The evaluation of the response to TACE treatment affects not only the assessment of the therapy efficacy but also the development of the next step in the treatment plan. The use of imaging to examine changes in tumor volume to assess the response of solid tumors to treatment has been controversial. In recent years, the emergence of new imaging technology has made it possible to observe the response of tumors to treatment prior to any morphological changes. In this article, the advances in studies reporting the use of computed tomography perfusion imaging, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intravoxel incoherent motion, diffusion kurtosis imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted imaging, blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and PET/MRI to assess the TACE treatment response are reviewed. PMID:27239110

  13. A phase I clinical trial of thymidine kinase-based gene therapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sangro, B; Mazzolini, G; Ruiz, M; Ruiz, J; Quiroga, J; Herrero, I; Qian, C; Benito, A; Larrache, J; Olagüe, C; Boan, J; Peñuelas, I; Sádaba, B; Prieto, J

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this phase I clinical trial was to assess the feasibility and safety of intratumoral administration of a first-generation adenoviral vector encoding herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene (Ad.TK) followed by systemic ganciclovir to patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Secondarily, we have analyzed its antitumor effect. Ten patients were enrolled in five dose-level cohorts that received from 10¹⁰ to 2 × 10¹² viral particles (vp). Ad.TK was injected intratumorally and patients received up to three doses at 30-day intervals. Positron emission tomography was used to monitor TK gene expression. Ad.TK injection was feasible in 100% of cases. Treatment was well tolerated and dose-limiting toxicity was not achieved. Cumulative toxicity was not observed. Hepatic toxicity was absent even in cirrhotic patients. Fever, flu-like syndrome, pain at the injection site and pancytopenia were the most common side effects. No partial responses were observed and 60% of patients showed tumor stabilization of the injected lesion. Importantly, two patients who received the highest dose showed signs of intratumoral necrosis by imaging procedures. One of them achieved a sustained stabilization and survived for 26 months. In conclusion, Ad.TK can be safely administered by intratumoral injection to patients with HCC up to 2 × 10¹² vp per patient. PMID:20689572

  14. Recent Advances in the Imaging Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Value of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DPTA), or gadoxetic acid for short, is a hepatocyte-specific contrast agent which is now increasingly used for the detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions, particularly in patients at high-risk of developing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In fact, several recent guidelines now recognize gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI (Gd-EOB-MRI) as the primary diagnostic imaging modality for the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, although it must be noted that several major guidelines still include only extracellular contrast media-enhanced computed tomography and MRI. The primary merits of Gd-EOB-MRI lie in the fact that it can provide not only dynamic imaging, but also hepatobiliary phase (HBP) imaging which can lead to high lesion-to-liver contrast and give additional information regarding hepatocyte uptake via organic anion transporting polypeptides. This, in turn, allows higher sensitivity in detecting small HCCs and helps provide additional information regarding the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis. Indeed, many recent studies have investigated the diagnostic value of Gd-EOB-MRI for early HCCs as well as its role as a potential imaging biomarker in predicting outcome. We herein review the recent advances in the imaging diagnosis of HCCs focusing on the applications of Gd-EOB-MRI and the challenging issues that remain. PMID:26989660

  15. Combined-modality treatment for advanced oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, K.-H.; Lin, C.-Y. |; Kang, C.-J.; Huang, S.-F.; Chen, I.-H.; Liao, C.-T. |; Wang, H.-M. |; Cheng, A.-J. |; Chang, J.T.-C. ||. E-mail: jtchang@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate prognostic factors in advanced-stage oral tongue cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant therapy and to identify indications for adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 201 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue managed between January 1995 and November 2002. All had undergone wide excision and neck dissection plus adjuvant radiotherapy or CCRT. Based on postoperative staging, 123 (61.2%) patients had Stage IV and 78 (38.8%) had Stage III disease. All patients were followed for at least 18 months after completion of radiotherapy or until death. The median follow-up was 40.4 months for surviving patients. The median dose of radiotherapy was 64.8 Gy (range, 58.8-72.8 Gy). Cisplatin-based regimens were used for chemotherapy. Results: The 3-year overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates were 48% and 50.8%, respectively. Stage, multiple nodal metastases, differentiation, and extracapsular spread (ECS) significantly affected disease-specific survival on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, multiple nodal metastases, differentiation, ECS, and CCRT were independent prognostic factors. If ECS was present, only CCRT significantly improved survival (3-year RFS with ECS and with CCRT = 48.2% vs. without CCRT = 15%, p = 0.038). In the presence of other poor prognostic factors, results of the two treatment strategies did not significantly differ. Conclusions: Based on this study, ECS appears to be an absolute indication for adjuvant CCRT. CCRT can not be shown to be statistically better than radiotherapy alone in this retrospective series when ECS is not present.

  16. Efficacy, Safety, and Biomarkers of Single-Agent Bevacizumab Therapy in Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Malka, David; Bourredjem, Abderrahmane; Dromain, Clarisse; Baey, Charlotte; Jacques, Nathalie; Pignon, Jean-Pierre; Vimond, Nadege; Bouvet-Forteau, Nathalie; De Baere, Thierry; Ducreux, Michel; Farace, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly vascularized tumor in which neoangiogenesis contributes to growth and metastasis. We assessed the safety, efficacy, and potential biomarkers of activity of bevacizumab in patients with advanced HCC. Methods. In this phase II trial, eligible patients received bevacizumab, 5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks. The disease-control rate at 16 weeks (16W-DCR) was the primary endpoint. Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and plasma cytokines and angiogenic factors (CAFs) were measured at baseline and throughout treatment. Results. The 16W-DCR was 42% (95% confidence interval, 27%–57%). Six of the 43 patients who received bevacizumab achieved a partial response (objective response rate [ORR], 14%). Grade 3–4 asthenia, hemorrhage, and aminotransferase elevation occurred in five (12%), three (7%), and three (7%) patients, respectively. During treatment, placental growth factor markedly increased, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A dramatically decreased (p < .0001); soluble VEGF receptor-2 (p < .0001) and CECs (p = .03) transiently increased on day 3. High and increased CEC counts at day 15 were associated with the ORR (p = .04) and the 16W-DCR (p = .02), respectively. Lower interleukin (IL)-8 levels at baseline (p = .01) and throughout treatment (p ≤ .04) were associated with the 16W-DCR. High baseline IL-8 and IL-6 levels predicted shorter progression-free and overall survival times (p ≤ .04). Conclusion. Bevacizumab is active and well tolerated in patients with advanced HCC. The clinical value of CECs, IL-6, and IL-8 warrants further investigation. PMID:22707516

  17. Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and sorafenib: Diagnosis, indications, clinical and radiological follow-up.

    PubMed

    Colagrande, Stefano; Regini, Francesco; Taliani, Gian Giacomo; Nardi, Cosimo; Inghilesi, Andrea Lorenzo

    2015-05-18

    Advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a category of disease defined by radiological, clinical and hepatic function parameters, comprehending a wide range of patients with different general conditions. The main therapeutic option is represented by sorafenib treatment, a multi-kinase inhibitor with anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effect. Trans-arterial Radio Embolization also represents a promising new approach to intermediate/advanced HCC. Post-marketing clinical studies showed that only a portion of patients actually benefits from sorafenib treatment, and an even smaller percentage of patients treated shows partial/complete response on follow-up examinations, up against relevant costs and an incidence of drug related adverse effects. Although the treatment with sorafenib has shown a significant increase in mean overall survival in different studies, only a part of patients actually shows real benefits, while the incidence of drug related significant adverse effects and the economic costs are relatively high. Moreover, only a small percentage of patients also shows a response in terms of lesion dimensions reduction. Being able to properly differentiate patients who are responding to the therapy from non-responders as early as possible is then still difficult and could be a pivotal challenge for the future; in fact it could spare several patients a therapy often difficult to bear, directing them to other second line treatments (many of which are at the moment still under investigation). For this reason, some supplemental criteria to be added to the standard modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors evaluation are being searched for. In particular, finding some parameters (cellular density, perfusion grade and enhancement rate) able to predict the sensitivity of the lesions to anti-angiogenic agents could help in stratifying patients in terms of treatment responsiveness before the beginning of the therapy itself, or in the first weeks of

  18. Lack of prognostic relevance of Her-2/neu, topoisomerase IIα and EGFR in advanced ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ENGELSTAEDTER, VERENA; BODA, JUDITH; VÖLKLEIN, CHRISTINE; ENGEL, JUTTA; JESCHKE, UDO; KIRCHNER, THOMAS; MAYR, DORIS

    2012-01-01

    Patients with advanced ovarian cancer (FIGO stage III) have a poor clinical prognosis. However, these patients show distinct differences in their survival time, possibly due to differing responses to chemotherapy and differing tumor biology. In contrast to histological subtype, grading and staging, which are known to affect a patient’s prognosis, the impact of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her-2/neu), topoisomerase IIα and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on survival remain inconclusive. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess their impact on survival in a group of advanced ovarian cancer patients. Tissue microarrays were constructed from specimens of 243 patients. Gene copy and chromosome numbers were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Scoring for the latter was calculated by considering the percentage of positive tumor cells and the relative staining intensity. FISH results were evaluated by previously published recommendations and correlated with overall survival. Using IHC, 1.6% of the cases that were tested for Her-2/neu and topoisomerase IIα were strongly positive, and 12.3% were positive for EGFR. Using FISH, 4.4% amplifications and 2.1% polysomies for Her-2/neu were identified; topoisomerase IIα showed 2.2% amplifications, 0.4% deletions and 3.5% polysomies. We observed 10.8% high polysomies, but no amplification for EGFR. None of the results obtained by IHC or FISH correlated with overall survival. In general, Her-2/neu, topoisomerase IIα and EGFR may be prognostic factors in ovarian carcinomas. However, within this group of FIGO stage III patients, differences in gene aberration or protein expression were not able to predict differences in survival. PMID:22969977

  19. Helical Tomotherapy and Larynx Sparing in Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma: A Dosimetric Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gielda, Benjamin T.; Millunchick, Cheryl H.; Smart, Joseph P.; Marsh, James C.; Turian, Julius V.; Coleman, Joy L.

    2010-10-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is gaining acceptance as a standard treatment technique for advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oropharynx. Dose to the uninvolved larynx and surrounding structures can pose a problem in patients with significant neck disease, potentially compromising laryngeal function and quality of life. Tomotherapy may allow greater laryngeal sparing. Seven patients with stage IV SCC of the oropharynx were replanned using Tomotherapy version 3.1. All contours/planning target volumes (PTVs) from the original plans were preserved, with the exception of the larynx, which was drawn to include all soft tissue encompassed by the thyroid/cricoid cartilage. A simultaneous integrated boost technique was used with PTV 1, 2, and 3 receiving 69.96, 59.40, and 54.00 Gy, respectively in 33 fractions. Dosimetry was evaluated via the Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS). Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was calculated from the dose volume histogram (DVH) using the general method with 'a' = 5.0. Mean larynx dose for all patients was 24.4 Gy. Mean EUD to the larynx was 34.2 Gy. Homogeneity was adequate; average maximum dose was 109.7% of the highest prescription. All other organs at risk (OAR) were adequately spared. Tomotherapy can spare the uninvolved larynx in the setting of advanced SCC of the oropharynx to levels that are similar to or better than those reported with other techniques. Sparing is achieved without compromising target coverage or other OAR sparing. The clinical benefit of this sparing remains to be determined in a prospective study.

  20. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2000-09-01

    In the past year, there has been at least one important clinical paper that sheds light on the character and natural history of painful chronic pancreatitis, which has important clinical implications. In addition, several novel mutations have been described in the cationic trypsinogen gene in patients with hereditary pancreatitis. The mechanism by which these mutations cause pancreatic disease remains speculative. The diagnosis of early chronic pancreatitis is controversial. A novel noninvasive pancreatic function test (measurement of postprandial APOB-48) was reported but is unlikely to be a sensitive test of pancreatic function. Pancreatic fibrosis is frequently seen in alcoholics without chronic pancreatitis, and this makes it difficult to interpret the findings on endoscopic ultrasonogram. Recent studies highlight the difficulty in abolishing pancreatic steatorrhea. Recently fibrosing colonopathy in adult patients has been reported. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy combined with endoscopic therapy failed to benefit patients with calcific chronic pancreatitis.

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of gemcitabine, S-1 and gemcitabine plus S-1 for treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer based on GEST study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Rongce; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Pengfei; Tang, Ruilei; Du, Zedong; He, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Jian; Li, Qiu

    2015-04-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM) alone, S-1 alone and gemcitabine plus S-1 (GS) have shown a marginal clinical benefit for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. However, there is no clearly defined optimal cost-effectiveness treatment. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of GEM alone, S-1 alone and GS for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer based on GEST study for public payers. A decision model compared GEM alone, S-1 alone and GS. Primary base case data were identified using the GEST study and the literatures. Costs were estimated from West China Hospital, Sichuan University, China, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated. Survival benefits were reported in quality-adjusted life-months (QALMs). Sensitive analyses were performed by varying potentially modifiable parameters of the model. The base case analysis showed that the GEM cost $21,912 and yielded survival of 6.93 QALMs, S-1 cost $19,371 and yielded survival of 7.90 QALMs and GS cost $22,943 and yielded survival of 7.46 QALMs in the entire treatment. The one-way sensitivity analyses showed that the ICER of S-1 was driven mostly by the S-1 group utility score of stable state compared with GEM, and the GEM group utility score of progressed state played a key role on the ICER of GS compared with GEM. S-1 represents an attractive cost-effective treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer, given the favorable cost per QALM and improvement in clinical efficacy, especially the limited available treatment options.

  2. Phase I Study of Daily Irinotecan as a Radiation Sensitizer for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fouchardiere, Christelle de la; Negrier, Sylvie; Labrosse, Hugues; Martel Lafay, Isabelle; Desseigne, Francoise; Meeus, Pierre; Tavan, David; Petit-Laurent, Fabien; Rivoire, Michel; Perol, David; Carrie, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose of daily irinotecan given with concomitant radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and March 2008, 36 patients with histologically proven unresectable pancreas adenocarcinoma were studied prospectively. Irinotecan was administered daily, 1 to 2 h before irradiation. Doses were started at 6 mg/m{sup 2} per day and then escalated by increments of 2 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 patients. Radiotherapy was administered in 2-Gy fractions, 5 fractions per week, up to a total dose of 50 Gy to the tumor volume. Inoperability was confirmed by a surgeon involved in a multidisciplinary team. All images and responses were centrally reviewed by radiologists. Results: Thirty-six patients were enrolled over a period of 8 years through eight dose levels (6 mg/m{sup 2} to 20 mg/m{sup 2} per day). The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 18 mg/m{sup 2} per day. The dose-limiting toxicities were nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, dehydration, and hypokalemia. The median survival time was 12.6 months with a median follow-up of 53.8 months. The median progression-free survival time was 6.5 months, and 4 patients (11.4%) with very good responses could undergo surgery. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose of irinotecan is 18 mg/m{sup 2} per day for 5 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicities are mainly gastrointestinal. Even though efficacy was not the aim of this study, the results are very promising, with a median survival time of 12.6 months.

  3. Comprehensive Genomic Profiling of Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Esophageal Adenocarcinomas Reveals Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Adrienne; Ali, Siraj M.; Klempner, Samuel J.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Vacirca, Jeffrey L.; Khaira, Depinder; Yelensky, Roman; Chmielecki, Juliann; Elvin, Julia A.; Lipson, Doron; Miller, Vincent A.; Stephens, Philip J.; Ross, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) and esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs) account for >95% of esophageal malignancies and represent a major global health burden. ESCC is the dominant histology globally but represents a minority of U.S. cases, with EAC accounting for the majority of U.S. cases. The patient outcomes for advanced ESCC and EAC are poor, and new therapeutic options are needed. Using a sensitive sequencing assay, we compared the genomic profiles of ESCC and EAC with attention to identification of therapeutically relevant genomic alterations. Methods. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive genomic profiling was performed on hybridization-captured, adaptor ligation-based libraries to a median coverage depth of >650× for all coding exons of 315 cancer-related genes plus selected introns from 28 genes frequently rearranged in cancer. Results from a single sample were evaluated for all classes of genomic alterations (GAs) including point mutations, short insertions and deletions, gene amplifications, homozygous deletions, and fusions/rearrangements. Clinically relevant genomic alterations (CRGAs) were defined as alterations linked to approved drugs and those under evaluation in mechanism-driven clinical trials. Results. There were no significant differences by sex for either tumor type, and the median age for all patients was 63 years. All ESCCs and EACs were at an advanced stage at the time of sequencing. All 71 ESCCs and 231 EACs featured GAs on profiling, with 522 GAs in ESCC (7.4 per sample) and 1,303 GAs in EAC (5.6 per sample). The frequency of clinically relevant GAs in ESCC was 94% (2.6 per sample) and 93% in EAC (2.7 per sample). CRGAs occurring more frequently in EAC included KRAS (23% EAC vs. 6% ESCC) and ERBB2 (23% EAC vs. 3% ESCC). ESCC samples were enriched for CRGA in PIK3CA (24% ESCC vs. 10% EAC), PTEN (11% ESCC vs. 4% EAC), and NOTCH1 (17% ESCC vs. 3% EAC). Other GAs that differed significantly between histologic

  4. Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yabar, Cinthya S; Winter, Jordan M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, yet advances in treatment options have been minimal over the past decade. In this review, we summarize the evaluation and treatments for this disease. We highlight molecular advances that hopefully will soon translate into improved outcomes. PMID:27546841

  5. Distal Pancreatectomy With En Bloc Celiac Axis Resection for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibing; Ma, Ruirui; Gong, Jian; Cai, Chengzong; Song, Zhenshun; Xu, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Although distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac resection (DP-CAR) is used to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the advantages and disadvantages of this surgical procedure remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its clinical safety and efficacy.Studies regarding DP-CAR were retrieved from the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Chinese electronic databases. Articles were selected according to predesigned inclusion criteria, and data were extracted according to predesigned sheets. Clinical, oncologic, and survival outcomes of DP-CAR were systematically reviewed by hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratio (OR) using fixed- or random-effects models.Eighteen studies were included. DP-CAR had a longer operating time and greater intraoperative blood loss compared to distal pancreatectomy (DP). A high incidence of vascular reconstruction occurred in DP-CAR: 11.53% (95%CI: 6.88-18.68%) for artery and 33.28% (95%CI: 20.45-49.19%) for vein. The pooled R0 resection rate of DP-CAR was 72.79% (95% CI, 46.19-89.29%). Higher mortality and morbidity rates were seen in DP-CAR, but no significant differences were detected compared to DP; the pooled OR was 1.798 for mortality (95% CI, 0.360-8.989) and 2.106 for morbidity (95% CI, 0.828-5.353). The pooled incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) was 31.31% (95%CI, 23.69-40.12%) in DP-CAR, similar to that of DP (OR = 1.07; 95%CI, 0.52-2.20). The pooled HR against DP-CAR was 5.67 (95%CI, 1.48-21.75) for delayed gastric emptying. The pooled rate of reoperation was 9.74% (95%CI, 4.56-19.59%) in DP-CAR. The combined 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates in DP-CAR were 65.22% (49.32-78.34%), 30.20% (21.50-40. 60%), and 18.70% (10.89-30.13%), respectively. The estimated means and medians for survival time in DP-CAR patients were 24.12 (95%CI, 18.26-29.98) months and 17.00 (95%CI, 13.52-20.48) months, respectively. There were no significant differences regarding

  6. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  7. Concomitant cetuximab and radiation therapy: A possible promising strategy for locally advanced inoperable non-melanoma skin carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    DELLA VITTORIA SCARPATI, GIUSEPPINA; PERRI, FRANCESCO; PISCONTI, SALVATORE; COSTA, GIUSEPPE; RICCIARDIELLO, FILIPPO; DEL PRETE, SALVATORE; NAPOLITANO, ALBERTO; CARRATURO, MARCO; MAZZONE, SALVATORE; ADDEO, RAFFAELE

    2016-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) include a heterogeneous group of malignancies arising from the epidermis, comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), Merkel cell carcinoma and more rare entities, including malignant pilomatrixoma and sebaceous gland tumours. The treatment of early disease depends primarily on surgery. In addition, certain patients present with extensive local invasion or metastasis, which renders these tumours surgically unresectable. Improving the outcome of radiotherapy through the use of concurrent systemic therapy has been demonstrated in several locally advanced cancer-treatment paradigms. Recently, agents targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have exhibited a consolidated activity in phase II clinical trials and case series reports. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to and completely inhibits the EGFR, which has been revealed to be up-regulated in a variety of SCCs, including NMSCs. The present review aimed to summarize the role of anti-EGFR agents in the predominant types of NMSC, including SCC and BCC, and focuses on the cetuximab-based studies, highlighting the biological rationale of this therapeutic option. In addition, the importance of the association between cetuximab and radiotherapy for locally advanced NMSC is discussed. PMID:27073643

  8. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-12

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  9. A randomized, placebo-controlled phase III trial of masitinib plus gemcitabine in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deplanque, G.; Demarchi, M.; Hebbar, M.; Flynn, P.; Melichar, B.; Atkins, J.; Nowara, E.; Moyé, L.; Piquemal, D.; Ritter, D.; Dubreuil, P.; Mansfield, C. D.; Acin, Y.; Moussy, A.; Hermine, O.; Hammel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Masitinib is a selective oral tyrosine–kinase inhibitor. The efficacy and safety of masitinib combined with gemcitabine was compared against single-agent gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients and methods Patients with inoperable, chemotherapy-naïve, PDAC were randomized (1 : 1) to receive gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) in combination with either masitinib (9 mg/kg/day) or a placebo. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) in the modified intent-to-treat population. Secondary OS analyses aimed to characterize subgroups with poor survival while receiving single-agent gemcitabine with subsequent evaluation of masitinib therapeutic benefit. These prospectively declared subgroups were based on pharmacogenomic data or a baseline characteristic. Results Three hundred and fifty-three patients were randomly assigned to receive either masitinib plus gemcitabine (N = 175) or placebo plus gemcitabine (N = 178). Median OS was similar between treatment-arms for the overall population, at respectively, 7.7 and 7.1 months, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.89 (95% CI [0.70; 1.13]. Secondary analyses identified two subgroups having a significantly poor survival rate when receiving single-agent gemcitabine; one defined by an overexpression of acyl–CoA oxidase-1 (ACOX1) in blood, and another via a baseline pain intensity threshold (VAS > 20 mm). These subgroups represent a critical unmet medical need as evidenced from median OS of 5.5 months in patients receiving single-agent gemcitabine, and comprise an estimated 63% of patients. A significant treatment effect was observed in these subgroups for masitinib with median OS of 11.7 months in the ‘ACOX1’ subgroup [HR = 0.23 (0.10; 0.51), P = 0.001], and 8.0 months in the ‘pain’ subgroup [HR = 0.62 (0.43; 0.89), P = 0.012]. Despite an increased toxicity of the combination as compared with single-agent gemcitabine, side-effects remained manageable. Conclusions The

  10. Budd-Chiari syndrome in urology: Impact on nephrectomy for advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shirodkar, Samir P.; Soloway, Mark S.; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is a poorly understood entity in urology. It results from obstruction of the hepatic veins and the subsequent complications. It has been infrequently reported to be secondary to hepatic venous obstruction from invasion by an inferior vena cava (IVC) tumor thrombus in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We report the largest known series of patients with RCC and BCS. Patients and Methods: Ten patients presented to a tertiary hospital with locally advanced RCC with IVC tumor thrombus. All were evaluated and had clinical or radiographic evidence of BCS. All underwent nephrectomy, IVC thrombectomy or ligation, and tumor removal from the hepatic veins. The perioperative and pathological factors were measured. These included estimated blood loss (EBL) and transfusions. Inpatient factors including duration of intubation, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and overall length of stay (LOS) were recorded. The tumor-free status was evaluated. Results: The average age was 59 years. No intraoperative deaths occurred. Two intraoperative complications were noted. The mean EBL was 4244 cc; mean surgery length was 8 hours 12 minutes; and the mean ICU stay was nine days. The overall LOS averaged 13.25 days. One patient died postoperatively of sepsis and multisystem organ failure. One patient required reoperation for an abdominal wall hematoma caused by subcutaneous enoxaparin administration. Average follow-up was 28 months. Five patients are alive with no evidence of disease. Conclusions: Budd-Chiari syndrome is a rare entity in urology, with a potential for significant morbidity and mortality. Surgical excision of the primary tumor along with thrombectomy results in alleviation of BCS and improvement in the patient. PMID:22022058

  11. Combined sorafenib and yttrium-90 radioembolization for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salman, A.; Simoneau, E.; Hassanain, M.; Chaudhury, P.; Boucher, L.M.; Valenti, D.; Cabrera, T.; Nudo, C.; Metrakos, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims In this pilot study, we assessed the safety and tolerability of combining sorafenib with 90Y radioembolization for the treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (hcc). Methods The study, conducted prospectively during 2009–2012, included eligible patients with unresectable hcc and a life expectancy of at least 12 weeks. Each patient received sorafenib (400 mg twice daily) for 6–8 weeks before 90Y treatment. Safety and tolerability were assessed. Results Of the 40 patients enrolled, 29 completed treatment (combined therapy). In the initial cohort, the most common cause of hcc was hepatitis C (32.5%), and most patients were staged Child A (82.5%). The 29 patients who completed the study had similar baseline characteristics. Grades 1 and 2 toxicities accounted for 77.8% of all adverse events reported. The most common toxicities reported were fatigue (19.0%), alteration in liver function (7.9%), and diarrhea (6.3%). There were 12 grade 3 and 2 grade 4 toxicity events reported. One patient died of liver failure within 30 days after treatment. During the study, the sorafenib dose was reduced in 6 patients (20.7%), and sorafenib had to be interrupted in 4 patients (13.8%) and discontinued in 4 patients (13.8%). The disease control rate was 72.4% per the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, and tumour necrosis was observed in 82.8% of patients. Overall survival in patients undergoing combined therapy was 12.4 months. Conclusions Preliminary results demonstrate the safety and tolerability of combining 90Y radioembolization and sorafenib for advanced hcc. A larger prospective study is needed to determine the extent of the survival benefit. PMID:27803608

  12. Critical appraisal of pazopanib as treatment for patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2011-01-01

    The management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has undergone significant changes during the past 10 years, with the treatment of metastatic RCC undergoing the most radical changes. These developments reflect an enhanced understanding of this tumor's underlying biology, which was then translated into the development of a new treatment paradigm. Current therapeutic approaches for the management of patients with metastatic RCC utilize knowledge of histology, molecular abnormalities, clinical prognostic factors, the natural history of this malignancy, and the treatment efficacy and toxicity of available agents. The treatment options available for patients with metastatic RCC have changed dramatically over the past 6 years. Interferon-α and interleukin-2 were the previous mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the US for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three are multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) including sunitinib, sorafenib, and pazopanib, two target the mammalian target of rapamycin (temsirolimus and everolimus), and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with interferon-α). The current review focuses on the newest TKI available to treat patients with metastatic RCC, pazopanib. The development of this agent both preclinically and clinically is reviewed. The efficacy and safety data from the pivotal clinical trials are discussed, and the potential role of pazopanib in the treatment of patients with metastatic RCC in comparison to other treatment alternatives is critically appraised. This agent has a favorable overall risk benefit, and the available data demonstrate efficacy in patients with metastatic RCC who are either treatment-naïve or cytokine refractory. It therefore represents another alternative for treatment of metastatic RCC patients.

  13. Sequence of treatment in locally advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Stefanie; Gillessen, Silke

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of drugs that have shown activity in advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has led to a debate on the optimal sequence of treatments. There is agreement on recommending targeted agents as the standard of care in this disease. Uncertainty, however, remains on the best first-line drug choice. Physicians and patients may select sunitinib, bevacizumab in combination with interferon-alpha (IFN-α), pazopanib, or—in poor risk patients—temsirolimus. There are also a variety of therapies with proven efficacy on hand in the second-line setting: sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib, and everolimus. While most randomized RCC trials assessed progression free survival (PFS) as primary endpoint, some agents were shown to improve median overall survival (OS), and given in sequence they have extended the life expectancy of RCC patients from 13 months in the cytokine era to over 30 months. Despite the progress made, there are sobering aspects to the oncologic success story in RCC, as the new treatments do not obtain an objective response or disease stabilization (SD) in all patients. There are also as yet no predictors to select patients who might benefit and those who are primary resistant to specific drugs, and ultimately almost all patients will experience disease progression. Bearing inevitable treatment failure in mind, availability of further drugs and switching therapy while the patient is in a condition to continue pharmacotherapy is essential. Of note, depending on the setting, only 33-59% of patients receive second-line treatment. In this review we present data on first-, second-, and third-line treatment in RCC, and discuss the difficulties in their interpretation in the context of treatment sequence. We summarize biological aspects and discuss mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy and their implications for treatment selection. PMID:26816832

  14. Hypofractionated radiotheapy using helical tomotherapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We want to evaluate the efficacy of helical tomotherapy (HT) for treating advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Methods We treated 35 patients for unresectable HCC combined with PVTT in whom other treatment modalities were not indicated. The tumor thrombi involved the main trunk of the portal vein in 18 patients (51.4%) and the first or second order branches in 17 patients (48.6%). A median dose of 50 Gy (range: 45–60 Gy) was delivered in 10 fractions. Capecitabine was given concomitantly at a dose of 600 mg/m2 twice daily during radiotherapy. Results The responses were evaluated via computed tomography. There was a complete response (CR) in 5 patients (14.3%), partial response (PR) in 10 patients (28.6%), stable disease (SD) in 18 patients (51.4%) and progressive disease (PD) in 2 patients (5.7%). The Child-Pugh classification (A vs B) and the Japan integrated staging (JIS) score (2 vs 3) were statistically significant parameters that predicted the response of PVTT (p = 0.010 and p = 0.026, respectively). The median survival, one and two year survival rate of all patients was 12.9 months, 51.4% and 22.2%, respectively. The patients with tumor thrombi in the main portal trunk showed statistically inferior overall survival than patients with tumor thrombi in the portal vein branches (9.8 versus 16.6 months, respectively, p = 0.036). The responders’ median survival was 13.9 months, double 6.9 months as the median survival of the non-responders. No radiation induced liver disease or treatment related mortality was not appeared. Conclusions Hypofractionated radiotherapy with HT was effective not only for tumor response but also for survival in the advanced HCC patients with PVTT. And stricter patient selection by Child-Pugh classification and JIS score may maximize the potential benefits of this treatment. PMID:23324259

  15. [A 5-year survival case of locally advanced cancer of the pancreatic body treated by distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac axis resection after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Iseki, Masahiro; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Mizuma, Masamichi; Hayashi, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Kei; Okada, Takaho; Otsuka, Hideo; Ottomo, Shigeru; Sakata, Naoaki; Fukase, Koji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Onogawa, Tohru; Naito, Takeshi; Katayose, Yu; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki

    2012-11-01

    A 59-year-old man was diagnosed with locally advanced cancer of the pancreatic body, involving the nerve plexus around the celiac axis, the common hepatic artery, and the splenic artery. He was treated with a combination of irradiation (2 Gy/day, total 24 Gy) and 600 mg/m2 of gemcitabine(GEM)biweekly. The tumor size and the involved plexus area were not diminished, but CA19-9 was reduced by half. Distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac axis resection(DP-CAR)was performed. The histological findings indicated extensive invasion into the nerve plexus, including that adjacent to the stump of the pancreas, and thus the R classification was R1. After surgery, 1,000 mg/m2 of GEM was administered biweekly. The chemotherapy has been performed for 5 years to prevent local and systemic recurrence. No recurrence has been found 5 years after surgery. Multidisciplinary treatment, combined with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, curative-intent resection, and postoperative chemotherapy is important for effective treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:23267939

  16. Treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer with 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and interferon alpha-2A: results of a phase II trial.

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, H.; Jäger-Arand, E.; Bernhard, G.; Heike, M.; Klein, O.; Riemann, J. F.; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K. H.; Dippold, W.; Knuth, A.

    1995-01-01

    Interferon alpha-2a (IFN-alpha) and folinic acid (FA) have been shown to modulate the cytotoxic effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the treatment of cancer. A phase II study was initiated to evaluate the effect of a combination of 5-FU/FA/IFN-alpha in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Sixty previously untreated patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were treated with 500 mg m-2 FU via an intravenous bolus 1 h after the initiation of a 2 h infusion of 500 mg m-2 FA. Before starting the FA infusion, 6 million units (MU) of IFN-alpha was administered subcutaneously. The treatment was repeated once a week. Of 57 evaluable patients, eight (14%) had a partial response (PR), eight (14%) a minor response (MR) and 28 (49%) no change of disease (NC). Thirteen patients (23%) had progressive disease (PD). The median survival time was 10 months for all patients, 22 months for patients with partial remission and 5 months for patients with progressive disease. Many patients with tumour-related pain whose tumours were affected in terms of PR, MR, NC were free of pain during treatment with this regimen (22/36 patients). The common toxicities observed were fever (56%), nausea (37%) and diarrhoea (33%). These data suggest that biochemical modulation of 5-FU with FA and IFN-alpha has some positive effects in the treatment of pancreatic cancer of moderate toxicity. PMID:7819023

  17. Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Autoimmune Pancreatitis: Similarities and Differences in Japan and Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Myung Hwan; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Chung, Jae Bock

    2013-01-01

    Two subtypes (types 1 and 2) of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) are currently recognized. Type 1 AIP is related to immunoglobulin G4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis), and type 2 AIP is characterized by neutrophilic infiltration into the epithelium of the pancreatic duct (idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis). Although type 2 AIP is sometimes observed in the United States and Europe, most cases of AIP in Japan and Korea are type 1. The international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP were created to be applicable worldwide and to distinguish between the two types of AIP. AIP is diagnosed based on the presence of at least one of the five cardinal features (i.e., imaging, serology, other organ involvement, histology, and response to steroid therapy). Oral steroids are the standard therapy for AIP, but immunomodulatory drugs or rituximab have been successfully used for patients with relapsed AIP in the United States and Europe. Generally, the clinical manifestations and demography of AIP are similar between Japan and Korea. However, there are differences in some aspects of the disease, including the proportion of other organ involvement, the prevalence of type 2 AIP, diagnostic criteria and maintenance therapy between the two countries. PMID:23898377

  18. Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dabizzi, Emanuele; Assef, Mauricio Saab; Raimondo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used. PMID:24212626

  19. Chinese Herbal Formulation PHY906 and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage B Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  20. Childhood pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Uretsky, G; Goldschmiedt, M; James, K

    1999-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare finding in childhood but probably more common than is generally realized. This condition should be considered in the evaluation of children with vomiting and abdominal pain, because it can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Clinical suspicion is required to make the diagnosis, especially when the serum amylase concentration is normal. Recurrent pancreatitis may be familial as a result of inherited biochemical or anatomic abnormalities. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are at high risk for pancreatic cancer.

  1. Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein With Standard Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Non-Resectable Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

  2. Efficacy and safety of the oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Zheng, Ying-hui; Han, Li; Qin, Shu-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Many clinical studies have demonstrated the survival benefits of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Therefore, we aim to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma by conducting a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases from their inception to June 2016. Only prospective studies evaluating oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma were selected. The main outcomes included objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and main adverse events. Results: Ten prospective studies involving 525 patients were included. The pooled ORR, 1-year PFS, and OS were 14.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.2–19.6%), 9.3% (95%CI 10–28%), and 35.7% (95%CI 27–44%), respectively, for oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. The median PFS and OS were 4.7 and 9.4 months, respectively. The incidences of grade 3/4 toxicities of neutropenia, thrombopenia, anemia, neurotoxicity, diarrhea, and nausea/vomiting were 17.2%, 9.2%, 6.0%, 4.8%, 3.1%, and 1.8%, respectively. Subgroup analysis revealed that the pooled ORR was 13.9% (95%CI 6.8–21%) in Asian patients and 12.8% (95%CI 6.8–18.7%) in Western patients. For Asian patients, the median PFS and OS were 4.2 and 9.2 months, and the 1-year PFS and OS were 12.5% and 30.5%, respectively. For Western patients, the median PFS and OS were 4.7 and 9.5 months, and the 1-year PFS and OS were 19.6% and 42.4%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the ORR, 1-year PFS, and OS (P > 0.05) between Asian and Western patients. Conclusions: Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy appears to be effective and safe for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27749557

  3. Long-term outcomes of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma who achieved complete remission after sorafenib therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Sorafenib is currently the sole molecular targeted agent that improves overall survival in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Despite the efficacy of sorafenib, the response rate varies in patients with advanced HCC. We retrospectively analyzed a series of Korean patients with advanced HCC with complete remission (CR) after sorafenib therapy. Methods In total, 523 patients with advanced HCC were treated with sorafenib in 3 large tertiary referral hospitals in Korea. A survey was conducted to collect data on patients who experienced CR after sorafenib monotherapy, and their medical records and follow-up data were analyzed. The tumor response and recurrence rates were assessed by radiologic study, based on modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. Results Seven patients with advanced HCC experienced CR after sorafenib therapy. The median time to tumor disappearance and the median disease-free survival time were 3 months and 9 months, respectively. HCC recurrence was identified in three cases (42.9%). Of these, two patients discontinued sorafenib before or after achieving CR and the other patient continued sorafenib after achieving CR. HCC recurred at 3, 10, and 42 months after CR in these three patients. Three patients needed dose reduction for toxicity and adverse events. Conclusions Though CR was achieved after sorafenib therapy in patients with advanced HCC, the recurrence rate was relatively high. Subsequent strategies to reduce a chance of recurrence after sorafenib therapy are required to investigate. PMID:26527250

  4. Locally Advanced Stage High-Grade Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of Salivary Gland in a 9-Year-Old Girl: The Controversy of Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Olga Micol; Dorado, Elena Daghoum; García, María Dolores Amorós; Ramírez, María Isabel Oviedo; de la Fuente Muñoz, Isabel; Soler, Jose Luis Fuster

    2016-01-01

    Malignant salivary gland tumors are rare in children, mostly represented by low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas. For these patients, long-term survival rates above 95% are reported after surgical resection. Here we report a case of a 9-year-old girl with a high grade locally advanced mucoepidermoid carcinoma undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy after surgery. We emphasize the controversy and lack of evidence-based indication for these highly toxic adjuvant therapy modalities in children. PMID:27746885

  5. [Survival after Sorafenib Treatment for Advanced Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Tumor Thrombus in the Inferior Vena Cava].

    PubMed

    Matoba, Hideaki; Seta, Shinsuke

    2015-11-01

    A 72-year-old man with chronic viral hepatitis type B undergoing surgery for hepatocellular carcinoma was found to have a recurrent tumor in the left liver with peritoneal dissemination near the inferior vena cava(IVC)and tumor thrombus in the IVC. For this patient diagnosed with Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) classification stage C hepatocellular carcinoma, we initiated 800 mg/body sorafenib. Two weeks after the initiation of sorafenib, the patient experienced grade 3 hand-foot syndrome, after which, the dose of sorafenib was reduced to 400 mg/body. After 1 year, CT showed an enlarged tumor in the left liver and multiple metastases to the lung. However, no remarkable difference was observed in the peritoneal dissemination and the tumor thrombus. He has been receiving sorafenib for 19 months with a good quality of life. Sorafenib can be provided on an outpatient basis and it may facilitate long-term survival for patients with advanced recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma with IVC tumor thrombus. This clinical condition is very rare, and the standard treatment for it still has not been established.

  6. [Survival after Sorafenib Treatment for Advanced Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Tumor Thrombus in the Inferior Vena Cava].

    PubMed

    Matoba, Hideaki; Seta, Shinsuke

    2015-11-01

    A 72-year-old man with chronic viral hepatitis type B undergoing surgery for hepatocellular carcinoma was found to have a recurrent tumor in the left liver with peritoneal dissemination near the inferior vena cava(IVC)and tumor thrombus in the IVC. For this patient diagnosed with Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) classification stage C hepatocellular carcinoma, we initiated 800 mg/body sorafenib. Two weeks after the initiation of sorafenib, the patient experienced grade 3 hand-foot syndrome, after which, the dose of sorafenib was reduced to 400 mg/body. After 1 year, CT showed an enlarged tumor in the left liver and multiple metastases to the lung. However, no remarkable difference was observed in the peritoneal dissemination and the tumor thrombus. He has been receiving sorafenib for 19 months with a good quality of life. Sorafenib can be provided on an outpatient basis and it may facilitate long-term survival for patients with advanced recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma with IVC tumor thrombus. This clinical condition is very rare, and the standard treatment for it still has not been established. PMID:26805098

  7. A Phase II Study of Fixed-Dose Rate Gemcitabine Plus Low-Dose Cisplatin Followed by Consolidative Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Andrew H.; Venook, Alan P.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The optimal strategy for treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer remains controversial, including the respective roles and timing of chemotherapy and radiation. We conducted a Phase II nonrandomized trial to evaluate sequential chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Chemotherapy naive patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} at 10 mg/m{sup 2}/min) plus cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Those without evidence of extrapancreatic metastases after six cycles of chemotherapy received radiation (5,040 cGy over 28 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (800 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the day of radiation) as a radiosensitizer. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled with a median follow-up time of 656 days. Twelve patients (48%) successfully received all six cycles of chemotherapy plus chemoradiation. Eight patients (32%) progressed during chemotherapy, including 7 with extrapancreatic metastases. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities were uncommon. Two patients sustained myocardial infarctions during chemotherapy, and 4 were hospitalized for infectious complications, although none in the setting of neutropenia. Median time to progression was 10.5 months and median survival was 13.5 months, with an estimated 1-year survival rate of 62%. Patients receiving all components of therapy had a median survival of 17.0 months. Conclusions: A strategy of initial fixed-dose rate gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, followed by chemoradiation, shows promising efficacy for treatment of locally advanced disease. A substantial proportion of patients will be identified early on as having extrapancreatic disease and spared the potential toxicities associated with radiation.

  8. PEDIATRIC PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, John F.; Uc, Aliye

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in pediatric pancreatitis and to discuss etiologies and current management. Recent Findings Although recent studies have estimated the annual incidence of pediatric acute pancreatitis approaching that of adults, there are no established guidelines about its diagnosis and treatment in children. Genetic and structural/congenital abnormalities are emerging as the primary risk factors for pediatric acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis. Specifically, chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant socioeconomic burden in children. Both medical and surgical therapies are proposed for pediatric chronic pancreatitis, but there is little evidence that they are beneficial. Summary Acute, acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis create significant health issues in the pediatric population. Medical and surgical therapies exist to potentially treat these conditions, but the pediatric data is limited and the cohorts are small. A multidisciplinary and multicenter approach is necessary to better determine pancreatic disease processes and treatment options in children. PMID:26181572

  9. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  10. Intratumoral PV701 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Unresectable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  11. Safety and Immune Response to a Multi-component Immune Based Therapy (MKC1106-PP) for Patients With Advanced Cancer.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-02

    Ovarian; Melanoma; Renal; Prostate; Colorectal; Endometrial Carcinoma; Cervical Carcinoma; Testicular Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Mesothelioma; Breast Carcinoma; Esophageal Carcinoma; Gastric Cancer; Pancreatic Carcinoma; Neuroendocrine Cancer; Liver Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Biliary Tract Cancer; Anal Carcinoma; Bone Sarcomas; Soft Tissue Sarcomas; Carcinoma of Unknown Origin, Primary

  12. Concomitant chemobrachyradiotherapy with ifosfamide and cisplatin followed by consolidation chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix uteri.

    PubMed

    Vrdoljak, E; Boraska Jelavic, T; Saratlija-Novakovic, Z; Hamm, W

    2005-01-01

    The optimal treatment of women with locally advanced adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix uteri is still undefined. We report a series of four consecutive patients with locally advanced adeno- or adenosquamous carcinomas of the uterine cervix (FIGO Stages IB-IIIB) treated by concomitant chemobrachyradiotherapy with ifosfamide and cisplatin followed by one to four cycles of consolidation chemotherapy with the same drug combination. After completion of this treatment all patients showed complete clinical remission. Now, after a median follow-up of 40 (range: 13.5-61) months all patients still present with no evidence of disease. Despite the low number of patients in this series we may conclude that concomitant chemobrachyradiotherapy with ifosfamide and cisplatin followed by consolidation chemotherapy with the same drug combination is an efficacious treatment of patients with locally advanced adeno- or adenosquamous carcinomas of the cervix uteri.

  13. Cell Based Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy (AIET) after Radiotherapy in a Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Sumana; Dedeepiya, Vidyasagar Devaprasad; Terunuma, Hiroshi; Senthilkumar, Rajappa; Srinivasan, Thangavelu; Reena, Helen C.; Preethy, Senthilkumar; Abraham, Samuel J. K.

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary form of treatment in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. However for residual disease in the form of the persistent lymph nodes, surgery or chemotherapy is recommended. As surgery is not acceptable by every patient and chemotherapy has associated side effects, we hereby report the positive outcome of in vitro expanded natural killer cell and activated T lymphocyte based autologous immune enhancement therapy (AIET) for the residual lymphadenopathy in a patient with locally advanced cervical cancer after radiation. After six transfusions of AIET, there was complete resolution of residual lymph nodes and there was no evidence of local lesion. The patient also reported improvement in quality of life. As AIET has been reported as the least toxic among the available therapies for cancer, combining AIET with conventional forms of therapy in similar patients might not only improve the outcome but may also help the patients achieve a good quality of life. PMID:23653878

  14. Utility of preoperative dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas in diagnosing tumor-forming pancreatitis that mimics pancreatic cancer: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Tamotsu; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Tsuneoka, Noritsugu; Adachi, Tomohiko; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and tumor-forming pancreatitis remains difficult, and this situation can cause serious problems because the management and prognosis of these two focal pancreatic masses are entirely different. We herein report a case of tumor-forming pancreatitis that mimics pancreatic carcinoma in an 80-year-old woman. Computed tomography showed a solid mass in the head of the pancreas, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed a complete obstruction of the main pancreatic duct in the head of the pancreas. Dynamic contrastenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a time-signal intensity curve (TIC) with a slow rise to a peak (1 min after the administration of the contrast material), followed by a slow decline at the pancreatic mass, indicating a fibrotic pancreas. Under the diagnosis of tumor-forming pancreatitis, the patient underwent a segmental pancreatectomy instead of a pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histopathology of the pancreatic mass was chronic pancreatitis without malignancy. The pancreatic TIC obtained from dynamiccontrast MRI can be helpful to differentiate tumor-forming pancreatitis from pancreatic carcinoma and to avoid any unnecessary major pancreatic surgery.

  15. Low podoplanin expression in pretreatment biopsy material predicts poor prognosis in advanced-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated by primary radiation.

    PubMed

    Dumoff, Kimberly L; Chu, Christina S; Harris, Eleanor E; Holtz, David; Xu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Paul J; Acs, Geza

    2006-05-01

    Lymphatic invasion and nodal metastasis are predictors of poor outcome in cervix carcinoma. We have recently found that low podoplanin immunoreactivity in cervix carcinoma correlated with the presence of lymphatic invasion and nodal metastasis. In the current study, we examined whether podoplanin expression in pretreatment cervical biopsies can predict the presence lymphatic invasion, nodal metastasis, and outcome in advanced-stage tumors treated by nonsurgical means. Podoplanin expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 48 cervical biopsies and corresponding hysterectomy specimens of early-stage invasive squamous cell carcinoma and in 74 pretreatment biopsies from advanced-stage tumors treated with primary radiation. We found a highly significant correlation between podoplanin expression obtained in biopsy and corresponding hysterectomy materials (r = 0.8962, P < 0.0001). Low podoplanin expression showed a significant correlation with lymphatic invasion (P < 0.0001) and nodal metastasis (P = 0.0058). Low podoplanin expression in pretreatment biopsy material showed a significant correlation with poor disease-free (P = 0.0009) and overall (P = 0.0002) survival in advanced-stage tumors. Our results suggest that in advanced-stage cervix carcinomas treated by radiation, when traditional prognostic indicators are not available and treatment decisions are based on biopsy material and clinical staging parameters, examination of podoplanin expression in pretreatment biopsy material may be a useful marker to predict lymphatic metastasis and patient outcome. Prospective studies involving larger numbers of patients are needed to further evaluate the clinical utility of examination of podoplanin expression in patients with cervix carcinoma.

  16. State of the art: diagnostic tools and innovative therapies for treatment of advanced thymoma and thymic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ried, Michael; Marx, Alexander; Götz, Andrea; Hamer, Okka; Schalke, Berthold; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan

    2016-06-01

    In this review article, state-of-the-art diagnostic tools and innovative treatments of thymoma and thymic carcinoma (TC) are described with special respect to advanced tumour stages. Complete surgical resection (R0) remains the standard therapeutic approach for almost all a priori resectable mediastinal tumours as defined by preoperative standard computed tomography (CT). If lymphoma or germ-cell tumours are differential diagnostic considerations, biopsy may be indicated. Resection status is the most important prognostic factor in thymoma and TC, followed by tumour stage. Advanced (Masaoka-Koga stage III and IVa) tumours require interdisciplinary therapy decisions based on distinctive findings of preoperative CT scan and ancillary investigations [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] to select cases for primary surgery or neoadjuvant strategies with optional secondary resection. In neoadjuvant settings, octreotide scans and histological evaluation of pretherapeutic needle biopsies may help to choose between somatostatin agonist/prednisolone regimens and neoadjuvant chemotherapy as first-line treatment. Finally, a multimodality treatment regime is recommended for advanced and unresectable thymic tumours. In conclusion, advanced stage thymoma and TC should preferably be treated in experienced centres in order to provide all modern diagnostic tools (imaging, histology) and innovative therapy techniques. Systemic and local (hyperthermic intrathoracic chemotherapy) medical treatments together with extended surgical resections have increased the therapeutic options in patients with advanced or recurrent thymoma and TC.

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression is a prognostic factor for radiotherapy outcome in advanced carcinoma of the cervix

    PubMed Central

    Loncaster, J A; Cooper, R A; Logue, J P; Davidson, S E; Hunter, R D; West, C M L

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate VEGF expression in tumour biopsies as a prognostic factor for radiotherapy outcome in advanced carcinoma of the cervix. A retrospective study was carried out on 100 patients. Pre-treatment tumour VEGF expression was examined immunohistochemically in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsies using a widely available commercial antibody. A semi-quantitative analysis was made using a scoring system of 0, 1, 2, and 3, for increasing intensity of staining. High VEGF expression was associated with a poor prognosis. A univariate log rank analysis found a significant relationship with overall survival (P = 0.0008) and metastasis-free survival (P = 0.0062), but not local control (P = 0.23). There was no correlation between VEGF expression and disease stage, tumour differentiation, patient age, or tumour radiosensitivity (SF2). In a Cox multivariate analysis of survival VEGF expression was the most significant independent prognostic factor (P = 0.001). After allowing for VEGF only SF2 was a significant prognostic factor (P = 0.003). In conclusion, immunohistochemical analysis of VEGF expression is a highly significant and independent prognostic indicator of overall and metastasis-free survival for patients treated with radiotherapy for advanced carcinoma of the cervix. It is also a rapid and easy method that could be used in the clinical setting, to identify patients at high risk of failure with conventional radiotherapy who may benefit from novel approaches or chemoradiotherapy. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10944602

  18. Trametinib and Navitoclax in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  19. Pharmacogenetics in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tourkantonis, Ioannis S; Peponi, Evangelia; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor overall survival rate. Given advances in pharmacogenomics, numerous gene mutations have been identified that could be potential targets for drug development. Therefore, future research strategies may identify prognostic and predictive markers aiming to improve outcome by maximizing efficacy whilst lowering toxicity. In this commentary, we summarize several interesting results regarding pancreatic cancer pharmacogenetics that have been presented in the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting. In particular, we focus on Abstract #4124, which investigated the potential predictive role of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) in patients treated with adjuvant gemcitabine for pancreatic cancer, on Abstract #4125, which examined the tolerability of a modified FOLFORINOX study based on UGT1A1*28 genotype guided dosing of IRI in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, and on Abstract #4130, which confirmed the predictive role of circulating tumor and invasive cells (CTICs) from patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer in second-line chemotherapy treatment setting. PMID:25076337

  20. CA19-9-related tumor kinetics after first-line chemotherapy of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: a monoinstitutional experience.

    PubMed

    Colloca, Giuseppe; Venturino, Antonella; Guarneri, Domenico

    2016-09-01

    The absolute value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) pretreatment and its reduction after chemotherapy are established prognostic variables for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The present study is a retrospective monoinstitutional evaluation of the prognostic role of the CA19-9 reduction and some CA19-9-related tumor kinetics parameters, such as tumor growth rate constant (G), kinetic tumor response and log ratio. Forty-one cases met the selection criteria. After 8 weeks only G reported an inverse relationship with OS (r = -0.494) that was confirmed by regression analysis (R (2) = 0.192). G after 8 weeks of chemotherapy appears as a possible surrogate end point of overall survival. PMID:27522503

  1. Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Limaiem, Faten; Khalfallah, Tahar; Farhat, Leila Ben; Bouraoui, Saâdia; Lahmar, Ahlem; Mzabi, Sabeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are rare and constitute approximately 0.5% of all pancreatic neoplasms. Aims: The study was to describe clinicopathological features of pancreatic cystic tumors. Patients and Methods: In our retrospective study, we reviewed 10 cases of pancreatic cystic neoplasms that were diagnosed at the pathology department of Mongi Slim hospital over a 14-year period (2000-2013). We adopted the latest World Health Organization (WHO) classification (2010) in grouping all tumors. Results: There were one male and nine female patients (sex ratio M/F = 1:9) aged between 21 and 68 years (mean = 37.5 years). The most common clinical presentation was epigastric and abdominal pain (n = 6) followed by vomiting (n = 3). Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan disclosed a cystic lesion of the pancreas ranging in size between 2 and 10 cm (mean = 6.75 cm). All patients underwent surgical treatment. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen established the diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (n = 2), serous cystic neoplasm (n = 2), mucinous cystadenoma (n = 4), mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (n = 1), and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma (n = 1). Conclusion: Better understanding of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is essential for clinicians to make accurate diagnosis and to provide the best management for patients. PMID:25210676

  2. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  3. Hypofractionated Image-Guided IMRT in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Infiltrated Vessels Concomitant With Capecitabine: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Passoni, Paolo; Reni, Michele; Cattaneo, Giovanni M.; Slim, Najla; Cereda, Stefano; Balzano, Gianpaolo; Castoldi, Renato; Longobardi, Barbara; Bettinardi, Valentino; Gianolli, Luigi; Gusmini, Simone; Staudacher, Carlo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose (MTD) of an integrated boost to the tumor subvolume infiltrating vessels, delivered simultaneously with radical dose to the whole tumor and concomitant capecitabine in patients with pretreated advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage III or IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma without progressive disease after induction chemotherapy were eligible. Patients underwent simulated contrast-enhanced four-dimensional computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography. Gross tumor volume 1 (GTV1), the tumor, and GTV2, the tumor subvolume 1 cm around the infiltrated vessels, were contoured. GTVs were fused to generate Internal Target Volume (ITV)1 and ITV2. Biological tumor volume (BTV) was fused with ITV1 to create the BTV+Internal Target Volume (ITV) 1. A margin of 5/5/7 mm (7 mm in cranium-caudal) was added to BTV+ITV1 and to ITV2 to create Planning Target Volume (PTV) 1 and PTV2, respectively. Radiation therapy was delivered with tomotherapy. PTV1 received a fixed dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions, and PTV2 received a dose escalation from 48 to 58 Gy as simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in consecutive groups of at least 3 patients. Concomitant chemotherapy was capecitabine, 1250 mg/m{sup 2} daily. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any treatment-related G3 nonhematological or G4 hematological toxicity occurring during the treatment or within 90 days from its completion. Results: From June 2005 to February 2010, 25 patients were enrolled. The dose escalation on the SIB was stopped at 58 Gy without reaching the MTD. One patient in the 2{sup nd} dose level (50 Gy) had a DLT: G3 acute gastric ulcer. Three patients had G3 late adverse effects associated with gastric and/or duodenal mucosal damage. All patients received the planned dose of radiation. Conclusions: A dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions to the whole tumor with an SIB of 58 Gy to small

  4. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  5. Efficacy of short-term nivolumab treatment in a Chinese patient with relapsed advanced-stage lung squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Guoliang; He, Hanping; Bi, Jianping; Li, Ying; Li, Yanping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Mingwei; Han, Guang; Lin, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Currently, the options are limited for the treatment of patients who have failed 2 lines of chemotherapy for advanced lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Recently, nivolumab, a fully human IgG4 programmed death 1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody, was approved to treat patients with advanced stage, relapsed/refractory lung SCC. Although nivolumab has demonstrated antitumor activity with survival benefit in Caucasian patients, its efficacy in Asian patients is unknown. Case Report: In this report, we describe a Chinese patient with relapsed advanced stage lung SCC who had an excellent response to nivolumab after only 2 doses without any adverse effects. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated the tumor was stained positive for programmed death-ligand 1. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report of satisfactory efficacy of short-term nivolumab treatment in a Chinese patient with relapsed advanced-stage lung SCC. Further clinical trials in Asian countries are needed to test whether nivolumab immunotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for Asian patients with lung SCC. PMID:27749580

  6. HPV Genotypes Predict Survival Benefits From Concurrent Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Huang, Yi-Ting; Chao, Angel; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone or concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: Between August 1993 and May 2000, 327 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage III/IVA or stage IIB with positive lymph nodes) were eligible for this study. HPV genotypes were determined using the Easychip Registered-Sign HPV genechip. Outcomes were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: We detected 22 HPV genotypes in 323 (98.8%) patients. The leading 4 types were HPV16, 58, 18, and 33. The 5-year overall and disease-specific survival estimates for the entire cohort were 41.9% and 51.4%, respectively. CCRT improved the 5-year disease-specific survival by an absolute 9.8%, but this was not statistically significant (P=.089). There was a significant improvement in disease-specific survival in the CCRT group for HPV18-positive (60.9% vs 30.4%, P=.019) and HPV58-positive (69.3% vs 48.9%, P=.026) patients compared with the RT alone group. In contrast, the differences in survival with CCRT compared with RT alone in the HPV16-positive and HPV-33 positive subgroups were not statistically significant (P=.86 and P=.53, respectively). An improved disease-specific survival was observed for CCRT treated patients infected with both HPV16 and HPV18, but these differenced also were not statistically significant. Conclusions: The HPV genotype may be a useful predictive factor for the effect of CCRT in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Verifying these results in prospective trials could have an impact on tailoring future treatment based on HPV genotype.

  7. Loss of MTUS1/ATIP expression is associated with adverse outcome in advanced bladder carcinomas: data from a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Seventy percent of all bladder tumours tend to recur and need intensive surveillance, and a subset of tumours progress to muscle-invasive and metastatic disease. However, it is still difficult to find the adequate treatment for every individual patient as it is a very heterogeneous disease and reliable biomarkers are still missing. In our study we searched for new target genes in the critical chromosomal region 8p and investigated the potential tumour suppressor gene candidate MTUS1/ATIP in bladder cancer. Methods MTUS1 was identified to be the most promising deleted target gene at 8p in aCGH analysis with 19 papillary bladder tumours. A correlation with bladder cancer was further validated using immunohistochemistry of 85 papillary and 236 advanced bladder tumours and in functional experiments. Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox-regression addressed overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) as a function of MTUS1/ATIP expression. Bivariate correlations investigated associations between MTUS1/ATIP expression, patient characteristics and histopathology. MTUS1 expression was analysed in cell lines and overexpressed in RT112, where impact on viability, proliferation and migration was measured. Results MTUS1 protein expression was lost in almost 50% of all papillary and advanced bladder cancers. Survival, however, was only influenced in advanced carcinomas, where loss of MTUS1 was associated with adverse OS and DSS. In this cohort, there was also a significant correlation of MTUS1 expression and histological subtype: positive expression was detected in all micropapillary tumours and aberrant nuclear staining was detected in a subset of plasmocytoid urothelial carcinomas. MTUS1 was expressed in all investigated bladder cell lines and overexpression in RT112 led to significantly decreased viability. Conclusions MTUS1 is a tumour suppressor gene in cultured bladder cancer cells and in advanced bladder tumours. It might represent one new

  8. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2001-09-01

    An increasing number of novel mutations are associated with chronic pancreatitis. Some cause a high-penetrance, autosomal dominant type of clinical picture (eg, mutations at codons 29 and 122 of the cationic trypsinogen gene), whereas others have a low penetrance or are frequent in the general population (eg, mutations in Kazal type 1 [SPINK1] and in codons 16, 22, and 23 of the cationic trypsinogen gene) and act as disease modifiers. The results of recent studies indicate that smoking adversely affects the course and complications of chronic pancreatitis (more frequent and faster rate of calcification and higher risk of development of pancreatic cancer). Thus, regardless of the cause of chronic pancreatis, patients with this condition should not smoke. Using current diagnostic criteria, the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is not good. For example, 39% of dyspeptic persons without any other evidence of chronic pancreatitis fulfilled the endoscopic ultrasound criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Diabetes frequently occurs in chronic pancreatitis, but it is not prevented or increased by pancreatic surgery. Islet cell autotransplantation holds promise for the prevention of diabetes in patients requiring total pancreatectomy if the pancreas is not extensively fibrotic. Splenic vein occlusion is present in 7% of patients undergoing surgery for chronic pancreatitis, but fewer than one fifth of these patients have variceal bleeding before or after surgery.

  9. CD14/TLR4 priming potentially recalibrates and exerts anti-tumor efficacy in tumor associated macrophages in a mouse model of pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Hridayesh; Nadella, Vinod; Singh, Sandhya; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth major cause of cancer related deaths in the world and 5 year survival is below 5%. Among various tumor directed therapies, stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLR) has shown promising effects in various tumor models. However, pancreatic cancer cells frequently express these receptors themselves and their stimulation (TLR 2 and/or 4 particularly) within tumor microenvironment is known to potentially enhance tumor cell proliferation and cancer progression. Consistent stimulation of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs), in particular with tumor derived TLR ligand within the tumor microenvironment promotes cancer related inflammation, which is sterile, non-immunogenic and carcinogenic in nature. In view of this, recalibrating of TAM has the potential to induce immunogenic inflammation. Consistent with this, we provide experimental evidence for the first time in this study that priming of TAMs with TLR4 ligend (LPS) alone or in combination with IFN-γ not only recalibrates pancreatic tumor cells induced M2 polarization, but also confers anti-tumor potential in TAMs. Most interestingly, reduced tumor growth in macrophage depleted animals suggests that macrophage directed approaches are important for the management of pancreatic tumors. PMID:27511884

  10. Simultaneous Inhibition of EGFR, VEGFR and PDGFR Signaling Combined with Gemcitabine Produces Therapy of Human Pancreatic Carcinoma and Prolongs Survival in an Orthotopic Nude Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Kenji; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Bucana, Corazon D.; Fan, Dominic; Baker, Cheryl H.; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Kuwai, Toshio; Abbruzzese, James L.; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2006-01-01

    Although gemcitabine has been approved as the first-line chemotherapeutic reagent for pancreatic cancer, its response rate is low and average survival duration is still only marginal. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) modulate tumor progression, we hypothesized that inhibition of phosphorylation of all three on tumor cells, tumor-associated endothelial cells, and stroma cells would improve the treatment efficacy of gemcitabine in an orthotopic pancreatic tumor model in nude mice and prolong survival. We implanted L3.6pl, a human pancreatic cancer cell, in the pancreas of nude mice. We found that tumor-associated endothelial cells in this model highly expressed phosphorylated EGFR, VEGFR, and PDGFR. Oral administration of AEE788, a dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor against EGFR and VEGFR, decreased phosphorylation of EGFR and VEGFR. PDGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by STI571. Although intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of gemcitabine did not inhibit tumor growth, its combination with AEE788 and STI571 produced >80% inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged survival in parallel with increases in number of tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cell apoptosis, decreased microvascular density, decreased proliferation rate, and prolonged survival. STI571 treatment also decreased pericyte coverage on tumor-associated endothelial cells. Thus, inhibiting phosphorylation of EGFR, VEGFR, and PDGFR in combination with gemcitabine enhanced the efficacy of gemcitabine, resulting in inhibition of experimental human pancreatic cancer growth and significant prolongation of survival. PMID:16288027

  11. NCCN Task Force Report: Optimizing Treatment of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma With Molecular Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hudes, Gary R.; Carducci, Michael A.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Esper, Peg; Jonasch, Eric; Kumar, Rashmi; Margolin, Kim A.; Michaelson, M. Dror; Motzer, Robert J.; Pili, Roberto; Roethke, Susan; Srinivas, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma has been substantially improved with administration of the currently available molecularly targeted therapies. However, proper selection of therapy and management of toxicities remain challenging. NCCN convened a multidisciplinary task force panel to address the clinical issues associated with these therapies in attempt to help practicing oncologists optimize patient outcomes. This report summarizes the background data presented at the task force meeting and the ensuing discussion. PMID:21335444

  12. Feasibility and Response of Concurrent Weekly Docetaxel with Radical Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    I, Rajesh; B, Rajesh; B, Selvamani; John, Subhashini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: (1) To study the feasibility, adverse effects and response of concurrent weekly Docetaxel with radical radiotherapy in inoperable locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. (2) To assess the compliance and tolerance of weekly Docetaxel with radiotherapy. Material and Methods: Twenty one patients with stage III and IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma satisfying inclusion criteria were selected and treated with conventional external radiotherapy of 70Gy in 35 fractions with weekly concurrent Docetaxel (15mg/sqm), administered one hour before radiotherapy. Assessment of toxicities and evaluationof response was carried out. Results: Majority of patients had stage IV diseaseand 17/21 (81%) received the planned radiotherapydose of 70Gy and ≥4 cycles of weekly chemotherapy. Duration of treatment ranged from 7.1to 11.2 weeks. The toxicities noted were Grade III mucositis in 57% and grade III skin reaction in 23%, grade III dysphagia in 38% and grade II weight loss in 23% of patients. Systemic toxicities associated with chemotherapy were minimal and there was no dose limiting toxicities. The overall locoregional response at first follow up was 85%, with complete response of 70% and partial response of 15%. Conclusion: Concurrent Docetaxel is a feasible and suitable alternate to Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil chemotherapy with good patient compliance. The late toxicities and survival need to be followed up. PMID:25954690

  13. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  14. Potential predictive role of chemotherapy-induced changes of soluble CD40 ligand in untreated advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Oronzo; Porcelli, Letizia; Graziano, Giusi; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Signorile, Michele; Scarpa, Aldo; Lorusso, Vito; Silvestris, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma lacks predictive biomarkers. CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. CD40-sCD40L interaction is considered to contribute to the promotion of tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of serum sCD40L as a predictor in metastatic pancreatic cancer. We evaluated 27 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients treated with FOLFIRINOX (21 patients) or gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel combination (six patients). The sCD40L level was measured in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at baseline, at first evaluation (all patients), and at time to progression (18 patients). The radiological response was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, Version 1.1. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pre-post treatment sCD40L levels with respect to clinical response, while Pearson's correlation coefficient was used for the correlation between sCD40L and CA19.9 pre- and post-treatment. The Kruskal-Wallis test was also conducted for further comparisons. We observed a statistically significant reduction in the sCD40L level after 3 months of treatment in patients with partial response (11,718.05±7,097.13 pg/mL vs 4,689.42±5,409.96 pg/mL; P<0.01). Conversely, in patients with progressive disease, the biomarker statistically increased in the same time (9,351.51±7,356.91 pg/mL vs 22,282.92±11,629.35 pg/mL; P<0.01). This trend of sCD40L was confirmed in 18 patients at time to progression after the first evaluation. No differences were recorded within the stable disease group. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the sCD40L and CA19.9 pre-post treatment variation percentage (Pearson's correlation coefficient =0.52; P<0.05). Our data suggest a possible predictive role of sCD40L in pancreatic cancer patients, similar to CA19.9. PMID:27555786

  15. Potential predictive role of chemotherapy-induced changes of soluble CD40 ligand in untreated advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Oronzo; Porcelli, Letizia; Graziano, Giusi; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Signorile, Michele; Scarpa, Aldo; Lorusso, Vito; Silvestris, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma lacks predictive biomarkers. CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. CD40–sCD40L interaction is considered to contribute to the promotion of tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of serum sCD40L as a predictor in metastatic pancreatic cancer. We evaluated 27 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients treated with FOLFIRINOX (21 patients) or gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel combination (six patients). The sCD40L level was measured in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at baseline, at first evaluation (all patients), and at time to progression (18 patients). The radiological response was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, Version 1.1. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pre–post treatment sCD40L levels with respect to clinical response, while Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used for the correlation between sCD40L and CA19.9 pre- and post-treatment. The Kruskal–Wallis test was also conducted for further comparisons. We observed a statistically significant reduction in the sCD40L level after 3 months of treatment in patients with partial response (11,718.05±7,097.13 pg/mL vs 4,689.42±5,409.96 pg/mL; P<0.01). Conversely, in patients with progressive disease, the biomarker statistically increased in the same time (9,351.51±7,356.91 pg/mL vs 22,282.92±11,629.35 pg/mL; P<0.01). This trend of sCD40L was confirmed in 18 patients at time to progression after the first evaluation. No differences were recorded within the stable disease group. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the sCD40L and CA19.9 pre–post treatment variation percentage (Pearson’s correlation coefficient =0.52; P<0.05). Our data suggest a possible predictive role of sCD40L in pancreatic cancer patients, similar to CA19.9. PMID:27555786

  16. Hsp90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Receiving Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  17. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2016-06-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy remains the only treatment option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the chance of long-term survival. If a radical tumor resection is possible, 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved. Pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years and resection approaches have been extended beyond standard procedures, including vascular and multivisceral resections. Consequently, borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR-PDAC), which has recently been defined by the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS), has become a controversial issue with regard to its management in terms of upfront resection vs. neoadjuvant treatment and sequential resection. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy to define resectability of PDAC is a keypoint in this context as well as the surgical and interdisciplinary expertise to perform advanced pancreatic surgery and manage complications. The present mini-review summarizes the current state of definition, management and outcome of BR-PDAC. Furthermore, the topic of ongoing and future studies on neoadjuvant treatment which is closely related to borderline resectability in PDAC is discussed. PMID:26970276

  18. Novel Pretreatment Scoring Incorporating C-reactive Protein to Predict Overall Survival in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Sorafenib Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Tsuchiya, Kaoru; Yasui, Yutaka; Higuchi, Mayu; Yoshida, Tsubasa; Komiyama, Yasuyuki; Takaura, Kenta; Hayashi, Tsuguru; Kuwabara, Konomi; Nakakuki, Natsuko; Takada, Hitomi; Ueda, Masako; Tamaki, Nobuharu; Suzuki, Shoko; Itakura, Jun; Takahashi, Yuka; Izumi, Namiki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to build a prediction score of prognosis for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after sorafenib treatment. Methods A total of 165 patients with advanced HCC who were treated with sorafenib were analyzed. Readily available baseline factors were used to establish a scoring system for the prediction of survival. Results The median survival time (MST) was 14.2 months. The independent prognostic factors were C-reactive protein (CRP) <1.0 mg/dL [hazard ratio (HR) =0.51], albumin >3.5 g/dL (HR =0.55), alpha-fetoprotein <200 ng/mL (HR =0.45), and a lack of major vascular invasion (HR =0.39). Each of these factors had a score of 1, and after classifying the patients into five groups, the total scores ranged from 0 to 4. Higher scores were linked to significantly longer survival (p<0.0001). Twenty-nine patients (17.6%) with a score of 4 had a MST as long as 36.5 months, whereas MST was as short as 2.4 and 3.7 months for seven (4.2%) and 22 (13.3%) patients with scores of 0 and 1, respectively. Conclusions A novel prognostic scoring system, which includes the CRP level, has the ability to stratify the prognosis of patients with advanced stage HCC after treatment with sorafenib. PMID:27781198

  19. A Phase I Dose-Finding Study of Silybin Phosphatidylcholine (Milk Thistle) in Patients With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Abby B.; Narayan, Rupa; Rodriguez, Rosa; Goyal, Abhishek; Jacobson, Judith S.; Kelly, Kara; Ladas, Elena; Lunghofer, Paul J.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Flaig, Thomas W.; Tsai, Wei Yann; Wu, David P. H.; Lee, Valerie; Greenlee, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose per day of silybin phosphatidylcholine (Siliphos) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hepatic dysfunction. Experimental Design Patients with advanced HCC not eligible for other therapies based on poor hepatic function were enrolled in a phase I study of silybin phosphatidylcholine. A standard phase I design was used with 4 planned cohorts, dose escalating from 2, 4, 8, to 12 g per day in divided doses for 12 weeks. Results Three participants enrolled in this single institution trial. All enrolled subjects consumed 2 g per day of study agent in divided doses. Serum concentrations of silibinin and silibinin glucuronide increased within 1 to 3 weeks. In all 3 patients, liver function abnormalities and tumor marker α-fetoprotein progressed, but after day 56 the third patient showed some improvement in liver function abnormalities and inflammatory biomarkers. All 3 participants died within 23 to 69 days of enrolling into the trial, likely from hepatic failure, but it could not be ruled out that deaths were possibly due to the study drug. Conclusion Short-term administration of silybin phosphatidylcholine in patients with advanced HCC resulted in detectable increases in silibinin and its metabolite, silibinin glucuronide. The maximum tolerated dose could not be established. Since patients died soon after enrollment, this patient population may have been too ill to benefit from an intervention designed to improve liver function tests. PMID:23757319

  20. The role of surgery in locally advanced carcinoma of cervix after sub-optimal chemoradiation: Indian scenario

    PubMed Central

    Kundargi, Rajshekar S.; Guruprasad, B.; Hanumantappa, Nikesh; Rathod, Praveen Shankar; Devi, Uma K.; Bafna, U. D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Standard treatment of advanced cervical cancer is concurrent chemoradiation. Radical radiotherapy for carcinoma cervix includes pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with the concomitant platinum based chemotherapy followed by intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) to boost central disease. Management of patients who are suboptimally treated, especially, after unsuccessful ICBT insertion is not well-defined. This study explores the role of hysterectomy in these patients. Materials and Methods: From January 2006 to December 2011, 38 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, in whom ICBT insertion was unsuccessful, were analyzed retrospectively. Operable patients with no parametrial involvement underwent hysterectomy and outcomes (recurrence free and overall survival) were noted. Results: The major complications in post operative period were wound infection, paralytic ileus and bladder atony all of which were conservatively managed with no mortality. At median follow-up of 36 months (range 12-60 months) there was no recurrence in patients with stage 1B2 and stage IIA, 25 out of 38 (65.8%) were event free and the overall survival was 71%. Conclusion: Many patients in Indian scenario receive suboptimal therapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. EBRT with chemotherapy followed by type 1 extra-fascial hysterectomy can be a good alternative for these patients. PMID:24455590

  1. Ultra-deep targeted sequencing of advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma identifies a mutation-based prognostic gene signature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Jung; Huang, Yi; Hsu, An; Tang, Petrus; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chen, Hua-Chien; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have heterogeneous outcomes that limit the implementation of tailored treatment options. Genetic markers for improved prognostic stratification are eagerly awaited. Methods Herein, next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed in 345 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples obtained from advanced OSCC patients. Genetic mutations on the hotspot regions of 45 cancer-related genes were detected using an ultra-deep (>1000×) sequencing approach. Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox regression analyses were used to investigate the associations between the mutation status and disease-free survival (DFS). Results We identified 1269 non-synonymous mutations in 276 OSCC samples. TP53, PIK3CA, CDKN2A, HRAS and BRAF were the most frequently mutated genes. Mutations in 14 genes were found to predict DFS. A mutation-based signature affecting ten genes (HRAS, BRAF, FGFR3, SMAD4, KIT, PTEN, NOTCH1, AKT1, CTNNB1, and PTPN11) was devised to predict DFS. Two different resampling methods were used to validate the prognostic value of the identified gene signature. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that presence of a mutated gene signature was an independent predictor of poorer DFS (P = 0.005). Conclusions Genetic variants identified by NGS technology in FFPE samples are clinically useful to predict prognosis in advanced OSCC patients. PMID:25980437

  2. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Chang, Daniel T.; Raman, Siva P.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan; Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Tryggestad, Erik; Pawlik, Timothy; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Koong, Albert C.; and others

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak}) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver{sub mean} + [2 × Liver{sub sd}]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm{sup 3} or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in

  3. Asian consensus workshop report: expert consensus guideline for the management of intermediate and advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in Asia.

    PubMed

    Han, Kwang-Hyub; Kudo, Masatochi; Ye, Sheng-Long; Choi, Jong Young; Poon, Roonni Tung-Ping; Seong, Jinsil; Park, Joong-Won; Ichida, Takafumi; Chung, Jin Wook; Chow, Pierce; Cheng, Ann-Lii

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly prevalent disease in many Asian countries, accounting for 80% of victims worldwide. Screening programs improve the detection of early HCC and have a positive impact on survival, but the majority of HCC patients in Asia still present with advanced stage disease. The treatment outcomes of HCC are affected by multiple variables, including liver function, performance status of the patient, and tumor stage. Therefore, it is not easy to apply a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach for optimal management. At present, limited numbers of HCC patients are eligible for curative therapies such as surgery or ablation in Asia. Therefore, most patients are eligible for only palliative treatments. For optimal management, the treatment choice is guided by staging systems and treatment guidelines. Numerous staging systems have been proposed and treatment guidelines vary by region. According to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) guideline based on evidence from randomized clinical trials, only transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is recommended for intermediate stage HCC and sorafenib for advanced stage HCC. However, treatment guidelines from Asian countries have adopted several other therapeutic modalities such as a surgical approach, hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, external radiation, and their combinations based on clinical experiences for intermediate and advanced stage HCC. Although TACE is the main therapeutic modality in the intermediate stage, overall therapeutic outcomes depend on the tumor size. In the advanced stage, the prognosis depends on the tumor status, e.g. major vessel invasion or extrahepatic spread. Thus, a new staging system representing prognoses suitable for Asian HCC patients and a corresponding optimal treatment algorithm should be further investigated using evidence-based data, which will finally bring about an Asian consensus for the management of intermediate and advanced stage HCC.

  4. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  5. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  6. Phase II Trial of Cetuximab and Conformal Radiotherapy Only in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer with Concurrent Tissue Sampling Feasibility Study1

    PubMed Central

    Rembielak, Agata I; Jain, Pooja; Jackson, Andrew S; Green, Melanie M; Santorelli, Gillian R; Whitfield, Gillian A; Crellin, Adrian; Garcia-Alonso, Angel; Radhakrishna, Ganesh; Cullen, James; Taylor, M Ben; Swindell, Ric; West, Catharine M; Valle, Juan; Saleem, Azeem; Price, Patricia M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preclinical data have indicated the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agent cetuximab (Erbitux) as a radiosensitizer in pancreatic cancer, but this has not been specifically addressed in a clinical study. We report the results of an original study initiated in 2007, where cetuximab was tested with radiotherapy (RT) alone in locally advanced pancreatic cancer in a phase II trial (PACER). METHODS: Patients (n = 21) received cetuximab loading dose (400 mg/m2) and weekly dose (250 mg/m2) during RT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). Toxicity and disease response end point data were prospectively assessed. A feasibility study of on-trial patient blood and skin sampling was incorporated. RESULTS: Treatment was well tolerated, and toxicity was low; most patients (71%) experienced acute toxicities of grade 2 or less. Six months posttreatment, stable local disease was achieved in 90% of evaluable patients, but only 33% were free from metastatic progression. Median overall survival was 7.5 months, and actuarial survival was 33% at 1 year and 11% at 3 years, reflecting swift metastatic progression in some patients but good long-term control of localized disease in others. High-grade acneiform rash (P = .0027), posttreatment stable disease (P = .0059), and pretreatment cancer antigen 19.9 (CA19.9) level (P = .0042) associated with extended survival. Patient skin and blood samples yielded sufficient RNA and good quality protein, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that cetuximab inhibits EGFR-mediated radioresistance to achieve excellent local control with minimal toxicity but does not sufficiently control metastatic progression in all patients. Translational studies of patient tissue samples may yield molecular information that may enable individual treatment response prediction. PMID:24772208

  7. Impact of Adding Concomitant Chemotherapy to Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuyts, Sandra Dirix, Piet; Clement, Paul M.J.; Poorten, Vincent Vander; Delaere, Pierre; Schoenaers, Joseph; Hermans, Robert; Bogaert, Walter van den

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) schedule combined with concomitant chemotherapy (Cx) in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2007, a total of 90 patients with locoregionally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma underwent irradiation according to a hybrid fractionation schedule consisting of 20 fractions of 2 Gy (once daily) followed by 20 fractions of 1.6 Gy (twice daily) to a total dose of 72 Gy. Concomitant Cx (cisplatinum 100 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered at the start of Weeks 1 and 4. Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with a previous patient group (n = 73) treated with the same schedule, but without concomitant Cx, between 2001 and 2004. Results: The locoregional control (LRC) rate was 70% after 2 years. Two-year overall and 2-year disease-free survival rates were 74% and 60%, respectively. In comparison with the RT-only group, an improvement of 15% in both LRC (p = 0.03) and overall survival (p = 0.09) was observed. All patients were treated to full radiation dose according to protocol, although the Cx schedule had to be adjusted in 12 patients. No acute Grade 4 or 5 toxicity was seen, but incidences of Grade 3 acute mucositis (74.5% vs. 50.7%; p = 0.002) and dysphagia (82.2% vs. 47.9%; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the chemoradiotherapy group compared with patients treated with RT alone. Conclusion: With this chemoradiotherapy regimen, excellent LRC and survival rates were achieved, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  8. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Neuroendocrine Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-15

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor

  9. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  10. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  11. Brachytherapy boost in loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a prospective randomized trial of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstact Background The purpose was to determine whether a brachytherapy boost improves outcomes in patients with advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with standard chemo-radiotherapy. Methods Patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma WHO grades I-III and TNM stages III or non-metastatic stage IV were eligible for this phase III study. Patients were randomized to either arm (A) induction chemotherapy, followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with concomitant cisplatin (n = 139) or arm (B), the same schedule plus a brachytherapy boost to the nasopharynx (n = 135). The EBRT doses given were 70 Gy to the primary tumour and positive lymph nodes and 46 Gy to the negative neck. The additional brachytherapy boost in arm (B) was given by either low dose-rate (LDR – 11 Gy) or high dose-rate (HDR – 3 fractions of 3.0 Gy) brachytherapy. The primary endpoint was 3-year overall survival (OS) and secondary endpoints were: local control, regional control, distant metastasis and grade 3–4 adverse events. Results 274 patients were randomized between September 2004 and December 2008. The two arms were comparable with regard to age, gender, stage and grade. 273 patients completed treatment. Median follow-up was 29 months (0.2-67 months). The effect of treatment arm, country, age, gender, WHO pathology, stage (T3-4, N2-3 versus other) and chemotherapy on overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) was studied. Stage significantly affected OS (p = 0.024) and DFS (p = 0.018) while age significantly affected OS (p = 0.014). None of the other factors studied were significant. The 3-year LRFS was 60.5% and 54.4% in arms A and B respectively (p = 0.647). The 3-year regional control rate in the neck was 59.7% and 54.3% respectively (p = 0.7). Distant metastasis developed in 59.7% of patients in arm A and 55.4% in arm B (p = 0.377). Patients with T1/T2 N + had a 3 year LRFS of 51.8% in Arm A (62 patients) versus 57.9% in Arm B (67

  12. Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulou, E

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery is feasible and safe. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy should be widely adopted for benign lesions of the pancreas. Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy, although technically demanding, in the setting of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a number of advantages including shorter hospital stay, faster recovery, allowing patients to recover in a timelier manner and pursue adjuvant treatment options. Furthermore, it seems that progression-free survival is longer in patients undergoing laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy in comparison with those undergoing open pancreaticoduodenectomy. Minimally invasive middle pancreatectomy seems appropriate for benign or borderline tumors of the neck of the pancreas. Technological advances including intraoperative ultrasound and intraoperative fluorescence imaging systems are expected to facilitate the wide adoption of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. Although, the oncological outcome seems similar with that of open surgery, there are still concerns, as the majority of relevant evidence comes from retrospective studies. Large multicenter randomized studies comparing laparoscopic with open pancreatectomy as well as robotic assisted with both open and laparoscopic approaches are needed. Robotic approach could be possibly shown to be less invasive than conventional laparoscopic approach through the less traumatic intra-abdominal handling of tissues. In addition, robotic approach could enable the wide adoption of the technique by surgeon who is not that trained in advanced laparoscopic surgery. A putative clinical benefit of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery could be the attenuated surgical stress response leading to reduced morbidity and mortality as well as lack of the detrimental immunosuppressive effect especially for the oncological patients. PMID:26530291

  13. Radioembolization using 90Y-resin microspheres for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sangro, Bruno . E-mail: bsangro@unav.es; Bilbao, Jose I.; Boan, Jose; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio; Benito, Alberto; Rodriguez, Javier; Panizo, Angel; Gil, Belen; Inarrairaegui, Mercedes; Herrero, Ignacio; Quiroga, Jorge; Prieto, Jesus

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the antitumor effect of resin microspheres loaded with 90-yttrium against hepatocellular carcinoma and their safety in the setting of liver cirrhosis. Patients and Methods: Data from 24 consecutive patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated by radioembolization in the period from September 2003 to February 2005 were reviewed. Patients received no further antineoplastic therapy. A comprehensive evaluation was performed to prevent the risk of damage due to microsphere misplacing. Patients were discharged the day after microspheres injection. Results: Serious liver toxicity observed among cirrhotic patients in a first period was subsequently prevented by modifying the selection criteria and the method for calculating the activity to be administered. Among 21 patients evaluable for response using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria, a reduction in size of target lesions was observed in all but 1 patient. When considering only target lesions, disease control rate and response rate were 100% and 23.8%, respectively. However, 43% of patients progressed in the liver in the form of new lesions appearing a median time of 3 months after radioembolization. Conclusion: Our experience in these series of patients indicates that radioembolization using resin microspheres has a significant antitumor effect against HCC and that using stringent selection criteria and conservative models for calculating Radiation activity to be administered, radioembolization can be performed safely even in cirrhotic patients.

  14. Pain in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Fasanella, Kenneth E; Davis, Brian; Lyons, John; Chen, Zongfu; Lee, Kenneth K; Slivka, Adam; Whitcomb, David C

    2007-06-01

    Chronic, debilitating abdominal pain is arguably the most important component of chronic pancreatitis, leading to significant morbidity and disability. Attempting to treat this pain, which is too often unsuccessful, is a frustrating experience for physician and patient. Multiple studies to improve understanding of the pathophysiology that causes pain in some patients but not in others have been performed since the most recent reviews on this topic. In addition, new treatment modalities have been developed and evaluated in this population. This review discusses new advances in neuroscience and the study of visceral pain mechanisms, as well as genetic factors that may play a role. Updates of established therapies, as well as new techniques used in addressing pain from chronic pancreatitis, are reviewed. Lastly, outcome measures, which have been highly variable in this field over the years, are addressed. PMID:17533083

  15. Sorafenib plus hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with cisplatin versus sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: randomized phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, M.; Shimizu, S.; Sato, T.; Morimoto, M.; Kojima, Y.; Inaba, Y.; Hagihara, A.; Kudo, M.; Nakamori, S.; Kaneko, S.; Sugimoto, R.; Tahara, T.; Ohmura, T.; Yasui, K.; Sato, K.; Ishii, H.; Furuse, J.; Okusaka, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sorafenib (Sor) is acknowledged as a standard therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of addition of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with cisplatin (SorCDDP) to Sor for the treatment of advanced HCC. Patients and methods We conducted a multicenter open-labeled randomized phase II trial in chemo-naïve patients with advanced HCC with Child-Pugh scores of 5–7. Eligible patients were randomly assigned 2:1 to receive SorCDDP (sorafenib: 400 mg bid; cisplatin: 65 mg/m2, day 1, every 4–6 weeks) or Sor (400 mg bid). The primary end point was overall survival. Results A total of 108 patients were randomized (Sor, n = 42; SorCDDP, n = 66). The median survival in the Sor and SorCDDP arms were 8.7 and 10.6 months, respectively [stratified hazard ratio (95% confidence interval), 0.60 (0.38–0.96), P = 0.031]. The median time to progression and the response rate were, respectively, 2.8 months and 7.3% in the Sor arm and 3.1 months and 21.7% in the SorCDDP arm. The adverse events were more frequent in the SorCDDP arm than in the Sor arm, but well-tolerated. Conclusion SorCDDP yielded favorable overall survival when compared with Sor in patients with advanced HCC. Clinical Trial registration UMIN-CTR (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index-j.htm), identification number: UMIN000005703. PMID:27573564

  16. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathology: changing “landscape”

    PubMed Central

    Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.; Hackeng, Wenzel M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. At time of diagnosis the disease is usually advanced and only a minority of patients are eligible for surgical resection. The overall 5-year survival is 6%. However, survival of patients with early stage pancreatic cancer is significantly better. To improve the prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer, it is essential to diagnose and treat pancreatic cancer in the earliest stage. Prevention of pancreatic cancer by treating noninvasive precursor lesions just before they invade tissues can potentially lead to even better outcomes. Pancreatic carcinogenesis results from a stepwise progression in which accumulating genetic alterations drive neoplastic progression in well-defined precursor lesions, ultimately giving rise to an invasive adenocarcinoma. A thorough understanding of the genetic changes that drive pancreatic carcinogenesis can lead to identification of biomarkers for early detection and targets for therapy. Recent next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies have shed new light on our understanding of the natural history of pancreatic cancer and the precursor lesions that give rise to these cancers. Importantly, there is a significant window of opportunity for early detection and treatment between the first genetic alteration in a cell in the pancreas and development of full-blown pancreatic cancer. The current views on the pathology and genetics of pancreatic carcinogenesis that evolved from studies of pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions are discussed in this review. PMID:26261723

  17. Overexpression of β3 Chains of Laminin-332 is Associated With Clinicopathologic Features and Decreased Survival in Patients With Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Weilin; Wei, Jianfeng; Zhou, Dongkai; Zhao, Xinyi; Song, Wei; Sun, Qiang; Huang, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laminin-332 (LM-332, formerly termed laminin-5) is a heterotrimeric glycoprotein that promotes cellular adhesion and migration. The heterotrimer consists of an α3, a β3, and a γ2 chain. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the clinicopathologic significance of laminin-332β3 (LNβ3) chain expression and determine its influence on survival in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Materials and Methods: Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to validate and detect the expression of LNβ3 mRNA in 37 pancreatic carcinoma tissue specimens and non-neoplastic pancreatic tissue samples. In addition, the protein expression of LNβ3 was detected by immunohistochemistry methods in 96 pancreatic carcinoma specimens and 90 non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues. We analyzed the association between immunohistochemically detected LNβ3 expression in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and clinicopathologic characteristics. Survival curves were completed using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using log-rank analysis. Results: Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that the relative value of LNβ3 mRNA was 1.427±1.554 and 1.423±1.439 by 2−Δ(ΔCt) in pancreatic carcinoma and non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues, respectively, values that were not statistically associated (P=0.991). Immunostaining for LNβ3 was expressed in all patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. LNβ3 expression was related to differentiation (P=0.000) and advanced stage (P=0.034). Tumors with low expression of LNβ3 had a survival advantage compared with tumors that had high expression of LNβ3 (P=0.016). Multivariate analysis indicated that location is an independent predictor of overall survival, whereas other clinicopathologic characteristics such as tumor size, duodenal invasion, differentiation, extent of invasion, hepatic metastasis, and expression of LNβ3 were not. Conclusion: Our results suggest that LNβ3 expression may play a key role in

  18. Hexon modification to improve the activity of oncolytic adenovirus vectors against neoplastic and stromal cells in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tanja; Benihoud, Karim; Vigant, Frédéric; Schmidt, Christoph Q; Schmidt, Christoph Q Andreas; Wortmann, Andreas; Bachem, Max G; Simmet, Thomas; Kochanek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pancreatic carcinoma has an unfavourable prognosis and standard treatment strategies mostly fail in advanced cases. Virotherapy might overcome this resistance to current treatment modalities. However, data from clinical studies with oncolytic viruses, including replicating adenoviral (Ad) vectors, have shown only limited activity against pancreatic cancer and other carcinomas. Since pancreatic carcinomas have a complex tumor architecture and frequently a strong stromal compartment consisting of non-neoplastic cell types (mainly pancreatic stellate cells = hPSCs) and extracellular matrix, it is not surprising that Ad vectors replicating in neoplastic cells will likely fail to eradicate this aggressive tumor type. Because the TGFβ receptor (TGFBR) is expressed on both neoplastic cells and hPSCs we inserted the TGFBR targeting peptide CKS17 into the hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of the capsid protein hexon with the aim to generate a replicating Ad vector with improved activity in complex tumors. We demonstrated increased transduction of both pancreatic cancer cell lines and of hPSCs and enhanced cytotoxicity in co-cultures of both cell types. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated decreased binding of coagulation factor X to CKS17-modified Ad particles and in vivo biodistribution studies performed in mice indicated decreased transduction of hepatocytes. Thus, to increase activity of replicating Ad vectors we propose to relax tumor cell selectivity by genetic hexon-mediated targeting to the TGFBR (or other receptors present on both neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells within the tumor) to enable replication also in the stromal cell compartment of tumors, while abolishing hepatocyte transduction, and thereby increasing safety.

  19. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts signaling cascades are activated in pancreatic fibroblasts, but not in the INS1E insulinoma cell line: Are mesenchymal cells major players in chronic inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Tago, Kazuma; Inoue, Ken-ichi; Ouchi, Motoshi; Miura, Yoshikazu; Kubota, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor that plays an important role in natural immunity. It is suggested that mesenchymal cells are the major players during inflammation. Previously, we reported that advanced glycation end products (AGE), known to be one of the ligands of RAGE, inhibited glucose-induced insulin secretion from ex vivo pancreatic islets, although the mechanism responsible remains largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the cascades operating downstream from RAGE using the insulinoma cell line INS1E and primary-cultured pancreatic fibroblasts as in vitro models for parenchymal (β) cells and mesenchymal cells, respectively. Phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase, inhibitor of nuclear factor κB kinase, and nuclear factor κB was stimulated by AGE or high mobility group binding 1 (HMGB1) in pancreatic fibroblasts, whereas no such effect