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Sample records for advanced peripheral vascular

  1. Peripheral Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Center Back to previous page En español Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy ... blockage including peripheral artery disease or PAD Aortic aneurysms Buerger's Disease Raynaud's Phenomenon Disease of the veins ...

  2. Pretreatment imaging of peripheral vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joshua B; Cogswell, Petrice M; McKusick, Michael A; Binkovitz, Larry A; Riederer, Stephen J; Young, Phillip M

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral vascular malformations (VMs) are complex and diverse vascular lesions which require individualized pretreatment planning. Pretreatment imaging using various modalities, especially magnetic resonance imaging and time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography, is a valuable tool for classifying peripheral VMs to allow proper diagnosis, demonstrate complete extent, identify the nidus, and distinguish between low-flow and high-flow dynamics that determines the treatment approach. We discuss pretreatment imaging findings in four patients with peripheral VMs and how diagnostic imaging helped guide management. PMID:25625123

  3. Increased Expression of Tissue Factor and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Buchs, A. E.; Kornberg, A.; Zahavi, M.; Aharoni, D.; Zarfati, C.; Rapoport, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the correlation between the expression of tissue factor (TF) and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGEs) and vascular complications in patients with longstanding uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2D). TF and RAGE mRNAs as well as TF antigen and activity were investigated in 21 T2D patients with and without vascular complications. mRNA expression was assessed by reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in nonstimulated and advanced glycation end product (AGE) albumin–stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). TF antigen expression was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and TF activity by a modified prothrombin time assay. Basal RAGE mRNA expression was 0.2 ± 0.06 in patients with complications and 0.05 ± 0.06 patients without complications (P = .004). Stimulation did not cause any further increase in either group. TF mRNA was 0.58 ± 0.29 in patients with complications and 0.21 ± 0.18 in patients without complications (P = .003). Stimulation resulted in a nonsignificant increase in both groups. Basal TF activity (U/106 PBMCs) was 18.4 ± 13.2 in patients with complications and 6.96 ± 5.2 in patients without complications (P = .003). It increased 3-fold in both groups after stimulation (P = .001). TF antigen (pg/106 PBMCs) was 33.7 ± 28.6 in patients with complications, 10.4 ± 7.8 in patients without complications (P = .02). Stimulation tripled TF antigen in both groups of patients (P = .001). The RAGE/TF axis is up-regulated inT2Dpatients with vascular complications as compared to patients without complications. This suggests a role for this axis in the pathogenesis of vascular complications in T2D. PMID:15203887

  4. Antithrombotic Therapy After Peripheral Vascular Intervention.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peter; Jones, Schuyler

    2016-03-01

    Cardioprotective medications and risk-factor modification are the hallmarks of treatment for all patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). If symptoms are life-limiting and/or do not respond to conservative treatment, endovascular or surgical revascularization can be considered especially for patients with critical limb ischemia or acute limb ischemia. The rates of peripheral vascular intervention (PVI) have risen dramatically over the past few decades and much of this care have shifted from inpatient hospital settings to outpatient settings and office-based clinics. While PVI rates have surged and technology advancements have dramatically changed the face of PVI, the data behind optimal antithrombotic therapy following PVI is scant. Currently in the USA, most patients are treated with indefinite aspirin therapy and a variable duration of clopidogrel (or other P2Y12 inhibitor)-typically 1 month, 3 months, or indefinite therapy. More observational analyses and randomized clinical trials evaluating clinically relevant outcomes such as cardiovascular morbidity/mortality and the risk of bleeding are needed to guide the optimal role and duration of antithrombotic therapy post-PVI. PMID:26841788

  5. Peripheral vascular imaging and intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. ); Orron, D.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This reference addresses the entire clinical approach to the vascular system from the diagnosis of pathology to surgery or interventional radiological management. All diagnostic imaging modalities currently available are included with specific information on how to interpret various results. It features discussions of the latest therapeutic techniques, including laser angioplasty, intravascular stents, and transluminal embolization.

  6. Fingolimod-Associated Peripheral Vascular Adverse Effects.

    PubMed

    Russo, Margherita; Guarneri, Claudio; Mazzon, Emanuela; Sessa, Edoardo; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2015-10-01

    Fingolimod is the first oral disease-modifying drug approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. The drug is usually well tolerated, and common adverse effects include bradycardia, headache, influenza, diarrhea, back pain, increased liver enzyme levels, and cough. Fingolimod is thought to provide therapeutic benefit by preventing normal lymphocyte egress from lymphoid tissues, thus reducing the infiltration of autoaggressive lymphocytes into the central nervous system. However, because the drug acts on different sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors, it may induce several biological effects by influencing endothelial cell-cell adhesion, angiogenesis, vascular development, and cardiovascular function. We describe a patient with multiple sclerosis who, after 3 weeks of fingolimod administration, developed purplish blotches over the dorsal surface of the distal phalanges of the second and fifth digits and the middle phalanx of the fourth ray, itching, and edema on his left hand, without other evident clinical manifestations. When fingolimod therapy was discontinued, the clinical picture regressed within a few days but reappeared after a rechallenge test. Physicians should be aware of unexpected peripheral vascular adverse effects due to fingolimod use, and patients with vascular-based acropathies should be carefully screened and monitored when taking this drug. PMID:26349949

  7. Advancing and Translating Knowledge in Vascular Medicine.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Marc; Barton, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, physicians have depended on the use of written information to gain knowledge. Book printing and binding introduced by Gutenberg in the fifteenth century revolutionized and accelerated the distribution of information. Advancing medical knowledge and progress is not only linked to the scientific quality of a discovery determining it will be accepted by the peers but also by its communication and sharing of new findings with the medical community. All these factors determine whether new knowledge will advance and improve clinical practice, medical education, and ultimately, patient care, and human health. In the past decade medical publishing has witnessed a revolution with regard to the instant, online availability of published "open access" information, which can be accessed and printed from any computer connected to the internet. As an example, how language and availability of printed information may affect distribution of knowledge, we discuss the publication of the first results of balloon angioplasty in patients with peripheral vascular disease 40 years ago by Andreas Grüntzig, M.D. at the University of Zürich. Vascular Medicine, as part of Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine, will provide open access provided to all published content for sharing and distributing new and most up-to-date information on clinical practice and medical knowledge in vascular medicine. We anticipate that the ongoing transformation of scientific publishing through open access will further accelerate this process and make new knowledge available even faster. Immediate, unrestricted, and rapid access to the most current knowledge published will play a role in maintaining and advancing human vascular health across the globe. PMID:26664857

  8. [Thinking and Problems of Peripheral Vascular Disease Research].

    PubMed

    Shang De-jun

    2016-01-01

    It is necessary to study further syndrome differentiation based treatment of peripheral vascular disease. In order to improve the clinical effect and reduce the rate of amputation, early diagnosis and early intervention are important. Meanwhile, treatment of Chinese medicine should be combined with necessary surgical intervention. It should be important to supplement some details about blood stasis syndrome and activating blood and dissolving stasis therapy of peripheral vascular disease. The application of various Chinese medicine external therapies should not be ignored, especially promoting granulation and wound healing therapy. PMID:26955670

  9. The utility of digital subtraction arteriography in peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kubal, W S; Crummy, A B; Turnipseed, W D

    1983-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA), whether used in conjunction with intravenous or intraarterial injection techniques, has an established role in evaluation of peripheral vascular disease. Use of DSA can reduce the time, cost, and patient discomfort of the standard arteriographic study. While it is limited by field size and patient cooperation in some instances, the utility of noninvasive imaging using intravenous DSA and the added anatomic detail of intraarterial DSA for roadmapping and delineation of small distal vessels provide the basis for future integration of standard arteriographic and DSA methods in assessment of peripheral vascular disease. PMID:6228296

  10. Infrared thermal imaging for detection of peripheral vascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bagavathiappan, S.; Saravanan, T.; Philip, John; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, Baldev; Karunanithi, R.; Panicker, T. M. R.; Korath, M. Paul; Jagadeesan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Body temperature is a very useful parameter for diagnosing diseases. There is a definite correlation between body temperature and diseases. We have used Infrared Thermography to study noninvasive diagnosis of peripheral vascular diseases. Temperature gradients are observed in the affected regions of patients with vascular disorders, which indicate abnormal blood flow in the affected region. Thermal imaging results are well correlated with the clinical findings. Certain areas on the affected limbs show increased temperature profiles, probably due to inflammation and underlying venous flow changes. In general the temperature contrast in the affected regions is about 0.7 to 1° C above the normal regions, due to sluggish blood circulation. The results suggest that the thermal imaging technique is an effective technique for detecting small temperature changes in the human body due to vascular disorders. PMID:20126565

  11. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Complicated by Vascular Erosion in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, Brian P; Farrow, Kathryn N; Kim, Stan; Hunter, Catherine J

    2016-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are widely used in the pediatric population, and their use continues to grow in popularity. These catheters provide a reliable source of venous access to neonatal patients but can also be the cause of life-threatening complications. There are several well-documented complications such as infections, catheter thrombosis, vascular extravasations, and fractured catheters. However, the complication of vascular erosion into the pleural space using both small and silicone-based catheters is rarely described. After obtaining institutional review board approval, we identified 4 cases to review of PICCs complicated by vascular erosions in the past 2 years. Herein, we also review the current literature of PICC complications. Getting the catheter tip as close to the atrial-caval junction as possible and confirmation of this placement are of the utmost importance. The thick wall of the vena cava near the atrium seems to be less likely to perforate; in addition, this position provides increased volume and turbulence to help dilute the hyperosmolar fluid, which seems to also be a factor in this complication. A daily screening chest x-ray in patients with upper extremity PICCs and ongoing parenteral nutrition (PN) are not necessary at this time given the overall low rate of vascular erosion and concerns regarding excessive radiation exposure in pediatric populations. However, a low threshold for chest x-ray imaging in patients with even mild respiratory symptoms in the setting of upper extremity PN is recommended. PMID:25700180

  12. Association between Bacterial Infection and Peripheral Vascular Disease: A Review.

    PubMed

    Budzyński, Jacek; Wiśniewska, Joanna; Ciecierski, Marek; Kędzia, Anna

    2016-03-01

    There are an increasing number of data showing a clinically important association between bacterial infection and peripheral artery disease (PAD). Bacteria suspected of being involved in PAD pathogenesis are: periodontal bacteria, gut microbiota, Helicobacter pylori, and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Infectious agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis via activation of a systemic or local host immunological response to contamination of extravascular tissues or the vascular wall, respectively. A systemic immunological reaction may damage vascular walls in the course of autoimmunological cross-reactions between anti-pathogen antibodies and host vascular antigens (immunological mimicry), pathogen burden mechanisms (nonspecific activation of inflammatory processes in the vascular wall), and neuroendocrine-immune cross-talk. Besides activating the inflammatory pathway, bacterial infection may trigger PAD progression or exacerbation by enhancement of platelet reactivity, by a stimulatory effect on von Willebrand factor binding, factor VIII, fibrinogen, P-selectin activation, disturbances in plasma lipids, increase in oxidative stress, and resistance to insulin. Local inflammatory host reaction and induction of atherosclerotic plaque progression and/or instability result mainly from atherosclerotic plaque colonization by microorganisms. Despite these premises, the role of bacterial infection in PAD pathogenesis should still be recognized as controversial, and randomized, controlled trials are required to evaluate the outcome of periodontal or gut bacteria modification (through diet, prebiotics, and probiotics) or eradication (using antibiotics) in hard and surrogate cardiovascular endpoints. PMID:26900306

  13. Peripheral Vascular Diagnostic Laboratory Record, Office Accounting and Research System

    PubMed Central

    Lofink, Raymond M.; Wolfson, Sidney K.; Lahoda, Edward J.

    1981-01-01

    A computerized Record, Office Accounting, and Research system (“ROAR”) has been developed for use in the Peripheral Vascular Diagnostic Laboratory of Montefiore Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The interactive, menu-driven system utilizes an in-office microcomputer for maintaining patient records with a dial-up link to a time-sharing system at the University of Pittsburgh for performing research activities. Formats for internal storage, screen editing, and printed reports are easily specified to permit additions of new forms and upward-compatible versions of old forms. An on-line patient directory and an expandable library of floppy diskettes provide a large capacity of storage for permanent patient records. An interestingly simple, cost-effective, but powerful combination of three processors using commercial and custom-written software is presented.

  14. [Sleep quality in aged patients with peripheral vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Karina; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2008-03-01

    Peripheral vascular diseases (PVD) are prevalent among the elderly, and, due to their chronic character, result in poor quality of life and poor sleep quality. This study aimed at evaluating sleep quality of elderly people diagnosed with PVD who undergo clinical ambulatory treatment in a university hospital in Campinas, in the State of São Paulo. Subjects (n=50, aged 74 +/- 8 years old) answered the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and provided basic demographic data and PVD history (35 subjects had arterial blockage in lower limbs). Results showed that 34 subjects presented bad sleep quality; sleep length was 5.8 (+/- 2.3) hours, and, according to 23 subjects, night sleep was frequently disturbed by pain (thrice a week or more). Eighteen subjects took analgesics; four took sleep medicines. Findings may have important implications for nurses working with PVD patients, stressing the need to take into account consequences of PVD on sleep disturbances when planning their interventions. PMID:18450142

  15. Advanced noninvasive imaging of spinal vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Eddleman, Christopher S.; Jeong, Hyun; Cashen, Ty A.; Walker, Matthew; Bendok, Bernard R.; Batjer, H. Hunt; Carroll, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal vascular malformations (SVMs) are an uncommon, heterogeneous group of vascular anomalies that can render devastating neurological consequences if they are not diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. Imaging SVMs has always presented a formidable challenge because their clinical and imaging presentations resemble those of neoplasms, demyelination diseases, and infection. Advancements in noninvasive imaging modalities (MR and CT angiography) have increased during the last decade and have improved the ability to accurately diagnose spinal vascular anomalies. In addition, intraoperative imaging techniques have been developed that aid in the intraoperative assessment before, during, and after resection of these lesions with minimal and/or optimal use of spinal digital subtraction angiography. In this report, the authors review recent advancements in the imaging of SVMs that will likely lead to more timely diagnoses and treatment while reducing procedural risk exposure to the patients who harbor these uncommon spinal lesions. PMID:19119895

  16. Economic evaluation of drugs in peripheral vascular disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Drummond, M; Davies, L

    1994-01-01

    Increased pressures on health-care budgets mean that governments require good value for money from the resources devoted to health care. In many countries, measures have been introduced to increase efficiency or to contain health-care costs. These include price controls, limitations on reimbursement of health technologies, budgetary reform in health-care institutions, and the encouragement of competition. Given this changing environment, it is important that drugs and other health technologies be shown to give good value for money. The methods of economic evaluation, such as cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis, can be used to assess the value of drugs and other health technologies. They have been widely applied. The economic evaluation of drugs in peripheral vascular disease and stroke would compare the cost of adding the drug with its benefits. These would include improvements in length and quality of life and the savings in treating vascular events that may be postponed, or lessened in intensity, by effective drug therapy. One study, following a clinical trial of naftidrofuryl in stroke, suggested that there would be significant reductions in costs through reductions in hospital stay if recovery was aided. Further research and a large multicenter trial are under way to confirm these findings. In peripheral artery disease there are no economic data collected alongside clinical trials. It is known, however, that the costs of leg ischemia can be significant. A study in the U.K. found that arterial construction would cost around pounds 7,750 per person (1989 prices) and amputation around pounds 11,000 per person.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7517476

  17. Peripheral vascular effects on auscultatory blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Rabbany, S Y; Drzewiecki, G M; Noordergraaf, A

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the accuracy of the conventional auscultatory method of blood pressure measurement. The influence of the physiologic state of the vascular system in the forearm distal to the site of Korotkoff sound recording and its impact on the precision of the measured blood pressure is discussed. The peripheral resistance in the arm distal to the cuff was changed noninvasively by heating and cooling effects and by induction of reactive hyperemia. All interventions were preceded by an investigation of their effect on central blood pressure to distinguish local effects from changes in central blood pressure. These interventions were sufficiently moderate to make their effect on central blood pressure, recorded in the other arm, statistically insignificant (i.e., changes in systolic [p < 0.3] and diastolic [p < 0.02]). Nevertheless, such alterations were found to modify the amplitude of the Korotkoff sound, which can manifest itself as an apparent change in arterial blood pressure that is readily discerned by the human ear. The increase in diastolic pressure for the cooling experiments was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Moreover, both measured systolic (p < 0.004) and diastolic (p < 0.001) pressure decreases during the reactive hyperemia experiments were statistically significant. The findings demonstrate that alteration in vascular state generates perplexing changes in blood pressure, hence confirming experimental observations by earlier investigators as well as predictions by our model studies. PMID:8463815

  18. Systemic sclerosis induces pronounced peripheral vascular dysfunction characterized by blunted peripheral vasoreactivity and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Frech, Tracy; Walker, Ashley E; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Hopkins, Paul N; Richardson, Russell S; Wray, D Walter; Donato, Anthony J

    2015-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) vasculopathy can result in a digital ulcer (DU) and/or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We hypothesized that bedside brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) testing with duplex ultrasound could be used in SSc patients to identify features of patients at risk for DU or PAH. Thirty-eight SSc patients were compared to 52 age-matched healthy controls from the VAMC Utah Vascular Research Laboratory. Peripheral hemodynamics, arterial structure, and endothelial function were assessed by duplex ultrasound. A blood pressure cuff was applied to the forearm and 5-min ischemia was induced. Post-occlusion, brachial artery vascular reactivity (peak hyperemia/area under the curve [AUC]), shear rate, and endothelial function (FMD) were measured. SSc patients had smaller brachial artery diameters (p < 0.001) and less reactive hyperemia (p < 0.001), peak shear rate (p = 0.03), and brachial artery FMD (p < 0.001) compared with healthy controls. Brachial artery FMD was lower (p < 0.05) in SSc patients with DU. Tertile analysis suggested the 2 lower FMD tertiles (<5.40 %) had a 40-50 % chance of presenting with DU while the SSc patients with highest FMD tertile (>5.40 %) had less than 15 % chance of DU. All brachial artery FMD measurements were similar between SSc patients with and without PAH (all p > 0.05). Compared to healthy controls, SSc patients had significantly smaller brachial artery diameter and blunted peripheral vascular reactivity and endothelial function. SSc patients with DU have even greater impairments in endothelial function compared to those without DU. FMD testing has clinical utility to identify SSc patients at risk for DU. PMID:25511849

  19. Prostacyclin synthesis stimulating plasma factor in patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Strobl-Jäger, E; Fitscha, P; Kaliman, J; Sinzinger, H; Peskar, B A

    1987-08-01

    Human plasma contains a factor capable of stimulating vascular prostacyclin generation even in atherosclerotic vessels with minimal in-vitro capacity for PGI2-synthesis. The activity of this prostacyclin stimulating plasma factor (PSPF) has been reported to be elevated in renal failure and hepatic coma. We are not aware of any data as to whether this PSPF plays a role in maintaining hemostatic balance in patients with peripheral vascular lesions. Therefore, we examined 62 patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD). This study group was subdivided into normo- and hyperlipemic subjects, patients with and without maturity onset diabetes, and plasma beta-thromboglobulin levels higher and lower than 50 ng/ml. 10 healthy sex and age matched persons served as controls. Vascular prostacyclin formation was studied in vitro after incubation of the patients' plasma and a buffer control with various tissue samples (human femoral artery, rat abdominal and thoracic aorta of healthy and of streptozotocin induced diabetic animals, swine endothelial layer and remaining tissue (media and adventitia) and cultured endothelial (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) of minipig arota. In addition, 6-oxo-PFG1 alpha formation by cultured EC and SMC (minipig aorta source) after incubation with tris HCl-buffer or plasma were estimated by means of specific radioimmunoassays. In general, tissue samples and cells incubated in plasma exhibit a marked increase of in-vitro PGI2-formation as compared to buffer. No difference could be found between PSPF of CHD-patients and healthy controls. Similar findings were obtained using incubated vascular tissue and cultured cells by means of the bioassay and specific RIA, respectively. These findings indicate that the PSPF does not seem to be of any clinical relevance in hemostatic regulation in patients with advanced atherosclerosis. PMID:2958884

  20. Pulse oximetry in the evaluation of peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jawahar, D; Rachamalla, H R; Rafalowski, A; Ilkhani, R; Bharathan, T; Anandarao, N

    1997-08-01

    The role of pulse oximetry in the evaluation of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) was investigated. In addition, the value of elevating the limb to improve the sensitivity of detection of PVD by the pulse oximeter was also determined. Pulse oximetry reading in the toes were obtained in 40 young, healthy volunteers and in 40 randomly selected patients referred to the vascular investigation laboratory over a period of two months. All 40 healthy volunteers had normal pulse oximetry readings. Normal pulse oximetry reading in the toes was defined as > 95% O2 Sat and +/-2 of finger pulse oximetry reading. In all 40 patients, pulse oximetry readings were either normal or not detected at all. Since there was no gradation in decrease in the pulse oximetry reading with severity of disease or with elevation of the patient's lower extremity, an absent or no reading was considered as an abnormal result from the test. The frequency of abnormal pulse oximetry readings increased significantly in groups with abnormal ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and also varied significantly with elevation of the patients' lower limbs. In patients with no PVD detected by Doppler (ABPI > 0.9), pulse oximetry readings were normal in all. However, in patients with moderate PVD (ABPI, 0.5-0.9), 84% of the patients' lower limbs had normal pulse oximetry readings and 16% had an abnormal reading at baseline level (flat). An additional 12% of the lower limbs in this group had an abnormal reading on elevation of the limb to 12 inches. In patients with severe PVD (ABPI < 0.5), 54% of the patients' lower limbs had an abnormal reading at baseline and an additional 23% had an abnormal reading at elevation of the limb to 12 inches. In conclusion, pulse oximetry was not a sensitive test for detecting early PVD. PMID:9269142

  1. Massage Therapy Restores Peripheral Vascular Function following Exertion

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Nina C.; Ali, Mohamed M.; Robinson, Austin T.; Norkeviciute, Edita; Phillips, Shane A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if lower extremity exercise-induced muscle injury (EMI) reduces vascular endothelial function of the upper extremity and if massage therapy (MT) improves peripheral vascular function after EMI. Design Randomized, blinded trial with evaluations at 90 minutes, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours. Setting Clinical research center at an academic medical center and laboratory Participants Thirty-six sedentary young adults were randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1) EMI + MT (n=15; mean age ± standard error (SE): 26.6±0.3), 2) EMI only (n=10; mean age ± SE: 23.6±0.4), and 3) MT only (n=11; mean age ± SE: 25.5 ± 0.4). Intervention Participants were assigned to either EMI only (a single bout of bilateral, eccentric leg-press exercise), MT only (30-minute lower extremity massage using Swedish technique), or EMI + MT. Main outcome measures Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was determined by ultrasound at each time point. Nitroglycerin-induced dilation was also assessed (NTG; 0.4 mg). Results Brachial FMD increased from baseline in the EMI + MT group and the MT only group (7.38±0.18 to 9.02±0.28%, p<0.05 and 7.77±0.25 to 10.20±0.22%, p < 0.05, respectively) at 90 minutes remaining elevated until 72 hrs. In the EMI only group FMD was reduced from baseline at 24 and 48 hrs (7.78±0.14 to 6.75±0.11%, p<0.05 and 6.53±0.11, p<0.05, respectively) returning to baseline after 72 hrs. Dilations to NTG were similar over time. Conclusions Our results suggest that MT attenuates impairment of upper extremity endothelial function resulting from lower extremity EMI in sedentary young adults. PMID:24583315

  2. [Quality standards for ultrasonographic assessment of peripheral vascular malformations and vascular tumors. Report of the French Society for Vascular Medicine].

    PubMed

    Laroche, J-P; Becker, F; Khau-Van-Kien, A; Baudoin, P; Brisot, D; Buffler, A; Coupé, M; Jurus, C; Mestre, S; Miserey, G; Soulier-Sotto, V; Tissot, A; Viard, A; Vignes, S; Quéré, I

    2013-02-01

    THE QUALITY STANDARDS OF THE FRENCH SOCIETY OF VASCULAR MEDICINE FOR THE ULTRASONOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF VASCULAR MALFORMATIONS ARE BASED ON THE TWO FOLLOWING REQUIREMENTS: Technical know-how: mastering the use of ultrasound devices and the method of examination. Medical know-how: ability to adapt the methods and scope of the examination to its clinical indication and purpose, and to rationally analyze and interpret its results. AIMS OF THE QUALITY STANDARDS: To describe an optimal method of examination in relation to the clinical question and hypothesis. To achieve consistent practice, methods, glossary, and reporting. To provide good practice reference points, and promote a high-quality process. ITEMS OF THE QUALITY STANDARDS: The three levels of examination; their clinical indications and goals. The reference standard examination (level 2), its variants according to clinical needs. The minimal content of the examination report; the letter to the referring physician (synthesis, conclusion and proposal for further investigation and/or therapeutic management). Commented glossary (anatomy, hemodynamics, semiology). Technical bases. Settings and use of ultrasound devices. Here, we discuss the methods of using ultrasonography for the assessment of peripheral vascular malformations and tumors. PMID:23312609

  3. A Case of Polyarteritis Nodosa Presenting Initially as Peripheral Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Sameer; Lu, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare necrotizing vasculitis that can be progressive and fatal, and its initial presenting symptom may be leg claudication due to peripheral vascular ischemia. To date, there have been fewer than ten case reports of polyarteritis nodosa presenting as peripheral vascular disease. We report a case of a 38-year-old man initially diagnosed to have premature peripheral vascular disease who presented 1 year later with symptoms consistent with giant cell arteritis and subsequently developed bowel ischemia leading to a fatal outcome. Based on the autopsy and the patient’s clinical course, the final diagnosis was polyarteritis nodosa. This case illustrates the challenges in diagnosing polyarteritis nodosa and the importance of considering vasculitis in young patients presenting with atypical presentations of diseases such as peripheral vascular disease or giant cell arteritis. PMID:18560943

  4. Perioperative heparin prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Spebar, M.J.; Collins, G.J. Jr.; Rich, N.M.; Kang, I.Y.; Clagett, G.P.; Salander, J.M.

    1981-12-01

    Perioperative low dose heparin was administered to 24 patients who were compared with 19 control patients undergoing peripheral vascular surgical procedures. This prophylactic measure was ineffective in reducing the incidence of subclinical, postoperative deep venous thrombosis, as indicated by iodine-125 fibrinogen scanning. The data suggest that patients undergoing vascular surgery will not benefit from the routine application of this prophylactic regimen.

  5. Peripheral limb vascular malformations: an update of appropriate imaging and treatment options of a challenging condition

    PubMed Central

    Farrant, J; Chhaya, N; Anwar, I; Marmery, H; Platts, A; Holloway, B

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral vascular malformations encompass a wide spectrum of lesions that can present as an incidental finding or produce potentially life- or limb-threatening complications. They can have intra-articular and intraosseous extensions that will result in more diverse symptomology and present greater therapeutic challenges. Developments in classification, imaging and interventional techniques have helped to improve outcome. The onus is now placed on appropriate detailed preliminary imaging, diagnosis and classification to direct management and exclude other more common mimics. Radiologists are thus playing an increasingly important role in the multidisciplinary teams charged with the care of these patients. By fully understanding the imaging characteristics and image-guided procedures available, radiologists will be armed with the tools to meet these responsibilities. This review highlights the recent advances made in imaging and the options available in interventional therapy. PMID:25525685

  6. Exercise testing and training in patients with peripheral vascular disease and lower extremity amputation.

    PubMed

    Priebe, M; Davidoff, G; Lampman, R M

    1991-05-01

    Patients with peripheral vascular disease have a high risk of coronary artery disease. The risk is even greater when the peripheral vascular disease leads to lower extremity amputation. Exercise testing using lower extremity exercise has been the "gold standard" for screening for coronary artery disease, but many patients with peripheral vascular disease and those with amputations have difficulty doing this type of exercise. Arm exercise ergometry has been shown to be a safe and effective alternative for the detection of coronary artery disease in patients who cannot do leg exercise. This test has also been used to determine safe exercise levels and may be able to predict the ultimate level of prosthetic use in amputees. Exercise training with arm ergometry also improves cardiovascular efficiency and upper body strength in poorly conditioned patients. Studies are needed to appreciate fully the role of exercise testing and training in the recovery of these patients after amputation. PMID:1866958

  7. Simultaneous hybrid peripheral re-vascularization: early results.

    PubMed

    Yurekli, Ismail; Gokalp, Orhan; Gunes, Tevfik; Yilik, Levent; Gurbuz, Ali

    2013-10-01

    Endovascular and open surgical interventions may be combined in treatment of peripheral arterial disease. In this study, we presented our simultaneous hybrid peripheral interventions under the light of current literature data. Eleven patients who were operated for occlusive peripheral arterial disease without aneurysms between June 2008 and November 2010 at our hybrid operating room were investigated retrospectively. Generally, endovascular intervention was performed initially, and then followed by surgery. After hybrid interventions, control angiograms were held during the same session. None of the patients experienced either stent or graft occlusion during early postoperative period. Primary patency rate was found to be 100% for the postoperative first six months. Ankle-brachial indices (ABI) increased significantly during postoperative period and clinical symptoms were relieved in all patients (mean preoperative ABI: 0.43 ± 0.08, mean postoperative sixth month ABI: 0.87 ± 0.08). Peripheral hybrid interventions may be performed both in separate sessions and also simultaneously by experienced teams if an angiography device is available within the operating room. PMID:23518846

  8. High Temporal and Spatial Resolution Imaging of Peripheral Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mostardi, Petrice M.; Young, Phillip M.; McKusick, Michael A.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the performance of a recently developed 3D time-resolved CE-MRA technique, Cartesian Acquisition with Projection-Reconstruction-like sampling (CAPR), for accurate characterization and treatment planning of vascular malformations of the periphery. Materials and Methods Twelve patient studies were performed (eight female, four male; average age, 33 years). The protocol consisted of three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved CE-MRA followed by a single late phase T1-weighted acquisition. Vascular malformations were imaged in the forearm, hand, thigh, and foot. Imaging evaluation was performed for accurate characterization of lesion type, identification of feeding and draining vessels, involvement with surrounding tissue, overall quality for diagnosis and treatment planning, and correlation with conventional angiography. Results Time-resolved CE-MRA allowed for characterization of malformation flow and type. Feeding and draining vessels were identified in all cases. Overall quality for diagnosis and treatment planning was 3.58/4.0, and correlation with conventional angiography was scored as 3.89/4.0. Conclusion The CAPR time series has been shown to portray the temporal dynamics and structure of vascular malformations as well as the normal vasculature with high quality. CAPR time-resolved imaging is able to accurately characterize high and low flow lesions, allowing for pretreatment lesion assessment and treatment planning. Delayed imaging is important to capture complete filling of very slow flow vascular malformations. PMID:22674646

  9. Peripheral Retinal Vascular Patterns in Patients with Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, San-Ni; Hwang, Jiunn-Feng; Wu, Wen-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    This is an observational study of fluorescein angiography (FA) in consecutive patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in Changhua Christian Hospital to investigate the peripheral retinal vascular patterns in those patients. All patients had their age, sex, axial length (AXL), and refraction status (RF) recorded. According to the findings in FA of the peripheral retina, the eyes were divided into 4 groups: in group 1, there was a ramified pattern of peripheral retinal vasculature with gradual tapering; in group 2, there was an abrupt ending of peripheral vasculature with peripheral non-perfusion; in group 3, there was a curving route of peripheral vasculature forming vascular arcades or anastomosis; and in group 4, the same as in group 3, but with one or more wedge-shaped avascular notches. Comparisons of age, sex, AXL, and RF, association of breaks with lattice degeneration and retinal non-perfusion, surgical procedures utilized, and mean numbers of operations were made among the four groups. Of the 73 eyes studied, there were 13 eyes (17.8%) in group 1, 3 eyes (4.1%) in group 2, 40 eyes (54.8%) in group 3 and 17 eyes (23.3%) in group 4. Significant differences in age, AXL and RF, and association of retinal breaks to non-perfusion were noted among the four groups. Patients in group 1 had older ages, while younger ages were noted in groups 3 and 4. Eyes in group 1 had the shortest average AXL and were least myopic in contrast to the eyes in groups 3 and 4. Association of retinal breaks and retinal non-perfusion was significantly higher in groups 2, 3 and 4 than in group 1. In conclusion, peripheral vascular anomalies are common in cases with RRD. Patients with peripheral non-perfusion tend to be younger, with longer axial length and have the breaks associated with retinal non-perfusion. PMID:26909812

  10. [Vascular rehabilitation in patients with peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    de Holanda, Ana; Aubourg, Marion; Dubus-Bausière, Valérie; Eveno, Dominique; Abraham, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Lower limb peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent debilitating disease associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. The benefit of rehabilitation in PAD patients has been largely demonstrated, both for patients that undergo amputation, and for patients with claudication. In these latter patients, rehabilitation programs rely on a variety of additional techniques or tools, among which: stretching, specific muscle proprioception, walking and a variety of other physical activities, exercise or situations adapted to community life, lower limb and respiratory physiotherapy, patient's education, support for smoking cessation and healthy nutrition, social support, etc. Whether rehabilitation is performed in specialised integrated structures or performed on a home-based basis, various clinicians are involved. Despite evidence-based proof of efficacy, rehabilitation of PAD patients with claudication is still under-used. PMID:23669319

  11. One minute oxygen uptake in peripheral ischemic vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Auchincloss, J H; Meade, J W; Gilbert, R; Chamberlain, B E

    1980-01-01

    Six males, ages 31-58, with ischemic vascular disease of the lower extremities, underwent treadmill testing with measurement of oxygen uptake at 45-60 seconds of exercise (VO2-45-60) as the test score. Tests were performed at 41, 123 and 164 watts of power against gravity. Depressed values were found in five subjects with aortic, iliac or common femoral disease but normal values in a subject with narrowing of the left superficial femoral artery. Reconstructive surgery resulted in normal values in four subjects retested. In three of these a calculation was made of the increased volume of oxygen uptake during the first minute of exercise associated with postsurgical improvement. The average was 430 ml, a value high enough to suggest increased aerobic metabolism of exercising muscles. PMID:7362287

  12. Effect of Artificial Nerve Conduit Vascularization on Peripheral Nerve in a Necrotic Bed

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Yuki; Murayama, Akira; Takeshita, Katsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several types of artificial nerve conduit have been used for bridging peripheral nerve gaps as an alternative to autologous nerves. However, their efficacy in repairing nerve injuries accompanied by surrounding tissue damage remains unclear. We fabricated a novel nerve conduit vascularized by superficial inferior epigastric (SIE) vessels and evaluated whether it could promote axonal regeneration in a necrotic bed. Methods: A 15-mm nerve conduit was implanted beneath the SIE vessels in the groin of a rat to supply it with blood vessels 2 weeks before nerve reconstruction. We removed a 13-mm segment of the sciatic nerve and then pressed a heated iron against the dorsal thigh muscle to produce a burn. The defects were immediately repaired with an autograft (n = 10), nerve conduit graft (n = 8), or vascularized nerve conduit graft (n = 8). Recovery of motor function was examined for 18 weeks after surgery. The regenerated nerves were electrophysiologically and histologically evaluated. Results: The vascularity of the nerve conduit implanted beneath the SIE vessels was confirmed histologically 2 weeks after implantation. Between 14 and 18 weeks after surgery, motor function of the vascularized conduit group was significantly better than that of the nonvascularized conduit group. Electrophysiological and histological evaluations revealed that although the improvement did not reach the level of reinnervation achieved by an autograft, the vascularized nerve conduit improved axonal regeneration more than did the conduit alone. Conclusion: Vascularization of artificial nerve conduits accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration, but further research is required to improve the quality of nerve regeneration. PMID:27257595

  13. Association between abdominal aortic diameter and peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, C; Bonapace, S; Starr, J; Radia, M; Bulpitt, C J

    1997-09-01

    Fifty-four elderly people 81.2 years +/- 7.4 (mean age +/- s.d., range 66-98 years) were selected. These included 20 men (78.6 +/- 6.4 years, range 70-91 years) and 34 women (82.2 +/- 7.6 years, range 66-98 years). The relationship between the size of the abdominal aorta and various cardiovascular risk indicators such as calf:-brachial systolic pressure ratio, plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and random blood glucose were examined. Abdominal aortic diameter correlated well with calf:-brachial systolic ratio measured by Doppler method over the posterior tibial artery and taking the lowest result of the right and left side (r = -0.28, P = 0.04). This correlation tended to be stronger in men (r = -0.55, P = 0.02) compared to women (r = -0.10, P = 0.57). However, the relationship tended to be confined to the systolic pressure in the left leg, raising the hypothesis that left-sided vascular disease is better related to aortic diameter, possibly due to a difference in the effects of reflected waves between the two sides. This needs further investigation. The contrast between the sexes was seen in the absence of any significant difference in resting blood pressure and calf:brachial systolic pressure ratio between the two. This finding suggests that the sex differences in the relationship between the size of the abdominal aorta and calf:brachial systolic pressure ratio are related to intrinsic properties of the arterial wall. PMID:9364278

  14. Vascular Imaging: The Evolving Role of the Multidisciplinary Team Meeting in Peripheral Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Andrew; Roditi, Giles

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the importance of preinterventional cross-sectional imaging in the evaluation of peripheral arterial disease, as well as discussing the pros and cons of each imaging modality. The importance of a multidisciplinary team approach is emphasized. PMID:25435657

  15. US-guided peripheral vascular interventions, comments on the EFSUMB guidelines.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Christoph Frank Frank; Horn, Rudolf; Morf, Susanne; Chiorean, Liliana; Dong, Yi; Cui, Xin Wu; Atkinson, Nathan; Jenssen, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral venous as well as arterial punctures have traditionally been performed on the basis of designated anatomical landmarks. However, due to patients' individual anatomy and vessel pathology and depending on individual operators' skill, this landmark approach is associated with a significant failure rate and complication risk. This review comments on the evidence-based recommendations on ultrasound (US)-guided vascular access which have been published recently within the framework of Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS) of the European Federation of Societies for US in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) from a clinical practice point of view. Part 1 of the review had its focus on general aspects of US- guidance and on central venous access, whereas part 2 refers to peripheral vascular access. PMID:27239660

  16. Acute Changes in Peripheral Vascular Tonus and Systemic Circulation during Static Stretching.

    PubMed

    Inami, Takayuki; Baba, Reizo; Nakagaki, Akemi; Shimizu, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the acute effect of static stretching (SS) on peripheral vascular tonus and to clarify the effect of SS on systemic circulation. Twenty healthy young male volunteers performed a 1-min SS motion of the right triceps surae muscle, repeated five times. The peripheral vascular tonus (|d/a| ratio) was obtained using second derivatives of the photoplethysmogram readings before, during, and after SS. Heart rate and blood pressure (BP) were also measured. The |d/a| ratio and BP were transiently, but significantly, elevated during SS and returned to baseline immediately after SS. Furthermore, we observed a significant correlation between the amount of change in the |d/a| ratio and the ankle range of motion during SS (r = 0.793 to 0.832, P = 0.01). These responses may be caused by mechanical stress during SS. PMID:25833293

  17. Perceptions of Canadian vascular surgeons toward pharmacological risk reduction in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Omran, Mohammed; Lindsay, Thomas F; Major, Jennifer; Jawas, Ali; Leiter, Larry A; Verma, Subodh

    2006-09-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are at a markedly higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, with evidence indicating that risk-reduction pharmacotherapy can serve to attenuate cardiovascular events in these patients. Given the central role of vascular surgeons in the treatment of patients with PAD, we sought to determine their perceptions and knowledge of risk-reduction pharmacotherapy in patients with PAD. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 79 Canadian vascular surgeons who attended the 2004 annual meeting of the Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery, the largest and most representative meeting of its kind in Canada. The recommended targets of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood glucose, and blood pressure were known to 53.8%, 40.4%, and 57.7% of vascular surgeons, respectively. The majority of vascular surgeons (65.4%) reported screening for risk factors in <50% of cases. Although 90.4% of vascular surgeons would recommend antiplatelet therapy for PAD, only 5.8% would recommend angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and 19.2% would recommend lipid-lowering therapy with statins. Eighty-four percent of Canadian vascular surgeons indicated that their self-assessment of risk reduction in PAD was average to below average, yet 90.4% of them believed that risk-reduction therapy should be recommended or initiated by vascular surgeons. Canadian vascular surgeons' perceptions toward risk reduction in PAD identify knowledge and action gaps, despite the recognition that recommending and instituting therapy is important to patient care. Given the heightened risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with PAD, these data have important implications. PMID:16871436

  18. Comparison of Angioseal and Manual Compression in Patients Undergoing Transfemoral Coronary and Peripheral Vascular Interventional Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Abdullah M.; Elsharawy, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Vascular closure devices (VCDs) were introduced in the early 1990s with the goal of limiting the time, labor, bed rest, and patient discomfort associated with manual compression (MC) for hemostasis after cardiovascular interventions. However, its advantage over MC has not been extensively studied after interventional procedures. The aim of this study was to do prospective, randomized study comparing the safety and efficacy of the Angio-Seal (AS) to that of MC in patients undergoing transfemoral coronary and peripheral vascular interventional procedure. A prospective, randomized trial was undertaken on consecutive series of patients admitted to King Fahd Hospital of the University for transfemoral coronary and peripheral vascular interventional procedures over 1 year. The study was designed to compare the hemostasis time in minutes and the incidence of vascular complications in patients receiving AS with those undergoing MC. All patients were on antiplatelets and received heparin during the procedure. During the study period, 160 patients were included, 80 in each group. There was a significant difference in mean time to hemostasis in minutes (15.83 ± 1.63 minutes for MC and 0.42 ± 0.04 minutes for the AS; p < 0.001), time to ambulation in minutes (280 ± 15 for MC and 120 for AS; p = 0.04) and in minor complications (33.8% in MC vs. AS 5%; p < 0.001). However, the major complication rate did not significantly differ between the two groups (0% in AS vs. 2.5% in MC; p = 0.15). AS was found to achieve rapid closure of the femoral access site safely in patients undergoing coronary and peripheral vascular interventional procedures under antiplatelets and systemic heparinization. PMID:26060385

  19. Arm exercise testing with myocardial scintigraphy in asymptomatic patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, S.; Rubler, S.; Bryk, H.; Sklar, B.; Glasser, L.

    1989-04-01

    Arm exercise with myocardial scintigraphy and oxygen consumption determinations was performed by 33 men with peripheral vascular disease, 40 to 74 years of age (group 2). None had evidence of coronary disease. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects (group 1) were also tested to determine the normal endurance and oxygen consumption during arm exercise in their age group and to compare the results with those obtained during a standard treadmill performance. The maximal heart rate, systolic blood pressure, pressure rate product, and oxygen consumption were all significantly lower for arm than for leg exercise. However, there was good correlation between all these parameters for both types of exertion. The maximal heart rate, work load and oxygen consumption were greater for group 1 subjects than in patients with peripheral vascular disease despite similar activity status. None of the group 1 subjects had abnormal arm exercise ECGs, while six members of group 2 had ST segment changes. Thallium-201 scintigraphy performed in the latter group demonstrated perfusion defects in 25 patients. After nine to 29 months of follow-up, three patients who had abnormal tests developed angina and one of them required coronary bypass surgery. Arm exercise with myocardial scintigraphy may be an effective method of detecting occult ischemia in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Those with good exercise tolerance and no electrocardiographic changes or /sup 201/T1 defects are probably at lower risk for the development of cardiac complications, while those who develop abnormalities at low exercise levels may be candidates for invasive studies.

  20. Effects of peripheral sympathectomy on thermoregulatory vascular control in the rabbit ear.

    PubMed

    Smith, T L; Koman, L A; Gordon, E S; Holden, M B; Smith, B P

    1998-01-01

    A rabbit ear model of the human digit was utilized to determine the vascular response to peripheral sympathectomy. Vascular responses were evaluated by subjecting chronically instrumented rabbits to a cold stress before and after sympathectomy surgery. The typical response to cold stress is for ear temperatures and auricular cutaneous perfusion to decrease during the cooling phase of the test and to increase toward baseline levels during the rewarming phase after cold exposure. Following peripheral sympathectomy, ear temperatures were significantly increased during both the cooling and rewarming phase of the cold stress test although overall ear perfusion and skin perfusion were not different from sham-operated rabbits. The responses observed in the rabbit ear following peripheral sympathectomy appear to mimic those noted in patients receiving digital peripheral sympathectomies for the treatment of refractory pain and ulceration. Peripheral sympathectomy may result in clinical improvements in patients because it improves both total digital and nutritional cutaneous blood flow. Peripheral sympathectomy in normal rabbit ears does not result in altered perfusion patterns with cold exposure although ear temperature is significantly higher. This pattern of changes suggests that the distribution of extremity perfusion is altered even though overall extremity perfusion and cutaneous perfusion per se are not significantly different from sham-operated controls. Complete sympathectomy was accompanied by a persistent increase in ear temperature and a dissociation between conductance and microvascular perfusion. Auricular conductance was transiently increased and then decreased to levels below preoperative control values. Microvascular perfusion is decreased immediately following amputation/replantation and thereafter increases. PMID:9674929

  1. Common Aging Signature in the Peripheral Blood of Vascular Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongbo; Han, Guangchun; Wang, Jiajia; Zeng, Fan; Li, Yuanming; Shao, Shaoju; Song, Fuhai; Bai, Zhouxian; Peng, Xing; Wang, Yan-Jiang; Shi, Xiangqun; Lei, Hongxing

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the two most dominant forms of dementia in elderly people. Due to the large overlap between AD and VaD in clinical observations, great controversies exist regarding the distinction and connection between these two types of senile dementia. Here for the first time, we resort to the gene expression pattern of the peripheral blood to compare AD and VaD objectively. In our previous work, we have demonstrated that the dysregulation of gene expression in AD is unique among the examined diseases including neurological diseases, cancer, and metabolic diseases. In this study, we found that the dysregulation of gene expression in AD and VaD is quite similar to each other at both functional and gene levels. Interestingly, the dysregulation started at the early stages of the diseases, namely mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). We have also shown that this signature is distinctive from that of peripheral vascular diseases. Comparison with aging studies revealed that the most profound change in AD and VaD, namely ribosome, is consistent with the accelerated aging scenario. This study may have implications to the common mechanism between AD and VaD. PMID:26099307

  2. Treatment of a High-Risk Diabetic Patient with Peripheral Vascular Disease and Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Latricia L; Kalmar, Garrett; Driver, Vickie R

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of calcaneal osteomyelitis that was surgically resected from a patient with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease. A 91-year-old male with history of type 2 diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, balloon angioplasty, and recent (2 months ago) stent of the superficial femoral artery presented to the emergency department with a left heel wound infection probed to bone. The patient reported having been on intravenous Zosyn for several months via an outside infectious disease provider for clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis, but noted no improvement. This report includes information regarding the clinical examination and imaging findings, which were used to assess this high-risk patient. Our patient underwent a partial calcanectomy and completed a 6-week course of intravenous antibiotics. The purpose of this case report is to illustrate limb preservation in a high-risk patient with compromised vascular supply who underwent a partial calcanectomy for treatment of calcaneal osteomyelitis. The patient underwent surgical resection of the calcaneus without complications and healed unremarkably with the ability to ambulate while wearing an ankle foot orthosis with a custom shoe. This report was authorized for publication as an educational report to contribute to generalizable knowledge and does not include any patient health information. PMID:27423990

  3. Increase in whole-body peripheral vascular resistance during three hours of air or oxygen prebreathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.; Conkin, J.; Dierlam, J. J.; Stanford, J., Jr.; Riddle, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Male and female subjects prebreathed air or 100% oxygen through a mask for 3.0 hours while comfortably reclined. Blood pressures, heart rate, and cardiac output were collected before and after the prebreathe. Peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) was calculated from these parameters and increased by 29% during oxygen prebreathing and 15% during air prebreathing. The oxygen contributed substantially to the increase in PVR. Diastolic blood pressure increased by 18% during the oxygen prebreathe while stystolic blood pressure showed no change under either procedure. The increase in PVR during air prebreathing was attributed to procedural stress common to air and oxygen prebreathing.

  4. Clinical evaluation of a near-infrared tissue spectrometer in peripheral vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xuefeng; Mao, Jian-Min; Xu, Xiaorong; Elmandjra, Mohamed; Bush, Robin; Christenson, Linda; O'Keefe, Bill; Bry, John

    2003-07-01

    We report results of a feasibility clinical evaluation of the near-infrared Photonify Tissue Spectrometer in detection of peripheral vascular disease (PVD). In the evaluation, using a blood pressured cuff, we measure changes in oxygen saturation (StO2) during a temporary occlusion of blood inflow. We use the post-occlusive StO2 recovery rate and the time needed for 80% recovery as parameters to differentiate healthy subjects from subjects with PVD, and obtained high diagnostic accuracy in 19 subjects enrolled in the clinical evaluation. This may suggest that the tissue spectrometer could be useful in diagnosis of PVD.

  5. Catheter Securement Systems for Peripherally Inserted and Nontunneled Central Vascular Access Devices

    PubMed Central

    Krenik, Karen M.; Smith, Graham E.

    2016-01-01

    Sutureless catheter securement systems are intended to eliminate risks associated with sutures. The clinical acceptability of a novel system was investigated compared with the current method of securement for peripherally inserted central catheters (19 facilities using StatLock or sutures) or nontunneled central vascular access devices (3 facilities using StatLock or sutures or HubGuard + Sorbaview Shield). More than 94% of respondents rated the novel system as same, better, or much better than their current product. More than 82% of respondents were willing to replace their current system with the new one. PMID:27379679

  6. Association Between Peripheral Vascular Endothelial Function and Progression of Open-Angle Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Hsiu; Su, Wei-Wen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Cheng, Shih-Tsung; Su, Cheng-Wen; Ho, Wang-Jing

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between Humphrey visual field progression and peripheral vascular endothelial function in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG), assessed by noninvasive endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD).Forty OAG patients, among which 22 had normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) and 18 had primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) were enrolled. Each enrolled patient underwent a thorough ophthalmological examination including the Humphrey visual field test and measurement of FMD via high-resolution 2-dimensional ultrasonographic imaging of the brachial artery. Blood samples were evaluated for biochemistry and lipid profiles as well as levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). The annual change of threshold sensitivity of the visual field in each test location were analyzed with pointwise linear regression. The correlation between long-term visual field progression and FMD was evaluated.A mean follow-up of 7.47 ± 1.84 years revealed a faster progression rate over the superior visual field in all 40 OAG patients (superior field -0.24 ± 0.67 dB/y, inferior field -0.10 ± 0.59 dB/y, P = 0.37). However, only the annual sensitivity change of the inferior peripheral field showed correlation with baseline FMD. There was no significant difference in the change slope of visual field between NTG and POAG patients.A correlation between baseline brachial artery FMD and visual field progression was observed in the inferior peripheral field in patients with NTG and POAG. This result suggests that peripheral vascular endothelial dysfunction may be related to glaucoma progression. PMID:26962832

  7. Vascular Effects of Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Stirban, Alin; Tschöpe, Diethelm

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated lately demonstrating that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play an important role in the development of diabetic and cardiovascular complications as well as the development of other chronic diseases. AGEs originating from diet have a significant contribution to the AGEs body pool and therefore dietary interventions aiming at reducing AGEs load are believed to exert health promoting effects. This review summarizes the evidence from clinical studies regarding effects of dietary AGEs on the vascular system, highlighting also the different aspects of vascular tests. It also advocates an extension of dietary recommendations towards the promotion of cooking methods that reduce dietary AGEs in consumed foods. PMID:26089897

  8. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and diabetic vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2005-02-01

    Diabetic vascular complication is a leading cause of acquired blindness, end-stage renal failure, a variety of neuropathies and accelerated atherosclerosis, which could account for disabilities and high mortality rates in patients with diabetes. Chronic hyperglycemia is essentially involved in the development and progression of diabetic micro- and macroangiopathy. Among various metabolic derangements implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complication, advanced glycation end product (AGE) hypothesis is most compatible with the theory of 'hyperglycemic memory'. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of diabetic vascular complication, specially focusing on AGEs and their receptor (RAGE) system. Several types of AGE inhibitors and their therapeutic implications in this devastating disorder are also discussed here. PMID:18220586

  9. VEGF gene therapy for coronary artery disease and peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Henrik Sandvad; Rasmussen, Camilla Sandvad; Macko, Jennifer

    2002-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are significant medical problems worldwide. Although substantial progress has been made in prevention as well as in the treatment, particularly of CAD, there are a large number of patients, who despite maximal medical treatment have substantial symptomatology and who are not candidates for mechanical revascularization. Therapeutic angiogenesis represents a novel, conceptually appealing treatment option. Ad{sub GV}VEGF121.10 (BIOBYPASS) is an adenovector, carrying the transgene encoding for human vascular endothelial growth factor 121 (VEGF{sub 121}). A number of preclinical studies have demonstrated angiogenic activity of BIOBYPASS, not only anatomically but also functionally. Phase I clinical studies have demonstrated that intramyocardial infection of BIOBYPASS in patients with severe CAD as well as intramuscular injections of BIOBYPASS in patients with severe peripheral vascular disease (PVD) was well tolerated; furthermore, these studies provided some intriguing indications of activity, which led to initiation of major randomized Phase II 'proof-of-concept' studies. This paper provides a review of the rationale behind BIOBYPASS as well as a summary of pertinent preclinical and early clinical data.

  10. The human peripheral lymph node vascular addressin. An inducible endothelial antigen involved in lymphocyte homing.

    PubMed Central

    Michie, S. A.; Streeter, P. R.; Bolt, P. A.; Butcher, E. C.; Picker, L. J.

    1993-01-01

    The extravasation of blood-borne lymphocytes into organized lymphoid tissues and sites of chronic inflammation is directed in part by interactions of lymphocyte surface adhesion molecules, known as homing receptors, with tissue-selective endothelial ligands called vascular addressins. In mice and humans, lymphocyte L-selectin and the peripheral lymph node addressin (PNAd) form a homing receptor-endothelial ligand pair involved in lymphocyte traffic to peripheral lymph node (PLN). We have examined the tissue distribution and function of human PNAd, using monoclonal antibody MECA-79 and in vitro assays of L-selectin-dependent lymphocyte binding. We demonstrate that PNAd is expressed by human high endothelial venules (HEV) in lymphoid tissues which support lymphocyte adhesion via a PLN-associated recognition system. MECA-79 inhibits adhesion to these HEV of a cell line that binds predominantly via the PLN-homing receptor, L-selectin, but has no effect on adhesion by a mucosal HEV-binding cell line. Furthermore, MECA-79 blocks binding of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to both PLN and tonsil HEV, but not significantly to HEV in the appendix. In addition, we demonstrate PNAd induction on venules at chronic inflammatory sites in humans, particularly sites with severe or long-standing chronic inflammatory involvement. These results confirm that PNAd functions as a PLN vascular addressin in humans, and that in addition to directing normal lymphocyte recirculation to lymph nodes and tonsils, this addressin likely participates in lymphocyte recruitment to sites of chronic inflammation. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:8256856

  11. Advanced bronchoscopy for the diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions.

    PubMed

    Asano, Fumihiro

    2016-07-01

    Bronchoscopy to examine peripheral pulmonary lesions is performed using a bronchoscope with an outer diameter of 5-6mm under fluoroscopy, but the diagnostic yield can be insufficient. Problems with transbronchial biopsy include a limited range of bronchoscope insertion, difficulty in guiding a bronchoscope and biopsy instruments to lesions, and insufficient confirmation of the arrival of biopsy instruments at the target lesion; as such, new techniques have been used to overcome these individual problems. Radial-endobronchial ultrasound is used to identify peripheral pulmonary lesions and sampling sites. In a meta-analysis, the diagnostic yield, that of lesions smaller than 2cm, and complication rate were 73, 56.3, and 1.0%, respectively. Virtual bronchoscopic navigation is a method to guide a bronchoscope to peripheral lesions under direct vision using virtual bronchoscopic images of the bronchial route, and the diagnostic yield, that of 2-cm or smaller lesions, and complication rate were 73.8, 67.4, and 1.0%, respectively. Electromagnetic navigation utilizes electromagnetism; the diagnostic yield was 64.9-71%, and the pneumothorax complication rate was 4% for this modality. Ultrathin bronchoscopes can be advanced to the peripheral bronchus under direct vision in contrast to normal-size bronchoscopes, and the diagnostic yield and pneumothorax complication rates were reported to be 63 and 1.5%, respectively. The overall diagnostic yield of these new techniques on meta-analysis was 70%, a higher yield than that obtained with conventional transbronchial biopsy. Each technique has advantages and disadvantages, and the investigation of appropriate combinations corresponding to individual cases is necessary. PMID:27424820

  12. Beneficial effects through aggressive coronary screening for type 2 diabetes patients with advanced vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Sugiyama, Takehiro; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kishimoto, Miyako; Noto, Hiroshi; Morooka, Miyako; Kubota, Kazuo; Kamimura, Munehiro; Hara, Hisao; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kakei, Masafumi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Glycemic control alone does not reduce cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and routine screening of all T2D patients for asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) is not effective for preventing acute cardiac events. We examined the effectiveness of an aggressive screening protocol for asymptomatic CAD in T2D patients with advanced vascular complications.We designed a 3-year cohort study investigating the effectiveness of the aggressive coronary screening for T2D patients with advanced vascular complications and no known coronary events using propensity score adjusted analysis at a national center in Japan. Eligibility criteria included T2D without known coronary events and with any 1 of the following 4 complications: advanced diabetic retinopathy, advanced chronic kidney disease, peripheral artery disease, or cerebrovascular disease. In the aggressive screening group (n = 122), all patients received stress single photon emission computed tomography and those exhibiting myocardial perfusion abnormalities underwent coronary angiography. In the conventional screening group (n = 108), patients were examined for CAD at the discretion of their medical providers. Primary endpoint was composite outcome of cardiovascular death and nonfatal cardiovascular events.Asymptomatic CAD with ≥70% stenosis was detected in 39.3% of patients completing aggressive screening. The proportions achieving revascularization and receiving intensive medical therapy within 90 days after the screening were significantly higher in the aggressive screening group than in the conventional screening group [19.7% vs 0% (P < 0.001) and 48.4% vs 9.3% (P < 0.001), respectively]. The cumulative rate of primary composite outcome was significantly lower in the aggressive screening group according to a propensity score adjusted Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio, 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.12-0.96; P = 0.04).Aggressive coronary screening for T2D patients

  13. Association between vascular-poor area of primary tumors and epidermal growth factor receptor gene status in advanced lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Yosuke; Masago, Katsuhiro; Kubo, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Daichi; Sakamori, Yuichi; Nagai, Hiroki; Kim, Young Hak; Togashi, Kaori; Mishima, Michiaki

    2012-12-01

    Mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR mutation) is a very important marker in the treatment for non-small cell lung cancer. Since signaling from this receptor induces tumor-associated angiogenesis, we hypothesized that lung cancers with EGFR mutations tend to develop locally with increased angiogenesis. Thus, the association between vascular-poor area of primary tumors and EGFR status was retrospectively investigated in advanced lung adenocarcinomas. To assess vascular-poor area, contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans taken before initial treatment for lung cancer were analyzed, together with primary tumor location (peripheral or central) and size. We analyzed 178 patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. EGFR mutations were detected in 95 of the 178 patients (53.4 %). EGFR mutation was found to be significantly related to women (P = 0.0070), never-smokers (P < 0.0001), and tumors without vascular-poor area (P < 0.0001). Based on a multivariate analysis, presence of EGFR mutations was independently associated with never-smokers (P = 0.0046), lack of vascular-poor area (P = 0.0001), and tumor size >30 mm (P = 0.0080). EGFR mutations were found in 41 of 51 never-smokers without vascular-poor area (80.4 %), 19 of 36 never-smokers with vascular-poor area (52.8 %), 19 of 37 current or former-smokers without vascular-poor area (51.4 %), and 16 of 54 current or former-smokers with vascular-poor area (29.6 %). This study showed an association between vascular-poor area of primary tumors and EGFR status. As a consequence, evaluation using a combination of smoking status and vascular-poor area allows us to predict presence of EGFR mutations at a high frequency. PMID:22492281

  14. Enhanced Vascular PI3K/Akt-NOX Signaling Underlies the Peripheral NMDAR-Mediated Pressor Response in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Marie A.; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for peripheral N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated vascular oxidative stress and pressor response are not known. We conducted integrative (in vivo) and ex vivo biochemical studies to test the hypothesis that ROS-dependent calcium influx, triggered by activation of vascular kinases, underlies the NMDAR-mediated pressor response. Pharmacological inhibition of PI3K/Akt (Wortmannin; 15 μg/kg), PKC (Chelerythrine; 5 mg/kg, i.v.), Ca2+ influx (nifedipine; 0.35 or 0.75 mg/kg) or NOX (apocynin; 5 mg/kg) attenuated the peripheral NMDAR-mediated pressor response in conscious male Sprague-Dawley rats. NMDAR activation enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt, ERK1, JNK and p38 (Western blot) and NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity in vascular tissues collected during the pressor response caused by NMDA infusion (180 μg/kg/min, 30 min). Further, ex vivo studies showed that wortmannin, chelerythrine or apocynin abrogated the NMDAR-mediated vascular NO and ROS generation and NOX activation in the vasculature. These findings implicate vascular PI3K/Akt-PKC signaling in the peripheral NMDAR-mediated increases in vascular NO and NOX activation (ROS), which ultimately lead to calcium influx and pressor response in conscious rats. PMID:24336015

  15. Quantitative near-infrared spectroscopy on patients with peripheral vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, Maria-Angela; Fantini, Sergio; Palumbo, Renato; Pasqualini, Leonella; Vaudo, Gaetano; Franceschini, Edoardo; Gratton, Enrico; Palumbo, Barbara; Innocente, Salvatore; Mannarino, Elmo

    1998-01-01

    We have used near-infrared spectroscopy to measure the hemoglobin saturation at rest and during exercise on patients affected by peripheral vascular disease (PVD). The instrument used in our study is a frequency-domain tissue oximeter which employs intensity modulated (110 MHz) laser diodes. We examined 9 subjects, 3 of which were controls and 6 were patients affected by stage II PVD. The optical probe was located on the calf muscle of the subjects. The measurement protocol consisted of: (1) baseline (approximately 5 min); (2) stationary bicycle exercise (approximately 5 min); (3) recovery (approximately 15 min). The change in hemoglobin saturation during exercise ((Delta) Y) and the recovery time after exercise (trec) were significantly greater in the PVD patients ((Delta) Y equals -21 +/- 3%, trec equals 5.9 +/- 3.8 min) than in the control subjects ((Delta) Y equals 2 +/- 3%, trec equals 0.6 +/- 0.1 min).

  16. Quantitative near-infrared spectroscopy on patients with peripheral vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, Maria A.; Fantini, Sergio; Palumbo, Renato; Pasqualini, Leonella; Vaudo, Gaetano; Franceschini, Edoardo; Gratton, Enrico; Palumbo, Barbara; Innocente, Salvatore; Mannarino, Elmo

    1997-12-01

    We have used near-infrared spectroscopy to measure the hemoglobin saturation at rest and during exercise on patients affected by peripheral vascular disease (PVD). The instrument used in our study is a frequency-domain tissue oximeter which employs intensity modulated (110 MHz) laser diodes. We examined 9 subjects, 3 of which were controls and 6 were patients affected by stage II PVD. The optical probe was located on the calf muscle of the subjects. The measurement protocol consisted of: (1) baseline (approximately 5 min); (2) stationary bicycle exercise (approximately 5 min); (3) recovery (approximately 15 min). The change in hemoglobin saturation during exercise ((Delta) Y) and the recovery time after exercise (trec) were significantly greater in the PVD patients ((Delta) Y equals -21 +/- 3%, trec equals 5.9 +/- 3.8 min) than in the control subjects ((Delta) Y equals 2 +/- 3%, trec equals 0.6 +/- 0.1 min).

  17. Central and peripheral pulmonary vascular resistance: Implications for who should undergo pulmonary thromboendarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Poullis, Mike

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy remains a technically challenging procedure with variable outcomes with regard to improvement in pulmonary function. Reducing the resistance to flow between the pulmonary valve and the pulmonary capillary bed is the key aim of surgery. The resistance to flow is due to the combination of resistance due to the central clot and distal capillary resistance. We hypothesise that the use of fluid mechanics in combination with modern radiology and electronic circuit theory can potentially predict who should or should not undergo a thromboendarterectomy. Electronic circuit theory of two resistors in series was utilised to demonstrate the concept of a model of a central clot and the peripheral pulmonary capillary bed. A simplified 2D model of the lungs utilising finite element analysis and Poiseuille's law was constructed for proof of principle. Modelling predicts that cardiac output and anatomical obstruction interplay and can have profound effects on the outcomes after thromboendarterectomy. Identical pulmonary artery pressures, due to differing cardiac outputs and identical anatomical obstructions due to thrombus can have very different physiological outcomes with regard to changes in pulmonary artery pressure. Modelling the pulmonary vasculature to determine central and peripheral pulmonary vascular resistance may help in predicting who should undergo pulmonary thromboendarterectomy. Mathematical modelling can potentially predict which patients have haemodynamically significant clots in their pulmonary arteries that thromboendarterectomy may potentially help in the setting of pulmonary capillary disease. PMID:25997984

  18. IMPAIRED VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR-A AND INFLAMMATION IN SUBJECTS WITH PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Parker, Donald E.; Montgomery, Polly S.; Sosnowska, Danuta; Casanegra, Ana I.; Esponda, Omar L.; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna; Sonntag, William E.

    2014-01-01

    We compared apoptosis, cellular oxidative stress, and inflammation of cultured endothelial cells treated with sera from 130 subjects with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and 36 control subjects with high burden of co-morbid conditions and cardiovascular risk factors. Secondly, we compared circulating inflammatory, antioxidant capacity, and vascular biomarkers between the groups. The groups were not significantly different (p>0.05) on apoptosis, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical antioxidant capacity, and nuclear factor k-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells. Circulating tissue necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) (p=0.016) and interleukin-8 (p=0.006) were higher in the PAD group, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) (p=0.023) was lower. PAD does not impair the endothelium beyond that which already occurs from co-morbid conditions and cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with claudication. However, subjects with PAD have lower circulating VEGF-A than controls, and higher circulating inflammatory parameters of TNFα and IL-8. PMID:24006146

  19. Initial trial of argon ion laser endarterectomy for peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene, J.; Ott, R.A.; Baribeau, Y.; McColgan, S.J.; Berns, M.W.; Mason, G.R. )

    1990-08-01

    In the initial of open laser endarterectomy, 16 patients underwent 18 reconstructions for claudication (13 patients), rest pain (3 patients), and gangrene (2 patients). The mean (+/- SD) preoperative ankle arm index was 0.53 +/- 0.18. The laser endarterectomies were aorto-bi-iliac (1 patient), iliac (1 patient), superficial femoral (7 patients), profunda femoral (7 patients), and popliteal-posterior tibial (2 patients). All operations included surgical exposure, vascular control, administration of heparin, and an arteriotomy. Atheromas were dissected from arteries with argon ion laser radiation (power, 1.0 W). End points were welded with laser light. Arteries were closed primarily. The laser endarterectomies were 6 to 60 cm long and required 168 J to 2447.5 J. All patients had symptomatic relief, with a postoperative ankle arm index of 0.97 +/- 0.10. There were no arterial perforations from laser radiation. Surgical complications included early thrombosis requiring thrombectomy (3 patients) and hematoma requiring evacuation (1 patient). The laser endarterectomies have an 88% patency at 1 year. Open endarterectomy can be performed with laser radiation. A larger clinical trial is necessary to define the indications for laser endarterectomy in peripheral vascular disease.

  20. An antiangiogenic isoform of VEGF-A contributes to impaired vascularization in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Kazuto; MacLauchlan, Susan; Ngo, Doan Thi-Minh; Shimizu, Ippei; Fuster, Jose Javier; Katanasaka, Yasufumi; Yoshida, Sumiko; Qiu, Yan; Yamaguchi, Terry P; Matsushita, Tadashi; Murohara, Toyoaki; Gokce, Noyan; Bates, David O; Hamburg, Naomi M; Walsh, Kenneth

    2014-12-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) generates tissue ischemia through arterial occlusions and insufficient collateral vessel formation. Vascular insufficiency in PAD occurs despite higher circulating levels of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), a key regulator of angiogenesis. Here we show that clinical PAD is associated with elevated levels of an antiangiogenic VEGF-A splice isoform (VEGF-A165b) and a corresponding reduction in levels of the proangiogenic VEGF-A165a splice isoform. In mice, VEGF-A165b expression was upregulated by conditions associated with impaired limb revascularization, including leptin deficiency, diet-induced obesity, genetic ablation of the secreted frizzled-related protein 5 (Sfrp5) adipokine and transgenic overexpression of Wnt5a in myeloid cells. In a mouse model of PAD, delivery of VEGF-A165b inhibited revascularization of ischemic hind limbs, whereas treatment with an isoform-specific neutralizing antibody reversed impaired revascularization caused by metabolic dysfunction or perturbations in the Wnt5a-Sfrp5 regulatory system. These results indicate that inflammation-driven expression of the antiangiogenic VEGF-A isoform can contribute to impaired collateralization in ischemic cardiovascular disease. PMID:25362254

  1. Effects of real and simulated weightlessness on the cardiac and peripheral vascular functions of humans: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Wang, Hanqing; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Weightlessness is an extreme environment that can cause a series of adaptive changes in the human body. Findings from real and simulated weightlessness indicate altered cardiovascular functions, such as reduction in left ventricular (LV) mass, cardiac arrhythmia, reduced vascular tone and so on. These alterations induced by weightlessness are detrimental to the health, safety and working performance of the astronauts, therefore it is important to study the effects of weightlessness on the cardiovascular functions of humans. The cardiovascular functional alterations caused by weightlessness (including long-term spaceflight and simulated weightlessness) are briefly reviewed in terms of the cardiac and peripheral vascular functions. The alterations include: changes of shape and mass of the heart; cardiac function alterations; the cardiac arrhythmia; lower body vascular regulation and upper body vascular regulation. A series of conclusions are reported, some of which are analyzed, and a few potential directions are presented. PMID:26224491

  2. Age and sex influence the balance between maximal cardiac output and peripheral vascular reserve.

    PubMed

    Ridout, Samuel J; Parker, Beth A; Smithmyer, Sandra L; Gonzales, Joaquin U; Beck, Kenneth C; Proctor, David N

    2010-03-01

    We evaluated the influence of age and sex on the relationship between central and peripheral vasodilatory capacity. Healthy men (19 younger, 12 older) and women (17 younger, 17 older) performed treadmill and knee extensor exercise to fatigue on separate days while maximal cardiac output (Q, acetylene uptake) and peak femoral blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) were measured, respectively. Maximal Q was reduced with age similarly in men (Y: 23.6 +/- 2.7 vs. O: 17.4 +/- 3.5 l/min; P < 0.05) and women (Y: 17.7 +/- 1.9 vs. O: 12.3 +/- 1.6 l/min; P < 0.05). Peak FBF was similar between younger (Y) and older (O) men (Y: 2.1 +/- 0.5 vs. O: 2.2 +/- 0.7 l/min) but was lower in older women compared with younger women (Y: 1.9 +/- 0.4 vs. O: 1.4 +/- 0.4 l/min; P < 0.05). Maximal Q was positively correlated with peak FBF in men (Y: r = 0.55, O: r = 0.74; P < 0.05) but not in women (Y: r = 0.34, O: r = 0.10). Normalization of cardiac output to appendicular muscle mass and peak FBF to quadriceps mass reduced the correlation between these variables in younger men (r = 0.30), but the significant association remained in older men (r = 0.68; P < 0.05), with no change in women. These data suggest that 1) aerobic capacity is associated with peripheral vascular reserve in men but not women, and 2) aging is accompanied by a more pronounced sex difference in this relationship. PMID:19959767

  3. Increased peripheral vascular disease risk progressively constrains perfusion adaptability in the skeletal muscle microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Frisbee, Jefferson C; Butcher, Joshua T; Frisbee, Stephanie J; Olfert, I Mark; Chantler, Paul D; Tabone, Lawrence E; d'Audiffret, Alexandre C; Shrader, Carl D; Goodwill, Adam G; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Brooks, Steven D; Brock, Robert W; Lombard, Julian H

    2016-02-15

    To determine the impact of progressive elevations in peripheral vascular disease (PVD) risk on microvascular function, we utilized eight rat models spanning "healthy" to "high PVD risk" and used a multiscale approach to interrogate microvascular function and outcomes: healthy: Sprague-Dawley rats (SDR) and lean Zucker rats (LZR); mild risk: SDR on high-salt diet (HSD) and SDR on high-fructose diet (HFD); moderate risk: reduced renal mass-hypertensive rats (RRM) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR); high risk: obese Zucker rats (OZR) and Dahl salt-sensitive rats (DSS). Vascular reactivity and biochemical analyses demonstrated that even mild elevations in PVD risk severely attenuated nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and caused progressive shifts in arachidonic acid metabolism, increasing thromboxane A2 levels. With the introduction of hypertension, arteriolar myogenic activation and adrenergic constriction were increased. However, while functional hyperemia and fatigue resistance of in situ skeletal muscle were not impacted with mild or moderate PVD risk, blood oxygen handling suggested an increasingly heterogeneous perfusion within resting and contracting skeletal muscle. Analysis of in situ networks demonstrated an increasingly stable and heterogeneous distribution of perfusion at arteriolar bifurcations with elevated PVD risk, a phenomenon that was manifested first in the distal microcirculation and evolved proximally with increasing risk. The increased perfusion distribution heterogeneity and loss of flexibility throughout the microvascular network, the result of the combined effects on NO bioavailability, arachidonic acid metabolism, myogenic activation, and adrenergic constriction, may represent the most accurate predictor of the skeletal muscle microvasculopathy and poor health outcomes associated with chronic elevations in PVD risk. PMID:26702145

  4. [Hearing disorders in peripheral arterial vascular diseases. A contribution on hearing loss in the aged].

    PubMed

    Böhme, G

    1987-12-01

    Otologic-audiologic examination was carried out in 171 patients (aged between 37-86; average age 64) with confirmed internal angiologic peripheral arterial vascular disease. Additional findings were observed in 94 of these patients who revealed an obliteration of the internal carotid artery or cerebral ischaemic stroke. Diseases of the ear were excluded clinically and audiologically. The mean hearing loss shows a sensory-neural high-tone loss in the tone audiogram. The range of scatter increases proportionately to the increase in tone loss. If compared with the physiologic examination of geriatric patients, the total word comprehension and minimal discrimination loss in the speech audiogram point towards a pathologic impairment of hearing in old age. The total word comprehension amounts to 251.20% in the 51-60 age group, 250.40% in the persons 61-70 years of age, 180.96% for the 71-80 age group and 131.67% for those over 80 years of age. The minimal discrimination loss comprises 4.00% for the 51-60 age group, 4.19% for the 61-70 group, 21.35% for 71-80 age bracket and 35.62% for those over 80. On the strength of these findings, an arterial sclerotic vascular disease should be considered as one of the multifactorial genesis of hearing impairment in old age. Special attention should be focussed on decompensation of the total word comprehension and minimal discrimination loss before the age of eighty. This would contribute towards a differentiation of physiologic and pathologic hearing diseases in old age. PMID:3431312

  5. Exercise performance and peripheral vascular insufficiency improve with AMPK activation in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Baltgalvis, Kristen A; White, Kathy; Li, Wei; Claypool, Mark D; Lang, Wayne; Alcantara, Raniel; Singh, Baljit K; Friera, Annabelle M; McLaughlin, John; Hansen, Derek; McCaughey, Kelly; Nguyen, Henry; Smith, Ira J; Godinez, Guillermo; Shaw, Simon J; Goff, Dane; Singh, Rajinder; Markovtsov, Vadim; Sun, Tian-Qiang; Jenkins, Yonchu; Uy, Gerald; Li, Yingwu; Pan, Alison; Gururaja, Tarikere; Lau, David; Park, Gary; Hitoshi, Yasumichi; Payan, Donald G; Kinsella, Todd M

    2014-04-15

    Intermittent claudication is a form of exercise intolerance characterized by muscle pain during walking in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Endothelial cell and muscle dysfunction are thought to be important contributors to the etiology of this disease, but a lack of preclinical models that incorporate these elements and measure exercise performance as a primary end point has slowed progress in finding new treatment options for these patients. We sought to develop an animal model of peripheral vascular insufficiency in which microvascular dysfunction and exercise intolerance were defining features. We further set out to determine if pharmacological activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) might counteract any of these functional deficits. Mice aged on a high-fat diet demonstrate many functional and molecular characteristics of PAD, including the sequential development of peripheral vascular insufficiency, increased muscle fatigability, and progressive exercise intolerance. These changes occur gradually and are associated with alterations in nitric oxide bioavailability. Treatment of animals with an AMPK activator, R118, increased voluntary wheel running activity, decreased muscle fatigability, and prevented the progressive decrease in treadmill exercise capacity. These functional performance benefits were accompanied by improved mitochondrial function, the normalization of perfusion in exercising muscle, increased nitric oxide bioavailability, and decreased circulating levels of the endogenous endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine. These data suggest that aged, obese mice represent a novel model for studying exercise intolerance associated with peripheral vascular insufficiency, and pharmacological activation of AMPK may be a suitable treatment for intermittent claudication associated with PAD. PMID:24561866

  6. Fibrin Sealant Improves Hemostasis in Peripheral Vascular Surgery: A Randomized Prospective Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Worthington G.; Burks, Sandra G.; Gagne, Paul J.; Kagan, Steven A.; Lawson, Jeffrey H.; Spotnitz, William D.

    2003-01-01

    . Conclusions FS achieved more rapid hemostasis than traditional techniques in this peripheral vascular procedure. FS use appeared to be safe for this procedure. PMID:12796584

  7. Optical coherence tomography and hyperspectral imaging of vascular recovery in a model of peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Kristin M.; Sit, Wesley W.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Duvall, Craig L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) leads to an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life. The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is the most commonly used system for studying the mechanisms of collateral vessel formation and for testing new PAD therapies, but there is a lack of techniques for acquiring physiologically-relevant, quantitative data intravitally in this model. In this work, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were applied to the mouse HLI model over a time course. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaged changes in blood flow (Doppler OCT) and microvessel morphology (speckle variance OCT) through the skin of haired mice with high resolution. Hyperspectral imaging was also used to quantify blood oxygenation. In ischemic limbs, blood oxygenation in the footpad was substantially reduced after induction of ischemia followed by complete recovery by three weeks, consistent with standard measures. Three dimensional images of the vasculature distal to vessel occlusion acquired with speckle variance OCT revealed changes in OCT flow signal and vessel morphology. Taken together, OCT and hyperspectral imaging enable intravital acquisition of both functional and morphological data which fill critical gaps in understanding structure-function relationships that contribute to recovery in the mouse HLI model. Therefore, these optical imaging methods hold promise as tools for studying the mechanisms of vascular recovery and evaluating novel therapeutic treatments in preclinical studies.

  8. Assessment by dipyridamole-thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy of coronary risk before peripheral vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, R.N.; Tellier, P.; Larmignat, P.; Azorin, J.; Fischbein, L.; Beaudet, B.; Cadilhac, P.; Cupa, M.; De Saint Florent, G.; Vulpillat, M.

    1988-05-01

    From October 1983 to January 1985, 46 patients (38 men and 8 women; average age, 60 years; range, 37 to 83 years) underwent peripheral vascular surgery of either the internal carotid artery or the arteries of the lower limbs. Each patient had a thorough clinical examination, an ECG, and a dipyridamole-thallium-201 myocardial scan before operation. On the basis of results, they were divided into two groups: 20 patients with and 26 patients without chronic ischemic heart disease. Three major cardiac events were noted during or after a period of 1 month after surgery: There were two deaths due to cardiac ischemic events and one patient had postoperative unstable angina pectoris. These three patients were classified in the coronary group (NS). When the patients were classified on the basis of whether or not there was thallium redistribution on serial images after infusion of dipyridamole, 14 with redistribution and 32 without redistribution were noted. The three patients who had major cardiac events were in the former group (p less than 0.04). Our data suggest that patients in whom redistribution occurs have a high incidence of postoperative ischemic events. These patients should be considered for particular preoperative coronary care to avoid major postoperative cardiac events and to increase chances of survival.

  9. Microvascular perfusion heterogeneity contributes to peripheral vascular disease in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Frisbee, Jefferson C; Goodwill, Adam G; Frisbee, Stephanie J; Butcher, Joshua T; Wu, Fan; Chantler, Paul D

    2016-04-15

    A major challenge facing public health is the increased incidence and prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, a clinical condition characterized by excess adiposity, impaired glycaemic control, dyslipidaemia and moderate hypertension. The greatest concern for this syndrome is the profound increase in risk for development of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) in afflicted persons. However, ongoing studies suggest that reductions in bulk blood flow to skeletal muscle may not be the primary contributor to the premature muscle fatigue that is a hallmark of PVD. Compelling evidence has been provided suggesting that an increasingly spatially heterogeneous and temporally stable distribution of blood flow at successive arteriolar bifurcations in metabolic syndrome creates an environment where a large number of the pre-capillary arterioles have low perfusion, low haematocrit, and are increasingly confined to this state, with limited ability to adapt perfusion in response to a challenged environment. Single pharmacological interventions are unable to significantly restore function owing to a divergence in their spatial effectiveness, although combined therapeutic approaches to correct adrenergic dysfunction, elevated oxidant stress and increased thromboxane A2 improve perfusion-based outcomes. Integrated, multi-target therapeutic interventions designed to restore healthy network function and flexibility may provide for superior outcomes in subjects with metabolic syndrome-associated PVD. PMID:25384789

  10. Marvels, Mysteries, and Misconceptions of Vascular Compensation to Peripheral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    ZIEGLER, MATTHEW A.; DISTASI, MATTHEW R.; BILLS, RANDALL G.; MILLER, STEVEN J.; ALLOOSH, MOUHAMAD; MURPHY, MICHAEL P.; AKINGBA, A. GEORGE; STUREK, MICHAEL; DALSING, MICHAEL C.; UNTHANK, JOSEPH L.

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a major health problem and there is a significant need to develop therapies to prevent its progression to claudication and critical limb ischemia. Promising results in rodent models of arterial occlusion have generally failed to predict clinical success and led to questions of their relevance. While sub-optimal models may have contributed to the lack of progress, we suggest that advancement has also been hindered by misconceptions of the human capacity for compensation and the specific vessels which are of primary importance. We present and summarize new and existing data from humans, Ossabaw miniature pigs, and rodents which provide compelling evidence that natural compensation to occlusion of a major artery (i) may completely restore perfusion, (ii) occurs in specific pre-existing small arteries, rather than the distal vasculature, via mechanisms involving flow-mediated dilation and remodeling (iii) is impaired by cardiovascular risk factors which suppress the flow-mediated mechanisms and (iv) can be restored by reversal of endothelial dysfunction. We propose that restoration of the capacity for flow-mediated dilation and remodeling in small arteries represents a largely unexplored potential therapeutic opportunity to enhance compensation for major arterial occlusion and prevent the progression to critical limb ischemia in the peripheral circulation. PMID:20141596

  11. Sensitivity and specificity of QTc dispersion for identification of risk of cardiac death in patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Darbar, D.; Luck, J.; Davidson, N.; Pringle, T.; Main, G.; McNeill, G.; Struthers, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether QTc dispersion, which is easily obtained from a standard electrocardiogram, can predict those patients with peripheral vascular disease who will subsequently suffer a cardiac death, despite having no cardiac symptoms or signs. DESIGN: Patients with peripheral vascular disease were followed up for five years after they had had coronary angiography, radionuclide ventriculography, and their QTc dispersion calculated from their 12 lead electrocardiogram. SUBJECTS: 49 such patients were then divided into three groups: survivors (34), cardiac death (12), and non-cardiac death (3). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Survival. RESULTS: The mean (SD; range) ejection fractions were similar in all three groups: survivors 45.9 (11.0; 27.0-52.0), cardiac death 44.0 (7.90; 28.5-59.0), and non-cardiac death 45.3 (4.55; 39.0-50.0). QTc dispersion was significantly prolonged in the cardiac death group compared with in the survivors (86.3(23.9; 41.0-139) v 56.5 (25.4; 25.0-164); P = 0.002). A QTc dispersion > or = 60 ms had a 92% sensitivity and 81% specificity in predicting cardiac death, QTc dispersion in patients with diffuse coronary artery disease was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than in those with no disease or disease affecting one, two, or three vessels. CONCLUSIONS: There is a strong link between QTc dispersion and cardiac death in patients with peripheral vascular disease. QTc dispersion may therefore be a cheap and non-invasive way of assessing the risk of cardiac death in patients with peripheral vascular disease. PMID:8611874

  12. Peripheral artery disease is associated with severe impairment of vascular function.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Soroosh; Aasen, Jonathan G; Holbrook, Monika; Khemka, Abhishek; Sharmeen, Farhana; LeLeiko, Rebecca M; Tabit, Corey E; Farber, Alik; Eberhardt, Robert T; Gokce, Noyan; Vita, Joseph A; Hamburg, Naomi M

    2013-04-01

    Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have higher cardiovascular event rates than patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD) and abnormal endothelial function predicts cardiovascular risk in PAD and CAD. We investigated the hypothesis that PAD is associated with a greater degree of impairment in vascular function than CAD. We used several non-invasive tests to evaluate endothelial function in 1320 men and women with combined PAD and CAD (n = 198), PAD alone (n = 179), CAD alone (n = 466), or controls aged > 45 years without CAD or PAD (n = 477). Patients with PAD had lower brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (5.1 ± 3.9% PAD and CAD, 5.9 ± 4.4% PAD alone) compared to patients with CAD alone (7.0 ± 4.5%) and no PAD or CAD (8.1 ± 5.1%, p < 0.0001). In multivariable models adjusting for clinical covariates and the presence of CAD, PAD remained associated with lower flow-mediated dilation (p < 0.0001). PAD was associated also with lower nitroglycerin-mediated dilation and reactive hyperemia. Patients with both PAD and CAD had a lower digital pulse amplitude tonometry (PAT) ratio in unadjusted models but not in adjusted models. Flow-mediated dilation was modestly associated with PAT ratio in patients with atherosclerotic disease (r = 0.23, p < 0.0001) but not among control participants (r = 0.008, p = 0.93). Our findings indicate that patients with PAD have greater impairment of vasodilator function and are consistent with the possibility that endothelial dysfunction may contribute to adverse cardiovascular prognosis in PAD. PMID:23509089

  13. Peripheral artery disease is associated with severe impairment of vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Soroosh; Aasen, Jonathan G; Holbrook, Monika; Khemka, Abhishek; Sharmeen, Farhana; LeLeiko, Rebecca M; Tabit, Corey E; Farber, Alik; Eberhardt, Robert T; Gokce, Noyan; Vita, Joseph A; Hamburg, Naomi M

    2013-01-01

    Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have higher cardiovascular event rates than patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD) and abnormal endothelial function predicts cardiovascular risk in PAD and CAD. We investigated the hypothesis that PAD is associated with a greater degree of impairment in vascular function than CAD. We used several non-invasive tests to evaluate endothelial function in 1320 men and women with combined PAD and CAD (n = 198), PAD alone (n = 179), CAD alone (n = 466), or controls aged > 45 years without CAD or PAD (n = 477). Patients with PAD had lower brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (5.1 ± 3.9% PAD and CAD, 5.9 ± 4.4% PAD alone) compared to patients with CAD alone (7.0 ± 4.5%) and no PAD or CAD (8.1 ± 5.1%, p < 0.0001). In multivariable models adjusting for clinical covariates and the presence of CAD, PAD remained associated with lower flow-mediated dilation (p < 0.0001). PAD was associated also with lower nitroglycerin-mediated dilation and reactive hyperemia. Patients with both PAD and CAD had a lower digital pulse amplitude tonometry (PAT) ratio in unadjusted models but not in adjusted models. Flow-mediated dilation was modestly associated with PAT ratio in patients with atherosclerotic disease (r = 0.23, p < 0.0001) but not among control participants (r = 0.008, p = 0.93). Our findings indicate that patients with PAD have greater impairment of vasodilator function and are consistent with the possibility that endothelial dysfunction may contribute to adverse cardiovascular prognosis in PAD. PMID:23509089

  14. Advances and Future Applications of Augmented Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jones, Salazar; Eisenberg, Howard M; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries remain a significant source of long lasting morbidity, disability, and economic costs. Much research continues to be performed in areas related to improving the surgical outcomes of peripheral nerve repair. In this review, the physiology of peripheral nerve regeneration and the multitude of efforts to improve surgical outcomes are discussed. Improvements in tissue engineering that have allowed for the use of synthetic conduits seeded with neurotrophic factors are highlighted. Selected pre-clinical and available clinical data using cell based methods such as Schwann cell, undifferentiated, and differentiated stem cell transplantation to guide and enhance peripheral nerve regeneration are presented. The limitations that still exist in the utility of neurotrophic factors and cell-based therapies are outlined. Strategies that are most promising for translation into the clinical arena are suggested. PMID:27618010

  15. Exercise performance and peripheral vascular insufficiency improve with AMPK activation in high-fat diet-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; White, Kathy; Li, Wei; Claypool, Mark D.; Lang, Wayne; Alcantara, Raniel; Singh, Baljit K.; Friera, Annabelle M.; McLaughlin, John; Hansen, Derek; McCaughey, Kelly; Nguyen, Henry; Smith, Ira J.; Godinez, Guillermo; Shaw, Simon J.; Goff, Dane; Singh, Rajinder; Markovtsov, Vadim; Sun, Tian-Qiang; Jenkins, Yonchu; Uy, Gerald; Li, Yingwu; Pan, Alison; Gururaja, Tarikere; Lau, David; Park, Gary; Hitoshi, Yasumichi; Payan, Donald G.

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent claudication is a form of exercise intolerance characterized by muscle pain during walking in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Endothelial cell and muscle dysfunction are thought to be important contributors to the etiology of this disease, but a lack of preclinical models that incorporate these elements and measure exercise performance as a primary end point has slowed progress in finding new treatment options for these patients. We sought to develop an animal model of peripheral vascular insufficiency in which microvascular dysfunction and exercise intolerance were defining features. We further set out to determine if pharmacological activation of 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) might counteract any of these functional deficits. Mice aged on a high-fat diet demonstrate many functional and molecular characteristics of PAD, including the sequential development of peripheral vascular insufficiency, increased muscle fatigability, and progressive exercise intolerance. These changes occur gradually and are associated with alterations in nitric oxide bioavailability. Treatment of animals with an AMPK activator, R118, increased voluntary wheel running activity, decreased muscle fatigability, and prevented the progressive decrease in treadmill exercise capacity. These functional performance benefits were accompanied by improved mitochondrial function, the normalization of perfusion in exercising muscle, increased nitric oxide bioavailability, and decreased circulating levels of the endogenous endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine. These data suggest that aged, obese mice represent a novel model for studying exercise intolerance associated with peripheral vascular insufficiency, and pharmacological activation of AMPK may be a suitable treatment for intermittent claudication associated with PAD. PMID:24561866

  16. Buflomedil. A review of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and therapeutic efficacy in peripheral and cerebral vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Clissold, S P; Lynch, S; Sorkin, E M

    1987-05-01

    Buflomedil hydrochloride is a vasoactive drug with a variety of pharmacodynamic properties. Importantly, it seems to improve nutritional blood flow in ischaemic tissue of patients with peripheral and/or cerebral vascular disease by a combination of pharmacological effects: inhibition of alpha-adrenoceptors, inhibition of platelet aggregation, improved erythrocyte deformability, nonspecific and weak calcium antagonistic effects, and oxygen sparing activity. Therapeutic trials with buflomedil in patients with peripheral vascular diseases have shown that it increases walking distances in those with intermittent claudication and heals trophic lesions and reduces rest pain in many patients with more severe vasculopathies. In open clinical trials a good to very good clinical response was achieved in 57 to 87% of those treated. In comparative studies buflomedil 600 mg/day orally was shown to be significantly superior to placebo and comparable in efficacy to pentoxifylline (oxpentifylline) and naftidrofuryl. In patients with symptoms presumed to be due to cerebrovascular insufficiencies and elderly patients with senile dementia, buflomedil 450 to 600 mg/day alleviated symptoms associated with impairment of cognitive and psychometric function and was significantly superior to placebo and slightly more effective than drugs such as cinnarizine, flunarizine and co-dergocrine mesylate. Overall, buflomedil at dosages of up to 600 mg/day has been very well tolerated and discontinuation of therapy has rarely been necessary. Thus, buflomedil would seem to be a useful adjunct to conservative treatment in patients with mild-to-moderate peripheral vascular disease and/or cerebrovascular insufficiency, and well worth a try in patients with more severe peripheral disease unable to undergo surgery. However, a few well-designed long term studies are needed to fully define its overall place in therapy. PMID:3297620

  17. Hybrid Therapy in Patients with Complex Peripheral Multifocal Steno-obstructive Vascular Disease: Two-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Cotroneo, Antonio Raffaele; Iezzi, Roberto Marano, Giuseppe; Fonio, Paolo; Nessi, Franco; Gandini, Giovanni

    2007-06-15

    Purpose. To report the 2-year results after hybrid (combined surgical-endovascular) therapy in patients with complex peripheral multifocal steno-obstructive vascular disease. Methods. From September 2001 through April 2003, 47 combined surgical-endovascular procedures were performed in a single session in 44 patients with peripheral occlusive artery disease. Although the common femoral artery is usually treated with open surgery, endoluminal procedures were performed upward in 23 patients (group A), distally in 18 patients (group B), and both upward and downward of the area treated with open surgery in 3 patients (group C). Patients underwent clinical assessment and color duplex ultrasonography examination at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after the procedure. Results. The technical success rate was 100%. Two patients died, at 2 and 19 months after treatment, respectively, both from myocardial infarction. Primary and primary-assisted patency rates were 86.2% and 90.8% at 6 months and 79.1% and 86.1% at 24 months, respectively. Thirty-three patients remained free of symptoms, without any secondary interventions, which corresponded to a primary patency rate of 78.6% (33 of 42). Conclusion. Combined therapy simplifies and allows the one-step treatment of patients with complex peripheral multifocal steno-obstructive vascular disease that has indications for revascularization, and it provides excellent long-term patency rates.

  18. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Peripheral Artery Questionnaire: Korean version for patients with peripheral vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Cho, Kyoung Im; Spertus, John; Kim, Seong Man

    2012-08-01

    The Peripheral Artery Questionnaire (PAQ), as developed in US English, is a validated scale to evaluate the health status of patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). The aim of this study was to translate the PAQ into Korean and to evaluate its reliability and validity. A multi-step process of forward-translation, reconciliation, consultation with the developer, back-translation and proofreading was conducted. The test-retest reliability was evaluated at a 2-week interval using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). The validity was assessed by identifying associations between Korean PAQ (KPAQ) scores and Korean Health Assessment Questionnaire (KHAQ) scores. A total of 100 PAD patients were enrolled: 63 without and 37 with severe claudication. The reliability of the KPAQ was adequate, with an ICC of 0.71. There were strong correlations between KPAQ's subscales. Cronbach's alpha for the summary score was 0.94, indicating good internal consistency and congruence with the original US version. The validity was supported by a significant correlation between the total KHAQ score and KPAQ physical function, stability, symptom, social limitation and quality of life scores (r = -0.24 to -0.90; p < 0.001) as well as between the KHAQ walking subscale and the KPAQ physical function score (r = -0.55, p < 0.001). Our results indicate that the KPAQ is a reliable, valid instrument to evaluate the health status of Korean patients with PAD. PMID:22653880

  19. [Search for Factors Related to Vascular Pain Expression upon Administration of Oxaliplatin into a Peripheral Vein].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Akiko; Yonemoto, Nao; Aoyama, Yuuya; Touma, Yuri; Kajiwara, Michiko; Watanabe, Kosuke; Miyazaki, Yoshiko; Koinuma, Masayoshi

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between vascular pain and various characteristics (age, sex, cancer stage, performance status [PS], height, weight, body mass index [BMI], body surface area, oxaliplatin dose, and presence and absence of the initial administration of dexamethasone) in colorectal cancer patients who were administered initial doses of oxaliplatin intravenously. The study population included 29 patients treated at Higashi Totsuka Memorial Hospital between June 2010 and April 2014. One-way analysis of variance showed that vascular pain was significantly associated with weight (p=0.015), body surface area (p=0.013), and oxaliplatin doses (p=0.0026), where the significance level was p=0.05. Logistic regression analysis and the likelihood ratio test demonstrated that the likelihood of vascular pain increased with the increase in the oxaliplatin dose. According to the cut-off value of vascular pain determined using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, a single dose of oxaliplatin was determined to be 175 mg or more. According to the cut-off value established using the ROC analysis, a single dose of oxaliplatin at which vascular pain is expressed was determined to be 175 mg or more. At this dose, 13 patients complained of vascular pain and 8 did not. At doses less than 175 mg, none of the 8 patients complained of vascular pain. These results suggest that lowering the diluted concentration and reducing the infusion rate of intravenously administered oxaliplatin may reduce vascular pain. PMID:26197757

  20. Catheter Securement Systems for Peripherally Inserted and Nontunneled Central Vascular Access Devices: Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Sutureless Device.

    PubMed

    Krenik, Karen M; Smith, Graham E; Bernatchez, Stéphanie F

    2016-01-01

    Sutureless catheter securement systems are intended to eliminate risks associated with sutures. The clinical acceptability of a novel system was investigated compared with the current method of securement for peripherally inserted central catheters (19 facilities using StatLock or sutures) or nontunneled central vascular access devices (3 facilities using StatLock or sutures or HubGuard + Sorbaview Shield). More than 94% of respondents rated the novel system as same, better, or much better than their current product. More than 82% of respondents were willing to replace their current system with the new one. PMID:27379679

  1. Silent myocardial ischemia and infarction in diabetics with peripheral vascular disease: Assessment by dipyridamole thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Nesto, R.W.; Watson, F.S.; Kowalchuk, G.J.; Zarich, S.W.; Hill, T.; Lewis, S.M.; Lane, S.E. )

    1990-11-01

    We investigated the incidence of silent myocardial ischemia and infarction as assessed by dipyridamole thallium scintigraphy in 30 diabetic patients with peripheral vascular disease and without clinical suspicion of coronary artery disease. Seventeen patients (57%) had thallium abnormalities, with reversible thallium defects compatible with ischemia in 14 patients (47%) and evidence of prior, clinically silent myocardial infarction in 11 patients (37%). Thallium abnormalities were most frequent in patients with concomitant hypertension and cigarette smoking (p = 0.001). These results suggest that unsuspected coronary artery disease is common in this particular group of patients with diabetes mellitus.

  2. Reporting standards of the Society for Vascular Surgery for endovascular treatment of chronic lower extremity peripheral artery disease: Executive summary.

    PubMed

    Stoner, Michael C; Calligaro, Keith D; Chaer, Rabih A; Dietzek, Alan M; Farber, Alik; Guzman, Raul J; Hamdan, Allen D; Landry, Greg J; Yamaguchi, Dean J

    2016-07-01

    Recommended reporting standards for lower extremity ischemia were last published by the Society for Vascular Surgery in 1997. Since that time, there has been a proliferation of endovascular therapies for the treatment of chronic peripheral arterial disease. The purpose of this document is to clarify and update these standards, specifically for reports on endovascular treatment. The document is divided into sections: Claudication Reporting, Critical Limb Ischemia Reporting, Preintervention Assessment and Nonanatomic Treatment, Intervention, Outcome Measures - Procedural, Outcome Measures - Disease Specific, and Complications. PMID:27345507

  3. Peripheral vascular reactivity and serum BDNF responses to aerobic training are impaired by the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Lemos, José R; Alves, Cleber R; de Souza, Sílvia B C; Marsiglia, Julia D C; Silva, Michelle S M; Pereira, Alexandre C; Teixeira, Antônio L; Vieira, Erica L M; Krieger, José E; Negrão, Carlos E; Alves, Guilherme B; de Oliveira, Edilamar M; Bolani, Wladimir; Dias, Rodrigo G; Trombetta, Ivani C

    2016-02-01

    Besides neuronal plasticity, the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is also important in vascular function. The BDNF has been associated with angiogenesis through its specific receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB). Additionally, Val66Met polymorphism decreases activity-induced BDNF. Since BDNF and TrkB are expressed in vascular endothelial cells and aerobic exercise training can increase serum BDNF, this study aimed to test the hypotheses: 1) Serum BDNF levels modulate peripheral blood flow; 2) The Val66Met BDNF polymorphism impairs exercise training-induced vasodilation. We genotyped 304 healthy male volunteers (Val66Val, n = 221; Val66Met, n = 83) who underwent intense aerobic exercise training on a running track three times/wk for 4 mo. We evaluated pre- and post-exercise training serum BDNF and proBDNF concentration, heart rate (HR), mean blood pressure (MBP), forearm blood flow (FBF), and forearm vascular resistance (FVR). In the pre-exercise training, BDNF, proBDNF, BDNF/proBDNF ratio, FBF, and FVR were similar between genotypes. After exercise training, functional capacity (V̇o2 peak) increased and HR decreased similarly in both groups. Val66Val, but not Val66Met, increased BDNF (interaction, P = 0.04) and BDNF/proBDNF ratio (interaction, P < 0.001). Interestingly, FBF (interaction, P = 0.04) and the FVR (interaction, P = 0.01) responses during handgrip exercise (HG) improved in Val66Val compared with Val66Met, even with similar responses of HR and MBP. There were association between BDNF/proBDNF ratio and FBF (r = 0.64, P < 0.001) and FVR (r = -0.58, P < 0.001) during HG exercise. These results show that peripheral vascular reactivity and serum BDNF responses to exercise training are impaired by the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and such responsiveness is associated with serum BDNF concentrations in healthy subjects. PMID:26603150

  4. Interactive effects of vascular risk burden and advanced age on cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Bangen, Katherine J.; Nation, Daniel A.; Clark, Lindsay R.; Harmell, Alexandrea L.; Wierenga, Christina E.; Dev, Sheena I.; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Zlatar, Zvinka Z.; Salmon, David P.; Liu, Thomas T.; Bondi, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular risk factors and cerebral blood flow (CBF) reduction have been linked to increased risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD); however the possible moderating effects of age and vascular risk burden on CBF in late life remain understudied. We examined the relationships among elevated vascular risk burden, age, CBF, and cognition. Seventy-one non-demented older adults completed an arterial spin labeling MR scan, neuropsychological assessment, and medical history interview. Relationships among vascular risk burden, age, and CBF were examined in a priori regions of interest (ROIs) previously implicated in aging and AD. Interaction effects indicated that, among older adults with elevated vascular risk burden (i.e., multiple vascular risk factors), advancing age was significantly associated with reduced cortical CBF whereas there was no such relationship for those with low vascular risk burden (i.e., no or one vascular risk factor). This pattern was observed in cortical ROIs including medial temporal (hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, uncus), inferior parietal (supramarginal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, angular gyrus), and frontal (anterior cingulate, middle frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus) cortices. Furthermore, among those with elevated vascular risk, reduced CBF was associated with poorer cognitive performance. Such findings suggest that older adults with elevated vascular risk burden may be particularly vulnerable to cognitive change as a function of CBF reductions. Findings support the use of CBF as a potential biomarker in preclinical AD and suggest that vascular risk burden and regionally-specific CBF changes may contribute to differential age-related cognitive declines. PMID:25071567

  5. Mortality After Nontraumatic Major Amputation Among Patients With Diabetes and Peripheral Vascular Disease: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Thorud, Jakob C; Plemmons, Britton; Buckley, Clifford J; Shibuya, Naohiro; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    High mortality rates have been reported after major amputations of a lower limb secondary to diabetes and peripheral vascular disease. However, the mortality rates have varied across studies. A systematic review of the 5-year mortality after nontraumatic major amputations of the lower extremity was conducted. A data search was performed of Medline using OVID, CINHAL, and Cochrane, 365 abstracts were screened, and 79 full text articles were assessed for eligibility. After review, 31 studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Overall, the 5-year mortality rate was very high among patients with any amputation (major and minor combined), ranging from 53% to 100%, and in patients with major amputations, ranging from 52% to 80%. Mortality after below-the-knee amputation ranged from 40% to 82% and after above-the-knee amputation from 40% to 90%. The risk factors for increased mortality included age, renal disease, proximal amputation, and peripheral vascular disease. Although our previous systematic review of the 5-year mortality after ulceration had much lower rates of death, additional studies are warranted to determine whether amputation hastens death or is a marker for underlying disease severity. PMID:26898398

  6. Recent Advances in Diagnostic Strategies for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is an increasing epidemic in Korea, and associated diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is its most common and disabling complication. DPN has an insidious onset and heterogeneous clinical manifestations, making it difficult to detect high-risk patients of DPN. Early diagnosis is recommended and is the key factor for a better prognosis and preventing diabetic foot ulcers, amputation, or disability. However, diagnostic tests for DPN are not clearly established because of the various pathophysiology developing from the nerve injury to clinical manifestations, differences in mechanisms according to the type of diabetes, comorbidities, and the unclear natural history of DPN. Therefore, DPN remains a challenge for physicians to screen, diagnose, follow up, and evaluate for treatment response. In this review, diagnosing DPN using various methods to assess clinical symptoms and/or signs, sensorineural impairment, and nerve conduction studies will be discussed. Clinicians should rely on established modalities and utilize current available testing as complementary to specific clinical situations. PMID:27246283

  7. [Advances in research on the genetics of peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Yin, Li; Han, Qi; Li, Xueyang; Liu, Zhenjie

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) shows increasing morbidity and mortality. Clinical manifestations of PAD, such as intermittent claudication, rest pain and nonhealing ulcer, contribute to impaired quality of life, and ischemic stroke caused by PAD can be life-threatening. Unfortunately, PAD patients often receive suboptimal treatment, and pathogenesis of the disease is still unclear. Over the past decade, the evolving technology and interdisciplinary collaboration have enabled improvement of diagnosis and treatment for PAD. This review makes a brief summary of the current status and progress in genetics research on PAD, which included candidate gene studies, linkage analyses, genome-wide association studies, and applications and development prospects of epigenetics, mitochondrial DNA and other new technologies. PMID:26663072

  8. Peripheral vascular effects of beta-adrenoceptor blockade: comparison of two agents.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, E D; Maltz, M B; Smith, R E; Bowcock, S A; Watkins, C J; Camm, A J

    1987-01-01

    1. The effects of atenolol (100 mg), a beta 1-adrenoceptor blocker, and bevantolol (200 mg) were compared on heart rate, blood pressure, lung function and on the peripheral circulation in normal volunteers before and after isoprenaline infusion. Recordings were obtained 2 and 24 h following a single dose and 24 h after continuous dosage for 7 days. 2. The effect of atenolol on the blockade of beta-adrenergic stimuli, as measured by the ability to reduce isoprenaline-induced tachycardia, was greater than that of bevantolol. Though both drugs achieved a similar reduction in systolic pressure there was a significantly greater reduction in diastolic pressure with bevantolol. The lung function tests gave similar results to those with other beta-adrenoceptor blockers. 3. Atenolol produced a fall in peripheral blood flow consistent with unopposed peripheral alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation. The effect of bevantolol differs from that of atenolol, an initial fall in peripheral blood flow being followed by a rapid recovery to baseline or greater. This effect may be due to partial alpha-adrenoceptor agonist activity. PMID:2889459

  9. Microsecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma stimulation of tissue macrophages for treatment of peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, V. Lin, A.; Brettschneider, J.; Fridman, G.; Fridman, A.; Kako, F.; Gabunia, K.; Kelemen, S.; Autieri, M.

    2015-12-15

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels and normally occurs during the process of inflammatory reactions, wound healing, tissue repair, and restoration of blood flow after injury or insult. Stimulation of angiogenesis is a promising and an important step in the treatment of peripheral artery disease. Reactive oxygen species have been shown to be involved in stimulation of this process. For this reason, we have developed and validated a non-equilibrium atmospheric temperature and pressure short-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma system, which can non-destructively generate reactive oxygen species and other active species at the surface of the tissue being treated. We show that this plasma treatment stimulates the production of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and CXCL 1 that in turn induces angiogenesis in mouse aortic rings in vitro. This effect may be mediated by the direct effect of plasma generated reactive oxygen species on tissue.

  10. The Discovery of Novel Genomic, Transcriptomic, and Proteomic Biomarkers in Cardiovascular and Peripheral Vascular Disease: The State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Stefano; Metzinger, Laurent; Serra, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CD) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in western countries and also responsible of a huge burden in terms of disability, functional decline, and healthcare costs. Biomarkers are measurable biological elements that reflect particular physiological or pathological states or predisposition towards diseases and they are currently widely studied in medicine and especially in CD. In this context, biomarkers can also be used to assess the severity or the evolution of several diseases, as well as the effectiveness of particular therapies. Genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics have opened new windows on disease phenomena and may permit in the next future an effective development of novel diagnostic and prognostic medicine in order to better prevent or treat CD. This review will consider the current evidence of novel biomarkers with clear implications in the improvement of risk assessment, prevention strategies, and medical decision making in the field of CD. PMID:27298828

  11. Microsecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma stimulation of tissue macrophages for treatment of peripheral vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V.; Lin, A.; Kako, F.; Gabunia, K.; Kelemen, S.; Brettschneider, J.; Fridman, G.; Fridman, A.; Autieri, M.

    2015-12-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels and normally occurs during the process of inflammatory reactions, wound healing, tissue repair, and restoration of blood flow after injury or insult. Stimulation of angiogenesis is a promising and an important step in the treatment of peripheral artery disease. Reactive oxygen species have been shown to be involved in stimulation of this process. For this reason, we have developed and validated a non-equilibrium atmospheric temperature and pressure short-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma system, which can non-destructively generate reactive oxygen species and other active species at the surface of the tissue being treated. We show that this plasma treatment stimulates the production of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and CXCL 1 that in turn induces angiogenesis in mouse aortic rings in vitro. This effect may be mediated by the direct effect of plasma generated reactive oxygen species on tissue.

  12. Value of a 24-hour image (four-phase bone scan) in assessing osteomyelitis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Dries, D.; Datz, F.; Lawrence, P.; Greenberg, E.; Taylor, A. Jr.

    1985-07-01

    The delayed images of the four-phase /sup 99m/Tc phosphonate bone scan are compared with the delayed images of the three-phase study in patients with diabetes mellitus and/or peripheral vascular disease and suspected osteomyelitis. Three-phase bone imaging includes an immediate postinjection radionuclide angiogram, a blood-pool image, and delayed static images to 7 hr. The four-phase study adds a 24-hr static image. The scan is positive for osteomyelitis if images show progressively increasing lesion to background activity ratios over time. The results of analyzing 21 three- and four-phase bone scans in 17 patients were correlated with clinical course, cultures, and/or x-rays, gallium scans, and CT scans. The accuracy of four-phase bone imaging for diagnosing osteomyelitis was 85%; for three phase, 80%. Sensitivity for four phase was 80%; specificity was 87%. Sensitivity for three phase was 100%; specificity was 73%.

  13. Percutaneous Treatment of Peripheral Vascular Malformations in Children: Long-Term Clinical Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Edwin van der; Otoide-Vree, Marleen; Pattynama, Peter M. T.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the rate of complications and clinical failure at 3 and 12 months after percutaneous treatment of vascular malformations in children. Furthermore, we describe patient satisfaction of treatment results during 5 years of follow-up. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, we evaluated 26 patients younger than aged 19 years who were treated for symptomatic vascular malformations. Data on treatment outcomes and patient satisfactions were obtained with a precoded structured questionnaire. Patient files and imaging data were retrieved to obtain information regarding the vascular malformations and treatment. Clinical success was defined as disappearance or partial improvement of the complaints. Patient satisfaction was declared whenever patients answered in the questionnaire that they were satisfied with the treatment results. Results: Of 26 eligible patients, we included 23 (88%). The mean follow-up was 36 (range, 15-127) months. Posttreatment, 87% (20/23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 66-97%) of patients reported clinical success at 3 months. At 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years of follow-up this percentage was 74%, 59%, 59%, 59%, and 59%, respectively. Eleven (48%, 95% CI 27-69%) patients had experienced complications and 22% (95% CI 7-44%) had major complications, of which 5 had required additional treatment. In all, 83% (19/23) of the patients reported satisfaction with the treatment. Conclusions: Percutaneous treatment of vascular malformations improved clinical symptoms in 87% of the patients at 3 months and were sustainable for half of all patients during a 5-year follow-up period. However, major complications were seen in 22%.

  14. A randomized prospective study of comparison of reservoir ports versus conventional vascular access in advanced-stage ovarian carcinoma cases treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sehirali, S; Inal, M M; Ozsezgin, S; Sanci, M; Atli, O; Nayki, C; Yildirim, Y; Tinar, S

    2005-01-01

    Vascular access ports were developed to overcome many of the problems associated with limited peripheral access, combined with the need for frequent venipuncture, in oncology patients receiving long-term intensive therapy. In this study, we compared the effectivity and acceptability of vascular access port with conventional needle application together with complication rates in ovarian cancer patients. Advanced-stage ovarian carcinoma cases under chemotherapy treatment were equally randomized into two groups, implantable vascular access ports applied to one group (22 cases) and conventional vascular access applied to the other (38 cases) as a control group. Anteroposterior thoracic X-rays of implantable port-applied cases were taken before and after the application. Vortex reservoir ports (Horizon Medical Products, Inc., Manchester, GA) were used in the application to the subclavian vein. Classic peripheral venipuncture method (Medikit), Mediflon(trade mark) IV cannula with PTFE radiopaque catheter and injection valve, Eastern Medikit Ltd, Gurgaon, Haryana, India) was used in the control group. Vascular accesses of all cases were controlled just after the application, 12 h after the application, and during each drug or intravenous fluid application. Mean port insertion time was 26.3 min. Total port occlusion was observed in two of the port-applied cases (11.7%) and partial port occlusion was observed in five of the port-applied cases (29%). Heparin and saline combination was used in order to open the port tip, in five cases, two with total occlusion and three with partial occlusion. Infection was observed in only one case (5%) to whom appropriate therapy was given, and the port was taken out. Ports of two cases were also taken out because of skin dehiscence. No change in port tip position was observed in any of the cases. Total occlusion was observed in 16 of the 38 cases (42.1%) with conventional vascular access. In 12 cases (31.5%), a need arose to change the

  15. Initial experience with a novel hybrid vascular graft for peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Willaert, W; Claes, K; Flamme, A; Jacobs, B

    2014-03-01

    This report describes the successful use of a new hybrid vascular graft as a conduit for above knee femoropopliteal bypass surgery. The graft consists of a proximal (heparin coated) expanded polytetrafluoroethylene section but ends distally as a nitinol reinforced selfexpandable stent that is covered and constrained, allowing a sutureless distal anastamosis. With this graft the creation of above knee bypasses in situations where lesions extend to the popliteal artery behind the knee, or in cases where the above knee popliteal artery is severely calcified is still possible. This avoids the necessity of an infragenicular bypass with potentially inferior longterm patency rates, especially when no autologous venous bypass material is available. PMID:24594800

  16. Role of Peripheral Vascular Resistance for the Association Between Major Depression and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouzinova, Elena V.; Wiborg, Ove; Aalkjaer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Major depression and cardiovascular diseases are 2 of the most prevalent health problems in Western society, and an association between them is generally accepted. Although the specific mechanism behind this comorbidity remains to be elucidated, it is clear that it has a complex multifactorial character including a number of neuronal, humoral, immune, and circulatory pathways. Depression-associated cardiovascular abnormalities associate with cardiac dysfunctions and with changes in peripheral resistance. Although cardiac dysfunction in association with depression has been studied in detail, little attention was given to structural and functional changes in resistance arteries responsible for blood pressure control and tissue perfusion. This review discusses recent achievements in studies of depression-associated abnormalities in resistance arteries in humans and animal experimental models. The changes in arterial structure, contractile and relaxing functions associated with depression symptoms are discussed, and the role of these abnormalities for the pathology of major depression and cardiovascular diseases are suggested. PMID:25469807

  17. The Toll of Vascular Insufficiency: Implications for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Sachdev, Ulka

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can result in limb loss within six months of diagnosis in a subset of patients who cannot undergo endovascular or surgical revascularization yet continues to maintain a marginal position in cardiovascular research. While a body of literature continues to grow describing the role of danger signaling and innate immunity in cardiac biology, the role of these pathways in the ischemic myopathy associated with PAD has not been extensively studied. The following report will review the current literature on the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in cardiovascular biology as well as in nonischemic myopathy. While attenuation of TLR signaling has not been shown to be clinically useful in the treatment of infectious inflammation, it may show promise in the management of severe arterial insufficiency. PMID:26998496

  18. Thoracic sympathectomy for peripheral vascular disease can lead to severe bronchospasm and excessive bronchial secretions

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Vikas Deep; Gupta, Bharti; Kumar, Sanjeev; Pal, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old male patient suffering from Buerger's disease presented with pre-gangrenous changes in right foot and ischemic symptoms in right hand. Computed tomographic angiography revealed diffuse distal disease not suitable for vascular bypass and angioplasty. Right lumbar sympathectomy was done using a retroperitoneal approach followed 1 year later by right thoracic sympathectomy using a transaxillary approach. Postoperatively, the patient had severe bronchospasm and excessive secretions in the respiratory tract resistant to theophylline and sympathomimetic group of drugs and without any clinical, laboratory and radiological evidence of infection. The patient was started on anticholinergics in anticipation that sympathectomy might have lead to unopposed cholinergic activity and the symptoms improved rapidly. The patient recovered well and was discharged on 10th post-operative day. PMID:25624604

  19. Quantitative measurement of the blood flow in peripheral vascular diseases by a new radionuclide plethysmography

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, K.; Mori, Y.; Mashima, Y.; Shimada, T.; Fukuoka, M.

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of the study is to introduce a new plethysmography using radionuclide (RN) for a quantitative measurement of the blood flow in the extremities following the routine RN angiography. Seventy five patients with various peripheral artery diseases have been examined. RN pletysmography was performed in the supine position 15 min. after the RN angiography using 15 mCi of Tc-99m RBC. The blood flow (F) was calculated by the equation (1) which consists of three parameters, the initial slope of the time-activity curve (dc/dt*t=0) after the venous occlusion on the thigh, changes of radio-activity (C-Co) before and after avascularization by inflation of cuff with 200 mmHg pressure at calf, and the blood volume per unit tissue volume (..beta..=Vb/V,ml/100g tissue). F (ml/min/100g) = ..beta.. (dc/dt*t=0)/C-Co. The blood flow measured simultaneously by RN plethysmography and admittance plethysmography was significantly correlated (r = 0.906,n = 16). The blood flow in 67 normal subjects was 2.78 +- 0.75 ml/min/100g. In the patients with intermittent claudication the blood flow was decreased (1.89 +- 0.75 ml/min/100g,n = 75). In the cases with poorly developed colateral circulation the blood flow markedly decreased (1.62 +- 0.29 ml/min/100g,n = 10). Increases of blood flow after exercise was small in the cases with stenosis, even in patients with collaterals. This method is very useful to evaluate quantitatively the peripheral hemodynamics following the routine RN angiographic examination.

  20. Pathophysiology and burden of infection in patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral vascular disease: focus on skin and soft-tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Dryden, M; Baguneid, M; Eckmann, C; Corman, S; Stephens, J; Solem, C; Li, J; Charbonneau, C; Baillon-Plot, N; Haider, S

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects 284 million adults worldwide and is increasing in prevalence. Accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus contributes an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases including peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Immune dysfunction, diabetic neuropathy and poor circulation in patients with diabetes mellitus, especially those with PVD, place these patients at high risk for many types of typical and atypical infections. Complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (cSSTIs) are of particular concern because skin breakdown in patients with advanced diabetes mellitus and PVD provides a portal of entry for bacteria. Patients with diabetes mellitus are more likely to be hospitalized with cSSTIs and to experience related complications than patients without diabetes mellitus. Patients with PVD requiring lower extremity bypass are also at high risk of surgical site and graft infections. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a frequent causative pathogen in cSSTIs, and may be a significant contributor to surgical site infections, especially in patients who are colonized with MRSA on hospital admission. Patients with cSSTIs and diabetes mellitus or PVD experience lower clinical success rates than patients without these comorbidities, and may also have a longer length of hospital stay and higher risk of adverse drug events. Clinicians should be vigilant in recognizing the potential for infection with multi-drug-resistant organisms, especially MRSA, in these populations and initiating therapy with appropriate antibiotics. PMID:26198368

  1. Results of a Peripheral Cutting Balloon Prospective Multicenter European Registry in Hemodialysis Vascular Access

    SciTech Connect

    Peregrin, Jan H. Rocek, Miloslav

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To report initial experience with the Peripheral Cutting Balloon (PCB) in treatment of failing hemodialysis shunts. Methods. A total of 190 patients (95 men, 95 women; average age 64.4 {+-} 11.9 years, range 32-87 years) who were treated with the PCB for pressure-resistant stenosis, restenosis or failed percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in the venous limb of an arteriovenous shunt were followed in seven European centers using a simple registry. The group consisted of 109 de novo lesions (57%) and 79 restenotic lesions (43%). Results. Technical success was achieved in 88.9% of cases. Primary patency was as follows (the results for whole group and simultaneous results for de novo lesions and restenoses are presented): 1 month (140 patients followed): 94%, 98%, and 93%; 3 months (116 patients followed): 93%, 98%, and 92%; 6 months (40 patients followed): 85%, 92%, and 79%; 12 months (27 patients followed): 74%, 87%, and 48%. No complication occurred. Patients experienced an equal or lower level of pain during the procedure compared with conventional PTA. Conclusion. The PCB proved to be successful in dilating pressure-resistant stenoses. We cannot conclude whether PCB angioplasty can lower the restenosis rate in hemodialysis access lesions, but the long-term patency for de novo lesions is high. A further randomized study is advisable.

  2. Dynamic fluorescence imaging of indocyanine green for reliable and sensitive diagnosis of peripheral vascular insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yujung; Lee, Jungsul; Kwon, Kihwan; Choi, Chulhee

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative measurement of functional tissue perfusion is essential for early diagnosis and proper treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). We have previously demonstrated that dynamic imaging of near-infrared fluorophore indocyanine green (ICG) can be a noninvasive and sensitive tool to measure tissue perfusion. In the present study, we investigated the clinical efficacy of ICG perfusion imaging method for the diagnosis of PAOD. Total nineteen PAOD patients and age-matched controls (n=10) were evaluated for lower extremity tissue perfusion using ICG perfusion imaging. The perfusion rates of the lower extremities with severe PAOD (n=25 legs, 16.6±8.3%/min) were significantly lower than those of normal controls (38.1±17.3%/min, p<0.001). In cases of mild PAOD, the perfusion rates (n=11 legs, 18.3±10.3%/min) were also significantly lower compared to the control; while the conventional ankle-brachial index (ABI) test failed to detect mild functional impairment. These results collectively indicate that ICG perfusion imaging can be a very effective tool for diagnosis of PAOD with a superior efficacy in comparison to conventional ABI test. PMID:20637783

  3. Load dependence of changes in forearm and peripheral vascular resistance after acute leg exercise in man.

    PubMed

    Piepoli, M; Isea, J E; Pannarale, G; Adamopoulos, S; Sleight, P; Coats, A J

    1994-07-15

    1. It is known that acute exercise is often followed by a reduction in arterial blood pressure. Little is known about the time course of the recovery of the blood pressure or the influence of the intensity of the exercise on this response. Controversy exists, in particular, concerning the changes in peripheral resistance that occur during this period. 2. Eight normal volunteers performed, in random order on separate days, voluntary upright bicycle exercise of three different intensities (maximal, moderate and minimal load) and, on another day, a control period of sitting on a bicycle. They were monitored for 60 min after each test. 3. Diastolic pressure fell after maximal exercise at 5 min (-15.45 mmHg) and 60 min (-9.45 mmHg), compared with the control day. Systolic and mean pressure also fell (non-significantly) after 45 min; heart rate was significantly elevated for the whole hour of recovery (at 60 min, +7.23 beats min-1). No changes in post-exercise blood pressure and heart rate were observed on the days of moderate and minimal exercises. 4. An increase in cardiac index was observed after maximal exercise compared with control (at 60 min, 2.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.2 l min-1 m-2). This was entirely accounted for by the persistent increase in heart rate, with no significant alteration in stroke volume after exercise on any day.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7965851

  4. Beyond vascular inflammation--recent advances in understanding atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Dennis; Zirlik, Andreas; Ley, Klaus

    2015-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most life-threatening pathology worldwide. Its major clinical complications, stroke, myocardial infarction, and heart failure, are on the rise in many regions of the world--despite considerable progress in understanding cause, progression, and consequences of atherosclerosis. Originally perceived as a lipid-storage disease of the arterial wall (Die cellularpathologie in ihrer begründung auf physiologische und pathologische gewebelehre. August Hirschwald Verlag Berlin, [1871]), atherosclerosis was recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease in 1986 (New Engl J Med 314:488-500, 1986). The presence of lymphocytes in atherosclerotic lesions suggested autoimmune processes in the vessel wall (Clin Exp Immunol 64:261-268, 1986). Since the advent of suitable mouse models of atherosclerosis (Science 258:468-471, 1992; Cell 71:343-353, 1992; J Clin Invest 92:883-893, 1993) and the development of flow cytometry to define the cellular infiltrate in atherosclerotic lesions (J Exp Med 203:1273-1282, 2006), the origin, lineage, phenotype, and function of distinct inflammatory cells that trigger or inhibit the inflammatory response in the atherosclerotic plaque have been studied. Multiphoton microscopy recently enabled direct visualization of antigen-specific interactions between T cells and antigen-presenting cells in the vessel wall (J Clin Invest 122:3114-3126, 2012). Vascular immunology is now emerging as a new field, providing evidence for protective as well as damaging autoimmune responses (Int Immunol 25:615-622, 2013). Manipulating inflammation and autoimmunity both hold promise for new therapeutic strategies in cardiovascular disease. Ongoing work (J Clin Invest 123:27-36, 2013; Front Immunol 2013; Semin Immunol 31:95-101, 2009) suggests that it may be possible to develop antigen-specific immunomodulatory prevention and therapy-a vaccine against atherosclerosis. PMID:26100516

  5. Quantitative optical imaging of vascular response in vivo in a model of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Poole, Kristin M; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M; Sit, Wesley W; Walsh, Alex J; Duvall, Craig L; Skala, Melissa C

    2013-10-15

    The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is well established for studying collateral vessel formation and testing therapies for peripheral arterial disease, but there is a lack of quantitative techniques for intravitally analyzing blood vessel structure and function. To address this need, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were developed to assess the time-course of recovery in the mouse HLI model. Hyperspectral imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to non-invasively image hemoglobin oxygen saturation and microvessel morphology plus blood flow, respectively, in the anesthetized mouse after induction of HLI. Hyperspectral imaging detected significant increases in hemoglobin saturation in the ischemic paw as early as 3 days after femoral artery ligation (P < 0.01), and significant increases in distal blood flow were first detected with OCT 14 days postsurgery (P < 0.01). Intravital OCT images of the adductor muscle vasculature revealed corkscrew collateral vessels characteristic of the arteriogenic response to HLI. The hyperspectral imaging and OCT data significantly correlated with each other and with laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and tissue oxygenation sensor data (P < 0.01). However, OCT measurements acquired depth-resolved information and revealed more sustained flow deficits following surgery that may be masked by more superficial measurements (LDPI, hyperspectral imaging). Therefore, intravital OCT may provide a robust biomarker for the late stages of ischemic limb recovery. This work validates non-invasive acquisition of both functional and morphological data with hyperspectral imaging and OCT. Together, these techniques provide cardiovascular researchers an unprecedented and comprehensive view of the temporal dynamics of HLI recovery in living mice. PMID:23955718

  6. Quantitative optical imaging of vascular response in vivo in a model of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Kristin M.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Sit, Wesley W.; Walsh, Alex J.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2013-01-01

    The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is well established for studying collateral vessel formation and testing therapies for peripheral arterial disease, but there is a lack of quantitative techniques for intravitally analyzing blood vessel structure and function. To address this need, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were developed to assess the time-course of recovery in the mouse HLI model. Hyperspectral imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to non-invasively image hemoglobin oxygen saturation and microvessel morphology plus blood flow, respectively, in the anesthetized mouse after induction of HLI. Hyperspectral imaging detected significant increases in hemoglobin saturation in the ischemic paw as early as 3 days after femoral artery ligation (P < 0.01), and significant increases in distal blood flow were first detected with OCT 14 days postsurgery (P < 0.01). Intravital OCT images of the adductor muscle vasculature revealed corkscrew collateral vessels characteristic of the arteriogenic response to HLI. The hyperspectral imaging and OCT data significantly correlated with each other and with laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and tissue oxygenation sensor data (P < 0.01). However, OCT measurements acquired depth-resolved information and revealed more sustained flow deficits following surgery that may be masked by more superficial measurements (LDPI, hyperspectral imaging). Therefore, intravital OCT may provide a robust biomarker for the late stages of ischemic limb recovery. This work validates non-invasive acquisition of both functional and morphological data with hyperspectral imaging and OCT. Together, these techniques provide cardiovascular researchers an unprecedented and comprehensive view of the temporal dynamics of HLI recovery in living mice. PMID:23955718

  7. Recent advances in angiogenesis, anti-angiogenesis and vascular targeting.

    PubMed

    Bikfalvi, Andreas; Bicknell, Roy

    2002-12-01

    Angiogenesis, the development of new blood vessels, has become a major focus of research. This has been stimulated by the therapeutic opportunities offered by the ability to manipulate the vasculature in pathologies such as cancer. Here, we present an overview of recent advances in angiogenesis. Especially noteworthy is the large volume of information from developmental studies, particularly those that involve transgenic and gene knockout mice. We also discuss the increasing repertoire of drugs with which to manipulate angiogenesis and new endothelial-specific genes with which to target the vasculature. PMID:12457776

  8. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products mitigates vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Yu, Manli; Zhang, Le; Cao, Qingxin; Song, Ying; Liu, Yuxiu; Gong, Jianbin

    2016-08-01

    Vascular dysfunction including vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction in hypertension often results in poor clinical outcomes and increased risk of vascular accidents. We investigate the effect of treatment with soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) on vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Firstly, the aortic AGE/RAGE pathway was investigated in SHR. Secondly, SHR received intraperitoneal injections of sRAGE daily for 4 weeks. Effect of sRAGE against vascular dysfunction in SHR and underlying mechanism was investigated. SHR aortas exhibited enhanced activity of aldose reductase, reduced activity of glyoxalase 1, accumulation of methylglyoxal and AGE, and upregulated expression of RAGE. Treatment of SHR with sRAGE had no significant effect on blood pressure, but alleviated aortic hypertrophy and endothelial dysfunction. In vitro, treatment with sRAGE reversed the effect of incubation with AGE on proliferation of smooth muscle cells and endothelial function. Treatment of SHR with sRAGE abated oxidative stress, suppressed inflammation and NF-κB activation, improved the balance between Ang II and Ang-(1-7) through reducing angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and enhancing ACE2 expression, and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) expression in aortas. In conclusion, treatment with sRAGE alleviated vascular adverse remodeling in SHR, possibly via suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation, improvement in RAS balance, and activation of PPAR-γ pathway. PMID:27426491

  9. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Lawrence, P.F.; Syverud, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique.

  10. Electrospray MS/MS reveals extensive and nonspecific oxidation of cholesterol esters in human peripheral vascular lesions[S

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Patrick M.; Moore, Ernest E.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Although LDL is rendered proatherogenic by various experimental treatments (e.g., acetylation), the exact structural changes that drive LDL transformation in vivo remain enigmatic. Among the many hypothesized targets of oxidative modification are cholesterol esters (CE). This family of neutral lipids, which carries a highly unsaturated pool of fatty acyl groups, is the main component of both LDL particles and atherosclerotic plaques. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was employed to reveal abundant and diverse oxidized CEs (oxCE), including novel oxidation products, within human peripheral vascular lesions. These oxCE species composed up to 40% of the total CE pool, with cholesteryl linoleate being oxidized to the greatest extent. Imaging mass spectrometry studies showed that oxCE was entirely confined within the plaque, along with unmodified CE and triacylglyceride (TAG). Interestingly, we found no evidence for TAG oxidation, although polyunsaturated species were abundant. Enzymatic oxidation of cholesteryl linoleate by 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO), an enzyme often invoked in CE oxidation, initially results in a regio- and stereospecific product. Analysis of intact cholesteryl hydroxyoctadecadienoate isomers in human atheromata revealed no regio- or stereospecificity, indicating 15-LO was either not a major source of oxCE or nonenzymatic processes had eroded any product specificity. PMID:21885431

  11. Reporting standards of the Society for Vascular Surgery for endovascular treatment of chronic lower extremity peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Stoner, Michael C; Calligaro, Keith D; Chaer, Rabih A; Dietzek, Alan M; Farber, Alik; Guzman, Raul J; Hamdan, Allen D; Landry, Greg J; Yamaguchi, Dean J

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) represents a spectrum from asymptomatic stenosis to limb-threatening ischemia. The last decade has seen a tremendous increase in the variety of endovascular devices and techniques to treat occlusive disease. Like many evolving technologies, the literature surrounding therapy for endovascular arterial disease consists of mixed-quality manuscripts without clear standardization. Accordingly, critical evaluation of the reported results may be problematic. As such, providers and their patients make treatment decisions without the full benefit of a comparative effectiveness framework. The purpose of this document is to provide a summary for the reporting of endovascular revascularization techniques in the setting of chronic disease. Much of the work in this document is based on prior publications and standards proposed by the Society for Vascular Surgery. We have also made recommendations based on current literature and have attempted to acknowledge shortcomings and areas for future research. The various sections contain summaries of required reporting standards and should serve as a guide for the design of clinical trials and as reference for journal editors and reviewers when considering scientific work pertaining to endovascular therapy for chronic lower extremity arterial disease. An Appendix is provided with commonly used abbreviations in this document. PMID:27345516

  12. Nifedipine in semi-solid formulations for topical use in peripheral vascular disease: preparation, characterization, and permeation assay.

    PubMed

    Santis, Ana Karla; de Freitas, Zaida Maria Faria; Ricci-Junior, Eduardo; de Brito-Gitirana, Lycia; Fonseca, Laís Bastos; Santos, Elisabete Pereira

    2013-07-01

    Nifedipine (NFD) has been used for the treatment of cutaneous lesions caused by peripheral vascular disease and diabetic ulcers. NFD was formulated at 8% in three semi-solid formulations: Polaxamer 407 Lecithin Organogel (PLO), PLO plus Transcutol(®), and an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion. In vitro release and permeation tests were carried out using a synthetic (cellulose acetate) or natural membrane (pig ear skin), respectively, mounted in a Franz-type diffusion cell at 37°C in a constant water bath. As a receptor solution, isotonic phosphate buffer at pH 7.4 was used. All samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography by employing a previously validated method. The drug flow values were 6.126 ± 0.288, 4.030 ± 0.081, and 6.660 ± 0.254 μg/cm(2)/h for PLO, PLO plus Transcutol(®), and o/w emulsion, respectively. The three formulations did not show significant differences in drug flow, considering p > 0.05. Furthermore, their penetration profiles in both the epidermis and dermis were statistically different. Thus, the incorporation of NFD in PLO, PLO plus Transcutol(®), and o/w emulsion changed the drug thermodynamic activity, as expected. In addition, Transcutol(®) increased the solubility of NFD in the formulation and promoted its penetration in both the epidermis and dermis. PMID:22901029

  13. Vascularized Free Lymph Node Flap Transfer in Advanced Lymphedema Patient after Axillary Lymph Node Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Kyung Hoon; Park, Myong Chul; Lim, Seong Yoon; Jung, Yong Sik

    2016-01-01

    Lymphedema is a condition characterized by tissue swelling caused by localized fluid retention. Advanced lymphedema is characterized by irreversible skin fibrosis (stage IIIb) and nonpitting edema, with leather-like skin, skin crypts, and ulcers with or without involvement of the toes (stage IVa and IVb, respectively). Recently, surgical treatment of advanced lymphedema has been a challenging reconstructive modality. Microvascular techniques such as lymphaticovenous anastomosis and vascularized lymph node flap transfer are effective for early stage lymphedema. In this study, we performed a two-stage operation in an advanced lymphedema patient. First, a debulking procedure was performed using liposuction. A vascularized free lymph node flap transfer was then conducted 10 weeks after the first operation. In this case, good results were obtained, with reduced circumferences in various parts of the upper extremity noted immediately postoperation. PMID:27064862

  14. Vascularized Free Lymph Node Flap Transfer in Advanced Lymphedema Patient after Axillary Lymph Node Dissection.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kyung Hoon; Park, Myong Chul; Lee, Il Jae; Lim, Seong Yoon; Jung, Yong Sik

    2016-03-01

    Lymphedema is a condition characterized by tissue swelling caused by localized fluid retention. Advanced lymphedema is characterized by irreversible skin fibrosis (stage IIIb) and nonpitting edema, with leather-like skin, skin crypts, and ulcers with or without involvement of the toes (stage IVa and IVb, respectively). Recently, surgical treatment of advanced lymphedema has been a challenging reconstructive modality. Microvascular techniques such as lymphaticovenous anastomosis and vascularized lymph node flap transfer are effective for early stage lymphedema. In this study, we performed a two-stage operation in an advanced lymphedema patient. First, a debulking procedure was performed using liposuction. A vascularized free lymph node flap transfer was then conducted 10 weeks after the first operation. In this case, good results were obtained, with reduced circumferences in various parts of the upper extremity noted immediately postoperation. PMID:27064862

  15. Review: Advances in Vascular Tissue Engineering Using Protein-Based Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stegemann, Jan P.; Kaszuba, Stephanie N.; Rowe, Shaneen L.

    2008-01-01

    The clinical need for improved blood vessel substitutes, especially in small-diameter applications, drives the field of vascular tissue engineering. The blood vessel has a well-characterized structure and function, but it is a complex tissue, and it has proven difficult to create engineered tissues that are suitable for widespread clinical use. This review is focused on approaches to vascular tissue engineering that use proteins as the primary matrix or “scaffold” material for creating fully biological blood vessel replacements. In particular, this review covers four main approaches to vascular tissue engineering: 1) cell-populated protein hydrogels, 2) cross-linked protein scaffolds, 3) decellularized native tissues, and 4) self-assembled scaffolds. Recent advances in each of these areas are discussed, along with advantages of and drawbacks to these approaches. The first fully biological engineered blood vessels have entered clinical trials, but important challenges remain before engineered vascular tissues will have a wide clinical effect. Cell sourcing and recapitulating the biological and mechanical function of the native blood vessel continue to be important outstanding hurdles. In addition, the path to commercialization for such tissues must be better defined. Continued progress in several complementary approaches to vascular tissue engineering is necessary before blood vessel substitutes can achieve their full potential in improving patient care. PMID:17961004

  16. Imaging of Small Animal Peripheral Artery Disease Models: Recent Advancements and Translational Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jenny B.; Phillips, Evan H.; Riggins, Ti’Air E.; Sangha, Gurneet S.; Chakraborty, Sreyashi; Lee, Janice Y.; Lycke, Roy J.; Hernandez, Clarissa L.; Soepriatna, Arvin H.; Thorne, Bradford R. H.; Yrineo, Alexa A.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a broad disorder encompassing multiple forms of arterial disease outside of the heart. As such, PAD development is a multifactorial process with a variety of manifestations. For example, aneurysms are pathological expansions of an artery that can lead to rupture, while ischemic atherosclerosis reduces blood flow, increasing the risk of claudication, poor wound healing, limb amputation, and stroke. Current PAD treatment is often ineffective or associated with serious risks, largely because these disorders are commonly undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Active areas of research are focused on detecting and characterizing deleterious arterial changes at early stages using non-invasive imaging strategies, such as ultrasound, as well as emerging technologies like photoacoustic imaging. Earlier disease detection and characterization could improve interventional strategies, leading to better prognosis in PAD patients. While rodents are being used to investigate PAD pathophysiology, imaging of these animal models has been underutilized. This review focuses on structural and molecular information and disease progression revealed by recent imaging efforts of aortic, cerebral, and peripheral vascular disease models in mice, rats, and rabbits. Effective translation to humans involves better understanding of underlying PAD pathophysiology to develop novel therapeutics and apply non-invasive imaging techniques in the clinic. PMID:25993289

  17. Advances of Peripheral Nerve Repair Techniques to Improve Hand Function: A Systematic Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    P, Mafi; S, Hindocha; M, Dhital; M, Saleh

    2012-01-01

    Concepts of neuronal damage and repair date back to ancient times. The research in this topic has been growing ever since and numerous nerve repair techniques have evolved throughout the years. Due to our greater understanding of nerve injuries and repair we now distinguish between central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, we have chosen to concentrate on peripheral nerve injuries and in particular those involving the hand. There are no reviews bringing together and summarizing the latest research evidence concerning the most up-to-date techniques used to improve hand function. Therefore, by identifying and evaluating all the published literature in this field, we have summarized all the available information about the advances in peripheral nerve techniques used to improve hand function. The most important ones are the use of resorbable poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB), epineural end-to-end suturing, graft repair, nerve transfer, side to side neurorrhaphy and end to side neurorrhaphy between median, radial and ulnar nerves, nerve transplant, nerve repair, external neurolysis and epineural sutures, adjacent neurotization without nerve suturing, Agee endoscopic operation, tourniquet induced anesthesia, toe transfer and meticulous intrinsic repair, free auto nerve grafting, use of distal based neurocutaneous flaps and tubulization. At the same time we found that the patient’s age, tension of repair, time of repair, level of injury and scar formation following surgery affect the prognosis. Despite the thorough findings of this systematic review we suggest that further research in this field is needed. PMID:22431951

  18. Efficacy and Safety of a Novel Vascular Closure Device (Glubran 2 Seal) After Diagnostic and Interventional Angiography in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Del Corso, Andrea; Bargellini, Irene Cicorelli, Antonio; Perrone, Orsola; Leo, Michele; Lunardi, Alessandro; Alberti, Aldo; Tomei, Francesca; Cioni, Roberto; Ferrari, Mauro; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2013-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate safety and efficacy of a novel vascular closure device (Glubran 2 Seal) after peripheral angiography in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). From December 2010 to June 2011, all consecutive patients with PAOD undergoing peripheral angiography were prospectively enrolled onto the study after percutaneous antegrade or retrograde puncture of the common femoral artery. After angiography, the Glubran 2 Seal device was used to achieve hemostasis. The following data were registered: technical success and manual compression duration, patients' discomfort (scale 0-5), operators' technical difficulty (scale 0-5), and vascular complications. The site of hemostasis was evaluated by clinical inspection and color-coded Duplex ultrasound performed 1 day and 1 month after the procedure. One hundred seventy-eight patients were enrolled (112 male, mean age 70.8 years) with a total of 206 puncture sites, including 104 (50.5 %) antegrade accesses. The device was successful in 198(96.1 %) of 206 procedures, with 8 cases of manual compression lasting longer than 5 min (maximum 20 min). No major vascular complications were observed, resulting in 100 % procedural success. Minor complications occurred in seven procedures (3.4 %), including two cases of pseudoaneurysms, successfully treated by ultrasound-guided glue injection. The mean {+-} standard deviation score for patients' discomfort was 0.9 {+-} 0.7, whereas the mean score for operators' difficulty was 1.2 {+-} 0.9. In patients with PAOD, the Glubran 2 Seal represents a simple, painless, and efficient vascular closure device, able to achieve hemostasis both in antegrade and retrograde accesses.

  19. Advances towards reliable identification and concentration determination of rare cells in peripheral blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemany Server, R.; Martens, D.; Jans, K.; Bienstman, P.; Hill, D.

    2016-03-01

    Through further development, integration and validation of micro-nano-bio and biophotonics systems FP7 CanDo is developing an instrument that will permit highly reproducible and reliable identification and concentration determination of rare cells in peripheral blood for two key societal challenges, early and low cost anti-cancer drug efficacy determination and cancer diagnosis/monitoring. A cellular link between the primary malignant tumour and the peripheral metastases, responsible for 90% of cancerrelated deaths, has been established in the form of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood. Furthermore, the relatively short survival time of CTCs in peripheral blood means that their detection is indicative of tumour progression thereby providing in addition to a prognostic value an evaluation of therapeutic efficacy and early recognition of tumour progression in theranostics. In cancer patients however blood concentrations are very low (=1 CTC/1E9 cells) and current detection strategies are too insensitive, limiting use to prognosis of only those with advanced metastatic cancer. Similarly, problems occur in therapeutics with anti-cancer drug development leading to lengthy and costly trials often preventing access to market. The novel cell separation/Raman analysis technologies plus nucleic acid based molecular characterization of the CanDo platform will provide an accurate CTC count with high throughput and high yield meeting both key societal challenges. Being beyond the state of art it will lead to substantial share gains not just in the high end markets of drug discovery and cancer diagnostics but due to modular technologies also in others. Here we present preliminary DNA hybridization sensing results.

  20. Chronic phase advance alters circadian physiological rhythms and peripheral molecular clocks.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Gretchen; Duncan, Marilyn J; Esser, Karyn A

    2013-08-01

    Shifting the onset of light, acutely or chronically, can profoundly affect responses to infection, tumor progression, development of metabolic disease, and mortality in mammals. To date, the majority of phase-shifting studies have focused on acute exposure to a shift in the timing of the light cycle, whereas the consequences of chronic phase shifts alone on molecular rhythms in peripheral tissues such as skeletal muscle have not been studied. In this study, we tested the effect of chronic phase advance on the molecular clock mechanism in two phenotypically different skeletal muscles. The phase advance protocol (CPA) involved 6-h phase advances (earlier light onset) every 4 days for 8 wk. Analysis of the molecular clock, via bioluminescence recording, in the soleus and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles and lung demonstrated that CPA advanced the phase of the rhythm when studied immediately after CPA. However, if the mice were placed into free-running conditions (DD) for 2 wk after CPA, the molecular clock was not phase shifted in the two muscles but was still shifted in the lung. Wheel running behavior remained rhythmic in CPA mice; however, the endogenous period length of the free-running rhythm was significantly shorter than that of control mice. Core body temperature, cage activity, and heart rate remained rhythmic throughout the experiment, although the onset of the rhythms was significantly delayed with CPA. These results provide clues that lifestyles associated with chronic environmental desynchrony, such as shift work, can have disruptive effects on the molecular clock mechanism in peripheral tissues, including both types of skeletal muscle. Whether this can contribute, long term, to increased incidence of insulin resistance/metabolic disease requires further study. PMID:23703115

  1. Chronic phase advance alters circadian physiological rhythms and peripheral molecular clocks

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Gretchen; Duncan, Marilyn J.

    2013-01-01

    Shifting the onset of light, acutely or chronically, can profoundly affect responses to infection, tumor progression, development of metabolic disease, and mortality in mammals. To date, the majority of phase-shifting studies have focused on acute exposure to a shift in the timing of the light cycle, whereas the consequences of chronic phase shifts alone on molecular rhythms in peripheral tissues such as skeletal muscle have not been studied. In this study, we tested the effect of chronic phase advance on the molecular clock mechanism in two phenotypically different skeletal muscles. The phase advance protocol (CPA) involved 6-h phase advances (earlier light onset) every 4 days for 8 wk. Analysis of the molecular clock, via bioluminescence recording, in the soleus and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles and lung demonstrated that CPA advanced the phase of the rhythm when studied immediately after CPA. However, if the mice were placed into free-running conditions (DD) for 2 wk after CPA, the molecular clock was not phase shifted in the two muscles but was still shifted in the lung. Wheel running behavior remained rhythmic in CPA mice; however, the endogenous period length of the free-running rhythm was significantly shorter than that of control mice. Core body temperature, cage activity, and heart rate remained rhythmic throughout the experiment, although the onset of the rhythms was significantly delayed with CPA. These results provide clues that lifestyles associated with chronic environmental desynchrony, such as shift work, can have disruptive effects on the molecular clock mechanism in peripheral tissues, including both types of skeletal muscle. Whether this can contribute, long term, to increased incidence of insulin resistance/metabolic disease requires further study. PMID:23703115

  2. Childhood Obesity Associates Haemodynamic and Vascular Changes That Result in Increased Central Aortic Pressure with Augmented Incident and Reflected Wave Components, without Changes in Peripheral Amplification.

    PubMed

    Castro, Juan M; García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Arana, Maite; Chiesa, Pedro; Giachetto, Gustavo; Zócalo, Yanina; Bia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The aims were to determine if childhood obesity is associated with increased central aortic blood pressure (BP) and to characterize haemodynamic and vascular changes associated with BP changes in obese children and adolescents by means of analyzing changes in cardiac output (stroke volume, SV), arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity, PWV), peripheral vascular resistances (PVR), and net and relative contributions of reflected waves to the aortic pulse wave amplitude. We included 117 subjects (mean/range age: 10 (5-15) years, 49 females), who were obese (OB) or had normal weight (NW). Peripheral and central aortic BP, PWV, and pulse wave-derived parameters (augmentation index, amplitude of forward and backward components) were measured with tonometry (SphygmoCor) and oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph). With independence of the presence of dyslipidemia, hypertension, or sedentarism, the aortic systolic and pulse BP were higher in OB than in NW subjects. The increase in central BP could not be explained by the elevation in the relative contribution of reflections to the aortic pressure wave and higher PVR or by an augmented peripheral reflection coefficient. Instead, the rise in central BP could be explained by an increase in the amplitude of both incident and reflect wave components associated to augmented SV and/or PWV. PMID:26881081

  3. Childhood Obesity Associates Haemodynamic and Vascular Changes That Result in Increased Central Aortic Pressure with Augmented Incident and Reflected Wave Components, without Changes in Peripheral Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Juan M.; García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Arana, Maite; Chiesa, Pedro; Giachetto, Gustavo; Zócalo, Yanina; Bia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The aims were to determine if childhood obesity is associated with increased central aortic blood pressure (BP) and to characterize haemodynamic and vascular changes associated with BP changes in obese children and adolescents by means of analyzing changes in cardiac output (stroke volume, SV), arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity, PWV), peripheral vascular resistances (PVR), and net and relative contributions of reflected waves to the aortic pulse wave amplitude. We included 117 subjects (mean/range age: 10 (5–15) years, 49 females), who were obese (OB) or had normal weight (NW). Peripheral and central aortic BP, PWV, and pulse wave-derived parameters (augmentation index, amplitude of forward and backward components) were measured with tonometry (SphygmoCor) and oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph). With independence of the presence of dyslipidemia, hypertension, or sedentarism, the aortic systolic and pulse BP were higher in OB than in NW subjects. The increase in central BP could not be explained by the elevation in the relative contribution of reflections to the aortic pressure wave and higher PVR or by an augmented peripheral reflection coefficient. Instead, the rise in central BP could be explained by an increase in the amplitude of both incident and reflect wave components associated to augmented SV and/or PWV. PMID:26881081

  4. Two Serious Complications of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Indicating the Need to Formalize Training for Placing Central Venous Vascular Access Devices.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Volker; Feenstra, Nico

    2016-02-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters are being used in increasing numbers. Common (thrombosis, infection, phlebitis, malfunction, or disconnection) and rare complications (pericardial tamponade) have been well explored. We describe 2 serious complications that resolved without sequelae. Both complications occurred in the context of limited provider competence. We conclude that vascular access is more than "just" placing a catheter; it can have serious clinical impact and has evolved into a specialist skill. With increasing use of intravascular catheters, the need for a formalized training becomes urgent. PMID:26517231

  5. Advances in peripheral nervous system regenerative therapeutic strategies: A biomaterials approach.

    PubMed

    Dalamagkas, Kyriakos; Tsintou, Magdalini; Seifalian, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a very common medical condition with varying clinical severity but always great impact on the patients' productivity and the quality of life. Even the current 1st-choice surgical therapeutic approach or the "gold standard" as frequently called in clinical practice, is not addressing the problem efficiently and cost-effectively, increasing the mortality through the need of a second surgical intervention, while it does not take into account the several different types of nerves involved in peripheral nerve injuries. Neural tissue engineering approaches could potentially offer a very promising and attractive tool for the efficient peripheral nerve injury management, not only by mechanically building the gap, but also by inducing neuroregenerative mechanisms in a well-regulated microenvironment which would mimic the natural environment of the specific nerve type involved in the injury to obtain an optimum clinical outcome. There is still room for a lot of optimizations in regard to the conduits which have been developed with the help of neural engineering since many parameters affect the clinical outcome and the underlying mechanisms are still not well understood. Especially the intraluminal cues controlling the microenvironment of the conduits are in an infantile stage but there is profound potential in the application of the scaffolds. The aim of our review is to provide a quick reference to the recent advances in the field, focusing on the parameters that can significantly affect the clinical potentials of each approach, with suggestions for future improvements that could take the current work from bench to bedside. Thus, further research could shed light to those questions and it might hold the key to discover new more efficient and cost-effective therapies. PMID:27157770

  6. Potential of advanced photoplethysmography sensing for noninvasive vascular diagnostics and early screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spigulis, Janis; Kukulis, Indulis; Fridenberga, Eva; Venckus, Girts

    2002-06-01

    Advanced sensor device for shape analysis of the tissue- reflected mean single period photoplethysmography (SPPPG) signals has been designed and clinically tested. The SPPPG signal shape reveals individual features of the patient's cardio-vascular state. Clinical studies of several patient groups (e.g. diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis obliterans, Raynaud's syndrome) made possible to specify components of the SPPPG signal that are sensitive to the corresponding organic or functional pathologies. Comparison of the right and left arm finger SPPPG signal shapes, for instance, appears to be efficient tool for early screening of unilateral atherosclerosis obliterans.

  7. The Role of Advanced Glycation Endproducts and Glyoxalase I in Diabetic Peripheral Sensory Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jack, M.M.; Wright, D.E.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes mellitus with over half of all patients developing altered sensation as a result of damage to peripheral sensory neurons. Hyperglycemia results in altered nerve conduction velocities, loss of epidermal innervation, and the development of painful or painless signs and symptoms in the feet and hands. Current research has been unable to determine if a patient will develop insensate or painful neuropathy or be protected from peripheral nerve damage all together. One of the mechanisms that has been recognized to have a role in the pathogenesis of sensory neuron damage is the process of reactive dicarbonyls forming advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) as a direct result of hyperglycemia. The glyoxalase system, composed of the enzymes glyoxalase I (GLO1) and glyoxalase II, is the main detoxification pathway involved in breaking down toxic reactive dicarbonyls before producing carbonyl stress and forming AGEs on proteins, lipids, or nucleic acids. This review discusses AGEs, GLO1, their role in diabetic neuropathy, and potential therapeutic targets of the AGE pathway. PMID:22500508

  8. Vascular quality of care pilot study: how admission to a vascular surgery service affects evidence-based pharmacologic risk factor modification in patients with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Steenhof, Naomi; Le Piane, Francesca; Leblanc, Kori; Eisenberg, Naomi R; Kwan, Yvonne; Malmberg, Christine; Papadopoulos, Alexandra; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) guidelines recommend aggressive risk factor modification to improve cardiovascular outcomes. Recommended pharmacologic therapies include antiplatelets, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins). Purpose We studied the degree to which patient admission to a vascular surgery service increased the use of these therapies. Patients and methods The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of 150 patients with PAD admitted to the vascular surgery service at a large Canadian tertiary care hospital. The use of recommended pharmacologic therapies at the time of admission and discharge were compared. A multidisciplinary clinical team established criteria by which patients were deemed ineligible to receive any of the recommended therapies. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) were considered an alternative to ACE inhibitors. Results Prior to hospital admission, 64% of patients were on antiplatelet therapy, 67% were on an ACE inhibitor or ARB, and 71% were on a statin. At the time of discharge, 91% of patients were on an antiplatelet (or not, with an acceptable reason), 77% were on an ACE inhibitor or an ARB (or not, with an acceptable reason), and 85% were on a statin (or not, with an acceptable reason). While new prescriptions were largely responsible for improved guideline adherence with antiplatelets and statins, most of the apparent improvement in ACE inhibitor and ARB use was the result of identifying an acceptable reason for not having them prescribed. Conclusion This hypothesis generating pilot study supports the findings of others that there is suboptimal prescription of pharmacologic risk reduction therapies in the PAD population. Admission to a vascular service increases these rates. Nevertheless, some patients are still not receiving evidence-based treatment at discharge even after consideration of acceptable reasons. Strategies are needed to improve PAD guideline

  9. Development of advanced pulmonary vascular disease in D-transposition of the great arteries after the neonatal arterial switch operation.

    PubMed Central

    Rivenes, S M; Grifka, R G; Feltes, T F

    1998-01-01

    We report the case of a neonate with D-transposition of the great arteries who, after undergoing an uneventful arterial switch operation at the age of 4 days, was found at the age of 42 months to have developed advanced pulmonary vascular disease. Because the arterial switch operation was performed when our patient was only 4 days old, this case challenges the hypothesis that postnatal hemodynamics alone dictate the development of advanced pulmonary vascular disease in infants and children with transposition of the great arteries. Images PMID:9782561

  10. Advanced Glycation End Products: A Molecular Target for Vascular Complications in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Suematsu, Mika; Kaseda, Kuniyoshi; Matsui, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    A nonenzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids contributes to the aging of macromolecules and subsequently alters their structural integrity and function. This process has been known to progress at an accelerated rate under hyperglycemic and/or oxidative stress conditions. Over a course of days to weeks, early glycation products undergo further reactions such as rearrangements and dehydration to become irreversibly cross-linked, fluorescent and senescent macroprotein derivatives termed advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There is a growing body of evidence indicating that interaction of AGEs with their receptor (RAGE) elicits oxidative stress generation and as a result evokes proliferative, inflammatory, thrombotic and fibrotic reactions in a variety of cells. This evidence supports AGEs’ involvement in diabetes- and aging-associated disorders such as diabetic vascular complications, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and osteoporosis. Therefore, inhibition of AGE formation could be a novel molecular target for organ protection in diabetes. This report summarizes the pathophysiological role of AGEs in vascular complications in diabetes and discusses the potential clinical utility of measurement of serum levels of AGEs for evaluating organ damage in diabetes. PMID:26605646

  11. Sustained release nitrite therapy results in myocardial protection in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome with peripheral vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Jessica M.; Islam, Kazi N.; Polhemus, David J.; Donnarumma, Erminia; Brewster, Luke P.; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Goodchild, Traci T.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) reduces endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and exacerbates vascular dysfunction in patients with preexisting vascular diseases. Nitrite, a storage form of NO, can mediate vascular function during pathological conditions when endogenous NO is reduced. The aims of the present study were to characterize the effects of severe MetS and obesity on dyslipidemia, myocardial oxidative stress, and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) regulation in the obese Ossabaw swine (OS) model and to examine the effects of a novel, sustained-release formulation of sodium nitrite (SR-nitrite) on coronary vascular reactivity and myocardial redox status in obese OS subjected to critical limb ischemia (CLI). After 6 mo of an atherogenic diet, obese OS displayed a MetS phenotype. Obese OS had decreased eNOS functionality and NO bioavailability. In addition, obese OS exhibited increased oxidative stress and a significant reduction in antioxidant enzymes. The efficacy of SR-nitrite therapy was examined in obese OS subjected to CLI. After 3 wk of treatment, SR-nitrite (80 mg·kg−1·day−1 bid po) increased myocardial nitrite levels and eNOS function. Treatment with SR-nitrite reduced myocardial oxidative stress while increasing myocardial antioxidant capacity. Ex vivo assessment of vascular reactivity of left anterior descending coronary artery segments demonstrated marked improvement in vasoreactivity to sodium nitroprusside but not to substance P and bradykinin in SR-nitrite-treated animals compared with placebo-treated animals. In conclusion, in a clinically relevant, large-animal model of MetS and CLI, treatment with SR-nitrite enhanced myocardial NO bioavailability, attenuated oxidative stress, and improved ex vivo coronary artery vasorelaxation. PMID:25957218

  12. Vascular complications following liver transplantation: A literature review of advances in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Piardi, Tullio; Lhuaire, Martin; Bruno, Onorina; Memeo, Riccardo; Pessaux, Patrick; Kianmanesh, Reza; Sommacale, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Although vascular complications (VCs) following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) seldom occur, they are the most feared complications with a high incidence of both graft loss and mortality, as they compromise the blood flow of the transplant (either inflow or outflow). Diagnosis and therapeutic management of VCs constitute a major challenge in terms of increasing the success rate of liver transplantation. While surgical treatment used to be considered the first choice for management, advances in endovascular intervention have increased to make this a viable therapeutic option. Considering VC as a rare but a major and dreadful issue in OLT history, and in view of the continuing and rapid progress in recent years, an update on these uncommon conditions seemed necessary. In this sense, this review comprehensively discusses the important features (epidemiological, clinical, paraclinical, prognostic and therapeutic) of VCs following OLT. PMID:26783420

  13. Percutaneous transluminal rotational atherectomy in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease using a transluminal endatherectomy catheter (TEC): Initial results and angiographic follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Rilinger, Norbert; Goerich, Johannes; Scharrer-Pamler, Reinhard; Vogel, Jochen; Tomczak, Reinhard; Merkle, Elmar; Sokiranski, Roman; Brambs, Hans-Juergen

    1997-07-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the clinical results of percutaneous transluminal rotational atherectomy in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease. Methods. Rotational atherectomy was performed in 39 patients aged 39-87 years (mean 66.6 years). A total of 71 lesions (43 stenoses and 28 occlusions) were treated in 40 limbs. Additional balloon angioplasty was required in 54% of lesions. Fifteen patients (37.5%) presented in Fontaine stage II, 10 patients (25%) in Fontaine stage III and 15 patients (37.5%) in Fontaine stage IV. Rotational atherectomy at 750 rpm was carried out over a 0.014-inch guidewire with continuous aspiration into a vacuum, bottle. Follow-up angiography and color flow Doppler examinations were performed in 22 patients (23 limbs) after a mean period of 6 months (range 2-14 months). Results. There was one primary technical failure. In 36 of 40 lesions there was a good angiographic result with residual stenoses in less than 30%. In 70 lesions treated by rotational atherectomy, however, 54% showed residual stenoses of 30%-50% and these cases required additional balloon angioplasty. The mean ankle-brachial index improved significantly (p<0.001), from 0.49 before the procedure to 1.01 after the procedure. A single distal embolus, related to primary recanalization, occurred and there were two large inguinal hematomas. Cumulative clinical patency after 6 months was 83.8% and cumulative angiographic patency after 6 months was 79.1%. Conclusion. Percutaneous rotational atherectomy is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic peripheral vascular disease. Further prospective, randomized studies are necessary to compare percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with this new technical approach.

  14. Non-invasive and quantitative evaluation of peripheral vascular resistances in rats by combined NMR measurements of perfusion and blood pressure using ASL and dynamic angiography.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Jacques C; Giacomini, Eric; Baligand, Céline; Fromes, Yves; Carlier, Pierre G

    2010-02-01

    The in vivo determination of peripheral vascular resistances (VR) is crucial for the assessment of arteriolar function. It requires simultaneous determination of organ perfusion (F) and arterial blood pressure (BP). A fully non-invasive method was developed to measure systolic and diastolic BP in the caudal artery of rats based on dynamic NMR angiography. A good agreement was found between the NMR approach and the gold standard techniques (linear regression slope = 0.98, R(2) = 0.96). This method and the ASL-MRI measurement of skeletal muscle perfusion were combined into one single NMR experiment to quantitatively evaluate the local vascular resistances in the calf muscle of anaesthetized rats, in vivo and non-invasively 1) at rest: VR = 7.0 +/- 1.0 mmHg x min 100 g x ml(-1), F = 13 +/- 3 ml min(-1) x 100 g(-1) and mean BP (MBP) = 88 +/- 10 mmHg; 2) under vasodilator challenge (milrinone): VR = 3.7 +/- 1.1 mmHg min x 100 g ml(-1), F = 21 +/- 4 ml min(-1) x 100 g(-1) and MBP = 75 +/- 14 mmHg; 3) under vasopressor challenge (norepinephrine): VR = 9.8 +/- 1.2 mmHg min 100 g ml(-1), F = 14 +/- 3 ml min(-1) x 100 g(-1) and MBP = 137 +/- 2 mmHg. PMID:19795372

  15. Peripheral Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Angiogenesis via Paracrine Stimulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Secretion in the Equine Model.

    PubMed

    Bussche, Leen; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2014-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have received much attention as a potential treatment of ischemic diseases, including ischemic tissue injury and cardiac failure. The beneficial effects of MSCs are thought to be mediated by their ability to provide proangiogenic factors, creating a favorable microenvironment that results in neovascularization and tissue regeneration. To study this in more detail and to explore the potential of the horse as a valuable translational model, the objectives of the present study were to examine the presence of angiogenic stimulating factors in the conditioned medium (CM) of peripheral blood-derived equine mesenchymal stromal cells (PB-MSCs) and to study their in vitro effect on angiogenesis-related endothelial cell (EC) behavior, including proliferation and vessel formation. Our salient findings were that CM from PB-MSCs contained significant levels of several proangiogenic factors. Furthermore, we found that CM could induce angiogenesis in equine vascular ECs and confirmed that endothelin-1, insulin growth factor binding protein 2, interleukin-8, and platelet-derived growth factor-AA, but not urokinase-type plasminogen activator, were responsible for this enhanced EC network formation by increasing the expression level of vascular endothelial growth factor-A, an important angiogenesis stimulator. PMID:25313202

  16. A Study on the Relationship between Serum Beta 2-Microglobulin Levels, Underlying Chronic Kidney Disease, and Peripheral Arterial Disease in High-Vascular-Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Real de Asúa, Diego; Puchades, Ramón; García-Polo, Iluminada; Suárez, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Background Serum beta 2-microglobulin (B2M) levels have been found to be increased in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), yet it is still unknown whether B2M correlates with PAD intensity. Objectives We aim to evaluate the correlation between B2M and the ankle-brachial index (ABI) values in high-vascular-risk patients. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 63 high-vascular-risk patients admitted to the Cardiology Department or evaluated as outpatients in the Internal Medicine Department of our institution. Patients were classified into two groups according to their ABI: patients without PAD (n = 44, ABI values between 0.9 and 1.4) and patients with PAD (n = 19, ABI values lower than 0.9 or higher than 1.4). We performed univariate and multivariate analysis based on a multiple linear regression model. Results Serum B2M levels were higher in patients with pathological ABI values than in those without PAD (2.36 ± 1.13 vs. 1.80 ± 0.65 mg/L; P<0.05). We found no correlation between B2M and ABI in our total population (r = –0.12) or in patients with PAD (r = –0.09; NS for both comparisons). Age, gender, arterial hypertension, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), uric acid, total cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol correlated with B2M in the univariate analysis. In the final linear regression model, eGFR, uric acid and total cholesterol correlated independently with B2M (P<0.01). Conclusion We found no correlation between B2M levels and ABI values in high-vascular-risk patients that could usefully help in the subsequent diagnosis of PAD. However, we observed a significant correlation between B2M and eGFR, even when renal function was only slightly impaired. PMID:24757603

  17. [Endovascular versus conventional vascular surgery - old-fashioned thinking? : Part 2: carotid artery stenosis and peripheral arterial occlusive disease].

    PubMed

    Debus, E S; Manzoni, D; Behrendt, C-A; Heidemann, F; Grundmann, R T

    2016-04-01

    Endovascular therapy has widely replaced conventional open vascular surgical reconstruction. For this reason, both techniques were widely considered to be competing approaches. Evidence-based data from randomized prospective trials, meta-analyses and clinical registries, however, demonstrated that both techniques should be used to complement each other. It became increasingly more evident that the use of either procedure depends on the underlying disease and the anatomical conditions, whereby a combination of both (hybrid approach) may be the preferred option in certain situations. This review focuses on the treatment of patients with carotid artery stenosis, intermittent claudication, critical limb ischemia and acute limb ischemia. PMID:26801751

  18. Percutaneous intravascular US as adjunct to catheter-based interventions: preliminary experience in patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Isner, J M; Rosenfield, K; Losordo, D W; Kelly, S; Palefski, P; Langevin, R E; Razvi, S; Pastore, J O; Kosowsky, B D

    1990-04-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound (US) transducers may be introduced into the vascular system to record high-resolution images of the vessel wall and lumen. The potential advantages and existing liabilities of percutaneous intravascular US as an adjunct to transluminal vascular recanalization were investigated. A 6.6-F braided, polyethylene catheter enclosing a rotary drive shaft with a single-element, 20-MHz transducer at the distal tip was used in 17 patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal (balloon) angioplasty (PTA) alone (10 patients), PTA with implantation of an endovascular stent (two patients), atherectomy alone (two patients), or laser angioplasty with PTA and/or atherectomy (three patients). The arteries treated and examined included the common iliac in five patients, the external iliac in two, the superficial femoral in nine, and a vein graft-arterial anastomosis in one. In 14 cases PTA was employed as sole or adjunctive therapy; plaque cracks were clearly delineated with intravascular US in all 14 (100%) and dissections were observed in 11 (78%). Plaque-arterial wall disruption was less prominent in the arteries treated with mechanical atherectomy. The results of laser angioplasty reflected the adjunctive modality employed. After stent implantation, serial intravascular US documented effacement of PTA-induced plaque cracks and/or dissections. Intravascular US also aided in the quantitative assessment of luminal cross-sectional areas after the procedures (19.0-51.8 mm2). The observations recorded in this preliminary group of 17 patients illustrate the potential utility of intravascular US as an adjunct to conventional angiography in patients undergoing percutaneous revascularization. PMID:2138342

  19. Current Advances in the Translation of Vascular Tissue Engineering to the Treatment of Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Ethan W.; Udelsman, Brooks; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) hold great promise for the improvement of outcomes in pediatric patients with congenital cardiac anomalies. Currently used synthetic grafts have several limitations, including thrombogenicity, increased risk of infection, and lack of growth potential. The first pilot clinical trial of TEVGs demonstrated the feasibility of this new technology and revealed an excellent safety profile. However, long-term follow-up from this trial revealed the primary graft-related complication to be stenosis, affecting 16 percent of grafts within 7 years post-implantation. In order to determine the mechanism behind TEVG stenosis and ultimately to create improved second generation TEVGs, our group has returned to the bench to study vascular neotissue formation in a variety of large and small animal models. The purpose of this report is to review the recent advances in the understanding of neotissue formation and vascular tissue engineering. PMID:22737051

  20. Spiral CT: vascular applications.

    PubMed

    Rankin, S C

    1998-08-01

    Recent technical advances in CT have renewed interest in the development of CT angiography (CTA). CT angiography is a minimally invasive method of visualising the vascular system and is becoming an alternative to conventional arteriography in some situations. Spiral technology allows a volume of data to be obtained on a single breath-hold with no respiratory misregistration. Fast machines with second or subsecond acquisition times mean the images are obtained while there are high circulating levels of contrast medium giving peak vascular opacification from a peripheral intravenous injection. Accurate timing will ensure either the arterial or venous phase is imaged. Multiple overlapping axial images can be obtained from the data set with no increase in radiation dose to the patient and from these scans computer generated multiplanar and 3D images are obtained which can be viewed from numerous angles. CT angiography can be performed more quickly, less invasively and at reduced cost compared to conventional angiography. PMID:9717621

  1. Imaging of vascular dynamics within the foot using dynamic diffuse optical tomography to diagnose peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Hoi, J. W.; Kim, I.; Dayal, R.; Shrikande, G.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is the narrowing of the functional area of the artery generally due to atherosclerosis. It affects between 8-12 million people in the United States and if untreated this can lead to ulceration, gangrene and ultimately amputation. The current diagnostic method for PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The ABI is a ratio of the patient's systolic blood pressure in the foot to that of the brachial artery in the arm, a ratio below 0.9 is indicative of affected vasculature. However, this method is ineffective in patients with calcified arteries (diabetic and end-stage renal failure patients), which falsely elevates the ABI recording resulting in a false negative reading. In this paper we present our results in a pilot study to deduce optical tomography's ability to detect poor blood perfusion in the foot. We performed an IRB approved 30 patient study, where we imaged the feet of the enrolled patients during a five stage dynamic imaging sequence. The patients were split up into three groups: 10 healthy subjects, 10 PAD patients and 10 PAD patients with diabetes and they were imaged while applying a pressure cuff to their thigh. Differences in the magnitude of blood pooling in the foot and rate at which the blood pools in the foot are all indicative of arterial disease.

  2. Step‐Monitored Home Exercise Improves Ambulation, Vascular Function, and Inflammation in Symptomatic Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Parker, Donald E.; Montgomery, Polly S.; Blevins, Steve M.

    2014-01-01

    Background This prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial compared changes in primary outcome measures of claudication onset time (COT) and peak walking time (PWT), and secondary outcomes of submaximal exercise performance, daily ambulatory activity, vascular function, inflammation, and calf muscle hemoglobin oxygen saturation (StO2) in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) following new exercise training using a step watch (NEXT Step) home‐exercise program, a supervised exercise program, and an attention‐control group. Methods and Results One hundred eighty patients were randomized. The NEXT Step program and the supervised exercise program consisted of intermittent walking to mild‐to‐moderate claudication pain for 12 weeks, whereas the controls performed light resistance training. Change scores for COT (P<0.001), PWT (P<0.001), 6‐minute walk distance (P=0.028), daily average cadence (P=0.011), time to minimum calf muscle StO2 during exercise (P=0.025), large‐artery elasticity index (LAEI) (P=0.012), and high‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein (hsCRP) (P=0.041) were significantly different among the 3 groups. Both the NEXT Step home program and the supervised exercise program demonstrated a significant increase from baseline in COT, PWT, 6‐minute walk distance, daily average cadence, and time to minimum calf StO2. Only the NEXT Step home group had improvements from baseline in LAEI, and hsCRP (P<0.05). Conclusions NEXT Step home exercise utilizing minimal staff supervision has low attrition, high adherence, and is efficacious in improving COT and PWT, as well as secondary outcomes of submaximal exercise performance, daily ambulatory activity, vascular function, inflammation, and calf muscle StO2 in symptomatic patients with PAD. Clinical Trial Registration URL: ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT00618670. PMID:25237048

  3. Peripheral artery bypass - leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... P. Peripheral arterial diseases. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ... noncoronary obstructive vascular disease.In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ...

  4. Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in subjects with moderate cardiovascular risk: Italian results from the PANDORA study Data from PANDORA (Prevalence of peripheral Arterial disease in subjects with moderate CVD risk, with No overt vascular Diseases nor Diabetes mellitus)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The PANDORA study has recently examined the prevalence of low ankle brachial index (ABI) in subjects with moderate risk of cardiovascular disease. This sub-analysis of the PANDORA study examines the prevalence of asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD), as determined by ABI, in Italian subjects presenting with moderate cardiovascular risk, in the absence of diabetes or overt vascular disease. Methods PANDORA is a non-interventional, cross-sectional study that was performed in 6 European countries, involving subjects with at least one cardiovascular (CV) risk factor. The primary objective was to evaluate the prevalence of asymptomatic PAD using ABI. For this post-hoc sub-analysis, data were extracted for subjects enrolled in Italy, comprising 51.5% (n = 5298) of subjects from the original PANDORA study. Secondary objectives were to establish the prevalence and treatment of CV risk factors. Results The mean age was 63.9 years and 22.9% (95% CI 21.7-24.0) of subjects presented with asymptomatic PAD. A range of risk factors comprising smoking, hypertension, low HDL-cholesterol, family history of coronary heart disease and habit of moderate-high alcohol intake were significantly associated with asymptomatic PAD (p < 0.0001). Statin treatment had the lowest incidence in Italian subjects. Furthermore, patients treated with statins were significantly less likely to have asymptomatic PAD than those who were not (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Asymptomatic PAD was highly prevalent in Italian subjects, the majority of whom were not candidates for ABI assessment according to current guidelines. Findings from this study suggest that these patients should be carefully examined in clinical practice and ABI measured so that therapeutic interventions known to decrease their CV risk may be offered. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00689377 PMID:21981988

  5. The role of vascular biomarkers for primary and secondary prevention. A position paper from the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on peripheral circulation: Endorsed by the Association for Research into Arterial Structure and Physiology (ARTERY) Society.

    PubMed

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Xaplanteris, Panagiotis; Aboyans, Victor; Brodmann, Marianne; Cífková, Renata; Cosentino, Francesco; De Carlo, Marco; Gallino, Augusto; Landmesser, Ulf; Laurent, Stéphane; Lekakis, John; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Naka, Katerina K; Protogerou, Athanasios D; Rizzoni, Damiano; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Van Bortel, Luc; Weber, Thomas; Yamashina, Akira; Zimlichman, Reuven; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Cockcroft, John; O'Rourke, Michael; Park, Jeong Bae; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Sillesen, Henrik; Townsend, Raymond R

    2015-08-01

    While risk scores are invaluable tools for adapted preventive strategies, a significant gap exists between predicted and actual event rates. Additional tools to further stratify the risk of patients at an individual level are biomarkers. A surrogate endpoint is a biomarker that is intended as a substitute for a clinical endpoint. In order to be considered as a surrogate endpoint of cardiovascular events, a biomarker should satisfy several criteria, such as proof of concept, prospective validation, incremental value, clinical utility, clinical outcomes, cost-effectiveness, ease of use, methodological consensus, and reference values. We scrutinized the role of peripheral (i.e. not related to coronary circulation) noninvasive vascular biomarkers for primary and secondary cardiovascular disease prevention. Most of the biomarkers examined fit within the concept of early vascular aging. Biomarkers that fulfill most of the criteria and, therefore, are close to being considered a clinical surrogate endpoint are carotid ultrasonography, ankle-brachial index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity; biomarkers that fulfill some, but not all of the criteria are brachial ankle pulse wave velocity, central haemodynamics/wave reflections and C-reactive protein; biomarkers that do no not at present fulfill essential criteria are flow-mediated dilation, endothelial peripheral arterial tonometry, oxidized LDL and dysfunctional HDL. Nevertheless, it is still unclear whether a specific vascular biomarker is overly superior. A prospective study in which all vascular biomarkers are measured is still lacking. In selected cases, the combined assessment of more than one biomarker may be required. PMID:26117398

  6. Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis and Vascular Remodeling in Cardiovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Golestani, Reza; Jung, Jae-Joon; Sadeghi, Mehran M.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular remodeling are involved in a wide array of cardiovascular diseases, from myocardial ischemia and peripheral arterial disease, to atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysm. Molecular imaging techniques to detect and quantify key molecular and cellular players in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors, αvβ3 integrin, and matrix metalloproteinases) can advance vascular biology research and serve as clinical tools for early diagnosis, risk stratification, and selection of patients who would benefit most from therapeutic interventions. To target these key mediators, a number of molecular imaging techniques have been developed and evaluated in animal models of angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. This review of the state of the art molecular imaging of angiogenesis and vascular (and valvular) remodeling, will focus mostly on nuclear imaging techniques (positron emission tomography and single photon emission tomography) that offer high potential for clinical translation. PMID:27275836

  7. Cilostazol attenuates the severity of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in patients with type 2 diabetes: the role of plasma soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jhih-Syuan; Chuang, Tsung-Ju; Chen, Jui-Hung; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Lin, Tsung-Kun; Hsiao, Fone-Ching; Hung, Yi-Jen

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the plasma soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE) play a major role in developing macrovascular complications of type 2 diabetes, including peripheral arterial occlusion disease (PAOD). Cilostazol is an antiplatelet, antithrombotic agent, which has been used for the treatment of PAOD. We hypothesized that cilostazol attenuates the severity of PAOD in patients with type 2 diabetes through the augmentation of plasma sRAGE. Ninety type 2 diabetic patients with PAOD defined as intermittent claudication with ankle-brachial index (ABI) ≦0.9 were recruited for an open-labeled, placebo-controlled study for 52 weeks with oral cilostazol 100 mg twice daily (n = 45) or placebo (n = 45). Fasting plasma sRAGE, endothelial variables of E-selectin, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), and inflammatory markers of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined. After completely the 52-week treatment program, the ABI values were elevated in cilostazol group (P < 0.001). The plasma sRAGE was significantly increased (P = 0.007), and hsCRP, sVCAM, and E-selectin concentrations were significantly decreased (P = 0.028, <0.001 and <0.001, respectively) with cilostazol treatment. In a partial correlation analysis with adjustments for sex and age, the net change of sRAGE significantly correlated with the change of ABI in the cilostazol group (P = 0.043). In a stepwise multiple regression model, only the change with regards to sRAGE was significantly associated with the change of ABI (P = 0.046). Our results suggest that cilostazol may effectively attenuate the severity of PAOD in patients with type 2 diabetes. Plasma sRAGE plays a role as an independent predictor for improving the index of PAOD. PMID:25666934

  8. [Research advances on DNA extraction methods from peripheral blood mononuclear cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ying; Yu, Chen-Xi

    2014-10-01

    DNA extraction is a basic technology of molecular biology. The purity and the integrality of DNA structure are necessary for different experiments of gene engineering. As commonly used materials in the clinical detection, the fast, efficient isolation and extraction of genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells is very important for the inspection and analysis of clinical blood. At present, there are many methods for extracting DNA, such as phenol-chloroform method, salting out method, centrifugal adsorption column chromatography method (artificial methods), magnetic beads (semi-automatic method) and DNA extraction kit. In this article, a brief review of the principle for existing DNA blood extraction method, the specific steps and the assessment of the specific methods briefly are summarized. PMID:25338615

  9. Vascular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Abel; Buchanan, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided into two main groups: tumors and malformations. Vascular tumors are a large and complex group of lesions, especially for clinicians with none or little experience in this field. In the past, these lesions caused a great deal of confusion because many appear analogous to the naked eye. Thankfully, recent advances in diagnostic techniques have helped the medical community to enhance our comprehension, accurately label, diagnose, and treat these lesions. In this article, we will review the most frequent vascular tumors and provide the reader with the tools to properly label, diagnose, and manage these complex lesions. PMID:25045329

  10. Advancing Beyond the ‘Heart-Healthy Diet’ for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nosova, Emily V.; Conte, Michael S.; Grenon, S. Marlene

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a burdensome cardiovascular condition that results from chronic inflammatory insults to the arterial vasculature. Key risk factors include age, gender, Type II diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, smoking, lack of physical fitness and poor diet, the latter three being modifiable in the development and progression of PAD. A growing body of evidence indicates that imbalanced nutrient intake may contribute to the development and progression of PAD. The purpose of this review is to summarize current knowledge about nutritional patterns among patients with PAD, and to ascertain whether certain health- promoting foods and nutrients could benefit patients with this condition. Methods We conducted a comprehensive literature review to examine primary source evidence for or against the nutrients that are commonly associated with PAD, and their potential utility as therapies. Results We summarized nine categories of nutrients, as well as four diets endorsed by the American Heart Association that may be prescribed to patients with or at risk for PAD. The nutrients reviewed included omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), folate and B-series vitamins, and anti-oxidants. The diet plans described include the DASH diet, Mediterranean diet, low-fat diet, low carbohydrate diet, Dr. Dean Ornish’s Spectrum® Diet and Dr. Andrew Weil’s Anti-Inflammatory Diet. Conclusion PAD is a chronic inflammatory condition that is associated with longstanding poor nutrition habits. We advocate for an intensified use of diet in PAD therapy, and we specifically recommend following eating patterns that are rich in nutrients with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. PMID:25534981

  11. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Peripheral Neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous ...

  12. Central and peripheral blood pressures in relation to plasma advanced glycation end products in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Huang, Q-F; Sheng, C-S; Kang, Y-Y; Zhang, L; Wang, S; Li, F-K; Cheng, Y-B; Guo, Q-H; Li, Y; Wang, J-G

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the association of plasma AGE (advanced glycation end product) concentration with central and peripheral blood pressures and central-to-brachial blood pressure amplification in a Chinese population. The study subjects were from a newly established residential area in the suburb of Shanghai. Using the SphygmoCor system, we recorded radial arterial waveforms and derived aortic waveforms by a generalized transfer function and central systolic and pulse pressure by calibration for brachial blood pressure measured with an oscillometric device. The central-to-brachial pressure amplification was expressed as the central-to-brachial systolic blood pressure difference and pulse pressure difference and ratio. Plasma AGE concentration was measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and logarithmically transformed for statistical analysis. The 1051 participants (age, 55.1±13.1 years) included 663 women. After adjustment for sex, age and other confounding factors, plasma AGE concentration was associated with central but not peripheral blood pressures and with some of the pressure amplification indexes. Indeed, each 10-fold increase in plasma AGE concentration was associated with 2.94 mm Hg (P=0.04) higher central systolic blood pressure and 2.39% lower central-to-brachial pulse pressure ratio (P=0.03). In further subgroup analyses, the association was more prominent in the presence of hypercholesterolemia (+8.11 mm Hg, P=0.008) for central systolic blood pressure and in the presence of overweight and obesity (-4.89%, P=0.009), diabetes and prediabetes (-6.26%, P=0.10) or current smoking (-6.68%, P=0.045) for central-to-brachial pulse pressure ratio. In conclusion, plasma AGE concentration is independently associated with central systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure amplification, especially in the presence of several modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26084655

  13. Involvement of the peripheral sensory and sympathetic nervous system in the vascular endothelial expression of ICAM-1 and the recruitment of opioid-containing immune cells to inhibit inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Shaaban A; Shaqura, Mohammed; Brendl, Ute; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud; Fürst, Susanna; Schäfer, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Endogenous opioids are known to be released within certain brain areas following stressful stimuli. Recently, it was shown that also leukocytes are a potential source of endogenously released opioid peptides following stress. They activate sensory neuron opioid receptors and result in the inhibition of local inflammatory pain. An important prerequisite for the recruitment of such leukocytes is the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in blood vessels of inflamed tissue. Here, we investigated the contribution of peripheral sensory and/or sympathetic nerves to the enhanced expression of ICAM-1 simultaneously with the increased recruitment of opioid peptide-containing leukocytes to promote the inhibition of inflammatory pain. Selective degeneration of either peripheral sensory or sympathetic nerve fibers by their respective neurotoxins, capsaicin or 6-hydroxydopamime, significantly reduced the subcutaneous immigration of β-endorphin- (END-) and met-enkephalin- (ENK-)-containing polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) (in the early phase) and mononuclear cells (in the late phase) during painful Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) rat hind paw inflammation. In contrast, this treatment did not alter the percentage of opioid peptide-containing leukocytes in the circulation. Calcitonin gene-related peptide- (CGRP-) and tyrosine hydroxylase- (TH-) immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers were in close contact to ICAM-1 IR blood vessels within inflamed subcutaneous tissue. The selective degeneration of sensory or sympathetic nerve fibers attenuated the enhanced expression of vascular endothelial ICAM-1 after intraplantar (i.pl.) FCA and abolished endogenous opioid peptide-mediated peripheral analgesia. Our results suggest that, during localized inflammatory pain, peripheral sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers augment the expression of vascular endothelial ICAM-1 simultaneously with the increased recruitment of opioid peptide-containing leukocytes which consequently

  14. Serum uric acid as a prognostic marker in the setting of advanced vascular disease: a prospective study in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Di Stolfo, Giuseppe; Mastroianno, Sandra; Potenza, Domenico Rosario; De Luca, Giovanni; d'Arienzo, Carmela; Pacilli, Michele Antonio; Fanelli, Mario; Russo, Aldo; Fanelli, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Background Many epidemiological studies analyze the relationship between hyperuricemia and cardiovascular outcomes. This observational prospective study investigates the association of serum uric acid (SUA) levels with adverse cardiovascular events and deaths in an elderly population affected by advanced atherosclerosis. Methods Two hundred and seventy six elderly patients affected by advanced atherosclerosis (217 males and 59 females; aged 71.2 ± 7.8 years) were included. All patients were assessed for history of cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity and traditional risk factors. Patients were followed for approximately 31 ± 11 months. Major events were recorded during follow-up, defined as myocardial infarction, cerebral ischemia, myocardial and/or peripheral revascularization and death. Results Mean SUA level was 5.47 ± 1.43 mg/dL; then we further divided the population in two groups, according to the median value (5.36 mg/dL). During a median follow up of 31 months (5 to 49 months), 66 cardiovascular events, 9 fatal cardiovascular events and 14 cancer-related deaths have occurred. The patients with increased SUA level presented a higher significant incidence of total cardiovascular events (HR: 1.867, P = 0.014, 95% CI: 1.134–3.074). The same patients showed a significant increased risk of cancer-related death (HR: 4.335, P = 0.025, 95% CI: 1.204–15.606). Conclusions Increased SUA levels are independently and significantly associated with risk of cardiovascular events and cancer related death in a population of mainly elderly patients affected by peripheral vasculopathy. PMID:26512243

  15. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products Signaling Interferes with the Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Contractile Phenotype and Function.

    PubMed

    Simard, Elie; Söllradl, Thomas; Maltais, Jean-Sébastien; Boucher, Julie; D'Orléans-Juste, Pédro; Grandbois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Increased blood glucose concentrations promote reactions between glucose and proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGE). Circulating AGE in the blood plasma can activate the receptor for advanced end-products (RAGE), which is present on both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). RAGE exhibits a complex signaling that involves small G-proteins and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), which lead to increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity. While RAGE signaling has been previously addressed in endothelial cells, little is known regarding its impact on the function of VSMC. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAGE signaling leads to alterations in the mechanical and functional properties of VSMC, which could contribute to complications associated with diabetes. We demonstrated that RAGE is expressed and functional in the A7r5 VSMC model, and its activation by AGE significantly increased NF-κB activity, which is known to interfere with the contractile phenotype of VSMC. The protein levels of the contraction-related transcription factor myocardin were also decreased by RAGE activation with a concomitant decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of transgelin (SM-22α), a regulator of VSMC contraction. Interestingly, we demonstrated that RAGE activation increased the overall cell rigidity, an effect that can be related to an increase in myosin activity. Finally, although RAGE stimulation amplified calcium signaling and slightly myosin activity in VSMC challenged with vasopressin, their contractile capacity was negatively affected. Overall, RAGE activation in VSMC could represent a keystone in the development of vascular diseases associated with diabetes by interfering with the contractile phenotype of VSMC through the modification of their mechanical and functional properties. PMID:26248341

  16. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products Signaling Interferes with the Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Contractile Phenotype and Function

    PubMed Central

    Simard, Elie; Söllradl, Thomas; Maltais, Jean-Sébastien; Boucher, Julie; D’Orléans-Juste, Pédro; Grandbois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Increased blood glucose concentrations promote reactions between glucose and proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGE). Circulating AGE in the blood plasma can activate the receptor for advanced end-products (RAGE), which is present on both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). RAGE exhibits a complex signaling that involves small G-proteins and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), which lead to increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity. While RAGE signaling has been previously addressed in endothelial cells, little is known regarding its impact on the function of VSMC. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAGE signaling leads to alterations in the mechanical and functional properties of VSMC, which could contribute to complications associated with diabetes. We demonstrated that RAGE is expressed and functional in the A7r5 VSMC model, and its activation by AGE significantly increased NF-κB activity, which is known to interfere with the contractile phenotype of VSMC. The protein levels of the contraction-related transcription factor myocardin were also decreased by RAGE activation with a concomitant decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of transgelin (SM-22α), a regulator of VSMC contraction. Interestingly, we demonstrated that RAGE activation increased the overall cell rigidity, an effect that can be related to an increase in myosin activity. Finally, although RAGE stimulation amplified calcium signaling and slightly myosin activity in VSMC challenged with vasopressin, their contractile capacity was negatively affected. Overall, RAGE activation in VSMC could represent a keystone in the development of vascular diseases associated with diabetes by interfering with the contractile phenotype of VSMC through the modification of their mechanical and functional properties. PMID:26248341

  17. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuritis; Neuropathy - peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy ... Neuropathy is very common. There are many types and causes. Often, no cause can be found. Some ...

  18. Peripheral artery bypass - leg - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... P. Peripheral arterial diseases. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ... noncoronary obstructive vascular disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ...

  19. Phase I Study of CKD-516, a Novel Vascular Disrupting Agent, in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Do-Youn; Kim, Tae-Min; Han, Sae-Won; Shin, Dong-Yeop; Lee, Yun Gyoo; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Tae-You; Jang, In-Jin; Lee, Jong-Seok; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose CKD-516 is a newly developed vascular disrupting agent. This phase I dose-escalation study of CKD-516 was conducted to determine maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor efficacy in patients with advanced solid tumors. Materials and Methods Patients received CKD-516 intravenously on D1 and D8 every 3 weeks, in a standard 3+3 design. Safety was evaluated by National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events ver. 4.02 and response was assessed by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor ver. 1.1. Results Twenty-three patients were treated with CKD-516 at seven dosing levels: 1 mg/m2/day (n=3), 2 mg/m2/day (n=3), 3.3 mg/m2/day (n=3), 5 mg/m2/day (n=3), 7 mg/m2/day (n=3), 9 mg/m2/day (n=6), and 12 mg/m2/day (n=2). Mean age was 54 and 56.5% of patients were male. Two dose-limiting toxicities, which were both grade 3 hypertension, were observed in two patients at 12 mg/m2/day. The MTD was determined as 12 mg/m2/day. Most common adverse events were gastrointestinal adverse events (diarrhea, 34.8% [30.4% grade 1/2, 13.0% grade 3]; nausea, 21.7% [all grade 1/2]; vomiting, 21.7% [all grade 1/2]), myalgia (17.4%, all grade 1/2), and abdominal pain (21.7% [21.7% grade 1/2, 4.3% grade 3]). The pharmacokinetic study showed the dose-linearity of all dosing levels. Among 23 patients, six patients (26.1%) showed stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 39 days (95% confidence interval, 37 to 41 days). Conclusion This study demonstrates feasibility of CKD-516, novel vascular disrupting agent, in patients with advanced solid tumor. MTD of CKD-516 was defined as 12 mg/m2/day on D1 and D8 every 3 weeks. PMID:25715767

  20. The inhibition of advanced glycation end-products-induced retinal vascular permeability by silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sheikpranbabu, Sardarpasha; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Eom, Soo Hyun; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2010-03-01

    The increased permeability of the blood-retinal barrier is known to occur in patients with diabetes, and this defect contributes to retinal edema. This study aimed to determine the effects of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) on advanced glycation end-products (AGEs)-induced endothelial cell permeability. Cultured porcine retinal endothelial cells (PRECs) were exposed to AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) and the endothelial cell permeability was detected by measuring the flux of RITC-dextran across the PREC monolayers. We found that AGE-BSA increased the dextran flux across a PREC monolayer and Ag-NPs blocked the solute flux induced by AGE-BSA. In order to understand the underlying signaling mechanism of Ag-NPs on the inhibitory effect of AGE-BSA-induced permeability, we demonstrated that Ag-NPs could inhibit the AGE-BSA-induced permeability via Src kinase pathway. AGE-BSA also increased the PREC permeability by stimulating the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and decreased the expression of occludin and ZO-1. Further, Ag-NPs inhibited the AGE-BSA-induced permeability by increased expression of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1, co-incident with an increase in barrier properties of endothelial monolayer. Together, our results indicate that Ag-NPs could possibly act as potent anti-permeability molecule by targeting the Src signaling pathway and tight junction proteins and it offers potential targets to inhibit the ocular related diseases. PMID:19963272

  1. Advanced glycosylation endproducts block the antiproliferative effect of nitric oxide. Role in the vascular and renal complications of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hogan, M; Cerami, A; Bucala, R

    1992-09-01

    Advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGEs) accumulate on long-lived tissue proteins such as basement membrane collagen and have been implicated in many of the long-term complications of diabetes mellitus. These products originate from glucose-derived Schiff base and Amadori products but undergo a series of complex rearrangement reactions to form ultimately protein-bound, fluorescent heterocycles. AGEs can react with and chemically inactivate nitric oxide (NO), a potent endothelial cell-derived vasodilator and antiproliferative factor. Since mesenchymal cell proliferation is an early and characteristic lesion of diabetic vasculopathy and glomerulopathy, we investigated the possibility that collagen-bound AGEs functionally inactivate the antiproliferative effect of NO. In model cell culture systems, AGEs were found to block the cytostatic effect of NO on aortic smooth muscle and renal mesangial cells. The inactivation of endothelial cell-derived NO by basement membrane AGEs may represent a common pathway in the development of the accelerated vascular and renal disease that accompany long-term diabetes mellitus. PMID:1522220

  2. Evaluation of Ischemia-Modified Albumin, Malondialdehyde, and Advanced Oxidative Protein Products as Markers of Vascular Injury in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Afzal; Manjrekar, Poornima; Yadav, Charu; Agarwal, Ashish; Srikantiah, Rukmini Mysore; Hegde, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    AIM This study aimed at evaluation of ischemia-modified albumin (IMA), malondialdehyde (MDA), and advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP) as markers of vascular injury in diabetic nephropathy (DN) with derivation of cutoff values for the same. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study population comprised 60 diabetes patients and 30 controls, with diabetes patients further categorized into three groups based on urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) of <30 mg/g (diabetes without microalbuminuria), 30–300 mg/g (early DN), and >300 mg/g of creatinine (overt DN). Serum IMA, MDA, and AOPP were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; HbA1c, serum creatinine, urine albumin, and urine creatinine were estimated using automated analyzers. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and receiver-operating characteristic curve. RESULTS A statistically significant difference was found in the levels of IMA among patients with early DN (154 ng/mL), diabetes without nephropathy (109.4 ng/mL), and healthy controls (45.7 ng/mL), with highest levels in early DN cases. Similar increase was seen in AOPP as well. A significant correlation was observed between IMA and UACR in diabetes without nephropathy (r = 0.448). CONCLUSION The present study postulates serum IMA as a novel biomarker for the assessment of disease progression in diabetes even before microalbuminuria, and a cutoff point ≥99 ng/mL can be used for detection of early DN. PMID:27158221

  3. Advanced 3D mesh manipulation in stereolithographic files and post-print processing for the manufacturing of patient-specific vascular flow phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Ryan P.; Chand, Arpita; Vidiyala, Sowmya; Arechavala, Stacie M.; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Rudin, Stephen; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2016-03-01

    Complex vascular anatomies can cause the failure of image-guided endovascular procedures. 3D printed patient-specific vascular phantoms provide clinicians and medical device companies the ability to preemptively plan surgical treatments, test the likelihood of device success, and determine potential operative setbacks. This research aims to present advanced mesh manipulation techniques of stereolithographic (STL) files segmented from medical imaging and post-print surface optimization to match physiological vascular flow resistance. For phantom design, we developed three mesh manipulation techniques. The first method allows outlet 3D mesh manipulations to merge superfluous vessels into a single junction, decreasing the number of flow outlets and making it feasible to include smaller vessels. Next we introduced Boolean operations to eliminate the need to manually merge mesh layers and eliminate errors of mesh self-intersections that previously occurred. Finally we optimize support addition to preserve the patient anatomical geometry. For post-print surface optimization, we investigated various solutions and methods to remove support material and smooth the inner vessel surface. Solutions of chloroform, alcohol and sodium hydroxide were used to process various phantoms and hydraulic resistance was measured and compared with values reported in literature. The newly mesh manipulation methods decrease the phantom design time by 30 - 80% and allow for rapid development of accurate vascular models. We have created 3D printed vascular models with vessel diameters less than 0.5 mm. The methods presented in this work could lead to shorter design time for patient specific phantoms and better physiological simulations.

  4. Linking Immunity to Atherosclerosis: Implications for Vascular Pharmacology - A tribute to Göran K. Hansson

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong-Jian; Jonasson, Lena

    2011-01-01

    For the past decade, we have deepened our understanding of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, a chronic arterial disease that causes cardiac and cerebral infarction and peripheral vascular disorders. Because of this extended understanding, more effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this disease are emerging. One of the fundamental mechanisms that lead to progress or regression in atherosclerosis, thus influencing its life-threatening complications, occurs through functional changes in vascular immunity and inflammation. This review briefly summarized the discoveries in basic and translational sciences in this area and recent advances in clinical medicine against atherosclerotic vascular diseases. PMID:22120836

  5. α4-Integrin Antibody Treatment Blocks Monocyte/Macrophage Traffic to, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression in, and Pathology of the Dorsal Root Ganglia in an SIV Macaque Model of HIV-Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lakritz, Jessica R; Thibault, Derek M; Robinson, Jake A; Campbell, Jennifer H; Miller, Andrew D; Williams, Kenneth C; Burdo, Tricia H

    2016-07-01

    Traffic of activated monocytes into the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) is critical for pathology in HIV peripheral neuropathy. We have shown that accumulation of recently recruited (bromodeoxyuridine(+) MAC387(+)) monocytes is associated with severe DRG pathology and loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers in SIV-infected macaques. Herein, we blocked leukocyte traffic by treating animals with natalizumab, which binds to α4-integrins. SIV-infected CD8-depleted macaques treated with natalizumab either early (the day of infection) or late (28 days after infection) were compared with untreated SIV-infected animals sacrificed at similar times. Histopathology showed diminished DRG pathology with natalizumab treatment, including decreased inflammation, neuronophagia, and Nageotte nodules. Natalizumab treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of bromodeoxyuridine(+) (early), MAC387(+) (late), CD68(+) (early and late), and SIVp28(+) (late) macrophages in DRG tissues. The number of CD3(+) T lymphocytes in DRGs was not affected by natalizumab treatment. Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, an adhesion molecule that mediates leukocyte traffic, was diminished in DRGs of all natalizumab-treated animals. These data show that blocking monocyte, but not T lymphocyte, traffic to the DRG results in decreased inflammation and pathology, supporting a role for monocyte traffic and activation in HIV peripheral neuropathy. PMID:27157989

  6. ACCF/ACR/AIUM/ASE/ASN/ICAVL/SCAI/SCCT/SIR/SVM/SVS 2012 appropriate use criteria for peripheral vascular ultrasound and physiological testing part I: Arterial ultrasound and physiological testing

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, Emile R.; Gornik, Heather L.; Gerhard-Herman, Marie; Misra, Sanjay; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Zierler, R. Eugene

    2015-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), in partnership with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where noninvasive vascular testing (ultrasound and physiological testing) is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of the original appropriate use criteria (AUC). The 159 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). A total of 255 indications (with the inclusion of surveillance timeframes) were rated. One hundred and seventeen indications were rated as appropriate, 84 were rated as uncertain, and 54 were rated as inappropriate. The AUC for peripheral vascular disease have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. PMID:22694919

  7. ACCF/ACR/AIUM/ASE/ASN/ICAVL/SCAI/SCCT/SIR/SVM/SVS 2012 Appropriate Use Criteria for Peripheral Vascular Ultrasound and Physiological Testing Part I: Arterial Ultrasound and Physiological Testing

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, Emile R.; Gornik, Heather L.; Gerhard-Herman, Marie; Misra, Sanjay; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Zierler, R. Eugene; Wolk, Michael J.; Mohler, Emile R.; Dixon, Bradley S.; Driver, Vickie R.; Fail, Peter S.; Fazel, Reza; Findeiss, Laura; Fuchs, Richard; Gillespie, John; Hughes, Joseph P.; Jaigobin, Cheryl; Leers, Steven A.; Moore, Colleen; Pellerito, John S.; Robbin, Michelle L.; Shugart, Rita E.; Weaver, Fred A.; White, Christopher J.; Yevzlin, Alexander S.; Wolk, Michael J.; Bailey, Steven R.; Douglas, Pamela S.; Hendel, Robert C.; Kramer, Christopher M.; Min, James K.; Patel, Manesh R.; Shaw, Leslee; Stainback, Raymond F.; Allen, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), in partnership with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where noninvasive vascular testing (ultrasound and physiological testing) is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of the original appropriate use criteria (AUC). The 159 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). A total of 255 indications (with the inclusion of surveillance timeframes) were rated. One hundred and seventeen indications were rated as appropriate, 84 were rated as uncertain, and 54 were rated as inappropriate. The AUC for peripheral vascular disease have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. PMID:22694840

  8. Stem cells as a new treatment for peripheral artery disease: hype or hope? The point of view of a vascular surgeon.

    PubMed

    Lehalle, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Because many of patients with peripheral arterial disease are not eligible for direct or conventional revascularization procedures, because stem cell therapy is being investigated as to its possible role in the treatment of limb ischemia, there is a need to evaluate this treatment and his true application. On the basis of experimental data, preliminary clinical studies have established the safety and feasibility of stem cells implantation in case of critical limb ischemia. Forthcoming large studies, especially randomized placebo controlled double blind studies, related to the optimal cell type, dosage, administration route, will consolidate this evidence and establish mid and long term effectiveness. PMID:25538058

  9. [INTERRELATION BETWEEN THE PREOPERATIVE MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PERIPHERAL BLOOD AND THE QUALITY OF ENGRAFTMENT OF VASCULARIZED ADIPO-FASCIO-CUTANEOUS FLAPS IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Shchudlo, N A; Shchudlo, M M; Sbrodova, L I

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the interrelation between the preoperative blood counts and the quality of vascularized adipo-fascio-cutaneous flap survival. In 10 adult male Wistar rats, a flap with the area of 18 cm2 was formed on the basis of superficial inferior epigastric artery; after a 90 min ischemic period it was replanted. 12 days after operation the quality of flap survival was assessed with computer-assisted planimetry. It was found that the combination of preoperative leukocyte, thrombocyte, neutrophil and eosinophil counts as well as reactive lymphocyte counts close to the maximal reference values increased the probability of epidermolysis. PMID:27487668

  10. Treatment of peripheral arterial disease in diabetes: a consensus of the Italian Societies of Diabetes (SID, AMD), Radiology (SIRM) and Vascular Endovascular Surgery (SICVE).

    PubMed

    Aiello, A; Anichini, R; Brocco, E; Caravaggi, C; Chiavetta, A; Cioni, R; Da Ros, R; De Feo, M E; Ferraresi, R; Florio, F; Gargiulo, M; Galzerano, G; Gandini, R; Giurato, L; Graziani, L; Mancini, L; Manzi, M; Modugno, P; Setacci, C; Uccioli, L

    2014-04-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is a chronic and highly disabling complication of diabetes. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is high in diabetic patients and, associated or not with peripheral neuropathy (PN), can be found in 50% of cases of DF. It is worth pointing out that the number of major amputations in diabetic patients is still very high. Many PAD diabetic patients are not revascularised due to lack of technical expertise or, even worse, negative beliefs because of poor experience. This despite the progress obtained in the techniques of distal revascularisation that nowadays allow to reopen distal arteries of the leg and foot. Italy has one of the lowest prevalence rates of major amputations in Europe, and has a long tradition in the field of limb salvage by means of an aggressive approach in debridement, antibiotic therapy and distal revascularisation. Therefore, we believe it is appropriate to produce a consensus document concerning the treatment of PAD and limb salvage in diabetic patients, based on the Italian experience in this field, to share with the scientific community. PMID:24486336

  11. Noninvasive vascular testing--a 35-year reflection.

    PubMed

    Lavenson, George S

    2005-01-01

    Noninvasive vascular testing has made a major contribution to the care of vascular surgery patients. This article a reflection on a 35-year corroborative association with Doctor Norman Rich, during which many of the advances in noninvasive vascular testing have been witnessed and effected. I served my vascular surgery fellowship under Doctor Rich in 1967-68 at Walter Reed Army Hospital. The only noninvasive vascular equipment then was a pencil probe Doppler. The value of the Doppler in the management of peripheral vascular disease that year and in determining limb viability in combat surgery in Vietnam the following year was established, and both experiences were published. Later, Doctor Rich established the annual Military Vascular Surgery Meeting and was appointed as the first Chair of the Department of Surgery at the Uniformed Services University for Health Sciences (USU). I entered private practice in Central California in 1976, and ultrasonic imaging was developed which allowed noninvasive examination of the carotid arteries. I then developed a protocol to screen for the three silent, immediate causes of stroke, employing a "a quick carotid scan" for carotid artery disease, a lead II rhythm strip for atrial fibrillation, and blood pressure determination for hypertension so that these common causes of strokes could be recognized and treated, and potentially prevent the majority of strokes. My association with USU, Doctor Rich, and others involved proved instrumental in initiating implementation of stroke prevention screening. The structure established at USU provides a means of establishing the protocol nationally. Noninvasive vascular testing is an addition to Medical Science that has led to significant improvements in individual patient care and that has the potential of allowing a major reduction in death and disability from stroke and other vascular diseases. Throughout a 35-year collaborative association with Doctor Norman M. Rich, I have witnessed and

  12. MicroRNA Expression Profiling of Peripheral Blood Samples Predicts Resistance to First-line Sunitinib in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients12

    PubMed Central

    Gámez-Pozo, Angelo; Antón-Aparicio, Luis M; Bayona, Cristina; Borrega, Pablo; Gallegos Sancho, María I; García-Domínguez, Rocío; de Portugal, Teresa; Ramos-Vázquez, Manuel; Pérez-Carrión, Ramón; Bolós, María V; Madero, Rosario; Sánchez-Navarro, Iker; Fresno Vara, Juan A; Arranz, Enrique Espinosa

    2012-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy benefits many patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but there is still a need for predictive markers that help in selecting the best therapy for individual patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cancer cell behavior and may be attractive biomarkers for prognosis and prediction of response. Forty-four patients with RCC were recruited into this observational prospective study conducted in nine Spanish institutions. Peripheral blood samples were taken before initiation of therapy and 14 days later in patients receiving first-line therapy with sunitinib for advanced RCC. miRNA expression in peripheral blood was assessed using microarrays and L2 boosting was applied to filtered miRNA expression data. Several models predicting poor and prolonged response to sunitinib were constructed and evaluated by binary logistic regression. Blood samples from 38 patients and 287 miRNAs were evaluated. Twenty-eight miRNAs of the 287 were related to poor response and 23 of the 287 were related to prolonged response to sunitinib treatment. Predictive models identified populations with differences in the established end points. In the poor response group, median time to progression was 3.5 months and the overall survival was 8.5, whereas in the prolonged response group these values were 24 and 29.5 months, respectively. Ontology analyses pointed out to cancer-related pathways, such angiogenesis and apoptosis. miRNA expression signatures, measured in peripheral blood, may stratify patients with advanced RCC according to their response to first-line therapy with sunitinib, improving diagnostic accuracy. After proper validation, these signatures could be used to tailor therapy in this setting. PMID:23308047

  13. Peripheral artery disease of the legs - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... 000577.htm Peripheral artery disease of the legs - self-care To use the sharing features on this ... do not heal Alternate Names Peripheral vascular disease - self-care; Intermittent claudication - self-care References Creager MA, ...

  14. Comparative study of the corrosion behavior of peripheral stents in an accelerated corrosion model: experimental in vitro study of 28 metallic vascular endoprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Paprottka, Karolin J.; Paprottka, Philipp M.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Waggershauser, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Clinical cases of stent-fractures show that corrosion behavior might play a role in these fractures. Implanted in vivo, especially in combination with other implanted foreign materials, these metallic products are exposed to special conditions, which can cause a process of corrosion. Here, we aimed to test the corrosion potential of stents made of different materials in an in vitro setting. METHODS A total of 28 peripheral stents of different materials (nitinol, cobalt-chromium-nickel, tantalum, V4A) and surface treatments (electropolish, mechanical polish, no polish) were tested in vitro. Corrosion was accelerated by applying a constant voltage of 3.5 V and amperage of 1.16 mA in 0.9% NaCl. RESULTS Nitinol stents showed the lowest susceptibility to corrosion and the longest period without damage. The Memotherm II® (BARD Angiomed®) was the only stent that showed neither macroscopic nor microscopic damages. The worst performing material was cobalt-chromium-nickel, which showed corrosion damages about ten times earlier compared to nitinol. Considering the reasons for termination of the test, nitinol stents primarily showed length deficits, while V4A and tantalum stents showed fractures. Cobalt-chromium-nickel stents had multiple fractures or a complete lysis in equal proportions. When placed in direct contact, nitinol stents showed best corrosion resistance, regardless of what material they were combined with. In terms of polishing treatments, electropolished stents performed the best, mechanical-polished stents and those without polishing treatment followed. CONCLUSION The analysis of corrosion behavior may be useful to select the right stent fulfilling the individual needs of the patient within a large number of different stents. PMID:26268301

  15. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  16. Peripheral artery disease in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Atmer, B; Jogestrand, T; Laska, J; Lund, F

    1995-03-01

    The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease in patients with coronary artery disease has been investigated in many different ways and depends on the diagnostic methods and the definition of the atherosclerotic manifestations in the different vascular beds. In this study we used the non-invasive methods digital volume pulse plethysmography and ankle and toe blood pressure measurements to identify arterial abnormalities in the lower limbs in 58 patients (49 males and 9 females; age 37-72 years) examined with coronary angiography. The prevalence of peripheral artery disease was 22%, in agreement with the results of most previous investigations. There was a tendency towards increasing prevalence of peripheral artery disease with more advanced coronary artery disease: 14% of the patients with no or minimal coronary atheromotous lesions, 18% of the patients with moderate coronary atheromotous lesions and 32% of the patients with marked coronary atheromotous disease. For this reason a non-invasive investigation of the peripheral arterial circulation should be included early in the clinical consideration of patients with chest pain or similar symptoms suggesting coronary heart disease. Toe pressure measurement appears to be the most appropriate technique being rather simple in management and also in evaluation of results. PMID:7658111

  17. The Science of Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia (VCID): A Framework for Advancing Research Priorities in the Cerebrovascular Biology of Cognitive Decline.

    PubMed

    Corriveau, Roderick A; Bosetti, Francesca; Emr, Marian; Gladman, Jordan T; Koenig, James I; Moy, Claudia S; Pahigiannis, Katherine; Waddy, Salina P; Koroshetz, Walter

    2016-03-01

    The World Health Organization reports that 47.5 million people are affected by dementia worldwide. With aging populations and 7.7 million new cases each year, the burden of illness due to dementia approaches crisis proportions. Despite significant advances in our understanding of the biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading dementia diagnosis, the actual causes of dementia in affected individuals are unknown except for rare fully penetrant genetic forms. Evidence from epidemiology and pathology studies indicates that damage to the vascular system is associated with an increased risk of many types of dementia. Both Alzheimer's pathology and cerebrovascular disease increase with age. How AD affects small blood vessel function and how vascular dysfunction contributes to the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's are areas of intense research. The science of vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) integrates diverse aspects of biology and incorporates the roles of multiple cell types that support the function of neural tissue. Because of the proven ability to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease and hypertension with population benefits for heart and stroke outcomes, it is proposed that understanding and targeting the biological mechanisms of VCID can have a similarly positive impact on public health. PMID:27095366

  18. Aging and vascular endothelial function in humans

    PubMed Central

    SEALS, Douglas R.; JABLONSKI, Kristen L.; DONATO, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Advancing age is the major risk factor for the development of CVD (cardiovascular diseases). This is attributable, in part, to the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction, as indicated by reduced peripheral artery EDD (endothelium-dependent dilation) in response to chemical [typically ACh (acetylcholine)] or mechanical (intravascular shear) stimuli. Reduced bioavailability of the endothelium-synthesized dilating molecule NO (nitric oxide) as a result of oxidative stress is the key mechanism mediating reduced EDD with aging. Vascular oxidative stress increases with age as a consequence of greater production of reactive oxygen species (e.g. superoxide) without a compensatory increase in antioxidant defences. Sources of increased superoxide production include up-regulation of the oxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase, uncoupling of the normally NO-producing enzyme, eNOS (endothelial NO synthase) (due to reduced availability of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin) and increased mitochondrial synthesis during oxidative phosphorylation. Increased bioactivity of the potent endothelial-derived constricting factor ET-1 (endothelin-1), reduced endothelial production of/responsiveness to dilatory prostaglandins, the development of vascular inflammation, formation of AGEs (advanced glycation end-products), an increased rate of endothelial apoptosis and reduced expression of oestrogen receptor α (in postmenopausal females) also probably contribute to impaired EDD with aging. Several lifestyle and biological factors modulate vascular endothelial function with aging, including regular aerobic exercise, dietary factors (e.g. processed compared with non-processed foods), body weight/fatness, vitamin D status, menopause/oestrogen deficiency and a number of conventional and non-conventional risk factors for CVD. Given the number of older adults now and in the future, more information is needed on effective strategies for the prevention and treatment of vascular endothelial aging. PMID

  19. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... P. Peripheral arterial diseases. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ... noncoronary obstructive vascular disease.In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ...

  20. Hypoxia-induced increases in glucose uptake do not cause oxidative injury or advanced glycation end-product (AGE) formation in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Viator, Ryan J; Khader, Heba; Hingorani, Neha; Long, Sara; Solodushko, Victor; Fouty, Brian

    2015-07-01

    An increase in glucose uptake by endothelial cells exposed to hyperglycemia is the presumed initiating event that causes systemic vascular disease in individuals with diabetes. Diabetics do not develop clinically significant pulmonary vascular disease, however, despite the pulmonary circulation's exposure to the same level of glucose. We hypothesized that pulmonary artery endothelial cells are protected from the detrimental effects of hyperglycemia because they take up less glucose than endothelial cells in the systemic circulation, either because of intrinsic differences between the two cell types or because the lower oxygen tension in the pulmonary arterial blood depresses glucose uptake. To test this hypothesis, we exposed normoglycemic and hyperglycemic bovine pulmonary artery (PAECs) and aortic endothelial cells (AECs) from the same animal to progressively lower oxygen tensions and determined glucose uptake. In contrast with our initial hypothesis, we detected no significant difference in glucose uptake between the two cell types. Furthermore, glucose uptake in both PAECs and AECs increased, not decreased, as the oxygen tension dropped; this oxygen-dependent increase in glucose uptake in endothelial cells predominated over the hyperglycemia-mediated decrease in glucose uptake that has been reported by others. Despite the increase in glucose uptake at lower oxygen tensions, we detected no corresponding increase in protein carbonylation or advanced glycation endproducts. These results demonstrate that small physiologically relevant changes in oxygen tension can have an important impact on glucose uptake in endothelial cells. These results also demonstrate that an increase in glucose uptake, by itself, is not sufficient to generate ROS-mediated protein carbonylation or increase intracellular advanced glycation endproducts in vascular endothelial cells. PMID:26177960

  1. Computational modeling of vascular anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Migliavacca, Francesco; Dubini, Gabriele

    2005-06-01

    Recent development of computational technology allows a level of knowledge of biomechanical factors in the healthy or pathological cardiovascular system that was unthinkable a few years ago. In particular, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural (CS) analyses have been used to evaluate specific quantities, such as fluid and wall stresses and strains, which are very difficult to measure in vivo. Indeed, CFD and CS offer much more variability and resolution than in vitro and in vivo methods, yet computations must be validated by careful comparison with experimental and clinical data. The enormous parallel development of clinical imaging such as magnetic resonance or computed tomography opens a new way toward a detailed patient-specific description of the actual hemodynamics and structural behavior of living tissues. Coupling of CFD/CS and clinical images is becoming a standard evaluation that is expected to become part of the clinical practice in the diagnosis and in the surgical planning in advanced medical centers. This review focuses on computational studies of fluid and structural dynamics of a number of vascular anastomoses: the coronary bypass graft anastomoses, the arterial peripheral anastomoses, the arterio-venous graft anastomoses and the vascular anastomoses performed in the correction of congenital heart diseases. PMID:15772842

  2. Warfarin and Vascular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Poterucha, Timothy J; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2016-06-01

    The vitamin K antagonist, warfarin, is the most commonly prescribed oral anticoagulant. Use of warfarin is associated with an increase in systemic calcification, including in the coronary and peripheral vasculature. This increase in vascular calcification is due to inhibition of the enzyme matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate Gla protein (MGP). MGP is a vitamin K-dependent protein that ordinarily prevents systemic calcification by scavenging calcium phosphate in the tissues. Warfarin-induced systemic calcification can result in adverse clinical effects. In this review article, we highlight some of the key translational and clinical studies that associate warfarin with vascular calcification. PMID:26714212

  3. The 2006 William Feinberg lecture: shifting the paradigm from stroke to global vascular risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Ralph L

    2007-06-01

    By the year 2010, it is estimated that 18.1 million people worldwide will die annually because of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. "Global vascular risk" more broadly includes the multiple overlapping disease silos of stroke, myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease, and vascular death. Estimation of global vascular risk requires consideration of a variety of variables including demographics, environmental behaviors, and risk factors. Data from multiple studies suggest continuous linear relationships between the physiological vascular risk modulators of blood pressure, lipids, and blood glucose rather than treating these conditions as categorical risk factors. Constellations of risk factors may be more relevant than individual categorical components. Exciting work with novel risk factors may also have predictive value in estimates of global vascular risk. Advances in imaging have led to the measurement of subclinical conditions such as carotid intima-media thickness and subclinical brain conditions such as white matter hyperintensities and silent infarcts. These subclinical measurements may be intermediate stages in the transition from asymptomatic to symptomatic vascular events, appear to be associated with the fundamental vascular risk factors, and represent opportunities to more precisely quantitate disease progression. The expansion of studies in molecular epidemiology and detection of genetic markers underlying vascular risks also promises to extend our precision of global vascular risk estimation. Global vascular risk estimation will require quantitative methods that bundle these multi-dimensional data into more precise estimates of future risk. The power of genetic information coupled with data on demographics, risk-inducing behaviors, vascular risk modulators, biomarkers, and measures of subclinical conditions should provide the most realistic approximation of an individual's future global vascular risk. The ultimate public health benefit

  4. The effect of an advanced glycation end-product crosslink breaker and exercise training on vascular function in older individuals: a randomized factorial design trial.

    PubMed

    Oudegeest-Sander, Madelijn H; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Smits, Paul; Thijssen, Dick H J; van Dijk, Arie P J; Levine, Benjamin D; Hopman, Maria T E

    2013-12-01

    Aging leads to accumulation of irreversible advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), contributing to vascular stiffening and endothelial dysfunction. When combined with the AGE-crosslink breaker Alagebrium, exercise training reverses cardiovascular aging in experimental animals. This study is the first to examine the effect of Alagebrium, with and without exercise training, on endothelial function, arterial stiffness and cardiovascular risk in older individuals. Forty-eight non-exercising individuals (mean age 70 ± 4 years) without manifest diseases or use of medication were allocated into 4 groups for a 1-year intervention: Exercise training & Alagebrium (200 mg/day); exercise training & placebo; no exercise training & Alagebrium (200 mg/day); and no exercise training & placebo. We performed a maximal exercise test (VO2max) and measured endothelial function using venous occlusion plethysmography and intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside and NG-monomethyl-l-arginine. Arterial stiffness was measured using pulse wave velocity. Cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Lifetime Risk Score (LRS). In the exercise training groups, LRS and VO2max improved significantly (23.9 ± 4.5 to 27.2 ± 4.6mLO2/min/kg, p < 0.001). Endothelial response to the vasoactive substances did not change, nor did arterial stiffness in any of the four groups. In conclusion, one year of exercise training significantly improved physical fitness and lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease without affecting endothelial function or arterial stiffness. The use of the AGE-crosslink breaker Alagebrium had no independent effect on vascular function, nor did it potentiate the effect of exercise training. Despite the clinical benefits of exercise training for older individuals, neither exercise training nor Alagebrium (alone or in combination) was able to reverse the vascular effects of decades of sedentary aging. PMID:24400341

  5. Prediction of clinical toxicity in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients by radio-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is treated mainly by surgery and radiotherapy. Normal tissue toxicity due to x-ray exposure is a limiting factor for treatment success. Many efforts have been employed to develop predictive tests applied to clinical practice. Determination of lymphocyte radio-sensitivity by radio-induced apoptosis arises as a possible method to predict tissue toxicity due to radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to analyze radio-induced apoptosis of peripheral blood lymphocytes in head and neck cancer patients and to explore their role in predicting radiation induced toxicity. Seventy nine consecutive patients suffering from head and neck cancer, diagnosed and treated in our institution, were included in the study. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated and irradiated at 0, 1, 2 and 8 Gy during 24 hours. Apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide. Lymphocytes were marked with CD45 APC-conjugated monoclonal antibody. Radiation-induced apoptosis increased in order to radiation dose and fitted to a semi logarithmic model defined by two constants: α and β. α, as the origin of the curve in the Y axis determining the percentage of spontaneous cell death, and β, as the slope of the curve determining the percentage of cell death induced at a determined radiation dose, were obtained. β value was statistically associated to normal tissue toxicity in terms of severe xerostomia, as higher levels of apoptosis were observed in patients with low toxicity (p = 0.035; Exp(B) 0.224, I.C.95% (0.060-0.904)). These data agree with our previous results and suggest that it is possible to estimate the radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients determining the radiation induced apoptosis with annexin V/propidium iodide staining. β values observed define an individual radiosensitivity profile that could predict late toxicity due to radiotherapy

  6. The vascular disrupting agent ZD6126 shows increased antitumor efficacy and enhanced radiation response in large, advanced tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, Dietmar W. . E-mail: siemadw@ufl.edu; Rojiani, Amyn M.

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: ZD6126 is a vascular-targeting agent that induces selective effects on the morphology of proliferating and immature endothelial cells by disrupting the tubulin cytoskeleton. The efficacy of ZD6126 was investigated in large vs. small tumors in a variety of animal models. Methods and Materials: Three rodent tumor models (KHT, SCCVII, RIF-1) and three human tumor xenografts (Caki-1, KSY-1, SKBR3) were used. Mice bearing leg tumors ranging in size from 0.1-2.0 g were injected intraperitoneally with a single 150 mg/kg dose of ZD6126. The response was assessed by morphologic and morphometric means as well as an in vivo to in vitro clonogenic cell survival assay. To examine the impact of tumor size on the extent of enhancement of radiation efficacy by ZD6126, KHT sarcomas of three different sizes were irradiated locally with a range of radiation doses, and cell survival was determined. Results: All rodent tumors and human tumor xenografts evaluated showed a strong correlation between increasing tumor size and treatment effect as determined by clonogenic cell survival. Detailed evaluation of KHT sarcomas treated with ZD6126 showed a reduction in patent tumor blood vessels that was {approx}20% in small (<0.3 g) vs. >90% in large (>1.0 g) tumors. Histologic assessment revealed that the extent of tumor necrosis after ZD6126 treatment, although minimal in small KHT sarcomas, became more extensive with increasing tumor size. Clonogenic cell survival after ZD6126 exposure showed a decrease in tumor surviving fraction from approximately 3 x 10{sup -1} to 1 x 10{sup -4} with increasing tumor size. When combined with radiotherapy, ZD6126 treatment resulted in little enhancement of the antitumor effect of radiation in small (<0.3 g) tumors but marked increases in cell kill in tumors larger than 1.0 g. Conclusions: Because bulky neoplastic disease is typically the most difficult to manage, the present findings provide further support for the continued development of vascular

  7. Peripheral vascular responses to fluorocarbon administration.

    PubMed

    Faithfull, N S; King, C E; Cain, S M

    1987-03-01

    To detect the local effect of hyperoxia on skeletal muscle vasculature, 2.5-ml boluses of oxygenated or deoxygenated fluorocarbon emulsion (F-O2 or F-N2) were washed through the hindlimb of anesthetized dogs at prevailing arterial pressure. Instantaneous hematocrit changes at the outflow were registered and stored in digital form with the red cells serving as the nondiffusible tracer in the resulting washout curves. A gamma density function was fitted and the gamma index (1/square root of alpha) was derived as a measure of skewness or perfusion heterogeneity. After recovery from the initial hypotensive reaction to fluorocarbon emulsion, washout curves for F-O2 and F-N2 were registered and blood samples were taken during 40 min of normoxia followed by 40 min of hypoxic hypoxia. The initial reaction to fluorocarbon significantly increased the gamma index so that the experiments began with a high index of perfusion heterogeneity in the limb vasculature. No significant difference was seen between F-O2 and F-N2 in normoxia but F-O2 maintained greater heterogeneity during hypoxia. The increased heterogeneity observed after the fluorocarbon reaction correlated highly with the severity of the hypotensive reaction which was also found to correlate inversely with the ability of the limb musculature to increase the O2 extraction ratio with onset of hypoxia. This blunting of microcirculatory reactivity to hyperoxia and hypoxia was attributed, in part, to the initial transient fluorocarbon reaction, possibly mediated by complement activation. PMID:3587075

  8. Changes in plasma vascular endothelial growth factor at 8 weeks after sorafenib administration as predictors of survival for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Kaoru; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Shuya; Muraoka, Masaru; Nakata, Toru; Suzuki, Yuichiro; Tamaki, Nobuharu; Yasui, Yutaka; Suzuki, Shoko; Hosokawa, Takanori; Nishimura, Takashi; Ueda, Ken; Kuzuya, Teiji; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Itakura, Jun; Takahashi, Yuka; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Izumi, Namiki

    2014-01-01

    Background A new predictive biomarker for determining prognosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who receive sorafenib is required, because achieving a reduction in tumor size with sorafenib is rare, even in patients who have a favorable prognosis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a sorafenib target. In the current study, the authors examined changes in plasma VEGF concentrations during sorafenib treatment and determined the clinical significance of VEGF as a prognostic indicator in patients with HCC. Methods Plasma VEGF concentrations were serially measured in 63 patients with advanced HCC before and during sorafenib treatment. A plasma VEGF concentration that decreased >5% from the pretreatment level at 8 weeks was defined as a “VEGF decrease.” An objective tumor response was determined using modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1 month after the initiation of therapy and every 3 months thereafter. Results Patients who had a VEGF decrease at week 8 (n = 14) had a longer median survival than those who did not have a VEGF decrease (n = 49; 30.9 months vs 14.4 months; P = .038). All patients who had a VEGF decrease survived for >6 months, and the patients who had both a VEGF decrease and an α-fetoprotein response (n = 6) survived during the observation period (median, 19.7 months; range, 6.5-31.0 months). In univariate analyses, a VEGF decrease, radiologic findings classified as progressive disease, and major vascular invasion were associated significantly with 1-year survival; and, in multivariate analysis, a VEGF decrease was identified as an independent factor associated significantly with survival. Conclusions A plasma VEGF concentration decrease at 8 weeks after starting sorafenib treatment may predict favorable overall survival in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:24122122

  9. Genetic Pathways of Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Marion A. Hofmann; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Arterial calcification of the aorta, coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries becomes more prevalent with age. Genomewide association studies have identified regions of the genome linked to vascular calcification, and these same regions are linked to myocardial infarction risk. The 9p21 region linked to vascular disease and inflammation also associates with vascular calcification. In addition to these common variants, rare genetic defects can serve as primary triggers of accelerated and premature calcification. Infancy-associated calcific disorders are caused by loss of function mutations in ENPP1 an enzyme that produces extracellular pyrophosphate. Adult onset vascular calcification is linked to mutations NTE5, another enzyme that regulates extracellular phosphate metabolism. Common conditions that secondarily enhance vascular calcification include atherosclerosis, metabolic dysfunction, diabetes, and impaired renal clearance. Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation, along with biophysical properties, converge with these predisposing factors to promote soft tissue mineralization. Vascular calcification is accompanied by an osteogenic profile, and this osteogenic conversion is seen within the vascular smooth muscle itself as well as the matrix. Herein we will review the genetic causes of medial calcification in the smooth muscle layer, focusing on recent discoveries of gene mutations that regulate extracellular matrix phosphate production and the role of S100 proteins as promoters of vascular calcification. PMID:23040839

  10. Recent advancements in the cardiovascular drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljeet; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the disease that affects the cardiovascular system, vascular diseases of the brain and kidney, and peripheral arterial disease. Despite of all advances in pharmacological and clinical treatment, heart failure is a leading cause of morbidness and mortality worldwide. Many new therapeutic advance strategies, including cell transplantation, gene delivery or therapy, and cytokines or other small molecules, have been research to treat heart failure. The main aim of this review article is to focus on nano carriers advancement and addressing the problems associated with old and modern therapeutics such as nonspecific effects and poor stability. PMID:25046615

  11. Rationale, scope, and 20-year experience of vascular surgical training with lifelike pulsatile flow models.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Schmidli, Jürg; Schumacher, Hardy; Gürke, Lorenz; Klemm, Klaus; Duschek, Nikolaus; Meile, Toni; Assadian, Afshin

    2013-05-01

    Vascular surgical training currently has to cope with various challenges, including restrictions on work hours, significant reduction of open surgical training cases in many countries, an increasing diversity of open and endovascular procedures, and distinct expectations by trainees. Even more important, patients and the public no longer accept a "learning by doing" training philosophy that leaves the learning curve on the patient's side. The Vascular International (VI) Foundation and School aims to overcome these obstacles by training conventional vascular and endovascular techniques before they are applied on patients. To achieve largely realistic training conditions, lifelike pulsatile models with exchangeable synthetic arterial inlays were created to practice carotid endarterectomy and patch plasty, open abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery, and peripheral bypass surgery, as well as for endovascular procedures, including endovascular aneurysm repair, thoracic endovascular aortic repair, peripheral balloon dilatation, and stenting. All models are equipped with a small pressure pump inside to create pulsatile flow conditions with variable peak pressures of ~90 mm Hg. The VI course schedule consists of a series of 2-hour modules teaching different open or endovascular procedures step-by-step in a standardized fashion. Trainees practice in pairs with continuous supervision and intensive advice provided by highly experienced vascular surgical trainers (trainer-to-trainee ratio is 1:4). Several evaluations of these courses show that tutor-assisted training on lifelike models in an educational-centered and motivated environment is associated with a significant increase of general and specific vascular surgical technical competence within a short period of time. Future studies should evaluate whether these benefits positively influence the future learning curve of vascular surgical trainees and clarify to what extent sophisticated models are useful to assess the level of

  12. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  13. Impact of type 2 diabetes on the plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and its soluble receptors type 1 and type 2 in patients with peripheral arterial disease*

    PubMed Central

    Wieczór, Radosław; Gadomska, Grażyna; Ruszkowska-Ciastek, Barbara; Stankowska, Katarzyna; Budzyński, Jacek; Fabisiak, Jacek; Suppan, Karol; Pulkowski, Grzegorz; Rość, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Type 2 diabetes coexistent with lower extremity artery disease (peripheral arterial disease (PAD)) can be observed in numerous patients. The mechanism compensating for ischemia and contributing to healing is angiogenesis—the process of forming new blood vessels. The purpose of this study was to assess the likely impact of type 2 diabetes on the plasma levels of proangiogenic factor (vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A)) and angiogenesis inhibitors (soluble VEGF receptors type 1 and type 2 (sVEGFR-1 and sVEGFR-2)) in patients with PAD. Methods: Among 46 patients with PAD under pharmacological therapy (non-invasive), we identified, based on medical history, a subgroup with coexistent type 2 diabetes (PAD-DM2+, n=15) and without diabetes (PAD-DM2−, n=31). The control group consisted of 30 healthy subjects. Plasma levels of VEGF-A, sVEGFR-1, and sVEGFR-2 were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Results: The subgroups of PAD-DM2+ and PAD-DM2− revealed significantly higher concentrations of VEGF-A (P=0.000 007 and P=0.000 000 1, respectively) and significantly lower sVEGFR-2 levels (P=0.02 and P=0.000 01, respectively), when compared with the control group. Patients with PAD and coexistent diabetes tended to have a lower level of VEGF-A and higher levels of sVEGFR-1 and sVEGFR-2 comparable with non-diabetic patients. Conclusions: The coexistence of type 2 diabetes and PAD is demonstrated by a tendency to a lower plasma level of proangiogenic factor (VEGF-A) and higher levels of angiogenesis inhibitors (sVEGFR-1 and sVEGFR-2) at the same time. Regardless of the coexistence of type 2 diabetes, hypoxia appears to be a crucial factor stimulating the processes of angiogenesis in PAD patients comparable with healthy individuals, whereas hyperglycemia may have a negative impact on angiogenesis in lower limbs. PMID:26537213

  14. Clinical results of high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in children with advanced stage rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Kyun; Kim, Hyo Sun; Suh, Chang-Ok; Kim, Hyun Ok; Lyu, Chuhl Joo

    2012-09-01

    Regardless of improvement in cure of Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the results in treatment of advanced stage of RMS in children are still dismal. Recently, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (HDC/APBSCT) has been tried to manage the advanced high-risk RMS patients. We investigated the effectiveness of HDC/APBSCT by reviewing the clinical records of high-risk pediatric RMS patients in single institute database. Over twenty years, 37 patients were diagnosed as RMS with high-risk at the time of first diagnosis. These patients were classified as two groups according to treatment method. The first group was HDC/APBSCT and the other was conventional multi-agent chemotherapy group. Differences of clinical results between the two groups were analyzed. The median age of patients was 5 yr, ranging from 6 months to 15 yr. The 5-yr event free survival rate (EFS) of all patients was 24.8% ± 4.8%. HDC/APBSCT group and conventional multi-agent chemotherapy group were 41.3% ± 17.8% and 16.7% ± 7.6% for 5-yr EFS, respectively (P = 0.023). There was a significant difference in the result of HDC/APBSCT between complete remission or very good partial response group and poor response group (50% ± 20.4% vs 37.5% ± 28.6%, P = 0.018). HDC/APBSCT can be a promising treatment modality in high-risk RMS patients. PMID:22969254

  15. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be associated with peripheral neuropathy. Metabolic and endocrine disorders impair the body’s ability to transform nutrients into ... to neuropathies as a result of chemical imbalances. Endocrine disorders that lead to hormonal imbalances can disturb normal ...

  16. Peripheral Neuropathy – Clinical and Electrophysiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tae; Prasad, Kalpana; Lloyd, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    This article is a primer on the pathophysiology and clinical evaluation of peripheral neuropathy for the radiologist. Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) has utility in the diagnosis of many focal peripheral nerve lesions. When combined with history, examination, electrophysiology, and laboratory data, future advancements in high-field MRN may play an increasingly important role in the evaluation of patients with peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24210312

  17. Efficacy and safety of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of advanced thyroid cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Yimaer, Wufuer; Abudouyimu, Aizizi; Tian, Ye; Magaoweiya, Sailike; Bagedati, Duman; Wen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the efficacy and safety of the US Food and Drug Administration approved vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR-TKIs) in the treatment of advanced thyroid cancer. Patients and methods We included prospective randomized controlled trials that compared VEGFR-TKIs with placebo for advanced thyroid cancer. The endpoints included safety (fatal adverse events [FAEs], treatment discontinuation, and any severe [grade 3 or 4] adverse events [AEs]) and efficacy (objective response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival). The pooled relative risk (RR) or hazard ratio (HR) was calculated by using either random-effects or fixed-effects models according to the heterogeneity of included studies. Results A total of 1,614 advanced thyroid cancer patients from five randomized controlled trials were identified for analysis. Compared with placebo alone, VEGFR-TKIs significantly increased the risk of treatment discontinuation (RR: 3.80, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.56–5.65, P<0.001) and any severe AEs (RR: 2.63, 95% CI: 1.72–4.03, P<0.001), but not of FAEs (RR: 1.24, 95% CI: 0.65–2.39, P=0.52). The use of VEGFR-TKIs in advanced thyroid cancer was associated with a significant improvement in objective response rate (RR: 8.73, 95% CI: 1.72–44.4, P=0.009) and progression-free survival (HR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.27–0.61, P<0.001), with a tendency to improve overall survival (HR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.68–1.01, P=0.06). Conclusion The use of small-molecule VEGFR-TKIs in advanced thyroid cancer did significantly increase the risk of treatment discontinuation and any severe AEs, but not of FAEs, compared with placebo alone. It is important for physicians to weigh the risk of toxicities as well as the potential survival benefits associated with VEGFR-TKI treatment in advanced thyroid cancer patients. PMID:27022276

  18. iRAGE as a novel carboxymethylated peptide that prevents advanced glycation end product-induced apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Maltais, Jean-Sébastien; Simard, Elie; Froehlich, Ulrike; Denault, Jean-Bernard; Gendron, Louis; Grandbois, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGE) and the receptor for AGE (RAGE) have been linked to numerous diabetic vascular complications. RAGE activation promotes a self-sustaining state of chronic inflammation and has been shown to induce apoptosis in various cell types. Although previous studies in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) showed that RAGE activation increases vascular calcification and interferes with their contractile phenotype, little is known on the potential of RAGE to induce apoptosis in VSMC. Using a combination of apoptotic assays, we showed that RAGE stimulation with its ligand CML-HSA promotes apoptosis of VSMC. The formation of stress granules and the increase in the level of the associated protein HuR point toward RAGE-dependent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is proposed as a key contributor of RAGE-induced apoptosis in VSMC as it has been shown to promote cell death via numerous mechanisms, including up-regulation of caspase-9. Chronic NF-κB activation and modulation of Bcl-2 homologs are also suspected to contribute to RAGE-dependent apoptosis in VSMC. With the goal of reducing RAGE signaling and its detrimental impact on VSMC, we designed a RAGE antagonist (iRAGE) derived from the primary amino acid sequence of HSA. The resulting CML peptide was selected for the high glycation frequency of the primary sequence in the native protein in vivo. Pretreatment with iRAGE blocked 69.6% of the increase in NF-κB signaling caused by RAGE activation with CML-HSA after 48h. Preincubation with iRAGE was successful in reducing RAGE-induced apoptosis, as seen through enhanced cell survival by SPR and reduced PARP cleavage. Activation of executioner caspases was 63.5% lower in cells treated with iRAGE before stimulation with CML-HSA. To our knowledge, iRAGE is the first antagonist shown to block AGE-RAGE interaction and we propose the molecule as an initial candidate for drug discovery. PMID:26707030

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression is a prognostic factor for radiotherapy outcome in advanced carcinoma of the cervix

    PubMed Central

    Loncaster, J A; Cooper, R A; Logue, J P; Davidson, S E; Hunter, R D; West, C M L

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate VEGF expression in tumour biopsies as a prognostic factor for radiotherapy outcome in advanced carcinoma of the cervix. A retrospective study was carried out on 100 patients. Pre-treatment tumour VEGF expression was examined immunohistochemically in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsies using a widely available commercial antibody. A semi-quantitative analysis was made using a scoring system of 0, 1, 2, and 3, for increasing intensity of staining. High VEGF expression was associated with a poor prognosis. A univariate log rank analysis found a significant relationship with overall survival (P = 0.0008) and metastasis-free survival (P = 0.0062), but not local control (P = 0.23). There was no correlation between VEGF expression and disease stage, tumour differentiation, patient age, or tumour radiosensitivity (SF2). In a Cox multivariate analysis of survival VEGF expression was the most significant independent prognostic factor (P = 0.001). After allowing for VEGF only SF2 was a significant prognostic factor (P = 0.003). In conclusion, immunohistochemical analysis of VEGF expression is a highly significant and independent prognostic indicator of overall and metastasis-free survival for patients treated with radiotherapy for advanced carcinoma of the cervix. It is also a rapid and easy method that could be used in the clinical setting, to identify patients at high risk of failure with conventional radiotherapy who may benefit from novel approaches or chemoradiotherapy. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10944602

  20. [Vascular vertigo syndromes].

    PubMed

    Dieterich, M

    2002-12-01

    Ischemia,hemorrhages, and other vascular disorders can result in various central or peripheral vestibular syndromes with vertigo, oculomotor/balance disturbances, and nausea. The vascular vertigo syndromes listed in Table 1 can however be brought about by other causes such as demyelitizing focuses in multiple sclerosis or space-occupying lesions, so that not only localization of the damaged structure but also the various etiologies are decisive for the choice of therapy. Occasionally, combined functional disturbances of the peripheral and central vestibular system appear, such as an infarction of the inferior anterior cerebellar artery, which supplies the labyrinth and parts of the brainstem and cerebellum. In rare cases, a central lesion can have the same signs as a peripheral-vertibular disturbance: a lacunar infarct at the root entry zone of the eighth nerve can mimic a unilateral partial loss of labyrinth function as it occurs in vestibular neuritis, thus named "pseudoneuritis". Differential diagnosis between vestibular migraine, vestibular paroxysmia, transient ischemic brainstem attacks, and Meniere's disease is sometimes so difficult that only trial therapies such as prophylaxis with beta blockers, carbamazepine, thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs, or betahistin can clarify the issue. PMID:12486562

  1. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  2. Comparison of Whole Blood and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Gene Expression for Evaluation of the Perioperative Inflammatory Response in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Nicholas; Maque, Jetrina; Chittoor, Jay; Chang, Eleanor; Bakir, Maral; Starling, Charlotte; Shahzad, Khurram; Ping, Peipei; Reed, Elaine; Deng, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) prevalence is increasing in the United States. Mechanical Circulatory Support (MCS) therapy is an option for Advanced HF (AdHF) patients. Perioperatively, multiorgan dysfunction (MOD) is linked to the effects of device implantation, augmented by preexisting HF. Early recognition of MOD allows for better diagnosis, treatment, and risk prediction. Gene expression profiling (GEP) was used to evaluate clinical phenotypes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) transcriptomes obtained from patients' blood samples. Whole blood (WB) samples are clinically more feasible, but their performance in comparison to PBMC samples has not been determined. Methods We collected blood samples from 31 HF patients (57±15 years old) undergoing cardiothoracic surgery and 7 healthy age-matched controls, between 2010 and 2011, at a single institution. WB and PBMC samples were collected at a single timepoint postoperatively (median day 8 postoperatively) (25–75% IQR 7–14 days) and subjected to Illumina single color Human BeadChip HT12 v4 whole genome expression array analysis. The Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score was used to characterize the severity of MOD into low (≤ 4 points), intermediate (5–11), and high (≥ 12) risk categories correlating with GEP. Results Results indicate that the direction of change in GEP of individuals with MOD as compared to controls is similar when determined from PBMC versus WB. The main enriched terms by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis included those involved in the inflammatory response, apoptosis, and other stress response related pathways. The data revealed 35 significant GO categories and 26 pathways overlapping between PBMC and WB. Additionally, class prediction using machine learning tools demonstrated that the subset of significant genes shared by PBMC and WB are sufficient to train as a predictor separating the SOFA groups. Conclusion GEP analysis of WB has the potential to become a clinical tool

  3. The harms of smoking and benefits of smoking cessation in women compared with men with type 2 diabetes: an observational analysis of the ADVANCE (Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron modified release Controlled Evaluation) trial

    PubMed Central

    Blomster, Juuso I; Woodward, Mark; Zoungas, Sophia; Hillis, Graham S; Harrap, Stephen; Neal, Bruce; Poulter, Neil; Mancia, Giuseppe; Chalmers, John; Huxley, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In general populations, the adverse effects of smoking on coronary risk have been demonstrated to be greater in women than in men; whether this is true for individuals with diabetes is unclear. Design Cohort study. Setting 20 countries worldwide participating in the ADVANCE (Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron modified release Controlled Evaluation) trial. Participants 11 140 patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥55 years and in cardiovascular risk at the time of randomisation. Primary and secondary outcome measures Major cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular disease, non-fatal stroke or non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI)), all cardiovascular events (major cardiovascular event or peripheral arterial disease or transient ischaemic attack), and all-cause mortality. Secondary outcome measures were major coronary events (fatal and non-fatal MI), major cerebrovascular events (fatal and non-fatal stroke), nephropathy (new or worsening renal disease), and all cancer. Results At baseline, 6466 (56% women) participants were never-smokers, 1550 (28% women) were daily smokers and 3124 (21% women) were former smokers. Median follow-up time was 5 years. In Cox regression models after multiple adjustments, compared with never smoking, daily smoking was associated with increased risk of all primary and secondary outcomes with the exception of major cerebrovascular disease. Only for major coronary events was there any evidence of a stronger effect in women than in men (ratio of the adjusted HRs women:men; 1.64 (0.83 to 3.26) p=0.08). For all other outcomes considered, the hazards of smoking were similar in men and women. Quitting smoking was associated with a 30% reduction in all-cause mortality (p=0.001) in both sexes. Conclusions In individuals with diabetes, the effects of smoking on all major forms of cardiovascular disease are equally as hazardous in women and men with the possible exception of major coronary events

  4. Involvement of Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 1 in advanced glycation end products-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Shujin; Song Tao; Zhou Shouhong; Liu Yuhui; Chen Gengrong; Huang Ningjiang; Liu Liying

    2008-10-24

    In this present study, we examined the role of Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 1 (NHE1) in the cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs significantly increased the [{sup 3}H] thymidine incorporation of VSMC. Cariporide, an NHE1 inhibitor, dose-dependently attenuated the AGEs-induced increase in cell DNA synthesis. Thus the effect of AGEs on NHE1 activity was next examined. The cariporide-dependent intracellular pH (pH{sub i}) was significantly increased after 24 h exposure to AGEs (10 {mu}g/ml). The direct AGEs-induced NHE1 activation was measured by the Na{sup +}-dependent intracellular pH recovery from intracellular acidosis. AGEs can increase the NHE1 activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of either the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) by anti-RAGE or mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) by PD98059 reversed the effect of AGEs on NHE1 activity. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis revealed that AGEs dose-dependently increased NHE1 mRNA at 24 h. These findings demonstrate NHE1 is required for in AGEs-induced proliferation of VSMC, and AGEs increase NHE1 activity via the MAPK pathway.

  5. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  6. Building Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hojae; Puranik, Amey S.; Gauvin, Robert; Edalat, Faramarz; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Only a few engineered tissues—skin, cartilage, bladder—have achieved clinical success, and biomaterials designed to replace more complex organs are still far from commercial availability. This gap exists in part because biomaterials lack a vascular network to transfer the oxygen and nutrients necessary for survival and integration after transplantation. Thus, generation of a functional vasculature is essential to the clinical success of engineered tissue constructs and remains a key challenge for regenerative medicine. In this Perspective, we discuss recent advances in vascularization of biomaterials through the use of biochemical modification, exogenous cells, or microengineering technology. PMID:23152325

  7. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. PMID:27301603

  8. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2010-03-19

    A recent study concluded that serum prostate specific antigen (PSA)-based screening is beneficial for reducing the lethality of PCa, but was also associated with a high risk of 'overdiagnosis'. Nevertheless, also PCa patients who suffered from organ confined tumors and had negative bone scans succumb to distant metastases after complete tumor resection. It is reasonable to assume that those tumors spread to other organs long before the overt manifestation of metastases. Our current results confirm that prostate tumors are highly heterogeneous. Even a small subpopulation of cells bearing BRCA1 losses can initiate PCa cell regional and distant dissemination indicating those patients which might be at high risk of metastasis. A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design: To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa-LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1 losses

  9. Dealing with vascular conundrums with MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Angthong, Wirana; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a robust imaging modality for evaluation of vascular diseases. Technological advances have made MR imaging widely available for accurate and time-efficient vascular assessment. In this article the clinical usefulness of MR imaging techniques and their application are reviewed, using examples of vascular abnormalities commonly encountered in clinical practice, including abdominal, pelvic, and thoracic vessels. Common pitfalls and problem solving in interpretation of vascular findings in body MR imaging are also discussed. PMID:24889175

  10. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  11. Angiogenesis impairment in diabetes: role of methylglyoxal-induced receptor for advanced glycation endproducts, autophagy and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongtao; Yu, Shujie; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes impairs physiological angiogenesis by molecular mechanisms that are not fully understood. Methylglyoxal (MGO), a metabolite of glycolysis, is increased in patients with diabetes. This study defined the role of MGO in angiogenesis impairment and tested the mechanism in diabetic animals. Endothelial cells and mouse aortas were subjected to Western blot analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) protein levels and angiogenesis evaluation by endothelial cell tube formation/migration and aortic ring assays. Incubation with MGO reduced VEGFR2 protein, but not mRNA, levels in a time and dose dependent manner. Genetic knockdown of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) attenuated the reduction of VEGFR2. Overexpression of Glyoxalase 1, the enzyme that detoxifies MGO, reduced the MGO-protein adducts and prevented VEGFR2 reduction. The VEGFR2 reduction was associated with impaired angiogenesis. Suppression of autophagy either by inhibitors or siRNA, but not of the proteasome and caspase, normalized both the VEGFR2 protein levels and angiogenesis. Conversely, induction of autophagy either by rapamycin or overexpression of LC3 and Beclin-1 reduced VEGFR2 and angiogenesis. MGO increased endothelial LC3B and Beclin-1, markers of autophagy, which were accompanied by an increase of both autophagic flux (LC3 punctae) and co-immunoprecipitation of VEGFR2 with LC3. Pharmacological or genetic suppression of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) generation not only blocked the autophagy but also reversed the reduction of VEGFR2 and angiogenesis. Like MGO-treated aortas from normglycemic C57BL/6J mice, aortas from diabetic db/db and Akita mice presented reductions of angiogenesis or VEGFR2. Administration of either autophagy inhibitor ex vivo or superoxide scavenger in vivo abolished the reductions. Taken together, MGO reduces endothelial angiogenesis through RAGE-mediated, ONOO(-)dependent and autophagy-induced VEGFR2 degradation, which may represent

  12. Angiogenesis Impairment in Diabetes: Role of Methylglyoxal-Induced Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts, Autophagy and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongtao; Yu, Shujie; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes impairs physiological angiogenesis by molecular mechanisms that are not fully understood. Methylglyoxal (MGO), a metabolite of glycolysis, is increased in patients with diabetes. This study defined the role of MGO in angiogenesis impairment and tested the mechanism in diabetic animals. Endothelial cells and mouse aortas were subjected to Western blot analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) protein levels and angiogenesis evaluation by endothelial cell tube formation/migration and aortic ring assays. Incubation with MGO reduced VEGFR2 protein, but not mRNA, levels in a time and dose dependent manner. Genetic knockdown of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) attenuated the reduction of VEGFR2. Overexpression of Glyoxalase 1, the enzyme that detoxifies MGO, reduced the MGO-protein adducts and prevented VEGFR2 reduction. The VEGFR2 reduction was associated with impaired angiogenesis. Suppression of autophagy either by inhibitors or siRNA, but not of the proteasome and caspase, normalized both the VEGFR2 protein levels and angiogenesis. Conversely, induction of autophagy either by rapamycin or overexpression of LC3 and Beclin-1 reduced VEGFR2 and angiogenesis. MGO increased endothelial LC3B and Beclin-1, markers of autophagy, which were accompanied by an increase of both autophagic flux (LC3 punctae) and co-immunoprecipitation of VEGFR2 with LC3. Pharmacological or genetic suppression of peroxynitrite (ONOO−) generation not only blocked the autophagy but also reversed the reduction of VEGFR2 and angiogenesis. Like MGO-treated aortas from normglycemic C57BL/6J mice, aortas from diabetic db/db and Akita mice presented reductions of angiogenesis or VEGFR2. Administration of either autophagy inhibitor ex vivo or superoxide scavenger in vivo abolished the reductions. Taken together, MGO reduces endothelial angiogenesis through RAGE-mediated, ONOO–dependent and autophagy-induced VEGFR2 degradation, which may represent

  13. Association of vascular endothelial growth factor -634G/C and receptor for advanced glycation end products G82S gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Asmaa; Abu Eleinen, Khaled; Siam, Ibrahem

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the association of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) G82S and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) -634 G/C gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR). METHODS Our cross-sectional study included 61 diabetic patients, 12 of them had proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), 15 had non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR), 34 had no diabetic retinopathy (NDR) and 61 healthy controls. Participants were tested for RAGE G82S and VEGF -634 G/C polymorphisms by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. RESULTS We found a significant association between VEGF -634 G/C polymorphism and PDR as PDR patients had increased incidence of VEGF -634 CC genotype compared to NDR patients [odds ratio for CC vs (GC+GG)=6.5, 95% CI=1.5-27.8, P=0.021]. Also VEGF -634 CC genotype and C allele were significantly higher in the PDR than in NPDR patients, which is a novel finding in our study (P=0.024, 0.009 respectively). The mean triglycerides level was significantly higher in diabetic patients with CC genotype (P=0.01) as compared to patients with other genotypes. All cases and control subjects were of the same heterozygous RAGE 82G/S genotype. CONCLUSION Patients carrying VEGF -634 C polymorphism have a higher risk of PDR development, so VEGF -634 G/C polymorphism could be used as a predictive marker for PDR in diabetic patients. We could not find a significant association between RAGE G82S polymorphism and DR. PMID:27588263

  14. Vascular smooth muscle in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Winquist, R J; Webb, R C; Bohr, D F

    1982-06-01

    The cause of the elevated arterial pressure in most forms of hypertension is an increase in total peripheral resistance. This brief review is directed toward an assessment of recent investigations contributing information about the factors responsible for this increased vascular resistance. Structural abnormalities in the vasculature that characterize the hypertensive process are 1) changes in the vascular media, 2) rarefication of the resistance vessels, and 3) lesions of the intimal vascular surface. These abnormalities are mainly the result of an adaptive process and are secondary to the increase in wall stress and/or to pathological damage to cellular components in the vessel wall. Functional alterations in the vascular smooth muscle are described as changes in agonist-smooth muscle interaction or plasma membrane permeability. These types of changes appear to play a primary, initiating role in the elevation of vascular resistance of hypertension. These alterations are not the result of an increase in wall stress and they often precede the development of high blood pressure. The functional changes are initiated by abnormal function of neurogenic, humoral, and/or myogenic changes that alter vascular smooth muscle activity. PMID:6282652

  15. The AMPLATZER Vascular Plug 4: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Bovio, Giulio; Petrocelli, Francesco; Seitun, Sara

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this communication is to describe our preliminary experience with the AMPLATZER Vascular Plug 4 (AVP 4) in peripheral vascular embolization. The AVP 4 was used for peripheral vascular embolization in five patients with renal pseudoaneurysm (n = 2), postsurgical peritoneal bleeding (n = 1), posttraumatic gluteal hemorrhage (n = 1), and intercostal pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). Occlusion time was recorded. Patients were followed up clinically and by imaging for 1 month after the procedure. All treated vessels or vascular abnormalities were successfully occluded within 3 min for low-flow circulation and over 8 min for high-flow circulation. At 1-month follow-up, all patients were symptom-free. All deployed devices remained in the original locations and desirable configurations. In conclusion, the AVP 4 seems to be safe and effective for occluding peripheral vessels and vascular abnormalities. Because of its compatibility with 0.038-in. catheters, it can be deployed through a diagnostic catheter following angiography without exchanging a sheath or guiding catheter. Compared with the previous generation of vascular plugs, the AVP 4 allows for faster procedure times and decreased exposure to radiation.

  16. Successful laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection preserving the common hepatic artery branched from the left gastric artery for advanced gastric cancer with an Adachi type VI (group 26) vascular anomaly.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hironobu; Yasuda, Takashi; Oshikiri, Taro; Imanishi, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Hironori; Oyama, Masato; Kakinoki, Keitaro; Ohara, Tadayuki; Sendo, Hiroyoshi; Fujino, Yasuhiro; Tominaga, Masahiro; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    We report a case of successful laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection preserving the common hepatic artery branched from the left gastric artery for advanced gastric cancer with an Adachi type VI (group 26) vascular anomaly. A 76-year-old female patient was admitted with a diagnosis of advanced gastric cancer at the anterior wall to the lesser curvature of the antrum (cT3N0M0 cStage IIA). Dynamic computed tomography showed the ectopia of the common hepatic artery branched from the left gastric artery. We made a diagnosis of an Adachi type VI (group 26) vascular anomaly and performed the abovementioned operation. In this anomaly pattern, scrupulous attention is required to remove the suprapancreatic lymph nodes because the portal vein is located immediately dorsal to those lymph nodes and is at increased risk for the injury in this situation. The common hepatic artery is branched from the left gastric artery, and the hepatic perfusion from the superior mesenteric artery is not present in group 26. Planning to preserve the artery will improve safety when it is possible oncologically. There were no postoperative complications, and the patient was discharged 9 days after the operation. To our knowledge, the present case is the first reported case of a laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection with an Adachi type VI (group 26) vascular anomaly. Preoperative diagnostic imaging is very important to prevent surgical complications because the reliable identification of vascular anomaly during an operation is very difficult. PMID:27259578

  17. Mineralocorticoid Receptors in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Inflammation and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Mary E.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the vasculature that causes significant morbidity and mortality from myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease. Landmark clinical trials revealed that mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists improve outcomes in cardiovascular patients. Conversely, enhanced MR activation by the hormone aldosterone is associated with increased risk of MI, stroke, and cardiovascular death. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the role of aldosterone and the MR in the pathogenesis of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis as it proceeds from risk factor-induced endothelial dysfunction and inflammation to plaque formation, progression, and ultimately rupture with thrombosis, the cause of acute ischemia. The role of the MR in converting cardiac risk factors into endothelial dysfunction, in enhancing leukocyte adhesion and infiltration into the vasculature, in promoting systemic inflammation and vascular oxidative stress, and in plaque destabilization and thrombosis are discussed. A greater understanding of the mechanisms by which the MR promotes atherosclerosis has substantial potential to identify novel treatment targets to improve cardiovascular health and decrease mortality. PMID:26441842

  18. Peripheral Tumor with Osteodentin and Cementum-like Material in an Infant: Odontogenic Hamartoma or Odontoma?

    PubMed

    Sfakianou, Aikaterini; Emmanouil, Dimitris E; Tosios, Konstantinos I; Sklavounou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe a peripheral tumor on the mandibular alveolar ridge of a seven-month-old Caucasian boy, consisting of ectomesencymal odontogenic tissues, in particular osteodentin and cementum-like material, in a cellular or loose vascular connective tissue stroma. This case may be considered either a peripheral odontogenic hamartoma or a peripheral odontoma. PMID:27098720

  19. Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibition reverses manifestation of peripheral diabetic neuropathy in type 1 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Watcho, Pierre; Shevalye, Hanna; Vareniuk, Igor; Obrosov, Alexander; Obrosova, Irina G.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for an important role for Na+/H+ exchangers in diabetic complications is emerging. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibition reverses experimental peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats were treated with the specific Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibitor cariporide for 4 wk after 12 wk without treatment. Neuropathy end points included sciatic motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, endoneurial nutritive blood flow, vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles, thermal nociception, tactile allodynia, and intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Advanced glycation end product and markers of oxidative stress, including nitrated protein levels in sciatic nerve, were evaluated by Western blot. Rats with 12-wk duration of diabetes developed motor and sensory nerve conduction deficits, thermal hypoalgesia, tactile allodynia, and intraepidermal nerve fiber loss. All these changes, including impairment of nerve blood flow and vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles, were partially reversed by 4 wk of cariporide treatment. Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibition was also associated with reduction of diabetes-induced accumulation of advanced glycation endproduct, oxidative stress, and nitrated proteins in sciatic nerve. In conclusion, these findings support an important role for Na+/H+ exchanger 1 in functional, structural, and biochemical manifestations of peripheral diabetic neuropathy and provide the rationale for development of Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibitors for treatment of diabetic vascular and neural complications. PMID:23736542

  20. Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibition reverses manifestation of peripheral diabetic neuropathy in type 1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Watcho, Pierre; Shevalye, Hanna; Vareniuk, Igor; Obrosov, Alexander; Obrosova, Irina G; Yorek, Mark A

    2013-08-01

    Evidence for an important role for Na(+)/H(+) exchangers in diabetic complications is emerging. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 inhibition reverses experimental peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats were treated with the specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 inhibitor cariporide for 4 wk after 12 wk without treatment. Neuropathy end points included sciatic motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, endoneurial nutritive blood flow, vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles, thermal nociception, tactile allodynia, and intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Advanced glycation end product and markers of oxidative stress, including nitrated protein levels in sciatic nerve, were evaluated by Western blot. Rats with 12-wk duration of diabetes developed motor and sensory nerve conduction deficits, thermal hypoalgesia, tactile allodynia, and intraepidermal nerve fiber loss. All these changes, including impairment of nerve blood flow and vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles, were partially reversed by 4 wk of cariporide treatment. Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 inhibition was also associated with reduction of diabetes-induced accumulation of advanced glycation endproduct, oxidative stress, and nitrated proteins in sciatic nerve. In conclusion, these findings support an important role for Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 in functional, structural, and biochemical manifestations of peripheral diabetic neuropathy and provide the rationale for development of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 inhibitors for treatment of diabetic vascular and neural complications. PMID:23736542

  1. [Vascular parkinsonism].

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, H

    1997-01-01

    Critchley speculated that multiple vascular lesions of the basal ganglia must have an etiological connection to the symptoms of so-called vascular parkinsonism (VP), but without neuropathological confirmation. Some had doubts about its existence because of the lack of the pathologically confirmed case with adequate clinical correlation. At present, VP is characterized clinically by the short-stepped or frozen gait, lead-pipe rigidity, the symmetry of findings, absence of resting tremor, and negative response to levodopa in elderly patients with cerebrovascular lesions on CT/MRI. Pseudobulbar palsies, pyramidal tract findings, and/or multi-infarct dementia coexist in some of the cases. Most of clinically suspected VP patients have cerebral white matter lesions as well as basal ganglia lesions. PMID:9014431

  2. Vascular trauma historical notes.

    PubMed

    Rich, Norman M

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a brief historical review of treatment of vascular trauma. Although methods for ligation came into use in the second century, this knowledge was lost during the Dark Ages and did not come back until the Renaissance. Many advances in vascular surgery occurred during the Balkan Wars, World War I, and World War II, although without antibiotics and blood banking, the philosophy of life over limb still ruled. Documenting and repairing both arteries and veins became more common during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Increased documentation has revealed that the current conflicts have resulted in more arterial injuries than in previous wars, likely because of improved body armor, improvised explosive device attacks, tourniquet use, and improved medical evacuation time. This brief review emphasizes the great value of mentorship and the legacy of the management of arterial and venous injuries to be passed on. PMID:21502112

  3. Noninvasive blood flow tests in vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, O. K.; Cole, C. W.

    1993-01-01

    Noninvasive testing is now routine for assessing vascular conditions. Many noninvasive tests are available for obtaining physiologic and anatomic information that is both precise and reproducible. This paper discusses noninvasive testing with plethysmography, Doppler ultrasonography, and duplex scanning for carotid artery occlusive disease, deep venous thrombosis, and peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8268746

  4. Image-Based Evaluation of Vascular Function and Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jongmin

    2013-01-01

    The noticeable characteristics of the blood vascular structure are the inconsistent viscosity of blood and the stiffness of the vascular wall. If we can control these two factors, we can solve more problems related to hemodynamics and vascular wall function. Understanding the properties of hemodynamics and vascular wall function may provide more information applicable to clinical practice for cardiovascular disease. The bedside techniques evaluating vascular function usually measure indirect parameters. In contrast, some medical imaging techniques provide clear and direct depictions of functional cardiovascular characteristics. In this review, image-based evaluation of hemodynamic and vascular wall functions is discussed from the perspective of blood flow velocity, flow volume, flow pattern, peripheral vascular resistance, intraluminal pressure, vascular wall stress, and wall stiffness. PMID:26587430

  5. Pulmonary vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mélot, C; Naeije, R

    2011-04-01

    Diseases of the pulmonary vasculature are a cause of increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and pulmonary arterial hypertension or decreased PVR in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations on hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, portal hypertension, or cavopulmonary anastomosis. All these conditions are associated with a decrease in both arterial PO2 and PCO2. Gas exchange in pulmonary vascular diseases with increased PVR is characterized by a shift of ventilation and perfusion to high ventilation-perfusion ratios, a mild to moderate increase in perfusion to low ventilation-perfusion ratios, and an increased physiologic dead space. Hypoxemia in these patients is essentially explained by altered ventilation-perfusion matching amplified by a decreased mixed venous PO2 caused by a low cardiac output. Hypocapnia is accounted for by hyperventilation, which is essentially related to an increased chemosensitivity. A cardiac shunt on a patent foramen ovale may be a cause of severe hypoxemia in a proportion of patients with pulmonary hypertension and an increase in right atrial pressure. Gas exchange in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is characterized by variable degree of pulmonary shunting and/or diffusion-perfusion imbalance. Hypocapnia is caused by an increased ventilation in relation to an increased pulmonary blood flow with direct peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation by shunted mixed venous blood flow. PMID:23737196

  6. Development of a clinical prediction rule to improve peripheral intravenous cannulae first attempt success in the emergency department and reduce post insertion failure rates: the Vascular Access Decisions in the Emergency Room (VADER) study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Peter J; Rippey, James C R; Cooke, Marie L; Bharat, Chrianna; Murray, Kevin; Higgins, Niall S; Foale, Aileen; Rickard, Claire M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral intravenous cannula (PIVC) insertion is one of the most common clinical interventions performed in emergency care worldwide. However, factors associated with successful PIVC placement and maintenance are not well understood. This study seeks to determine the predictors of first time PIVC insertion success in emergency department (ED) and identify the rationale for removal of the ED inserted PIVC in patients admitted to the hospital ward. Reducing failed insertion attempts and improving peripheral intravenous cannulation practice could lead to better staff and patient experiences, as well as improving hospital efficiency. Methods and analysis We propose an observational cohort study of PIVC insertions in a patient population presenting to ED, with follow-up observation of the PIVC in subsequent admissions to the hospital ward. We will collect specific PIVC observational data such as; clinician factors, patient factors, device information and clinical practice variables. Trained researchers will gather ED PIVC insertion data to identify predictors of insertion success. In those admitted from the ED, we will determine the dwell time of the ED-inserted PIVC. Multivariate regression analyses will be used to identify factors associated with insertions success and PIVC failure and standard statistical validation techniques will be used to create and assess the effectiveness of a clinical predication rule. Ethics and dissemination The findings of our study will provide new evidence to improve insertion success rates in the ED setting and identify strategies to reduce premature device failure for patients admitted to hospital wards. Results will unravel a complexity of factors that contribute to unsuccessful PIVC attempts such as patient and clinician factors along with the products, technologies and infusates used. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000588594; Pre-results. PMID:26868942

  7. [Peripheral arterial disease--an underappreciated clinical problem].

    PubMed

    Masanauskiene, Edita; Naudziūnas, Albinas

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease is a common vascular disorder. In contrast to coronary and cerebral artery disease, peripheral arterial disease remains an underappreciated condition that despite being serious and extremely prevalent is rarely diagnosed and even less frequently treated. Early diagnosis of peripheral artery disease and individual assessment of risk factors are important in preventing further cardiovascular complications. The ankle-brachial index is a simple, reliable tool for diagnosing peripheral artery disease. Many studies underscore the importance of using the ankle-brachial index to identify persons with peripheral artery disease, since peripheral artery disease is frequently undiagnosed or asymptomatic. Measurement of the ankle-brachial index is simple enough to be performed in any doctor's office, and it is one of the most reliable indices of peripheral artery disease. PMID:18469511

  8. Measuring Vascular Permeability In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Eelco F J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, in vivo vascular permeability measurements have provided significant insight into vascular functions in physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as the response to pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling, abnormality of tumor vasculature and its normalization, and delivery and efficacy of therapeutic agents. Different approaches for vascular permeability measurements have been established. Here, we describe and discuss a conventional 2D imaging method to measure vascular permeability, which was originally documented by Gerlowski and Jain in 1986 (Microvasc Res 31:288-305, 1986) and further developed by Yuan et al. in the early 1990s (Microvasc Res 45:269-289, 1993; Cancer Res 54:352-3356, 1994), and our recently developed 3D imaging method, which advances the approach originally described by Brown et al. in 2001 (Nat Med 7:864-868, 2001). PMID:27581015

  9. Biomaterials for vascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Swathi; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the USA. The limited availability of healthy autologous vessels for bypass grafting procedures has led to the fabrication of prosthetic vascular conduits. While synthetic polymers have been extensively studied as substitutes in vascular engineering, they fall short of meeting the biological challenges at the blood–material interface. Various tissue engineering strategies have emerged to address these flaws and increase long-term patency of vascular grafts. Vascular cell seeding of scaffolds and the design of bioactive polymers for in situ arterial regeneration have yielded promising results. This article describes the advances made in biomaterials design to generate suitable materials that not only match the mechanical properties of native vasculature, but also promote cell growth, facilitate extracellular matrix production and inhibit thrombogenicity. PMID:20017698

  10. Optoacoustic angiography of peripheral vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermilov, Sergey; Su, Richard; Zamora, Mario; Hernandez, Travis; Nadvoretsky, Vyacheslav; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    We developed a new optoacoustic microangiography system (OmAS) intended for in-vivo vascular imaging of a human finger. The system employs an arc-shaped acoustic array that is rotated 360 degrees around the finger providing optoacoustic data necessary for tomographic reconstruction of the three-dimensional images of a finger. A near-infrared Q-switched laser is used to generate optoacoustic signals with increased contrast of blood vessels. The laser is coupled through two randomized fiberoptic bundles oriented in orthogonal optoacoustic mode. To demonstrate OmAS capabilities, we present a time-series of optoacoustic images of a human finger taken after the hypothermia stress test. The images show a detailed vascular anatomy of a finger down to the capillary level. A series of quick 30s scans allowed us to visualize the thermoregulatory response within the studied finger as it was manifested via vasomotor activity during the hypothermia recovery. We propose that the developed system can be used for diagnostics of various medical conditions that are manifested in change of the peripheral (finger) blood flow. Examples of the medical conditions that could be diagnosed and staged using the OmAS include the peripheral arterial disease (PAD), thrombosis, frostbite, and traumas.

  11. Human peripheral blood eosinophils induce angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Puxeddu, Ilaria; Alian, Akram; Piliponsky, Adrian Martin; Ribatti, Domenico; Panet, Amos; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2005-03-01

    Eosinophils play a crucial role in allergic reactions and asthma. They are also involved in responses against parasites, in autoimmune and neoplastic diseases, and in fibroses. There is increasing evidence that angiogenesis plays an important role in these processes. Since eosinophils are known to produce angiogenic mediators, we have hypothesized a direct contribution of these cells to angiogenesis. The effect of human peripheral blood eosinophil sonicates on rat aortic endothelial cell proliferation (in vitro), rat aorta sprouting (ex vivo) and angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (in vivo) have been investigated. To determine whether eosinophil-derived vascular endothelial growth factor influences the eosinophil pro-angiogenic activity, eosinophil sonicates were incubated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibodies and then added to the chorioallantoic membrane. Vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor density on the endothelial cells were also evaluated. Eosinophils were found to enhance endothelial cell proliferation and to induce a strong angiogenic response both in the aorta rings and in the chorioallantoic membrane assays. Pre-incubation of eosinophil sonicates with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibodies partially reduced the angiogenic response of these cells in the chorioallantoic membrane. Eosinophils also increased vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA production on endothelial cells. Eosinophils are able to induce angiogenesis and this effect is partially mediated by their pre-formed vascular endothelial growth factor. This strongly suggests an important role of eosinophils in angiogenesis-associated diseases such as asthma. PMID:15618019

  12. Exercise Training and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Tara L.; Lloyd, Pamela G.; Yang, Hsiao-Tung; Terjung, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common vascular disease that reduces blood flow capacity to the legs of patients. PAD leads to exercise intolerance that can progress in severity to greatly limit mobility, and in advanced cases leads to frank ischemia with pain at rest. It is estimated that 12–15 million people in the United States are diagnosed with PAD, with a much larger population that is undiagnosed. The presence of PAD predicts a 50–1500% increase in morbidity and mortality, depending on severity. Treatment of patients with PAD is limited to modification of cardiovascular disease risk factors, pharmacological intervention, surgery, and exercise therapy. Extended exercise programs that involve walking ~5 times/wk, at a significant intensity that requires frequent rest periods, are most significant. Pre-clinical studies and virtually all clinical trials demonstrate the benefits of exercise therapy, including: improved walking tolerance, modified inflammatory/hemostatic markers, enhanced vasoresponsiveness, adaptations within the limb (angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, mitochondrial synthesis) that enhance oxygen delivery and metabolic responses, potentially delayed progression of the disease, enhanced quality of life indices, and extended longevity. A synthesis is provided as to how these adaptations can develop in the context of our current state of knowledge and events known to be orchestrated by exercise. The benefits are so compelling that exercise prescription should be an essential option presented to patients with PAD in the absence of contraindications. Obviously, selecting for a life style pattern, that includes enhanced physical activity prior to the advance of PAD limitations, is the most desirable and beneficial. PMID:23720270

  13. Peripheral arterial disease: implications beyond the peripheral circulation.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Whayne, Thomas F

    2013-11-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects a considerable percentage of the population. The manifestations of this disease are not always clinically overt. As a result, PAD remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. PAD is not just a disease of the peripheral arteries, but also an indication of generalized vascular atherosclerosis. PAD patients also have a high prevalence of other arterial diseases, such as coronary/carotid artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysms. PAD is also a predictor of increased risk of lung and other cancers. The most often used examination for the establishment of the diagnosis of PAD, the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI), is also a predictor of generalized atherosclerosis, future cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality. Several markers that have been linked with PAD (e.g. C-reactive protein, serum bilirubin levels) may also have predictive value for other conditions besides PAD (e.g. kidney dysfunction). The management of PAD should therefore not be restricted to the peripheral circulation but should include measurements to manage and decrease the systemic atherosclerotic burden of the patient. PMID:23221278

  14. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Solveig L; Hook, Kristen P

    2016-03-01

    This review provides a clinically-oriented summary of the most commonly encountered overgrowth syndromes associated with vascular malformations. This manuscript will outline morphologic features, clinical evaluation and management of this complex group of patients. Recent genetic advances have aided in classification and help to explain overlapping clinical features in many cases. PMID:27607325

  15. Computed Tomography–Guided Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Combination With Regional Positive Lymph Node Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Peripheral Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Li; Zhang, Jian-wen; Lin, Sheng; Luo, Hui-Qun; Wen, Qing-Lian; He, Li-Jia; Shang, Chang-Ling; Ren, Pei-Rong; Yang, Hong-Ru; Pang, Hao-Wen; Yang, Bo; He, Huai-Lin; Chen, Yue; Wu, Jing-Bo

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical safety, adverse events, and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in combination with regional positive lymph node intensity modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced peripheral non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a prospective, officially approved phase 1 trial. Primary tumors were treated with HDR brachytherapy. A single 30-Gy dose was delivered to the 90% isodose line of the gross lung tumor volume. A total dose of at least 70 Gy was administered to the 95% isodose line of the planning target volume of malignant lymph nodes using 6-MV X-rays. The patients received concurrent or sequential chemotherapy. We assessed treatment efficacy, adverse events, and radiation toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 28 months (range, 7-44 months). There were 3 cases of mild pneumothorax but no cases of hemothorax, dyspnea, or pyothorax after the procedure. Grade 3 or 4 acute hematologic toxicity was observed in 5 patients. During follow-up, mild fibrosis around the puncture point was observed on the CT scans of 2 patients, but both patients were asymptomatic. The overall response rates (complete and partial) for the primary mass and positive lymph nodes were 100% and 92.3%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 90.9% and 67%, respectively, with a median OS of 22.5 months. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that HDR brachytherapy is safe and feasible for peripheral locally advanced NSCLC, justifying a phase 2 clinical trial.

  16. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  17. Development of peripheral opioid antagonists' new insights into opioid effects.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jonathan; Rosow, Carl E

    2008-10-01

    The recent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration of 2 medications--methylnaltrexone and alvimopan--introduces a new class of therapeutic entities to clinicians. These peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonists selectively reverse opioid actions mediated by receptors outside the central nervous system, while preserving centrally mediated analgesia. Methylnaltrexone, administered subcutaneously, has been approved in the United States, Europe, and Canada. In the United States, it is indicated for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation in patients with advanced illness (eg, cancer, AIDS) who are receiving palliative care, when response to laxative therapy has not been sufficient. Alvimopan, an orally administered medication, has been approved in the United States to facilitate recovery of gastrointestinal function after bowel resection and primary anastomosis. Clinical and laboratory studies performed during the development of these drugs have indicated that peripheral receptors mediate other opioid effects, including decreased gastric emptying, nausea and vomiting, pruritus, and urinary retention. Laboratory investigations with these compounds suggest that opioids affect fundamental cellular processes through mechanisms that were previously unknown. These mechanisms include modifications of human immunodeficiency virus penetration, tumor angiogenesis, vascular permeability, and bacterial virulence. PMID:18828971

  18. Metanx alleviates multiple manifestations of peripheral neuropathy and increases intraepidermal nerve fiber density in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Shevalye, Hanna; Watcho, Pierre; Stavniichuk, Roman; Dyukova, Elena; Lupachyk, Sergey; Obrosova, Irina G

    2012-08-01

    Metanx is a product containing L-methylfolate, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, and methylcobalamin for management of endothelial dysfunction. Metanx ingredients counteract endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling and oxidative stress in vascular endothelium and peripheral nerve. This study evaluates Metanx on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in ZDF rats, a model of type 2 diabetes. Metanx was administered to 15-week-old ZDF and ZDF lean rats at either 4.87 mg ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ day(-1) (a body weight-based equivalent of human dose) or 24.35 mg ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ day(-1) by oral gavage two times a day for 4 weeks. Both doses alleviated hind limb digital sensory, but not sciatic motor, nerve conduction slowing and thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia in the absence of any reduction of hyperglycemia. Low-dose Metanx increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density but did not prevent morphometric changes in distal tibial nerve myelinated fibers. Metanx treatment counteracted endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, inducible nitric oxide synthase upregulation, and methylglyoxal-derived advanced glycation end product, nitrotyrosine, and nitrite/nitrate accumulation in the peripheral nerve. In conclusion, Metanx, at a body weight-based equivalent of human dose, increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density and improved multiple parameters of peripheral nerve function in ZDF rats. Clinical studies are needed to determine if Metanx finds use in management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:22751692

  19. New developments in the clinical use of drug-coated balloon catheters in peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Naghi, Jesse; Yalvac, Ethan A; Pourdjabbar, Ali; Ang, Lawrence; Bahadorani, John; Reeves, Ryan R; Mahmud, Ehtisham; Patel, Mitul

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) involving the lower extremity is a major source of morbidity and mortality. Clinical manifestations of PAD span the spectrum from lifestyle limiting claudication to ulceration and gangrene leading to amputation. Advancements including balloon angioplasty, self-expanding stents, drug-eluting stents, and atherectomy have resulted in high technical success rates for endovascular therapy in patients with PAD. However, these advances have been limited by somewhat high rates of clinical restenosis and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. The recent introduction of drug-coated balloon technology shows promise in limiting neointimal hyperplasia induced by vascular injury after endovascular therapies. This review summarizes the contemporary clinical data in the emerging area of drug-coated balloons. PMID:27418859

  20. Effects of pitavastatin versus atorvastatin on the peripheral endothelial progenitor cells and vascular endothelial growth factor in high-risk patients: a pilot prospective, double-blind, randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) reflect endothelial repair capacity and may be a significant marker for the clinical outcomes of cardiovascular disease. While some high-dose statin treatments may improve endothelial function, it is not known whether different statins may have similar effects on EPCs.This study aimed to investigate the potential class effects of different statin treatment including pitavastatin and atorvastatin on circulating EPCs in clinical setting. Methods A pilot prospective, double-blind, randomized study was conducted to evaluate the ordinary dose of pitavastatin (2 mg daily) or atorvastatin (10 mg daily) treatment for 12 weeks on circulating EPCs in patients with cardiovascular risk such as hypercholesterolemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Additional in vitro study was conducted to clarify the direct effects of both statins on EPCs from the patients. Results A total of 26 patients (19 with T2DM) completed the study. While the lipid-lowering effects were similar in both treatments, the counts of circulating CD34+KDR+EPCs were significantly increased (from 0.021 ± 0.015 to 0.054 ± 0.044% of gated mononuclear cells, P < 0.05) only by pitavastatin treatment. Besides, plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine level was reduced (from 0.68 ± 0.10 to 0.53 ± 0.12 μmol/L, P < 0.05) by atorvastatin, and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level was increased (from 74.33 ± 32.26 to 98.65 ± 46.64 pg/mL, P < 0.05) by pitavastatin. In the in vitro study, while both statins increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression, only pitavastatin increased the phosphorylation of eNOS in EPCs. Pitavastatin but not atorvastatin ameliorated the adhesion ability of early EPCs and the migration and tube formation capacities of late EPCs. Conclusions While both statins similarly reduced plasma lipids, only pitavastatin increased plasma VEGF level and circulating EPCs in

  1. Advanced flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle targeting to rare leukemic stem cells in peripheral human blood in a defined model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christy L.; Leary, James F.

    2015-03-01

    Leukemia stem cells are both stem-like and leukemic-like. This complicates their detection as rare circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of leukemia patients. Since leukemic stem cells are also resistant to standard chemotherapeutic regimens, new therapeutic strategies need to be designed to kill the leukemic stem cells without killing normal stem cells. In these initial targeting studies we utilized a bioinformatics approach to design an antibodyfluorescent nanoparticle conjugate for targeting to these leukemic stem cells and to minimize targeting to normal stemprogenitor cells. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were performed on a BD FACS Aria III. Human leukemic stem cell-like cell RS4;11 (with putative immunophenotype CD133+/CD24+/-, CD34+/-, CD38+, CD10-/Flt3+) was spiked into normal hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells obtained from a "buffy coat" prep (with putative immunophenotype CD133- /CD34+/CD38-/CD10-/Flt-3-) to be used as a model human leukemia patient. To analyze the model system, digital data mixtures of the two cell types were first created and assigned classifiers in order to create truth sets. ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) and multidimensional cluster analyses were used to evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of the immunophenotyping panel and for automated cell population identification, respectively. Costs of misclassification (false targeting) were also accounted for by this analysis scheme. Ultimately, this analysis scheme will be applied to use of nanoparticle-antibody conjugates at therapeutic doses for targeted killing of leukemia stem cells preferentially to normal stem -progenitor cells.

  2. Cell-based strategies for vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tongqiang; Fan, Jiabing; Fartash, Armita; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2016-05-01

    Vascular regeneration is known to play an essential role in the repair of injured tissues mainly through accelerating the repair of vascular injury caused by vascular diseases, as well as the recovery of ischemic tissues. However, the clinical vascular regeneration is still challenging. Cell-based therapy is thought to be a promising strategy for vascular regeneration, since various cells have been identified to exert important influences on the process of vascular regeneration such as the enhanced endothelium formation on the surface of vascular grafts, and the induction of vessel-like network formation in the ischemic tissues. Here are a vast number of diverse cell-based strategies that have been extensively studied in vascular regeneration. These strategies can be further classified into three main categories, including cell transplantation, construction of tissue-engineered grafts, and surface modification of scaffolds. Cells used in these strategies mainly refer to terminally differentiated vascular cells, pluripotent stem cells, multipotent stem cells, and unipotent stem cells. The aim of this review is to summarize the reported research advances on the application of various cells for vascular regeneration, yielding insights into future clinical treatment for injured tissue/organ. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1297-1314, 2016. PMID:26864677

  3. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  4. Vascular permeability, vascular hyperpermeability and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura; Zeng, Huiyan; Dvorak, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the definition of vascular permeability and the proper methodology for its measurement. We review these conflicting views, finding that both provide useful but complementary information. Vascular permeability by any measure is dramatically increased in acute and chronic inflammation, cancer, and wound healing. This hyperpermeability is mediated by acute or chronic exposure to vascular permeabilizing agents, particularly vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A). We demonstrate that three distinctly different types of vascular permeability can be distinguished, based on the different types of microvessels involved, the composition of the extravasate, and the anatomic pathways by which molecules of different size cross-vascular endothelium. These are the basal vascular permeability (BVP) of normal tissues, the acute vascular hyperpermeability (AVH) that occurs in response to a single, brief exposure to VEGF-A or other vascular permeabilizing agents, and the chronic vascular hyperpermeability (CVH) that characterizes pathological angiogenesis. Finally, we list the numerous (at least 25) gene products that different authors have found to affect vascular permeability in variously engineered mice and classify them with respect to their participation, as far as possible, in BVP, AVH and CVH. Further work will be required to elucidate the signaling pathways by which each of these molecules, and others likely to be discovered, mediate the different types of vascular permeability. PMID:18293091

  5. Propylthiouracil and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Van Boekel, V; Godoy, J M; Lamy, L A; Assuf, S; Meyer Neto, J G; Balassiano, S L; Prata, L E

    1992-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a rare manifestation in hyperthyroidism. We describe the neurological manifestations of a 38 year old female with Graves' disease who developed peripheral neuropathy in the course of her treatment with propylthiouracil. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs disappeared. Therefore, we call attention for a possible toxic effect on peripheral nervous system caused by this drug. PMID:1339201

  6. Redox regulation of vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Ashley, Euan A; Ali, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is a dynamic process of structural and functional changes in response to biochemical and biomechanical signals in a complex in vivo milieu. While inherently adaptive, dysregulation leads to maladaptive remodeling. Reactive oxygen species participate in homeostatic cell signaling in tightly regulated- and compartmentalized cellular circuits. It is well established that perturbations in oxidation-reduction (redox) homeostasis can lead to a state of oxidative-, and more recently, reductive stress. We provide an overview of the redox signaling in the vasculature and review the role of oxidative- and reductive stress in maladaptive vascular remodeling. Particular emphasis has been placed on essential processes that determine phenotype modulation, migration and fate of the main cell types in the vessel wall. Recent advances in systems biology and the translational opportunities they may provide to specifically target the redox pathways driving pathological vascular remodeling are discussed. PMID:26483132

  7. Vascular Injury in Orthopedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Panagopoulos, George N; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Mantas, George; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Sfyroeras, George S; Lazaris, Andreas; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2016-07-01

    Vascular injury in orthopedic trauma is challenging. The risk to life and limb can be high, and clinical signs initially can be subtle. Recognition and management should be a critical skill for every orthopedic surgeon. There are 5 types of vascular injury: intimal injury (flaps, disruptions, or subintimal/intramural hematomas), complete wall defects with pseudoaneurysms or hemorrhage, complete transections with hemorrhage or occlusion, arteriovenous fistulas, and spasm. Intimal defects and subintimal hematomas with possible secondary occlusion are most commonly associated with blunt trauma, whereas wall defects, complete transections, and arteriovenous fistulas usually occur with penetrating trauma. Spasm can occur after either blunt or penetrating trauma to an extremity and is more common in young patients. Clinical presentation of vascular injury may not be straightforward. Physical examination can be misleading or initially unimpressive; a normal pulse examination may be present in 5% to 15% of patients with vascular injury. Detection and treatment of vascular injuries should take place within the context of the overall resuscitation of the patient according to the established principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Advances in the field, made mostly during times of war, have made limb salvage the rule rather than the exception. Teamwork, familiarity with the often subtle signs of vascular injuries, a high index of suspicion, effective communication, appropriate use of imaging modalities, sound knowledge of relevant technique, and sequence of surgical repairs are among the essential factors that will lead to a successful outcome. This article provides a comprehensive literature review on a subject that generates significant controversy and confusion among clinicians involved in the care of trauma patients. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):249-259.]. PMID:27322172

  8. Evaluating Peripheral Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Tara; Hsieh, Gary; Mankoff, Jennifer

    Although peripheral displays have been a domain of inquiry for over a decade now, evaluation criteria and techniques for this area are still being created. Peripheral display evaluation is an acknowledged challenge in a field setting. This chapter first describes models and methods that have been tailored specifically to evaluating peripheral displays (measuring how well they achieve their goals). Then, we present evaluation criteria used in past evaluations of peripheral displays, ranging from issues such as learnability to distraction. After explaining how these criteria have been assessed in the past, we present a case study evaluation of two e-mail peripheral displays that demonstrates the pros and cons of various evaluation techniques.

  9. Endovascular Intervention for Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thukkani, Arun K.; Kinlay, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Advances in endovascular therapies during the past decade have broadened the options for treating peripheral vascular disease percutaneously. Endovascular treatment offers a lower risk alternative to open surgery in many patients with multiple comorbidities. Noninvasive physiological tests and arterial imaging precede an endovascular intervention and help localize the disease and plan the procedure. The timing and need for revascularization are broadly related to the 3 main clinical presentations of claudication, critical limb ischemia, and acute limb ischemia. Many patients with claudication can be treated by exercise and medical therapy. Endovascular procedures are considered when these fail to improve quality of life and function. In contrast, critical limb ischemia and acute limb ischemia threaten the limb and require more urgent revascularization. In general, endovascular treatments have greater long-term durability for aortoiliac disease than femoral popliteal disease. Infrapopliteal revascularization is generally reserved for critical and acute limb ischemia. Balloon angioplasty and stenting are the mainstays of endovascular therapy. New well-tested innovations include drug-eluting stents and drug-coated balloons. Adjunctive devices for crossing chronic total occlusions or debulking plaque with atherectomy are less rigorously studied and have niche roles. Patients receiving endovascular procedures need a structured surveillance plan for follow-up care. This includes intensive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors to prevent myocardial infarction and stroke, which are the main causes of death. Limb surveillance aims to identify restenosis and new disease beyond the intervened segments, both of which may jeopardize patency and lead to recurrent symptoms, functional impairment, or a threatened limb. PMID:25908731

  10. Peripheral arterial injuries: a reassessment.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, H F; Parnell, C L; Williams, G D; Campbell, G S

    1976-01-01

    Ninety-four patients with peripheral arterial injuries were subjected to acute repair, negative exploration, or late repair of the complications of the arterial injury (false aneurysm, A-V fistula, and/or limb ischemia). The causes of failure after acute injury include extensive local soft tissue and bony damage, severe concomitant head, chest or abdominal wounding, stubborn reliance on negative arteriograms in patients with probable arterial injury, failure to repair simultaneous venous injuries, or harvesting of a vein graft from a severely damaged extremity. There is a positive correlation between non-operative expectant treatment and the incidence of late vascular complications requiring late arterial repair. Delayed complications of arterial injuries occurred most frequently in wounds below the elbow and knee. PMID:973757

  11. Inflammation and Vascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Daniel I.

    2014-01-01

    The invited special lecture at the 76th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society focused on the central role of inflammation in vascular injury and repair. Early studies pioneered the concept that mechanical injury, such as balloon angioplasty and endovascular stent deployment, elicits an inflammatory response from the vessel wall. This hypothesis was developed and substantiated at a time when the prevailing dogma viewed restenosis following angioplasty as a primarily proliferative smooth muscle cell disease. Antibody targeting of Mac-1 reduced leukocyte accumulation and limited neointimal formation following balloon injury or stent implantation. Genetic absence of Mac-1 resulted in diminished leukocyte accumulation and neointimal thickening after carotid artery injury in mice. In the course of those studies, our laboratory made fundamental discoveries regarding the mechanism of leukocyte recruitment at sites of vascular injury and identified platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, a component of the GPIb-IX-V complex, as the previously unknown platelet counter-receptor for Mac-1. Follow-on studies have focused extensively on the structure, function, and signaling of the leukocyte integrin Mac-1. The binding site for GPIbα in Mac-1 has been mapped and subsequently showed that leukocyte engagement of platelet GPIbα via Mac-1 is critical not only for the biological response to vascular injury, but also for thrombosis, vasculitis, glomerulonephritis, and multiple sclerosis, thereby advancing the hypothesis that virtually all inflammation is platelet-dependent. Furthermore, ligand engagement of Mac-1 initiates a novel gene program that promotes inflammation by activating NFκB and downregulating the expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxp1 that controls monocyte differentiation. Small molecule inhibitors of Mac-1 function have been pursued, including targeting of Mac-1-GPIbα binding or the downstream tyrosine kinase spleen tyrosine kinase

  12. Vascular Distribution of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered primarily occupational, novel nanotechnology innovation and application has led to widespread domestic use and intentional biomedical exposures. With these exciting advances, the breadth and depth of toxicological considerations must also be expanded. The vascular system interacts with every tissue in the body, striving to homeostasis. Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) have been reported to distribute in many different organs and tissues. However, these observations have tended to use approaches requiring tissue homogenization and/or gross organ analyses. These techniques, while effective in establishing presence, preclude an exact determination of where ENM are deposited within a tissue. It is necessary to identify this exact distribution and deposition of ENM throughout the cardiovascular system, with respect to vascular hemodynamics and in vivo/ in vitro ENM modifications taken into account if nanotechnology is to achieve its full potential. Distinct levels of the vasculature will first be described as individual compartments. Then the vasculature will be considered as a whole. These unique compartments and biophysical conditions will be discussed in terms of their propensity to favor ENM deposition. Understanding levels of the vasculature will also be discussed. Ultimately, future studies must verify the mechanisms speculated on and presented herein. PMID:24777845

  13. PERIPHERAL BLOOD FILM - A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Adewoyin, AS; Nwogoh, B.

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral blood film (PBF) is a laboratory work-up that involves cytology of peripheral blood cells smeared on a slide. As basic as it is, PBF is invaluable in the characterization of various clinical diseases. This article highlights the basic science and art behind the PBF. It expounds its laboratory applications, clinical indications and interpretations in the light of various clinical diseases. Despite advances in haematology automation and application of molecular techniques, the PBF has remained a very important diagnostic test to the haematologist. A good quality smear, thorough examination and proper interpretation in line with patient's clinical state should be ensured by the haemato-pathologist. Clinicians should be abreast with its clinical utility and proper application of the reports in the management of patients. PMID:25960697

  14. Endothelial Outgrowth Cells: Function and Performance in Vascular Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical need for vascular grafts continues to grow. Tissue engineering strategies have been employed to develop vascular grafts for patients lacking sufficient autologous vessels for grafting. Restoring a functional endothelium on the graft lumen has been shown to greatly improve the long-term patency of small-diameter grafts. However, obtaining an autologous source of endothelial cells for in vitro endothelialization is invasive and often not a viable option. Endothelial outgrowth cells (EOCs), derived from circulating progenitor cells in peripheral blood, provide an alternative cell source for engineering an autologous endothelium. This review aims at highlighting the role of EOCs in the regulation of processes that are central to vascular graft performance. To characterize EOC performance in vascular grafts, this review identifies the characteristics of EOCs, defines functional performance criteria for EOCs in vascular grafts, and summarizes the existing work in developing vascular grafts with EOCs. PMID:24004404

  15. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area. PMID:25926569

  16. Isolated plexiform neurofibroma mimicking a vascular lesion.

    PubMed

    Stefano, Paola Cecilia; Apa, Sebastian Nicolas; Lanoël, Agustina Maria; María, Josefina Sala; Sierre, Sergio; Pierini, Adrián Martin

    2016-04-01

    Plexiform neurofibromas are benign tumors originating from peripheral nerve sheaths, generally associated with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). They are diffuse, painful and sometimes locally invasive, generating cosmetic problems. This report discusses an adolescent patient who presented with an isolated, giant plexiform neurofibroma on her leg that was confused with a vascular lesion due to its clinical aspects. Once the diagnosis was confirmed by surgical biopsy, excision of the lesion was performed with improvement of the symptoms. PMID:27192529

  17. An Innovative Ultrasound Technique for Evaluation of Tumor Vascularity in Breast Cancers: Superb Micro-Vascular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ah Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Yeom, Suk Keu; Lee, Seung Wha; Chung, Hwan Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Tumor vascularity is an important indicator for differential diagnosis, tumor growth, and prognosis. Superb micro-vascular imaging (SMI) is an innovative ultrasound technique for vascular examination that uses a multidimensional filter to eliminate clutter and preserve extremely low-velocity flows. Theoretically, SMI could depict more vessels and more detailed vascular morphology, due to the increased sensitivity of slow blood flow. Here, we report the early experience of using SMI in 21 breast cancer patients. We evaluated tumor vascular features in breast cancer and compared SMI and conventional color or power Doppler imaging. SMI was superior to color or power Doppler imaging in detecting tumor vessels, the details of vessel morphology, and both peripheral and central vascular distribution. In conclusion, SMI is a promising ultrasound technique for evaluating microvascular information of breast cancers.

  18. RECIST 1.1 Compared With RECIST 1.0 in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Receiving Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor–Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, Katherine M.; Nishino, Mizuki; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) is the most widely accepted method to objectively assess response to therapy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)–targeted therapy. Both RECIST 1.0 and 1.1 have been used to assess response to VEGF-targeted therapies; however, systematic comparisons are lacking. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty-two patients with metastatic RCC treated with VEGF-targeted therapies were retrospectively studied. Tumor measurements and response assessment according to RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 were compared, including the number of target lesions, baseline measurements, response at each follow-up, best overall response, and time to progression (TTP). Morphologic changes and new enhancement were also assessed over the course of treatment, and TTP was evaluated using morphologic change criteria in combination with RECIST 1.1. RESULTS The number of target lesions according to RECIST 1.1 was significantly fewer than by RECIST 1.0 (median, 2 vs 4; p < 0.0001). At first imaging follow-up, the percentage change of the sums of the diameter measurements by RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 were highly concordant (R = 0.857; mean shrinkage, 12.1% by RECIST 1.1 vs 10.8% by RECIST 1.0). Best response assessment was highly concordant between the two criteria (weighted κ = 0.819). There was no evidence of a difference in TTP by the two criteria, with a median TTP of 8.9 months (95% CI for the median, 5.5–13.9) by RECIST 1.1 and 8.9 months (95% CI for the median, 5.8–13.6) by RECIST 1.0. The median TTP by RECIST 1.1 alone was 8.9 months compared with 5.6 months for RECIST 1.1 and morphologic changes combined. CONCLUSION RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 response assessments were overall highly concordant in patients with RCC treated with VEGF-targeted therapy, with fewer target lesions according to RECIST 1.1 but no difference in TTP. PMID:25714313

  19. Animal models of HIV peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Burdo, Tricia H; Miller, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    The use of animal models in the study of HIV and AIDS has advanced our understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of infection. Of the multitude of HIV disease manifestations, peripheral neuropathy remains one of the most common long-term side effects. Several of the most important causes of peripheral neuropathy in AIDS patients include direct association with HIV infection with or without antiretroviral medication and infection with opportunistic agents. Because the pathogeneses of these diseases are difficult to study in human patients, animal models have allowed for significant advancement in the understanding of the role of viral infection and the immune system in disease genesis. This review focuses on rodent, rabbit, feline and rhesus models used to study HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies, focusing specifically on sensory neuropathy and antiretroviral-associated neuropathies. PMID:25214880

  20. [Results of peripheral arterial vascular injury in polytraumatized patients].

    PubMed

    Aufmkolk, M; Dominguez, E; Letsch, R; Neudeck, F; Niebel, W

    1996-08-01

    The therapeutic concept of limb salvage or immediate amputation is controversial in patients with multiple trauma. Sixty-three multiple trauma patients (injury severity score ISS > 18 patients) with blunt arterial injuries were investigated. Twenty-seven had injuries of the upper limb and 36 patients of the lower limb. In 33 cases a limb salvage procedure was performed (group I), while in 30 cases the limb was amputated (group II). Neither group showed a significant difference in age (I: 33 +/- 3, II: 30 +/- 3 years), ISS (I: 30 +/- 2, II: 29 +/- 2 patients), time of ischemia (I: 238 +/- 30, II: 203 +/- 20 min) ICU stay (I: 18 +/- 4, II: 19 +/- 4 days). Lethality and morbidity were slightly increased in group I (death: I: n = 8; II: n = 4; MOF: I: n = 5; II: n = 3; Sepsis: I: n = 11, II: n = 4). No differences were found in the incidence of local infections (I: n = 12, II: n = 10). Secondary amputations were performed in 7 patients after 12 +/- 2 days (range 3-40; median: 5 days). We conclude that limb salvage did not increase the risk for severe complications. Lethality and morbidity were related to the severity of the injury. To prevent complications, secondary amputations had to be performed early. PMID:8975376

  1. Peripheral vascular responses to heat stress after hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looft-Wilson, Robin C.; Gisolfi, Carl V.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether hindlimb suspension (which simulates the effects of microgravity) results in impaired hemodynamic responses to heat stress or alterations in mesenteric small artery sympathetic nerve innervation. METHODS: Over 28 d, 16 male Sprague-Dawley rats were hindlimb-suspended, and 13 control rats were housed in the same type of cage. After the treatment, mean arterial pressure (MAP), colonic temperature (Tcol), and superior mesenteric and iliac artery resistances (using Doppler flowmetry) were measured during heat stress [exposure to 42 degrees C until the endpoint of 80 mm Hg blood pressure was reached (75 +/- 9 min); endpoint Tcore = 43.6 +/- 0.2] while rats were anesthetized (sodium pentobarbital, 50 mg x kg(-1) BW). RESULTS: Hindlimb-suspended and control rats exhibited similar increases in Tcol, MAP, and superior mesenteric artery resistance, and similar decreases in iliac resistance during heat stress (endpoint was a fall in MAP below 80 mm Hg). Tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining indicated similar sympathetic nerve innervation in small mesenteric arteries from both groups. CONCLUSION: Hindlimb suspension does not alter the hemodynamic or thermoregulatory responses to heat stress in the anesthetized rat or mesenteric sympathetic nerve innervation, suggesting that this sympathetic pathway is intact.

  2. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  3. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... branch of medicine that focuses on the cardiovascular system. ... Circulatory system; Vascular system; Cardiovascular system ... to diagnose, monitor or treat diseases of the circulatory and vascular system include: Cardiac CT for calcium scoring Cardiac MRI ...

  4. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Annual Meeting Events Calendar Vascular Medicine Events Job Bank Professional Practice Position Statements PAD Awareness Vascular Related ... for a new job? Try the SVM Job Bank . Browse the jobs or sign up for job ...

  5. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/007459.htm Heart and vascular services To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood vessels (arteries and veins). Heart and vascular services refers to the branch of medicine that focuses ...

  6. Peripheral giant cell granuloma.

    PubMed

    Adlakha, V K; Chandna, P; Rehani, U; Rana, V; Malik, P

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma is a benign reactive lesion of gingiva. It manifests as a firm, soft, bright nodule or as a sessile or pedunculate mass. This article reports the management of peripheral giant cell granuloma in a 12-year-old boy by surgical excision. PMID:21273719

  7. Peripheral Color Demo

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A set of structured demonstrations of the vividness of peripheral color vision is provided by arrays of multicolored disks scaled with eccentricity. These demonstrations are designed to correct the widespread misconception that peripheral color vision is weak or nonexistent. PMID:27551354

  8. Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Cirrhosis-Associated Cardiomyopathy in Liver Transplant Candidates: Advanced Echo Imaging, Cardiac Biomarkers, and Advanced Heart Failure Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Maryjane; Schulze, Paul Christian

    2014-01-01

    Patients with end-stage liver disease in need of liver transplantation increasingly are older with a greater burden of cardiac disease and other co-morbidities, which may increase perioperative risk and adversely affect long-term prognosis. Cirrhosis of any etiology manifests hemodynamically as a state of low systemic vascular resistance, with high peripheral, but low central blood volume, leading to a state of neurohormonal activation and high cardiac output, which may adversely affect cardiac reserve under extreme perioperative stress, aptly termed cirrhosis-associated or cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. Evidence of asymptomatic cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may be found in subtle electrocardiographic and echocardiographic changes, but may progress to severe heart failure under the demands of bleeding and transfusions, vasopressors, rebounding peripheral vascular resistance, withdrawal of cardioprotective beta-blockers and mineralocorticoid antagonists, exacerbated by sepsis or systemic inflammatory response syndrome. This review will add to the current body of literature on cirrhotic cardiomyopathy by focusing on the role of advanced echocardiographic imaging techniques, cardiac biomarkers, and advanced heart failure therapies available to manage patients with cirrhotic cardiomyopathy while waiting for liver transplant and during the perioperative period. PMID:25657603

  9. Effects of combination of perindopril, indapamide, and calcium channel blockers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: results from the Action In Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) trial.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, John; Arima, Hisatomi; Woodward, Mark; Mancia, Giuseppe; Poulter, Neil; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Zoungas, Sophia; Patel, Anushka; Williams, Bryan; Harrap, Stephen

    2014-02-01

    The objective of the present analysis was to determine the effects of a fixed combination of perindopril and indapamide in combination with calcium channel blockers (CCBs) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) trial was a factorial randomized controlled trial. A total of 11 140 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly assigned to fixed combination of perindopril-indapamide (4/1.25 mg) or placebo. Effects of randomized treatment on mortality and major cardiovascular outcomes were examined in subgroups defined by baseline use of CCBs. Patients on CCB at baseline (n=3427) constituted a higher risk group compared with those not on CCB (n=7713), with more extensive use of antihypertensive and other protective therapies. Active treatment reduced the relative risk of death by 28% (95% confidence interval, 10%-43%) among patients with CCB at baseline compared with 5% (-12% to 20%) among those without CCB (P homogeneity=0.02) and 14% (2%-25%) for the whole population. Similarly, the relative risk reduction for major cardiovascular events was 12% (-8% to 28%) versus 6% (-10% to 19%) for those with and without CCB at baseline although the difference was not statistically significant (P homogeneity=0.38). There was no detectable increase in adverse effects in those receiving CCB. The combination of perindopril and indapamide with CCBs seems to provide further protection against mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24324048

  10. Vascular restoration therapy and bioresorbable vascular scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of minimally invasive intervention technologies for vascular restoration therapy from early-stage balloon angioplasty in 1970s, metallic bare metal stent and metallic drug-eluting stent technologies in 1990s and 2000s, to bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) technology in large-scale development in recent years. The history, the current stage, the challenges and the future of BVS development are discussed in detail as the best available approach for vascular restoration therapy. The criteria of materials selection, design and processing principles of BVS, and the corresponding clinical trial results are also summarized in this article. PMID:26816624

  11. Vascular Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Hera; Goldie, Lauren C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of human stem and progenitor cells is critically important for the development and optimization of regenerative medicine strategies. For vascular regeneration studies, specifically, a true “vascular stem cell” population has not yet been identified. However, a number of cell types that exist endogenously, or can be generated or propagated ex vivo, function as vascular precursor cells and can participate in and/or promote vascular regeneration. Herein, we provide an overview of what is known about the regulation of their differentiation specifically toward a vascular endothelial cell phenotype. PMID:22866199

  12. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  13. Effect of propranolol on the splanchnic and peripheral renin angiotensin system in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Walkíria Wingester; Jr, Antônio Ribeiro-Oliveira; da Cunha Ribeiro, Renata; Vieira, Renata Lúcia Pereira; Almeida, Jerusa; Nadu, Ana Paula; Silva, Ana Cristina Simões e; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of β-blockade on angiotensins in the splanchnic and peripheral circulation of cirrhotic patients and also to compare hemodynamic parameters during liver transplantation according to propranolol pre-treatment or not. METHODS: Patients were allocated into two groups: outpatients with advanced liver disease(LD) and during liver transplantation(LT). Both groups were subdivided according to treatment with propranolol or not. Plasma was collected through peripheral venipuncture to determine plasma renin activity(PRA), Angiotensin(Ang) I, Ang II, and Ang-(1-7) levels by radioimmunoassay in LD group. During liver transplantation, hemodynamic parameters were determined and blood samples were obtained from the portal vein to measure renin angiotensin system(RAS) components. RESULTS: PRA, Ang I, Ang II and Ang-(1-7) were significantly lower in the portal vein and periphery in all subgroups treated with propranolol as compared to non-treated. The relationships between Ang-(1-7) and Ang I levels and between Ang II and Ang I were significantly increased in LD group receiving propranolol. The ratio between Ang-(1-7) and Ang II remained unchanged in splanchnic and peripheral circulation in patients under β-blockade, whereas the relationship between Ang II and Ang I was significantly increased in splanchnic circulation of LT patients treated with propranolol. During liver transplantation, cardiac output and index as well systemic vascular resistance and index were reduced in propranolol-treated subgroup. CONCLUSION: In LD group, propranolol treatment reduced RAS mediators, but did not change the ratio between Ang-(1-7) and Ang II in splanchnic and peripheral circulation. Furthermore, the modification of hemodynamic parameters in propranolol treated patients was not associated with changes in the angiotensin ratio. PMID:19058308

  14. [Novel mechanism for retinal vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Suzuma, Kiyoshi

    2015-03-01

    I. A new therapeutic target for diabetic retinopathy. Recent reports state that succinate may be an independent retinal angiogenic factor. We evaluated concentrations in vitreous from proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), and found that succinate increased significantly in PDR. Interestingly, levels of succinate from bevacizumab-pre-injected PDR were normal, suggesting that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) had a positive feedback mechanism for succinate since succinate was previously reported to induce VEGF. II. A new understanding of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). We evaluated retinal blood flow velocity with laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG) made in Japan, and found that cases in which both macular edema and retinal blood flow velocity improved after anti-VEGF therapy had better prognosis. In ischemic CRVO at final visit, mean retinal blood velocity was less than 50% of fellow eyes after 1st anti-VEGF therapy, suggesting that those cases might have poor prognosis. LSFG is useful for evaluation and decision in CRVO treatment. III. From exploration for mechanism in retinal vascular diseases to re-vascularization therapy. The standard treatment for retinal non-perfusion area is scatter laser photocoagulation, which is both invasive of the peripheral retina and may prove destructive. Re-vascularization is an ideal strategy for treatment of retinal non-perfusion area. To develop a new methods for re-vascularization in retinal non-perfusion area, we have designed experiments using a retina without vasculature differentiated from induced pluripotent stem(iPS) cells. PMID:25854111

  15. Microfluidic Techniques for Development of 3D Vascularized Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Anwarul; Paul, Arghya; Vrana, Nihal Engin; Zhao, Xin; Memic, Adnan; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Development of a vascularized tissue is one of the key challenges for the successful clinical application of tissue engineered constructs. Despite the significant efforts over the last few decades, establishing a gold standard to develop three dimensional (3D) vascularized tissues has still remained far from reality. Recent advances in the application of microfluidic platforms to the field of tissue engineering have greatly accelerated the progress toward the development of viable vascularized tissue constructs. Numerous techniques have emerged to induce the formation of vascular structure within tissues which can be broadly classified into two distinct categories, namely (1) prevascularization-based techniques and (2) vasculogenesis and angiogenesis-based techniques. This review presents an overview of the recent advancements in the vascularization techniques using both approaches for generating 3D vascular structure on microfluidic platforms. PMID:24906345

  16. Strategic Plan for Lung Vascular Research

    PubMed Central

    Erzurum, Serpil; Rounds, Sharon I.; Stevens, Troy; Aldred, Micheala; Aliotta, Jason; Archer, Stephen L.; Asosingh, Kewal; Balaban, Robert; Bauer, Natalie; Bhattacharya, Jahar; Bogaard, Harm; Choudhary, Gaurav; Dorn, Gerald W.; Dweik, Raed; Fagan, Karen; Fallon, Michael; Finkel, Toren; Geraci, Mark; Gladwin, Mark T.; Hassoun, Paul M.; Humbert, Marc; Kaminski, Naftali; Kawut, Steven M.; Loscalzo, Joseph; McDonald, Donald; McMurtry, Ivan F.; Newman, John; Nicolls, Mark; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Shizuru, Judy; Oka, Masahiko; Polgar, Peter; Rodman, David; Schumacker, Paul; Stenmark, Kurt; Tuder, Rubin; Voelkel, Norbert; Sullivan, Eugene; Weinshilboum, Richard; Yoder, Mervin C.; Zhao, Yingming; Gail, Dorothy; Moore, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    The Division of Lung Diseases of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, with the Office of Rare Diseases Research, held a workshop to identify priority areas and strategic goals to enhance and accelerate research that will result in improved understanding of the lung vasculature, translational research needs, and ultimately the care of patients with pulmonary vascular diseases. Multidisciplinary experts with diverse experience in laboratory, translational, and clinical studies identified seven priority areas and discussed limitations in our current knowledge, technologies, and approaches. The focus for future research efforts include the following: (1) better characterizing vascular genotype–phenotype relationships and incorporating systems biology approaches when appropriate; (2) advancing our understanding of pulmonary vascular metabolic regulatory signaling in health and disease; (3) expanding our knowledge of the biologic relationships between the lung circulation and circulating elements, systemic vascular function, and right heart function and disease; (4) improving translational research for identifying disease-modifying therapies for the pulmonary hypertensive diseases; (5) establishing an appropriate and effective platform for advancing translational findings into clinical studies testing; and (6) developing the specific technologies and tools that will be enabling for these goals, such as question-guided imaging techniques and lung vascular investigator training programs. Recommendations from this workshop will be used within the Lung Vascular Biology and Disease Extramural Research Program for planning and strategic implementation purposes. PMID:20833821

  17. Lipidomics in vascular health: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kolovou, Genovefa; Kolovou, Vana; Mavrogeni, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms that convert a healthy vascular wall to an atherosclerotic wall is of major importance since the consequences may lead to a shortened lifespan. Classical risk factors (age, smoking, obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia) may result in the progression of atherosclerotic lesions by processes including inflammation and lipid accumulation. Thus, the evaluation of blood lipids and the full lipid complement produced by cells, organisms, or tissues (lipidomics) is an issue of importance. In this review, we shall describe the recent progress in vascular health research using lipidomic advances. We will begin with an overview of vascular wall biology and lipids, followed by a short analysis of lipidomics. Finally, we shall focus on the clinical implications of lipidomics and studies that have examined lipidomic approaches and vascular health. PMID:26109865

  18. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. Such people should seek medical care immediately. Did You Know... When people suddenly develop a painful, ... In This Article Animation 1 Peripheral Arterial Disease Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  19. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  20. Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  1. Permanent Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The health risks and side effects of fluoroquinolone use include the risk of tendon rupture and myasthenia gravis exacerbation, and on August 15, 2013, the Food and Drug Administration updated its warning to include the risk of permanent peripheral neuropathy. We present a case of fluoroquinolone-induced peripheral neuropathy in a patient treated for clinically diagnosed urinary tract infection with ciprofloxacin antibiotic. PMID:26425618

  2. Arterial structure and function in vascular ageing: are you as old as your arteries?

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Carter, Sophie E; Green, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Advancing age may be the most potent independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, a relationship that is not fully explained by time-related changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Since some arteries exhibit differential susceptibility to atherosclerosis, generalisations regarding the impact of ageing in humans may be overly simplistic, whereas in vivo assessment of arterial function and health provide direct insight. Coronary and peripheral (conduit, resistance and skin) arteries demonstrate a gradual, age-related impairment in vascular function that is likely to be related to a reduction in endothelium-derived nitric oxide bioavailability and/or increased production of vasoconstrictors (e.g. endothelin-1). Increased exposure and impaired ability for defence mechanisms to resist oxidative stress and inflammation, but also cellular senescence processes, may contribute to age-related changes in vascular function and health. Arteries also undergo structural changes as they age. Gradual thickening of the arterial wall, changes in wall content (i.e. less elastin, advanced glycation end-products) and increase in conduit artery diameter are observed with older age and occur similarly in central and peripheral arteries. These changes in structure have important interactive effects on artery function, with increases in small and large arterial stiffness representing a characteristic change with older age. Importantly, direct measures of arterial function and structure predict future cardiovascular events, independent of age or other cardiovascular risk factors. Taken together, and given the differential susceptibility of arteries to atherosclerosis in humans, direct measurement of arterial function and health may help to distinguish between biological and chronological age-related change in arterial health in humans. PMID:26140618

  3. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  4. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  5. Correlation among soluble receptors for advanced glycation end-products, soluble vascular adhesion protein-1/semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (sVAP-1) and cardiometabolic risk markers in apparently healthy adolescents: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gurecká, Radana; Koborová, Ivana; Csongová, Melinda; Šebek, Jozef; Šebeková, Katarína

    2016-08-01

    In non-diabetics, low levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycations end products (sRAGE) associate with an increased risk of development of diabetes, cardiovascular afflictions, or death. The majority of studies in non-diabetics report an inverse relationship between measures of obesity, cardiometabolic risk factors and sRAGE and/or endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE) levels. To elucidate whether this inconsistency is related to the metabolically healthy obese phenotype, or a different impact of the risk factors in presence and absence of obesity, we analyzed data from 2206 apparently healthy adolescents (51 % girls) aged 15-to-19 years. The association of sRAGE levels with soluble vascular adhesion protein-1/semicarbazide sensitive amine oxidase (sVAP-1/SSAO) was also investigated. Centrally obese, including metabolically healthy, adolescents present significantly lower sRAGE and esRAGE, but not sVAP-1, levels in comparison with their lean counterparts. An increasing number of cardiometabolic risk factors did not associate with significant changes in sRAGE, esRAGE or sVAP-1 levels either in lean or in obese subjects. In multivariate analyses, WHtR, hsCRP, markers of glucose homeostasis, renal function, adiponectin, and sVAP-1 associated significantly with sRAGE and esRAGE. SVAP-1 correlated significantly with glycemia, adiponectin, hsCRP, and sRAGE. Thus, in adolescents, a decline in sRAGE and esRAGE precedes the development of metabolic syndrome. When combined, standard and non-standard cardiometabolic risk factors explain only minor proportion in a variability of sRAGE and esRAGE (8 %-11 %); or sVAP-1 (12 %-20 %). Elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms underlying early decline in sRAGE and esRAGE levels in obese adolescents and their clinical impact with regard to future cardiometabolic health requires further studies. PMID:27300745

  6. Gene expression differences during the heterogeneous progression of peripheral atherosclerosis in familial hypercholesterolemic swine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The heterogeneous progression of atherosclerotic disease in the peripheral arteries is currently not well understood. In humans, artery specific disease progression is partly attributed to the local hemodynamic environments. However, despite similar hemodynamic environments, porcine brachial arteries are protected while femoral arteries are highly susceptible to advanced lesion formation. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether artery specific gene expression patterns contribute to the uneven distribution of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in Rapacz Familial-Hypercholesterolemic (FHC) swine. Results Histological results confirmed rapid atherosclerotic disease progression in femoral but not brachial arteries. A total of 18,922 probe sets had sufficient signal abundance. A main effect for age and artery was observed for 1784 and 1256 probe sets, respectively. A significant age x artery interaction was found for 184 probe sets. Furthermore, comparison between arteries found a decrease from 714 to 370 differentially expressed transcripts from nine months to two years of age. Gene ontology analysis of the 56 genes with a main effect for artery and an age x artery interaction identified vascular smooth muscle contraction as enhanced biological signaling pathway. Conclusion This is the first investigation to report that the total number of differential genes decreases with diverging atherosclerotic disease pattern between porcine brachial and femoral arteries. PMID:23822099

  7. Vascular Tissue Engineering: Building Perfusable Vasculature for Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Liqiong; Niklason, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue and organ replacement is required when there are no alternative therapies available. Although vascular tissue engineering was originally developed to meet the clinical demands of small-diameter vascular conduits as bypass grafts, it has evolved into a highly advanced field where perfusable vasculatures are generated for implantation. Herein, we review several cutting-edge techniques that have led to implantable human blood vessels in clinical trials, the novel approaches that build complex perfusable microvascular networks in functional tissues, the use of stem cells to generate endothelial cells for vascularization, as well as the challenges in bringing vascular tissue engineering technologies into the clinics. PMID:24533306

  8. Drugs for the treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are frequent in association with systemic diseases as well as isolated disorders. Recent advances in the therapy of specific neuropathies led to the approval of new drugs/treatments. This review selected those peripheral neuropathies where the most recent approvals were provided and revised the potential future developments in diabetic and toxic-induced neuropathies, although they do not have a currently available causal therapy in view of their epidemiological and social relevance. Data have been extracted from the most important published trials and from clinical experience. In addition, data from the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency indications on the treatment of the selected peripheral neuropathies and from recently updated international guidelines have also been included. The website of the U.S. National Institutes of Health www.clinicaltrials.gov registry has been used as the reference database for phase III clinical trials not yet published or ongoing. This review gives a general overview of the most recent advances in the treatment of amyloid, inflammatory, and paraproteinemic peripheral neuropathies. Moreover, it briefly describes the unmet medical need in disabling and frequent conditions, such as diabetic and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, highlighting the most promising therapeutic approaches to their treatment. PMID:26567516

  9. Restenosis: a challenge for vascular surgeon.

    PubMed

    Setacci, C; Castelli, P; Chiesa, R; Grego, F; Simoni, G A; Stella, A; Galzerano, G; Sirignano, P; De Donato, G; Setacci, F

    2012-12-01

    From the beginning of the cardiovascular surgery to the endovascular era restenosis represents the main problem of several spreading vascular disciplines. It can be considered as an excessive wound healing reaction of target vessel of revascularization procedures, that leads to a new narrowing of the vascular lumen. Restenosis still represents the main limiting factor of the long-term success of revascularization procedures. Prevention and strict follow-up are well established techniques in order to reduce restenosis rate and clinical impact of this condition. New drugs as cilostazol have been proven beneficial for patients with de novo lesions of peripheral arteries and cilostazol seems to avoid restenosis process in the majority of patients. PMID:23207556

  10. [A peripheral osteoma].

    PubMed

    Mizbah, K; Soehardi, A; Maal, T J J; Weijs, W L J; Merkx, M A W; Barkhuysen, R

    2012-02-01

    A 43-year-old man appeared with a painless, asymptomatic swelling on the left side of his neck, which had existed for years and had slowly been progressing. After surgical removal, it became clear that it had to do with a peripheral osteoma. This is a benign lesion with a low incidence. Generally, complete surgical removal leads to cure, although recurrence is possible. A peripheral osteoma is mostly located in the mandible, although peripheral osteomata in the frontal or maxillary sinus have been described. The aetiology is unknown. Trauma in the patient's history has been described on occasion. The presence of multiple osteomata in the jawbones is characteristic of Gardner's syndrome. PMID:22428273

  11. [Wounds in vascular and metabolic diseases].

    PubMed

    Leskovec, Nada Kecelj; Huljev, Dubravko; Matoh, Marijetka

    2012-10-01

    There are many causes of leg ulcer development; however, vascular etiology is most commonly involved. Venous or lymphatic causes underlay 80% and arterial or arteriovenous causes 20%-25% of cases. Over years, the prevalence of arteriovenous ulcers has increased due to the increased prevalence of peripheral arterial disease. Concerning metabolic reasons, diabetes is the most common underlying disease leading to ulcer formation, whereas calciphylaxis is a very rare one. In addition to the general principles of local ulcer therapy, additional therapy treating the cause of ulcer is necessary. Therapy of leg ulcers is manly interdisciplinary and should include a dermatologist, surgeon, internal medicine specialist, radiologist, general practitioner. PMID:23193829

  12. Radiographic Findings Associated with Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Masand, Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of patients with vascular tumors and malformations has been sufficiently refined to answer pertinent questions when making treatment decisions in this challenging subgroup of pediatric patients. The imaging modalities at hand include conventional radiography, Doppler ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging with time-resolved, contrast-material enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. This review article will focus on the characteristic imaging features of some focal and diffuse vascular lesions, which have been classified by their clinical history and physical exam, and further labeled as a vascular tumor or slow-flow versus high-flow vascular malformation based on the updated classification system proposed by the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies. The recent advances in knowledge regarding the biology of these vascular anomalies have led to increased awareness of the current nomenclature. Moreover, with better understanding of the imaging features, the radiologist has become a key player in the multidisciplinary approach offered at various institutions where appropriate treatment algorithms and interventional strategies are put together. This is crucial in avoiding misdiagnosis and improper management. PMID:25045332

  13. Painful Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Marchettini, P; Lacerenza, M; Mauri, E; Marangoni, C

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases affecting peripheral nerves. The causes are multiple: hereditary, metabolic, infectious, inflammatory, toxic, traumatic. The temporal profile includes acute, subacute and chronic conditions. The majority of peripheral neuropathies cause mainly muscle weakness and sensory loss, positive sensory symptoms and sometimes pain. When pain is present, however, it is usually extremely intense and among the most disabling symptoms for the patients. In addition, the neurological origin of the pain is often missed and patients receive inadequate or delayed specific treatment. Independently of the disease causing the peripheral nerve injury, pain originating from axonal pathology or ganglionopathy privileges neuropathies affecting smaller fibres, a clinical observation that points towards abnormal activity within nociceptive afferents as a main generator of pain. Natural activation of blood vessels or perineurial nociceptive network by pathology also causes intense pain. Pain of this kind, i.e. nerve trunk pain, is among the heralding symptoms of inflammatory or ischemic mononeuropathy and for its intensity represents itself a medical emergency. Neuropathic pain quality rekindles the psychophysical experience of peripheral nerves intraneural microstimulation i.e. a combination of large and small fibres sensation temporally distorted compared to physiological perception evoked by natural stimuli. Pins and needles, burning, cramping mixed with numbness, and tingling are the wording most used by patients. Nociceptive pain instead is most often described as aching, deep and dull. Good command of peripheral nerve anatomy and pathophysiology allows timely recognition of the different pain components and targeted treatment, selected according to intensity, type and temporal profile of the pain. PMID:18615140

  14. Computer aided diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekh, Viktor; Soliz, Peter; McGrew, Elizabeth; Barriga, Simon; Burge, Mark; Luan, Shuang

    2014-03-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) refers to the nerve damage that can occur in diabetes patients. It most often affects the extremities, such as the feet, and can lead to peripheral vascular disease, deformity, infection, ulceration, and even amputation. The key to managing diabetic foot is prevention and early detection. Unfortunately, current existing diagnostic techniques are mostly based on patient sensations and exhibit significant inter- and intra-observer differences. We have developed a computer aided diagnostic (CAD) system for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The thermal response of the feet of diabetic patients following cold stimulus is captured using an infrared camera. The plantar foot in the images from a thermal video are segmented and registered for tracking points or specific regions. The temperature recovery of each point on the plantar foot is extracted using our bio-thermal model and analyzed. The regions that exhibit abnormal ability to recover are automatically identified to aid the physicians to recognize problematic areas. The key to our CAD system is the segmentation of infrared video. The main challenges for segmenting infrared video compared to normal digital video are (1) as the foot warms up, it also warms up the surrounding, creating an ever changing contrast; and (2) there may be significant motion during imaging. To overcome this, a hybrid segmentation algorithm was developed based on a number of techniques such as continuous max-flow, model based segmentation, shape preservation, convex hull, and temperature normalization. Verifications of the automatic segmentation and registration using manual segmentation and markers show good agreement.

  15. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  16. Delivery of Polymeric Nanoparticles to Target Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Edward; Kandimalla, Karunyna

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in nanotechnology have paved the way for the early detection, prevention and treatment of various diseases such as vascular disorders and cancer. These advances have provided novel approaches or modalities of incorporating or adsorbing therapeutic, biosensor and targeting agents into/on nanoparticles. With significant progress, nanomedicine for vascular therapy has shown significant advantages over traditional medicine because of its ability to selectively target the disease site and reduce adverse side effects. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to vascular endothelial cells or the vascular wall provides an effective and more efficient way for early detection and/or treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis and Cerebrovascular Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA). Clinical applications of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers in areas such as vascular graft, implantable drug delivery, stent devices and tissue engineering scaffolds have advanced the candidature of polymers as potential nano-carriers for vascular-targeted delivery of diagnostic agents and drugs. This review focuses on the basic aspects of the vasculature and its associated diseases and relates them to polymeric nanoparticle-based strategies for targeting therapeutic agents to diseased vascular site. PMID:26069867

  17. [Vascular factors in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mottet, B; Aptel, F; Geiser, M; Romanet, J P; Chiquet, C

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of glaucoma is not fully understood. Understanding of the vascular pathophysiology of glaucoma requires: knowing the techniques for measuring ocular blood flow and characterizing the topography of vascular disease and the mechanisms involved in this neuropathy. A decreased mean ocular perfusion pressure and a loss of vascular autoregulation are implicated in glaucomatous disease. Early decrease in ocular blood flow has been identified in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal pressure glaucoma, contributing to the progression of optic neuropathy. The vascular damage associated with glaucoma is present in various vascular territories within the eye (from the ophthalmic artery to the retina) and is characterized by a decrease in basal blood flow associated with a dysfunction of vasoregulation. PMID:26597554

  18. Peripheral Nervous System Manifestations of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brizzi, Kate T.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious causes of peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease are underrecognized but potentially treatable. Heightened awareness educed by advanced understanding of the presentations and management of these infections can aid diagnosis and facilitate treatment. In this review, we discuss the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of common bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections that affect the PNS. We additionally detail PNS side effects of some frequently used antimicrobial agents. PMID:25360209

  19. Molecular Mechanisms for Vascular Development and Secondary Cell Wall Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung Hyun; Wang, Huanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular tissues are important for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant and as physical support of upright growth. The primary constituents of vascular tissues, xylem, and phloem, are derived from the meristematic vascular procambium and cambium. Xylem cells develop secondary cell walls (SCWs) that form the largest part of plant lignocellulosic biomass that serve as a renewable feedstock for biofuel production. For the last decade, research on vascular development and SCW biosynthesis has seen rapid progress due to the importance of these processes to plant biology and to the biofuel industry. Plant hormones, transcriptional regulators and peptide signaling regulate procambium/cambium proliferation, vascular patterning, and xylem differentiation. Transcriptional regulatory pathways play a pivot role in SCW biosynthesis. Although most of these discoveries are derived from research in Arabidopsis, many genes have shown conserved functions in biofuel feedstock species. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of vascular development and SCW formation and discuss potential biotechnological uses. PMID:27047525

  20. Molecular Mechanisms for Vascular Development and Secondary Cell Wall Formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung Hyun; Wang, Huanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular tissues are important for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant and as physical support of upright growth. The primary constituents of vascular tissues, xylem, and phloem, are derived from the meristematic vascular procambium and cambium. Xylem cells develop secondary cell walls (SCWs) that form the largest part of plant lignocellulosic biomass that serve as a renewable feedstock for biofuel production. For the last decade, research on vascular development and SCW biosynthesis has seen rapid progress due to the importance of these processes to plant biology and to the biofuel industry. Plant hormones, transcriptional regulators and peptide signaling regulate procambium/cambium proliferation, vascular patterning, and xylem differentiation. Transcriptional regulatory pathways play a pivot role in SCW biosynthesis. Although most of these discoveries are derived from research in Arabidopsis, many genes have shown conserved functions in biofuel feedstock species. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of vascular development and SCW formation and discuss potential biotechnological uses. PMID:27047525

  1. Vascular Radiology in Trauma: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Anthony A.

    2004-03-15

    It's been 30 years since an endovascular technique to control traumatic hemorrhage was first described. Despite major technical advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic technology, and a great deal of experience since then, endovascular techniques are rarely considered as part of frontline management for vascular trauma. This review considers the literature and calls for better planning and implementation of diagnostic and image=guided therapeutic facilities. Endovascular techniques should be an essential part of vascular trauma management along with endovascular specialists, partners in trauma teams.

  2. Barriers of the peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, Sirkku; Alanne, Maria; Peltonen, Juha

    2013-01-01

    This review introduces the traditionally defined anatomic compartments of the peripheral nerves based on light and electron microscopic topography and then explores the cellular and the most recent molecular basis of the different barrier functions operative in peripheral nerves. We also elucidate where, and how, the homeostasis of the normal human peripheral nerve is controlled in situ and how claudin-containing tight junctions contribute to the barriers of peripheral nerve. Also, the human timeline of the development of the barriers of the peripheral nerve is depicted. Finally, potential future therapeutic modalities interfering with the barriers of the peripheral nerve are discussed. PMID:24665400

  3. Treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Tandon, D; Berardelli, A

    1985-01-01

    There are three general approaches to treatment of peripheral neuropathy. First, an attempt should be made to reverse the pathophysiological process if its nature can be elucidated. Second, nerve metabolism can be stimulated and regeneration encouraged. Third, even if the neuropathy itself cannot be improved, symptomatic therapy can be employed. This review outlines the options available for each approach. PMID:3003254

  4. Peripheral neuropathies 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Assal, J.P.; Liniger, C.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present results and experience in sixteen specific disciplines related to the study of nerve physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment. Twenty-two different peripheral neuropathies are presented, and different models related to health care strategies are discussed. The authors report on Inflammatory and autoimmune neuropathies and Genetic neuropathies.

  5. Depressive behavior and vascular dysfunction: a link between clinical depression and vascular disease?

    PubMed Central

    d'Audiffret, Alexandre C.; Frisbee, Stephanie J.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Goodwill, Adam G.; Isingrini, Elsa

    2010-01-01

    As chronic stress and depression have become recognized as significant risk factors for peripheral vascular disease in patients with no prior history of vasculopathy, we interrogated this relationship utilizing an established mouse model of chronic stress/depressive symptoms from behavioral research. Male mice were exposed to 8 wk of unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS; e.g., wet bedding, predator sound/smell, random disruption of light/dark cycle), with indexes of depressive behavior (coat status, grooming, and mobility) becoming exacerbated vs. controls. In vascular rings, constrictor (phenylephrine) and endothelium-independent dilator (sodium nitroprusside) responses were not different between groups, although endothelium-dependent dilation (methacholine) was attenuated with UCMS. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition was without effect in UCMS but nearly abolished reactivity in controls, while cyclooxygenase inhibition blunted dilation in both. Combined blockade abolished reactivity in controls, although a significant dilation remained in UCMS that was abolished by catalase. Arterial NO production was attenuated by UCMS, although H2O2 production was increased. UCMS mice demonstrated an increased, although variable, insulin resistance and inflammation. However, while UCMS-induced vascular impairments were consistent, the predictive power of aggregate plasma levels of insulin, TNF-α, IL-1β, and C-reactive peptide were limited. However, when separated into tertiles with regard to vascular outcomes, insulin resistance and hypertension were predictive of the most severe vascular impairments. Taken together, these data suggest that aggregate insulin resistance, inflammation, and hypertension in UCMS mice are not robust predictors of vascular dysfunction, suggesting that unidentified mechanisms may be superior predictors of poor vascular outcomes in this model. PMID:20167667

  6. High-mobility group box 1 protein is implicated in advanced glycation end products–induced vascular endothelial growth factor A production in the rat retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Jer; Hsiao, Chang-Chun; Yang, I-Hui; Chou, Ming-Huei; Wu, Chia-Lin; Wei, Yin-Chu; Chen, Chih-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) has been reported to be a potent proangiogenic factor induced by inflammatory stress. In this study, we explore the role of HMGB1 in advanced glycation end products (AGEs)–induced vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) production in rat retinal ganglion cell line 5 (RGC-5) cells. Methods The VEGF-A protein and mRNA levels in conditioned medium of RGC-5 cells incubated with AGE-modified BSA (AGE-BSA) were examined with real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and BSA-treated cells were used as controls. The expression of HMGB1, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) was assessed with immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) were detected with flow cytometry measurements of peroxide-dependent oxidation of 2′-7′-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), glycyrrhizin (GZ), and SP600125 were used to block ROS, HMGB1, and JNK, respectively. Results Compared with the BSA controls, the RGC-5 cells incubated with AGE-BSA showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in VEGF-A mRNA and VEGF-A protein secretion in the supernatant, with the highest levels achieved at 24 h. AGE-BSA stimulated a significant release of HMGB1 in the supernatant and a significant increase of intracellular ROS production at 3 h. NAC blocked HMGB1 production in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking with GZ, NAC, and JNK significantly suppressed AGE-induced VEGF-A production. Conclusions HMGB1 is implicated in the production of VEGF-A in retinal ganglion cell line-5 (RGC-5). Blocking HMGB1, ROS, or the JNK pathway may attenuate VEGF-A production, suggesting HMGB1 and related signaling molecules play a role in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:22511847

  7. Effects of Hemodynamic Forces on the Vascular Differentiation of Stem Cells: Implications for Vascular Graft Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, Rokhaya; Li, Song

    Although the field of vascular tissue engineering has made tremendous advances in the past decade, several complications have yet to be overcome in order to produce biocompatible small-diameter vascular conduits with long-term patency. Stem cells and progenitor cells represent potential cell sources in the development of autologous (or allogeneic), nonthrombogenic vascular grafts with mechanical properties comparable to native blood vessel. However, a better understanding of the effects of mechanical forces on stem cells and progenitor cells is needed to properly utilize these cells for tissue engineering applications. In this chapter, we discuss the current understanding of the effects of hemodynamic forces on the differentiation and function of adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and progenitor cells. We also review the use of stem cells and progenitor cells in vascular graft engineering.

  8. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  9. Arginase and vascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Lakshmi; Christianson, David W.; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2008-01-01

    Vascular and associated ventricular stiffness is one of the hallmarks of the aging cardiovascular system. Both an increase in reactive oxygen species production and a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability contribute to the endothelial dysfunction that underlies this vascular stiffness, independent of other age-related vascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis. The activation/upregulation of arginase appears to be an important contributor to age-related endothelial dysfunction by a mechanism that involves substrate (l-arginine) limitation for NO synthase (NOS) 3 and therefore NO synthesis. Not only does this lead to impaired NO production but also it contributes to the enhanced production of reactive oxygen species by NOS. Although arginase abundance is increased in vascular aging models, it appears that posttranslational modification by S-nitrosylation of the enzyme enhances its activity as well. The S-nitrosylation is mediated by the induction of NOS2 in the endothelium. Furthermore, arginase activation contributes to aging-related vascular changes by mechanisms that are not directly related to changes in NO signaling, including polyamine-dependent vascular smooth muscle proliferation and collagen synthesis. Taken together, arginase may represent an as yet elusive target for the modification of age-related vascular and ventricular stiffness contributing to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:18719233

  10. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with ... developing atherosclerosis, the most common cause of peripheral artery disease (PAD) . And individuals with PAD have a ...

  11. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; Peroneal artery - ...

  12. Vascular anomalies: classification, diagnosis, and natural history.

    PubMed

    Marler, J J; Mulliken, J B

    2001-11-01

    In the past, patients with vascular anomalies went from one physician to another. No one seemed to understand the condition, and sometimes the child was harmed by the wrong treatment. Now interdisciplinary vascular anomalies centers are organizing. The disciplines may differ, depending on local interest and capabilities. Such teams form a critical mass for proper diagnosis, therapy, and clinical/basic research. The advances in genetics are leading the way to a molecular understanding of vascular anomalies, and someday, molecular-based, novel therapy. The Internet also has had a major impact on this field. Because of continued confusion about diagnosis and therapy, cyber-savvy parents will self-refer to specialists. Family support groups have arisen and provide commendable service to these patients. PMID:17590938

  13. Medial Arterial Calcification: An Overlooked Player in Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chin Yee; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a global health issue that is becoming more prevalent in an aging world population. Diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease are also on the increase, and both are associated with accelerated vascular calcification and an unfavorable prognosis in PAD. These data challenge the traditional athero-centric view of PAD, instead pointing toward a disease process complicated by medial arterial calcification. Like atherosclerosis, aging is a potent risk factor for medial arterial calcification, and accelerated vascular aging may underpin the devastating manifestations of PAD, particularly in patients prone to calcification. Consequently, this review will attempt to dissect the relationship between medial arterial calcification and atherosclerosis in PAD and identify common as well as novel risk factors that may contribute to and accelerate progression of PAD. In this context, we focus on the complex interplay between oxidative stress, DNA damage, and vascular aging, as well as the unexplored role of neuropathy. PMID:27312224

  14. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  15. Implications of Vascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Barodka, Viachaslau M.; Joshi, Brijen L.; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Hogue, Charles W.; Nyhan, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Chronological age is a well established risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. The changes that accumulate in the vasculature with age, though, are highly variable. It is now increasingly recognized that indices of vascular health are more reliable than age per se in predicting adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The variation in the accrual of these age-related vascular changes is a function of multiple genetic and environmental factors. In this review, we highlight some of the pathophysiological mechanisms that characterize the vascular aging phenotype. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the key outcome studies that address the value of these vascular health indices in general and discuss potential effects on perioperative cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:21474663

  16. Vascular Access for Hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... short-term use. [ Top ] What is an arteriovenous fistula? An AV fistula is a connection, made by a vascular surgeon, ... vessel surgery. The surgeon usually places an AV fistula in the forearm or upper arm. An AV ...

  17. Women and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Patient information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Women and Vascular Disease Early Warning Symptom for ... major public health issue, the Society of Interventional Radiology recommends greater screening efforts by the medical community ...

  18. Diversity in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Karen; Kalata, Emily A; Hingorani, Anil P

    2012-12-01

    A growing body of literature in vascular surgery demonstrates disparities in the type of health care that racial/ethnic minorities receive in the United States. Numerous recommendations, including those of the Institute of Medicine, have been set forth, which identify increasing the number of minority health professionals as a key strategy to eliminating health disparities. The purpose of this study is to compare the racial/ethnic distribution of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) membership, the SVS leadership, vascular surgery trainees, and medical students. The results demonstrate that the racial/ethnic distribution of the SVS membership reflects a considerable lack of diversity with a paucity of diversity among the SVS leadership. An increasing rate of racial/ethnic diversity among vascular surgery trainees may indicate that the SVS will see an improvement in diversity in the future. PMID:23182481

  19. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  20. Vascular structures in dermoscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ayhan, Erhan; Ucmak, Derya; Akkurt, ZeynepMeltem

    2015-01-01

    Dermoscopy is an aiding method in the visualization of the epidermis and dermis. It is usually used to diagnose melanocytic lesions. In recent years, dermoscopy has increasingly been used to diagnose non-melanocytic lesions. Certain vascular structures, their patterns of arrangement and additional criteria may demonstrate lesion-specific characteristics. In this review, vascular structures and their arrangements are discussed separately in the light of conflicting views and an overview of recent literature. PMID:26375224

  1. Vascular Effects of Histamine.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, Anthony B; Talabi, Olufunke O

    2014-01-01

    Four subtypes of receptors (H1, H2, H3 and H4) mediate the actions of histamine. In the vascular wall, the effects of histamine are mediated via H1 and H2 receptors and the actions are modulated by H3 receptor subtype located on presynaptic neurones. Alterations in vascular responses to histamine are associated with experimental as well as a human form of hypertension, suggesting a role for histanine in cardiovascular regulation. PMID:26196559

  2. [Zaidemberg's vascularized radial graft].

    PubMed

    Saint-Cast, Y

    2010-12-01

    In 1991, Carlos Zaidemberg described a new technique to repair scaphoid non-unions with a vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process. An anatomic study based on 30 dissections after colorized latex injection established the constancy of the radial styloid process's artery, while showing that its origin, course and length were subject to variations. In a retrospective series of 38 cases over a period of 10 years, the vascularized bone graft was indicated for: (1) scaphoid non-union with the presence of avascular changes of the proximal fragment (23 cases); (2) failed prior reconstruction with bone graft and internal fixation (nine cases); (3) degenerative styloid-scaphoid arthritis (three cases); (4) fracture on Preiser dystrophy (three cases). The five steps of the simplified operative technique without dissection of the vascular pedicle include: (1) longitudinal dorso-radial approach, identification of the periosteal portion of the radial styloid process artery; (2) incision of the first and second compartments, longitudinal arthrotomy under the second compartment; (3) styloidectomy and transversal resection of the scaphoid non-union and sclerotic bone; (4) elevation of the vascularized bone graft; (5) transversal and radial insertion of the vascularized bone graft, osteosynthesis by two or three K-wire touching the scaphoid's radial edge. Scaphoid union was obtained in 33 cases out of 38. The only postoperative complications were two transient radial paresthesia. The standardized surgical procedure using vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process provides an efficient scaphoid reconstruction. PMID:21087882

  3. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  4. Immunotherapy in Peripheral Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Léger, Jean-Marc; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Muntean, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been investigated in a small subset of peripheral neuropathies, including an acute one, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 3 chronic forms: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and neuropathy associated with IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein. Several experimental studies and clinical data are strongly suggestive of an immune-mediated pathogenesis. Either cell-mediated mechanisms or antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin, or nodal antigens are considered to act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves. Immunomodulatory treatments used in these neuropathies aim to act at various steps of this pathogenic process. However, there are many phenotypic variants and, consequently, there is a significant difference in the response to immunotherapy between these neuropathies, as well as a need to improve our knowledge and long-term management of chronic forms. PMID:26602549

  5. [Ganglia of peripheral nerves].

    PubMed

    Tatagiba, M; Penkert, G; Samii, M

    1993-01-01

    The authors present two different types of ganglion affecting the peripheral nerves: extraneural and intraneural ganglion. Compression of peripheral nerves by articular ganglions is well known. The surgical management involves the complete removal of the lesion with preservation of most nerve fascicles. Intraneural ganglion is an uncommon lesion which affects the nerve diffusely. The nerve fascicles are usually intimately involved between the cysts, making complete removal of all cysts impossible. There is no agreement about the best surgical management to be applied in these cases. Two possibilities are available: opening of the epineural sheath lengthwise and pressing out the lesion; or resection of the affected part of the nerve and performing a nerve reconstruction. While in case of extraneural ganglion the postoperative clinical evolution is very favourable, only long follow up studies will reveal in case of intraneural ganglion the best surgical approach. PMID:8128785

  6. Chapter 11: Tissue engineering of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Battiston, Bruno; Raimondo, Stefania; Tos, Pierluigi; Gaidano, Valentina; Audisio, Chiara; Scevola, Anna; Perroteau, Isabelle; Geuna, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering of peripheral nerves has seen an increasing interest over the last years and, similarly to many other fields of regenerative medicine, great expectations have risen within the general public to its potential clinical application in the treatment of damaged nerves. However, in spite of the scientific advancements, applications to the patients is still very limited and it appears that to optimize the strategy for the tissue engineering of the peripheral nerves in the clinical view, researchers have to strive for a new level of innovation which will bring together (in a multitranslational approach) the main pillars of tissue engineering: namely (1) microsurgery, (2) cell and tissue transplantation, (3) material science, and (4) gene transfer. This review paper provides an overview of these four key approaches to peripheral nerve tissue engineering. While some of these issues will also be specifically addressed in other papers in this special issue on peripheral nerve regeneration of the International Review of Neurobiology, in this paper we will focus on an example of successful translational research in tissue engineering, namely nerve reconstruction by muscle-vein-combined nerve scaffolds. PMID:19682640

  7. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009. (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 59 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents; bypass surgery; cilostazol; exercise; pentoxifylline; percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA); prostaglandins; smoking cessation; and statins. PMID:19454099

  8. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010. Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review. We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 70 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents, bypass surgery, cilostazol, exercise, pentoxifylline, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), prostaglandins, smoking cessation, and statins. PMID:21477401

  9. Alteration in systemic vascular resistance and cardiac output during acute cellular rejection and recovery in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Garan, Arthur R; Uriel, Nir; Sayer, Gabriel; Sims, Daniel; Zahner, Doris; Farr, Maryjane; Mancini, Donna; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2010-03-01

    Coronary vascular reserve is impaired during acute cellular rejection of the orthotopically transplanted heart, but changes in the peripheral vasculature during rejection have not been well described. To investigate whether peripheral vascular compensatory mechanisms are preserved after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT), we longitudinally observed systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and cardiac output (CO) during acute cellular rejection. CO decreased during high-grade acute cellular rejection, and maintenance of mean arterial pressure was achieved by increases in SVR, and these changes did not return to baseline until several months after histologic resolution of rejection. PMID:19875310

  10. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies. PMID:26585821

  11. Preoperative optimization of the vascular surgery patient.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Henry T; Purcell, Seth T; Bush, Ruth L

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that patients who suffer from peripheral (noncardiac) vascular disease often have coexisting atherosclerotic diseases of the heart. This may leave the patients susceptible to major adverse cardiac events, including death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and pulmonary edema, during the perioperative time period, in addition to the many other complications they may sustain as they undergo vascular surgery procedures, regardless of whether the procedure is performed as an open or endovascular modality. As these patients are at particularly high risk, up to 16% in published studies, for postoperative cardiac complications, many proposals and algorithms for perioperative optimization have been suggested and studied in the literature. Moreover, in patients with recent coronary stents, the risk of non-cardiac surgery on adverse cardiac events is incremental in the first 6 months following stent implantation. Just as postoperative management of patients is vital to the outcome of a patient, preoperative assessment and optimization may reduce, and possibly completely alleviate, the risks of major postoperative complications, as well as assist in the decision-making process regarding the appropriate surgical and anesthetic management. This review article addresses several tools and therapies that treating physicians may employ to medically optimize a patient before they undergo noncardiac vascular surgery. PMID:26170688

  12. Gasotransmitters in Vascular Complications of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    van den Born, Joost C; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Greffrath, Wolfgang; van Goor, Harry; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    2016-02-01

    In the past decades three gaseous signaling molecules-so-called gasotransmitters-have been identified: nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). These gasotransmitters are endogenously produced by different enzymes in various cell types and play an important role in physiology and disease. Despite their specific functions, all gasotransmitters share the capacity to reduce oxidative stress, induce angiogenesis, and promote vasorelaxation. In patients with diabetes, a lower bioavailability of the different gasotransmitters is observed when compared with healthy individuals. As yet, it is unknown whether this reduction precedes or results from diabetes. The increased risk for vascular disease in patients with diabetes, in combination with the extensive clinical, financial, and societal burden, calls for action to either prevent or improve the treatment of vascular complications. In this Perspective, we present a concise overview of the current data on the bioavailability of gasotransmitters in diabetes and their potential role in the development and progression of diabetes-associated microvascular (retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy) and macrovascular (cerebrovascular, coronary artery, and peripheral arterial diseases) complications. Gasotransmitters appear to have both inhibitory and stimulatory effects in the course of vascular disease development. This Perspective concludes with a discussion on gasotransmitter-based interventions as a therapeutic option. PMID:26798119

  13. Regional anesthesia for major vascular surgery.

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, D. P.; Cunningham, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The relative merits of general vs regional anesthesia for patients undergoing major vascular surgery has been the subject of debate over the past decade. Previous studies of regional vs general anesthesia often were deficient in experimental design and, therefore, did not produce definitive answers. Some of these deficiencies related to non-standardized, poorly conducted, and/or described general anesthetic techniques, nonstandardized methods of postoperative analgesia in the general anesthesia groups, and variations in preoperative cardiac status in the study groups. Furthermore, most studies did not conclusively demonstrate a cause and effect relationship between the proposed mechanisms of the beneficial effect of regional anesthesia and outcome. Recent studies, however, have claimed improvements in outcome following regional anesthesia in patients undergoing peripheral vascular procedures. The reported beneficial effects have included amelioration of the neuroendocrine stress response to surgery, improvement in pulmonary function, cardiovascular stability, enhancement of lower limb blood flow, reduction in the incidence of graft thrombosis, and a reduction in the thrombic response to surgery. Skeptics still question whether recent studies have the power to determine whether regional anesthesia decreases the incidence of cardiac and pulmonary complications following major vascular surgery. Furthermore, the issue of whether the beneficial effects of regional anesthesia on the incidence of graft thrombosis and the thrombotic response to surgery relating to intraoperative or postoperative regional anesthesia/analgesia, to regional anesthesia per se, or to the systemic effects of absorbed local anesthetics remains unresolved. PMID:7825346

  14. Applications of Doppler ultrasound in clinical vascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, R. W.; Hokanson, D. E.; Sumner, D. S.; Strandness, D. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound has become the most useful and versatile noninvasive technique for objective evaluation of clinical vascular disease. Commercially available continuous-wave instruments provide qualitative and quantitative assessment of venous and arterial disease. Pulsed Doppler ultrasound was developed to provide longitudinal and transverse cross-sectional images of the arterial lumen with a resolution approaching that of conventional X-ray techniques. Application of Doppler ultrasound in venous, peripheral arterial, and cerebrovascular diseases is reviewed.

  15. Bridging long gap peripheral nerve injury using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro

    2014-07-15

    Long gap peripheral nerve injuries usually reulting in life-changing problems for patients. Skeletal muscle derived-multipotent stem cells (Sk-MSCs) can differentiate into Schwann and perineurial/endoneurial cells, vascular relating pericytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle cells in the damaged peripheral nerve niche. Application of the Sk-MSCs in the bridging conduit for repairing long nerve gap injury resulted favorable axonal regeneration, which showing superior effects than gold standard therapy--healthy nerve autograft. This means that it does not need to sacrifice of healthy nerves or loss of related functions for repairing peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25221587

  16. Tissue microcirculation measured by vascular occlusion test during anesthesia induction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Kyong; Cho, Youn Joung; Min, Jeong Jin; Murkin, John M; Bahk, Jae-Hyon; Hong, Deok Man; Jeon, Yunseok

    2016-02-01

    Tissue microcirculation measured by vascular occlusion test is impaired during septic shock. However, it has not been investigated extensively during anesthesia induction. The aim of the study is to evaluate tissue microcirculation during anesthesia induction. We hypothesized that during anesthesia induction, tissue microcirculation measured by vascular occlusion test might be enhanced with peripheral vasodilation during anesthesia induction. We conducted a prospective observational study of 50 adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. During anesthesia induction, we measured and analyzed tissue oxygen saturation, vascular occlusion test, cerebral oximetry, forearm-minus-fingertip skin temperature gradients and hemodynamic data in order to evaluate microcirculation as related to alterations in peripheral vasodilation as reflected by increased Tforearm-finger thermal gradients. During anesthesia induction, recovery slope during vascular occlusion test and cerebral oxygen saturation increased from 4.0 (1.5) to 4.7 (1.3) % s(-1) (p = 0.02) and 64.0 (10.2) to 74.2 (9.2) % (p < 0.001), respectively. Forearm-minus-fingertip skin temperature gradients decreased from 1.9 (2.9) to -1.4 (2.2) °C (p < 0.001). There was an inverse correlation between changes in the skin temperature gradients and changes in cerebral oximetry (r = 0.33; p = 0.02). During anesthesia induction, blood pressure and forearm-minus-fingertip skin temperature gradients decrease while cerebral oximetry and vascular occlusion test recovery slope increase. These findings suggest that anesthesia induction increases tissue microcirculation with peripheral vasodilation. PMID:25750016

  17. Cell Therapy of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Zankhana; Losordo, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    The age-adjusted prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in the US population was estimated to approach 12% in 1985, and as the population ages, the overall population having peripheral arterial disease is predicted to rise. The clinical consequences of occlusive peripheral arterial disease include intermittent claudication, that is, pain with walking, and critical limb ischemia (CLI), which includes pain at rest and loss of tissue integrity in the distal limbs, which may ultimately lead to amputation of a portion of the lower extremity. The risk factors for CLI are similar to those linked to coronary artery disease and include advanced age, smoking, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. The worldwide incidence of CLI was estimated to be 500 to 1000 cases per million people per year in 1991. The prognosis is poor for CLI subjects with advanced limb disease. One study of >400 such subjects in the United Kingdom found that 25% required amputation and 20% (including some subjects who had required amputation) died within 1 year. In the United States, ≈280 lower-limb amputations for ischemic disease are performed per million people each year. The first objective in treating CLI is to increase blood circulation to the affected limb. Theoretically, increased blood flow could be achieved by increasing the number of vessels that supply the ischemic tissue with blood. The use of pharmacological agents to induce new blood vessel growth for the treatment or prevention of pathological clinical conditions has been called therapeutic angiogenesis. Since the identification of the endothelial progenitor cell in 1997 by Asahara and Isner, the field of cell-based therapies for peripheral arterial disease has been in a state of continuous evolution. Here, we review the current state of that field. PMID:23620237

  18. [Chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kolak, Agnieszka; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Kubiatowski, Tomasz; Kieszko, Dariusz; Cisek, Paweł; Patyra, Krzysztof Ireneusz; Surdyka, Dariusz; Mocarska, Agnieszka; Burdan, Franciszek

    2013-11-01

    Modern cancer therapy prolongs patients life but commonly increases incidence of treatment-related complications. One of such adverse effect is a neurotoxicity, which usually manifestates as peripheral neuropathies (CIPN), characterised by various sensory (tingling, numbness, pain), motor (foot and hands drop, fastening buttons difficulties) and autonomic (constipation, arythmia) abnormalities as well as pain. Despite of intensive epidemiological and clinical studies, standardized diagnostic criteria and methods of the neuropathy prevention and treatment have not been fully established. The most commonly used form of treatment is symptomatic therapy, including anticonvulsant and antidepressant drugs. Proper education of patients and their families of symptoms and neuropathy consequences is desirable to reduce anxiety and stress. PMID:24575651

  19. Peripheral Stent Placement in Hemodialysis Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Kariya, Shuji Tanigawa, Noboru; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Komemushi, Atsushi; Shomura, Yuzo; Shiraishi, Tomokuni; Kawanaka, Toshiaki; Sawada, Satoshi

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of peripheral stent placement after failed balloon angioplasty in patients with grafts who are on hemodialysis. We examined 30 Wallstents that were placed in 26 patients because balloon angioplasty failed or early restenosis (<3 months) occurred within 3 months. We retrospectively reviewed 267 consecutive balloon angioplasties performed in 71 patients with graft access between August 2000 and March 2007. Stent placements accounted for 30 (11.2%) of the 267 balloon angioplasties. The clinical success rate of stent placement was 93.3% (28 of 30 stent placements). The 3-, 6-, and 12-month primary patency rates were 73.3%, 39.3%, and 17.7%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year secondary patency rates were 90.2%, 83.8%, and 83.8%, respectively. Primary patency was significantly prolonged by stent placement after early restenosis compared with previous balloon angioplasty alone (P = 0.0059). Primary patency after stent placement was significantly lower than after successful balloon angioplasty without indications for stent placement (P = 0.0279). Secondary patency rates did not significantly differ between stent placement and balloon angioplasty alone. The mean number of reinterventions required to maintain secondary patency after stent placement was significantly larger than that after balloon angioplasty alone (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.0419). We concluded that peripheral stent placement for graft access is effective for salvaging vascular access after failed balloon angioplasty and for prolonging patency in early restenosis after balloon angioplasty. However, reinterventions are required to maintain secondary patency after stent placement. Furthermore, peripheral stent placement for graft access cannot achieve the same primary patency as balloon angioplasty alone.

  20. Peripheral olfactory signaling in insects

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Eunho; Bohbot, Jonathan; Zwiebel, Laurence J.

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory signaling is a crucial component in the life history of insects. The development of precise and parallel mechanisms to analyze the tremendous amount of chemical information from the environment and other sources has been essential to their evolutionary success. Considerable progress has been made in the study of insect olfaction fueled by bioinformatics- based utilization of genomics along with rapid advances in functional analyses. Here we review recent progress in our rapidly emerging understanding of insect peripheral sensory reception and signal transduction. These studies reveal that the nearly unlimited chemical space insects encounter is covered by distinct chemosensory receptor repertoires that are generally derived by species-specific, rapid gene gain and loss, reflecting the evolutionary consequences of adaptation to meet their specific biological needs. While diverse molecular mechanisms have been put forth, often in the context of controversial models, the characterization of the ubiquitous, highly conserved and insect-specific Orco odorant receptor co-receptor has opened the door to the design and development of novel insect control methods to target agricultural pests, disease vectors and even nuisance insects. PMID:25584200

  1. Development of pluripotent stem cells for vascular therapy

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Katharina S.; Miljan, Erik; Khoo, Amanda; Cooke, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterized by reduced limb blood flow due to arterial obstruction. Current treatment includes surgical or endovascular procedures, the failure of which may result in amputation of the affected limb. An emerging therapeutic approach is cell therapy to enhance angiogenesis and tissue survival. Small clinical trials of adult progenitor cell therapies have generated promising results, although large randomized clinical trials using well-defined cells have not been performed. Intriguing pre-clinical studies have been performed using vascular cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) or human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). In particular, hiPSC-derived vascular cells may be a superior approach for vascular regeneration. The regulatory roadmap to the clinic will be arduous, but achievable with further understanding of the reprogramming and differentiation processes; with meticulous attention to quality control; and perseverance. PMID:22387745

  2. Peripheral neuropathies during biologic therapies.

    PubMed

    Yagita, Masato; Hamano, Toshiaki; Hatachi, Saori; Fujita, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies should be recognized as the adverse effects of biological agents, especially anti-TNF agents. However, no solid clinical databases for biological agent-associated peripheral neuropathies (BAPN) have been established in Japan. Here we report two cases of peripheral neuropathy associated with anti-TNF agents. One was peroneal motor neuropathy. The other case was chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. In addition, we summarize the previous reports on BAPN and discuss their prevalence rate, pathogenesis and management. PMID:24313920

  3. Age-associated proinflammatory secretory phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells from the non-human primate Macaca mulatta: reversal by resveratrol treatment.

    PubMed

    Csiszar, Anna; Sosnowska, Danuta; Wang, Mingyi; Lakatta, Edward G; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2012-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that age-associated chronic low-grade inflammation promotes the development of both large-vessel disease (myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease) and small-vessel pathologies (including vascular cognitive impairment) in older persons. However, the source of age-related chronic vascular inflammation remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that cell-autonomous mechanisms contribute to the proinflammatory changes in vascular phenotype that accompanies advancing age, we analyzed the cytokine secretion profile of primary vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) derived from young (∼13 years old) and aged (∼21 years old) Macaca mulatta. Aged VSMCs cultured in the absence of systemic factors exhibited significantly increased secretion of interleukin-1β, MCP-1, and tumor necrosis factorα compared with young control cells. Secretion of interleukin-6 also tended to increase in aged VSMCs. This age-associated proinflammatory shift in the cellular secretory phenotype was associated with an increased mitochondrial O(2)(-) production and nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells activation. Treatment of aged VSMCs with a physiologically relevant concentration of resveratrol (1 μM) exerted significant anti-inflammatory effects, reversing aging-induced alterations in the cellular cytokine secretion profile and inhibiting nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells. Resveratrol also attenuated mitochondrial O(2)(-) production and upregulated the transcriptional activity of Nrf2 in aged VSMCs. Thus, in non-human primates, cell-autonomous activation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and expression of an inflammatory secretome likely contribute to vascular inflammation in aging. Resveratrol treatment prevents the proinflammatory properties of the aged VSMC secretome, an effect that likely contributes to the demonstrated vasoprotective action of resveratrol in animal

  4. Vascular Diseases of the Spinal Cord: Infarction, Hemorrhage, and Venous Congestive Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Shawn M; Jeong, William J; Morales, Humberto; Abruzzo, Todd A

    2016-10-01

    Vascular pathologies of the spinal cord are rare and often overlooked. This article presents clinical and imaging approaches to the diagnosis and management of spinal vascular conditions most commonly encountered in clinical practice. Ischemia, infarction, hemorrhage, aneurysms, and vascular malformations of the spine and spinal cord are discussed. Pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical classification schemes, clinical presentations, imaging findings, and treatment modalities are considered. Recent advances in genetic and syndromic vascular pathologies of the spinal cord are also discussed. Clinically relevant spinal vascular anatomy is reviewed in detail. PMID:27616317

  5. Lymphocyte binding to vascular endothelium in inflamed skin revisited: a central role for vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1).

    PubMed

    Arvilommi, A M; Salmi, M; Kalimo, K; Jalkanen, S

    1996-04-01

    The binding of leukocytes to vascular endothelium and their migration into tissues is mediated by adhesion molecules on the endothelial cells and leukocytes. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a 170-180/90-kDa endothelial molecule expressed most prominently in high endothelial venules in peripheral lymph node (PLN) type lymphatic tissues. VAP-1 mediates lymphocyte binding to PLN, tonsil and synovium. The expression of VAP-1 is induced in inflammatory diseases such as arthritis and gut inflammation. We examined the expression, structure and function of VAP-1 in normal and inflamed skin and compared it to those of other adhesion molecules implicated in skin homing. In psoriasis lichen ruber planus, pemphigoid and allergic lesions, VAP-1 was markedly upregulated. The expression of VAP-1 was also increased in biopsies of healthy skin of the patients. The VAP-1 molecule induced in skin is decorated with abundant sialic acids. VAP-1 inflamed skin is functional, since inhibition with anti-VAP-1 monoclonal antibodies caused a 60% reduction in lymphocytes adhesion to vascular endothelium. Antibodies against E-selectin, which has been regarded as the major vascular addressin directing cutaneous lymphocyte traffic, and, surprisingly, against peripheral lymph node addressin (PNAd), caused inhibitions of 30% and 60%, respectively, in the frozen section adhesion assay. These findings suggest important roles also for VAP-1 and PNAd in lymphocyte homing into inflamed skin. PMID:8625974

  6. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  7. Low bone density and abnormal bone turnover in patients with atherosclerosis of peripheral vessels.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, P; Signorelli, S S; Riccobene, S; Celotta, G; Di Pino, L; La Malfa, T; Fiore, C E

    2004-05-01

    Patients with vascular calcifications often have low bone mineral density (BMD), but it is still uncertain if osteoporosis and peripheral vascular disease (VD) are interrelated and linked by a common pathomechanism. Moreover, data on bone turnover in patients with advanced atherosclerosis are lacking. We measured BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative bone ultrasound (QUS), as well as the serum levels of osteocalcin (OC), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and its ligand RANKL, and the urinary concentration of the C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CrossLaps), in 36 patient (20 male and 16 female) with serious atherosclerotic involvement of the carotid and/or femoral artery to investigate the underlying mechanism of vascular and osseous disorders. Thirty age-matched and gender matched healthy individuals served as controls. After adjustment for age, BMD was significantly reduced at the lumbar spine in 23/36 (63%) patients (mean T score -1.71+/-1.42) and at the proximal femur in 34/36 (93%) patients (neck mean T score -2.5+/-0.88). Ten patients (27%) had abnormal QUS parameters. Gender and diabetes had no effect on the relationship between vascular calcification and bone density at any site measured. VD subjects had OC and BAP serum levels lower than controls (13.3+/-3.1 vs 27.7+/-3.3 ng/ml, P<0.01, and 8.4+/-2.3 vs 12.5+/-1.4 microg/l, P<0.01, respectively). Urinary CrossLaps excretion was not significantly different in patients with VD and in controls (257.9+/-138.9 vs 272.2+/-79.4 micro g/mmol Cr, respectively). Serum OPG and RANKL levels were similar in patients and in controls (3.5+/-1.07 vs 3.4+/-1.05 pmol/l, and 0.37+/-0.07 vs 0.36+/-0.06 pmol/l, respectively). We proved high occurrence of osteoporosis in VD, with evidence of age and gender independence. Negative bone remodelling balance would be a consequence of reduced bone formation, with no apparent increased activation of the OPG-RANKL system

  8. Peripheral arterial calcification: Prevalence, mechanism, detection, and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Singh, Krishna J; Zeller, Thomas; Jaff, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC), particularly medial (Mönckeberg's medial sclerosis) arterial calcification, is common in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and genetic pathways of VC are not fully known, hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and the suppression of parathyroid hormone activity are central to the development of vessel mineralization and, consequently, bone demineralization. In addition to preventive measures, such as the modification of atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk factors, current treatment strategies include the use of calcium-free phosphate binders, vitamin D analogs, and calcium mimetics that have shown promising results, albeit in small patient cohorts. The impact of intimal and medial VC on the safety and effectiveness of endovascular devices to treat symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remains poorly defined. The absence of a generally accepted, validated vascular calcium grading scale hampers clinical progress in assessing the safety and utility of various endovascular devices (e.g., atherectomy) in treating calcified vessels. Accordingly, we propose the peripheral arterial calcium scoring system (PACSS) and a method for its clinical validation. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and the development of optimal medical and endovascular treatment strategies are crucial as the population ages and presents with more chronic comorbidities. PMID:24402839

  9. Schwann cells as a therapeutic target for peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Helmar C.; Höke, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Schwann cells, the myelin forming cells in the peripheral nervous system, play a key role in the pathology of various inflammatory, metabolic and hereditary polyneuropathies. Advances in identifying growth factors and signaling molecules that are expressed by Schwann cells have paved the way to development of new treatment strategies that are aimed to improve the protective and regenerative properties of Schwann cells in peripheral nerve disorders. These include the exogenous application of growth factors and neurohormones, which have been advanced into clinical trials in humans and transplantation paradigms that have been moved into late stage preclinical models. In this review we will discuss the latest developments in these therapeutic approaches with special regard to peripheral nerve disorders, in which the progress in basic research have already been translated into clinical trials including HIV-associated distal sensory polyneuropathy and diabetic neuropathy. PMID:20874704

  10. Peripherally Silylated Porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kenichi; Fujimoto, Keisuke; Yorimitsu, Hideki; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2015-09-21

    Silylation of peripherally lithiated porphyrins with silyl electrophiles has realized the first synthesis of a series of directly silyl-substituted porphyrins. The meso-silyl group underwent facile protodesilylation, whereas the β-silyl group was entirely compatible with standard work-up and purification on silica gel. The meso-silyl group caused larger substituent effects to the porphyrin compared with the β-silyl group. Silylation of β-lithiated porphyrins with 1,2-dichlorodisilane furnished β-to-β disilane-bridged porphyrin dimers. A doubly β-to-β disilane-bridged Ni(II)-porphyrin dimer was also synthesized from a β,β-dilithiated Ni(II)-porphyrin and characterized by X-ray crystallographic analysis to take a steplike structure favorable for interporphyrinic interaction. Denickelation of β-silylporphyrins was achieved upon treatment with a 4-tolylmagnesium bromide to yield the corresponding freebase porphyrins. PMID:26356498

  11. The association between skin autofluorescence and vascular complications in Chinese patients with diabetic foot ulcer: an observational study done in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuanbo; Xu, Liying; Gao, Hui; Ye, Junna; Huang, Yao; Wu, Minjie; Xie, Ting; Ni, Pengwen; Yu, Xiaoping; Cao, Yemin; Lu, Shuliang

    2015-03-01

    The tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) can be noninvasively assessed as skin autofluorescence (SAF) by the AGE Reader(TM) device. We aimed to detect the association between SAF and diabetes-associated vascular complications in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients engaged in this study. This cross-sectional survey consisted of 118 consecutive hospitalized diabetic foot patients. The diabetic microvascular (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) and macrovascular referring to coronary heart disease (CHD), cerebrovascular disease (CVD), or peripheral artery disease (PAD) complications were evaluated, and then they were divided into different subgroups based on the assessment of vascular complications. As seen from the results, the mean SAF value was 2.8 ± 0.2 AU. SAF was significantly associated with diabetes duration and blood urea nitrogen (R(2) = 62.8%; P < .01). Moreover, in logistic regression analysis, SAF was significantly associated with retinopathy (odds ratio [OR] = 40.11), nephropathy (OR = 8.44), CHD (OR = 44.31), CVD (OR = 80.73), and PAD (OR = 5.98 × 10(9)). In conclusion, SAF, reflecting tissue accumulation of AGEs, is independently associated with the presence of vascular complications in DFU patients. PMID:25694437

  12. Autoimmune peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Pierre R; Chardon, Jodi Warman; Massie, Rami

    2015-09-20

    Peripheral nervous system axons and myelin have unique potential protein, proteolipid, and ganglioside antigenic determinants. Despite the existence of a blood-nerve barrier, both humoral and cellular immunity can be directed against peripheral axons and myelin. Molecular mimicry may be triggered at the systemic level, as was best demonstrated in the case of bacterial oligosaccharides. The classification of immune neuropathy has been expanded to take into account specific syndromes that share unique clinical, electrophysiological, prognostic and serological features. Guillain-Barré syndrome encompasses a classical syndrome of acute demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and many variants: axonal motor and sensory, axonal motor, Miller-Fisher, autonomic, and sensory. Similarly, chronic immune neuropathy is composed of classic chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and variants characterized as multifocal (motor or sensorimotor), sensory, distal symmetric, and syndromes associated with monoclonal gammopathy. Among putative biomarkers, myelin associated glycoprotein and several anti-ganglioside autoantibodies have shown statistically significant associations with specific neuropathic syndromes. Currently, the strongest biomarker associations are those linking Miller-Fisher syndrome with anti-GQ1b, multifocal motor neuropathy with anti-GM1, and distal acquired symmetric neuropathy with anti-MAG antibodies. Many other autoantibody associations have been proposed, but presently lack sufficient specificity and sensitivity to qualify as biomarkers. This field of research has contributed to the antigenic characterization of motor and sensory functional systems, as well as helping to define immune neuropathic syndromes with widely different clinical presentation, prognosis and response to therapy. Serologic biomarkers are likely to become even more relevant with the advent of new targeted forms of immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:25748038

  13. Time-of-day variation in vascular function.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, G C; Denniff, M

    2016-08-01

    What is the topic of this review? This report looks at the role of endothelial nitric oxide signalling in the time-of-day variation in vasoconstriction of resistance vessels. What advances does it highlight? It highlights a time-of-day variation in contraction of mesenteric arteries, characterized by a reduced contractile response to either phenylephrine or high K(+) and increased relaxation in response to acetylcholine during the active period. This time-of-day variation in contraction results from a difference in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signalling that correlates with levels of eNOS expression, which peak during the active period and may have far reaching physiological consequences beyond regulation of blood pressure. There is a strong time-of-day variation in the vasoconstriction in response to sympathetic stimulation that may contribute to the time-of-day variation in blood pressure, which is characterized by a dip in blood pressure during the individual's rest period when sympathetic activity is low. Vasoconstriction is known to be regulated tightly by nitric oxide signalling from the endothelial cells, so we have looked at the effect of time-of-day on levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and vascular contractility. Mesenteric arteries isolated from the nocturnal rat exhibit a time-of-day variation in their contractile response to α1 -adrenoreceptor and muscarinic activation, which is characterized by a reduced vasoconstriction in response to phenylephrine and enhanced vasodilatation in response to acetylcholine during the rat's active period at night. An increase in eNOS signalling during the active period is responsible for this time-of-day difference in response to phenylephrine and acetylcholine and correlates with the large increase in eNOS expression (mRNA and protein) during the active period, possibly driven by the presence of a functioning peripheral circadian clock. This increase in eNOS signalling may function to

  14. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Fernyhough, Paul; Calcutt, Nigel A.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal neuronal calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis has been implicated in numerous diseases of the nervous system. The pathogenesis of two increasingly common disorders of the peripheral nervous system, namely neuropathic pain and diabetic polyneuropathy, has been associated with aberrant Ca2+ channel expression and function. Here we review the current state of knowledge regarding the role of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and associated mitochondrial dysfunction in painful and diabetic neuropathies. The central impact of both alterations of Ca2+ signalling at the plasma membrane and also intracellular Ca2+ handling on sensory neuron function is discussed and related to abnormal endoplasmic reticulum performance. We also present new data highlighting sub-optimal axonal Ca 2+ signalling in diabetic neuropathy and discuss the putative role for this abnormality in the induction of axonal degeneration in peripheral neuropathies. The accumulating evidence implicating Ca2+ dysregulation with both painful and degenerative neuropathies, along with recent advances in understanding of regional variations in Ca2+ channel and pump structures, makes modulation of neuronal Ca2+ handling an increasingly viable approach for therapeutic interventions against the painful and degenerative aspects of many peripheral neuropathies. PMID:20034667

  15. Vascular Effects of Estrogenic Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reslan, Ossama M.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in men and postmenopausal women (Post-MW) than premenopausal women (Pre-MW). Despite recent advances in preventive measures, the incidence of CVD in women has shown a rise that matched the increase in the Post-MW population. The increased incidence of CVD in Post-MW has been related to the decline in estrogen levels, and hence suggested vascular benefits of endogenous estrogen. Experimental studies have identified estrogen receptor ERα, ERβ and a novel estrogen binding membrane protein GPR30 (GPER) in blood vessels of humans and experimental animals. The interaction of estrogen with vascular ERs mediates both genomic and non-genomic effects. Estrogen promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation by increasing nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and hyperpolarizing factor. Estrogen also inhibits the mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contraction including [Ca2+]i, protein kinase C and Rho-kinase. Additional effects of estrogen on the vascular cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, lipid profile and the vascular inflammatory response have been reported. In addition to the experimental evidence in animal models and vascular cells, initial observational studies in women using menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) have suggested that estrogen may protect against CVD. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) such as the Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS) and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), which examined the effects of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) in older women with established CVD (HERS) or without overt CVD (WHI), failed to demonstrate protective vascular effects of estrogen treatment. Despite the initial set-back from the results of MHT RCTs, growing evidence now supports the ‘timing hypothesis’, which suggests that MHT could increase the risk of CVD if started late after menopause, but may produce beneficial cardiovascular effects in younger women during the perimenopausal period. The choice of

  16. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  17. Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Philip B; Counts, Scott E; Nyenhuis, David

    2016-05-01

    Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment are receiving heightened attention as potentially modifiable factors for dementias of later life. These factors have now been linked not only to vascular cognitive disorders but also Alzheimer's disease. In this chapter we review 3 related topics that address vascular contributions to cognitive impairment: 1. vascular pathogenesis and mechanisms; 2. neuropsychological and neuroimaging phenotypic manifestations of cerebrovascular disease; and 3. prospects for prevention of cognitive impairment of later life based on cardiovascular and stroke risk modification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26704177

  18. Supply and demand: Will we have enough vascular surgeons by 2030?

    PubMed

    Williams, Katherine; Schneider, Brandon; Lajos, Paul; Marin, Michael; Faries, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The increase in prevalence of certain cardiovascular risk factors increases susceptibility to vascular disease, which may create demand for surgical intervention. In our study, data collected by the American Association of Medical Colleges Physician Specialty Databook of 2012, the United States Census Bureau, and other nationwide organizations were referenced to calculate future changes in vascular surgeon supply and prevalence of people at risk for vascular disease. In 2010, there were 2853 active vascular surgeons. By 2040, the workforce is expected to linearly rise to 3573. There will be an exponential rise in people with cardiovascular risk factors. Adding to concern, in 2030, an estimated 3333 vascular surgeons will be available for 180,000,000 people with at least one risk factor for peripheral arterial disease. The paucity of properly trained surgeons entering the workforce needs to be addressed before this shortage becomes a larger burden on healthcare providers and governmental spending. PMID:26199290

  19. Vascular Reactivity is Impaired and Associated With Walking Ability in Patients With Intermittent Claudication.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rita de Cassia Gengo E; Wolosker, Nelson; Yugar-Toledo, Juan Carlos; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda Marciano

    2015-08-01

    We verified whether vascular reactivity is impaired and whether there is any association between vascular reactivity, walking ability, and peripheral artery disease (PAD) severity in patients with intermittent claudication (IC). We studied 63 patients and 17 age- and sex-matched volunteers without PAD. Vascular reactivity was evaluated in the brachial artery during reactive hyperemia (flow-mediated dilation [FMD]) and after a sublingual single dose of nitroglycerin (nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation [NID]). Walking ability was verified by a 6-minute walk test. Vascular reactivity and walking ability were significantly worse in patients with IC compared with control participants. The ankle-brachial index correlated with FMD, NID, as well as total and pain-free distances. The NID and walking ability progressively decreased as PAD severity increased. Walking ability correlated with NID but not with FMD. In patients with IC, vascular reactivity is impaired and is related to the severity of PAD and to walking ability. PMID:25100750

  20. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  1. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mohamad Anas; Aljabri, Badr; Al-Omran, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct terms are used to describe vascular thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) depending on which structure is predominantly affected: venous TOS (due to subclavian vein compression) and arterial TOS (due to subclavian artery compression). Although the venous and arterial subtypes of TOS affect only 3% and <1% of all TOS patients respectively, the diagnostic and management approaches to venous and arterial TOS have undergone considerable evolution due to the recent emergence of minimally invasive endovascular techniques such as catheter-directed arterial and venous thrombolysis, and balloon angioplasty. In this review, we discuss the anatomical factors, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of vascular TOS patients. In addition, we use the most up to date observational evidence available to provide a contemporary approach to the diagnosis and management of venous TOS and arterial TOS patients. PMID:27568153

  2. HIV peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gabbai, Alberto Alain; Castelo, Adauto; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are the most common neurological manifestations occurring in HIV-infected individuals. Distal symmetrical sensory neuropathy is the most common form encountered today and is one of the few that are specific to HIV infection or its treatment. The wide variety of other neuropathies is akin to the neuropathies seen in the general population and should be managed accordingly. In the pre-ART era, neuropathies were categorized according to the CD4 count and HIV viral load. In the early stages of HIV infection when CD4 count is high, the inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies predominate and in the late stages with the decline of CD4 count opportunistic infection-related neuropathies prevail. That scenario has changed with the present almost universal use of ART (antiretroviral therapy). Hence, HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies are better classified according to their clinical presentations: distal symmetrical polyneuropathy, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), mononeuropathies, mononeuropathies multiplex and cranial neuropathies, autonomic neuropathy, lumbosacral polyradiculomyelopathy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-like motor neuropathy. Treated with ART, HIV-infected individuals are living longer and are at a higher risk of metabolic and age-related complications; moreover they are also prone to the potentially neurotoxic effects of ART. There are no epidemiological data regarding the incidence and prevalence of the peripheral neuropathies. In the pre-ART era, most data were from case reports, series of patients, and pooled autopsy data. At that time the histopathological evidence of neuropathies in autopsy series was almost 100%. In large prospective cohorts presently being evaluated, it has been found that 57% of HIV-infected individuals have distal symmetrical sensory neuropathy and 38% have neuropathic pain. It is now clear that

  3. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses for more profitable strategies in peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Di Minno, Giovanni; Spadarella, Gaia; Cafaro, Giovanni; Petitto, Maurizio; Lupoli, Roberta; Di Minno, Alessandro; de Gaetano, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    In the peripheral arteries, a thrombus superimposed on atherosclerosis contributes to the progression of peripheral artery disease (PAD), producing intermittent claudication (IC), ischemic necrosis, and, potentially, loss of the limb. PAD with IC is often undiagnosed and, in turn, undertreated. The low percentage of diagnosis (∼30%) in this setting of PAD is of particular concern because of the potential worsening of PAD (amputation) and the high risk of adverse vascular outcomes (vascular death, coronary artery disease, stroke). A Medline literature search of the highest-quality systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials documents that, due to risk of bias, imprecision, and indirectness, the overall quality of the evidence concerning diagnostic tools and antithrombotic interventions in PAD is generally low. Areas of research emerge from the information collected. Appropriate treatments for PAD patients will only derive from ad-hoc studies. Innovative imaging techniques are needed to identify PAD subjects at the highest vascular risk. Whether IC unresponsive to physical exercise and smoking cessation identifies those with a heritable predisposition to more severe vascular events deserves to be addressed. Devising ways to improve prevention of vascular events in patients with PAD implies a co-ordinated approach in vascular medicine. PMID:25045928

  4. Simulation in vascular access surgery training.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Lukas Werner; Schmidli, Jürg; Widmer, Matthias Kurt; Wyss, Thomas Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing technical developments and working time constraints call for changes in trainee formation. In reality, trainees spend fewer hours in the hospital and face more difficulties in acquiring the required qualifications in order to work independently as a specialist. Simulation-based training is a potential solution. It offers the possibility to learn basic technical skills, repeatedly perform key steps in procedures and simulate challenging scenarios in team training. Patients are not at risk and learning curves can be shortened. Advanced learners are able to train rare complications. Senior faculty member's presence is key to assess and debrief effective simulation training. In the field of vascular access surgery, simulation models are available for open as well as endovascular procedures. In this narrative review, we describe the theory of simulation, present simulation models in vascular (access) surgery, discuss the possible benefits for patient safety and the difficulties of implementing simulation in training. PMID:25751566

  5. Update on Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ayesha; Kalaria, Raj N; Corbett, Anne; Ballard, Clive

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a major contributor to the dementia syndrome and is described as having problems with reasoning, planning, judgment, and memory caused by impaired blood flow to the brain and damage to the blood vessels resulting from events such as stroke. There are a variety of etiologies that contribute to the development of vascular cognitive impairment and VaD, and these are often associated with other dementia-related pathologies such as Alzheimer disease. The diagnosis of VaD is difficult due to the number and types of lesions and their locations in the brain. Factors that increase the risk of vascular diseases such as stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking also raise the risk of VaD. Therefore, controlling these risk factors can help lower the chances of developing VaD. This update describes the subtypes of VaD, with details of their complex presentation, associated pathological lesions, and issues with diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:27502303

  6. Pulmonary vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Kenneth W; Flake, Alan W

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary vascular malformations have historically been diagnosed in a wide range of age groups, but the extensive use of prenatal imaging studies has resulted in the majority of lesions being diagnosed in utero. Among this group of lesions, bronchopulmonary sequestrations (BPS), hybrid lesions with both congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and BPS, aberrant systemic vascular anastomoses, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM), are the most common. The biologic behavior of these lesions and the subsequent therapy is, in large part, determined by the age of the patient at diagnosis. In the fetus, large BPS or hybrid lesions can result in fetal hydrops and in utero fetal demise. In the perinatal period, pulmonary hypoplasia from the mass effect or air trapping within the cystic component of hybrid lesions can result in life-threatening respiratory distress. In the postnatal period, communication of the lesion with the aero-digestive system can result in recurrent pneumonia. Alternatively, increased pulmonary blood flow from the systemic arterial supply can result in hemorrhage, hemoptysis, or high output cardiac failure. In addition, there have been several reports of malignant degeneration. Finally, the broad spectrum encompassed by these lesions makes classification and subsequent communication of the lesions confusing and difficult. This paper will review the components of these lesions, their associated anomalies, the diagnosis and natural history, and finally, current concepts in the management of pulmonary vascular malformations. PMID:18158137

  7. Vascular Cambium Development

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Blomster, Tiina; Helariutta, Ykä; Mähönen, Ari Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Secondary phloem and xylem tissues are produced through the activity of vascular cambium, the cylindrical secondary meristem which arises among the primary plant tissues. Most dicotyledonous species undergo secondary development, among them Arabidopsis. Despite its small size and herbaceous nature, Arabidopsis displays prominent secondary growth in several organs, including the root, hypocotyl and shoot. Together with the vast genetic resources and molecular research methods available for it, this has made Arabidopsis a versatile and accessible model organism for studying cambial development and wood formation. In this review, we discuss and compare the development and function of the vascular cambium in the Arabidopsis root, hypocotyl, and shoot. We describe the current understanding of the molecular regulation of vascular cambium and compare it to the function of primary meristems. We conclude with a look at the future prospects of cambium research, including opportunities provided by phenotyping and modelling approaches, complemented by studies of natural variation and comparative genetic studies in perennial and woody plant species. PMID:26078728

  8. Peripheral arterial disease in general and diabetic population.

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, E M

    2007-06-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is stenosis or occlusion of peripheral arterial vessels by atherosclerotic plaque. It may present as intermittent claudication, rest pain and impotence. PAD of the lower limbs is the third most important site of atherosclerotic disease after coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Increasing age, family history, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia and more decisively diabetes are significant risk factors. PAD is a clinical condition that has often been neglected, underdiagnosed, undertreated and has a serious outcome. It may lead to nonhealing wounds, gangrene and amputation of the lower limbs. Hence, early identification of patients at risk of PAD and timely referral to the vascular surgeon in severe cases is crucial. PMID:18705464

  9. Overview of Classification Systems in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Rulon L.; Jazaeri, Omid; Yi, J.; Smith, M.; Gupta, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD), secondary to atherosclerotic disease, is currently the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. While PAD is common, it is estimated that the majority of patients with PAD are undiagnosed and undertreated. The challenge to the treatment of PAD is to accurately diagnose the symptoms and determine treatment for each patient. The varied presentations of peripheral vascular disease have led to numerous classification schemes throughout the literature. Consistent grading of patients leads to both objective criteria for treating patients and a baseline for clinical follow-up. Reproducible classification systems are also important in clinical trials and when comparing medical, surgical, and endovascular treatment paradigms. This article reviews the various classification systems for PAD and advantages to each system. PMID:25435665

  10. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sang Youl

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) exhibits broad clinical characteristics and various consequences and is known as one of the major macrovascular complications of T2DM. Atherosclerosis is recognized as the most direct and important cause of PAD, but acute or chronic limb ischemia may be the result of various risk factors. In light of the increasing number of patients who undergo peripheral vascular procedures, the number of subjects who are exposed to the risks for PAD and related complications is increasing. In this review, we will discuss the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of PAD, as well as the clinical significance of PAD in T2DM subjects. PMID:26301189

  11. International prevalence of the use of peripheral intravenous catheters.

    PubMed

    Alexandrou, Evan; Ray-Barruel, Gillian; Carr, Peter J; Frost, Steven; Inwood, Sheila; Higgins, Niall; Lin, Frances; Alberto, Laura; Mermel, Leonard; Rickard, Claire M

    2015-08-01

    Over a billion peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are inserted each year in hospitalized patients worldwide. However, international data on prevalence and management of these devices are lacking. The study assessed the prevalence of PIVCs and their management practices across different regions of the world. This global audit involved 14 hospitals across 13 countries, with 479 patients screened for the presence of a PIVC. We found 59% of patients had at least 1 PIVC in place, and 16% had other types of vascular devices. We also found that overall, 25% of patients had no vascular device in place. The majority of PIVCs were inserted by nursing staff or a specialist team. The prevalence of idle PIVCs in place with no fluid or medication orders was 16%, and 12% of PIVCs had at least 1 symptom of phlebitis. PMID:26041384

  12. Dynamic diffuse optical tomography imaging of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Michael A.; Kim, Hyun K.; Kim, In-Kyong; Flexman, Molly; Dayal, Rajeev; Shrikhande, Gautam; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is the narrowing of arteries due to plaque accumulation in the vascular walls. This leads to insufficient blood supply to the extremities and can ultimately cause cell death. Currently available methods are ineffective in diagnosing PAD in patients with calcified arteries, such as those with diabetes. In this paper we investigate the potential of dynamic diffuse optical tomography (DDOT) as an alternative way to assess PAD in the lower extremities. DDOT is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality that uses near-infrared light to create spatio-temporal maps of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin in tissue. We present three case studies in which we used DDOT to visualize vascular perfusion of a healthy volunteer, a PAD patient and a diabetic PAD patient with calcified arteries. These preliminary results show significant differences in DDOT time-traces and images between all three cases, underscoring the potential of DDOT as a new diagnostic tool. PMID:23024920

  13. Peripheral MR Angiography of Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Alessandro; Olivetti, Lucio

    2004-09-15

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare congenital vascular disease of unknown etiology that affects one or more limbs. It is characterized clinically by three physical findings (the so-called triad): port-wine stain hemangioma, hypertrophy of the bony and/or soft tissue, and varicose veins. A review of the medical literature in 1999 revealed about 1,000 case studies. We present here the case of a patient with clinical diagnosis of KTS studied using peripheral magnetic resonance angiography.

  14. Peripheral Mechanisms of Itch.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Ehsan; Xia, Jimmy; Lerner, Ethan A

    2016-01-01

    A multitude of exogenous environmental stimuli and endogenous molecular and cellular components interface directly or indirectly with the free nerve endings of sensory nerves in the skin. Environmental stimuli include substances derived from the microbiome and materials, such as allergens, that otherwise come in contact with the skin. Endogenous stimuli include components of or mediators derived from the epidermal barrier, keratinocytes, mast cells, and additional resident and skin-homing immune cells. The sensation of itch is ultimately provoked by mediators that interact with and activate pruriceptors on the sensory nerve fibers. These peripheral fibers convey signals from the skin to the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia and on to the spinal cord and brain where central processing of the itch sensation occurs. A discussion of the nature and sources of itch stimuli and receptors in the periphery form the basis of this chapter. The development of drugs that target these processes is in the process of revolutionizing therapeutic approaches to itch. PMID:27578066

  15. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation. PMID:26888065

  16. Relaxin as a natural agent for vascular health

    PubMed Central

    Bani, Daniele

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension, atherothrombosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and renal failure are the main manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death and disability in developed countries. Continuing insight into the pathophysiology of CVD can allow identification of effective therapeutic strategies to reduce the occurrence of death and/or severe disabilities. In this context, a healthy endothelium is deemed crucial to proper functioning and maintenance of anatomical integrity of the vascular system in many organs. Of note, epidemiologic studies indicate that the incidence of CVD in women is very low until menopause and increases sharply thereafter. The loss of protection against CVD in post-menopausal women has been chiefly attributed to ovarian steroid deficiency. However, besides steroids, the ovary also produces the peptide hormone relaxin (RLX), which provides potent vasoactive effects which render it the most likely candidate as the elusive physiological shield against CVD in fertile women. In particular, RLX has a specific relaxant effect on peripheral and coronary vasculature, exerted by the stimulation of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) generation by cells of the vascular wall, and can induce angiogenesis. Moreover, RLX inhibits the activation of inflammatory leukocytes and platelets, which play a key role in CVD. Experimental studies performed in vascular and blood cell in vitro and in animal models of vascular dysfunction, as well as pioneer clinical observations, have provided evidence that RLX can prevent and/or improve CVD, thus offering background to clinical trials aimed at exploring the broad therapeutic potential of human recombinant RLX as a new cardiovascular drug. PMID:18827902

  17. Peripheral coding of taste

    PubMed Central

    Liman, Emily R.; Zhang, Yali V.; Montell, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Five canonical tastes, bitter, sweet, umami (amino acid), salty and sour (acid) are detected by animals as diverse as fruit flies and humans, consistent with a near universal drive to consume fundamental nutrients and to avoid toxins or other harmful compounds. Surprisingly, despite this strong conservation of basic taste qualities between vertebrates and invertebrates, the receptors and signaling mechanisms that mediate taste in each are highly divergent. The identification over the last two decades of receptors and other molecules that mediate taste has led to stunning advances in our understanding of the basic mechanisms of transduction and coding of information by the gustatory systems of vertebrates and invertebrates. In this review, we discuss recent advances in taste research, mainly from the fly and mammalian systems, and we highlight principles that are common across species, despite stark differences in receptor types. PMID:24607224

  18. [Congenital vascular malformations: epidemiology, classification and therapeutic basis].

    PubMed

    Pereira Albino, J

    2010-01-01

    Congenital vascular malformations are part of the rare diseases of angiology and vascular surgery and can present in a variety of forms. They rise a lot of doubts and many diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Treatment options are widely variable and often debated; surgeons usually have doubts about the best procedure to adopt. It is also an area of great anatomic and functional variability where the confusion regarding the nomenclature and classifications has been frequent, rendering difficult to adopt standardized measures. There have been significant advances in the recent years towards reaching a consensus. Based on his practical clinical experience and past work on these issues, the author reviews the epidemiology, the classifications and the therapeutic basis of this pathology. The author emphasizes the fact that the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) classification provides a useful framework for classifying vascular anomalies, as well as the therapeutic percutaneous embolization using polidocanol foam to control venous malformations. PMID:20972487

  19. Cardiac evaluation and risk reduction in patients undergoing major vascular operations.

    PubMed Central

    Potyk, D K

    1994-01-01

    Occult coronary artery disease often accompanies symptomatic peripheral vascular disease and has an important effect on survival. Most perioperative and late fatalities after peripheral vascular operations are due to cardiac causes. Noninvasive cardiac testing can identify patients at increased risk for postoperative cardiac complications, although controversy exists regarding the optimal preoperative evaluation. Risk reduction strategies for patients known to be at high risk are also controversial. Some authors advocate coronary revascularization with coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty before the vascular procedure. Others believe that the combined morbidity and mortality of 2 operations exceed those of a peripheral vascular operation performed with aggressive monitoring and medical therapy. Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring after an operation has identified silent myocardial ischemia as a powerful predictor of cardiac complications. Ongoing research is likely to provide insights into the pathogenesis of postoperative cardiac complications and may lead to specific therapeutic interventions. Few prospective studies have been done in this area, and the threshold for preoperative and postoperative intervention is unknown. I review the literature and present an algorithm to guide cardiac testing and risk reduction in patients undergoing elective vascular surgical procedures. PMID:7941507

  20. Managing a peripheral ossifying fibroma.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, F; Waggoner, W F

    1996-01-01

    The Peripheral Ossifying Fibroma is an inflammatory lesion which most often appears in twenty-five to thirty-four-year-old females. It averages 1.0 cm at its greatest dimension. This case reports a seven-year-eight-month-old female who presented with a peripheral ossifying fibroma lesion which measured 2.7 cm by 1.5 cm by 1.0 cm. A review of peripheral ossifying fibroma, and the management and postsurgical sequelae of this child are discussed. PMID:8708123

  1. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor.

    PubMed

    James, Aaron W; Shurell, Elizabeth; Singh, Arun; Dry, Sarah M; Eilber, Fritz C

    2016-10-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is the sixth most common type of soft tissue sarcoma. Most MPNSTs arise in association with a peripheral nerve or preexisting neurofibroma. Neurofibromatosis type is the most important risk factor for MPNST. Tumor size and fludeoxyglucose F 18 avidity are among the most helpful parameters to distinguish MPNST from a benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The histopathologic diagnosis is predominantly a diagnosis of light microscopy. Immunohistochemical stains are most helpful to distinguish high-grade MPNST from its histologic mimics. Current surgical management of high-grade MPNST is similar to that of other high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:27591499

  2. VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR 2 (VEGFR2) AS A MARKER FOR MALIGNANT VASCULAR TUMORS AND MESOTHELIOMA – IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF 262 VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL AND 1640 NONVASCULAR TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Markku; Rikala, Maarit-Sarlomo; Rysz, Janusz; Lasota, Jerzy; Wang, Zeng-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is a primary responder to vascular endothelial growth factor signal, and thereby regulates endothelial migration and proliferation. This receptor is expressed in endothelial cells and some vascular tumors, but many reports also detail its expression in carcinomas and lymphomas. VEGFR2 is a potential cell type marker, and data on VEGFR2 expression may also have therapeutic significance in view of recent availability of VEGFR2 inhibitors. In this study we immunohistochemically examined 262 vascular endothelial and 1640 non-vascular tumors and selected non-neoplastic tissues with a VEGFR2-specific rabbit monoclonal antibody 55B11. In early human embryo, VEFGR2 was expressed in endothelia of developing capillaries, thoracic duct, great vessels, hepatic sinusoids, epidermis, and mesothelia. In late first trimester fetus peripheral soft tissues, VEGFR2 was restricted to capillary endothelia, chrondrocytes, and superficial portion of the epidermis. In normal adult tissues, it was restricted to endothelia and mesothelia. VEGFR2 was consistently expressed in angiosarcomas, Kaposi sarcomas, and retiform hemangioendotheliomas. It was detected only in half of epithelioid hemangioendotheliomas (15/27), usually focally. VEGFR2 was strongly expressed in most capillary hemangiomas and weakly or focally in cavernous, venous, and spindle cell hemangiomas, and lymphangiomas. Malignant epithelial mesothelioma was found to be a unique epithelial neoplasm with a strong and nearly consistent VEGFR2 expression, including membrane staining (35/38). Approximately 10% of squamous cell carcinomas and 23% of pulmonary adenocarcinomas contained focal positivity. The only non-endothelial mesenchymal tumors found VEGFR2-positive were biphasic synovial sarcoma (focal epithelial expression), and chordoma. All melanomas and lymphomas were negative. VEGFR2 is a promising marker for malignant vascular tumors and malignant epithelioid mesothelioma

  3. Retinal vascular changes are a marker for cerebral vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk. PMID:26008809

  4. [How Treatable is Vascular Dementia?].

    PubMed

    Mori, Etsuro

    2016-04-01

    Vascular dementia is an umbrella term, encompassing the pathological changes in the brain due to cerebrovascular disease that result in dementia. Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia, after Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, I outline the concept of vascular dementia, the key aspects of the disease that are yet to be clarified, and the current status of clinical trials. Assessing these factors, I discuss how treatable vascular dementia presently is. Use of the term'vascular dementia'is riddled with uncertainties regarding disease classification, and non-standardized diagnostic criteria. There are difficulties in determining the exact relationship between cerebrovascular pathology and cognitive impairment. The comorbid effects of Alzheimer's pathology in some individuals also present an obstacle to reliable clinical diagnosis, and hinder research into effective management approaches. Vascular dementia is preventable and treatable, as there are established primary and secondary prevention measures for the causative cerebrovascular diseases, such as vascular risk factor intervention, antiplatelet therapy, and anticoagulation, amongst others. However, unlike Alzheimer's disease, there are no established symptomatic treatments for vascular dementia. Clinical trials of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine indicate that they produce small cognitive benefits in patients with vascular dementia, though the exact clinical significance of these is uncertain. Data are insufficient to support the widespread use of these drugs in vascular dementia. Rehabilitation and physical and cognitive exercise may be beneficial, but evidence of cognitive benefit and relief of neuropsychiatric symptoms due to exercise is lacking. PMID:27056862

  5. Peripheral nerve/field stimulation for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Deogaonkar, Milind; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation and peripheral nerve field stimulation are emerging as a viable neuromodulatory therapy in the treatment of refractory pain. Although the technology of percutaneous stimulation has been available for decades, recent advancements have broadened the number of indications. Success of treatment revolves around identifying the correct patient population, and the selection and placement of the appropriate electrodes and implantable pulse generators. Most results to date have come from case reports and retrospective studies. However, given the promising outcomes in reducing otherwise medically refractory pain, future randomized controlled studies are needed to assess this emerging technology. PMID:24262894

  6. About Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  7. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... registry health exam . Research on peripheral neuropathy and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... acute or subacute onset may be associated with herbicide exposure. Based on this evidence, VA presumed an ...

  8. Management of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Gey, Daniela C; Lesho, Emil P; Manngold, Johannes

    2004-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is common, but the diagnosis frequently is overlooked because of subtle physical findings and lack of classic symptoms. Screening based on the ankle brachial index using Doppler ultrasonography may be more useful than physical examination alone. Noninvasive modalities to locate lesions include magnetic resonance angiography, duplex scanning, and hemodynamic localization. Major risk factors for peripheral arterial disease are cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, older age (older than 40 years), hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and hyperhomocystinemia. Nonsurgical therapy for intermittent claudication involves risk-factor modification, exercise, and pharmacologic therapy. Based on available evidence, a supervised exercise program is the most effective treatment. All patients with peripheral arterial disease should undergo aggressive control of blood pressure, sugar intake, and lipid levels. All available strategies to help patients quit smoking, such as counseling and nicotine replacement, should be used. Effective drug therapies for peripheral arterial disease include aspirin (with or without dipyridamole), clopidogrel, cilostazol, and pentoxifylline. PMID:14971833

  9. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  10. Reproducibility and repeatability of peripheral microvascular assessment using iontophoresis in conjunction with laser Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Sachin; Sattar, Naveed; Petrie, John R; Cobbe, Stuart M; Ferrell, William R

    2007-09-01

    Interrogation of peripheral vascular function is increasingly recognized as a noninvasive surrogate marker for coronary vascular function and carries with it important prognostic information regarding future cardiovascular risk. Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) is a completely noninvasive method for looking at peripheral microvascular function. We sought to look at reproducibility and repeatability of LDI-derived assessment of peripheral microvascular function between arms and 8 weeks apart. We used LDI in conjunction with iontophoretic application of ACh and SNP to look at endothelium-dependent and -independent microvascular function, respectively, in a mixture of women with cardiac syndrome X and healthy volunteers. We looked at variation between arms (n = 40) and variation at 8 weeks apart (n = 22). When measurements were corrected for skin resistance, there was nonsignificant variation between arms for ACh (2.7%) and SNP (3.8%) and nonsignificant temporal variation for ACh (3.5%) and SNP (4.7%). Construction of Bland-Altman plots reinforce that measurements have good repeatability. Elimination of the baseline perfusion response had deleterious effects on repeatability. LDI can be used to assess peripheral vascular response with good repeatability as long as measurements are corrected for skin resistance, which affects drug delivery. This has important implications for the future use of LDI. PMID:17878765

  11. Medical management of vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Trenor, Cameron C

    2016-03-01

    We have entered an exciting era in the care of patients with vascular anomalies. These disorders require multidisciplinary care and coordination and dedicated centers have emerged to address this need. Vascular tumors have been treated with medical therapies for many years, while malformations have been historically treated with endovascular and operative procedures. The recent serendipitous discoveries of propranolol and sirolimus for vascular anomalies have revolutionized this field. In particular, sirolimus responses are challenging the dogma that vascular malformations are not biologically active. While initially explored for lymphatic anomalies, sirolimus is now being used broadly throughout the spectrum of vascular anomalies. Whether medical therapies are reserved for refractory patients or used first line is currently dependent on the experience and availability of alternative therapies at each institution. On the horizon, we anticipate new drugs targeting genes and pathways involved in vascular anomalies to be developed. Also, combinations of medications and protocols combining medical and procedural approaches are in development for refractory patients. PMID:27607327

  12. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  13. Putative mechanisms behind effects of spinal cord stimulation on vascular diseases: a review of experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mingyuan; Linderoth, Bengt; Foreman, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a widely used clinical technique to treat ischemic pain in peripheral, cardiac and cerebral vascular diseases. The use of this treatment advanced rapidly during the late 80's and 90's, particularly in Europe. Although the clinical benefits of SCS are clear and the success rate remains high, the mechanisms are not yet completely understood. SCS at lumbar spinal segments (L2-L3) produces vasodilation in the lower limbs and feet which is mediated by antidromic activation of sensory fibers and decreased sympathetic outflow. SCS at thoracic spinal segments (T1-T2) induces several benefits including pain relief, reduction in both frequency and severity of angina attacks, and reduced short-acting nitrate intake. The benefits to the heart are not likely due to an increase, or redistribution of local blood flow, rather, they are associated with SCS-induced myocardial protection and normalization of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system. At somewhat lower cervical levels (C3-C6), SCS induces increased blood flow in the upper extremities. SCS at the upper cervical spinal segments (C1-C2) increased cerebral blood flow, which is associated with a decrease in sympathetic activity, an increase in vasomotor center activity and a release of neurohumoral factors. This review will summarize the basic science studies that have contributed to our understanding about mechanisms through which SCS produces beneficial effects when used in the treatment of vascular diseases. Furthermore, this review will particularly focus on the antidromic mechanisms of SCS-induced vasodilation in the lower limbs and feet. PMID:18083639

  14. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  15. Vascular trauma in civilian practice.

    PubMed Central

    Golledge, J.; Scriven, M. W.; Fligelstone, L. J.; Lane, I. F.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular trauma is associated with major morbidity and mortality, but little is known about its incidence or nature in Britain. A retrospective study of 36 patients requiring operative intervention for vascular trauma under one vascular surgeon over a 6-year period was undertaken. Twenty-four patients suffered iatrogenic trauma (median age 61 years); including cardiological intervention (19), radiological intervention (2), varicose vein surgery (1), umbilical vein catherisation (1) and isolated hyperthermic limb perfusion (1). There were 23 arterial and three venous injuries. Twelve patients had accidental trauma (median age 23 years). Three of the ten patients with blunt trauma were referred for vascular assessment before orthopaedic intervention, two after an on-table angiogram and five only after an initial orthopaedic procedure (range of delay 6 h to 10 days). Injuries were arterial in nine, venous in two and combined in one. Angiography was obtained in six patients, and in two patients with multiple upper limb fractures identified the site of injury when clinical localisation was difficult. A variety of vascular techniques were used to treat the injuries. Two patients died postoperatively and one underwent major limb amputation. Thirty-two (89%) remain free of vascular sequelae after a median follow-up of 48 months (range 3-72 months). Vascular trauma is uncommon in the United Kingdom. To repair the injuries a limited repertoire of vascular surgery techniques is needed. Therefore, vascular surgical assessment should be sought at an early stage to prevent major limb loss. PMID:8540659

  16. Are MPNs vascular diseases?

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Guido; De Stefano, Valerio; Barbui, Tiziano

    2013-12-01

    A high risk of arterial and venous thrombosis is the hallmark of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), particularly polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET). Clinical aspects, pathogenesis and management of thrombosis in MPN resemble those of other paradigmatic vascular diseases. The occurrence of venous thrombosis in atypical sites, such as the splanchnic district, and the involvement of plasmatic prothrombotic factors, including an acquired resistance to activated protein C, both link MPN to inherited thrombophilia. Anticoagulants are the drugs of choice for these complications. The pathogenic role of leukocytes and inflammation, and the high mortality rate from arterial occlusions are common features of MPN and atherosclerosis. The efficacy and safety of aspirin in reducing deaths and major thrombosis in PV have been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. Finally, the Virchow's triad of impaired blood cells, endothelium and blood flow is shared both by MPN and thrombosis in solid cancer. Phlebotomy and myelosuppressive agents are the current therapeutic options for correcting these abnormalities and reducing thrombosis in this special vascular disease represented by MPN. PMID:24037420

  17. Critical role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor 3 in vascular repair

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaweck, Sebastian; Zimmer, Sebastian; Struck, Rafael; Werner, Nikos; Latz, Eicke; Nickenig, Georg; Ghanem, Alexander

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} NLRP3 is not required for systemic cardiovascular function in healthy mice. {yields} NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and that it does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. {yields} NLRP3 is critical in neointima formation following vascular injury. -- Abstract: Vascular remodeling characterized by hyperproliferative neointima formation is an unfavorable repair process that is triggered by vascular damage. This process is characterized by an increased local inflammatory and proliferative response that critically involves the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}). IL-1{beta} is expressed and cytosolically retained as a procytokine that requires additional processing prior to exerting its pro-inflammatory function. Maturation and release of pro IL-1{beta} is governed by a cytosolic protein scaffold that is known as the inflammasome. Here we show that NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pryin domain containing 3), an important activating component of the inflammasome, is involved in neointima formation after vascular injury. NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. However, neointima development following wire injury of the carotid artery was significantly decreased in NLRP3-deficient mice as compared to wild-type controls. In all, NLRP3 plays a non-redundant role in vascular damage mediated neointima formation. Our data establish NLRP3 as a key player in the response to vascular damage, which could open new avenues to therapeutic intervention.

  18. Drug-Coated Balloons for Infrainguinal Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjum S; Lee, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Revascularization of infrainguinal peripheral artery disease has traditionally been accomplished via percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. However, long-term results have been hampered by high rates of restenosis. Along with the advent of stents, paclitaxel-coated balloons are an emerging therapeutic option for the invasive management of infrainguinal peripheral artery disease. Paclitaxel has been successful in inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia, the main mechanism for in-stent restenosis. Technological advances have facilitated the development of paclitaxel-coated balloons, which show promise in early trials for femoropopliteal stenosis relative to uncoated balloons. For infrapopliteal stenoses, the data remain scant and conflicted. Therefore, large-scale randomized clinical trials with long-term follow-up evaluating safety and effectiveness between various strategies need to be performed to determine the optimal invasive management strategy for infrainguinal peripheral artery disease. PMID:27342205

  19. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approaches continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.

  20. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approachesmore » continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.« less

  1. Complete vascular healing and sustained suppression of neointimal thickening after local delivery of advanced c-myc antisense at six months follow-up in a rabbit balloon injury model

    SciTech Connect

    Kipshidze, Nicholas; Iversen, Patrick; Keane, Eamon; Stein, David; Chawla, Paramjith; Skrinska, Victor; Shankar, Latha Raja; Mehran, Roxana; Chekanov, Valerie; Dangas, George; Komorowski, Richard; Haudenschild, Christian; Khanna, Ashwani; Leon, Martin; Keelan, Michael H.; Moses, Jeffrey

    2002-03-01

    Background: Neointimal hyperplasia following percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is one of the major components of the process of restenosis. We evaluated the long-term impact of local delivery of c-myc neutrally charged antisense oligonucleotides (Resten-NG) upon neointimal formation following PTCA in a rabbit model.Methods:PTCA was performed in the iliac arteries of 10 New Zealand white rabbits at 8 atm for 30 s, three times. An infusion of 500 {mu}g Resten-NG (n=6) or saline (n=4) was delivered to the site at 2 atm via the outer balloon pores of the transport{sup TM} catheter over 2 min. The diet was supplemented with 0.25% cholesterol for 10 days before and 6 months following PTCA.Results:After 6 months, animals were sacrificed and vessels were fixed in formalin, processed and stained with hematoxylin, eosin, and movat. Histological analysis revealed complete vascular healing in both groups of animals. Planimetry showed that intimal areas were 1.71{+-}0.25 and 0.65{+-}0.36 mm{sup 2} in the control and antisense delivery groups, respectively (P<.05).Conclusion:We conclude that local delivery of Resten-NG significantly inhibited neointimal thickening following PTCA in a rabbit for up to 6 months.

  2. 219 vascular fellows' perception of the future of vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Anil P; Ascher, Enrico; Marks, Natalie; Shiferson, Alexander; Puggioni, Alessandra; Tran, Victor; Patel, Nirav; Jacob, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to identify the fellows' concerns about the future of the field of vascular surgery, we conducted a survey consisting of 22 questions at an annual national meeting in March from 2004 to 2007. In order to obtain accurate data, all surveys were kept anonymous. The fellows were asked (1) what type of practice they anticipated they would be in, (2) what the new training paradigm for fellows should be, (3) to assess their expectation of the needed manpower with respect to the demand for vascular surgeons, (4) what were major threats to the future of vascular surgery, (5) whether they had heard of and were in favor of the American Board of Vascular Surgery (ABVS), (6) who should be able to obtain vascular privileges, and (7) about their interest in an association for vascular surgical trainees. Of 273 attendees, 219 (80%) completed the survey. Males made up 87% of those surveyed, and 60% were between the ages of 31 and 35 years. Second-year fellows made up 82% of those surveyed. Those expecting to join a private, academic, or mixed practice made up 35%, 28%, and 20% of the respondents, respectively, with 71% anticipating entering a 100% vascular practice. Forty percent felt that 5 years of general surgery with 2 years of vascular surgery should be the training paradigm, while 45% suggested 3 and 3 years, respectively. A majority, 79%, felt that future demand would exceed the available manpower, while 17% suggested that manpower would meet demand. The major challenges to the future of vascular surgery were felt to be competition from cardiology (82%) or radiology (30%) and lack of an independent board (29%). Seventeen percent were not aware of the ABVS, and only 2% were against it; 71% suggested that vascular privileges be restricted to board-certified vascular surgeons. Seventy-six percent were interested in forming an association for vascular trainees to address the issues of the future job market (67%), endovascular training during fellowship (56

  3. Vascular access for extracorporeal life support: tips and tricks

    PubMed Central

    Reeb, Jeremie; Olland, Anne; Renaud, Stephane; Lejay, Anne; Santelmo, Nicola; Massard, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    In thoracic surgery, extracorporeal life support (ECLS) techniques are performed to (I) provide a short to mid term extracorporeal mechanical support; (II) realize the gas exchanges; and (III)—depending the configuration of the circuit—substitute the failed heart function. The objective of this review is to describe the rational of the different ECLS techniques used in thoracic surgery and lung transplantation (LTx) with a specific attention to the vascular access. Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) is the most common ECLS technique used in thoracic surgery and represents the best strategy to support the lung function. VV ECMO needs peripheral vascular access. The selection between his double-site or single-site configuration should be decided according the level of O2 requirements, the nosological context, and the interest to perform an ECLS ambulatory strategy. Venoarterial (VA) ECMO uses peripheral and/or central cannulation sites. Central VA ECMO is mainly used in LTx instead a conventional cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) to decrease the risk of hemorrhagic issues and the rate of primary graft dysfunction (PGD). Peripheral VA ECMO is traditionally realized in a femoro-femoral configuration. Femoro-femoral VA ECMO allows a cardiocirculatory support but does not provide an appropriate oxygenation of the brain and the heart. The isolated hypercapnic failure is currently supported by extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) devices inserted in jugular or subclavian veins. The interest of the Novalung (Novalung GmbH, Hechingen, Germany) persists due to his central configuration indicated to bridge to LTx patients suffering from pulmonary hypertension. The increasing panel of ECLS technologies available in thoracic surgery is the results of a century of clinical practices, engineering progress, and improvements of physiological knowledges. The selection of the ECLS technique—and therefore the vascular access to implant the device—for a given

  4. [Local vascular complications after iatrogenic femoral artery puncture].

    PubMed

    Fruhwirth, J; Pascher, O; Hauser, H; Amann, W

    1996-01-01

    Over a period of 5 years 81 vascular complications after 15,460 catheterizations of the femoral artery for diagnostic (n = 11,883) or therapeutic (n = 3577) procedures were registered. The following complications were observed in declining frequency: 1. False aneurysm (n = 65), 2. arterial occlusion (dissection, embolia, thrombosis) (n = 8), 3. vascular lesion causing profuse bleeding (n = 7), 4. AV-fistula (n = 1). The total complication rate was 0.52%. The complication rate was significantly higher in therapeutical procedures (1,03%) than in diagnostic investigations (0.37%). Pseudoaneurysms were complicated by thrombosis of the femoral vein (n = 3), lymphatic fistula (n = 3) and deep wound infection (n = 9); secondary complication rate 18.5%. Risk factors for local vascular complications are old age, female gender, high grade arteriosclerosis at the puncture site, overweight, manifest arterial hypertension and medication with cumarin, acetylsalicylic acid or heparin. Further complicating factors are connected with technical risks such as duration of the procedure. French size of the catheter, the catheter sheath and multiple punctures. Vascular repair was performed by simple angiography in most cases, but in 14.8% more extensive surgical procedures were required. In patients with signs of occlusive vascular disease the external iliac artery was replaced by a PTFE-vascular access graft in 4 cases and an arterioplasty of the deep femoral artery was performed in 2 patients. 36% of the operations were undertaken as emergencies. Reintervention was necessary for a postoperative bleeding complication in 1 case (surgical complication rate 1.2%). A female patient suffering from aortic valve stenosis died during emergency operation due to massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage after cardiac catheterization (mortality rate 1.2%). Over a median follow-up period of 37 months no late complications of the intervention were recorded, nor recurrences of peripheral arterial occlusive

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor: a neurovascular target in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Lange, Christian; Storkebaum, Erik; de Almodóvar, Carmen Ruiz; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Brain function critically relies on blood vessels to supply oxygen and nutrients, to establish a barrier for neurotoxic substances, and to clear waste products. The archetypal vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, arose in evolution as a signal affecting neural cells, but was later co-opted by blood vessels to regulate vascular function. Consequently, VEGF represents an attractive target to modulate brain function at the neurovascular interface. On the one hand, VEGF is neuroprotective, through direct effects on neural cells and their progenitors and indirect effects on brain perfusion. In accordance, preclinical studies show beneficial effects of VEGF administration in neurodegenerative diseases, peripheral neuropathies and epilepsy. On the other hand, pathologically elevated VEGF levels enhance vessel permeability and leakage, and disrupt blood-brain barrier integrity, as in demyelinating diseases, for which blockade of VEGF may be beneficial. Here, we summarize current knowledge on the role and therapeutic potential of VEGF in neurological diseases. PMID:27364743

  6. Vascular Protection by Tetrahydrobiopterin: Progress and Therapeutic Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Katusic, Zvonimir S.; d’Uscio, Livius; Nath, Karl A.

    2009-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential co-factor required for the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Suboptimal concentrations of BH4 in the endothelium reduce the biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO), thus contributing to the pathogenesis of vascular endothelial dysfunction. Supplementation with exogenous BH4 or therapeutic approaches that increase endogenous amounts of BH4 can reduce or reverse endothelial dysfunction by restoring production of NO. Improvements in formulations of BH4 for oral delivery have stimulated clinical trials which test the efficacy of BH4 in the treatment of systemic hypertension, peripheral arterial disease, coronary artery disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and sickle cell disease. This review discusses ongoing progress in the translation of knowledge, accumulated in pre-clinical studies, into the clinical application of BH4 in the treatment of vascular diseases. This review also addresses the emerging roles of BH4 in the regulation of endothelial function and their therapeutic implications. PMID:19042039

  7. [Intraosseous vascular access, a technic previously underestimated in France].

    PubMed

    Oriot, D; Cardona, J; Berthier, M; Nasimi, A; Boussemart, T

    1994-07-01

    Intraosseous vascular access is a simple and very efficient technique for fluid and drug administration in any pediatric emergencies where the intravenous route is impossible or inadequate. Yet it remains unrecognized in France. Its pharmacokinetics is close to that of peripheral intravenous route, but it allows much greater infusion flow rates. In pediatric resuscitation it must be considered as the number one technique of intravascular access in infants, and rapidly as the first alternative after failure of attempt of intravenous route in children under 6. Provided that the technique is performed with careful asepsis, the risk of infectious complications is very low. However the intraosseous route must remain a transitory vascular access, and has to be stopped as soon as possible, its use never exceeding 24 hours. PMID:7987470

  8. Current endovascular therapy for lower extremity peripheral arterial disease: indications, outcomes and modalities

    PubMed Central

    Yan, B P; Kiernan, T J; Lam, Y-Y; Yu, C-M

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis of the lower extremities frequently leads to lifestyle-restricting claudication and can cause critical limb ischaemia (rest pain, non-healing ulcer, or gangrene). The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is rising in line with an ageing population. In the USA, PAD affects 8–10 million people (approximately 12% of the adult population). There is a strong association with concomitant coronary artery and cerebral vascular disease in these patients, which represents a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with PAD. Disease affecting the lower extremity peripheral vessels is most aggressive in smokers and diabetics.

  9. Therapeutic Potential of Modulating MicroRNA in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hamburg, Naomi M.; Leeper, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) produces significant disability attributable to lower extremity ischemia. Limited treatment modalities exist to ameliorate clinical symptoms in patients with PAD. Growing evidence links microRNAs to key processes that govern disease expression in PAD including angiogenesis, endothelial function, inflammation, vascular regeneration, vascular smooth muscle cell function, restenosis, and mitochondrial function. MicroRNAs have been identified in circulation and may serve as novel biomarkers in PAD. This article reviews the potential contribution of microRNA to key pathways of disease development in PAD that may lead to microRNA-based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:23713861

  10. [Vertigo and peripheral ischemic cochleovestibular syndrome caused by circulatory insufficiency in the vertebrobasilar system].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, N S; Kirichenko, I M

    2006-01-01

    We studied characteristics of vestibular and acoustic disorders in patients with arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis and vascular dystonia; correlation between peripheral cochleovestibular syndromes (PCVS) and circulation in the major and intracranial arteries, central hemodynamics, organic changes in the brain. We discovered that anomalies and asymmetry in vertebral arteries diameters, stenoses, reduced stroke and minute blood volumes play an essential role in development of PCVS. The latter are rarely accompanied with ischemic foci in the brain. Medication of vascular vertigo consists in administration of an adequate drug. We believe that betaserk is most effective. PMID:16710175

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor from embryonic status to cardiovascular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a multifunctional cytokine with distinct functions in angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, vascular permeability, and hematopoiesis. VEGF is a highly conserved, disulfide-bonded dimeric glycoprotein of 34 to 45 kDa produced by several cell types including fibroblasts, neutrophils, endothelial cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, particularly T lymphocytes and macrophages. Six VEGF isoforms are generated as a result of alternative splicing from a single VEGF gene, consisting of 121, 145, 165, 183, 189, or 206 amino acids. VEGF121, VEGF145, and VEGF165 are secreted whereas VEGF183, VEGF189, and VEGF206 are cell membrane-bound. VEGF145 has a key role during the vascularization of the human ovarian follicle and corpus luteum, in the placentation and embryonic periods, and in bone and wound healing, while VEGF165 is the most abundant and biologically active isoform. VEGF has been linked with a number of vascular pathologies including cardiovascular diseases such ischemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke, and diabetes and its related complications. In this review we aimed to present some important roles of VEGF in a number of clinical issues and indicate its involvement in several phenomena from the initial steps of the embryonic period to cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26989723

  12. Vascular health late after Kawasaki disease: implications for accelerated atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yiu-Fai

    2014-11-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD), an acute vasculitis that primarily affects young children, is the most common acquired paediatric cardiovascular disease in developed countries. While sequelae of arterial inflammation in the acute phase of KD are well documented, its late effects on vascular health are increasingly unveiled. Late vascular dysfunction is characterized by structural alterations and functional impairment in term of arterial stiffening and endothelial dysfunction and shown to involve both coronary and systemic arteries. Further evidence suggests that continuous low grade inflammation and ongoing active remodeling of coronary arterial lesions occur late after acute illness and may play a role in structural and functional alterations of the arteries. Potential importance of genetic modulation on vascular health late after KD is implicated by associations between mannose binding lectin and inflammatory gene polymorphisms with severity of peripheral arterial stiffening and carotid intima-media thickening. The changes in cholesterol and lipoproteins levels late after KD further appear similar to those proposed to be atherogenic. While data on adverse vascular health are less controversial in patients with persistent or regressed coronary arterial aneurysms, data appear conflicting in individuals with no coronary arterial involvements or only transient coronary ectasia. Notwithstanding, concerns have been raised with regard to predisposition of KD in childhood to accelerated atherosclerosis in adulthood. Until further evidence-based data are available, however, it remains important to assess and monitor cardiovascular risk factors and to promote cardiovascular health in children with a history of KD in the long term. PMID:25550701

  13. Antibiotic treatment and resistance in chronic wounds of vascular origin

    PubMed Central

    TZANEVA, VALENTINA; MLADENOVA, IRENA; TODOROVA, GALINA; PETKOV, DIMITAR

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim The problem of antibiotic resistance is worldwide and affects many types of pathogens. This phenomenon has been growing for decades and nowadays we are faced with a wide range of worrisome pathogens that are becoming resistant and many pathogens that may soon be untreatable. The aim of this study was to determine the resistance and antibiotic treatment in chronic wounds of vascular origin. Methods We performed a cross sectional study on a sample of patients with chronic vascular wounds, hospitalized between October 2014 and August 2015, in the Clinic of Vascular Surgery in Trakia Hospital Stara Zagora. The statistical analysis of data was descriptive, considering the p value of ≤0.05, the threshold of statistical significance. Results In the group of 110 patients, the significantly most frequent chronic wound (p<0.001) was peripheral arteriopathy (47.3%, CI95%: 38.19–56.54). Among 159 strains, 30% of patients having multiple etiology, the species most frequently isolated were Staphylococcus aureus, E.coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis with a significant predominance (p<0.05) of the Gram negative (55.1%). The spectrum of strains resistance included the Beta-lactams (36.4%, p<0.001), Macrolides (20%), Tetracyclines (9.1%), Aminoglycosides (8.2%) and Fluoroquinolones (4.5%). Conclusions Gram negative microorganisms were the main isolates in patients with vascular chronic wound. Significantly predominant was the resistance to the beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:27547055

  14. Adaptive optics for peripheral vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosén, R.; Lundström, L.; Unsbo, P.

    2012-07-01

    Understanding peripheral optical errors and their impact on vision is important for various applications, e.g. research on myopia development and optical correction of patients with central visual field loss. In this study, we investigated whether correction of higher order aberrations with adaptive optics (AO) improve resolution beyond what is achieved with best peripheral refractive correction. A laboratory AO system was constructed for correcting peripheral aberrations. The peripheral low contrast grating resolution acuity in the 20° nasal visual field of the right eye was evaluated for 12 subjects using three types of correction: refractive correction of sphere and cylinder, static closed loop AO correction and continuous closed loop AO correction. Running AO in continuous closed loop improved acuity compared to refractive correction for most subjects (maximum benefit 0.15 logMAR). The visual improvement from aberration correction was highly correlated with the subject's initial amount of higher order aberrations (p = 0.001, R 2 = 0.72). There was, however, no acuity improvement from static AO correction. In conclusion, correction of peripheral higher order aberrations can improve low contrast resolution, provided refractive errors are corrected and the system runs in continuous closed loop.

  15. Synchronous Multiple Lung Adenocarcinomas: Estrogen Concentration in Peripheral Lung

    PubMed Central

    Shinchi, Yusuke; Sanada, Mune; Motooka, Yamato; Fujino, Kosuke; Mori, Takeshi; Suzuki, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Background The detection rate of synchronous multiple lung adenocarcinomas (SMLA), which display multiple ground glass opacity nodules in the peripheral lung, is increasing due to advances in high resolution computed tomography. The backgrounds of multicentric development of adenocarcinoma are unknown. In this study, we quantitated estrogen concentration in the peripheral lungs of postmenopausal female patients with SMLA. Methods The tissue concentration of estrogens (estrone [E1] and estdadiol [E2]) in the noncancerous peripheral lung were measured with liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry in postmenopausal female patients with lung adenocarcinoma. The expression levels of CYP19A1 in the normal lung were also quantitated with real-time PCR. Thirty patients with SMLA and 79 cases of control patients with single lung adenocarcinoma were analyzed. Results The concentrations of E1 and E2 in the noncancerous tissue were significantly higher in SMLA cases than control cases (P = 0.004 and P = 0.02, respectively). The minor allele (A) of single nucleotide polymorphism rs3764221 were significantly associated with higher concentration of E1 and E2 (P = 0.002 and P = 0.01, respectively) and higher CYP19A1 mRNA expression (P = 0.03). Conclusion The tissue estrogen concentration of peripheral lung was significantly higher in SMLA than control cases. The high concentration of estrogen may be one of the causes of multicentric development of peripheral lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:27526096

  16. [Banks of vascular homografts].

    PubMed

    Polvani, G L; Guarino, A; Pompilio, G; Parolari, A; Piccolo, G; Sala, A; Biglioli, P

    2001-01-01

    We define as Banking of the tissues all the procedures that include the finding, preparation, conservation and distribution of the homograft. The vascular homografts are taken and put into a solution of transportation at +4 degrees C and kept at this temperature till their arrival at the Bank. The following step is the dissection of the homograft which will have to be performed as quickly as possible at most 24 hours after the taking in conditions of maximum sterility. At the Italian Homograft Bank at Centro Cardiologico, the vascular homografts are kept at +4 degrees C for 96 hours on average with antibiotics. After a phase of sterilization at +4 degrees C the tissue is frozen according to a homogeneous and controlled thermic decrease and stored at -150 degrees C/-180 degrees C in fumes of liquid nitrogen till the moment of their employment allowing a long term conservation. The aim of all these procedures of cryopreservation is to keep the structural and functional integrity of cells and tissues. The thermic decrease of the tissues must occur so that to avoid all the damages of the cellular vitality and functionality and especially of the tissue structure in toto. In order to limitate these events some cryoprotector agents are employed because they reduce the concentration of the solutes, the cellular dehydration, the formation of micro-macro crystals. Another step to establish if the homograft is proper is the study of bacteriological and viral aspects. The viral screenings are performed on the donor's blood and the bacteriological tests are performed on the tissue and on the liquids. For each phase of the banking a series of information about the donor and about the tissues are recorded and filed both on paper and database so that to grant always a right conduct of the material. PMID:11552466

  17. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  18. Vascular ageing and interventions: lessons and learnings.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryan

    2016-06-01

    This review discusses the relationship between elevated blood pressure, hypertension, arterial stiffness and hence vascular ageing. This is a complex process and the majority of treatments target the consequences of this, rather than the pathophysiology of ageing itself. This is because preventing vascular ageing from occurring is complex and would require very early intervention and lifelong treatment. The process of arteriosclerosis is known to result from reversible and irreversible functional components, and, together, these are responsible for the increased systolic and decreased diastolic blood pressure seen with advancing age. Indeed, hypertension develops as it becomes more difficult for the heart to drive blood flow around the body, as a result of poor ventricular coupling and increased arterial stiffness. Elevated blood pressure is therefore a clinical manifestation of ageing that continues to increase with advancing years, and is also linked with an increased risk of cardiac, cerebrovascular and chronic kidney disease. These manifestations arise due to changing haemodynamics associated with ageing, and therefore treatments that reduce the development of these conditions or delay their progression have the potential to improve patient outcomes. This may be possible with existing therapies as well as new treatments currently under investigation. PMID:27102114

  19. The role of insulin in the vascular contributions to age-related dementia.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Timothy M; Craft, Suzanne

    2016-05-01

    In addition to its well-known role in energy metabolism in the body, insulin is a vasoactive hormone that regulates peripheral and cerebral blood flow and neuronal function. Vascular and metabolic dysfunctions are emerging risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-related dementias, and recent evidence suggests that the two pathways are constitutive and interrelated. As a result, an emphasis on correcting metabolic disorders is emerging as an important strategy in the treatment and prevention of age-related cognitive impairment and AD. We review the evidence regarding the unique and interactive effects of vascular and metabolic disorders in pathological brain aging, with special consideration of the role of insulin dysregulation in promoting AD pathologic processes and vascular brain injury. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26657615

  20. PERIPHERAL MECHANISMS IN APPETITE REGULATION

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral mechanisms in appetite regulation include the motor functions of the stomach, such as the rate of emptying and accommodation, which convey symptoms of satiation to the brain. The rich repertoire of peripherally released peptides and hormones provides feedback from the arrival of nutrients in different regions of the gut from where they are released to exert effects on satiation, or regulate metabolism through their incretin effects. Ultimately, these peripheral factors provide input to the highly organized hypothalamic circuitry and vagal complex of nuclei to determine cessation of energy intake during meal ingestion, and the return of appetite and hunger after fasting. Understanding these mechanisms is key to the physiological control of feeding and the derangements that occur in obesity and their restoration with treatment (as demonstrated by the effects of bariatric surgery). PMID:25241326

  1. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  2. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course. PMID:27001769

  3. [Complex assessment of vasomotor function of vascular endothelium in patients with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Gel'tser, B I; Savchenko, S V; Kotel'nikov, V N; Plotnikova, I V

    2004-01-01

    Vasomotor function of vascular endothelium was studied in 62 patients with grade 1-2 hypertension with moderate and high added risk. Methods included study of brachial and middle cerebral artery endothelium dependent and independent vasodilation/vasoconstriction, measurement of plasma levels of nitric oxide metabolites (NO(n)-), endothelin-1, and antithrombin, as well as registration of their changes during vasomotor tests with calculation of integral indexes. Most patients with hypertension differed from controls by preponderance of vasoconstrictor over vasodilator reactions both in peripheral and cerebral vascular bed. At the same time patients with hypertension had pronounced dissociation between vasomotor responses of cerebral and peripheral vessels compared with subjects with normal blood pressure (p<0.05). Besides lowered basal level of NO(n)- and high concentration of endothelin-1 patients with hypertension were characterized by hyperreactivity of nitricoxidergic system, augmented lability of endothelin producing system, and impaired athrombogenecity of vascular endothelium. Complex assessment of vasomotor function of vascular endothelium by sequential vasoactive tests characterizes functional and metabolic activity of cerebral and peripheral vessels and can be used for improvement of risk stratification and monitoring of efficacy of treatment of patients with hypertension. PMID:15111971

  4. Potential Peripheral Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Seema; Shah, Raj J.; Coleman, Paul; Sabbagh, Marwan

    2011-01-01

    Advances in the discovery of a peripheral biomarker for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's would provide a way to better detect the onset of this debilitating disease in a manner that is both noninvasive and universally available. This paper examines the current approaches that are being used to discover potential biomarker candidates available in the periphery. The search for a peripheral biomarker that could be utilized diagnostically has resulted in an extensive amount of studies that employ several biological approaches, including the assessment of tissues, genomics, proteomics, epigenetics, and metabolomics. Although a definitive biomarker has yet to be confirmed, advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of the disease and major susceptibility factors have been uncovered and reveal promising possibilities for the future discovery of a useful biomarker. PMID:22114744

  5. Peripheral signals modifying food reward.

    PubMed

    Menzies, John R W; Skibicka, Karolina P; Egecioglu, Emil; Leng, Gareth; Dickson, Suzanne L

    2012-01-01

    The pleasure derived from eating may feel like a simple emotion, but the decision to eat, and perhaps more importantly what to eat, involves central pathways linking energy homeostasis and reward and their regulation by metabolic and endocrine factors. Evidence is mounting that modulation of the hedonic aspects of energy balance is under the control of peripheral neuropeptides conventionally associated with homeostatic appetite control. Here, we describe the significance of reward in feeding, the neural substrates underlying the reward pathway and their modification by peptides released into the circulation from peripheral tissues. PMID:22249813

  6. The role of atherectomy in the treatment of lower extremity peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of lower extremity peripheral artery disease (LE-PAD) continues to increase and associated morbidity remains high. Despite the significant development of percutaneous revascularization strategies, over the past decade, LE-PAD still represents a unique challenge for interventional cardiologists and vascular surgeons. Method Typical features of atherosclerosis that affects peripheral vascular bed (diffuse nature, poor distal runoff, critical limb ischemia, chronic total occlusion) contribute to the disappointing results of traditional percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). New technologies have been developed in attempt to improve the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous revascularization. Among these, atherectomy, debulking and removing atherosclerotic plaque, offers the potential advantage of eliminating stretch on arterial walls and reducing rates of restenosis. Conclusions This review summarizes the features and the current applications of new debulking devices. PMID:23173800

  7. Role of homocysteine in age-related vascular and non-vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Parnetti, L; Bottiglieri, T; Lowenthal, D

    1997-08-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) may represent a metabolic link in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular diseases and old-age dementias. Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease and peripheral vascular disease, and is also associated with cerebrovascular disease; specifically, the risk of extracranial carotid atherosclerosis significantly increases in relation to Hcy levels. Hcy is a reliable marker of vitamin B12 deficiency, a common condition in the elderly which is known to induce neurological deficits including cognitive impairment; a high prevalence of folate deficiency has been reported in psychogeriatric patients suffering from depression and dementia. Both these vitamins occupy a key position in the remethylation and synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), a major methyl donor in CNS; therefore, deficiencies in either of these vitamins lead to a decrease in SAMe and increase in Hcy, which can be critical in the aging brain. Another pathogenetic mechanism linking high Hcy levels to reduced cognitive performances in the elderly might be represented by excitotoxicity, since hyperhomocysteinemia may lead to an excessive production of homocysteic acid and cysteine sulphinic acid, which act as endogenous agonists of NMDA receptors. Considering the reasonably high prevalence in the general population of a genetic predisposition to a thermolabile form of the enzyme 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), hyperhomocysteinemia can be seen as the result of multiple genetic and environmental factors leading to vascular and/or neurodegenerative disorders where age-related involutive phenomena represent a common pathogenetic ground. Systematic studies in different psychogeriatric conditions monitoring Hcy levels and clinical features before and after vitamin supplementation are therefore highly recommended. PMID:9359935

  8. Vascular parkinsonism: Deconstructing a syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vizcarra, Joaquin A.; Lang, Anthony E.; Sethi, Kapil D; Espay, Alberto J.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive ambulatory impairment and abnormal white matter signal on neuroimaging come together under the diagnostic umbrella of vascular parkinsonism. A critical appraisal of the literature, however, suggests that (1) no abnormal structural imaging pattern is specific to vascular parkinsonism; (2) there is poor correlation between brain magnetic resonance imaging hyperintensities and microangiopathic brain disease and parkinsonism from available clinicopathologic data; (3) pure parkinsonism from vascular injury (“definite” vascular parkinsonism) consistently results from ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes involving the substantia nigra and/or nigrostriatal pathway but sparing the striatum itself, the cortex, and the intervening white matter; and (4) many cases reported as vascular parkinsonism may represent pseudovascular parkinsonism (e.g., Parkinson disease or another neurodegenerative parkinsonism such as progressive supranuclear palsy with non-specific neuroimaging signal abnormalities), vascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., akinetic mutism due to bilateral mesial frontal strokes or apathetic depression from bilateral striatal lacunar strokes), or pseudovascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., higher-level gait disorders, including normal pressure hydrocephalus with transependimal exudate). These syndromic designations are preferable over vascular parkinsonism until pathology or validated biomarkers confirm the underlying nature and relevance of the leukoaraiosis. PMID:25997420

  9. Vascular Injuries: Trends in Management

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd Lateef; Ahangar, Ab Gani; Ganie, Farooq Ahmad; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Wani, Nasir-ud-din

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vascular injury presents a great challenge to the emergency resident because these injuries require urgent intervention to prevent loss of life or limb. Sometimes serious vascular injury presents with only subtle or occult signs or symptoms. The patient may present weeks or months after initial injury with symptoms of vascular insufficiency, embolization, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula etc. Although the majority of vascular injuries are caused by penetrating trauma from gunshot wounds, stabbing or blast injury, the possibility of vascular injury needs to be considered in patients presenting with displaced long bone fractures, crush injury, prolonged immobilization in a fixed position by tight casts or bandages and various invasive procedures. iatrogenic vascular injuries constitute about 10% of cases in most series; however the incidence is an increasing trend because more endovascular procedures such as angioplasty and cardiac catheterization are being performed routinely. Civilian trauma is more frequently seen in young males. However, it can occur at any age due to road accidents, firearms, bomb blasts and diagnostic procedures. Most of the time, civilian trauma causes less tissue damage. There is an epidemic of vascular injuries in Kashmir valley because of problems in law and order in the past two decades. This review deals with the topic in detail. PMID:24350103

  10. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Blei, Francine

    2015-04-01

    Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies encompass entities with a vascular anomaly as the predominant feature vs those syndromes with predominant somatic overgrowth and a vascular anomaly as a more minor component. The focus of this article is to categorize these syndromes phenotypically, including updated clinical criteria, radiologic features, evaluation, management issues, pathophysiology, and genetic information. A literature review was conducted in PubMed using key words "overgrowth syndromes and vascular anomalies" as well as specific literature reviews for each entity and supportive genetic information (e.g., somatic mosaicism). Additional searches in OMIM and Gene Reviews were conducted for each syndrome. Disease entities were categorized by predominant clinical features, known genetic information, and putative affected signaling pathway. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of disorders, often with variable clinical expression, due to germline or somatic mutations. Overgrowth can be focal (e.g., macrocephaly) or generalized, often asymmetrically (and/or mosaically) distributed. All germ layers may be affected, and the abnormalities may be progressive. Patients with overgrowth syndromes may be at an increased risk for malignancies. Practitioners should be attentive to patients having syndromes with overgrowth and vascular defects. These patients require proactive evaluation, referral to appropriate specialists, and in some cases, early monitoring for potential malignancies. Progress in identifying vascular anomaly-related overgrowth syndromes and their genetic etiology has been robust in the past decade and is contributing to genetically based prenatal diagnosis and new therapies targeting the putative causative genetic mutations. PMID:25937473

  11. Atherosclerotic vascular disease in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Matthew H.; Mandl, Lisa A.; Costenbader, Karen; Fox, Ervin; Karlson, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    In the United States, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disproportionately affects African Americans. It has become a chronic disease with long-term morbidity including chronic renal disease, osteoporosis, cataracts, psychosocial impairment, and importantly, atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD). The latter (myocardial infarction, angina, peripheral vascular disease and stroke) are strikingly accelerated, occurring in subjects who are predominantly premenopausal women at an age when ASVD is rare or unusual. Although much is known about the biology, risk factors, and the prevention of atherosclerosis in normal individuals, little work has been done in SLE. In fact, ASVD in people with SLE may be a different disease. Approximately 1.5% of SLE patients per year will have a myocardial infarction or equivalent; about 0.5% of SLE patients per year will have a stroke. The risk factors for ASVD in SLE are based on small, retrospective, single center studies. These suggest that the risk factors known for the general population (i.e., smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, high LDL cholesterol, etc.) are also observed in SLE. The best study of risk factors shows that even accounting for the known factors, SLE and/or its treatment (glucocorticoids) is by far the most important. Our current management of cardiovascular risk factors in SLE patients with ASVD is substandard and our adherence to national guidelines for prevention is substandard. It is not known whether improving either will prevent these disastrous outcomes. Very little is known about the risk factors in African Americans with SLE, although there is data to suggest that they may not be identical to those seen in Caucasian populations. The study of the best and most effective means to prevent ASVD in SLE and in African Americans with SLE and in African Americans with SLE should be a major priority. PMID:12392045

  12. Bacterial invasion of vascular cell types: vascular infectology and atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kozarov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    To portray the chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis, leukocytic cell types involved in the immune response to invading pathogens are often the focus. However, atherogenesis is a complex pathological deterioration of the arterial walls, where vascular cell types are participants with regards to deterioration and disease. Since other recent reviews have detailed the role of both the innate and adaptive immune response in atherosclerosis, herein we will summarize the latest developments regarding the association of bacteria with vascular cell types: infections as a risk factor for atherosclerosis; bacterial invasion of vascular cell types; the atherogenic sequelae of bacterial presence such as endothelial activation and blood clotting; and the identification of the species that are able to colonize this niche. The evidence of a polybacterial infectious component of the atheromatous lesions opens the doors for exploration of the new field of vascular infectology and for the study of atherosclerosis microbiome. PMID:22185451

  13. Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and related risk factors in Turkish elders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is known that prevalence of peripheral arterial disease being a widespread atherosclerotic vascular disease increases by age. On the other hand, no comprehensive study showing the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in Turkish elders is seen. In this study, it is aimed to assess prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and related risk factors in Turkish elders in primary health center. Methods 507 elderly staying at Narlidere Geriatric Care Center and Residential Home and accepting to participate in the study were included in the study. Epidemiological data for diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease, risk factors, findings of physical examination and ankle brachial index measurements were assessed in the study. Data were analyzed in terms of prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, age and gender relation and other cardiovascular risk factors. Results Of the participants, 317 (62.5%) were female. The mean age was 77.61 ± 6.93 years (62-102). The most wide-spread chronic diseases in elderly included hypertension, coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia and Type 2 DM, respectively. On the other hand, only 7 (1.4%) elderly were diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease. The number of elderly ABI of whom was measured as < 0.90 and sent to cardiovascular surgery polyclinic with the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease was assessed as 30 (5.9%). Intermittent claudication was seen in about half of these patients. Conclusions Peripheral arterial disease is expected to be seen prevailing in elderly. However, it was determined at very low rate before the study due to the fact that the disease cannot be diagnosed clinically especially in early-period. Peripheral arterial disease determined in the study is lower than expected as per the age group. This can be associated with practices of geriatrics nursing and family practice including continuous care to reduce cardiovascular risk factors of patients staying at the unit. PMID:21929797

  14. Optimal Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease for the Non-Specialist

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, ME; Reid, JA; Lau, LL; Hannon, RJ; Lee, B

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) now affects approximately 20% of adults older than 55 years to an estimated total of 27 million people in the Western World. The aim of this paper is to describe the medical management of PAD for the non-vascular specialist, particularly general practitioners, where PAD has now been included in the Northern Ireland Department of Health's Primary Care Service Framework (Directed Enhanced Service). PMID:22347739

  15. Vascular infections: exceeding the threshold.

    PubMed

    Cox, T R

    1995-12-01

    During fiscal year 1988, our hospital infection control practitioner identified a 400% increase in the incidence of vascular surgery nosocomial infections. The six graft and six amputation infections were validated as nosocomial against hospital definitions adopted from the Centers for Disease Control. Our Infection Control Committee mandated an audit of the infected vascular surgery patients using a case/control design to identify and examine associated variables that may need attention. The significant finding was microbial resistance to prophylactic antibiotics used during surgery (p > 0.0001, Fisher's exact). The use of vancomycin as a prophylactic antimicrobial agent for all major vascular cases was recommended to the surgeons. PMID:8775383

  16. How to Pick Computer Peripherals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Glenn

    1983-01-01

    A guide to computer peripherals--additional hardware that can expand the educational uses of computers--is given. Tips are furnished on selection and possible use of computer printers; modulator/demodulators (modems); graphics tablets; plotters, speech synthesizers, and robots. (PP)

  17. [Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Sports].

    PubMed

    Tettenborn, B; Mehnert, S; Reuter, I

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries due to sports are relatively rare but the exact incidence is not known due to a lack of epidemiological studies. Particular sports activities tend to cause certain peripheral nerve injuries including direct acute compression or stretching, repetitive compression and stretching over time, or another mechanism such as ischemia or laceration. These nerve lesions may be severe and delay or preclude the athlete's return to sports, especially in cases with delayed diagnosis. Repetitive and vigorous use or overuse makes the athlete vulnerable to disorders of the peripheral nerves, and sports equipment may cause compression of the nerves. Depending on etiology, the treatment is primarily conservative and includes physiotherapy, modification of movements and sports equipment, shoe inserts, splinting, antiphlogistic drugs, sometimes local administration of glucocorticoids or, lately, the use of extracorporeal shock waves. Most often, cessation of the offending physical activity is necessary. Surgery is only indicated in the rare cases of direct traumatic nerve injury or when symptoms are refractory to conservative therapy. Prognosis mainly depends on the etiology and the available options of modifying measures.This article is based on the publications "Reuter I, Mehnert S. Engpasssyndrome peripherer Nerven bei Sportlern". Akt Neurol 2012;39:292-308 and Sportverl Sportschad 2013;27:130-146. PMID:27607069

  18. Gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the setting of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a relatively common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that leads to progressive narrowing of the lumen of leg arteries. Circulating monocytes are in contact with the arterial wall and can serve as reporters of vascular pathology in the setting of PAD. We performed gene expression analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients with PAD and controls without PAD to identify differentially regulated genes. Methods PAD was defined as an ankle brachial index (ABI) ≤0.9 (n = 19) while age and gender matched controls had an ABI > 1.0 (n = 18). Microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix HG-U133 plus 2.0 gene chips and analyzed using GeneSpring GX 11.0. Gene expression data was normalized using Robust Multichip Analysis (RMA) normalization method, differential expression was defined as a fold change ≥1.5, followed by unpaired Mann-Whitney test (P < 0.05) and correction for multiple testing by Benjamini and Hochberg False Discovery Rate. Meta-analysis of differentially expressed genes was performed using an integrated bioinformatics pipeline with tools for enrichment analysis using Gene Ontology (GO) terms, pathway analysis using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), molecular event enrichment using Reactome annotations and network analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis suite. Extensive biocuration was also performed to understand the functional context of genes. Results We identified 87 genes differentially expressed in the setting of PAD; 40 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated. We employed an integrated bioinformatics pipeline coupled with literature curation to characterize the functional coherence of differentially regulated genes. Conclusion Notably, upregulated genes mediate immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, stress response, phosphorylation, hemostasis, platelet activation and platelet aggregation. Downregulated genes included several genes from

  19. Relationship between regional spending on vascular care and amputation rate

    PubMed Central

    Goodney, Philip P.; Travis, Lori L.; Brooke, Benjamin S.; DeMartino, Randall R.; Goodman, David C.; Fisher, Elliott S.; Birkmeyer, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Importance While lower extremity revascularization is effective in preventing amputation, the relationship between spending on vascular care and regional amputation rates remains unclear. Objective To test the hypothesis that higher regional spending on vascular care is associated with lower amputation rates in patients with severe peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting United States Medicare patients, 2003-2010 Participants 18,463 patients who underwent major PAD-related amputation. Exposures Price-adjusted Medicare spending on revascularization procedures and related vascular care in the year before lower extremity amputation, across hospital referral regions. Main Outcome Measure(s) Correlation coefficient between regional spending on vascular care and regional rates of PAD-related amputation. Results Among patients ultimately subject to amputation, 64% were admitted to the hospital in the year prior to amputation for revascularization, wound-related care, or both; 36% were admitted only for their amputation. The mean cost of inpatient care in the year before amputation, including the amputation itself, was $22,405, but varied from $11,077 (Bismarck, North Dakota) to $42,613 (Salinas, California) (p<0.001). Patients in high-spending regions were more likely to undergo vascular procedures in crude analyses (12.0 procedures per 10,000 patients in the lowest quintile of spending, 20.4 procedures per 10,000 patients in the highest quintile of spending, p<0.0001), as well as in risk-adjusted analyses (adjusted OR for receiving a vascular procedure in highest quintile of spending = 3.5, 95 % CI 3.2-3.8, p<0.0001). While revascularization was associated with higher spending (R=0.38, p<0.001), higher spending was not associated with lower regional amputation rates (R=0.10, p=0.06). Regions most aggressive in the use of endovascular interventions which most likely to have high spending (R=0.42, p=0.002) and high amputation rates (R

  20. Abdominopelvic vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Sriussadaporn, S

    2000-01-01

    The clinical records of 25 patients with 32 abdominopelvic vascular injuries were reviewed. Sixty per cent of patients sustained blunt trauma and 40 per cent sustained penetrating trauma. Nineteen patients (76%) were in shock on arrival, 2 of them underwent ER thoracotomy when they first arrived in the emergency room. Nine patients (36%) had signs of lower extremity ischemia. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) ranged from 16-50, mean 29 +/- 10.0. Nineteen patients (76%) had 35 associated injuries. Of the 32 injured vessels; 8 were external iliac artery, 5 were renal vein, 4 were abdominal aorta, 3 were common iliac artery, common iliac vein, external iliac vein and inferior vena cava, and 1 was superior mesenteric artery, superior mesenteric vein and median sacral artery. Treatments included: 13 lateral repair, 4 prosthetic grafting, 4 nephrectomy, 3 ligation, 3 reversed saphenous vein grafting, 2 end to end anastomosis, 1 internal iliac artery grafting, 1 intravascular shunt and packing and 1 perihepatic packing. Nine patients (36%) died. High mortality was observed in injuries to the abdominal aorta (75%), inferior vena cava (66.7%), common iliac vein (66.7%) and associated major pelvic fractures (50%). Factors significantly associated with mortality were the presence of shock on arrival, associated injuries and high Injury Severity Score. The author concludes that short prehospital time, effective resuscitation and proper surgical decision making are important for survival in these critically injured patients. PMID:10710864

  1. Autophagy in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ryter, Stefan W; Lee, Seon-Jin; Smith, Akaya; Choi, Augustine M K

    2010-02-01

    Autophagy, or "self eating," refers to a regulated cellular process for the lysosomal-dependent turnover of organelles and proteins. During starvation or nutrient deficiency, autophagy promotes survival through the replenishment of metabolic precursors derived from the degradation of endogenous cellular components. Autophagy represents a general homeostatic and inducible adaptive response to environmental stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypoxia, oxidative stress, and exposure to pharmaceuticals and xenobiotics. Whereas elevated autophagy can be observed in dying cells, the functional relationships between autophagy and programmed cell death pathways remain incompletely understood. Preclinical studies have identified autophagy as a process that can be activated during vascular disorders, including ischemia-reperfusion injury of the heart and other organs, cardiomyopathy, myocardial injury, and atherosclerosis. The functional significance of autophagy in human cardiovascular disease pathogenesis remains incompletely understood, and potentially involves both adaptive and maladaptive outcomes, depending on model system. Although relatively few studies have been performed in the lung, our recent studies also implicate a role for autophagy in chronic lung disease. Manipulation of the signaling pathways that regulate autophagy could potentially provide a novel therapeutic strategy in the prevention or treatment of human disease. PMID:20160147

  2. Education in vascular access.

    PubMed

    Moist, Louise M; Lee, Timmy C; Lok, Charmaine E; Al-Jaishi, Ahmed; Xi, Wang; Campbell, Vern; Graham, Janet; Wilson, Barb; Vachharajani, Tushar J

    2013-01-01

    The successful creation and use of an arteriovenous vascular access (VA) requires a coordinated, educated multidisciplinary team to ensure an optimal VA for each patient. Patient education programs on VA are associated with increased arteriovenous VA use at dialysis initiation. Education should be tailored to patient goals and preferences with the understanding that experiential education from patient to patient is far more influential than that provided by the healthcare professional. VA education for the nephrologist should focus on addressing the systematic and patient-level barriers in achieving a functional VA, with specific components relating to VA creation, maturation, and cannulation that consider patient goals and preferences. A deficit in nursing skills in the area of assessment and cannulation can have devastating consequences for hemodialysis patients. Delivery of an integrated education program increases nurses' knowledge of VA and development of simulation programs or constructs to assist in cannulation of the VA will greatly facilitate the much needed skill transfer. Adequate VA surgical training and experience are critical to the creation and outcomes of VA. Simulations can benefit nephrologists, dialysis nurses surgeons, and interventionalists though aiding in surgical creation, understanding of the physiology and anatomy of a dysfunctional VA, and practicing cannulation techniques. All future educational initiatives must emphasize the importance of multidisciplinary care to attain successful VA outcomes. PMID:23432319

  3. Constructal vascularized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetkin, Erdal

    2015-06-01

    Smart features such as self-healing and selfcooling require bathing the entire volume with a coolant or/and healing agent. Bathing the entire volume is an example of point to area (or volume) flows. Point to area flows cover all the distributing and collecting kinds of flows, i.e. inhaling and exhaling, mining, river deltas, energy distribution, distribution of products on the landscape and so on. The flow resistances of a point to area flow can be decreased by changing the design with the guidance of the constructal law, which is the law of the design evolution in time. In this paper, how the flow resistances (heat, fluid and stress) can be decreased by using the constructal law is shown with examples. First, the validity of two assumptions is surveyed: using temperature independent Hess-Murray rule and using constant diameter ducts where the duct discharges fluid along its edge. Then, point to area types of flows are explained by illustrating the results of two examples: fluid networks and heating an area. Last, how the structures should be vascularized for cooling and mechanical strength is documented. This paper shows that flow resistances can be decreased by morphing the shape freely without any restrictions or generic algorithms.

  4. Retina vascular network recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascini, Guido; Passerini, Giorgio; Puliti, Paolo; Zingaretti, Primo

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of morphological and structural modifications of the retina vascular network is an interesting investigation method in the study of diabetes and hypertension. Normally this analysis is carried out by qualitative evaluations, according to standardized criteria, though medical research attaches great importance to quantitative analysis of vessel color, shape and dimensions. The paper describes a system which automatically segments and recognizes the ocular fundus circulation and micro circulation network, and extracts a set of features related to morphometric aspects of vessels. For this class of images the classical segmentation methods seem weak. We propose a computer vision system in which segmentation and recognition phases are strictly connected. The system is hierarchically organized in four modules. Firstly the Image Enhancement Module (IEM) operates a set of custom image enhancements to remove blur and to prepare data for subsequent segmentation and recognition processes. Secondly the Papilla Border Analysis Module (PBAM) automatically recognizes number, position and local diameter of blood vessels departing from optical papilla. Then the Vessel Tracking Module (VTM) analyses vessels comparing the results of body and edge tracking and detects branches and crossings. Finally the Feature Extraction Module evaluates PBAM and VTM output data and extracts some numerical indexes. Used algorithms appear to be robust and have been successfully tested on various ocular fundus images.

  5. From the battlefront: peripheral nerve surgery in modern day warfare.

    PubMed

    Ecklund, James M; Ling, Geoffrey S F

    2009-01-01

    Warfare historically causes a large number of peripheral nerve injuries. During the current global war on terror, an increased use of advanced regional anesthesia techniques appears to have significantly reduced pain syndromes that have been previously reported with missile-induced nerve injuries. Additionally, a new program has been established to develop advanced prosthetic devises that can interface with neural tissue to obtain direct neural control. As this technology matures, the functional restoration gained from these new generation prosthetic devices may exceed that which can be obtained by standard nerve repair techniques. PMID:19064183

  6. Preoperative evaluation of cardiac risk using dobutamine-thallium imaging in vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Zellner, J.L.; Elliott, B.M.; Robison, J.G.; Hendrix, G.H.; Spicer, K.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Coronary artery disease is frequently present in patients undergoing evaluation for reconstructive peripheral vascular surgery. Dobutamine-thallium imaging has been shown to be a reliable and sensitive noninvasive method for the detection of significant coronary artery disease. Eighty-seven candidates for vascular reconstruction underwent dobutamine-thallium imaging. Forty-eight patients had an abnormal dobutamine-thallium scan. Twenty-two patients had infarct only, while 26 had reversible ischemia demonstrated on dobutamine-thallium imaging. Fourteen of 26 patients with reversible ischemia underwent cardiac catheterization and 11 showed significant coronary artery disease. Seven patients underwent preoperative coronary bypass grafting or angioplasty. There were no postoperative myocardial events in this group. Three patients were denied surgery on the basis of unreconstructible coronary artery disease, and one patient refused further intervention. Ten patients with reversible myocardial ischemia on dobutamine-thallium imaging underwent vascular surgical reconstruction without coronary revascularization and suffered a 40% incidence of postoperative myocardial ischemic events. Five patients were denied surgery because of presumed significant coronary artery disease on the basis of the dobutamine-thallium imaging and clinical evaluation alone. Thirty-nine patients with normal dobutamine-thallium scans underwent vascular reconstructive surgery with a 5% incidence of postoperative myocardial ischemia. Dobutamine-thallium imaging is a sensitive and reliable screening method which identifies those patients with coronary artery disease who are at high risk for perioperative myocardial ischemia following peripheral vascular surgery.

  7. Disruption of vascular Ca2+-activated chloride currents lowers blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Heinze, Christoph; Seniuk, Anika; Sokolov, Maxim V.; Huebner, Antje K.; Klementowicz, Agnieszka E.; Szijártó, István A.; Schleifenbaum, Johanna; Vitzthum, Helga; Gollasch, Maik; Ehmke, Heimo; Schroeder, Björn C.; Hübner, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    High blood pressure is the leading risk factor for death worldwide. One of the hallmarks is a rise of peripheral vascular resistance, which largely depends on arteriole tone. Ca2+-activated chloride currents (CaCCs) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are candidates for increasing vascular contractility. We analyzed the vascular tree and identified substantial CaCCs in VSMCs of the aorta and carotid arteries. CaCCs were small or absent in VSMCs of medium-sized vessels such as mesenteric arteries and larger retinal arterioles. In small vessels of the retina, brain, and skeletal muscle, where contractile intermediate cells or pericytes gradually replace VSMCs, CaCCs were particularly large. Targeted disruption of the calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A, also known as ANO1, in VSMCs, intermediate cells, and pericytes eliminated CaCCs in all vessels studied. Mice lacking vascular TMEM16A had lower systemic blood pressure and a decreased hypertensive response following vasoconstrictor treatment. There was no difference in contractility of medium-sized mesenteric arteries; however, responsiveness of the aorta and small retinal arterioles to the vasoconstriction-inducing drug U46619 was reduced. TMEM16A also was required for peripheral blood vessel contractility, as the response to U46619 was attenuated in isolated perfused hind limbs from mutant mice. Out data suggest that TMEM16A plays a general role in arteriolar and capillary blood flow and is a promising target for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:24401273

  8. Microsurgical Techniques Used to Construct the Vascularized and Neurotized Tissue Engineered Bone

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Junjun; Bi, Long; Jin, Dan; Wei, Kuanhai; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Pei, Guoxian

    2014-01-01

    The lack of vascularization in the tissue engineered bone results in poor survival and ossification. Tissue engineered bone can be wrapped in the soft tissue flaps which are rich in blood supply to complete the vascularization in vivo by microsurgical technique, and the surface of the bone graft can be invaded with new vascular network. The intrinsic vascularization can be induced via a blood vessel or an arteriovenous loop located centrally in the bone graft by microsurgical technique. The peripheral nerve especially peptidergic nerve has effect on the bone regeneration. The peptidergic nerve can be used to construct the neurotized tissue engineered bone by implanting the nerve fiber into the center of bone graft. Thus, constructing a highly vascularized and neurotized tissue engineered bone according with the theory of biomimetics has become a useful method for repairing the large bone defect. Many researchers have used the microsurgical techniques to enhance the vascularization and neurotization of tissue engineered bone and to get a better osteogenesis effect. This review aims to summarize the microsurgical techniques mostly used to construct the vascularized and neurotized tissue engineered bone. PMID:24900962

  9. Region-specific vascular remodeling and its prevention by artificial gravity in weightless environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Fan

    2013-12-01

    Evidence from recent ground and spaceflight studies with animals and humans supports the notion that microgravity-induced vascular remodeling contributes to postflight orthostatic intolerance. In the vascular beds of lower body, such as in splanchnic and lower limb circulation, resistance vessels would undergo hypotrophy and decrement in myogenic tone and vasoreactivity. Thus, despite the concurrent sympathetic activation, the increase in peripheral vascular resistance would still be compromised while astronauts were re-exposed to Earth's 1-G gravity, since ~75 % of the total vascular conductance lies below the heart. On the contrary, cerebral arteries would undergo hypertrophy and vasoreactivity enhancement due to adaptation to cerebral hypertension, which protects the down-stream microcirculation in the brain during spaceflight. However, the enhanced vasoreactivity of cerebral vessels might also aggravate postflight orthostatic intolerance, particularly after long-duration spaceflight. Animal studies have indicated that the underlying mechanisms may involve ion-channel remodeling in vascular smooth muscle cells and vascular NO-NOS and local renin-angiotensin system (L-RAS). Furthermore, vascular remodeling and associated ion-channel and L-RAS changes can be prevented by a countermeasure of daily short-duration restoring to normal standing posture. These findings substantiate in general the hypothesis that redistribution of transmural pressure along the arterial vasculature due to the removal of gravity might be the primary factor that initiates vascular remodeling in microgravity, and daily short-duration restoring its normal distribution by intermittent artificial gravity (IAG) can effectively prevent the vascular adaptation and hence postflight cardiovascular deconditioning. IAG might also be beneficial in maintaining vascular health during future long-duration space flight. PMID:23525669

  10. MicroRNA and vascular remodelling in acute vascular injury and pulmonary vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Robert A.; Hata, Akiko; MacLean, Margaret R.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular remodelling is an integral pathological process central to a number of cardiovascular diseases. The complex interplay between distinct cell populations in the vessel wall following vascular injury leads to inflammation, cellular dysfunction, pro-growth signals in the smooth muscle cell (SMC) compartment, and the acquisition of a synthetic phenotype. Although the signals for vascular remodelling are diverse in different pathological contexts, SMC proliferation and migration are consistently observed. It is therefore critical to elucidate key mechanisms central to these processes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding sequences of RNA that have the capacity to regulate many genes, pathways, and complex biological networks within cells, acting either alone or in concert with one another. In diseases such as cancer and cardiac disease, the role of miRNA in disease pathogenesis has been documented in detail. In contrast, despite a great deal of interest in miRNA, relatively few studies have directly assessed the role of miRNA in vascular remodelling. The potential for modulation of miRNA to achieve therapeutic benefits in this setting is attractive. Here, we focus on the role of miRNA in vascular inflammation and remodelling associated with acute vascular injury (vein graft disease, angioplasty restenosis, and in-stent restenosis) as well as in vascular remodelling associated with the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:22065733

  11. Angiography of Hepatic Vascular Malformations Associated with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Manabu Tate, Etuko; Nishii, Toshiaki; Watarai, Jiro; Shioya, Takanobu; White, Robert I.

    2003-04-15

    Purpose: To describe the angiographic features of hepatic involvement in hereditary hemorrhagictelangiectasia (HHT), particularly the presence of portovenous shunts. Methods: We reviewed the angiographic findings of seven patients with HHT. The patients comprised three women and four men with a mean age of 51 years. Results: Intrahepatictelangiectasias were found in all seven patients and shunts between three vascular channels were found in six of seven patients. In the four patients who had portovenous shunts combined with arterioportal shunts, the portovenous shunts were large. Three patients had noportovenous shunts. Two of these patients had arteriovenous shunts, and one had no shunt. The mean age (69 years) of the patients with portovenous shunts was older than those without portovenous shunts (26 years). Conclusions: Hepatic vascular lesions in HHT are varied, ranging from telangiectasias to large shunts between three vascular channels. In an advanced stage of involvement, large portovenous shunts are present.

  12. Visualization of peripheral vasodilative indices in human skin by use of red, green, blue images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishidate, Izumi; Tanaka, Noriyuki; Kawase, Tatsuya; Maeda, Takaaki; Yuasa, Tomonori; Aizu, Yoshihisa; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Niizeki, Kyuichi

    2013-06-01

    We propose a method to visualize the arterial inflow, the vascular resistance, and the venous capacitance in the skin tissue from red, green, blue (RGB) digital color images. The arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the skin tissue are visualized based on an increase in the rate of change in the total blood concentration and the change of the total blood concentration during upper limb occlusion at a pressure of 50 mmHg. The resultant arterial inflow with the measured mean arterial pressure also provides an image of the vascular resistance in human skin. The arterial inflow, the vascular resistance, and the venous capacitance acquired by the method are well correlated with those obtained from the conventional strain-gauge plethysmograph. The correlation coefficients R between the estimated values by the method and the measurements by the SPG are calculated to be 0.83 (P<0.001) for the arterial inflow, 0.77 (P<0.01) for the vascular resistance, and 0.77 (P<0.01) for the venous capacitance. The arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the skin tissue are significantly higher in active subjects compared with the sedentary subjects, whereas the vascular resistance was significantly lower in the active subjects compared with the sedentary subjects. The results of the present study indicate the possibility of using the proposed method for evaluating the peripheral vascular functions in human skin.

  13. BMP signaling in vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Pardali, Evangelia; Sánchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; ten Dijke, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family that signal via type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors and intracellular Smad transcription factors. BMPs are multifunctional regulators of development and tissue homeostasis and they were initially characterized as inducers of bone regeneration. Genetic studies in humans and mice showed that perturbations in BMP signaling lead to various diseases, such as skeletal diseases, vascular diseases and cancer. Mutations in BMP type II receptor and BMP type I receptor/activin receptor-like kinase 1 have been linked to pulmonary arterial hypertension and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, respectively. BMPs have also been implicated in promoting vascular calcification and tumor angiogenesis. In this review we discuss the role of BMP signaling in vascular diseases and the value of BMP signaling as a vascular disease marker or a therapeutic target. PMID:22710160

  14. How to Prevent Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  15. Social media in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Gates, Lindsay; Mitchell, Erica L; Muhs, Bart E

    2013-04-01

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of social media to expand the visibility of various specialties in medicine. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest updates on some current applications of social media in the practice of vascular surgery as well as existing limitations of use. This investigation demonstrates that the use of social networking sites appears to have a positive impact on vascular practice, as is evident through the incorporation of this technology at the Cleveland Clinic and by the Society for Vascular Surgery into their approach to patient care and physician communication. Overall, integration of social networking technology has current and future potential to be used to promote goals, patient awareness, recruitment for clinical trials, and professionalism within the specialty of vascular surgery. PMID:23321344

  16. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eui Seok; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. PMID:25667739

  17. Age-associated vascular inflammation promotes monocytosis during atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Wong, Christine; Song, Yang; Shen, Hua; Mori, Daniel; Rotllan, Noemi; Price, Nathan; Dobrian, Anca D; Meng, Hailong; Kleinstein, Steven H; Fernandez-Hernando, Carlos; Goldstein, Daniel R

    2016-08-01

    Aging leads to a proinflammatory state within the vasculature without disease, yet whether this inflammatory state occurs during atherogenesis remains unclear. Here, we examined how aging impacts atherosclerosis using Ldlr(-/-) mice, an established murine model of atherosclerosis. We found that aged atherosclerotic Ldlr(-/-) mice exhibited enhanced atherogenesis within the aorta. Aging also led to increased LDL levels, elevated blood pressure on a low-fat diet, and insulin resistance after a high-fat diet (HFD). On a HFD, aging increased a monocytosis in the peripheral blood and enhanced macrophage accumulation within the aorta. When we conducted bone marrow transplant experiments, we found that stromal factors contributed to age-enhanced atherosclerosis. To delineate these stromal factors, we determined that the vasculature exhibited an age-enhanced inflammatory response consisting of elevated production of CCL-2, osteopontin, and IL-6 during atherogenesis. In addition, in vitro cultures showed that aging enhanced the production of osteopontin by vascular smooth muscle cells. Functionally, aged atherosclerotic aortas displayed higher monocyte chemotaxis than young aortas. Hence, our study has revealed that aging induces metabolic dysfunction and enhances vascular inflammation to promote a peripheral monocytosis and macrophage accumulation within the atherosclerotic aorta. PMID:27135421

  18. A Novel Use of the AMPLATZER Vascular Plug: Preventing Bile Leak Following Inadvertent Subcapsular Deployment of a Biliary Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Dionello, Roberta; Warakaulle, Dinuke; Liong, Wei-Chuen

    2010-02-15

    The AMPLATZER Vascular Plug (AVP; AGA Medical, USA) is designed to provide optimal embolization of peripheral veins and arteries through single-device occlusion. There are no reported cases of the AVP's being used to prevent bile leak. We report the successful use of the AVP within the liver to prevent intraperitoneal bile leak following inadvertent subcapsular stent deployment.

  19. New Insights into Dialysis Vascular Access: Molecular Targets in Arteriovenous Fistula and Arteriovenous Graft Failure and Their Potential to Improve Vascular Access Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Timmy; Misra, Sanjay

    2016-08-01

    Vascular access dysfunction remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. At present there are few effective therapies for this clinical problem. The poor understanding of the pathobiology that leads to arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and graft (AVG) dysfunction remains a critical barrier to development of novel and effective therapies. However, in recent years we have made substantial progress in our understanding of the mechanisms of vascular access dysfunction. This article presents recent advances and new insights into the pathobiology of AVF and AVG dysfunction and highlights potential therapeutic targets to improve vascular access outcomes. PMID:27401527

  20. From neuroanatomy to behavior: central integration of peripheral signals regulating feeding behavior

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kevin W; Elmquist, Joel K

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two centuries, prevalent models of energy and glucose homeostasis have emerged from careful anatomical descriptions in tandem with an understanding of cellular physiology. More recent technological advances have culminated in the identification of peripheral and central factors that influence neural circuits regulating metabolism. This Review highlights contributions to our understanding of peripheral and central factors regulating food intake and energy expenditure. PMID:23007190

  1. Challenges, current status and future perspectives of proteomics in improving understanding, diagnosis and treatment of vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Moxon, Joseph V.; Padula, Matthew P.; Herbert, Ben R.; Golledge, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Technical advances have seen the rapid adoption of genomics and multiplex genetic polymorphism identification to research on vascular diseases. The utilization of proteomics for the study of vascular diseases has been limited by comparison. In this review we outline currently available proteomics techniques, the challenges to using these approaches and modifications which may improve the utilization of proteomics in the study of vascular diseases. PMID:19541510

  2. Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Lorraine A; Dumais, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma is considered rare in the dog with little known about the clinicopathologic features. There are few reports in the veterinary literature concerning this benign, reactive lesion, formerly known as giant cell epulis. In humans, the four most commonly described reactive epulides are focal fibrous hyperplasia (fibrous epulis), pyogenic granuloma, peripheral ossifying fibroma, and peripheral giant cell granuloma. This case report describes the diagnosis and surgical management of a peripheral giant cell granuloma in a dog. PMID:26415387

  3. Theory underlying the peripheral vision horizon device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Money, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    Peripheral Vision Horizon Device (PVHD) theory states that the likelihood of pilot disorientation in flight is reduced by providing an artificial horizon that provides orientation information to peripheral vision. In considering the validity of the theory, three areas are explored: the use of an artificial horizon device over some other flight instrument; the use of peripheral vision over foveal vision; and the evidence that peripheral vision is well suited to the processing of orientation information.

  4. Simulation study of autoregulation responses of peripheral circulation to systemic pulsatility

    PubMed Central

    Aletti, Federico; Lanzarone, Ettore; Costantino, Maria Laura; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Background This simulation study investigated potential modulations of total peripheral resistance (TPR), due to distributed peripheral vascular activity, by means of a lumped model of the arterial tree and a non linear model of microcirculation, inclusive of local controls of blood flow and tissue-capillary fluid exchange. Results Numerical simulations of circulation were carried out to compute TPR under different conditions of blood flow pulsatility, and to extract the pressure-flow characteristics of the cardiovascular system. Simulations showed that TPR seen by the large arteries was increased in absence of pulsatility, while it decreased with an augmented harmonic content. This is a typically non linear effect due to the contribution of active, non linear autoregulation of the peripheral microvascular beds, which also generated a nonlinear relationship between arterial blood pressure and cardiac output. Conclusion This simulation study, though focused on a simple effect attaining TPR modulation due to pulsatility, suggests that non-linear autoregulation mechanisms cannot be overlooked while studying the integrated behavior of the global cardiovascular system, including the arterial tree and the peripheral vascular bed. PMID:19630959

  5. Relation of haemostatic, fibrinolytic, and rheological variables to the angiographic extent of peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Woodburn, K R; Lowe, G D; Rumley, A; Love, J; Pollock, J G

    1995-12-01

    We investigated the relationships between the angiographic severity of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and haemostasis, fibrinolytic, and rheological variables in 219 patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). White cell count, fibrinogen, cross-linked fibrin degradation products (FDP), von Willebrand factor, and plasminogen activator inhibitor levels were all elevated in comparison with age-matched population controls (all p < 0.0001, Mann-Whitney U test), while fibrinogen (Spearman r = 0.30), von Willebrand factor (r = 0.40), and log (FDP) (r = 0.56), (all p < 0.0001) showed a strong correlation with the angiographic extent of PAOD. Multivariate analysis indicated that log (FDP) was a strong independent predictor of the angiographic severity of PAOD (p < 0.0001), in addition to increasing age (p < 0.0001), presence of tissue sepsis (p < 0.02), prior vascular surgery (p = 0.007), and other vascular pathology (p = 0.007). These results confirm that increase in fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor and fibrin turnover, are strongly associated with the presence of symptomatic peripheral arterial disease, and suggest that there may be a causal link between fibrin turnover, as determined by FDP levels, and the extent of peripheral arterial occlusive disease. PMID:8708425

  6. Relation of haemostatic, fibrinolytic, and rheological variables to the angiographic extent of peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Woodburn, K R; Lowe, G D; Rumley, A; Love, J; Pollock, J G

    1995-09-01

    We investigated the relationships between the angiographic severity of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and haemostasis, fibrinolytic, and rheological variables in 219 patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). White cell count, fibrinogen, cross-linked fibrin degradation products (FDP), von Willebrand factor, and plasminogen activator inhibitor levels were all elevated in comparison with age-matched population controls (all p < 0.0001, Mann-Whitney U test), while fibrinogen (Spearman r = 0.30), von Willebrand factor (r = 0.40), and log (FDP) (r = 0.56), (all p < 0.0001) showed a strong correlation with the angiographic extent of PAOD. Multivariate analysis indicated that log (FDP) was a strong independent predictor of the angiographic severity of PAOD (p < 0.0001), in addition to increasing age (p < 0.0001), presence of tissue sepsis (p < 0.02), prior vascular surgery (p = 0.007), and other vascular pathology (p = 0.007). These results confirm that increases in fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor and fibrin turnover, are strongly associated with the presence of symptomatic peripheral arterial disease, and suggest that there may be causal link between fibrin turnover, as determined by FDP levels, and the extent of peripheral arterial occlusive disease. PMID:8919237

  7. Tissue engineered small-diameter vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Schmedlen, Rachael H; Elbjeirami, Wafa M; Gobin, Andrea S; West, Jennifer L

    2003-10-01

    Arterial occlusive disease remains the leading cause of death in western countries and often requires vascular reconstructive surgery. The limited supply of suitable small-diameter vascular grafts has led to the development of tissue engineered blood vessel substitutes. Many different approaches have been examined, including natural scaffolds containing one or more ECM proteins and degradable polymeric scaffolds. For optimal graft development, many efforts have modified the culture environment to enhance ECM synthesis and organization using bioreactors under physiologic conditions and biochemical supplements. In the past couple of decades, a great deal of progress on TEVGs has been made. Many challenges remain and are being addressed, particularly with regard to the prevention of thrombosis and the improvement of graft mechanical properties. To develop a patent TEVG that grossly resembles native tissue, required culture times in most studies exceed 8 weeks. Even with further advances in the field, TEVGs will likely not be used in emergency situations because of the time necessary to allow for cell expansion, ECM production and organization, and attainment of desired mechanical strength. Furthermore, TEVGs will probably require the use of autologous tissue to prevent an immunogenic response, unless advances in immune acceptance render allogenic and xenogenic tissue use feasible. TEVGs have not yet been subjected to clinical trials, which will determine the efficacy of such grafts in the long term. Finally, off-the-shelf availability and cost will become the biggest hurdles in the development of a feasible TEVG product. Although many obstacles exist in the effort to develop a small-diameter TEVG, the potential benefits of such an achievement are exciting. In the near future, a nonthrombogenic TEVG with sufficient mechanical strength may be developed for clinical trials. Such a graft will have the minimum characteristics of biological tissue necessary to remain patent

  8. Tumor vascularity evaluated by transrectal color Doppler US in predicting therapy outcome for low-lying rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro, Brunella . E-mail: a.leonemd@tiscalinet.it; Valentini, Vincenzo; Coco, Claudio; Mancini, Anna Paola; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Vecchio, Fabio Maria; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact on T downstaging of the vasculature supplying blood flow to rectal cancer evaluated by color Doppler ultrasound. Methods and Materials: Color Doppler images were graded in 29 T3-staged rectal carcinoma patients sonographically just before chemoradiation. Any arterial vessels detected in rectal masses were assigned one of two grades: vascularity was considered as grade 1 for vessels feeding the periphery and as grade 2 for vessels coursing in all rectal masses within its peripheral and central portions. The pulsatility indices (PI = peak systolic velocity - end-diastolic velocity/time-averaged maximum velocity) were calculated in the central and peripheral portions. Results: The pathologic observations showed a change in stage in 15 of the 23 patients graded 2, positive predictive value 65.2% (p = 0.047), and in one of the six rectal cancers graded 1 (negative predictive value, 83.3%). The minimal peripheral PI values in rectal cancer graded 2 were higher in nonresponding (2.2 {+-} 1.3) than in responding lesions (1.6 {+-} 0.7) p = 0.01. Conclusion: Vascularity graded 2 associated with low peripheral PI values are indicators of therapy outcome. Vascularity graded 1 and high peripheral PI values in graded 2 have negative predictive value.

  9. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (SecPBMC), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-SecPBMC), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-SecPBMC had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-SecPBMC had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-SecPBMC significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  10. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (Sec(PBMC)), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-Sec(PBMC)), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-Sec(PBMC) significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype. PMID:27213345

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of vascular damage in dementia.

    PubMed

    Biessels, Geert Jan

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of cognitive impairment due to vascular brain damage, which is referred to as vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Over the past decades, we have seen marked progress in detecting VCI, both through maturation of diagnostic concepts and through advances in brain imaging, especially MRI. Yet in daily practice, it is often challenging to establish the diagnosis, particularly in patients where there is no evident temporal relation between a cerebrovascular event and cognitive dysfunction. Because vascular damage is such a common cause of cognitive dysfunction, it provides an obvious target for treatment. In patients whose cognitive dysfunction follows directly after a stroke, the etiological classification of this stroke will direct treatment. In many patients however, VCI develops due to so-called "silent vascular damage," without evident cerebrovascular events. In these patients, small vessel diseases (SVDs) are the most common cause. Yet no SVD-specific treatments currently exist, which is due to incomplete understanding of the pathophysiology. This review addresses developments in this field. It offers a framework to translate diagnostic criteria to daily practice, addresses treatment, and highlights some future perspectives. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia, edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau, and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26612719

  13. Protective role of sulphoraphane against vascular complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Matsui, Takanori

    2016-10-01

    Context Diabetes is a global health challenge. Although large prospective clinical trials have shown that intensive control of blood glucose or blood pressure reduces the risk for development and progression of vascular complications in diabetes, a substantial number of diabetic patients still experience renal failure and cardiovascular events, which could account for disabilities and high mortality rate in these subjects. Objective Sulphoraphane is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in widely consumed cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cabbage and Brussels sprouts, and an inducer of phase II antioxidant and detoxification enzymes with anticancer properties. We reviewed here the protective role of sulphoraphane against diabetic vascular complications. Methods In this review, literature searches were undertaken in Medline and in CrossRef. Non-English language articles were excluded. Keywords [sulphoraphane and (diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic complications, vascular, cardiomyocytes, heart or glycation)] have been used to select the articles. Results There is accumulating evidence that sulphoraphane exerts beneficial effects on vascular damage in both cell culture and diabetic animal models via antioxidative properties. Furthermore, we have recently found that sulphoraphane inhibits in vitro formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), suppresses the AGE-induced inflammatory reactions in rat aorta by reducing receptor for AGEs (RAGE) expression and decreases serum levels of AGEs in humans. Conclusion These findings suggest that blockade of oxidative stress and/or the AGE-RAGE axis by sulphoraphane may be a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing vascular complications in diabetes. PMID:26841240

  14. Extracellular Vesicles and Vascular Injury: New Insights for Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Flamant, Stéphane; Tamarat, Radia

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews our current knowledge about cell-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs), including microparticles and exosomes, and their emergence as mediators of a new important mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. Particular emphasis has been given to the increasing involvement of EVs in the field of radiation-induced vascular injury. Although EVs have been considered for a long time as cell "dust", they in fact precisely reflect the physiological state of the cells. The role of microparticles and exosomes in mediating vascular dysfunction suggests that they may represent novel pathways in short- or long-distance paracrine intercellular signaling in vascular environment. In this article, the mechanisms involved in the biogenesis of microparticles and exosomes, their composition and participation in the pathogenesis of vascular dysfunction are discussed. Furthermore, this article highlights the concept of EVs as potent vectors of biological information and protagonists of an intercellular communication network. Special emphasis is made on EV-mediated microRNA transfer and on the principal consequences of such signal exchange on vascular injury and radiation-induced nontargeted effect. The recent progress in elucidating the biology of EVs has provided new insights for the field of radiation, advancing their use as diagnostic biomarkers or in therapeutic interventions. PMID:27459703

  15. Coaching Peripheral Vision Training for Soccer Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques, Nelson Kautzner, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Brazilian Soccer began developing its current emphasis on peripheral vision in the late 1950s, by initiative of coach of the Canto do Rio Football Club, in Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, a pioneer in the development of peripheral vision training in soccer players. Peripheral vision training gained world relevance when a young talent from Canto do Rio,…

  16. Advanced Neuroimaging of Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Prashant; Steven, Andrew; Rath, Tanya; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2016-05-01

    Although tinnitus may originate in damage to the peripheral auditory apparatus, its perception and distressing symptomatology are consequences of alterations to auditory, sensory, and limbic neural networks. This has been described in several studies, some using advanced structural MR imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging. An understanding of these complex changes could enable development of targeted treatment. New MR imaging techniques enabling detailed depiction of the labyrinth may be useful when diagnosis of Meniere disease is equivocal. Advances in computed tomography and MR imaging have enabled noninvasive diagnosis of dural arteriovenous fistulae. PMID:27154611

  17. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  18. Recent progress in the treatment of vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, W. Charles; Lomashvili, Koba A.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular calcification is common in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease and is associated with poorer outcomes. Although the pathophysiology is not completely understood, it is clear that it is a multifactorial process involving altered mineral metabolism, as well as changes in systemic and local factors that can promote or inhibit vascular calcification, and all of these are potential therapeutic targets. Current therapy is closely linked to strategies for preventing disordered bone and mineral metabolism in advanced kidney disease and involves lowering the circulating levels of both phosphate and calcium. The efficacy of compounds that specifically target calcification, such as bisphosphonates and thiosulfate, has been shown in animals but only in small numbers of humans, and safety remains an issue. Additional therapies, such as pyrophosphate, vitamin K, and lowering of pH, are supported by animal studies, but are yet to be investigated clinically. As the mineral composition of vascular calcifications is the same as in bone, potential effects on bone must be addressed with any therapy for vascular calcification. PMID:20861819

  19. Peripheral neuromodulation in chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Perini, F; De Boni, A

    2012-05-01

    Patients with chronic migraines are often refractory to medical treatment. Therefore, they might need other strategies to modulate their pain, according to their level of disability. Neuromodulation can be achieved with several tools: meditation, biofeedback, physical therapy, drugs and electric neurostimulation (ENS). ENS can be applied to the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), either invasively (cortical or deep brain) or non-invasively [cranial electrotherapy stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation]. Among chronic primary headaches, cluster headaches are most often treated either through deep brain stimulation or occipital nerve stimulation because there is a high level of disability related to this condition. ENS, employed through several modalities such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, interferential currents and pulsed radiofrequency, has been applied to the peripheral nervous system at several sites. We briefly review the indications for the use of peripheral ENS at the site of the occipital nerves for the treatment of chronic migraine. PMID:22644166

  20. Biomaterials for the Development of Peripheral Nerve Guidance Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Nectow, Alexander R.; Marra, Kacey G.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, surgical treatments for peripheral nerve injury are less than satisfactory. The gold standard of treatment for peripheral nerve gaps >5 mm is the autologous nerve graft; however, this treatment is associated with a variety of clinical complications, such as donor site morbidity, limited availability, nerve site mismatch, and the formation of neuromas. Despite many recent advances in the field, clinical studies implementing the use of artificial nerve guides have yielded results that are yet to surpass those of autografts. Thus, the development of a nerve guidance conduit, which could match the effectiveness of the autologous nerve graft, would be beneficial to the field of peripheral nerve surgery. Design strategies to improve surgical outcomes have included the development of biopolymers and synthetic polymers as primary scaffolds with tailored mechanical and physical properties, luminal “fillers” such as laminin and fibronectin as secondary internal scaffolds, surface micropatterning, stem cell inclusion, and controlled release of neurotrophic factors. The current article highlights approaches to peripheral nerve repair through a channel or conduit, implementing chemical and physical growth and guidance cues to direct that repair process. PMID:21812591

  1. Differentiation of Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells Contributes to Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wang, Aijun; Yuan, Falei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Bo; Chu, Julia S.; Helms, Jill A.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the de-differentiation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from contractile to proliferative/synthetic phenotype has an important role during vascular remodeling and diseases. Here we provide evidence that challenges this theory. We identify a new type of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) in blood vessel wall. MVSCs express markers including Sox17, Sox10 and S100β, are cloneable, have telomerase activity, and can differentiate into neural cells and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like cells that subsequently differentiate into SMCs. On the other hand, we use lineage tracing with smooth muscle myosin heavy chain as a marker to show that MVSCs and proliferative or synthetic SMCs do not arise from the de-differentiation of mature SMCs. Upon vascular injuries, MVSCs, instead of SMCs, become proliferative, and MVSCs can differentiate into SMCs and chondrogenic cells, thus contributing to vascular remodeling and neointimal hyperplasia. These findings support a new hypothesis that the differentiation of MVSCs, rather than the de-differentiation of SMCs, contributes to vascular remodeling and diseases. PMID:22673902

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor coordinates islet innervation via vascular scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Rachel B.; Cai, Qing; Hong, Ji-Young; Plank, Jennifer L.; Aamodt, Kristie; Prasad, Nripesh; Aramandla, Radhika; Dai, Chunhua; Levy, Shawn E.; Pozzi, Ambra; Labosky, Patricia A.; Wright, Christopher V. E.; Brissova, Marcela; Powers, Alvin C.

    2014-01-01

    Neurovascular alignment is a common anatomical feature of organs, but the mechanisms leading to this arrangement are incompletely understood. Here, we show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling profoundly affects both vascularization and innervation of the pancreatic islet. In mature islets, nerves are closely associated with capillaries, but the islet vascularization process during embryonic organogenesis significantly precedes islet innervation. Although a simple neuronal meshwork interconnects the developing islet clusters as they begin to form at E14.5, the substantial ingrowth of nerve fibers into islets occurs postnatally, when islet vascularization is already complete. Using genetic mouse models, we demonstrate that VEGF regulates islet innervation indirectly through its effects on intra-islet endothelial cells. Our data indicate that formation of a VEGF-directed, intra-islet vascular plexus is required for development of islet innervation, and that VEGF-induced islet hypervascularization leads to increased nerve fiber ingrowth. Transcriptome analysis of hypervascularized islets revealed an increased expression of extracellular matrix components and axon guidance molecules, with these transcripts being enriched in the islet-derived endothelial cell population. We propose a mechanism for coordinated neurovascular development within pancreatic islets, in which endocrine cell-derived VEGF directs the patterning of intra-islet capillaries during embryogenesis, forming a scaffold for the postnatal ingrowth of essential autonomic nerve fibers. PMID:24574008

  3. The nuclear factor-kappaB-interleukin-6 signalling pathway mediating vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brasier, Allan R

    2010-05-01

    Vascular inflammation is a common pathophysiological response to diverse cardiovascular disease processes, including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and aortic aneurysms/dissection. Inflammation is an ordered process initiated by vascular injury that produces enhanced leucocyte adherence, chemotaxis, and finally activation in situ. This process is coordinated by local secretion of adhesion molecules, chemotactic factors, and cytokines whose expression is the result of vascular injury-induced signal transduction networks. A wide variety of mediators of the vascular injury response have been identified; these factors include vasoactive peptides (angiotensin II, Ang II), CD40 ligands, oxidized cholesterol, and advanced glycation end-products. Downstream, the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcription factor performs an important signal integration step, responding to mediators of vascular injury in a stimulus-dependent and cell type-specific manner. The ultimate consequence of NF-kappaB signalling is the activation of inflammatory genes including adhesion molecules and chemotaxins. However, clinically, the hallmark of vascular NF-kappaB activation is the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), whose local role in vascular inflammation is relatively unknown. The recent elucidation for the role of the IL-6 signalling pathway in Ang II-induced vascular inflammation as one that controls monocyte activation as well as its diverse signalling mechanism will be reviewed. These new discoveries further our understanding for the important role of the NF-kappaB-IL-6 signalling pathway in the process of vascular inflammation. PMID:20202975

  4. Morphogeometric Approaches to Non-vascular Plants

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Daniel E.; Reeb, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Morphometric analysis of organisms has undergone a dramatic renaissance in recent years, embracing a range of novel computational and imaging techniques to provide new approaches to phenotypic characterization. These innovations have often developed piece-meal, and may reflect the taxonomic specializations and biases of their creators. In this review, we aim to provide a brief introduction to applications and applicability of modern morphometrics to non-vascular land plants, an often overlooked but evolutionarily and ecologically important group. The scale and physiology of bryophytes (mosses, liverworts, and hornworts) differ in important and informative ways from more “traditional” model plants, and their inclusion has the potential to powerfully broaden perspectives in plant morphology. In particular we highlight three areas where the “bryophytic perspective” shows considerable inter-disciplinary potential: (i) bryophytes as models for intra-specific and inter-specific phenotypic variation, (ii) bryophyte growth-forms as areas for innovation in architectural modularity, and (iii) bryophytes as models of ecophysiological integration between organs, individuals, and stands. We suggest that advances should come from two-way dialog: the translation and adoption of techniques recently developed for vascular plants (and other organisms) to bryophytes and the use of bryophytes as model systems for the innovation of new techniques and paradigms in morphogeometric approaches. PMID:27446146

  5. Vascular Extracellular Matrix and Arterial Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    WAGENSEIL, JESSICA E.; MECHAM, ROBERT P.

    2009-01-01

    An important factor in the transition from an open to a closed circulatory system was a change in vessel wall structure and composition that enabled the large arteries to store and release energy during the cardiac cycle. The component of the arterial wall in vertebrates that accounts for these properties is the elastic fiber network organized by medial smooth muscle. Beginning with the onset of pulsatile blood flow in the developing aorta, smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall produce a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that will ultimately define the mechanical properties that are critical for proper function of the adult vascular system. This review discusses the structural ECM proteins in the vertebrate aortic wall and will explore how the choice of ECM components has changed through evolution as the cardiovascular system became more advanced and pulse pressure increased. By correlating vessel mechanics with physiological blood pressure across animal species and in mice with altered vessel compliance, we show that cardiac and vascular development are physiologically coupled, and we provide evidence for a universal elastic modulus that controls the parameters of ECM deposition in vessel wall development. We also discuss mechanical models that can be used to design better tissue-engineered vessels and to test the efficacy of clinical treatments. PMID:19584318

  6. Morphogeometric Approaches to Non-vascular Plants.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Daniel E; Reeb, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Morphometric analysis of organisms has undergone a dramatic renaissance in recent years, embracing a range of novel computational and imaging techniques to provide new approaches to phenotypic characterization. These innovations have often developed piece-meal, and may reflect the taxonomic specializations and biases of their creators. In this review, we aim to provide a brief introduction to applications and applicability of modern morphometrics to non-vascular land plants, an often overlooked but evolutionarily and ecologically important group. The scale and physiology of bryophytes (mosses, liverworts, and hornworts) differ in important and informative ways from more "traditional" model plants, and their inclusion has the potential to powerfully broaden perspectives in plant morphology. In particular we highlight three areas where the "bryophytic perspective" shows considerable inter-disciplinary potential: (i) bryophytes as models for intra-specific and inter-specific phenotypic variation, (ii) bryophyte growth-forms as areas for innovation in architectural modularity, and (iii) bryophytes as models of ecophysiological integration between organs, individuals, and stands. We suggest that advances should come from two-way dialog: the translation and adoption of techniques recently developed for vascular plants (and other organisms) to bryophytes and the use of bryophytes as model systems for the innovation of new techniques and paradigms in morphogeometric approaches. PMID:27446146

  7. Peripheral neuritis due to isoniazid*

    PubMed Central

    Devadatta, S.; Gangadharam, P. R. J.; Andrews, R. H.; Fox, Wallace; Ramakrishnan, C. V.; Selkon, J. B.; Velu, S.

    1960-01-01

    It is well known that in the treatment of tuberculosis with isoniazid the complication of peripheral neuritis may arise. This complication is normally rare when small dosages of the drug are used, but a high incidence of the neuropathy has recently been observed in East Africa in a group of malnourished tuberculous patients receiving isoniazid in comparatively low dosage (4-6 mg/kg body-weight daily). The present paper reports on 20 cases of peripheral neuritis encountered in Madras, India, among 338 poorly nourished tuberculous patients during a trial of four isoniazid regimens, two of low and two of high dosage (3.9-5.5 and 7.8-9.6 mg/kg body-weight daily, respectively). Nineteen of the 20 cases occurred in the two groups of patients receiving the high dosage and these 19 patients were found to have a higher mean serum level of free isoniazid than the patients in the same groups who did not develop the complication. The authors consider that dosages of 7.8-9.6 mg/kg body-weight daily should not be used for the mass therapy of poorly nourished patients unless steps are taken to prevent the development of peripheral neuritis. Pyridoxine has been reported to be an effective preventive, but is too expensive for use on a large scale. This study indicates, however, that administration of the cheaper vitamin B complex might give satisfactory results and warrants further investigation. PMID:13722334

  8. The BHVI-EyeMapper: Peripheral Refraction and Aberration Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Bakaraju, Ravi C.; Holden, Brien A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The aim of this article was to present the optical design of a new instrument (BHVI-EyeMapper, EM), which is dedicated to rapid peripheral wavefront measurements across the visual field for distance and near, and to compare the peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles obtained in myopic eyes with and without accommodation. Methods Central and peripheral refractive errors (M, J180, and J45) and higher-order aberrations (C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0]) were measured in 26 myopic participants (mean [±SD] age, 20.9 [±2.0] years; mean [±SD] spherical equivalent, −3.00 [±0.90] diopters [D]) corrected for distance. Measurements were performed along the horizontal visual field with (−2.00 to −5.00 D) and without (+1.00 D fogging) accommodation. Changes as a function of accommodation were compared using tilt and curvature coefficients of peripheral refraction and aberration profiles. Results As accommodation increased, the relative peripheral refraction profiles of M and J180 became significantly (p < 0.05) more negative and the profile of M became significantly (p < 0.05) more asymmetric. No significant differences were found for the J45 profiles (p > 0.05). The peripheral aberration profiles of C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0] became significantly (p < 0.05) less asymmetric as accommodation increased, but no differences were found in the curvature. Conclusions The current study showed that significant changes in peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles occurred during accommodation in myopic eyes. With its extended measurement capabilities, that is, permitting rapid peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration measurements up to visual field angles of ±50 degrees for distance and near (up to −5.00 D), the EM is a new advanced instrument that may provide additional insights in the ongoing quest to understand and monitor myopia development. PMID:25105690

  9. Central versus peripheral mediation of naloxone's perfusion effects in endotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A C; Sam, A D; Alden, K J; Moore, S L; Law, W R; Ferguson, J L

    2000-10-01

    Opioid receptor antagonists can act centrally and peripherally. It is unclear if these 2 pathways differentially mediate the perfusion-associated effects of opioid antagonism during endotoxemia. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats (340-390 g) were surgically prepared with left ventricular, tail artery, and jugular vein catheters 24 h before experiments were begun. Conscious, unrestrained rats were challenged with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 2 mg/kg/hr over 30 min) infusion. Measurements of regional blood flows were made using radioactive microspheres prior to (baseline), and at 60 and 120 min after LPS infusion. Saline (1 mL/kg bolus + 0.5 mL/kg/h infusion), naloxone (Nlx; 4 mg/kg bolus + 2 mg/kg/h infusion), or naloxone methyl bromide (Nlx-mb; 4.64 mg/kg, bolus + 2.32 mg/kg/h infusion) were administered 40 min after LPS infusion was begun. Nlx-mb does not cross the blood-brain barrier, and was thus used to differentiate central from peripherally mediated responses. At the end of each experiment, blood samples were collected for determination of ET-1 and nitric oxide metabolites (NOx = NO3 + NO2) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Griess reaction methods, respectively. Endotoxemia produced a significant decrease in cardiac output and an increase in systemic vascular resistance. Treatment with Nlx or Nlx-mb significantly attenuated the endotoxin-induced elevation in systemic vascular resistance and the decrease in cardiac output at 60 min after induction of endotoxemia compared with their respective baseline values. Nlx and Nlx-mb also attenuated the endotoxin-induced increases in hepatic portal and skeletal vascular resistances. These observations suggested that the ameliorative effect of Nlx on endotoxemia-induced regional vascular resistance alterations was mediated via peripheral opioid receptor mechanisms. However, although Nlx attenuated the endotoxin-induced decreases in the blood flow to the stomach and pancreas, Nlx-mb attenuated the

  10. IR imaging of blood circulation of patients with vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Wade, Dwight R., Jr.; Kam, Jack

    2004-04-01

    We conducted a preliminary IR imaging study of blood circulation in patients with peripheral vascular diseases. Abnormal blood flow is common in older adults, especially those with elevated blood lipids, diabetes, hypertension, and a history of smoking. All of these conditions have a high prevalence in our population, often with more than one condition in the same individual. The differences in blood flow is revealed by temperature differences in areas of the extremities as well as other regions of the body. However, what is needed is an imaging technique that is relatively inexpensive and can reveal the blood flow in real time. The IR imaging can show detailed venous system and small tempearture changes associated with blood flow. Six patients with vascular diseases were tested in a clinic set up. Their legs and feet were imaged. We observed large temperature differences (cooling of more than 10° C) at the foot, especially toes. More valuable information were obtained from the temperature distribution maps. IR thermography is potentially a very valuable tool for medical application, especially for vascular diseases.

  11. Silent brain infarction in the presence of systemic vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Slark, Julia; Bentley, Paul; Sharma, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic brain ischaemic in the presence of vascular disease in other arterial territories. Design Studies up to January 2011 were identified through comprehensive search strategies. Arcsine transformation for meta-analysis was used to calculate the standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Setting A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. Participants For each study, the proportion of patients positive for SBI in the presence of other systemic vascular disease was extracted and analyzed. Main outcome measures Using a random-effects model, a pooled effect estimate interpreted as a percentage prevalence of disease was calculated. Results SBI in the presence of acute ischaemic stroke was found in 23% (SMD 0.99; P < 0.001; 95% CI 0.88–1.10); a 35% prevalence was found in patients with coronary artery disease (SMD 1.26; P < 0.001; 95% CI 0.95–1.58); and a 14% prevalence in patients with peripheral artery disease (SMD 0.48; P < 0.002; 95% CI 0.42–0.54), although the data-set in the latter is smaller. Conclusions Patients with systemic vascular disease are at an increased risk of silent brain infarction. PMID:24175060

  12. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Martin R; Sinha, Sanjay; Owens, Gary K

    2016-02-19

    The historical view of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in atherosclerosis is that aberrant proliferation of VSMCs promotes plaque formation, but that VSMCs in advanced plaques are entirely beneficial, for example preventing rupture of the fibrous cap. However, this view has been based on ideas that there is a homogenous population of VSMCs within the plaque, that can be identified separate from other plaque cells (particularly macrophages) using standard VSMC and macrophage immunohistochemical markers. More recent genetic lineage tracing studies have shown that VSMC phenotypic switching results in less-differentiated forms that lack VSMC markers including macrophage-like cells, and this switching directly promotes atherosclerosis. In addition, VSMC proliferation may be beneficial throughout atherogenesis, and not just in advanced lesions, whereas VSMC apoptosis, cell senescence, and VSMC-derived macrophage-like cells may promote inflammation. We review the effect of embryological origin on VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis, the role, regulation and consequences of phenotypic switching, the evidence for different origins of VSMCs, and the role of individual processes that VSMCs undergo in atherosclerosis in regard to plaque formation and the structure of advanced lesions. We think there is now compelling evidence that a full understanding of VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis is critical to identify therapeutic targets to both prevent and treat atherosclerosis. PMID:26892967

  13. Relationship Between the Levels of Oxidative Stress in Mesenteric and Peripheral Serum and Clinicopathological Variables in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Ahmet Fikret; Kemik, Özgür; Kemik, Ahu Sarbay; Purisa, Sevim; Tüzün, İshak Sefa

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the differences existing between the levels of oxidative stress in peripheral and mesenteric serum in patients with colorectal cancer. Material and Methods One hundred fifty patients with colorectal cancer who underwent surgery between May 2005 and March 2010 were prospectively analyzed. The differences between oxidative stress parameters in their peripheral and mesenteric blood were measured. The associations between peripheral and mesenteric levels and the staging and clinicopathological variables were investigated. Results: Oxidative stress parameters were higher in patients with advanced tumor staging (p<0.01), lymph node invasion (p<0.01), and venous invasion (p<0.01). Differences between oxidative stress parameters in peripheral and mesenteric blood samples were also observed. Conclusions: The mesenteric levels of the oxidative stress markers were higher than the peripheral levels in these colorectal cancer patients. Higher levels of these oxidative stress markers are associated with an advanced state of cancer. PMID:25206984

  14. Pediatric Interventional Radiology: Non-Vascular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR), which includes variety of procedures done under image guidance has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions, plays a significant role in the delivery of safe and effective care by reducing surgical risks, decreasing the length of hospital stay and reducing costs. The application of interventional techniques in children has been delayed over years as compared to adults due to lack of special hardwares/equipments, lack of adequately trained physicians and also the lack of awareness among the pediatric practitioners. This situation is gradually changing now owing to the advancements in technology. In this review, authors will discuss various non-vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. PMID:26762330

  15. Unusual Vascular Supply to Extensor Digitorum Brevis

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Dinuksha; Hsieh, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Lower limb reconstruction after a traumatic event has always been a challenge for plastic surgeons. The reliability of vessel integrity postinjury often drives us away from a local reconstructive option. With the advancement of computed tomography angiogram, it can not only demonstrate the continuation of major vessels but also helps to map the vascular supply at a perforator level. We hereby report an incidentally identified anatomical variant with dual dominant blood supply to the extensor digitorum brevis muscle from an extra branch of anterior tibial artery originated at midtibial level. This variant was picked up preoperatively by computed tomography angiogram and confirmed intraoperatively to be one of the dominant supply. We took advantage of this unusual anatomy by basing our reconstruction on this branch and hence spared the need to terminalize distal dorsalis pedis artery. PMID:27200235

  16. Pulmonary Vascular Complications of Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jason S.; Fallon, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension are two pulmonary vascular complications of liver disease. The pathophysiology underlying each disorder is distinct, but patients with either condition may be limited by dyspnea. A careful evaluation of concomitant symptoms, the physical examination, pulmonary function testing and arterial blood gas analysis, and echocardiographic, imaging, and hemodynamic studies is crucial to establishing (and distinguishing) these diagnoses. Our understanding of the pathobiology, natural history, and treatment of these disorders has advanced considerably over the past decade; however, the presence of either still increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in patients with underlying liver disease. There is no effective medical treatment for hepatopulmonary syndrome. Although liver transplantation can resolve hepatopulmonary syndrome, there appears to be worse survival even with transplantation. Liver transplantation poses a very high risk of death in those with significant portopulmonary hypertension, where targeted medical therapies may improve functional status and allow successful transplantation in a small number of select patients. PMID:23155142

  17. Markers of arterial stiffness in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Marc; Jacomella, Vincenzo; Thalhammer, Christoph; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice R

    2015-09-01

    Increased arterial stiffness results from reduced elasticity of the arterial wall and is an independent predictor for cardiovascular risk. The gold standard for assessment of arterial stiffness is the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. Other parameters such as central aortic pulse pressure and aortic augmentation index are indirect, surrogate markers of arterial stiffness, but provide additional information on the characteristics of wave reflection. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterised by its association with systolic hypertension, increased arterial stiffness, disturbed wave reflexion and prognosis depending on ankle-brachial pressure index. This review summarises the physiology of pulse wave propagation and reflection and its changes due to aging and atherosclerosis. We discuss different non-invasive assessment techniques and highlight the importance of the understanding of arterial pulse wave analysis for each vascular specialist and primary care physician alike in the context of PAD. PMID:26317253

  18. Conditions Presenting with Symptoms of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aditya M.; Norton, Patrick T.; Zhu, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is estimated to affect more than 20% of people older than 65 years. The vast majority of patients with symptoms suggestive of PAD have atherosclerosis often associated with conventional vascular risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and inflammation. A minority of people presenting with symptoms suggesting PAD have an alternative etiology. These groups of disorders are often underdiagnosed, and if diagnosed correctly the diagnosis may be delayed. Understanding these pathologies well is important, as they can be very debilitating and optimal treatment may vary significantly. Inappropriate treatment of these disorders can lead to worsening morbidity and mortality. This article discusses the underlying causes of nonatherosclerotic PAD, including the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. PMID:25435652

  19. An Unusual Presentation of Neurofibroma Masquerading as a Vascular Hamartoma, Post-Iatrogenic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Siba Prasad; Das, Subhabrata P; Rangan, Vasundhara S; Bhartiya, Subhash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibroma is a localized discrete mass of benign nerve sheath tumour in the peripheral nervous system. Mostly present as skin lesions. Solitary neurofibroma may occur in deep soft tissue or subcutaneous plane in rare cases associated with syndromes like NF1. The neurofibroma most commonly present as skin lesions as isolated soft papules or nodules arising in any cutaneous site. Present case depicts unusual presentation of a neurofibroma as a vascular hamartoma post an iatrogenic intervention. PMID:25738032

  20. Inflammatory Cytokines in Vascular Dysfunction and Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Alexander H.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2009-01-01

    The vascular inflammatory response involves complex interaction between inflammatory cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages), endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and extracellular matrix (ECM). Vascular injury is associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules by ECs and recruitment of inflammatory cells, growth factors, and cytokines, with consequent effects on ECs, VSMCs and ECM. Cytokines include tumor necrosis factors, interleukins, lymphokines, monokines, interferons, colony stimulating factors, and transforming growth factors. Cytokines are produced by macrophages, T cells and monocytes, as well as platelets, ECs and VSMCs. Circulating cytokines interact with specific receptors on various cell types and activate JAK-STAT, NF-κB, and Smad signaling pathways leading to an inflammatory response involving cell adhesion, permeability and apoptosis. Cytokines also interact with mitochondria to increasie the production of reactive oxygen species. Cytokine-induced activation of these pathways in ECs modifies the production/activity of vasodilatory mediators such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, and bradykinin, as well as vasoconstrictive mediators such as endothelin and angiotensin II. Cytokines interact with VSMCs to activate Ca2+, protein kinase C, Rho-Kinase, and MAPK pathways, which promote cell growth and migration, and VSM reactivity. Cytokines also interact with integrins and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and modify ECM composition. Persistent increases in cytokines are associated with vascular dysfunction and vascular disease such as atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm, varicose veins and hypertension. Genetic and pharmacological tools to decrease the production of cytokines or to diminish their effects using cytokine antagonists could provide new approaches in the management of inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:19413999